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Sample records for crack depth sizing

  1. Application of ultrasonic inspection technique for crack depth sizing on nickel based alloy weld. Part 3. Establishment of UT procedure for crack depth sizing by phased array UT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji; Okada, Hisao; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it is reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) was occurred at the nickel based alloy weld components such as steam generator safe end weld, reactor vessel safe end weld, and so on, in PWR. Defect detection and sizing is important in order to ensure the reliable operation and life extension of nuclear power plants. In the reactor vessel safe end weld, it was impossible to measure crack depth of PWSCC. The crack was detected in the axial direction of the safe end weld. Furthermore, the crack had some features such as shallow, large aspect ratio (ratio of crack depth and length), sharp geometry of crack tip, and so on. Therefore, development and improvement of defect detection and sizing capabilities for ultrasonic testing (UT) is required. Phased array technique was applied to nickel based alloy weld specimen with SCC cracks. From the experimental results, good accuracy of crack depth sizing by phased array UT for the inside inspection was shown. From these results, UT procedure for crack depth sizing was verified. Therefore, effectiveness of phased array UT for crack depth sizing in the nickel based alloy welds was shown. (author)

  2. Simulation and experiment for depth sizing of cracks in anchor bolts by ultrasonic phased array technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan

    2018-04-01

    There have been lots of reports about the occurrence of cracks in bolts in aging nuclear and thermal power plants. Sizing of such cracks is crucial for assessing the integrity of bolts. Currently, hammering and visual tests are used to detect cracks in bolts. However, they are not applicable for sizing cracks. Although the tip diffraction method is well known as a crack sizing technique, reflection echoes from threads make it difficult to apply this technique to bolts. This paper addresses a method for depth sizing of cracks in bolts by means of ultrasonic phased array technology. Numerical results of wave propagation in bolts by the finite element method (FEM) shows that a peak associated within the vicinity of a crack tip can be observed in the curve of echo intensity versus refraction angle for deep cracks. The refraction angle with respect to this peak decreases as crack depth increases. Such numerical results are verified by experiments on bolt specimens that have electrical discharge machining notches or fatigue cracks with different depths. In the experiment, a 10-MHz linear array probe is used. Depth of cracks in bolts using the refraction angle associated with the peak is determined and compared to actual depths. The comparison shows that accurately determining a crack depth from the inspection results is possible.

  3. Development of phased array UT procedure for crack depth sizing on nickel based alloy weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji; Okada, Hisao; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it is reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been occurred at the nickel based alloy weld components such as steam generator safe end weld, reactor vessel safe end weld, and so on, in PWR. Defect detection and sizing is important in order to ensure the reliable operation and life extension of nuclear power plants. In the reactor vessel safe end weld, it was impossible to measure crack depth of PWSCC. The crack was detected in the axial direction of the safe end weld. Furthermore, the crack had some features such as shallow, large aspect ratio (ratio of crack depth and length), sharp geometry of crack tip, and so on. Therefore, development and improvement of defect detection and sizing capabilities for ultrasonic inspection technique is required. Phased array UT technique was applied to nickel based alloy weld specimen with SCC cracks. From the experimental results, good accuracy of crack depth sizing by phased array UT for the inside inspection was shown. From these results, UT procedure for crack depth sizing was verified. Therefore, effectiveness of phased array UT for crack depth sizing in the nickel based alloy welds was shown. (author)

  4. Depth-Sizing Technique for Crack Indications in Steam Generator Tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hong Deok

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear power plants have been safely operated by plugging the steam generator tubes which have the crack indications. Tube rupture events can occur if analysts fail to detect crack indications during in-service inspection. There are various types of crack indication in steam generator tubes and they have been detected by the eddy current test. The integrity assessment should be performed using the crack-sizing results from eddy current data when the crack indication is detected. However, it is not easy to evaluate the crack-depth precisely and consistently due to the complexity of the methods. The current crack-sizing methods were reviewed in this paper and the suitable ones were selected through the laboratory tests. The retired steam generators of Kori Unit 1 were used for this study. The round robin tests by the domestic qualified analysts were carried out and the statistical models were introduced to establish the appropriate depth-sizing techniques. It is expected that the proposed techniques in this study can be utilized in the Steam Generator Management Program

  5. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuting; Gan, Fangji; Wan, Zhengjun; Liao, Junbi; Li, Wenqiang

    2015-10-01

    Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  6. Investigation of UT procedure for crack depth sizing by phased array UT in Ni-based alloy weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has occurred in nickel based alloy weld components such as steam generator safe end weld, reactor vessel safe end weld, and so on, in PWR. Defect detection and sizing are important in order to ensure the reliable operation and life extension of nuclear power plants. In the reactor vessel safe end weld, it was impossible to measure crack depth of PWSCC. The cracks have occurred in the axial direction of the safe end weld. Furthermore, the cracks had some features such as deep, large aspect ratio (ratio of crack depth and length), sharp geometry of crack tip, and so on. Therefore, development and improvement of defect depth sizing capabilities by ultrasonic testing (UT) have been required. Phased array UT technique was applied with regard to defect depth sizing at the inside inspection in Ni-based alloy welds. Phased array UT was examined a standard block specimen with side drilled holes (SDHs). From the experimental results, the performance of linear array probes and dual matrix array probe were investigated. In the basis of the results, UT procedure for defect depth sizing was investigated and proposed. The UT procedure was applied to the defect depth measurement in Ni-based alloy weld specimen with electric discharge machine (EDM) notches. From these results, good accuracy of defect depth sizing by phased array UT for the inside inspection was shown. Therefore, it was clarified the effectiveness of the UT procedure for defect depth sizing in Ni-based alloy weld. (author)

  7. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuting; Gan Fangji; Wan Zhengjun; Liao Junbi; Li Wenqiang

    2015-01-01

    Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of s...

  8. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuting

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  9. Ultrasonic sizing of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    Surface and buried fatigue cracks in steel plates have been sized using immersion probes as transmitters-receivers, angled to produce shear waves in the steel. Sizes have been estimated by identifying the ultrasonic waves diffracted from the crack tip and by measuring the time taken for a signal to travel to and from the crack tip. The effects of compression normal to a fatigue crack and of crack front curvature are discussed. Another diffraction technique, developed by UKAEA, Harwell, is reviewed

  10. Analytical modeling of the effect of crack depth, specimen size, and biaxial stress on the fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Yuh-Jin

    1995-01-01

    Fracture, toughness values for A533-B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel obtained from test programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and University of Kansas (KU) are interpreted using the J-A 2 analytical model. The analytical model is based on the critical stress concept and takes into consideration the constraint effect using the second parameter A 2 in addition to the generally accepted first parameter J which represents the loading level. It is demonstrated that with the constraint level included in the model effects of crack depth (shallow vs deep), specimen size (small vs. large), and loading type (uniaxial vs biaxial) on the fracture toughness from the test programs can be interpreted and predicted

  11. Influence of crack length on crack depth measurement by an alternating current potential drop technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, Manoj K; Mahadevan, S; Rao, B P C; Behera, S P; Jayakumar, T; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    An alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique is used for sizing depth of surface cracks in metallic components. Crack depth estimations are prone to large deviations when ACPD measurements are made on very shallow and finite length cracks, especially in low conducting materials such as austenitic stainless steel (SS). Detailed studies have been carried out to investigate the influence of crack length and aspect ratio (length to depth) on depth estimation by performing measurements on electric discharge machined notches with the aspect ratio in the range of 1 to 40 in SS plates. In notches with finite length, an additional path for current to flow through the surface along the length is available causing the notch depths to be underestimated. The experimentally observed deviation in notch depth estimates is explained from a simple mathematical approach using the equivalent resistive circuit model based on the additional path available for the current to flow. A scheme is proposed to accurately measure the depth of cracks with finite lengths in SS components

  12. Sizing of intergranular stress corrosion cracking using low frequency ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, M.D.; Avioli, M.J.; Rose, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Based upon the work thus far accomplished on low frequency sizing, the following conclusions can be drawn: the potential of low frequency ultrasound for the sizing of IGSCC seams encouraging as demonstrated in this work. If minimal walking is expected, larger values of crack height/wavelength ratios should not affect the reliability of estimates; notch data points out the validity of signal amplitude for sizing. With care in frequency consideration, the technique can be extended to cracks; when wavelength is greater than flaw size, importance of orientation and reflector shape diminishes although less so for deeper cracks; when beam profile is larger than the defect size, echo amplitude is proportional to defect area when using shear wave probes and corner reflectors; other factors, in addition to crack size, affect signal amplitude. Reference data to compensate for depth and material (HAZ) is a must; additional crack samples should be studied in order to further develop and characterize the use of low frequency ultrasonics

  13. Signal processing for underclad crack sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, R.; Lane, S.S.; Paradiso, T.J.; Quinn, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The techniques developed in this work provide a means of sizing underclad cracks and quality control methods for assessing the accuracy of the data. Data were collected with a minicomputer (LSI 11-02), a transient recorder (Biomaton 8100) and anti-aliasing filter. Three techniques were developed: the calibration curve, phase velocity and epicentral. The phase reversal characteristic in the data is a strong indication of the nature of the signal source. That is, cracks are clearly seperable from two isolated inclusions on the basis of observed phase reversal. These methods have been implemented on a computer and appear to provide an accurate rapid method to discriminate and size underclad cracks

  14. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Prachuktam, S.; Gardner, D.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdowns. Typical PWR steam generator units contain thousands of long straight tubes with U-bend sections. These tubes are primarily made from alloy 600 and their sizes vary between 3 / 4 '' and 7 / 8 '' (1.905 cm and 2.223 cm) in diameter with nominal thicknesses of 0.043'' to 0.053'' (0.109 cm to 0.135 cm). Since alloy 600 (and the previously used 304-SS tubes) are ductile, high toughness materials LEFM (linear elastic fracture mechanics) criteria do not apply. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered

  15. Eddy-current inversion in the thin-skin limit: Determination of depth and opening for a long crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, S. K.

    1994-09-01

    A method for crack size determination using eddy-current nondestructive evaluation is presented for the case of a plate containing an infinitely long crack of uniform depth and uniform crack opening. The approach is based on the approximate solution to Maxwell's equations for nonmagnetic conductors in the limit of small skin depth and relies on least-squares polynomial fits to a normalized coil impedance function as a function of skin depth. The method is straightforward to implement and is relatively insensitive to both systematic and random errors. The procedure requires the computation of two functions: a normalizing function, which depends both on the coil parameters and the skin depth, and a crack-depth function which depends only on the coil parameters in addition to the crack depth. The practical perfomance of the method was tested using a set of simulated cracks in the form of electro-discharge machined slots in aluminum alloy plates. The crack depths and crack opening deduced from the eddy-current measurements agree with the actual crack dimensions to within 10% or better. Recommendations concerning the optimum conditions for crack sizing are also made.

  16. Induction Thermography for Surface Crack Detection and Depth Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Oswald-Tranta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, induction thermography has been established as a non-destructive testing method for localizing surface cracks in metals. The sample to be inspected is heated with a short induced electrical current pulse, and the infrared camera records—during and after the heating pulse—the temperature distribution at the surface. Transforming the temporal temperature development for each pixel to phase information makes not only highly reliable detection of the cracks possible but also allows an estimation of its depth. Finite element simulations were carried out to investigate how the phase contrast depends on parameters such as excitation frequency, pulse duration, material parameters, crack depth, and inclination angle of the crack. From these results, generalized functions for the dependency of the phase difference on all these parameters were derived. These functions can be used as an excellent guideline as to how measurement parameters should be optimized for a given material to be able to detect cracks and estimate their depth. Several experiments on different samples were also carried out, and the results compared with the simulations showed very good agreement.

  17. Eddy current technique for detecting and sizing surface cracks in steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecco, V.S.; Carter, J.R.; Sullivan, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    Cracking has occurred in pressure vessel nozzles and girth welds due to thermal fatigue. Pipe welds, welds in support structures, and welds in reactor vault liner panels in nuclear facilities have failed because of cracks. Cracking can also occur in turbine rotor bore surfaces due to high cycle fatigue. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and other surface NDT methods are used to detect cracks but cannot be used for depth sizing. Crack depth can be measured with various NDT methods such as ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD), potential drop, and eddy current. The TOFD technique can be difficult to implement on nozzle welds and is best suited for sizing deep cracks (>5 mm). The conventional eddy current method is easy to implement, but crack sizing is normally limited to shallow cracks ( 2 mm) cracks. Eddy current testing (ET) techniques are readily amenable to remote/automatic inspections. These new probes could augment present magnetic particle (MT) and dye penetrant (PT) testing through provision of reliable defect depth information. Reliable crack sizing permits identification of critical cracks for plant life extension and licensing purposes. In addition, performing PT and MT generates low level radioactive waste in some inspection applications in nuclear facilities. Replacing these techniques with ET for some components will eliminate some of this radioactive waste. (author)

  18. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Gardner, D.; Prachuktam, S.; Chang, T.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdown. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered since the material is non-notch sensitive. Non-linear finite element analyses are carried out to determine the burst pressures of steam generator tubes containing longitudinal cracks located on the outer surface of the tubes. The non-linearities considered herein include elastic-plastic material behaviour and large deformations. A non-proprietary general purpose non-linear finite element program, NFAP was adopted for the analysis. Due to the asymmetric nature of the cracks, two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional finite element analyses, were performed. The analysis clearly shows that for short cracks axial effects play a significant role. For long cracks, they are not important since two-dimensional conditions predominate and failure is governed by circumferential or hoop stress conditions. (Auth.)

  19. Detection and Sizing of Fatigue Cracks in Steel Welds with Advanced Eddy Current Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, E. I.; Mohr, W. C.; Lozev, M. G.

    2008-02-01

    Butt-welded specimens were fatigued to produce cracks in the weld heat-affected zone. Advanced eddy current (AEC) techniques were used to detect and size the cracks through a coating. AEC results were compared with magnetic particle and phased-array ultrasonic techniques. Validation through destructive crack measurements was also conducted. Factors such as geometry, surface treatment, and crack tightness interfered with depth sizing. AEC inspection techniques have the potential of providing more accurate and complete sizing flaw data for manufacturing and in-service inspections.

  20. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Gardner, D.; Prachuktam, S.; Chang, T.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdowns. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered since the material is non-notch sensitive. Non-linear finite element analyses are carried out to determine the burst pressures of steam generator tubes containing longitudinal cracks located on the outer surface of the tubes. The non-linearities considered herein include elastic-plastic material behavior and large deformations. A non-proprietary general purpose non-linear finite element program, NFAP was adopted for the analysis. Due to the asymmetric nature of the cracks, two-dimensional, as well as three-dimensional finite element analyses, were performed. The two-dimensional element and its formulations are similar to those of NONSAP. The three-dimensional isoparametric element with elastic-plastic material characteristics together with the large deformation formulations used in NFAP are described in the Report BNL-20684. The numerical accuracy of the program was investigated and checked with known solutions of benchmark problems. In addition to the three-dimensional element which was specifically inserted into NFAP for this problem, other features such as direct pressure inputs for isoparametric elements, automatic load increment adjustments for convergent non-linear solutions, and automatic bandwidth reduction schemes are incorporated into the program thus allowing for a more economical evaluation of three-dimensional inelastic analysis. In summary the analysis clearly shows that for short cracks axial effects play a significant role. For long cracks, they are not important since two-dimensional conditions predominate and failure is governed by circumferential or hoop stress conditions

  1. Sizing of small surface-breaking tight cracks by using laser-ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Kuroda, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Onodera, T.

    2004-01-01

    On the nondestructive testing, not only detection but also sizing of crack is desirable because the crack depth is one of the most important parameter to evaluate the impact of the crack to the material, to estimate crack growth and ultimately to predict lifetime of the component. Moreover, accurate measurement of the crack depth optimizes countermeasures and timing of repairs, and eventually reduces total cost for plant maintenance. Laser-ultrasonic is a technique that uses two laser beams; one with a short pulse for the generation of ultrasound and another one, long pulse or continuous, coupled to an optical interferometer for detection. The technique features a large detection bandwidth, which is important for small defect inspection. Another feature of laser-ultrasonics is the remote optical scanning of generation and detection points, which enables to inspect components in narrow space and/or having complex shapes. A purpose of this paper is to describe the performance of a laser-ultrasonic testing (LUT) system on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) inspection. We have developed a new technique for sizing shallow cracks, say 0.5-1.5mm, based on the laser-induced surface wave and its frequency analysis. First, sizing capability of the system will be demonstrated by using an artificial surface-breaking slot having depth of 0-2mm in a stainless steel plate. Evaluated depths show good agreement with the machined slot depths within the accuracy of about a few hundred micrometers. Then, SCCs in a stainless steel plate are examined by using the system. Depth of SCC is evaluated every 0.2mm over the crack aperture length. The evaluated depths are compared with the depths measured by the destructive testing. (author)

  2. Statistical distribution of time to crack initiation and initial crack size using service data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R. A.; Yang, J. N.

    1977-01-01

    Crack growth inspection data gathered during the service life of the C-130 Hercules airplane were used in conjunction with a crack propagation rule to estimate the distribution of crack initiation times and of initial crack sizes. A Bayesian statistical approach was used to calculate the fraction of undetected initiation times as a function of the inspection time and the reliability of the inspection procedure used.

  3. Determination of crack depth in aluminum using eddy currents and GMR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Ribeiro, A.; Pasadas, D.; Ramos, H. G.; Rocha, T.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we use eddy currents to determine the depth of linear cracks in aluminum plates. A constant field probe is used to generate the spatially uniform excitation field and a single axis giant magneto-resistor (GMR) sensor is used to measure the eddy currents magnetic field. Different depths were machined in one aluminum plate with 4 mm of thickness. By scanning those cracks the magnetic field components parallel and perpendicular to the crack's line were measured when the eddy currents were launched perpendicularly to the crack's line. To characterize one crack in a plate of a given thickness and material, the experimental procedure was defined. The plate surface is scanned to detect and locate one crack. The acquired data enables the determination of the crack's length and orientation. A second scanning is performed with the excitation current perpendicular to the crack and the GMR sensing axis perpendicular and parallel to the crack's line.

  4. Impulse response measurements as dependent on crack depth. Delamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulriksen, Peter

    2011-02-01

    sizes were used. The vibrations of the concrete surface was measured with an accelerometer pushed manually to the surface and also by an adjacent microphone. The results indicate clearly that the small hammer generates a spectrum better suited to the present resonance frequencies and that both the accelerometer- and microphone signals can be used to detect delamination down to a depth of 120 mm. This is somewhat deeper than what was possible with the vibrator and impedance head, which may be attributed to higher energy in the hammer blows. The large hammer was not suited for the present resonance frequencies. The possibility of using a microphone as a vibration sensor opens for a remote application, when the microphone is fixed in the room and only a modally tuned hammer is used for striking the concrete. The third part of the project is using the big hammer to strike two types of hand held impedance heads. One measures force and velocity F/v the other measures force and acceleration F/a. There are three experiments in the third part a-c. a) The first experiment showed that the small hard-metal points used to improve contact with the concrete contributed undesired oscillations in the F/v impedance head. For this reason these points have not been used in further experiments. b) The second experiment showed that the F/v impedance head produce results that better couple to the properties like delamination depth and width than does the F/a impedance head. It also showed that the two parameters measured in the time domain: Fmax/vmax-impedance and concrete spring constant F/d are good indicators of these delamination properties. The experiment demonstrated that it is best to measure the spring constant in the rebound movement of the concrete surface. c) The third experiment demonstrated that it is possible to use the F/v impedance head for measurements in the frequency domain. However the dominating frequency was lower than that obtained with the vibrator and with the small

  5. Sizing of cracks by ultrasonic testing - Diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, K.; Sattari-Far, I.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    The work has been concentrated on manual ultrasonic testing of plates in carbon and austenitic steel with thicknesses of 10-40 mm. Evaluation of data was performed by studying the amplitude, accuracy (crack depth) and visibility. The experience from the project showed that identification of the weak signals from the crack tips requires well-trained personnel. Besides that, the following can be recommended: Estimate if the crack has compressive stresses. Especially shallow cracks are exposed for compressive stresses. Chose a refraction angle ≥ 60 degrees if the crack is deep. Try both low (approx equivalent to 2MHz) and high (approx equivalent to 4-5MHz) frequency. Lower frequencies often increase amplitude response. Avoid the combination of refraction angle greater than 60 degrees and low frequency. Inspect with half as well as full skip. Sometimes a stronger signal is received for full skip, because the amplitude of the diffracted signal is higher from the cracked side. Use complementary measurements with mode conversion techniques. Focused probes can improve the results, especially for complicated geometries. Do not use reference reflectors of EDM-notch type for verification of signal amplitude. No correlation between amplitude from an EDM-notch tip and a crack tip exists. Reference reflectors of EDM-notch type can be used to verify the resolution of the system. A shallow EDM-notch can show if the probe can separate the tip and corner. It is our experience that general solutions does not exist, and each case needs an individual solution

  6. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses for reducers with constant-depth internal circumferential surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Szu-Ying; Tsai, Bor-Jiun; Chen, Jien-Jong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a 3-D automatic elastic-plastic finite element mesh generator is established to accurately predict the J-integral value of an arbitrary reducer with a constant-depth internal circumferential surface crack under bending and axial force. The contact pairs are used on the crack surfaces to simulate the actual contact behaviors of the crack model under loadings. In order to verify the accuracy of the proposed elastic-plastic finite element model for a reducer with a surface crack, the cracked straight pipe models are generated according to a special modeling procedure for a flawed reducer. The J-integral values along the crack front of surface crack are calculated and compared with the straight pipe models which have been verified in the previous published studies. Based on the comparison of computed results, good agreements are obtained to show the accuracy of present numerical models. More confidence on using the 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis for reducers with internal circumferential surface cracks can be thus established in this work

  7. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin.

  8. Guided wave crack detection and size estimation in stiffened structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Yeasin; Faisal Haider, Mohammad; Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2018-03-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) deals with the nondestructive inspection of defects, corrosion, leaks in engineering structures by using ultrasonic guided waves. In the past, simplistic structures were often considered for analyzing the guided wave interaction with the defects. In this study, we focused on more realistic and relatively complicated structure for detecting any defect by using a non-contact sensing approach. A plate with a stiffener was considered for analyzing the guided wave interactions. Piezoelectric wafer active transducers were used to produce excitation in the structures. The excitation generated the multimodal guided waves (aka Lamb waves) that propagate in the plate with stiffener. The presence of stiffener in the plate generated scattered waves. The direct wave and the additional scattered waves from the stiffener were experimentally recorded and studied. These waves were considered as a pristine case in this research. A fine horizontal semi-circular crack was manufactured by using electric discharge machining in the same stiffener. The presence of crack in the stiffener produces additional scattered waves as well as trapped waves. These scattered waves and trapped wave modes from the cracked stiffener were experimentally measured by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). These waves were analyzed and compared with that from the pristine case. The analyses suggested that both size and shape of the horizontal crack may be predicted from the pattern of the scattered waves. Different features (reflection, transmission, and mode-conversion) of the scattered wave signals are analyzed. We found direct transmission feature for incident A0 wave mode and modeconversion feature for incident S0 mode are most suitable for detecting the crack in the stiffener. The reflection feature may give a better idea of sizing the crack.

  9. Experimental study of the crack depth ratio threshold to analyze the slow crack growth by creep of high density polyethylene pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, Lucien; Devilliers, Clémence; Lucatelli, Jean Marc; Gaudichet-Maurin, Emmanuelle; Brossard, Jean Michel

    2014-01-01

    To assess the durability of drinking water connection pipes subjected to oxidation and slow crack growth, a comprehensive database was constructed on a novel specimen geometry: the pre-cracked NOL ring. 135 tests were carried out consisting of initial crack depth ratio ranging from 0.08 to 0.6; single or double longitudinal cracks: tensile with steady strain rate and creep loading. A threshold value of the crack depth ratio of 0.2, induced by the oxidation was determined by analyzing several mechanical parameters. This threshold value was shown to be independent on the strain rate effects, single or double crack configuration and the kind of loading: tensile or creep. Creep test results with crack depth ratio larger than 0.2 were then utilized to establish a failure assessment diagram. A methodology allowing the prediction of residual lifetime of in-service pipes was proposed, using this diagram. - Highlights: • Experimental data on pre-cracked rings featuring a longitudinally cracked HDPE pipe. • Crack depth ratio threshold for slow crack growth study consecutive to oxidation. • Investigation of the effects of the single/double notch(es) and of the strain rate. • Original results obtained from tests performed with tensile and creep loadings. • Correlation between creep initiation time and C* with DENT and ring specimens

  10. Fracture capacity of HFIR vessel with random crack size and toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The probability of fracture versus a range of applied hoop stresses along the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel is obtained as an estimate of its fracture capacity. Both the crack size and the fracture toughness are assumed to be random variables and subject to assumed distribution functions. Possible hoop stress is based on the numerical solution of the vessel response by applying a point pressure-pulse at the center of the fluid volume within the vessel. Both the fluid-structure interaction and radiation embrittlement are taken into consideration. Elastic fracture mechanics is used throughout the analysis. The probability function of fracture for a single crack due to either a variable crack depth or a variable toughness is derived. Both the variable crack size and the variable toughness are assumed to follow known distributions. The probability of vessel fracture with multiple number of cracks is then obtained as a function of the applied hoop stress. The probability of fracture function is, then, extended to include different levels of confidence and variability. It, therefore, enables one to estimate the high confidence and low probability fracture capacity of the reactor vessel under a range of accident loading conditions

  11. Influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Bryson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Recently, it has been shown that, in notched beam testing, shallow cracks tend to exhibit an elevated toughness as a result of a loss of constraint at the crack tip. The loss of constraint takes place when interaction occurs between the elastic-plastic crack-tip stress field and the specimen surface nearest the crack tip. An increased shallow-crack fracture toughness is of interest to the nuclear industry because probabilistic fracture-mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the probability of vessel failure during postulated pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) events. Tests have been performed on beam specimens loaded in 3-point bending using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel material (A533 B). Testing has been conducted using specimens with a constant beam depth (W = 94 mm) and within the lower transition region of the toughness curve for A533 B. Test results indicate a significantly higher fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens compared to the fracture toughness determined using deep-crack (a/W = 0.5) specimens. Test data also show little influence of thickness on the fracture toughness for the current test temperature (-60 degree C). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Nondestructive estimation of depth of surface opening cracks in concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arne, Kevin; In, Chiwon; Kurtis, Kimberly; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and thus assessment of damage in concrete structures is of the utmost importance from both a safety point of view and a financial point of view. Of particular interest are surface opening cracks that extend through the concrete cover, as this can expose the steel reinforcement bars underneath and induce corrosion in them. This corrosion can lead to significant subsequent damage in concrete such as cracking and delamination of the cover concrete as well as rust staining on the surface of concrete. Concrete beams are designed and constructed in such a way to provide crack depths up to around 13 cm. Two different types of measurements are made in-situ to estimate depths of real surface cracks (as opposed to saw-cut notches) after unloading: one based on the impact-echo method and the other one based on the diffuse ultrasonic method. These measurements are compared to the crack depth visually observed on the sides of the beams. Discussions are given as to the advantages and disadvantages of each method

  13. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Franesqui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA. The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled “Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves” (Franesqui et al., 2017 [1].

  14. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franesqui, Miguel A; Yepes, Jorge; García-González, Cándida

    2017-08-01

    This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA). The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled "Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves" (Franesqui et al., 2017) [1].

  15. Estimating the Initial Crack Size in a Particulate Composite Material: An Analytical and Experimental Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, C

    2001-01-01

    The objectives in this report are to: determine the inherent critical initial crack size in a particulate composite material, determine the statistical distribution function of the inherent critical crack size, normal distribution, two...

  16. Fatigue-crack propagation in gamma-based titanium aluminide alloys at large and small crack sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzic, J.J.; Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-01-01

    Most evaluations of the fracture and fatigue-crack propagation properties of γ+α 2 titanium aluminide alloys to date have been performed using standard large-crack samples, e.g., compact-tension specimens containing crack sizes which are on the order of tens of millimeters, i.e., large compared to microstructural dimensions. However, these alloys have been targeted for applications, such as blades in gas-turbine engines, where relevant crack sizes are much smaller ( 5 mm) and (c ≅ 25--300 microm) cracks in a γ-TiAl based alloy, of composition Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr-0.2B (at.%), specifically for duplex (average grain size approximately17 microm) and refined lamellar (average colony size ≅150 microm) microstructures. It is found that, whereas the lamellar microstructure displays far superior fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth resistance in the presence of large cracks, in small-crack testing the duplex microstructure exhibits a better combination of properties. The reasons for such contrasting behavior are examined in terms of the intrinsic and extrinsic (i.e., crack bridging) contributions to cyclic crack advance

  17. Crack growth prediction method considering interaction between multiple cracks. Growth of surface cracks of dissimilar size under cyclic tensile and bending load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Miyokawa, Eiichi; Kikuchi, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    When multiple cracks approach one another, the stress intensity factor is likely to change due to the interaction of the stress field. This causes change in growth rate and shape of cracks. In particular, when cracks are in parallel position to the loading direction, the shape of cracks becomes non-planar. In this study, the complex growth of interacting cracks is evaluated by using the S-Version finite element method, in which local detailed finite element mesh (local mesh) is superposed on coarse finite element model (global mesh) representing the global structure. In order to investigate the effect of interaction on the growth behavior, two parallel surface cracks are subjected to cyclic tensile or bending load. It is shown that the smaller crack is shielded by larger crack due to the interaction and stops growing when the difference in size of two cracks is significant. Based on simulations of various conditions, a procedure and criteria for evaluating crack growth for fitness-for-service assessment is proposed. According to the procedure, the interaction is not necessary to be considered in the crack growth prediction when the difference in size of two cracks exceeds the criterion. (author)

  18. Failure Assessment for the High-Strength Pipelines with Constant-Depth Circumferential Surface Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas transportation system over long distance, application of high-strength pipeline steels can efficiently reduce construction and operation cost by increasing operational pressure and reducing the pipe wall thickness. Failure assessment is an important issue in the design, construction, and maintenance of the pipelines. The small circumferential surface cracks with constant depth in the welded pipelines are of practical interest. This work provides an engineering estimation procedure based upon the GE/EPRI method to determine the J-integral for the thin-walled pipelines with small constant-depth circumferential surface cracks subject to tension and bending loads. The values of elastic influence functions for stress intensity factor and plastic influence functions for fully plastic J-integral estimation are derived in tabulated forms through a series of three-dimensional finite element calculations for different crack geometries and material properties. To check confidence of the J-estimation solution in practical application, J-integral values obtained from detailed finite element (FE analyses are compared with those estimated from the new influence functions. Excellent agreement of FE results with the proposed J-estimation solutions for both tension and bending loads indicates that the new solutions can be applied for accurate structural integrity assessment of high-strength pipelines with constant-depth circumferential surface cracks.

  19. Development of the advanced phased array UT technique for accurate sizing of cracks in the nozzle welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Jun-ichiro; Kawanami, Seiichi; Ideo, Mitsushi; Matsuura, Takayuki; Chigusa, Naoki; Hirano, Shinro; Sera, Takehiko

    2010-01-01

    Recently, preventive maintenance tasks for welding of safe-end nozzles of reactor vessels and steam generators of PWRs in Japan had been carried out sequentially. Before the maintenance tasks, inspection services were carried out and several crack indications were found by eddy current testing (ECT). These indications were found in the welding which made by 600 series nickel base alloy and evaluated as stress corrosion cracks which were oriented to the axial direction of the nozzle. Then investigations to evaluate the depth of cracks were carried out by ultrasonic testing (UT) from inner surface of the nozzles. However they were difficult to evaluate the depth of cracks due to the high attenuation of the ultrasonic propagation caused by large grain structure of welding. And also it was required high resolution near surface region for accurate sizing. Therefore development of advanced phased array UT techniques specialized for the sizing at this portion was carried out. This paper reports the development status and verification test results. Firstly simulations of the ultrasonic propagation in the welding were carried out to optimize beam profiles of phased array probes. Next prototype probes were manufactured and verification tests were conducted to evaluate the accuracy of depth sizing. It is shown that the developed techniques have high sizing accuracy for artificial stress corrosion cracks in the welding. (author)

  20. Processing vertical size disparities in distinct depth planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Philip A; Howard, Ian P

    2012-08-17

    A textured surface appears slanted about a vertical axis when the image in one eye is horizontally enlarged relative to the image in the other eye. The surface appears slanted in the opposite direction when the same image is vertically enlarged. Two superimposed textured surfaces with different horizontal size disparities appear as two surfaces that differ in slant. Superimposed textured surfaces with equal and opposite vertical size disparities appear as a single frontal surface. The vertical disparities are averaged. We investigated whether vertical size disparities are averaged across two superimposed textured surfaces in different depth planes or whether they induce distinct slants in the two depth planes. In Experiment 1, two superimposed textured surfaces with different vertical size disparities were presented in two depth planes defined by horizontal disparity. The surfaces induced distinct slants when the horizontal disparity was more than ±5 arcmin. Thus, vertical size disparities are not averaged over surfaces with different horizontal disparities. In Experiment 2 we confirmed that vertical size disparities are processed in surfaces away from the horopter, so the results of Experiment 1 cannot be explained by the processing of vertical size disparities in a fixated surface only. Together, these results show that vertical size disparities are processed separately in distinct depth planes. The results also suggest that vertical size disparities are not used to register slant globally by their effect on the registration of binocular direction of gaze.

  1. Minimum critical crack depths in pressure vessels guidelines for nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, M.R.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1983-09-01

    Estimates of the minimum critical depths which can be expected in high quality vessels designed to certain British and American Code rules are given. A simple means of allowing for fatigue crack growth in service is included. The data which are presented can be used to decide what sensitivity and what reporting levels should be employed during an ultrasonic inspection of a pressure vessel. It is emphasised that the minimum crack depths are those which would be relevant to a vessel in which the material is stressed to its maximum permitted value during operation. Stresses may, in practice, be significantly less than this. Less restrictive inspection standards may be established, if it were considered worthwhile to carry out a detailed stress analysis of the particular vessel under examination. (author)

  2. Failure Assessment for the High-Strength Pipelines with Constant-Depth Circumferential Surface Cracks

    OpenAIRE

    X. Liu; Z. X. Lu; Y. Chen; Y. L. Sui; L. H. Dai

    2018-01-01

    In the oil and gas transportation system over long distance, application of high-strength pipeline steels can efficiently reduce construction and operation cost by increasing operational pressure and reducing the pipe wall thickness. Failure assessment is an important issue in the design, construction, and maintenance of the pipelines. The small circumferential surface cracks with constant depth in the welded pipelines are of practical interest. This work provides an engineering estimation pr...

  3. Towards modeling intergranular stress corrosion cracks on grain size scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovski, Igor; Cizelj, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simulating the onset and propagation of intergranular cracking. ► Model based on the as-measured geometry and crystallographic orientations. ► Feasibility, performance of the proposed computational approach demonstrated. - Abstract: Development of advanced models at the grain size scales has so far been mostly limited to simulated geometry structures such as for example 3D Voronoi tessellations. The difficulty came from a lack of non-destructive techniques for measuring the microstructures. In this work a novel grain-size scale approach for modelling intergranular stress corrosion cracking based on as-measured 3D grain structure of a 400 μm stainless steel wire is presented. Grain topologies and crystallographic orientations are obtained using a diffraction contrast tomography, reconstructed within a detailed finite element model and coupled with advanced constitutive models for grains and grain boundaries. The wire is composed of 362 grains and over 1600 grain boundaries. Grain boundary damage initialization and early development is then explored for a number of cases, ranging from isotropic elasticity up to crystal plasticity constitutive laws for the bulk grain material. In all cases the grain boundaries are modeled using the cohesive zone approach. The feasibility of the approach is explored.

  4. Detection and sizing of cracks using potential drop techniques based on electromagnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Kim, Hoon

    2011-01-01

    The potential drop techniques based on electromagnetic induction are classified into induced current focused potential drop (ICFPD) technique and remotely induced current potential drop (RICPD) technique. The possibility of numerical simulation of the techniques is investigated and the applicability of these techniques to the measurement of defects in conductive materials is presented. Finite element analysis (FEA) for the RICPD measurements on the plate specimen containing back wall slits is performed and calculated results by FEA show good agreement with experimental results. Detection limit of the RICPD technique in depth of back wall slits can also be estimated by FEA. Detection and sizing of artificial defects in parent and welded materials are successfully performed by the ICFPD technique. Applicability of these techniques to detection of cracks in field components is investigated, and most of the cracks in the components investigated are successfully detected by the ICFPD and RICPD techniques. (author)

  5. Fracture fragility of HFIR vessel caused by random crack size or random toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Shih-Jung; Proctor, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    This report discuses the probability of fracture (fracture fragility) versus a range of applied hoop stresses along the HFIR vessel which is obtained as an estimate of its fracture capacity. Both the crack size and the fracture toughness are assumed to be random variables that follow given distribution functions. Possible hoop stress is based on the numerical solution of the vessel response by applying a point pressure-pulse it the center of the fluid volume within the vessel. Both the fluid-structure interaction and radiation embrittlement are taken into consideration. Elastic fracture mechanics is used throughout the analysis. The probability of vessel fracture for a single crack caused by either a variable crack depth or a variable toughness is first derived. Then the probability of fracture with multiple number of cracks is obtained. The probability of fracture is further extended to include different levels of confidence and variability. It, therefore, enables one to estimate the high confidence and low probability capacity accident load

  6. Size matters: Perceived depth magnitude varies with stimulus height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirlin, Inna; Wilcox, Laurie M; Allison, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Both the upper and lower disparity limits for stereopsis vary with the size of the targets. Recently, Tsirlin, Wilcox, and Allison (2012) suggested that perceived depth magnitude from stereopsis might also depend on the vertical extent of a stimulus. To test this hypothesis we compared apparent depth in small discs to depth in long bars with equivalent width and disparity. We used three estimation techniques: a virtual ruler, a touch-sensor (for haptic estimates) and a disparity probe. We found that depth estimates were significantly larger for the bar stimuli than for the disc stimuli for all methods of estimation and different configurations. In a second experiment, we measured perceived depth as a function of the height of the bar and the radius of the disc. Perceived depth increased with increasing bar height and disc radius suggesting that disparity is integrated along the vertical edges. We discuss size-disparity correlation and inter-neural excitatory connections as potential mechanisms that could account for these results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Photographic assessment of burn size and depth: reliability and validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hop, M.; Moues, C.; Bogomolova, K.; Nieuwenhuis, M.; Oen, I.; Middelkoop, E.; Breederveld, R.; de Baar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of using photographs of burns to assess both burn size and depth. Method: Fifty randomly selected photographs taken on day 0-1 post burn were assessed by seven burn experts and eight referring physicians. Inter-rater

  8. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spending time in a rehab facility or getting cognitive-behavioral therapy or other treatments. Right now, there are no medicines to treat a crack addiction. If you smoke crack, talking with a counselor ...

  9. Development of measurement technique for crack depth in weld zone of thick stainless steel pipe with ultrasonic phased array TOFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Phased array TOFD (time of flight diffraction) method which makes possible to detect tip diffraction echoes and measure crack depth in an austenitic stainless steel weld zone with a thickness of more than 25 mm to which region it was difficult to apply ultrasonic test due to scattering of ultrasonic waves has been developed. The developed method uses a single array transducer to have a short distance between incident points of transmitter and receiver in order to propagate waves in shorter pass in the weld region. Transmitting and receiving ultrasonic beams from a single array probe can be set a crossing point and a focal point at desired depth. This method makes possible to scan with 16 kinds of combination of crossing points and focal pints of ultrasonic beam at a time. We have examined fundamental characteristics of depth measurement with electric discharge machining slits on base metal of a stainless steel with a thickness of 35 mm. As the results: (1) We could measure the slit depth with 0.2mm error from the slit depth with a estimating method of a lateral wave propagation time with back wall echo. (2) The largest error of the depth measurement from the slit depth with the ultrasonic beam crossing point set at the 4mm different point from the tip of the slit was 0.3 mm. (3) The largest error of the depth measurements due to the difference of focal point depth of ultrasonic beam was 0.2 mm. (4) The highest tip diffraction echo could be observed with the ultrasonic beam cross point set at the tip of the slit. The difference of 4 mm between the cross point and the tip of the slit caused attenuation of tip diffraction echo height in -6.8 dB. Furthermore we have measured a depth of electric discharge machining slits, fatigue cracks and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stainless steel welded pipe specimens with a thickness of 35 mm. As the results: (1) We could detect the tip diffraction echoes which have a signal noise ratio with more than 2.4 from the fatigue

  10. Fractal and multifractal approaches for the analysis of crack-size dependent scaling laws in fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggi, Marco [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: marco.paggi@polito.it; Carpinteri, Alberto [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    The enhanced ability to detect and measure very short cracks, along with a great interest in applying fracture mechanics formulae to smaller and smaller crack sizes, has pointed out the so-called anomalous behavior of short cracks with respect to their longer counterparts. The crack-size dependencies of both the fatigue threshold and the Paris' constant C are only two notable examples of these anomalous scaling laws. In this framework, a unified theoretical model seems to be missing and the behavior of short cracks can still be considered as an open problem. In this paper, we propose a critical reexamination of the fractal models for the analysis of crack-size effects in fatigue. The limitations of each model are put into evidence and removed. At the end, a new generalized theory based on fractal geometry is proposed, which permits to consistently interpret the short crack-related anomalous scaling laws within a unified theoretical formulation. Finally, this approach is herein used to interpret relevant experimental data related to the crack-size dependence of the fatigue threshold in metals.

  11. Fractal and multifractal approaches for the analysis of crack-size dependent scaling laws in fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paggi, Marco; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced ability to detect and measure very short cracks, along with a great interest in applying fracture mechanics formulae to smaller and smaller crack sizes, has pointed out the so-called anomalous behavior of short cracks with respect to their longer counterparts. The crack-size dependencies of both the fatigue threshold and the Paris' constant C are only two notable examples of these anomalous scaling laws. In this framework, a unified theoretical model seems to be missing and the behavior of short cracks can still be considered as an open problem. In this paper, we propose a critical reexamination of the fractal models for the analysis of crack-size effects in fatigue. The limitations of each model are put into evidence and removed. At the end, a new generalized theory based on fractal geometry is proposed, which permits to consistently interpret the short crack-related anomalous scaling laws within a unified theoretical formulation. Finally, this approach is herein used to interpret relevant experimental data related to the crack-size dependence of the fatigue threshold in metals.

  12. Effect of crack size on gas leakage characteristics in a confined space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Kun Hyuk; Ryou, Hong Sun; Yoon, Kee Bong; Lee, Hy Uk; Bang, Joo Won [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Li, Longnan; Choi, Jin Wook; Kim, Dae Joong [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    We numerically investigated the influence of crack size on gas leakage characteristics in a confined space. The real scale model of underground Combined cycle power plant (CCPP) was taken for simulating gas leakage characteristics for different crack sizes such as 10 mm, 15 mm and 20 mm. The commercial code of Fluent (v.16.1) was used for three-dimensional simulation. In particular, a risk region showing such a probability of ignition was newly suggested with the concept of Lower flammable limit (LFL) of methane gas used in the present study to characterize the gas propagation and the damage area in space. From the results, the longitudinal and transverse leakage distances were estimated and analyzed for quantitative evaluation of risk area. The crack size was found to have a great impact on the longitudinal leakage distance, showing an increasing tendency with the crack size. In case of a crack size of 20 mm, the longitudinal leakage distance suddenly increased after 180 s, whereas it remained constant after 2 s in the other cases. This is because a confinement effect, which is caused by circulation flows in the whole space, increased the gas concentration near the gas flow released from the crack. The confinement effect is thus closely associated with the released mass flow rate changing with the crack size. This result would be useful in designing the gas detector system for preventing accidents in the confined space as like CCPP.

  13. Crack detection and analyses using resonance ultrasonic vibrations in full-size crystalline silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, A.; Polupan, O.; Dallas, W.; Ostapenko, S.; Hess, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental approach for fast crack detection and length determination in full-size solar-grade crystalline silicon wafers using a resonance ultrasonic vibrations (RUV) technique is presented. The RUV method is based on excitation of the longitudinal ultrasonic vibrations in full-size wafers. Using an external piezoelectric transducer combined with a high sensitivity ultrasonic probe and computer controlled data acquisition system, real-time frequency response analysis can be accomplished. On a set of identical crystalline Si wafers with artificially introduced periphery cracks, it was demonstrated that the crack results in a frequency shift in a selected RUV peak to a lower frequency and increases the resonance peak bandwidth. Both characteristics were found to increase with the length of the crack. The frequency shift and bandwidth increase serve as reliable indicators of the crack appearance in silicon wafers and are suitable for mechanical quality control and fast wafer inspection

  14. Importance and role of grain size in free surface cracking prediction of heavy forgings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenhua [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Forging & Stamping Technology and Science, Yanshan University, Ministry of Education of China, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Sun, Shuhua; Wang, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shi, Zhongping [Key Laboratory of Advanced Forging & Stamping Technology and Science, Yanshan University, Ministry of Education of China, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Fu, Wantang, E-mail: wtfu@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2015-02-11

    The importance and role of grain size in predicting surface cracking of heavy forgings were investigated. 18Mn18Cr0.5N steel specimens with four different grain sizes were tensioned between 900 and 1100 °C at a strain rate of 0.1 s{sup −1}. The nucleation sites and crack morphology were analyzed through electron backscatter diffraction analysis, and the fracture morphology was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The nucleation sites were independent of the grain size, and cracks primarily formed at grain boundaries and triple junctions between grains with high Taylor factors. Grains with lower Taylor factors inhibited crack propagation. Strain was found to mainly concentrate near the grain boundaries; thus, a material with a larger grain size cracks more easily because there are fewer grain boundaries. Fine grains can be easily rotated to a lower Taylor factor to further inhibit cracking. The fracture morphology transformed from a brittle to ductile type with a lowering of grain size. At lower temperature, small dimples on the fracture surfaces of specimens with smaller grain sizes were left by single parent grains and the dimple edge was the grain edge. At higher temperature, dimples formed through void coalescence and the dimple edge was the tearing edge. Finally, the relationship between the reduction in area, grain size, and deformation temperature was obtained.

  15. A method for crack sizing using Bayesian inference arising in eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Fumio; Kikuchi, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a sizing methodology of crack using Bayesian inference arising in eddy current testing. There is often uncertainty about data through quantitative measurements of nondestructive testing and this can yield misleading inference of crack sizing at on-site monitoring. In this paper, we propose optimal strategies of measurements in eddy current testing using Bayesian prior-to-posteriori analysis. First our likelihood functional is given by Gaussian distribution with the measurement model based on the hybrid use of finite and boundary element methods. Secondly, given a priori distributions of crack sizing, we propose a method for estimating the region of interest for sizing cracks. Finally an optimal sensing method is demonstrated using our idea. (author)

  16. Size-effects at a crack-tip interacting with a number of voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    A strain gradient plasticity theory is used to analyse the growth of discretely represented voids in front of a blunting crack tip, in order to study the influence of size effects on two competing mechanisms of crack growth. For a very small void volume fraction the crack tip tends to interact...... of the characteristic material length relative to the initial void radius. For a case showing the multiple void mechanism, it is found that the effect of the material length can change the behaviour towards the void by void mechanism. A material model with three characteristic length scales is compared with a one...

  17. A model-based approach to crack sizing with ultrasonic arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Katherine M M; Mulholland, Anthony J; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic phased array systems have become increasingly popular in the last 10 years as tools for flaw detection and characterization within the nondestructive testing industry. The existence and location of flaws can often be deduced via images generated from the data captured by these arrays. A factor common to these imaging techniques is the subjective thresholding required to estimate the size of the flaw. This paper puts forward an objective approach which employs a mathematical model. By exploiting the relationship between the width of the central lobe of the scattering matrix and the crack size, an analytical expression for the crack length is reached via the Born approximation. Conclusions are then drawn on the minimum resolvable crack length of the method and it is thus shown that the formula holds for subwavelength defects. An analytical expression for the error that arises from the discrete nature of the array is then derived and it is observed that the method becomes less sensitive to the discretization of the array as the distance between the flaw and array increases. The methodology is then extended and tested on experimental data collected from welded austenitic plates containing a lack-of-fusion crack of 6 mm length. An objective sizing matrix (OSM) is produced by assessing the similarity between the scattering matrices arising from experimentally collected data with those arising from the Born approximation over a range of crack lengths and frequencies. Initially, the global minimum of the OSM is taken as the objective estimation of the crack size, giving a measurement of 7 mm. This is improved upon by the adoption of a multifrequency averaging approach, with which an improved crack size estimation of 6.4 mm is obtained.

  18. Detection and sizing of inside-surface cracks in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Katsuo; Satoh, Kunio; Honma, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    According to the past operational experience of LWRs, most of the defects arising in reactor pressure vessels accompanying operation are cracks occurring in the build up welding of austenitic stainless steel on the internal surfaces. The detection of these cracks has been carried out by ultrasonic flaw detection from outside in BWRs and from inside in PWRs as in-service inspection. However, there are difficulties such as ultrasonic echoes often occur though defects do not exist, and the quantitative evaluation of detected cracks is difficult by this method because of its accuracy. One of the means to reduce the first difficulty is to use eddy current method together to help the judgement, and for overcoming the second, the ultrasonic method catching end peak echo, that catching diffracted waves, eddy current method and electric resistance method were tried and compared. It is desirable to detect cracks in early stage before they reach parent material. The techniques to detect cracks on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels from the inside and to measure the depth are reported in this paper. The methods of flaw detection examined and the instruments used, the experimental method and the results are reported. It was concluded that eddy current method can be used as the backup for ultrasonic remote flaw detection, and the accuracy of depth measurement was the highest in ultrasonic diffraction wave method. (Kako, I.)

  19. Representative volume element size of a polycrystalline aggregate with embedded short crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovski, I.; Cizelj, L.

    2007-01-01

    A random polycrystalline aggregate model is proposed for evaluation of a representative volume element size (RVE) of a 316L stainless steel with embedded surface crack. RVE size is important since it defines the size of specimen where the influence of local microstructural features averages out, resulting in the same macroscopic response for geometrically similar specimen. On the other hand macroscopic responses of specimen with size smaller than RVE will, due to the microstructural features, differ significantly. Different sizes and orientations of grains, inclusions, voids,... etc are examples of such microstructural features. If a specimen size is above RVE size, classical continuum mechanics can be applied. On the other hand, advanced material models should be used for specimen with size below RVE. This paper proposes one such model, where random size, shape and orientation of grains are explicitly modeled. Crystal plasticity constitutive model is used to account for slip in the grains. RVE size is estimated by calculating the crack tip opening displacements of aggregates with different grain numbers. Progressively larger number of grains are included in the aggregates until the crack tip displacements for two consecutive aggregates of increasing size differ less than 1 %. At this point the model has reached RVE size. (author)

  20. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Xie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM, the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm.

  1. Material size effects on crack growth along patterned wafer-level Cu–Cu bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, John W.

    2013-01-01

    together. Crack growth along the bond interface is here studied numerically using finite element analyses. The experiments have shown that plasticity in the Cu films makes a major contribution to the macroscopic interface toughness. To account for the size dependence of the plastic flow a strain gradient...... plasticity model is applied here for the metal. A cohesive zone model is applied to represent the crack growth along the bond between the two Cu films. This cohesive zone model incorporates the effect of higher order stresses in the continuum, such that the higher order tractions on the crack faces decay...... the toughness peak and the subsequent plateau level are highly sensitive to the value of the characteristic material length. A small material length, relative to the thickness of the Cu film, gives high toughness whereas a length comparable to the film thickness gives much reduced crack growth resistance...

  2. Crack-depth effects in the cylindrically guided wave technique for bolt and pump-shaft inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.M.; Liu, S.N.; Light, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have experienced the failures of bolts and pump shafts. The industry is concerned about nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that can be applied to these components. The cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) has been developed to detect the simulated circumferential defects in long bolts and studs. The ultrasonic CGWT employs the zero-degree longitudinal waves constrained to travel within the boundary of the components with cylindrical shape during inspection. When longitudinal waves are guided to travel along a cylinder, and impinge onto a circumferential defect, the waves are scattered at the crack on the cylinder surface. In this work, the wave scattering at the circumferential crack on a long cylinder is investigated. The transfer factor of the scattered waves is calculated for a wide range of frequency spectra. The scattered waveform at a distance away from a crack is calculated. The effect that crack depth exerts to the waveform in CGWT is shown. CGWT signals, waveform calculation and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Determination of crack size around rivet hole through neural network using ultrasonic Lamb wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Woo; Lee, Joon Hyun

    1998-01-01

    Rivets are typical structural features that are potential initiation sites for fatigue crack due to combination of local stress concentration around rivet hole and moisture trapping. For the viewpoint of structural assurance, it is crucial to evaluate the size of crack around rivets by appropriate nondestructive techniques. Guided waves, which direct wave energy along the plate, carry information about the material in their path and offer a potentially more efficient tool for nondestructive inspection of structural material. Neural network that is considered to be the most suitable for pattern recognition and has been used by researchers in NDE field to classify different types of flaws and flaw size. In this study, crack size determination around rivet through a neural network based on the back-propagation algorithm has been done by extracting some feature from time-domain waveforms of ultrasonic Lamb wave for Al 2024-T3 skin panel of aircraft. Special attention was paid to reduce the coupling effect between transducer and specimen by extracting some features related to only time component data in ultrasonic waveform. It was demonstrated clearly that features extraction based on time component data of the time-domain waveform of Lamb wave was very useful to determine crack size initiated from rivet hole through neural network.

  4. Influence of size and depth on accuracy of electrical impedance scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malich, Ansgar; Facius, Mirjam; Boettcher, Joachim; Sauner, Dieter; Hansch, Andreas; Marx, Christiane; Petrovitch, Alexander; Pfleiderer, Stefan; Kaiser, Werner [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich Schiller University, Bachstrasse 18, 07740, Jena (Germany); Anderson, Roselle [Siemens Medical Systems, Oncology Care Systems Group, 4040 Nelson Ave., CA 94520, Concorde (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Cancer cells exhibit altered local dielectric properties which can be assessed using electrical impedance scanning (EIS). The study was aimed at clarifying influence of lesion size and depth on EIS performance. From a series of 387 lesions (129 malignant and 258 benign) from 363 patients being sonographically and/or mammographically evaluated, size and depth information was not available in 112 lesions, size was available in 86 lesions and additional depth information was available in 189 lesions, respectively, while performing EIS. Lesions were either histologically verified or had a follow-up of at least 2 years. One hundred three of 129 malignant lesions and 165 of 258 benign lesions were correctly detected (sensitivity 79.8%, specificity 64.0%, accuracy 71.9%). Sensitivity without knowledge of size and depth was 64.6% (10 of 16 malignant lesions detected). This value increased to 76.2% (32 of 42) with knowledge of the size and further increased to 85.9% with knowledge of size and depth (61 of 71). Specificity values in the three subgroups were almost similar: 64.6 (62 of 96), 65.9 (29 of 44), and 62.7% (74 of 118), respectively. Accuracy rises from 63.6% (without knowledge of size/depth) to 71.1 and 74.3% (with size knowledge and with size and depth knowledge, respectively). Accuracy of EIS improved significantly by including sonographical information about depth and size into the analysis. Ultrasound examination should be performed prior to EIS. (orig.)

  5. Influence of size and depth on accuracy of electrical impedance scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malich, Ansgar; Facius, Mirjam; Boettcher, Joachim; Sauner, Dieter; Hansch, Andreas; Marx, Christiane; Petrovitch, Alexander; Pfleiderer, Stefan; Kaiser, Werner; Anderson, Roselle

    2003-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit altered local dielectric properties which can be assessed using electrical impedance scanning (EIS). The study was aimed at clarifying influence of lesion size and depth on EIS performance. From a series of 387 lesions (129 malignant and 258 benign) from 363 patients being sonographically and/or mammographically evaluated, size and depth information was not available in 112 lesions, size was available in 86 lesions and additional depth information was available in 189 lesions, respectively, while performing EIS. Lesions were either histologically verified or had a follow-up of at least 2 years. One hundred three of 129 malignant lesions and 165 of 258 benign lesions were correctly detected (sensitivity 79.8%, specificity 64.0%, accuracy 71.9%). Sensitivity without knowledge of size and depth was 64.6% (10 of 16 malignant lesions detected). This value increased to 76.2% (32 of 42) with knowledge of the size and further increased to 85.9% with knowledge of size and depth (61 of 71). Specificity values in the three subgroups were almost similar: 64.6 (62 of 96), 65.9 (29 of 44), and 62.7% (74 of 118), respectively. Accuracy rises from 63.6% (without knowledge of size/depth) to 71.1 and 74.3% (with size knowledge and with size and depth knowledge, respectively). Accuracy of EIS improved significantly by including sonographical information about depth and size into the analysis. Ultrasound examination should be performed prior to EIS. (orig.)

  6. Effect of interaction between seed size and sowing depth of cashew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of interaction between seed size and sowing depth of cashew Anacardium occidentale (L) on seedlings emergence and height under treatment with organic and inorganic fertilizer in Gidan-Waya, Southern Guinea Savanna, Nigeria.

  7. Subcritical crack growth law and its consequences for lifetime statistics and size effect of quasibrittle structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Jia-Liang; Bazant, Zdenek P; Bazant, Martin Z

    2009-01-01

    For brittle failures, the probability distribution of structural strength and lifetime are known to be Weibullian, in which case the knowledge of the mean and standard deviation suffices to determine the loading or time corresponding to a tolerable failure probability such as 10 -6 . Unfortunately, this is not so for quasibrittle structures, characterized by material inhomogeneities that are not negligible compared with the structure size (as is typical, e.g. for concrete, fibre composites, tough ceramics, rocks and sea ice). For such structures, the distribution of structural strength was shown to vary from almost Gaussian to Weibullian as a function of structure size (and also shape). Here we predict the size dependence of the distribution type for the lifetime of quasibrittle structures. To derive the lifetime statistics from the strength statistics, the subcritical crack growth law is requisite. This empirical law is shown to be justified by fracture mechanics of random crack jumps in the atomic lattice and the condition of equality of the energy dissipation rates calculated on the nano-scale and the macro-scale. The size effect on the lifetime is found to be much stronger than that on the structural strength. The theory is shown to match the experimentally observed systematic deviations of lifetime histograms from the Weibull distribution.

  8. Effects of loading frequency on fatigue crack growth mechanisms in α/β Ti microstructure with large colony size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoz, F.; Ghonem, H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with crack tip/microstructure interactions at 520 deg. C in lamellar Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si (Ti6242) alloy under different fatigue loading frequencies. A series of heat treatments were performed in order to produce large colony microstructures that vary in their lamellar and colony size. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) experiments were conducted on these microstructures at loading frequencies of 10 and 0.05 Hz. The lower frequency was explored with and without imposing a 5 min hold-time at the peak stress level during each loading cycle. Results show that the crack growth behavior is sensitive to the loading frequency. For the same microstructure, the crack growth rate is found to be lower at 10 than at 0.05 Hz. The addition of a hold-time, however, did not alter the FCG rate indicating that creep strain during one loading cycle does not contribute significantly in the crack growth process. It is also shown that variations in lamella and colony size have no effects on the FCG rate except for the early stage of crack propagation. Scanning Electron Microscope examinations are performed on the fracture surface in order to identify the relevant crack growth mechanisms with respect to the loading frequency and the microstructure details. Quasi-cleavage of the α/β colonies along strong planar shear bands is shown to be a major mode of failure under all test condition. At a loading frequency of 10 Hz, the crack path proceeds arbitrary along planes either perpendicular or parallel to the long axis of α lamellae, while at 0.05 Hz, parallel-to-lamellae crack paths become favored. Corresponding differences of crack growth behavior are examined in terms of slip emission at the crack tip and interactions with the microstructure details

  9. Estimation of the failure risk of a maxillary premolar with different crack depths with endodontic treatment by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Li; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Hsieh, Shih-Kai; Chang, Wen-Jen

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the risk of failure for an endodontically treated premolar with different crack depths, which was shearing toward the pulp chamber and was restored by using 3 different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic restoration configurations. Three 3-dimensional finite element models designed with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations were constructed to perform simulations. The Weibull function was incorporated with finite element analysis to calculate the long-term failure probability relative to different load conditions. The results indicated that the stress values on the enamel, dentin, and luting cement for endocrown restorations exhibited the lowest values relative to the other 2 restoration methods. Weibull analysis revealed that the overall failure probabilities in a shallow cracked premolar were 27%, 2%, and 1% for the onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations, respectively, in the normal occlusal condition. The corresponding values were 70%, 10%, and 2% for the depth cracked premolar. This numeric investigation suggests that the endocrown provides sufficient fracture resistance only in a shallow cracked premolar with endodontic treatment. The conventional crown treatment can immobilize the premolar for different cracked depths with lower failure risk. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring How Weathering Related Stresses and Subcritical Crack Growth May Influence the Size of Sediment Produced From Different Rock Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, M. C.; Hallet, B.; Hancock, G. S.; Mackenzie-Helnwein, P.; Keanini, R.

    2016-12-01

    The formation and diminution of rock debris, sediment and soil at and near Earth's surface is driven in large part by in situ, non-transport related, rock cracking. Given the relatively low magnitude stresses that arise in surface and near-surface settings, this production and diminution of granular material is likely strongly influenced and/or driven by subcritical crack growth (Eppes et al., 2016), cracking that occurs under stress loading conditions much lower than a rock's strength as typically measured in the laboratory under rapid loading. Despite a relatively sound understanding of subcritical crack growth through engineering and geophysical studies, its geomorphic and sedimentologic implications have only been minimally explored. Here, based on existing studies, we formulate several hypotheses to predict how weathering-induced stresses combined with the subcritical crack growth properties of rock may influence sediment size distribution. For example, subcritical crack growth velocity (v) can be described by v = CKIn where KI is the mode I (simple opening mode) stress intensity factor, a function of tensile stress at the crack tip and crack length; C is a rock- and environment-dependent constant; and n is material constant, the subcritical crack growth index. Fracture length and spacing in rock is strongly dependent on n, where higher n values result in fewer, more distally spaced cracks (e.g. Olsen, 1993). Thus, coarser sediment might be expected from rocks with higher n values. Weathering-related stresses such as thermal stresses and mineral hydration, however, can disproportionally stress boundaries between minerals with contrasting thermal or chemical properties and orientation, resulting in granular disintegration. Thus, rocks with properties favorable to inducing these stresses might produce sediment whose size is reflective of its constituent grains. We begin to test these hypotheses through a detailed examination of crack and rock characteristics in

  11. Design features to achieve defence-in-depth in small and medium sized reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Broader incorporation of inherent and passive safety design features has become a 'trademark' of many advanced reactor concepts, including several evolutionary designs and nearly all innovative small and medium sized design concepts. Ensuring adequate defence-in-depth is important for reactors of smaller output because many of them are being designed to allow more proximity to the user, specifically, when non-electrical energy products are targeted. Based on the activities recently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the paper provides a summary description of the design features used to achieve defence in depth in the eleven representative concepts of small and medium sized reactors. (author)

  12. Effects of specimen size and crack depth ratio on calibration curves for modified compact tension specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seitl, Stanislav; Viszlay, V.; Cifuentes, H.; Canteli, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2015) ISSN 1804-4824 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Modified compact tension test * fracture * concrete * core drill * stress intensity factor Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  13. On the constitutive criteria for the fault: influence of size and tensile cracks generation during rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, J.D.; Miguel, L.F.F.; Gudiel, L.A.D.

    2005-01-01

    In recent studies the authors consider the possibility of occurrence of tensile crack generation near the free surface during faulting. The main assumption is that the dynamic tensile stress created during the shear rupture process would be dominant over the background stress near the free-surface. The proposed model was able to simulate the mechanism of cracks developed as a flower like-structure surrounding the shear fault in the vicinity of the free surface and explain some aspects of the fracture zones found after the 2000 Tottori earthquake. The applicability of various constitutive laws for the fault employed in numerical analysis of the near source motion, such as the slip-weakening, velocity-weakening or rate- and state-dependent friction laws, were also recently discussed by the authors in connection with results of laboratory experiments on friction. In this paper, the most important conclusions of the studies outlined above are summarized by way of introduction to the numerical modeling of the region adjacent to the fault surface, which includes material nonhomogeneities as well as the possibility of generation of new tensile cracks. In the presence of fracture, both factors exert important influence on the macro constitutive laws for the fault, which relate the static (mean normal and shear stresses) with kinetic (displacements) variables, as well as with their time derivatives. By means of simulation, it is shown that the coefficients in the equation that relate the relevant variables depend on size, that is, they vary with the contact area over which stresses, displacements and velocities are averaged. Any variability in Young's modulus or mass density of the surround rock may however be neglected, the only significant random fields being those that describe friction at the interface and the specific fracture energy. (authors)

  14. Cracking in Flexural Reinforced Concrete Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    The system of cracks developing in reinforced concrete is in many aspects essential when modelling structures in both serviceability- and ultimate limit state. This paper discusses the behavior concerning crack development in flexural members observed from tests and associates it with two different...... existing models. From the investigations an approach is proposed on how to predict the crack pattern in flexural members involving two different crack systems; primary flexural cracks and local secondary cracks. The results of the approach is in overall good agreement with the observed tests and captures...... the pronounced size effect associated with flexural cracking in which the crack spacing and crack widths are approximately proportional to the depth of the member....

  15. A Fatigue Crack Size Evaluation Method Based on Lamb Wave Simulation and Limited Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing He

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic and general method for Lamb wave-based crack size quantification using finite element simulations and Bayesian updating. The method consists of construction of a baseline quantification model using finite element simulation data and Bayesian updating with limited Lamb wave data from target structure. The baseline model correlates two proposed damage sensitive features, namely the normalized amplitude and phase change, with the crack length through a response surface model. The two damage sensitive features are extracted from the first received S0 mode wave package. The model parameters of the baseline model are estimated using finite element simulation data. To account for uncertainties from numerical modeling, geometry, material and manufacturing between the baseline model and the target model, Bayesian method is employed to update the baseline model with a few measurements acquired from the actual target structure. A rigorous validation is made using in-situ fatigue testing and Lamb wave data from coupon specimens and realistic lap-joint components. The effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method is demonstrated under different loading and damage conditions.

  16. Effects of depth and crayfish size on predation risk and foraging profitability of a lotic crayfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, C.A.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted field surveys and experiments to determine whether observed distributions of crayfish among habitats were influenced by differential resource availability, foraging profitability, and predation rates and whether these factors differed with crayfish size and habitat depth. We sampled available food resources (detritus and invertebrates) and shelter as rock substrate in deep (>50 cm) and shallow (<30 cm) habitats. We used an enclosure-exclosure experiment to examine the effects of water depth and crayfish size on crayfish biomass and survival, and to determine whether these factors affected silt accrual, algal abundance (chlorophyll a [chl a]), and detritus and invertebrate biomass (g ash-free dry mass) differently from enclosures without crayfish. We conducted tethering experiments to assess predation on small (13-17 mm carapace length [CL]) and large (23-30 mm CL) Orconectes marchandi and to determine whether predation rates differed with water depth. Invertebrate biomass was significantly greater in shallow water than in deep water, whereas detritus biomass did not differ significantly between depths. Cobble was significantly more abundant in shallow than in deep water. Depth and crayfish size had a significant interactive effect on change in size of enclosed crayfish when CL was used as a measure of size but not when biomass was used as a measure of size. CL of small crayfish increased significantly more in enclosures in shallow than in deep water, but CL of large crayfish changed very little at either depth. Silt, chl a, and detritus biomass were significantly lower on tiles in large- than in small- and no-crayfish enclosures, and invertebrate biomass was significantly lower in large- than in no-crayfish enclosures. Significantly more crayfish were consumed in deep than in shallow water regardless of crayfish size. Our results suggest that predation and resource availability might influence the depth distribution of small and large crayfish. Small

  17. Experimental investigation of grain size effect on fatigue crack growth rate in turbine disc superalloy GH4169 under different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dianyin [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Aero-Engine, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Aero-Engine Structure and Strength, Beijing 100191 (China); Mao, Jianxing [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Song, Jun, E-mail: jun.song2@mcgill.ca [Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 0C5 (Canada); Meng, Fanchao [Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 0C5 (Canada); Shan, Xiaoming [China Aviation Powerplant Research Institute, Zhuzhou 412002 (China); Wang, Rongqiao, E-mail: wangrq@buaa.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Aero-Engine, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Aero-Engine Structure and Strength, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Systematic experiments for fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate on compact tension (CT) specimens have been conducted in nickel-based superalloy GH4169 at a broad range of temperatures with a frequency of 10 Hz and a stress ratio of 0.1. In order to investigate the crack closure behavior, FCG experiments at stress ratio of 0.5 were also performed by comparing with the results at stress ration of 0.1. CT specimens were cut from three typical locations of an actual forged turbine disc to investigate the effect of grain size on the FCG behaviors. The grain size distribution, precipitates and fracture surface characteristics at different locations of the turbine disc were examined through optical microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) analyses. Digital image correlation (DIC), optical interferometry and oxide film measurements were carried out to investigate the presence and inducement of the crack closure. Then a modified FCG model, with a distribution factor that evaluates the scattering in the FCG rate, was formulated to describe the dependence of FCG rate on grain size. Finally, the possible microscopic mechanisms to explain the grain size effect on the FCG behaviors based on crack deflection and blockage, and the crack closure inducements involving plasticity and oxide were discussed in this study.

  18. Results of UT training for defect detection and sizing technique using specimens with fatigue crack and SCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, H.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sugibayashi, T.

    2005-01-01

    At the importance increase of UT (ultrasonic testing) with the application of rules on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants, JAPEIC (Japan power engineering and inspection corporation) started education training for defect detection and sizing technique. Weld joints specimen with EDM (Electro-Discharged Machining) notches, fatigue cracks and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were tested and practiced repeatedly based on a modified ultrasonic method and the defect size measuring accuracy of the trainees was surely improved. Results of the blind test confirmed effectiveness of education training. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Earthquake resistance of cracked concrete embedded with large size rebars (D43 and D57) in nuclear containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Y-C. [Chaoyang Univ. of Tech., Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pei, K-C. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    The bond behavior of varying size re-bar (D19, D32, D43 and D57) embedded in concrete, under cyclic load in a pullout test, were investigated through a series of experiments and monitored in real-time by acoustic emission (AE) herein. Parallel tests of specimens with an existing crack were also conducted to observe the behavior of cracked concrete subject to cyclic load. The detailed acoustics information can be used for analyzing and comparing the effects of concrete with varying size re-bar. The results provide useful in formation in evaluating the safety of NPP RC structure subjected to cyclic load. (author)

  20. How Frequency of Electrosurgical Current and Electrode Size Affect the Depth of Electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Arash; Mansoori, Parisa; Bahrami, Naeim; Alinia, Hossein; Watkins, Casey E; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    Many factors affect the depth of electrocoagulation. To evaluate the effect of current frequency and electrode size on the depth of electrocoagulation. In this in vitro study, 4 cylindrical electrodes (2, 2.3, 3, and 4 mm) were used to apply 3 electrosurgical currents (0.4, 1.5, and 3 MHz) to bovine liver. Each electrode was placed at different points on the surface of the liver, and energy at various levels and frequencies was delivered to the tissue. Subsequently, cross-sections of the liver were analyzed. Coagulation started at the periphery of the electrode-tissue contact area. With higher energy levels, coagulation spreads to involve the remainder of the contact area. Neither the frequency nor the electrode size had any effect on this coagulation pattern. The frequency of the current also did not show any relation with depth of coagulation; however, there was a direct correlation between the size of the electrode and the depth of coagulation. Larger-tip electrodes provided deeper coagulation compared with finer-tip electrodes.

  1. Functional, size and taxonomic diversity of fish along a depth gradient in the deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindel, Beth L; Neat, Francis C; Trueman, Clive N; Webb, Thomas J; Blanchard, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity is well studied in ecology and the concept has been developed to include traits of species, rather than solely taxonomy, to better reflect the functional diversity of a system. The deep sea provides a natural environmental gradient within which to study changes in different diversity metrics, but traits of deep-sea fish are not widely known, hampering the application of functional diversity to this globally important system. We used morphological traits to determine the functional richness and functional divergence of demersal fish assemblages along the continental slope in the Northeast Atlantic, at depths of 300-2,000 m. We compared these metrics to size diversity based on individual body size and species richness. Functional richness and size diversity showed similar patterns, with the highest diversity at intermediate depths; functional divergence showed the opposite pattern, with the highest values at the shallowest and deepest parts of the study site. Species richness increased with depth. The functional implications of these patterns were deduced by examining depth-related changes in morphological traits and the dominance of feeding guilds as illustrated by stable isotope analyses. The patterns in diversity and the variation in certain morphological traits can potentially be explained by changes in the relative dominance of pelagic and benthic feeding guilds. All measures of diversity examined here suggest that the deep areas of the continental slope may be equally or more diverse than assemblages just beyond the continental shelf.

  2. Functional, size and taxonomic diversity of fish along a depth gradient in the deep sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L. Mindel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity is well studied in ecology and the concept has been developed to include traits of species, rather than solely taxonomy, to better reflect the functional diversity of a system. The deep sea provides a natural environmental gradient within which to study changes in different diversity metrics, but traits of deep-sea fish are not widely known, hampering the application of functional diversity to this globally important system. We used morphological traits to determine the functional richness and functional divergence of demersal fish assemblages along the continental slope in the Northeast Atlantic, at depths of 300–2,000 m. We compared these metrics to size diversity based on individual body size and species richness. Functional richness and size diversity showed similar patterns, with the highest diversity at intermediate depths; functional divergence showed the opposite pattern, with the highest values at the shallowest and deepest parts of the study site. Species richness increased with depth. The functional implications of these patterns were deduced by examining depth-related changes in morphological traits and the dominance of feeding guilds as illustrated by stable isotope analyses. The patterns in diversity and the variation in certain morphological traits can potentially be explained by changes in the relative dominance of pelagic and benthic feeding guilds. All measures of diversity examined here suggest that the deep areas of the continental slope may be equally or more diverse than assemblages just beyond the continental shelf.

  3. On multiple crack detection in beam structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Shapour; Kargozarfard, Mohammad [Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    This study presents an inverse procedure to identify multiple cracks in beams using an evolutionary algorithm. By considering the crack detection procedure as an optimization problem, an objective function can be constructed based on the change of the eigenfrequencies and some strain energy parameters. Each crack is modeled by a rotational spring. The changes in natural frequencies due to the presence of the cracks are related to a damage index vector. Then, the bees algorithm, a swarm-based evolutionary optimization technique, is used to optimize the objective function and find the damage index vector, whose positive components show the number and position of the cracks. A second objective function is also optimized to find the crack depths. Several experimental studies on cracked cantilever beams are conducted to ensure the integrity of the proposed method. The results show that the number of cracks as well as their sizes and locations can be predicted well through this method.

  4. Configuring the Mesh Size, Side Taper and Wing Depth of Penaeid Trawls to Reduce Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Matt K.; Sterling, David J.; Millar, Russell B.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of reducing mesh size while concomitantly varying the side taper and wing depth of a generic penaeid-trawl body were investigated to improve engineering performance and minimize bycatch. Five trawl bodies (with the same codends) were tested across various environmental (e.g. depth and current) and biological (e.g. species and sizes) conditions. The first trawl body comprised 41-mm mesh and represented conventional designs (termed the ‘41 long deep-wing'), while the remaining trawl bodies were made from 32-mm mesh and differed only in their side tapers, and therefore length (i.e. 1N3B or ‘long’ and ∼28o to the tow direction vs 1N5B or ‘short’ and ∼35o) and wing depths (‘deep’–97 T vs ‘shallow’–60 T). There were incremental drag reductions (and therefore fuel savings – by up to 18 and 12% per h and ha trawled) associated with reducing twine area via either modification, and subsequently minimizing otter-board area in attempts to standardize spread. Side taper and wing depth had interactive and varied effects on species selectivity, but compared to the conventional 41 long deep-wing trawl, the 32 short shallow-wing trawl (i.e. the least twine area) reduced the total bycatch by 57% (attributed to more fish swimming forward and escaping). In most cases, all small-meshed trawls also caught more smaller school prawns Metapenaeus macleayi but to decrease this effect it should be possible to increase mesh size slightly, while still maintaining the above engineering benefits and species selectivity. The results support precisely optimizing mesh size as a precursor to any other anterior penaeid-trawl modifications designed to improve environmental performance. PMID:24911786

  5. The influence of specimen size on creep crack growth rate in cross-weld CT specimens cut out from a welded component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Peder; Segle, Peter; Samuelson, Lars Aa.

    1999-04-01

    A 3D finite element study of creep crack growth in cross-weld CT specimens with material properties of 2.25Cr1Mo at 550 deg C is carried out, where large strain and displacement theory is used. The creep crack growth rate is calculated using a creep ductility based damage model, in which the creep strain rate perpendicular to the crack plane ahead of the crack tip is integrated, considering the multiaxial stress state. The influence of specimen size on creep crack growth rate under constant load is given special attention, but the possibility to transfer results from cross-weld CT specimens to welded high temperature components is also investigated. The creep crack growth rate of a crack in a circumferentially welded pipe is compared with the creep crack growth rate of cross-weld CT specimens of three different sizes, cut out from the pipe. Although the constraint ahead of the crack tip is higher for a larger CT specimen, the creep crack growth rate is higher for a smaller specimen than for a larger one if they are loaded to attain the same stress intensity factor. If the specimens are loaded to the same C* value, however, a more complicated pattern occurs; depending on the material properties of the weldment constituents, the CT specimen with the intermediate size will either yield the highest or the lowest creep crack growth rate

  6. Depth Discrimination of Constant Angular Size Stimuli in Action Space: Role of Accommodation and Convergence Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeldjallil eNaceri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In our daily life experience, the angular size of an object correlates with its distance from the observer, provided that the physical size of the object remains constant. In this work, we investigated depth perception in action space (i.e., beyond the arm reach, while keeping the angular size of the target object constant. This was achieved by increasing the physical size of the target object as its distance to the observer increased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a similar protocol has been tested in action space, for distances to the observer ranging from 1.4 to 2.4m. We replicated the task in virtual and real environments and we found that the performance was significantly different between the two environments. In the real environment, all participants perceived the depth of the target object precisely. Whereas, in virtual reality the responses were significantly less precise, although, still above chance level in 16 of the 20 observers. The difference in the discriminability of the stimuli was likely due to different contributions of the convergence and the accommodation cues in the two environments. The values of Weber fractions estimated in our study were compared to those reported in previous studies in peripersonal and action space.

  7. Analysis on the stress corrosion crack inception based on pit shape and size of the FV520B tensile specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Longhao; Pan, Juyi; Chen, Songying

    2018-06-01

    The influence of pit shape and size on local stress concentration in the tensile specimen and the stress corrosion cracks inception was studied by employing the element remove technique. The maximum stress located in the bottom of pit on FV520B tensile specimen. The location of maximum strain was near the mouth of the pit or the shoulder and plastic strain existed in this region. Stress concentration factor and plastic deformation on four different geometrical shape pits of hemisphere, semi-ellipsoid, bullet and butterfly were numerically investigated, respectively. The simulation results showed that butterfly pit got the biggest stress concentration factor. The plastic strain rate during pit growth was in the sensitivity range of stress corrosion cracks inception, indicating that stress corrosion cracks were more likely to nucleate near the pit tip or the shoulder.

  8. Determination of Flaw Size and Depth From Temporal Evolution of Thermal Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Cramer, Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of flaws have tended to be based on either the spatial or temporal response. This independent assessment limits the accuracy of characterization. A variational approach is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for a flaw that incorporates both the temporal and spatial response to improve the characterization. The size and depth are determined from both the temporal and spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above a flaw and constraints on the length of the contour surrounding the delamination. Examples of the application of the technique to simulation and experimental data acquired are presented to investigate the limitations of the technique.

  9. Artificial neural network (ANN)-based prediction of depth filter loading capacity for filter sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Harshit; Rathore, Anurag S; Hadpe, Sandeep Ramesh; Alva, Solomon J

    2016-11-01

    This article presents an application of artificial neural network (ANN) modelling towards prediction of depth filter loading capacity for clarification of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) product during commercial manufacturing. The effect of operating parameters on filter loading capacity was evaluated based on the analysis of change in the differential pressure (DP) as a function of time. The proposed ANN model uses inlet stream properties (feed turbidity, feed cell count, feed cell viability), flux, and time to predict the corresponding DP. The ANN contained a single output layer with ten neurons in hidden layer and employed a sigmoidal activation function. This network was trained with 174 training points, 37 validation points, and 37 test points. Further, a pressure cut-off of 1.1 bar was used for sizing the filter area required under each operating condition. The modelling results showed that there was excellent agreement between the predicted and experimental data with a regression coefficient (R 2 ) of 0.98. The developed ANN model was used for performing variable depth filter sizing for different clarification lots. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to estimate the cost savings by using different filter areas for different clarification lots rather than using the same filter area. A 10% saving in cost of goods was obtained for this operation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1436-1443, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Finite size and geometrical non-linear effects during crack pinning by heterogeneities: An analytical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoya, Manish; Unni, Aparna Beena; Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Lazarus, Veronique; Ponson, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Crack pinning by heterogeneities is a central toughening mechanism in the failure of brittle materials. So far, most analytical explorations of the crack front deformation arising from spatial variations of fracture properties have been restricted to weak toughness contrasts using first order approximation and to defects of small dimensions with respect to the sample size. In this work, we investigate the non-linear effects arising from larger toughness contrasts by extending the approximation to the second order, while taking into account the finite sample thickness. Our calculations predict the evolution of a planar crack lying on the mid-plane of a plate as a function of material parameters and loading conditions, especially in the case of a single infinitely elongated obstacle. Peeling experiments are presented which validate the approach and evidence that the second order term broadens its range of validity in terms of toughness contrast values. The work highlights the non-linear response of the crack front to strong defects and the central role played by the thickness of the specimen on the pinning process.

  11. Effect of grain size upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of alloy 718 under hold-time cycling at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, L A

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation tests were conducted in air at 538/sup 0/C on several specimens of Alloy 718 representing several different producers, melt practices and product forms. This variety resulted in a range of grain sizes from ASTM Size 5 to 11.5. Tests at low cyclic frequency employing a tensile hold-time revealed a relationship between crack growth rates and grain size: higher growth rates were associated with fine-grain material and lower rates with larger-grain material. The lowest crack growth rates were associated with a necklace microstructure, whereby large grains are associated with necklaces of very small grains.

  12. Detection and sizing of large-scale cracks in centrifugally cast stainless steel pipes using Lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoc, T.D.K.; Avioli, M.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Application of conventional ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipes in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been limited, mainly due to the anisotropy of the CCSS materials. Phenomena such as beam skewing and distortion are directly attributable to this anisotropy and cause severe difficulties in crack detection and sizing. To improve CCSS inspectability, the feasibility of using Lamb waves as the probing mechanism for detecting and characterizing a surface-breaking crack originating from the pipe interior surface is discussed. A similar research effort has been reported by Rokhlin who investigated the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations in thin sheets. Rokhlin and Adler also reported recently on the use of Lamb waves for evaluating spot welds. The motivation for using this probing mechanism derives from the recognition that the difficulties introduced by beam skewing, beam distortion, and high attenuation are circumvented, since Lamb waves are not bulk waves, but are resonant vibrational modes of a solid plate

  13. What Grasps and Holds 8-Month-Old Infants' Looking Attention? The Effects of Object Size and Depth Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Yu; Corbetta, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The current eye-tracking study explored the relative impact of object size and depth cues on 8-month-old infants' visual attention processes. A series of slides containing 3 objects of either different or same size were displayed on backgrounds with varying depth cues. The distribution of infants' first looks (a measure of initial attention switch) and infants' looking durations (a measure of sustained attention) at the objects were analyzed. Results revealed that the large objects captured i...

  14. Ultrasonic detection and sizing of cracks in cast stainless steel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allidi, F.; Edelmann, X.; Phister, O.; Hoegberg, K.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    The test consisted of 15 samples of cast stainless steel, each with a weld. Some of the specimens were provided with artificially made thermal fatique cracks. The inspection was performed with the P-scan method. The investigations showed an improvement of recognizability relative to earlier investigations. One probe, the dual type, longitudinal wave 45 degrees, low frequence 0.5-1 MHz gives the best results. (G.B.)

  15. Primary water stress corrosion cracks in nickel alloy dissimilar metal welds: Detection and sizing using established and emerging nondestructive examination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braatz, B.G.; Doctor, S.R.; Cumblidge, S.E.; Prokofiev, I.G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (∼400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (∼900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  16. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  17. Effect of microscopic structure on deformation in nano-sized copper and Cu/Si interfacial cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumigawa, Takashi, E-mail: sumigawa@cyber.kues.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Nakano, Takuya; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effect of microscopic structure on the mechanical properties of nano-sized components (nano-components). We developed a bending specimen with a substructure that can be observed by means of a transmission electron microscope (TEM). We examined the plastic behavior of a Cu bi-crystal and the Cu/Si interfacial cracking in a nano-component. TEM images indicated that an initial plastic deformation takes place near the interface edge (the junction between the Cu/Si interface and the surface) in the Cu film with a high critical resolved shear stress (400–420 MPa). The deformation developed preferentially in a single grain. Interfacial cracking took place at the intersection between the grain boundary and the Cu/Si interface, where a high stress concentration existed due to deformation mismatch. These results indicate that the characteristic mechanical behavior of a nano-component is governed by the microscopic stress field, which takes into account the crystallographic structure. - Highlights: ► A nano-component specimen including a bi-crystal copper layer was prepared. ► A loading test with in-situ transmission electron microscopy was conducted. ► The plastic and cracking behaviors were governed by microscopic stress. ► Stress defined under continuum assumption was still present in nano-components.

  18. Size and emotion or depth and emotion? Evidence, using Matryoshka (Russian) dolls, of children using physical depth as a proxy for emotional charge

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, AK; Taylor, N; Baguley, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: The size and emotion effect is the tendency for children to draw people and other objects with a positive emotional charge larger than those with a negative or neutral charge. Here we explored the novel idea that drawing size might be acting as a proxy for depth (proximity).Methods: Forty-two children (aged 3-11 years) chose, from 2 sets of Matryoshka (Russian) dolls, a doll to represent a person with positive, negative or neutral charge, which they placed in front of themselves o...

  19. The penetration depth and lateral distribution of pigment related to the pigment grain size and the calendering of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelow, K.; Kristiansson, P.; Schueler, B.; Tullander, E.; Oestling, S.; Elfman, M.; Malmqvist, K.; Pallon, J.; Shariff, A.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of ink and newspaper has been investigated and the specific question of penetration of ink into the paper has been addressed with a nuclear microprobe using particle induced X-ray emission. The penetration depth of the newsprint is a critical factor in terms of increasing the quality of newsprint and minimising the amount of ink used. The objective of the experiment was to relate the penetration depth of pigment with the calendering of the paper. The dependence of the penetration depth on the pigment grain size was also studied. To study the penetration depth of pigment in paper, cyan ink with Cu as a tracer of the coloured pigment was used. For the study of the penetration depth dependence of pigment size, specially grounded Japanese ink with well-defined pigment grain size was used. This was compared to Swedish ink with pigment grains with normal size-distribution. The results show that the calendering of the paper considerably affects the penetration depth of ink

  20. Tomographic visualization of stress corrosion cracks in tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.; Kruger, R.P.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1979-06-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine the possibility of detecting and sizing cracks in reactor cooling water tubes using tomographic techniques. Due to time and financial constraints, only one tomographic reconstruction using the best technique available was made. The results indicate that tomographic reconstructions can, in fact, detect cracks in the tubing and might possibly be capable of measuring the depth of the cracks. Limits of detectability and sensitivity have not been determined but should be investigated in any future work

  1. No support for Heincke's law in hagfish (Myxinidae): lack of an association between body size and the depth of species occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, E L; Owens, B D; Uyeno, T A; Clark, A J; Reece, J S

    2017-08-01

    This study tests for interspecific evidence of Heincke's law among hagfishes and advances the field of research on body size and depth of occurrence in fishes by including a phylogenetic correction and by examining depth in four ways: maximum depth, minimum depth, mean depth of recorded specimens and the average of maximum and minimum depths of occurrence. Results yield no evidence for Heincke's law in hagfishes, no phylogenetic signal for the depth at which species occur, but moderate to weak phylogenetic signal for body size, suggesting that phylogeny may play a role in determining body size in this group. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Anomaly depth detection in trans-admittance mammography: a formula independent of anomaly size or admittivity contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Lee, Eunjung; Seo, Jin Keun

    2014-01-01

    Trans-admittance mammography (TAM) is a bioimpedance technique for breast cancer detection. It is based on the comparison of tissue conductivity: cancerous tissue is identified by its higher conductivity in comparison with the surrounding normal tissue. In TAM, the breast is compressed between two electrical plates (in a similar architecture to x-ray mammography). The bottom plate has many sensing point electrodes that provide two-dimensional images (trans-admittance maps) that are induced by voltage differences between the two plates. Multi-frequency admittance data (Neumann data) are measured over the range 50 Hz–500 kHz. TAM aims to determine the location and size of any anomaly from the multi-frequency admittance data. Various anomaly detection algorithms can be used to process TAM data to determine the transverse positions of anomalies. However, existing methods cannot reliably determine the depth or size of an anomaly. Breast cancer detection using TAM would be improved if the depth or size of an anomaly could also be estimated, properties that are independent of the admittivity contrast. A formula is proposed here that can estimate the depth of an anomaly independent of its size and the admittivity contrast. This depth estimation can also be used to derive an estimation of the size of the anomaly. The proposed estimations are verified rigorously under a simplified model. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed method also works well in general settings. (paper)

  3. Evaluation of nondestructive evaluation size measurement for integrity assessment of axial outside diameter stress corrosion cracking in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Kyung Mun; Hong, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the initiation of outside diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) at the tube support plate region of domestic steam generators (SG) with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes has been increasing. As a result, SGs with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes must be replaced early or are scheduled to be replaced prior to their designed lifetime. ODSCC is one of the biggest threats to the integrity of SG tubes. Therefore, the accurate evaluation of tube integrity to determine ODSCC is needed. Eddy current testing (ECT) is conducted periodically, and its results could be input as parameters for evaluating the integrity of SG tubes. The reliability of an ECT inspection system depends on the performance of the inspection technique and ability of the analyst. The detection probability and ECT sizing error of degradation are considered to be the performance indices of a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. This paper introduces an optimized evaluation method for ECT, as well as the sizing error, including the analyst performance. This study was based on the results of a round robin program in which 10 inspection analysts from 5 different companies participated. The analysis of ECT sizing results was performed using a linear regression model relating the true defect size data to the measured ECT size data.

  4. Evaluation of nondestructive evaluation size measurement for integrity assessment of axial outside diameter stress corrosion cracking in steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Kyung Mun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Ltd., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jun Hee [Dept. of mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Recently, the initiation of outside diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) at the tube support plate region of domestic steam generators (SG) with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes has been increasing. As a result, SGs with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes must be replaced early or are scheduled to be replaced prior to their designed lifetime. ODSCC is one of the biggest threats to the integrity of SG tubes. Therefore, the accurate evaluation of tube integrity to determine ODSCC is needed. Eddy current testing (ECT) is conducted periodically, and its results could be input as parameters for evaluating the integrity of SG tubes. The reliability of an ECT inspection system depends on the performance of the inspection technique and ability of the analyst. The detection probability and ECT sizing error of degradation are considered to be the performance indices of a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. This paper introduces an optimized evaluation method for ECT, as well as the sizing error, including the analyst performance. This study was based on the results of a round robin program in which 10 inspection analysts from 5 different companies participated. The analysis of ECT sizing results was performed using a linear regression model relating the true defect size data to the measured ECT size data.

  5. Ultrasonic signal processing for sizing under-clad flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, R.; Paradiso, T.J.; Lane, S.S.; Quinn, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonic digital data were collected from underclad cracks in sample pressure vessel specimen blocks. These blocks were weld cladded under different processes to simulate actual conditions in US Pressure Water Reactors. Each crack was represented by a flaw-echo dynamic curve which is a plot of the transducer motion on the surface as a function of the ultrasonic response into the material. Crack depth sizing was performed by identifying in the dynamic curve the crack tip diffraction signals from the upper and lower tips. This paper describes the experimental procedure, digital signal processing methods used and algorithms developed for crack depth sizing

  6. Trophic diversity, size and biomass spectrum of Bay of Bengal nematodes: A study case on depth and latitudinal patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Kapuli Gani Mohamed Thameemul; Lyla, Somasundharanair; Khan, Syed Ajmal; Bhadury, Punyasloke

    2017-09-01

    Depth and latitudinal patterns of nematode functional attributes were investigated from 35 stations of Bay of Bengal (BoB) continental shelf. We aim to address whether depth and latitudinal variations can modify nematode community structure and their functional attributes (trophic diversity, size and biomass spectra). Global trend of depth and latitudinal related variations have also been noticed from BoB shelf in terms of nematode abundance and species richness, albeit heterogeneity patterns were encountered in functional attributes. Index of trophic diversity values revealed higher trophic diversity across the BoB shelf and suggested variety of food resource availability. However, downstream analysis of trophic status showed depth and latitude specific patterns but not reflected in terms of size and biomass spectrum. The peaks at different positions clearly visualized heterogeneity in distribution patterns for both size and biomass spectrum and also there was evidence of availability of diversified food resources. Nematode biomass spectra (NBS) constructed for nematode communities showed shift in peak biomass values towards lower to moderate size classes particularly in shallower depth but did not get reflected in latitudes. However, Chennai and Parangipettai transects demonstrated shift in peak biomass values towards higher biomass classes explaining the representation of higher nematode abundance. Our findings concluded that depth and latitudes are physical variables; they may not directly affect nematode community structure and functional attributes but they might influence the other factors such as food availability, sediment deposition and settlement rate. Our observations suggest that the local factors (seasonal character) of phytodetrital food flux can be very important for shaping the nematode community structure and success of nematode functional heterogeneity patterns across the Bay of Bengal shelf.

  7. A case study of the crack sizing performance of the Ultrasonic Phased Array combined crack and wall loss inspection tool on the Centennial pipeline, the defect evaluation, including the defect evaluation, field feature verification and tool performance validation (performed by Marathon Oil, DNV and GE Oil and Gas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrncir, T.; Turner, S. [Marathon Pipe Line LLC, Findley, OH (United States); Polasik, SJ [DNV Columbus, Inc, Dublin, OH 43017 (United States); Vieth, P. [BP EandP, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, D.; Lachtchouk, I.; Senf, P.; Foreman, G. [GE Oil and Gas PII Pipeline Solutions, Stutensee (Germany)], email: geoff.foreman@ge.com

    2010-07-01

    The Centennial Pipeline System is operated by Marathon Pipe Line LLC. It is 754 miles long and carries liquid products from eastern Texas to southern Illinois. Most of it was constructed in 1951 for natural gas, but it was converted in 2001 for liquid product service. GE Oil and Gas conducted an ultrasonic phased array in-line inspection (ILI) survey of this pipeline, whose primary purpose was to detect and characterize stress corrosion cracking. A dig verification was performed in 2008 to increase the level of confidence in the detection and depth-sizing capabilities of this inspection method. This paper outlines of the USCD technology and experience and describes how the ILI survey results were validated, how the ILI data analysis was improved, and the impact on managing the integrity of the line section. Results indicate that the phased array technology approached a 90% certainty predicted depth with a tolerance of 1 mm at a 95% confidence level.

  8. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  9. Aerosol spectral optical depths and size characteristics at a coastal industriallocation in India - effect of synoptic and mesoscale weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol spectral optical depths at ten discrete channels in the visible and near IR bands, obtained from a ground-based passive multi-wavelength solar radiometer at a coastal industrial location, Visakhapatnam, on the east coast of India, are used to study the response of the aerosol optical properties and size distributions to the changes in atmospheric humidity, wind speed and direction. It is observed that during high humidity conditions, the spectral optical depths show about 30% higher growth factors, and the size distributions show the generation of a typical new mode around 0.4 microns. The surface wind speed and direction also indicate the formation of new particles when the humid marine air mass interacts with the industrial air mass. This is interpreted in terms of new particle formation and subsequent particle growth by condensation and self-coagulation. The results obtained on the surface-size segregated aerosol mass distribution from a co-located Quartz Crystal Microbalance during different humidity conditions also show a large mass increase in the sub-micron size range with an increase in atmospheric humidity, indicating new particle formation at the sub-micron size range.

  10. Effect of source depth correction on the estimation of earthquake size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; Panza, G.

    1995-03-01

    The relationship between surface wave magnitude, M s , and seismic moment, M o , of earthquakes is essential for the estimation of seismic risk in any region. In the hypothesis of constant stress drop, theoretical models predict that Log M o and M s are related by a linear law. The slope most commonly found in the literature is around 1.5. Here we show that the application to the Ms values of the necessary correction for the focal depth, gives a general increment of the correlation coefficient, and that a slope around 1.0 is consistent with the global data, while for regionalized data it can vary from about 1.0 to 2.0. (author). 14 refs, 3 tabs

  11. Effect of source depth correction on the estimation of earthquake size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanelli, F [Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Trieste (Italy). Istituto di Geodesia e Geofisica; Panza, G

    1995-03-01

    The relationship between surface wave magnitude, M{sub s}, and seismic moment, M{sub o}, of earthquakes is essential for the estimation of seismic risk in any region. In the hypothesis of constant stress drop, theoretical models predict that Log M{sub o} and M{sub s} are related by a linear law. The slope most commonly found in the literature is around 1.5. Here we show that the application to the Ms values of the necessary correction for the focal depth, gives a general increment of the correlation coefficient, and that a slope around 1.0 is consistent with the global data, while for regionalized data it can vary from about 1.0 to 2.0. (author). 14 refs, 3 tabs.

  12. The Silhouette Zoetrope: A New Blend of Motion, Mirroring, Depth, and Size Illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Christine; Pham, Quang-Cuong; Maus, Gerrit W

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a novel combination of visual illusions in one stimulus device, a contemporary innovation of the traditional zoetrope, called Silhouette Zoetrope. In this new device, an animation of moving silhouettes is created by sequential cutouts placed outside a rotating empty cylinder, with slits illuminating the cutouts successively from the back. This "inside-out" zoetrope incurs the following visual effects: the resulting animated figures are perceived (a) horizontally flipped, (b) inside the cylinder, and (c) appear to be of different size than the actual cutout object. Here, we explore the unique combination of illusions in this new device. We demonstrate how the geometry of the device leads to a retinal image consistent with a mirrored and distorted image and binocular disparities consistent with the perception of an object inside the cylinder.

  13. Determination of the columnar aerosol size distribution by inversion of spectral aerosol optical depth measurements at different areas in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Metwally, M.; Madkour, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosols have a great effects on nuclear safety calculations and atmospheric environment. The aerosol optical depth measurements are carried out at four areas in Egypt: Cairo and Helwan as urban/industrial areas, Aswan as an arid area and Mansoura as an agricultural area covering the period from Jun 1992 to May 1993. These measurements were recorded by ground-based pyrheliometers with large band-pass filters. Monthly average values of aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed a pronounced temporal trend, with a maximum AOD during summer and the transition seasons (spring and autumn) at all sites. Levels of AODs are higher at both urban and industrial areas than at other areas. Variation of Angstrom exponent a with the AOD was clear at most sites and the a value depends on the spectral range used in its determination. The mean contribution of anthropogenic sources to AOD over Cairo was at the range of 25.1-54.3%, whereas those values in Helwan were at the range of 34.5-59.8%. Finally, columnar aerosol size distributions have been inferred by inverting particularly AOD measurements as a function of wavelength. The Junge (type I) and bimodal (type III) distributions are dominant at urban and arid areas (Cairo and Aswan), whereas mono dispersion distribution (type II) are dominant in industrial and agricultural areas (Helwan and Mansoura). In Cairo and Aswan, the peak of columnar size distribution for the fine mode at radius r is around 0.1 and 0.2 μm respectively, while it is around 1.0 and 2.0 μm for the coarse mode. .Also, the peak of size distribution for the mono dispersion mode was marked at radius around 0.2 μm at both Helwan and Mansoura. A comprehensive comparison of our results with literature size distributions is very sparse, nevertheless, our size distributions in general agree with them

  14. Effect of a new specimen size on fatigue crack growth behavior in thick-walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariati, Mahmoud; Mohammadi, Ehsan; Masoudi Nejad, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in thick-walled pressure vessels is an important factor affecting their fracture. Predicting the path of fatigue crack growth in a pressure vessel is the main issue discussed in fracture mechanics. The objective of this paper is to design a new geometrical specimen in fatigue to define the behavior of semi-elliptical crack growth in thick-walled pressure vessels. In the present work, the importance of the behavior of fatigue crack in test specimen and real conditions in thick-walled pressure vessels is investigated. The results of fatigue loading on the new specimen are compared with the results of fatigue loading in a cylindrical pressure vessel and a standard specimen. Numerical and experimental methods are used to investigate the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the new specimen. For this purpose, a three-dimensional boundary element method is used for fatigue crack growth under stress field. The modified Paris model is used to estimate fatigue crack growth rates. In order to verify the numerical results, fatigue test is carried out on a couple of specimens with a new geometry made of ck45. A comparison between experimental and numerical results has shown good agreement. - Highlights: • This paper provides a new specimen to define the behavior of fatigue crack growth. • We estimate the behavior of fatigue crack growth in specimen and pressure vessel. • A 3D finite element model has been applied to estimate the fatigue life. • We compare the results of fatigue loading for cylindrical vessel and specimens. • Comparison between experimental and numerical results has shown a good agreement.

  15. An experimental study of crack development in flexural reinforced concrete members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Hagsten, Lars German; Würst Sørensen, Bjarke

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental program of eight reinforced concrete beams carried out in order to investigate the development of cracks related to flexure. To be able to investigate possible size effects with respect to cracking, beams of two different depths were tested...

  16. Studies on the behavior of part-through circumferential crack at intrados in elbows under in-plane bending moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Prabhakaran, K.M.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Behavior of cracked elbows with part-through crack at intrados under bending moment is studied. → Some part of crack always opens and some part gets closed irrespective of mode of applied moment. → Fraction of the crack that opens basically decides the weakening effect of the cracked elbow. → Results will be useful for fracture studies and limit load estimation especially for LBB. - Abstract: This paper presents the behavior of part-through circumferential crack at intrados in elbows under in-plane bending moment. This is based on detailed non-linear (both material and geometric) finite element analysis performed on various sizes of elbows (generally used in piping industry), having different crack sizes. It is observed that some part of the crack always opens and some part gets closed irrespective of the mode of applied bending moment (opening/closing). The fraction of the crack that opens basically decides the weakening effect of the cracked elbow. It is observed that there is a threshold value of crack length and crack depth, before which no crack opening is observed under opening mode. Also as elbow becomes thinner, the threshold value of above two parameters increases. Quite interestingly, the part of crack which closes in opening mode opens under closing mode. The above mentioned study on the behavior of crack will be useful for fracture studies and limit load estimation especially when leak before break concept is to be employed.

  17. Detection of cracks with low vertical offset in clayey formations from galleries by using seismic methods. Tournemire experimental station. First part: problem analysis and measurement sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretaudeau, Francois; Gelis, Celine; Cabrera, Justo; Leparoux, Donatienne; Cote, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Within the frame of the expertise of the ANDRA file on the project of storage of radioactive wastes in clayey formations, the detection of natural cracks which could locally alter the argillite containment properties is a crucial issue. As some previous studies showed that some cracks exhibiting a low vertical offset could not be detected in clayey formations from the surface, this document reports a study which aimed at assessing the possibility of detection of such a crack by means of seismic methods directly implemented from underground works. It reports a detailed analysis of the seismic imagery problem, the characterization of different areas of the investigated environment, the assessment and validation of various hypotheses by using experimental data obtained in an experimental station and numerical simulations. The potential of each envisaged method (migration, tomography, wave form inversion) is assessed, notably with respect to synthetic seismic data obtained by numerical modelling. Preliminary results are used to size a complete seismic measurement campaign aimed at the characterization of the crack area, and at the assessment of detection limitations of the different methods

  18. Effect of size of alpha phases on cyclic deformation and fatigue crack initiation during fatigue of an alpha-beta titanium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qiaoyan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha phase exhibits equiaxed or lamellar morphologies with size from submicron to microns in an alpha-beta titanium alloy. Cyclic deformation, slip characteristics and crack nucleation during fatigue in different microstructures of TC21 alloy (Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-3Mo-1Cr-2Nb-0.1Si were systematically investigated and analyzed. During low-cycle fatigue, equiaxed microstructure (EM in TC21 alloy exhibits higher strength, ductility and longer low-cycle fatigue life than those of the lamellar microstructure (LM. There are more voids in the single lamellar alpha than the equiaxed alpha grains. As a result, voids more easily link up to form crack in the lamellar alpha phase than the equiaxed alpha phase. However, during high-cycle fatigue, the fine lamellar microstructure (FLM shows higher fatigue limit than bimodal microstructure (BM. The localized plastic deformation can be induced during high-cycle fatigue. The slip bands or twins are observed in the equiaxed and lamellar alpha phases(>1micron, which tends to form strain concentration and initiate fatigue crack. The localized slip within nanoscale alpha plates is seldom observed and extrusion/intrusion dispersedly distributed on the sample surface in FLM. This indicates that FLM show super resistance to fatigue crack which bring about higher fatigue limit than BM.

  19. A Small Crack Length Evaluation Technique by Electronic Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sang; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The results of crack evaluation by conventional UT(Ultrasonic Test)is highly depend on the inspector's experience or knowledge of ultrasound. Phased array UT system and its application methods for small crack length evaluation will be a good alternative method which overcome present UT weakness. This study was aimed at checking the accuracy of crack length evaluation method by electronic scanning and discuss about characteristics of electronic scanning for crack length evaluation. Especially ultrasonic phased array with electronic scan technique was used in carrying out both sizing and detect ability of crack as its length changes. The response of ultrasonic phased array was analyzed to obtain the special method of determining crack length without moving the transducer and detectability of crack minimal length and depth from the material. A method of crack length determining by electronic scanning for the small crack is very real method which has it's accuracy and verify the effectiveness of method compared to a conventional crack length determination

  20. Distribution of Mast Cells and Locations, Depths, and Sizes of the Putative Acupoints CV 8 and KI 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Jiyoon Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical locations and sizes of acupuncture points (APs are identified in traditional Chinese medicine by using the cun measurement method. More precise knowledge of those locations and sizes to submillimeter precision, along with their cytological characterizations, would provide significant contributions both to scientific investigations and to precise control of the practice of acupuncture. Over recent decades, researchers have come to realize that APs in the skin of rats and humans have more mast cells (MCs than neighboring nonacupoints. In this work, the distribution of MCs in the ventral skin of mice was studied so that it could be used to infer the locations, depths from the epidermis, and sizes of three putative APs. The umbilicus was taken as the reference point, and a transversal cross section through it was studied. The harvested skins from 8-week-old mice were stained with toluidine blue, and the MCs were recognized by their red-purple stains and their metachromatic granules. The three putative APs, CV 8 and the left and the right KI 16 APs, were identified based on their high densities of MCs. These findings also imply that acupuncture may stimulate, through MCs, an immune response to allergic inflammation.

  1. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T.

    1998-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  2. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  3. Effects of prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on doses in high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shidong; Aref, Ibrahim; Walker, Eleanor; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of the prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (HDR-VBT) of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were prescribed and optimized based on points at the cylinder surface or at 0.5-cm depth. Cylinder sizes ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, and treatment lengths ranging from 3 to 8 cm were used. Dose points in various depths were precisely defined along the cylinder dome. The given dose and dose uniformity to a depth of interest were measured by the mean dose (MD) and standard deviation (SD), respectively, among the dose points belonging to the depth. Dose fall-off beyond the 0.5 cm treatment depth was determined by the ratio of MD at 0.75-cm depth to MD at 0.5-cm depth. Results: Dose distribution varies significantly with different prescriptions. The surface prescription provides more uniform doses at all depths in the target volume, whereas the 0.5-cm depth prescription creates larger dose variations at the cylinder surface. Dosimetric uncertainty increases significantly (>30%) with shorter tip space. Extreme hot (>150%) and cold spots (<60%) occur if no optimization points were placed at the curved end. Conclusions: Instead of prescribing to a depth of 0.5 cm, increasing the dose per fraction and prescribing to the surface with the exact surface points around the cylinder dome appears to be the optimal approach

  4. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Optical Depth and Aerosol Particle Size Distribution Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle size from the Visible Infrared Imaging...

  5. Size determinations, by ultrasonic techniques, of cracks in hydride blisters formed in Zr-2.5 % Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trujillo Badillo, Giovanna; Desimone, Carlos; Domizzi, Gladys

    1999-01-01

    Non destructive techniques (NDT) are very useful in the detection of flaws produced in structural components in service. During the service of CANDU nuclear power reactors, it is possible that pressure tubes (PT) may contact calandria tubes (CT). After the PT/CT contact, zirconium hydride blisters may form at the point of contact depending on the concentration of hydrogen/deuterium. Zirconium hydride is brittle and is therefore prone to cracking under stress. Ultrasonic NDT is routinely use during PT in service inspection. In order to be able of detecting cracked blisters, it is of great importance the development of standards to calibrate the employed equipment. On this purpose, hydride blisters were grown, in laboratory, on sections of pressure tube. The cracks in the blisters were detected and measured by ultrasonic techniques. The obtained results were compared with measurements carried out in optic microscope, on successive sections of the samples. The crack tip diffraction technique was found to be the more effective for the mentioned ends. (author)

  6. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wire, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) can cause increases in fatigue crack growth rates of 40 to 100 times the rate in air for low alloy steels. The increased rates can lead to very large predicted crack growth. EAC is activated by a critical level of dissolved sulfides at the crack tip. Sulfide inclusions (MnS) in the steel produce corrosive sulfides in solution following exposure by a growing crack. In stagnant, low oxygen water conditions considered here, diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism acting to change the sulfide concentration within the crack. The average crack tip velocity is below the level required to produce the critical crack tip sulfide ion concentration required for EAC. Crack extension analyses also consider the breakthrough of large, hypothetical embedded defects with the attendant large freshly exposed sulfide inventory. Combrade et al. noted that a large inventory of undissolved metallurgical sulfides on crack flanks could trigger EAC, but did not quantify the effects. Diffusion analysis is extended herein to cover breakthrough of embedded defects with large sulfide inventories. The mass transport via diffusion is limited by the sulfide solubility. As a result, deep cracks in high sulfur steels are predicted to retain undissolved sulfides for extended but finite periods of time t diss which increase with the crack length and the metallurgical sulfide content in the steel. The analysis shows that the duration of EAC is limited to t diss providing V eac , the crack tip velocity associated with EAC is less than V In , the crack tip velocity below which EAC will not occur in an initially sulfide free crack. This condition on V eac need only be met for a short time following crack cleanup to turn off EAC. The predicted crack extension due to limited duration of EAC is a small fraction of the initial embedded defect size and would not greatly change calculated crack depths

  7. Effect of the surface film electric resistance on eddy current detectability of surface cracks in Alloy 600 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Paine, J.P.N.

    1995-01-01

    The most widely used technique for NDE of steam generator tubing is eddy current. This technique can reliably detect cracks grown in sodium hydroxide environment only at depths greater than 50% through wall. However, cracking caused by thiosulphate solutions have been detected and sized at shallower depths. The disparity has been proposed to be caused by the different electric resistance of the crack wall surface films and corrosion products in the cracks formed in different environments. This work was undertaken to clarify the role of surface film electric resistance on the disparity found in eddy current detectability of surface cracks in alloy 600 tubes. The proposed model explaining the above mentioned disparity is the following. The detectability of tightly closed cracks by the eddy current technique depends on the electric resistance of the surface films of the crack walls. The nature and resistance of the films which form on the crack walls during operation depends on the composition of the solution inside the crack and close to the crack location. During cooling down of the steam generator, because of contraction and loss of internal pressurization, the cracks are rather tightly closed so that exchange of electrolyte and thus changes in the film properties become difficult. As a result, the surface condition prevailing at high temperature is preserved. If the environment is such that the films formed on the crack walls under operating conditions have low electric resistance, eddy current technique will fail to indicate these cracks or will underestimate the size of these cracks. However, if the electric resistance of the films is high, a tightly closed crack will resemble an open crack and will be easily indicated and correctly sized by eddy current technique

  8. Deterministic and probabilistic crack growth analysis for the JRC Ispra 1/5 scale pressure vessel n0 R2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner-Foit, A.; Munz, D.

    1989-10-01

    A deterministic and a probabilistic crack growth analysis is presented for the major defects found in the welds during ultrasonic pre-service inspection. The deterministic analysis includes first a determination of the number of load cycles until crack initiation, then a cycle-by-cycle calculation of the growth of the embedded elliptical cracks, followed by an evaluation of the growth of the semi-elliptical surface crack formed after the crack considered has broken through the wall and, finally, a determination of the critical crack size and shape. In the probabilistic analysis, a Monte-Carlo simulation is performed with a sample of cracks where the statistical distributions of the crack dimensions describe the uncertainty in sizing of the ultrasonic inspection. The distributions of crack depth, crack length and location are evaluated as a function of the number of load cycles. In the simulation, the fracture mechanics model of the deterministic analysis is employed for each random crack. The results of the deterministic and probabilistic crack growth analysis are compared with the results of the second in-service inspection where stable extension of some of the cracks had been observed. It is found that the prediction and the experiment agree only with a probability of the order of 5% or less

  9. Influence of crystallite size and shape of zeolite ZSM-22 on its activity and selectivity in the catalytic cracking of n-octane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bager, F.; Ernst, S. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry, Chemical Technology

    2013-11-01

    Light olefins belong to the major building blocks for the petrochemical industry, particularly for the production of polymers. It has become necessary to increase the production of light olefins specifically in the case for propene with so called 'on-purpose propene' technologies. One possible route is to increase the amount of propene that can be obtained from Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) by optimizing the catalyst through introducing new additives, which offer a high selectivity to propene. Zeolite ZSM-22 samples with different crystallite sizes and morphologies have been synthesized via hydrothermal syntheses and characterized by powder X-Ray diffraction, nitrogen physisorption, atomic absorption spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The zeolites in the Broensted-acid form have been tested as catalysts in the catalytic cracking of n-octane as a model hydrocarbon. Clear influences of the crystallite size on the deactivation behavior have been observed. Larger crystals of zeolite ZSM-22 produce an increased amount of coke deposits resulting in a faster deactivation of the catalyst. The experimental results suggest that there is probably some influence of pore diffusion on the catalytic activity of the ZSM-22 sample with the large crystallite size. However a noticeable influence on the general product distribution could not be observed. (orig.)

  10. Microwave based method of monitoring crack formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, Sergej; Aman, Alexander; Majcherek, Soeren; Hirsch, Soeren; Schmidt, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    The formation of cracks in glass particles was monitored by application of linearly polarized microwaves. The breakage behavior of glass spheres coated with a thin gold layer of about 50 nm, i.e. a thickness that is lower than the microwave penetration depth, was tested. In this way the investigation of fracture behavior of electronic circuits was simulated. A shielding current was induced in the gold layer by the application of microwaves. During the crack formation the distribution of this current changed abruptly and a scattered microwave signal appeared at the frequency of the incident microwaves. The time behavior of the scattered signal reflects the microscopic processes occurring during the fracture of the specimen. The duration of the increasing signal corresponds to the crack formation time in the tested specimen. This time was estimated as particle size divided by crack development speed in glass. An intense emission of electrons occurs during the formation of cracks. Due to this, coherent Thomson scattering of microwaves by emitted electrons becomes significant with a delay of a few microseconds after the initial phase of crack formation. In this time the intensity of the microwave signal increases. (paper)

  11. Benefits and drawbacks of TOFD and SAFT for crack depth measurement at thick-walled vessels; Vor- und Nachteile von TOFD und SAFT zur Risstiefenmessung an dickwandigen Behaeltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, V.; Mueller, W. [IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany); Hecht, A. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    1999-08-01

    The results presented in the paper show that TOFD can be applied in many cases as a low-cost and reliable testing method, but is less suitable for some cases. These are: Description of cracks in welded joints which yield a multitude of data, as e.g. microstructural data, so that the method is less suitable for austenitic weld testing; detection of small cracks. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Aus den gezeigten Beispielen ergibt sich, dass TOFD in einer Vielzahl von Anwendungsfaellen als preisguenstiges und zuverlaessiges Pruefverfahren eingesetzt werden kann, dass es aber fuer einige Anwendungsfaelle weniger geeignet ist: Diese Anwendungsfaelle sind: (1) Nachweis von Rissen in Schweissnaehten mit vielen Anzeigen, z.B. Gefuegeanzeigen, d.h. insbesondere bei austenitischen Schweissnaehten, und (2) Nachweis von kleinen Rissen. Der Nachweis auch von kleinen Rissen wird dahingegen beim Impuls-Echo Verfahren aufgrund des vorliegenden Winkelspiegeleffektes durchaus moeglich sein. Durch eine nachgeschaltete SAFT-Auswertung werden zum einen stoerendes Gefuegerauschen unterdrueckt und zum anderen Echos von Fehlstellen angehoben. Diese Verbesserung des Signal-Rausch-Abstandes fuehrt zu einer Verbesserung der Fehlererkennbarkeit und der Fehlerbewertung. (orig.)

  12. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  13. Finite-Element Analysis of Crack Arrest Properties of Fiber Reinforced Composites Application in Semi-Elliptical Cracked Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyuan; Song, Shulei; Deng, Hongbo; Zhong, Kai

    2018-04-01

    In nowadays, repair method using fiber reinforced composites as the mainstream pipe repair technology, it can provide security for X100 high-grade steel energy long-distance pipelines in engineering. In this paper, analysis of cracked X100 high-grade steel pipe was conducted, simulation analysis was made on structure of pipes and crack arresters (CAs) to obtain the J-integral value in virtue of ANSYS Workbench finite element software and evaluation on crack arrest effects was done through measured elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter J-integral and the crack arrest coefficient K, in a bid to summarize effect laws of composite CAs and size of pipes and cracks for repairing CAs. The results indicate that the K value is correlated with laying angle λ, laying length L2/D1, laying thickness T1/T2of CAs, crack depth c/T1 and crack length a/c, and calculate recommended parameters for repairing fiber reinforced composite CAs in terms of two different crack forms.

  14. Analysis of short and long crack behavior and single overload effect by crack opening stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sam Hong; Lee, Kyeong Ro

    1999-01-01

    The study analyzed the behaviors of short and long crack as well as the effect of single tensile overload on the crack behaviors by using fatigue crack opening behavior. Crack opening stress is measured by an elastic compliance method which may precisely and continuously provide many data using strain gages during experiment. The unusual growth behaviors of short crack and crack after the single tensile overload applied, was explained by the variations of crack opening stress. In addition, fatigue crack growth rate was expressed as a linear form for short crack as for long crack by using effective stress intensity factor range as fracture mechanical parameter, which is based on crack closure concept. And investigation is performed with respect to the relation between plastic zone size formed at the crack tip and crack retardation, crack length and the number of cycles promoted or retarded, and the overload effect on the fatigue life

  15. Buckling Analysis of Edge Cracked Sandwich Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Mohammed Hussein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents mainly the buckling load of sandwich plates with or without crack for different cases. The buckling loads are analyzed experimentally and numerically by using ANSYS 15. The experimental investigation was to fabricate the cracked sandwich plate from stainless steel and PVC to find mechanical properties of stainless steel and PVC such as young modulus. The buckling load for different aspect ratio, crack length, cracked location and plate without crack found. The experimental results were compared with that found from ANSYS program. Present of crack is decreased the buckling load and that depends on crack size, crack location and aspect ratio.

  16. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, Steen; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of concrete beams is presented. The load-displacement curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modeled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the midsection of the beam. Outside the elastic layer the deformations...... are modeled by beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bilinearly on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. Results from the analytical model are compared with results from a more detailed model based on numerical methods...... for different beam sizes. The analytical model is shown to be in agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. It is shown that the point on the load-displacement curve where the fictitious crack starts to develop and the point where the real crack...

  17. A characteristics of the small crack evaluation technique by triangle method with phased array UT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sang

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is a kind of nondestructive test to detect a crack or discontinuity in material or material surface by sending ultrasound to it. This conventional ultrasonic test has some difficulties to detect crack or inspect material specially in the case of complex-shaped power plant components such as Turbine blade root. Phased array UT system and its application methods for complex shaped power plant components will be a good alternative method which overcome present UT weakness. This study was aimed at developing a new method for finding the crack on material or material structures, and especially for determining the crack length without moving transducer. Especially ultrasonic phased array with electronic scan technique was used in carrying out both sizing and detect ability of crack as its depth and length changes. The response of ultrasonic phased array was analyzed to obtain the special method of determining crack length without moving the transducer and detect-ability of crack minimal length and depth from the material. The result showed a newly developed method for crack length determining is very real method which has its accuracy and verify the effectiveness of method compared to a conventional crack length determining method

  18. Surface and subsurface cracks characteristics of single crystal SiC wafer in surface machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiusheng, Y., E-mail: qsyan@gdut.edu.cn; Senkai, C., E-mail: senkite@sina.com; Jisheng, P., E-mail: panjisheng@gdut.edu.cn [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Different machining processes were used in the single crystal SiC wafer machining. SEM was used to observe the surface morphology and a cross-sectional cleavages microscopy method was used for subsurface cracks detection. Surface and subsurface cracks characteristics of single crystal SiC wafer in abrasive machining were analysed. The results show that the surface and subsurface cracks system of single crystal SiC wafer in abrasive machining including radial crack, lateral crack and the median crack. In lapping process, material removal is dominated by brittle removal. Lots of chipping pits were found on the lapping surface. With the particle size becomes smaller, the surface roughness and subsurface crack depth decreases. When the particle size was changed to 1.5µm, the surface roughness Ra was reduced to 24.0nm and the maximum subsurface crack was 1.2µm. The efficiency of grinding is higher than lapping. Plastic removal can be achieved by changing the process parameters. Material removal was mostly in brittle fracture when grinding with 325# diamond wheel. Plow scratches and chipping pits were found on the ground surface. The surface roughness Ra was 17.7nm and maximum subsurface crack depth was 5.8 µm. When grinding with 8000# diamond wheel, the material removal was in plastic flow. Plastic scratches were found on the surface. A smooth surface of roughness Ra 2.5nm without any subsurface cracks was obtained. Atomic scale removal was possible in cluster magnetorheological finishing with diamond abrasive size of 0.5 µm. A super smooth surface eventually obtained with a roughness of Ra 0.4nm without any subsurface crack.

  19. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  20. Effect of the size of the apical enlargement with rotary instruments, single-cone filling, post space preparation with drills, fiber post removal, and root canal filling removal on apical crack initiation and propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çapar, İsmail Davut; Uysal, Banu; Ok, Evren; Arslan, Hakan

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of apical crack initiation and propagation in root dentin after several endodontic procedures. Sixty intact mandibular premolars were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis at 1 mm from the apex, and the apical surface was polished. Thirty teeth were left unprepared and served as a control, and the remaining 30 teeth were instrumented with ProTaper Universal instruments (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) up to size F5. The root canals were filled with the single-cone technique. Gutta-percha was removed with drills of the Rebilda post system (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany). Glass fiber-reinforced composite fiber posts were cemented using a dual-cure resin cement. The fiber posts were removed with a drill of the post system. Retreatment was completed after the removal of the gutta-percha. Crack initiation and propagation in the apical surfaces of the samples were examined with a stereomicroscope after each procedure. The absence/presence of cracks was recorded. Logistic regression was performed to analyze statistically the incidence of crack initiation and propagation with each procedure. The initiation of the first crack and crack propagation was associated with F2 and F4 instruments, respectively. The logistic regression analysis revealed that instrumentation and F2 instrument significantly affected apical crack initiation (P .05). Rotary nickel-titanium instrumentation had a significant effect on apical crack initiation, and post space preparation with drills had a significant impact on crack propagation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Egg size as a life history character of marine invertebrates: Is it all it's cracked up to be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Amy L; McAlister, Justin S

    2009-06-01

    Egg size is one of the most important aspects of the life history of free-spawning marine organisms, and it is correlated with larval developmental mode and many other life-history characters. Egg size is simple to measure and data are available for a wide range of taxa, but we have a limited understanding of how large and small eggs differ in composition; size is not always the best measure of the characters under selection. Large eggs are generally considered to reflect increased maternal investment, but egg size alone can be a poor predictor of energetic content within and among taxa. We review techniques that have been used to measure the energetic content and biochemical makeup of invertebrate eggs and point out the strengths and difficulties associated with each. We also suggest a number of comparative and descriptive approaches to biochemical constituent analysis that would strengthen our understanding of how natural selection shapes oogenic strategies. Finally, we highlight recent empirical research on the intrinsic factors that drive intraspecific variation in egg size. We also highlight the relative paucity of these data in the literature and provide some suggestions for future research directions.

  2. B-scan technique for localization and characterization of fatigue cracks around fastener holes in multi-layered structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Deborah; Datuin, Marvin; Aldrin, John; Warchol, Mark; Warchol, Lyudmila; Forsyth, David

    2018-04-01

    The work presented here aims to develop and transition angled-beam shear-wave inspection techniques for crack localization at fastener sites in multi-layer aircraft structures. This requires moving beyond detection to achieve reliable crack location and size, thereby providing invaluable information for maintenance actions and service-life management. The technique presented is based on imaging cracks in "True" B-scans (depth view projected in the sheets along the beam path). The crack traces that contribute to localization in the True B-scans depend on small, diffracted signals from the crack edges and tips that are visible in simulations and experimental data acquired with sufficient gain. The most recent work shows that cracks rotated toward and away from the central ultrasonic beam also yield crack traces in True B-scans that allow localization in simulations, even for large obtuse angles where experimental and simulation results show very small or no indications in the C-scans. Similarly, for two sheets joined by sealant, simulations show that cracks in the second sheet can be located in True B-scans for all locations studied: cracks that intersect the front or back wall of the second sheet, as well as relatively small mid-bore cracks. These results are consistent with previous model verification and sensitivity studies that demonstrate crack localization in True B-scans for a single sheet and cracks perpendicular to the ultrasonic beam.

  3. On 'lower bound crack resistance curves' as material law for the safety assessment of components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, E.; Silcher, H.; Eisele, U.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental fracture-mechanics investigations were carried out on large scale specimens. The specimen geometries and the crack depth ratio, a/W, in a parameter field were varied. Three materials of different toughness were chosen for the specimens. Their load-deformation behaviour, crack resistance curves, stretched zones Δa i and crack initiation values J i were determined and compared with the results from CT25 specimens. Numerical finite-element calculations were made to determine the state of stres in the specimens and the size of the plastic zones. (orig.)

  4. Dependence of some transmission factors on field size and treatment depth in external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using the theratron equinox 100 cobalt 60 machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odonkor, P.

    2015-07-01

    The use of beam modifiers in today’s radiotherapy is very important as it attenuates the beam and reduces the dose to the patient; therefore the need to know the amount of attenuation (in terms of a transmission factor) they provide during treatment. The purpose of this research work is to evaluate the variation (or dependence) of the transmission factors (TFs) of block tray and physical wedges (of different angles) as a function of treatment depth and field size using both iso-centric setups, SAD and SSD; and thus compare the results from the two setup techniques. Wedge and tray TF measurements were performed in a full scatter, large water phantom using a 0.04cc ionization chamber and an average photon energy of 1.25MV from a cobalt-60 unit at an SAD/SSD of 100cm at various depths and field sizes with gantry and collimator angles fixed at 0°. From the measurements carried out, the wedge TF of the 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60°, wedges were found to be 0.775±0.005, 0.650±0.010, 0.505±0.015, and 0.280±0.015 respectively; and the tray TF was found to be 0.960±0.003. Also, the results obtained showed that both the wedge TF and the tray TF has a strong linear dependence on treatment depth; however, the variation of the 15°, wedge TF and the tray TF with depth is less significant (less than 2%). Maximum percentage variation for the 15°, wedge for the SAD setup was 1.1% and 1.59% for the SSD setup; and that for the tray was 0.60% for the SAD setup and 0.12% for the SSD setup. Also, the variation of the 15°, 30°, and 45°, wedge TF with field size was less significant (less than 2%); and a weaker dependence was observed with field size as compared to the treatment depth. However, the 60°, wedge showed a significant variation (maximum of 2.22% and 2.88% for the SAD and SSD setups respectively) as an increase in field size was accompanied by an increase in its wedge TF. Also though the tray TF graphically showed a strong linear dependence on field size the

  5. Buffered and unbuffered dike emplacement on Earth and Venus - Implications for magma reservoir size, depth, and rate of magma replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Head, J. W., III

    1993-01-01

    Models of the emplacement of lateral dikes from magma chambers under constant (buffered) driving pressure conditions and declining (unbuffered) driving pressure conditions indicate that the two pressure scenarios lead to distinctly different styles of dike emplacement. In the unbuffered case, the lengths and widths of laterally emplaced dikes will be severely limited and the dike lengths will be highly dependent on chamber size; this dependence suggests that average dike length can be used to infer the dimensions of the source magma reservoir. On Earth, the characteristics of many mafic-dike swarms suggest that they were emplaced in buffered conditions (e.g., the Mackenzie dike swarm in Canada and some dikes within the Scottish Tertiary). On Venus, the distinctive radial fractures and graben surrounding circular to oval features and edifices on many size scales and extending for hundreds to over a thousand km are candidates for dike emplacement in buffered conditions.

  6. The interaction of pulsed eddy current with metal surface crack for various coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.-C.; Tai, C.-C.

    2002-01-01

    We study the interaction of pulsed eddy current (PEC) with metal surface cracks using various coils that have different geometric sizes. In the previous work, we have showed that the PEC technique can be used to inspect electrical-discharge-machined (EDM) notches with depth from 0.5 mm to 9 mm. The results showed that the relationship between PEC signals and crack depth is obvious. In this work, we further try a series of coils with different radii, heights, turns and shapes. We will discuss the effects of these coil parameters on the PEC signal. Some other critical problems of PEC measurements such as signal drift that caused by heating effect of coil currents will be studied. We also show more experiments on fatigue cracks to demonstrate the capability of PEC technique for cracks inspection

  7. Crack identification for reinforced concrete using PZT based smart rebar active sensing diagnostic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, N. N.; Wu, F.

    2016-04-01

    An active sensing diagnostic system using PZT based smart rebar for SHM of RC structure has been currently under investigation. Previous test results showed that the system could detect the de-bond of concrete from reinforcement, and the diagnostic signals were increased exponentially with the de-bonding size. Previous study also showed that the smart rebar could function well like regular reinforcement to undertake tension stresses. In this study, a smart rebar network has been used to detect the crack damage of concrete based on guided waves. Experimental test has been carried out for the study. In the test, concrete beams with 2 reinforcements have been built. 8 sets of PZT elements were mounted onto the reinforcement bars in an optimized way to form an active sensing diagnostic system. A 90 kHz 5-cycle Hanning-windowed tone burst was used as input. Multiple cracks have been generated on the concrete structures. Through the guided bulk waves propagating in the structures from actuators and sensors mounted from different bars, crack damage could be detected clearly. Cases for both single and multiple cracks were tested. Different crack depths from the surface and different crack numbers have been studied. Test result shows that the amplitude of sensor output signals is deceased linearly with a propagating crack, and is decreased exponentially with increased crack numbers. From the study, the active sensing diagnostic system using PZT based smart rebar network shows a promising way to provide concrete crack damage information through the "talk" among sensors.

  8. Study of initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks. Quantitative characterization and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrat, Christine

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenological study of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) cracks initiation and growth was carried out on a Z 2 CN 18.10 stainless steel in a boiling aqueous magnesium chloride solution at 153 deg. C. The characterization method exploits the morphological information (cracks shape and size distribution) available on a specimen after SCC test. This method, independent of any mechanistic hypothesis, led to the analytical representation of the growth rate of a given crack as a function of its depth and of the density of deeper cracks. The presence of this last parameter could be the expression of a 'shielding effect' of mechanical origin, exerted by the cracks of large size. A 'true initiation' rate was calculated by an extrapolation based on the analytical expression of the growth rate. This analytical representation of cracks initiation and growth accounts for the saturation observed in the experimental determination of the 'apparent initiation'. As time goes, the number of cracks deeper than a given threshold depth tends towards a limit which depends very strongly on the chosen threshold. This saturation effect can be interpreted as exclusively due to the way the small cracks propagate, as the 'true initiation' rate can be expressed versus time by a simple power law. In the case of slow strain rate tests, it is shown that the kinetic parameters characteristic of initiation and growth depend on the applied elongation rate. In particular, the initial crack growth rate increases with elongation rate. The validity domains of the proposed expressions have been specified by means of SCC tests carried out under different types of mechanical loading. (author) [fr

  9. Evaluation of stress corrosion crack growth in BWR piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassir, M.; Sharma, S.; Reich, M.; Chang, M.T.

    1985-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to evaluate the effects of stress intensity factor and environment on the growth behavior of intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel piping systems. Most of the detected cracks are known to be circumferential in shape, and initially started at the inside surface in the heat affected zone near girth welds. These cracks grow both radially in-depth and circumferentially in length and, in extreme cases, may cause leakage in the installation. The propagation of the crack is essentially due to the influence of the following simultaneous factors: (1) the action of applied and residual stress; (2) sensitization of the base metal in the heat affected zone adjacent to girth weld; and (3) the continuous exposure of the material to an aggressive environment of high temperature water containing dissolved oxygen and some levels of impurities. Each of these factors and their effects on the piping systems is discussed in detail in the report. The report also evaluates the time required for hypothetical cracks in BWR pipes to propagate to their critical size. The pertinent times are computed and displayed graphically. Finally, parametric study is performed in order to assess the relative influence and sensitivity of the various input parameters (residual stress, crack growth law, diameter of pipe, initial size of defect, etc.) which have bearing on the growth behavior of the intergranular stress corrosion cracks in type 304 stainless steel. Cracks in large-diameter as well as in small-diameter pipes are considered and analyzed. 27 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  10. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Said; Julan, Emricka; Tran, Xuan-Van; Robert, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  11. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  12. Modelling of excavation depth and fractures in rock caused by tool indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou Shaoquan; Tan Xiangchun; Lindqvist, P.A. [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    The hydraulic regime after excavation in the near-field rock around deposition holes and deposition tunnels in a spent nuclear fuel repository is of concern for prediction of the saturation process of bentonite buffer and tunnel backfill. The hydraulic condition of main interest in this context is a result of the fracture network that is caused by the excavation. Modelling of the excavation disturbed zone in hard rocks caused by mechanical excavation has been carried out in the Division of Mining Engineering since 1993. This report contains an overview of the work conducted. The mechanical excavation is reasonably simplified as an indentation process of the interaction between rigid indenters and rocks. A large number of experiments have been carried out in the laboratory, and the results used for identifying crushed zones and fracture systems in rock under indentation are presented based on these experiments. The indentation causes crushing and damage of the rock and results in a crushed zone and a cracked zone. The indenter penetrates the rock with a certain depth when the force is over a threshold value relevant to the rock and tool. Outside the cracked zone there are basically three systems of cracks: median cracks, radial cracks, and side cracks. Fully developed radial cracks on each side of the indented area can connect with each other and join with median crack. This forms the so-called radial/median crack system. The influence of the mechanical properties of the rock is discussed based on our conceptual model, and the main factors governing the indentation event are summarised. The cracked zone is dealt with by an analytical fracture model. The side crack is simulated by applying the boundary element method coupled with fracture mechanics. Functional relationships are established relating either the indentation depth or the length of radial/median cracks to the various quantities characterising the physical event, namely the shape and the size of the

  13. Modelling of excavation depth and fractures in rock caused by tool indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou Shaoquan; Tan Xiangchun; Lindqvist, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    The hydraulic regime after excavation in the near-field rock around deposition holes and deposition tunnels in a spent nuclear fuel repository is of concern for prediction of the saturation process of bentonite buffer and tunnel backfill. The hydraulic condition of main interest in this context is a result of the fracture network that is caused by the excavation. Modelling of the excavation disturbed zone in hard rocks caused by mechanical excavation has been carried out in the Division of Mining Engineering since 1993. This report contains an overview of the work conducted. The mechanical excavation is reasonably simplified as an indentation process of the interaction between rigid indenters and rocks. A large number of experiments have been carried out in the laboratory, and the results used for identifying crushed zones and fracture systems in rock under indentation are presented based on these experiments. The indentation causes crushing and damage of the rock and results in a crushed zone and a cracked zone. The indenter penetrates the rock with a certain depth when the force is over a threshold value relevant to the rock and tool. Outside the cracked zone there are basically three systems of cracks: median cracks, radial cracks, and side cracks. Fully developed radial cracks on each side of the indented area can connect with each other and join with median crack. This forms the so-called radial/median crack system. The influence of the mechanical properties of the rock is discussed based on our conceptual model, and the main factors governing the indentation event are summarised. The cracked zone is dealt with by an analytical fracture model. The side crack is simulated by applying the boundary element method coupled with fracture mechanics. Functional relationships are established relating either the indentation depth or the length of radial/median cracks to the various quantities characterising the physical event, namely the shape and the size of the

  14. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Development of growth prediction model and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kawakubo, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the fatigue damage was assumed to be equivalent to the crack initiation and its growth, and fatigue life was assessed by predicting the crack growth. First, a low-cycle fatigue test was conducted in air at room temperature under constant cyclic strain range of 1.2%. The crack initiation and change in crack size during the test were examined by replica investigation. It was found that a crack of 41.2 μm length was initiated almost at the beginning of the test. The identified crack growth rate was shown to correlate well with the strain intensity factor, whose physical meaning was discussed in this study. The fatigue life prediction model (equation) under constant strain range was derived by integrating the crack growth equation defined using the strain intensity factor, and the predicted fatigue lives were almost identical to those obtained by low-cycle fatigue tests. The change in crack depth predicted by the equation also agreed well with the experimental results. Based on the crack growth prediction model, it was shown that the crack size would be less than 0.1 mm even when the estimated fatigue damage exceeded the critical value of the design fatigue curve, in which a twenty-fold safety margin was used for the assessment. It was revealed that the effect of component size and surface roughness, which have been investigated empirically by fatigue tests, could be reasonably explained by considering the crack initiation and growth. Furthermore, the environmental effect on the fatigue life was shown to be brought about by the acceleration of crack growth. (author)

  15. Effects of niobium additions on the structure, depth, and austenite grain size of the case of carburized 0.07% C steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. A.; Bepari, M. M. A.

    1996-10-01

    Carbon (0.07%) steel samples containing about 0.04% Nb singly and in combination with nitrogen were carburized in a natural Titas gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1223 K (950 °C) and a pressure of about 0.10 MPa for 1/2 to 4 h, followed by slow cooling in the furnace. Their microstructures were studied by optical microscopy. The austenite grain size of the case and the case depths were determined on baseline samples of low-carbon steels and also on niobium and (Nb + N) microalloyed steel samples. It was found that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium alone or in combination with nitrogen decreased the thickness of cementite network near the surface of the carburized case of the steels. However, niobium in combination with nitrogen was more effective than niobium in reducing the thickness of cementite network. Niobium with or without nitrogen inhibited the formation of Widmanstätten cementite plates at grain boundaries and within the grains near the surface in the hypereutectoid zone of the case. It was also revealed that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium decreased the case depth of the carburized steels, but that niobium with nitrogen is more effective than niobium alone in reducing the case depth. Niobium as niobium carbide (NbC) and niobium in the presence of nitrogen as niobium carbonitride, [Nb(C,N)] particles refined the austenite grain size of the carburized case, but Nb(C,N) was more effective than NbC in inhibiting austenite grain growth.

  16. Simulation of eye-tracker latency, spot size, and ablation pulse depth on the correction of higher order wavefront aberrations with scanning spot laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueeler, Michael; Mrochen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this theoretical work was to investigate the robustness of scanning spot laser treatments with different laser spot diameters and peak ablation depths in case of incomplete compensation of eye movements due to eye-tracker latency. Scanning spot corrections of 3rd to 5th Zernike order wavefront errors were numerically simulated. Measured eye-movement data were used to calculate the positioning error of each laser shot assuming eye-tracker latencies of 0, 5, 30, and 100 ms, and for the case of no eye tracking. The single spot ablation depth ranged from 0.25 to 1.0 microm and the spot diameter from 250 to 1000 microm. The quality of the ablation was rated by the postoperative surface variance and the Strehl intensity ratio, which was calculated after a low-pass filter was applied to simulate epithelial surface smoothing. Treatments performed with nearly ideal eye tracking (latency approximately 0) provide the best results with a small laser spot (0.25 mm) and a small ablation depth (250 microm). However, combinations of a large spot diameter (1000 microm) and a small ablation depth per pulse (0.25 microm) yield the better results for latencies above a certain threshold to be determined specifically. Treatments performed with tracker latencies in the order of 100 ms yield similar results as treatments done completely without eye-movement compensation. CONCWSIONS: Reduction of spot diameter was shown to make the correction more susceptible to eye movement induced error. A smaller spot size is only beneficial when eye movement is neutralized with a tracking system with a latency <5 ms.

  17. Tensile cracks in creeping solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, H.; Rice, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The loading parameter determining the stress and strain fields near a crack tip, and thereby the growth of the crack, under creep conditions is discussed. Relevant loading parameters considered are the stress intensity factor K/sub I/, the path-independent integral C*, and the net section stress sigma/sub net/. The material behavior is modelled as elastic-nonlinear viscous where the nonlinear term describes power law creep. At the time t = 0 load is applied to the cracked specimen, and in the first instant the stress distribution is elastic. Subsequently, creep deformation relaxes the initial stress concentration at the crack tip, and creep strains develop rapidly near the crack tip. These processes may be analytically described by self-similar solutions for short times t. Small scale yielding may be defined. In creep problems, this means that elastic strains dominate almost everywhere except in a small creep zone which grows around the crack tip. If crack growth ensues while the creep zone is still small compared with the crack length and the specimen size, the stress intensity factor governs crack growth behavior. If the calculated creep zone becomes larger than the specimen size, the stresses become finally time-independent and the elastic strain rates can be neglected. In this case, the stress field is the same as in the fully-plastic limit of power law hardening plasticity. The loading parameter which determines the near tip fields uniquely is then the path-independent integral C*.K/sub I/ and C* characterize opposite limiting cases. The case applied in a given situation is decided by comparing the creep zone size with the specimen size and the crack length. Besides several methods of estimating the creep zone size, a convenient expression for a characteristic time is derived, which characterizes the transition from small scale yielding to extensive creep of the whole specimen

  18. Shaft Crack Identification Based on Vibration and AE Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiu Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shaft crack is one of the main serious malfunctions that often occur in rotating machinery. However, it is difficult to locate the crack and determine the depth of the crack. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE signal and vibration response are used to diagnose the crack. The wavelet transform is applied to AE signal to decompose into a series of time-domain signals, each of which covers a specific octave frequency band. Then an improved union method based on threshold and cross-correlation method is applied to detect the location of the shaft crack. The finite element method is used to build the model of the cracked rotor, and the crack depth is identified by comparing the vibration response of experiment and simulation. The experimental results show that the AE signal is effective and convenient to locate the shaft crack, and the vibration signal is feasible to determine the depth of shaft crack.

  19. Crack tip stress and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, D.

    1975-01-01

    The study of potential energy variations in a loaded elastic solid containing a crack leads to determination of the crack driving force G. Generalization of this concept to cases other than linear elasticity leads to definition of the integral J. In a linear solid, the crack tip stress field is characterized by a single parameter: the stress-intensity factor K. When the crack tip plastic zone size is confined to the elastic singularity J=G, it is possible to establish relationship between these parameters and plastic strain (and in particular the crack tip opening displacement delta). The stress increases because of the triaxiality effect. This overload rises with increasing strain hardening. When the plastic zone size expands, using certain hypotheses, delta can be calculated. The plastic strain intensity is exclusively dependent on parameter J [fr

  20. Pulsed magnetic flux leakage method for hairline crack detection and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Chukwunonso K.; Meydan, Turgut

    2018-04-01

    The Magnetic Flux leakage (MFL) method is a well-established branch of electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), extensively used for evaluating defects both on the surface and far-surface of pipeline structures. However the conventional techniques are not capable of estimating their approximate size, location and orientation, hence an additional transducer is required to provide the extra information needed. This research is aimed at solving the inevitable problem of granular bond separation which occurs during manufacturing, leaving pipeline structures with miniature cracks. It reports on a quantitative approach based on the Pulsed Magnetic Flux Leakage (PMFL) method, for the detection and characterization of the signals produced by tangentially oriented rectangular surface and far-surface hairline cracks. This was achieved through visualization and 3D imaging of the leakage field. The investigation compared finite element numerical simulation with experimental data. Experiments were carried out using a 10mm thick low carbon steel plate containing artificial hairline cracks with various depth sizes, and different features were extracted from the transient signal. The influence of sensor lift-off and pulse width variation on the magnetic field distribution which affects the detection capability of various hairline cracks located at different depths in the specimen is explored. The findings show that the proposed technique can be used to classify both surface and far-surface hairline cracks and can form the basis for an enhanced hairline crack detection and characterization for pipeline health monitoring.

  1. Thermal fatigue cracking in T-fittings of feed water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, J.

    1983-03-01

    The existence of thermal fatigue cracks can be determined by ultrasonic methods. The depth of the cracks will be of importance for evaluation of the seriousness of the situation. Currently, no method is available for determining depth of cracks without cutting and grinding. Methods for gaining information of crack depth have been discussed with leading European materials testing institutes. More elaborate ultrasonic methods have been tested with negative results. On testing signals from crack corners flood possible signals from the crack tips. At present no reliable technique based on ultrasonics exist (in Europe, that will give information of crack depth.(P.Aa.)

  2. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  3. Outline and current status of crack growth evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taku

    2017-01-01

    This paper explains the outline of crack growth evaluation against stress corrosion cracking (SCC), knowledge obtained from actual equipment failure cases, and the latest trends of technology development concerning crack growth evaluation. As for the reactor integrity evaluation system, the use of the maintenance standards for the nuclear power generation of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (hereinafter referred to as maintenance standards') is specified for its evaluation. Based on whether or not the result satisfies the evaluation criteria for the SCC soundness assessment, it is judged whether continuous operation within the evaluation period is allowed or repair/replacement is required. According to main findings obtained from the cases of actual equipment failure, the following have been recognized. (1) The SCC generated and developed in the nickel base alloy welded metal stayed at the boundary between low alloy steel and stainless steel. (2) The progress of SCC strongly depends on the growth direction of dendrite, which is the welded solidified structure, and preferentially develops in the direction parallel to the growth direction. The latest development of crack propagation evaluation includes (1) development of solution for stress intensity factor, and (2) crack propagation evaluation by means of FEM analysis. With regard to the SCC of stainless steel in recirculation system piping under BWR environment, if the defect depth and surface length are sized, the progress of cracks in the actual equipment can be reproduced to some extent by crack growth according to maintenance standards. The sizing results of the defect based on non-destructive test are the starting point. (A.O.)

  4. Ductile crack growth simulation from near crack tip dissipated energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.

    2000-01-01

    A method to calculate ductile tearing in both small scale fracture mechanics specimens and cracked components is presented. This method is based on an estimation of the dissipated energy calculated near the crack tip. Firstly, the method is presented. It is shown that a characteristic parameter G fr can be obtained, relevant to the dissipated energy in the fracture process. The application of the method to the calculation of side grooved crack tip (CT) specimens of different sizes is examined. The value of G fr is identified by comparing the calculated and experimental load line displacement versus crack extension curve for the smallest CT specimen. With this identified value, it is possible to calculate the global behaviour of the largest specimen. The method is then applied to the calculation of a pipe containing a through-wall thickness crack subjected to a bending moment. This pipe is made of the same material as the CT specimens. It is shown that it is possible to simulate the global behaviour of the structure including the prediction of up to 90-mm crack extension. Local terms such as the equivalent stress or the crack tip opening angle are found to be constant during the crack extension process. This supports the view that G fr controls the fields in the vicinity near the crack tip. (orig.)

  5. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels: Part 1, medium-sulfur forging steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Poskie, T.J.; Auten, T.A.; Cullen, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a medium- sulfur ASTM A508-2 forging steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 30.3--38.3 mm, and depths of 13.1--16.8 mm. The experiments were conducted in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 degrees C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, and cyclic frequency) conductive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) in higher-sulfur steels under quasi-stagnant conditions. Earlier experiments on unclad compact tension specimens of this heat of steel did not exhibit EAC, and the present experiments on semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating cladding also did not exhibit EAC

  6. K{sub I}-T estimation for embedded flaws in pipes - Part II: Circumferentially oriented cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xudong, E-mail: cveqx@nus.edu.s [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2010-04-15

    This paper, in parallel to the investigation on axially embedded cracks reported in the companion paper, presents a numerical study on the linear-elastic K{sub I} and T-stress values over the front of elliptical cracks circumferentially embedded in the wall of a pipe/cylindrical structure, under a uniform pressure applied on the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical procedure employs the interaction-integral approach to compute the linear-elastic stress-intensity factor (SIF) K{sub I} and T-stress values for embedded cracks with practical sizes at different locations in the wall of the pipe. The parametric study covers a wide range of geometric parameters for embedded cracks in the pipe, including: the wall thickness to the inner radius ratio (t/R{sub i}), the crack depth over the wall thickness ratio (a/t), the crack aspect ratio (a/c) and the ratio of the distance from the centerline of the crack to the outer surface of the pipe over the pipe wall thickness (e{sub M}/t). The parametric investigation identifies a significant effect of the remaining ligament length on both the T-stress and K{sub I} values at the crack-front location (denoted by point O) nearest to the outer surface of the pipe and at the crack-front location (denoted by point I) nearest to the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical investigation establishes the database to derive approximate functions from a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure to predict the T-stress and K{sub I} values at three critical front locations of the circumferentially embedded crack in a pipe: points O, I and M. The proposed T-stress and K{sub I} functions utilize a combined second-order polynomial and a power-law expression, which presents a close agreement with the T-stress and K{sub I} values computed from the very detailed finite element models. The comparison between the circumferentially embedded crack and the axially embedded crack indicates that both the T-stress and K{sub I} values at crack-front points O and

  7. A probabilistic model of brittle crack formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Probability of a brittle crack formation in an elastic solid with fluctuating strength is considered. A set Omega of all possible crack trajectories reflecting the fluctuation of the strength field is introduced. The probability P(X) that crack penetration depth exceeds X is expressed as a functional integral over Omega of a conditional probability of the same event taking place along a particular path. Various techniques are considered to evaluate the integral. Under rather nonrestrictive assumptions, the integral is reduced to solving a diffusion-type equation. A new characteristic of fracture process, 'crack diffusion coefficient', is introduced. An illustrative example is then considered where the integration is reduced to solving an ordinary differential equation. The effect of the crack diffusion coefficient and of the magnitude of strength fluctuations on probability density of crack penetration depth is presented. Practical implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  8. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  9. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  10. Analysis of 3D crack propagation by microfocus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Bo; Chen Fuxing; Deng Cuizhen; Zeng Yabin

    2014-01-01

    The three-point bending test of notched specimens of 2A50 forging aluminum was performed by high frequency fatigue tester, and the surface cracks of different stages were analyzed and contrasted by SEM. The crack was reconstructed by microfocus computed tomography, and its size, position and distribution were visually displayed through 3D visualization. The crack propagation behaviors were researched through gray value and position of crack front of 2D CT images in two adjacent stages, and the results show that crack propagation is irregular. The projection image of crack was obtained if crack of two stages projected onto the reference plane respectively, a significant increase of new crack propagation was observed compared with the previous projection of crack, and the distribution curve of crack front of two stages was displayed. The 3D increment distribution of the crack front propagation was obtained through the 3D crack analysis of two stages. (authors)

  11. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Cracked Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    directed by: CAPT Te!Ty Webb, D.D.S., M.S. A " cracked tooth" is defined as a thin surface enamel and dentin disruption of unknown depth, and is often...OUTCOME OF ENDODONTICALL Y TREATED CRACKED TEETH by David Michael Dow II, D.D.S. Lieutenant Commander, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript titled: "Outcome ofEndodontically Treated Cracked Teeth" is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond

  12. Cracking and delamination of vapor-deposited tantalum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.M.; Duan, J.Z.; Liu, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on tantalum films which begin to crack and spall during vapor deposition on glass at a thickness of 180 nm. Islands and ribbons, 10 - 30 μm in size, delaminate by crack growth along the Ta/glass interface for several μm after which the crack penetrates into the glass to a depth of 0.5 - 1 μm and complete spalling occurs. X-ray diffraction showed that about 50% of the original bct, β-tantalum, phase had transformed to the bcc α-Ta phase. When Ta was deposited on glass that was first covered with 52 nm of copper, spalling was observed to begin at a thickness of 105 nm. In this case, the film first cracks and then peels along the Cu/glass interface and curls into scrolls indicating the presence of a small stress gradient. X-ray diffraction of the as-deposited film, and electron diffraction of ion-milled flakes, showed that the Ta films deposited on Cu-coated glass almost completely transform to bcc α-Ta. The critical thickness for delamination along the Cu/glass interface is about 1/2 that for cracking in the glass substrate when an intermediate layer of Cu is not present. All of the above findings are in good agreement with previous observations on Cr films

  13. Research progress on expansive soil cracks under changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Zheng, Cheng-feng; Wu, Jin-kun

    2014-01-01

    Engineering problems shunned previously rise to the surface gradually with the activities of reforming the natural world in depth, the problem of expansive soil crack under the changing environment becoming a control factor of expansive soil slope stability. The problem of expansive soil crack has gradually become a research hotspot, elaborates the occurrence and development of cracks from the basic properties of expansive soil, and points out the role of controlling the crack of expansive soil strength. We summarize the existing research methods and results of expansive soil crack characteristics. Improving crack measurement and calculation method and researching the crack depth measurement, statistical analysis method, crack depth and surface feature relationship will be the future direction.

  14. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  15. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  16. The effect of crack branching on the residual lifetime of machine components containing stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdowski, R.M.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Speidel, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations concerning the effect of crack branching on the reduction of stress intensity at the tip of single cracks. The results indicate that the division of a single crack into n branches reduces the stress intensity at the branch tips by a factor of about 1/√n. This permits branched cracks to grow to larger depths before becoming critical. The implication is that longer residual lifetimes and longer operating times between inspections can be calculated for machine components with growing branched stress corrosion cracks. (author)

  17. Factors that lead to the use of crack cocaine in combination with marijuana in Brazil: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Janaina R; Nappo, Solange A

    2015-07-25

    In Brazil, crack cocaine use remains a healthcare challenge due to the rapid onset of its pleasurable effects, its ability to induce craving and addiction, and the fact that it is easily accessible. Delayed action on the part of the Brazilian Government in addressing the drug problem has led users to develop their own strategies for surviving the effects of crack cocaine use, particularly the drug craving and psychosis. In this context, users have sought the benefits of combining crack cocaine with marijuana. Our aim was to identify the reasons why users combine crack cocaine with marijuana and the health implications of doing so. The present study is a qualitative study, using in-depth interviews and criteria-based sampling, following 27 crack cocaine users who combined its use with marijuana. Participants were recruited using the snowball sampling technique, and the point of theoretical saturation was used to define the sample size. Data were analyzed using the content analysis technique. The interviewees reported that the combination of crack cocaine use with marijuana provided "protection" (reduced undesirable effects, improved sleep and appetite, reduced craving for crack cocaine, and allowed the patients to recover some quality of life). Combined use of cannabis as a strategy to reduce the effects of crack exhibited several significant advantages, particularly an improved quality of life, which "protected" users from the violence typical of the crack culture. Crack use is considered a serious public health problem in Brazil, and there are few solution strategies. Within that limited context, the combination of cannabis and crack deserves more thorough clinical investigation to assess its potential use as a strategy to reduce the damage associated with crack use.

  18. Monitoring crack growth using thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djedjiga, Ait Aouita; Abdeldjalil, Ouahabi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a novel strategy for real-time monitoring crack growth of materials. The process is based on the use of thermal data extracted along the horizontal axis of symmetry of single edge notch tension (SENT) specimens, during fatigue tests. These data are exploited using an implemented program to detect in situ the growth of fatigue crack, with the critical size and propagation speed of the crack. This technique has the advantage to be applicable to a wide range of materials regardless of their electrical conductivity and their surface texture. (authors)

  19. A probabilistic approach to crack instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1989-01-01

    A probabilistic model of brittle fracture is examined with reference to two-dimensional problems. The model is illustrated by using experimental data obtained for 25 macroscopically identical specimens made of short-fiber-reinforced composites. It is shown that the model proposed here provides a predictive formalism for the probability distributions of critical crack depth, critical loads, and crack arrest depths. It also provides similarity criteria for small-scale testing.

  20. Capacity fading of LiAlyNi1-x-yCoxO2 cathode for lithium-ion batteries during accelerated calendar and cycle life tests (effect of depth of discharge in charge-discharge cycling on the suppression of the micro-crack generation of LiAlyNi1-x-yCoxO2 particle)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shoichiro; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Hosokawa, Takashi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Nakura, Kensuke

    2014-08-01

    Cycle performance of a LiAl0.10Ni0.76Co0.14O2 (NCA) cathode/graphite cell closely depended on the range of depth of discharge in charge-discharge processes (ΔDOD). When ΔDOD was 10-70%, cycle performance at 25 °C was maintained even at 60 °C. Deterioration phenomena were analyzed by electrochemical method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and micro-cracks in NCA particles were analyzed with cross-sectional views by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Many micro-cracks were observed only after a 0-100% DOD region cycle test. Cycle tests in several restricted ΔDOD conditions showed that the deterioration was closely related to not the upper and lower limits of DOD or operation voltage but the width of ΔDOD.

  1. Noncontact measurement of guided ultrasonic wave scattering for fatigue crack characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, P.

    2013-04-01

    Fatigue cracks can develop in aerospace structures at locations of stress concentration such as fasteners. For the safe operation of the aircraft fatigue cracks need to be detected before reaching a critical length. Guided ultrasonic waves offer an efficient method for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in large aerospace structures. Noncontact excitation of guided waves was achieved using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT). The transducers were developed for the specific excitation of the A0 Lamb mode. Based on the induced eddy currents in the plate a simple theoretical model was developed and reasonably good agreement with the measurements was achieved. However, the detection sensitivity for fatigue cracks depends on the location and orientation of the crack relative to the measurement locations. Crack-like defects have a directionality pattern of the scattered field depending on the angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and on the ratio of the characteristic defect size to wavelength. The detailed angular dependency of the guided wave field scattered at crack-like defects in plate structures has been measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement with 3D Finite Element simulation predictions was achieved for machined part-through and through-thickness notches. The amplitude of the scattered wave was quantified for a variation of angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and the defect depth. These results provide the basis for the defect characterization in aerospace structures using guided wave sensors.

  2. A study on the evolution of crack networks under thermal fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Taheri, Said

    2008-01-01

    The crack network is a typical cracking morphology caused by thermal fatigue loading. It was pointed out that the crack network appeared under relatively small temperature fluctuations and did not grow deeply. In this study, the mechanism of evolution of crack network and its influence on crack growth was examined by numerical calculation. First, the stress field near two interacting cracks was investigated. It was shown that there are stress-concentration and stress-shielding zones around interacting cracks, and that cracks can form a network under the bi-axial stress condition. Secondly, a Monte Carlo simulation was developed in order to simulate the initiation and growth of cracks under thermal fatigue loading and the evolution of the crack network. The local stress field formed by pre-existing cracks was evaluated by the body force method and its role in the initiation and growth of cracks was considered. The simulation could simulate the evolution of the crack network and change in number of cracks observed in the experiments. It was revealed that reduction in the stress intensity factor due to stress feature in the depth direction under high cycle thermal fatigue loading plays an important role in the evolution of the crack network and that mechanical interaction between cracks in the network affects initiation rather than growth of cracks. The crack network appears only when the crack growth in the depth direction is interrupted. It was concluded that the emergence of the crack network is preferable for the structural integrity of cracked components

  3. Password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Χριστοφάκης, Μιχαήλ Κ.

    2014-01-01

    Information security is the next big thing in computers society because of the rapidly growing security incidents and the outcomes of those. Hacking and cracking existed even from the start of the eighties decade when there was the first step of the interconnection through the internet between humans. From then and ever after there was a big explosion of such incidents mostly because of the worldwide web which was introduced in the early nineties. Following the huge steps forward of computers...

  4. Stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, W.; Turnbull, A.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.03 and is structured as follows: General aspects of SCC testing; Non-precracked specimens; Precracked specimens - the fracture mechanics approach to SCC; Crack growth measurement; Limitations of the LEFM approach to SCC; The use of SCC data; Guide to selection of mechanical scc test method

  5. A Critical Analysis of Grain-Size and Yield-Strength Dependence of Near-Threshold Fatigue-Crack Growth in Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-15

    of high-strength steel ), and a host of microstructural types (ferritic, martensitic, pearlitic, bainitic , austenitic). Accession For NTIS GRA&l DTIC...IN STEELS , : RPRNGO.RPRTNMR 1~A Tw.R CONTRACT OA4A&XMUt8~ G/~ ! R./koderl L.A./Cooleyad T.W./Crooker 2 .{I 9PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND A10R4SI...growth Steels Microstructure Ferrous alloys Structure-sensitive crack growth 20 ABSTRACT (Con~tinue an r*,er.. side it necesar and Identity by black

  6. Fatigue crack nucleation of type 316LN stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2000-01-01

    Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) life decreases drastically with increasing temperature but increases with the addition of nitrogen at room and high temperatures. The effect of nitrogen on LCF life may be related to crack nucleation at high temperatures in austenitic stainless steel because the fraction of crack nucleation in LCF life is about 40%. The influence of nitrogen on the crack nucleation of LCF in type 316LN stainless steel is investigated by observations of crack population and crack depth after testing at 40% of fatigue life. Nitrogen increases the number of cycles to nucleate microcracks of 100 μm but decreases the crack population

  7. Cracking hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forwood, G F; Lane, M; Taplay, J G

    1921-10-07

    In cracking and hydrogenating hydrocarbon oils by passing their vapors together with steam over heated carbon derived from shale, wood, peat or other vegetable or animal matter, the gases from the condenser are freed from sulfuretted hydrogen, and preferably also from carbon dioxide, and passed together with oil vapors and steam through the retort. Carbon dioxide may be removed by passage through slaked lime, and sulfuretted hydrogen by means of hydrated oxide of iron. Vapors from high-boiling oils and those from low-boiling oils are passed alternately through the retort, so that carbon deposited from the high-boiling oils is used up during treatment of low-boiling oils.

  8. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  9. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  10. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, S.; Brincker, Rune

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of unreinforced notched and un-notched concrete beams is presented. The load displacement-curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modelled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the mid-section of the beam. Outside...... the elastic layer the deformations are modelled by the Timoshenko beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bi-lineary on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. For different beam size results from the analytical model...... is compared with results from a more accurate model based on numerical methods. The analytical model is shown to be in good agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. Several general results are obtained. It is shown that the point on the load...

  11. Stress-intensity factor equations for cracks in three-dimensional finite bodies subjected to tension and bending loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Stress intensity factor equations are presented for an embedded elliptical crack, a semielliptical surface crack, a quarter elliptical corner crack, a semielliptical surface crack along the bore of a circular hole, and a quarter elliptical corner crack at the edge of a circular hole in finite plates. The plates were subjected to either remote tension or bending loads. The stress intensity factors used to develop these equations were obtained from previous three dimensional finite element analyses of these crack configurations. The equations give stress intensity factors as a function of parametric angle, crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and, where applicable, hole radius. The ratio of crack depth to plate thickness ranged from 0 to 1, the ratio of crack depth to crack length ranged from 0.2 to 2, and the ratio of hole radius to plate thickness ranged from 0.5 to 2. The effects of plate width on stress intensity variation along the crack front were also included.

  12. Effects of off-centered cracks and restraint of induced bending caused by pressure on the crack-opening-area analysis of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.M.; Bonora, N.

    1996-01-01

    Current models for the crack-opening-area analysis of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks are based on various idealizations or assumptions which are often necessary to simplify the mathematical formulation and numerical calculation. This paper focuses on the validity of two such assumptions that involve off-centered cracks and the restraint of induced bending caused by pressure, and quantifies their effects on the crack-opening area analysis of pipes. Finite element and/or simple estimation methods were employed to compute the center-crack-opening displacement and crack-opening shape for a through-wall-cracked pipe, considering off-centered cracks and the restraint of induced bending caused by pressure. The results of the analyses show that, for both cases, the crack-opening area can be reduced significantly. For pipes with off-centered cracks, the crack-opening area can be evaluated from analyses of symmetrically centered cracks and assuming elliptical profile. For pipes with complete restraint of the induced bending caused by pressure, the reduction in crack-opening area depends on the crack size. When the crack size is small, the restraint effects can be ignored. However, when the crack size is large, the restrained crack opening can be significantly smaller than the unrestrained crack opening, depending on the length of pipe involved; hence, it may be important for the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses. (orig.)

  13. SCC life estimation based on cracks initiated from the corrosion pits of bolting material SCM435 used in steam turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hitomi; Ochi, Mayumi; Fujiwara, Isao; Momoo, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Life estimation was performed for the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) that occurs in deaerated and wet hot pure steam at the bottoms of the threads of bolts made of SCM435 (equivalent to AISI 4137) used in steam turbine. SCC is believed to occur when corrosion pits are formed and grow to critical size, after which SCC is initiated and cracks propagate until the critical fracture toughness value is reached. Calculations were performed using laboratory and field data. The results showed that, for a 40mm diameter bolt with 0.2% offset strength of 820MPa, the critical crack depth for straight-front cracks was 5.4mm. The SCC life depends on the lubricant used; the SCC life estimated from this value is approximately 70,000 hours when graphite is used as a lubricant. (author)

  14. A numerical study of non-linear crack tip parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure concept has been widely used to explain different issues of fatigue crack propagation. However, different authors have questioned the relevance of crack closure and have proposed alternative concepts. The main objective here is to check the effectiveness of crack closure concept by linking the contact of crack flanks with non-linear crack tip parameters. Accordingly, 3D-FE numerical models with and without contact were developed for a wide range of loading scenarios and the crack tip parameters usually linked to fatigue crack growth, namely range of cyclic plastic strain, crack tip opening displacement, size of reversed plastic zone and total plastic dissipation per cycle, were investigated. It was demonstrated that: i LEFM concepts are applicable to the problem under study; ii the crack closure phenomenon has a great influence on crack tip parameters decreasing their values; iii the Keff concept is able to explain the variations of crack tip parameters produced by the contact of crack flanks; iv the analysis of remote compliance is the best numerical parameter to quantify the crack opening level; v without contact there is no effect of stress ratio on crack tip parameters. Therefore it is proved that the crack closure concept is valid.

  15. Stress-intensity factor equations for cracks in three-dimensional finite bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical stress intensity factor equations are presented for embedded elliptical cracks, semi-elliptical surface cracks, quarter-elliptical corner cracks, semi-elliptical surface cracks at a hole, and quarter-elliptical corner cracks at a hole in finite plates. The plates were subjected to remote tensile loading. Equations give stress intensity factors as a function of parametric angle, crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and where applicable, hole radius. The stress intensity factors used to develop the equations were obtained from three dimensional finite element analyses of these crack configurations.

  16. On size and geometry effects on the brittle fracture of ferritic and tempered martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odette, G. R.; Chao, B. L.; Lucas, G. E.

    1992-09-01

    A finite element computation of nonsingular crack tip fields was combined with a weakest link statistics model of cleavage fracture. Model predictions for three point bend specimens with various widths and crack depth to width ratios are qualitatively consistent with a number of trends observed in a 12 Cr martensitic stainless steel. The toughness “benefits” of small sizes and shallow cracks are primarily reflected in strain limits rather than net section stress capacities, which is significant to fusion structures subject to large secondary stresses.

  17. Applied model of through-wall crack of coolant vessels of WWER-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, V.; Hovakimyan, T.; Vardanyan, M.; Khachatryan, A.; Minasyan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an applied-model of Through-Wall Crack (TWC) for WWER-type units primary vessels. The model allows to simulate the main morphological parameters of real TWC, i.e. length, area of inlet and outlet openings, channel depth and small and large size unevenness of the crack surface. The model can be used for developing and improving the coolant-leak detectors for the primary circuit vessels of WWER-units. Also, it can be used for research of the coolant two-phase leakage phenomenon through narrow cracks/channels and thermo-physical processes in heat-insulation layer of the Main Coolant Piping (MCP) during the leak

  18. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  19. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water

  20. Process and device for magnetic crack testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, D.; Meili, E.; Fuchs, E.

    1983-01-01

    There is a problem of sufficient crack depth discrimination to suppress fault signals or pictures due to unevenness not caused by cracks. To solve this, when magnetising in the preferred direction of adhesion, the effect depending on the direction of the crack, before magnetic powder detection, magnetic powder is blown on, showing the fault and for the comparison of the adhesion effect crack direction characteristics it is blown on parallel to the preferred direction, or if one wants to stress the directional characteristic, it is blown on transversely to the preferred direction. In both cases one blows with the same force, without removing the magnetic powder remnants relevant to faults in the intended crack areas. This strong blowing removes the magnetic powder remnants relevant to interference and not relevant to faults. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Natural Vibration of a Beam with a Breathing Oblique Crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method is proposed to calculate the natural frequency of a cantilever beam with a breathing oblique crack. A double-linear-springs-model is developed in the modal analysis process to describe the breathing oblique crack, and the breathing behaviour of the oblique crack is objectively simulated. The finite element method (FEM analysis software ABAQUS is used to calculate the geometric correction factors when the cracked plate is subjected to a pure bending moment at different oblique crack angles and relative depths. The Galerkin method is applied to simplify the cracked beam to a single degree of freedom system, allowing the natural frequency of the beam with the breathing oblique crack to be calculated. Compared with the natural frequencies of the breathing oblique cracked beam obtained using the ABAQUS FEM method, the proposed analytical method exhibits a high computational accuracy, with a maximum error of only 4.65%.

  2. Probabilistic modeling of crack networks in thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, N.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal superficial crack networks have been detected in mixing zone of cooling system in nuclear power plants. Numerous experimental works have already been led to characterize initiation and propagation of these cracks. The random aspect of initiation led to propose a probabilistic model for the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal fatigue. In a first part, uniaxial mechanical test were performed on smooth and slightly notched specimens in order to characterize the initiation of multiple cracks, their arrest due to obscuration and the coalescence phenomenon by recovery of amplification stress zones. In a second time, the probabilistic model was established under two assumptions: the continuous cracks initiation on surface, described by a Poisson point process law with threshold, and the shielding phenomenon which prohibits the initiation or the propagation of a crack if this one is in the relaxation stress zone of another existing crack. The crack propagation is assumed to follow a Paris' law based on the computation of stress intensity factors at the top and the bottom of crack. The evolution of multiaxial cracks on the surface can be followed thanks to three quantities: the shielding probability, comparable to a damage variable of the structure, the initiated crack density, representing the total number of cracks per unit surface which can be compared to experimental observations, and the propagating crack density, representing the number per unit surface of active cracks in the network. The crack sizes distribution is also computed by the model allowing an easier comparison with experimental results. (author)

  3. Crack turning in integrally stiffened aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener---a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation. Drawing upon these principles, two crack turning prediction approaches are extended to include fracture

  4. New breathing functions for the transverse breathing crack of the cracked rotor system: Approach for critical and subcritical harmonic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shudeifat, Mohammad A.; Butcher, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    The actual breathing mechanism of the transverse breathing crack in the cracked rotor system that appears due to the shaft weight is addressed here. As a result, the correct time-varying area moments of inertia for the cracked element cross-section during shaft rotation are also determined. Hence, two new breathing functions are identified to represent the actual breathing effect on the cracked element stiffness matrix. The new breathing functions are used in formulating the time-varying finite element stiffness matrix of the cracked element. The finite element equations of motion are then formulated for the cracked rotor system and solved via harmonic balance method for response, whirl orbits and the shift in the critical and subcritical speeds. The analytical results of this approach are compared with some previously published results obtained using approximate formulas for the breathing mechanism. The comparison shows that the previously used breathing function is a weak model for the breathing mechanism in the cracked rotor even for small crack depths. The new breathing functions give more accurate results for the dynamic behavior of the cracked rotor system for a wide range of the crack depths. The current approach is found to be efficient for crack detection since the critical and subcritical shaft speeds, the unique vibration signature in the neighborhood of the subcritical speeds and the sensitivity to the unbalance force direction all together can be utilized to detect the breathing crack before further damage occurs.

  5. Influence of bending test configuration on cracking behavior of FRC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finazzi, Silvia; Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    the flexural load-deformation response of FRC. This research focuses particularly on the influence of the appearance and depth of the notch on the cracking behavior of FRC. For this purpose, several specimens, both un-notched and notched with different depths of the notch (25 mm and 45 mm), were tested....... The results obtained in the various tests are compared to determine to what extent the notch can affect cracking behavior and the resulting evaluation of the material according to the method described in the standard. Formation of cracking and the crack development has been documented by means of a digital...

  6. Fracture mechanics of piezoelectric solids with interface cracks

    CERN Document Server

    Govorukha, Volodymyr; Loboda, Volodymyr; Lapusta, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive study of cracks situated at the interface of two piezoelectric materials. It discusses different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces, in particular the cases of electrically permeable, impermeable, partially permeable, and conducting cracks. The book also elaborates on a new technique for the determination of electromechanical fields at the tips of interface cracks in finite sized piezoceramic bodies of arbitrary shape under different load types. It solves scientific problems of solid mechanics in connection with the investigation of electromechanical fields in piezoceramic bodies with interface cracks, and develops calculation models and solution methods for plane fracture mechanical problems for piecewise homogeneous piezoceramic bodies with cracks at the interfaces. It discusses the “open” crack model, which leads to a physically unrealistic oscillating singularity at the crack tips, and the contact zone model for in-plane straight interface cracks betw...

  7. Thermographic Inspection of Fatigue Crack by Using Contact Thermal Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Yong; Kim, No Hyu [Korean University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Fatigue crack was detected from a temperature change around surface crack using the thermographic technique. Thermal gradient across the crack decreased very much due to thermal resistance of contact surface in the crack. Heat diffusion flow passing through the discontinuity was visualized in temperature by infrared camera to find and locate the crack. A fatigue crack specimen(SM-45C), which was prepared according to KS specification and notched in its center to initiate fatigue crack from the notch tip, was heated by halogen lamp at the end of one side to generate a heat diffusion flow in lateral direction. A abrupt jump in temperature across the fatigue crack was observed in thermographic image, by which the crack could be located and sized from temperature distribution.

  8. Thermographic Inspection of Fatigue Crack by Using Contact Thermal Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Yong; Kim, No Hyu

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue crack was detected from a temperature change around surface crack using the thermographic technique. Thermal gradient across the crack decreased very much due to thermal resistance of contact surface in the crack. Heat diffusion flow passing through the discontinuity was visualized in temperature by infrared camera to find and locate the crack. A fatigue crack specimen(SM-45C), which was prepared according to KS specification and notched in its center to initiate fatigue crack from the notch tip, was heated by halogen lamp at the end of one side to generate a heat diffusion flow in lateral direction. A abrupt jump in temperature across the fatigue crack was observed in thermographic image, by which the crack could be located and sized from temperature distribution.

  9. The influence of microstructure on fatigue crack initiation in spheroidal graphite cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkey, M.S.; Irving, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports the first stage of this work which concentrates on fatigue crack initiation with particular emphasis on the influence of microstructure. The fatigue lives of three fully ferritic and two fully pearlitic irons, each with different graphite nodule size distributions, have been determined at two strain amplitudes, 0.005 and 0.00018. The tests were carried out in fully reversed strain control on smooth cylindrical specimens in a servohydraulic testing machine. The effects of matrix structure and strength were clearly seen in that the pearlitic irons were superior at both strain levels. Nodule size on the other hand appeared to have no significant effect. The crack initiation sites in the specimens were located by interrupting the tests on detection of a 5% tensile load drop and heat tinting, before continuing. After failure, which was defined as complete separation, the fracture faces were examined on the scanning electron microscope. In the majority of the specimens the major crack origin was found to be a surface micropore with depths ranging from 50 to 250 μm. It is suggested that these micropores and not the graphite modules strongly influence the crack initiation behaviour in SG iron. These findings were confirmed by monitoring the initiation and growth of surface cracks from micropores using surface replica techniques. The influence of microstructure on the percentage of life spent in initiating and propagating a crack was thus determined. Hence the factors contributing to the fatigue behaviour of SG irons can be quantified. Their influence on predictions of cycles to crack initiation using the local approach is discussed. (orig.) 891 RW/orig. 892 RKD [de

  10. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, Jaume; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Fuková, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-01-01

    The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57%) of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%). Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes.

  11. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Macas

    Full Text Available The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57% of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%. Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes.

  12. Dynamic Characteristics of Electrostatically Actuated Microbeams with Slant Crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved model of the slant crack on a microbeam is presented. Based on fracture mechanics, the rotation coefficient for the slant crack is derived as a massless rotational spring accounting for the additional stress intensity factors generated by the orientation of the crack compared to the transverse crack. Comparisons between microbeams with a slant crack of different geometry parameters (slant angle, depth ratio, and crack position are investigated with regard to the dynamic mechanical behaviors and nonlinear response. By presenting a mathematical modeling, the effects of the slant crack and the electric actuation of an electrostatically actuated fixed-fixed microbeam on the dynamic characteristics are examined in detail. It is shown that the crack position has more significant influence on the pull-in voltage value than the slant angle or the depth ratio. Approaching the slant crack to the fixed end or enlarging the external incentives amplifies the nonlinearity of the microbeam system, while the effects of depth ratio and slant angle are dependent on the crack position. The resonance frequency and the resonance amplitude are affected as well.

  13. Eddy current standards - Cracks versus notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemaier, D. J.; Collingwood, M. R.; Nguyen, K. H.

    1992-10-01

    Eddy current tests aimed at evaluating cracks and electron-discharge machined (EDM) notches in 7075-T6 aluminum specimens are described. A comparison of the shape and amplitude of recordings made from both transverse and longitudinal scans of small EDM notches and fatigue cracks showd almost identical results. The signal amplitude and phase angle increased with an increase of EDM notch and crak size. It is concluded that equivalent eddy current results obtained from similar-size surface cracks and notches in aluminum can be used to establish a desired sensitivity level for inspection.

  14. Crack sizing by the time-of-flight diffraction method, in the light of recent international round-robin trials, (UKAEA, DDT and PISC II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In 1980-81, Harwell developed a mini-computer controlled multi-probe defect detection and sizing system based on the ultrasonic time-of-flight/diffraction principle introduced by Silk. This system proved to be capable of fully automatic data collection from the PWR girth-weld simulation Plates 1 and 2 in the Defect Detection Trials of 1981-82. The speed of collection and subsequent analysis was such that a report on the defects found could be filed within 48 hours. The mode of operation adopted simulated minimum time of access to the defects, and was intended to define that dimension of a defect which has greatest significance, i.e. the through-thickness dimension. In 1984, for the PISC II Trial, the approach adopted changed to emphasize the three-dimensional location and sizing capabilities of the time-of-flight/diffraction method. Data collection and analysis became highly interactive and the mode of operation simulated NDE at the manufacturing stage of a pressure vessel. The purpose of this paper is to indicate the defect through-thickness sizing capability of TOFD achieved in the 1981-82 Defect Detection Trials and the defect mapping capability achieved in the 1984 PISC II Trial

  15. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  16. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels. Part 2: Water flow rate effects in high-sulfur plate steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high-sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/s or 4.7 m/s was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi-stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/s and 5.0 m/s parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity

  17. Crack detection using image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, M.A.A

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contains five main subjects in eight chapters and two appendices. The first subject discus Wiener filter for filtering images. In the second subject, we examine using different methods, as Steepest Descent Algorithm (SDA) and the Wavelet Transformation, to detect and filling the cracks, and it's applications in different areas as Nano technology and Bio-technology. In third subject, we attempt to find 3-D images from 1-D or 2-D images using texture mapping with Open Gl under Visual C ++ language programming. The fourth subject consists of the process of using the image warping methods for finding the depth of 2-D images using affine transformation, bilinear transformation, projective mapping, Mosaic warping and similarity transformation. More details about this subject will be discussed below. The fifth subject, the Bezier curves and surface, will be discussed in details. The methods for creating Bezier curves and surface with unknown distribution, using only control points. At the end of our discussion we will obtain the solid form, using the so called NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline); which depends on: the degree of freedom, control points, knots, and an evaluation rule; and is defined as a mathematical representation of 3-D geometry that can accurately describe any shape from a simple 2-D line, circle, arc, or curve to the most complex 3-D organic free-form surface or (solid) which depends on finding the Bezier curve and creating family of curves (surface), then filling in between to obtain the solid form. Another representation for this subject is concerned with building 3D geometric models from physical objects using image-based techniques. The advantage of image techniques is that they require no expensive equipment; we use NURBS, subdivision surface and mesh for finding the depth of any image with one still view or 2D image. The quality of filtering depends on the way the data is incorporated into the model. The data should be treated with

  18. Small fatigue cracks; Proceedings of the Second International Conference/Workshop, Santa Barbara, CA, Jan. 5-10, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Lankford, J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume include crack initiation and stage I growth, microstructure effects, crack closure, environment effects, the role of notches, analytical modeling, fracture mechanics characterization, experimental techniques, and engineering applications. Papers are presented on fatigue crack initiation along slip bands, the effect of microplastic surface deformation on the growth of small cracks, short fatigue crack behavior in relation to three-dimensional aspects and the crack closure effect, the influence of crack depth on crack electrochemistry and fatigue crack growth, and nondamaging notches in fatigue. Consideration is also given to models of small fatigue cracks, short crack theory, assessment of the growth of small flaws from residual strength data, the relevance of short crack behavior to the integrity of major rotating aero engine components, and the relevance of short fatigue crack growth data to the durability and damage tolerance analyses of aircraft.

  19. Comparing the floquet stability of open and breathing fatigue cracks in an overhung rotordynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Philip; Green, Itzhak

    2017-11-01

    Rotor cracks represent an uncommon but serious threat to rotating machines and must be detected early to avoid catastrophic machine failure. An important aspect of analyzing rotor cracks is understanding their influence on the rotor stability. It is well-known that the extent of rotor instability versus shaft speed is exacerbated by deeper cracks. Consequently, crack propagation can eventually result in an unstable response even if the shaft speed remains constant. Most previous investigations of crack-induced rotor instability concern simple Jeffcott rotors. This work advances the state-of-the-art by (a) providing a novel inertial-frame model of an overhung rotor, and (b) assessing the stability of the cracked overhung rotor using Floquet stability analysis. The rotor Floquet stability analysis is performed for both an open crack and a breathing crack, and conclusions are drawn regarding the importance of appropriately selecting the crack model. The rotor stability is analyzed versus crack depth, external viscous damping ratio, and rotor inertia. In general, this work concludes that the onset of instability occurs at lower shaft speeds for thick rotors, lower viscous damping ratios, and deeper cracks. In addition, when comparing commensurate cracks, the breathing crack is shown to induce more regions of instability than the open crack, though the open crack generally predicts an unstable response for shallower cracks than the breathing crack. Keywords: rotordynamics, stability, rotor cracks.

  20. Sub-10-micrometer toughening and crack tip toughness of dental enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Ang, Siang Fung; Schulz, Anja; Pacher Fernandes, Rodrigo; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies, enamel showed indications to occlude small cracks in-vivo and exhibited R-curve behaviors for bigger cracks ex-vivo. This study quantifies the crack tip toughness (KI0, KIII0), the crack closure stress and the cohesive zone size at the crack tip of enamel and investigates the toughening mechanisms near the crack tip down to the length scale of a single enamel crystallite. The crack-opening-displacement (COD) profile of cracks induced by Vickers indents on mature bovine en...

  1. Evaluations of environmental effect on micro crack initiation and propagation by surface observations of fatigue specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Ryosuke; Abe, Shigeki; Nakamura, Takao; Kamaya, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue life of nuclear facilities tends to be decreased by the influence of reactor coolant, which is called environmental effect. The effect accelerates crack growth rate but the influence for crack initiation is not clarified. This study intends to discuss the environmental effect in crack initiation. The crack length and the number of cracks are measured from the investigation of fatigue test specimens in reactor coolant and air. The behavior of crack initiation is revealed from the measurement of number of cracks, crack sizes and fatigue life. From this study, environmental effect of reactor coolant is considered to influence crack initiation and increase the number of micro crack. It is also estimated that the coalescence of cracks influences the acceleration of crack growth. (author)

  2. Sustainability of the use of natural capital in a city: Measuring the size and depth of urban ecological and water footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kai; Zhang, Qifeng; Yu, Huajun; Wang, Yutao; Dong, Liang; Shi, Lei

    2018-08-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are limited in their ability to measure progress towards environmental sustainability especially at the city level. The aim of this paper is to provide insights into an integrated assessment of urban sustainability, with emphasis on the significance of the maintenance of natural capital stocks. The use of water and land as critical natural capital in Guiyang, a southeast city in China was investigated by bringing together the ecological footprint (EF), water footprint (WF) and corresponding capacity indicators into an improved three-dimensional (i3D) model. Results showed that Guiyang has long been operating in a state of overshoot due to shortage of annual natural capital flows and accumulated depletion of stocks. This is particularly true for land use, whose stocks maintained a relatively stable level of depletion between 2000 and 2014. As of 2014, an EF depth of 6.45 was accumulated. With respect to water use, a shift in the city's role from creditor to debtor was observed in 2004. Industrial use of natural capital has more than tripled over the past 15 years and replaced agriculture to be the main driver of water unsustainability. Overall, Guiyang's economic growth did not show signs of decoupling from the EF and WF. These findings highlight the need for effective policies that would help Guiyang reduce dependency on the use of critical natural capital. Finally, this paper provided an in-depth discussion of the methodological strengths and limitations of the i3D model and concluded that it is able to track the structural and characteristic dynamics of both flows and stocks while avoiding burden shifting across various components within single forms of natural capital from a strong sustainability perspective. Our study enhances understanding of the critical role of natural capital in ensuring urban sustainability and improving human welfare in connection with SDGs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microstructural features of environmentally assisted cracking in pipeline steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.W.; Lambert, S.B.; Zhang, X.; Plumtree, A.; Sutherby, R.

    2003-01-01

    A number of small-scale pipeline specimens containing edge or surface cracks were tested in simulated groundwater (NS4 solution) in an anaerobic environment under cyclic loading conditions. Micrographs of the crack surface showed corrosion fatigue at high frequencies and low R-ratios. Following large amounts of growth (∼200 μm) for those specimens tested at low frequencies, evidence of transgranular quasi-cleavage was detected. Green rust was found to be present at the crack tips and along their flanks. Iron sulfide, resulting from anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron carbonate were also present in the NS4 solution during testing. These corrosion products retarded crack growth in the depth direction of surface cracks. Under variable amplitude loadings conditions, the accompanying increased surface crack growth rate can be accounted for by rupture of the green rust film at the crack tip. (author)

  4. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  5. Effect of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in adults: an in-depth literature review of randomized trials with effect size calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrane, Susan; Cohen, Susan M

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate the effect of Reiki therapy for pain and anxiety in randomized clinical trials. A systematic search of PubMed, ProQuest, Cochrane, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, Global Health, and Medline databases was conducted using the search terms pain, anxiety, and Reiki. The Center for Reiki Research also was examined for articles. Studies that used randomization and a control or usual care group, used Reiki therapy in one arm of the study, were published in 2000 or later in peer-reviewed journals in English, and measured pain or anxiety were included. After removing duplicates, 49 articles were examined and 12 articles received full review. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria: four articles studied cancer patients, one examined post-surgical patients, and two analyzed community dwelling older adults. Effect sizes were calculated for all studies using Cohen's d statistic. Effect sizes for within group differences ranged from d = 0.24 for decrease in anxiety in women undergoing breast biopsy to d = 2.08 for decreased pain in community dwelling adults. The between group differences ranged from d = 0.32 for decrease of pain in a Reiki versus rest intervention for cancer patients to d = 4.5 for decrease in pain in community dwelling adults. Although the number of studies is limited, based on the size Cohen's d statistics calculated in this review, there is evidence to suggest that Reiki therapy may be effective for pain and anxiety. Continued research using Reiki therapy with larger sample sizes, consistently randomized groups, and standardized treatment protocols is recommended. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The crack-initiation threshold in ceramic materials subject to elastic/plastic indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, J.; Davidson, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The threshold for indentation cracking is established for a range of ceramic materials, using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and acoustic emission. It is found that by taking into account indentation plasticity, current theories may be successfully combined to predict threshold indentation loads and crack sizes. Threshold cracking is seen to relate to radial rather than median cracking. (author)

  7. Effect of laser shock processing on fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio-Gonzalez, C.; Ocana, J.L.; Gomez-Rosas, G.; Molpeceres, C.; Paredes, M.; Banderas, A.; Porro, J.; Morales, M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) or laser shock peening is a new technique for strengthening metals. This process induces a compressive residual stress field which increases fatigue crack initiation life and reduces fatigue crack growth rate. Specimens of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy are used in this investigation. A convergent lens is used to deliver 1.2 J, 8 ns laser pulses by a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser, operating at 10 Hz. The pulses are focused to a diameter of 1.5 mm onto a water-immersed type aluminum samples. Effect of pulse density in the residual stress field is evaluated. Residual stress distribution as a function of depth is assessed by the hole drilling method. It is observed that the higher the pulse density the larger the zone size with compressive residual stress. Densities of 900, 1350 and 2500 pulses/cm 2 with infrared (1064 nm) radiation are used. Pre-cracked compact tension specimens were subjected to LSP process and then tested under cyclic loading with R = 0.1. Fatigue crack growth rate is determined and the effect of LSP process parameters is evaluated. Fatigue crack growth rate is compared in specimens with and without LSP process. In addition fracture toughness is determined in specimens with and without LSP treatment. It is observed that LSP reduces fatigue crack growth and increases fracture toughness in the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

  8. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic thermal transient stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  9. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic transient thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  10. Creep crack extension by grain-boundary cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassani, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent work by Riedel and coworkers has led to various descriptions of stationary and moving crack tip fields under creep conditions. For stationary and growing cracks, several flow mechanisms (e.g., elastic, time-independent plastic, primary creep, and secondary creep) can dictate the analytical form of the crack tip field. In this paper, relationship between overall loading and crack velocities are modelled based upon grain-boundary cavity growth and coalescence within the zone of concentrated strain in the crack tip field. Coupled diffusion and creep growth of the cavities is considered. Overall crack extension is taken to be intermittent on a size scale equivalent to the size of a grain. Numerical results are presented for a center-cracked panel of 304 stainless steel. (author)

  11. Eddy current crack detection capability assessment approach using crack specimens with differing electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2018-03-01

    Like other NDE methods, eddy current surface crack detectability is determined using probability of detection (POD) demonstration. The POD demonstration involves eddy current testing of surface crack specimens with known crack sizes. Reliably detectable flaw size, denoted by, a90/95 is determined by statistical analysis of POD test data. The surface crack specimens shall be made from a similar material with electrical conductivity close to the part conductivity. A calibration standard with electro-discharged machined (EDM) notches is typically used in eddy current testing for surface crack detection. The calibration standard conductivity shall be within +/- 15% of the part conductivity. This condition is also applicable to the POD demonstration crack set. Here, a case is considered, where conductivity of the crack specimens available for POD testing differs by more than 15% from that of the part to be inspected. Therefore, a direct POD demonstration of reliably detectable flaw size is not applicable. Additional testing is necessary to use the demonstrated POD test data. An approach to estimate the reliably detectable flaw size in eddy current testing for part made from material A using POD crack specimens made from material B with different conductivity is provided. The approach uses additional test data obtained on EDM notch specimens made from materials A and B. EDM notch test data from the two materials is used to create a transfer function between the demonstrated a90/95 size on crack specimens made of material B and the estimated a90/95 size for part made of material A. Two methods are given. For method A, a90/95 crack size for material B is given and POD data is available. Objective of method A is to determine a90/95 crack size for material A using the same relative decision threshold that was used for material B. For method B, target crack size a90/95 for material A is known. Objective is to determine decision threshold for inspecting material A.

  12. TEM observations of crack tip: cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, J.A.; Ohr, S.M.; Jesser, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Crack tip-cavity interactions have been studied by performing room temperature deformation experiments in a transmission electron microscope on ion-irradiated type 316 stainless steel with small helium containing cavities. Slip dislocations emitted from a crack tip cut, sheared, and thereby elongated cavities without a volume enlargement. As the crack tip approached, a cavity volume enlargement occurred. Instead of the cavities continuing to enlarge until they touch, the walls between the cavities fractured. Fracture surface dimples do not correlate in size or density with these enlarged cavities

  13. Cracking susceptibility of stainless steel subjected to plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, H.

    1995-01-01

    The similarities and differences in the cracking susceptibility between welding and resolidification after plasma disruption were examined experimentally using a number of primary candidate alloy samples with different chemical compositions. The product of the number density and the average depth of the cracks was measured after simulated disruption, employing a hydrogen ion beam as the heat source, and was compared with the Varestraint test result. An adequate correlation was observed between them, which indicates that the cracking susceptibility during plasma disruption can be well estimated from the welding cracking susceptibility. (orig.)

  14. Comparative study of direct and inverse problems of cracked beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahieddine Chettah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the analysis and evaluation of the cracked structures were hot spots in several engineering fields and has been the subject of great interest with important and comprehensive surveys covering various methodologies and applications, in order to obtain reliable and effective methods to maintain the safety and performance of structures on a proactive basis. The presence of a crack, not only causes a local variation in the structural parameters (e.g., the stiffness of a beam at its location, but it also has a global effect which affects the overall dynamic behavior of the structure (such as the natural frequencies. For this reason, the dynamic characterization of the cracked structures can be used to detect damage from non-destructive testing. The objective of this paper is to compare the accuracy and ability of two methods to correctly predict the results for both direct problem to find natural frequencies and inverse problem to find crack’s locations and depths of a cracked simply supported beam. Several cases of crack depths and crack locations are investigated. The crack is supposed to remain open. The Euler–Bernoulli beam theory is employed to model the cracked beam and the crack is represented as a rotational spring with a sectional flexibility. In the first method, the transfer matrix method is used; the cracked beam is modeled as two uniform sub-segments connected by a rotational spring located at the cracked section. In the second method which is based on the Rayleigh’s method, the mode shape of the cracked beam is constructed by adding a cubic polynomial function to that of the undamaged beam. By applying the compatibility conditions at crack’s location and the corresponding boundary conditions, the general forms of characteristic equations for this cracked system are obtained. The two methods are then utilized to determine the locations and depths by using any two natural frequencies of a cracked simply

  15. Cracked rotors. A survey on static and dynamic behaviour including modelling and diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachschmid, Nicolo; Pennacchi, Paolo; Tanzi, Ezio [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Cracks can develop in rotating shafts and can propagate to relevant depths without affecting consistently the normal operating conditions of the shaft. In order to avoid catastrophic failures, accurate vibration analyses have to be performed for crack detection. The identification of the crack location and depth is possible by means of a model based diagnostic approach, provided that the model of the crack and the model of the cracked shaft dynamical behavior are accurate and reliable. This monograph shows the typical dynamical behavior of cracked shafts and presents tests for detecting cracks. The book describes how to model cracks, how to simulate the dynamical behavior of cracked shaft, and compares the corresponding numerical with experimental results. All effects of cracks on the vibrations of rotating shafts are analyzed, and some results of a numerical sensitivity analysis of the vibrations to the presence and severity of the crack are shown. Finally the book describes some crack identification procedures and shows some results in model based crack identification in position and depth. The book is useful for higher university courses in mechanical and energetic engineering, but also for skilled technical people employed in power generation industries. (orig.)

  16. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  17. Crack detecting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michiko; Aida, Shigekazu

    1998-01-01

    A penetration liquid or a slow drying penetration liquid prepared by mixing a penetration liquid and a slow drying liquid is filled to the inside of an artificial crack formed to a member to be detected such as of boiler power generation facilities and nuclear power facilities. A developing liquid is applied to the periphery of the artificial crack on the surface of a member to be detected. As the slow-drying liquid, an oil having a viscosity of 56 is preferably used. Loads are applied repeatedly to the member to be detected, and when a crack is caused to the artificial crack, the permeation liquid penetrates into the crack. The penetration liquid penetrated into the crack is developed by the developing liquid previously coated to the periphery of the artificial crack of the surface of the member to be detected. When a crack is caused, since the crack is developed clearly even if it is a small opening, the crack can be recognized visually reliably. (I.N.)

  18. Effects of off-centered crack and restraint of induced bending due to pressure on the crack-opening-area analysis of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Bonora, N.

    1995-01-01

    Estimation of leak rate is an important element in developing leak-before-break (LBB) methodology for piping integrity and safety analysis of nuclear power plants. Here, current models for the crack-opening-area analysis of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks are based on various idealizations or assumption which are often necessary to simplify the mathematical formulation and numerical calculation. This paper focuses on the validity of two such assumptions involving off-centered cracks and restraint of induced bending due to pressure and quantifies their effects on the crack-opening analysis of pipes. Both finite element and/or simple estimation methods were employed to compute the center-crack-opening displacement and crack-opening shape for a through-wall-cracked pipe considering off-centered cracks and restrain of induced bending due to pressure. The results of analyses show that for both cases the crack-opening area can be reduced significantly. For pipes with off-centered cracks, the crack-opening area can be evaluated from analyses of symmetrically centered cracks and assuming elliptical profile. For pipes with complete restraint of induced bending due to pressure, the reduction of crack-opening area depends on the crack size. When the crack size is small, the restraint effects can be ignored. However, when the crack size is larger, the restrained crack-opening can be significantly smaller than the unrestrained crack-opening depending on the length of pipe involved, and hence, may be important for the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses

  19. Evaluation of creep-fatigue crack growth for large-scale FBR reactor vessel and NDE assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hun; Yoo, Bong

    2001-03-01

    Creep fatigue crack growth contributes to the failure of FRB reactor vessels in high temperature condition. In the design stage of reactor vessel, crack growth evaluation is very important to ensure the structural safety and setup the in-service inspection strategy. In this study, creep-fatigue crack growth evaluation has been performed for the semi-elliptical surface cracks subjected to thermal loading. The thermal stress analysis of a large-scale FBR reactor vessel has been carried out for the load conditions. The distributions of axial, radial, hoop, and Von Mises stresses were obtained for the loading conditions. At the maximum point of the axial and hoop stress, the longitudinal and circumferential surface cracks (i.e. PTS crack, NDE short crack and shallow long crack) were postulated. Using the maximum and minimum values of stresses, the creep-fatigue crack growth of the proposed cracks was simulated. The crack growth rate of circumferential cracks becomes greater than that of longitudinal cracks. The total crack growth of the largest PTS crack is very small after 427 cycles. The structural integrity of a large-scale reactor can be maintained for the plant life. The crack depth growth of the shallow long crack is faster than that of the NDE short crack. In the ISI of the large-scale FBR reactor vessel, the ultrasonic inspection is beneficial to detect the shallow circumferential cracks.

  20. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  1. Non destructive characterization of cracks in concrete by ultrasonic auscultation of civil engineering structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiviger, A.; Payan, C.; Chaix, J.F.; Zardan, J.P.; Garnier, V.; Salin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Concrete Non Destructive Characterisation is one of the important issues to evaluate the life duration in the present and future civil engineering structures. The damaging modes of the structures often imply the phases of the appearance and after growth of the cracks. We have to detect, identify and characterize them. The characterization result must lead to a diagnosis of the criticality of a crack regarding to the integrity of the structure and its ability to fulfill its function. The Non Destructive Evaluation techniques are numerous but the ultrasonic ones are able to give an answer to both the characterization and the follow-up of the defect on site. Yet if this method is potentially relevant to detect and identify the cracks in the concrete, we have today a certain amount of locks to remove in order to offer robust and reproducible industrial solutions. These locks range from research points like the description of the real propagation of linear or non linear ultrasonic waves in a heterogeneous material, to more industrial concepts such as the development of devices designed to be applied in the concrete control. For this purpose, we present our latest works on this topic. We develop an overview of the problem: first, to extract the most important theoretical solutions to analyse an unstopping and closed crack in concrete with an only one face access. Then we suggest a methodology to apply one of these solutions on site. A first step of this work after having chosen a solution is to check the ability of the technique to detect a crack, and its sensitivity to the length, depth and opening of the crack. We have developed an experimental plan based on theoretical concept to compare the linear and non linear survey on a set of specimens composed of concrete beams cracked to different depths. We describe the devices and give the latest results. The non linear technique is able to extract information on the size of the cracks. It is an important step to progress in

  2. Non destructive characterization of cracks in concrete by ultrasonic auscultation of civil engineering structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiviger, A.; Payan, C.; Chaix, J.F.; Zardan, J.P.; Garnier, V. [EDF, LCND (France); Salin, J. [EDF Paris (France)

    2011-07-01

    Concrete Non Destructive Characterisation is one of the important issues to evaluate the life duration in the present and future civil engineering structures. The damaging modes of the structures often imply the phases of the appearance and after growth of the cracks. We have to detect, identify and characterize them. The characterization result must lead to a diagnosis of the criticality of a crack regarding to the integrity of the structure and its ability to fulfill its function. The Non Destructive Evaluation techniques are numerous but the ultrasonic ones are able to give an answer to both the characterization and the follow-up of the defect on site. Yet if this method is potentially relevant to detect and identify the cracks in the concrete, we have today a certain amount of locks to remove in order to offer robust and reproducible industrial solutions. These locks range from research points like the description of the real propagation of linear or non linear ultrasonic waves in a heterogeneous material, to more industrial concepts such as the development of devices designed to be applied in the concrete control. For this purpose, we present our latest works on this topic. We develop an overview of the problem: first, to extract the most important theoretical solutions to analyse an unstopping and closed crack in concrete with an only one face access. Then we suggest a methodology to apply one of these solutions on site. A first step of this work after having chosen a solution is to check the ability of the technique to detect a crack, and its sensitivity to the length, depth and opening of the crack. We have developed an experimental plan based on theoretical concept to compare the linear and non linear survey on a set of specimens composed of concrete beams cracked to different depths. We describe the devices and give the latest results. The non linear technique is able to extract information on the size of the cracks. It is an important step to progress in

  3. A theoretical model of semi-elliptic surface crack growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Kaikai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model of semi-elliptic surface crack growth based on the low cycle strain damage accumulation near the crack tip along the cracking direction and the Newman–Raju formula is developed. The crack is regarded as a sharp notch with a small curvature radius and the process zone is assumed to be the size of cyclic plastic zone. The modified Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren (HRR formulations are used in the presented study. Assuming that the shape of surface crack front is controlled by two critical points: the deepest point and the surface point. The theoretical model is applied to semi-elliptic surface cracked Al 7075-T6 alloy plate under cyclic loading, and five different initial crack shapes are discussed in present study. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results is obtained.

  4. A unified model of hydride cracking based on elasto-plastic energy release rate over a finite crack extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Sauve, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    A fracture criterion based on energy balance is proposed for elasto-plastic cracking at hydrides in zirconium, assuming a finite length of crack advance. The proposed elasto-plastic energy release rate is applied to the crack initiation at hydrides in smooth and notched surfaces, as well as the subsequent delayed hydride cracking (DHC) considering limited crack-tip plasticity. For a smooth or notched surface of an elastic body, the fracture parameter is related to the stress intensity factor for the initiated crack. For DHC, a unique curve relates the non-dimensionalized elasto-plastic energy release rate with the length of crack extension relative to the plastic zone size. This fracture criterion explains experimental observations concerning DHC in a qualitative manner. Quantitative comparison with experiments is made for fracture toughness and DHC tests on specimens containing certain hydride structures; very good agreement is obtained. ((orig.))

  5. Correlation of fracture parameters during onset of crack in middle tension specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Starvin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study addresses the implementation of finite element analysis and the prediction of fracture parameters in a middle tension (MT specimen that was fabricated using AISI 4140 steel. The correlation of fracture parameters with external loads and crack sizes was investigated. A Finite Element code was developed to simulate the fracture model. The contour integral method was applied in the calculation of stress intensity factor and J-integral in the cracked specimen. The ASTM standard empirical formula was used to calculate the stress intensity factor (SIF and the numerical predictions were validated. A standard laboratory experiment was also carried out using the MT specimen to calculate the crack growth rate in this specific material. The SIF values were almost linear with external load but it was decreasing as the crack size increases. The crack requires minimum load for crack propagation as the crack size increases. Similarly the J-integral was accelerated with increase in crack size.

  6. Detection of a fatigue crack in a rotor system using full-spectrum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    parameters identified are the additive stiffness due to crack, disc eccentricity due to unbalance, and system viscous damping. ... to increase in direct proportion to the crack size, accord- ... come defects in traditional methods of vibration signal.

  7. Numerical simulations of material mismatch and ductile crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestby, Erling

    2002-07-01

    Both the global geometry and inhomogeneities in material properties will influence the fracture behaviour of structures in presence of cracks. In this thesis numerical simulations have been used to investigate how some aspects of both these issues affect the conditions at the crack-tip. The thesis is organised in an introduction chapter, summarising the major findings and conclusions, a review chapter, presenting the main aspects of the developments in the field of fracture mechanics, and three research papers. Paper I considers the effect of mismatch in hardening exponent on the local near-tip stress field for stationary interface cracks in bi-materials under small scale yielding conditions. It is demonstrated that the stress level in the weaker material increases compared to what is found in the homogeneous material for the same globally applied load level, with the effect being of increasing importance as the crack-tip is approached. Although a coupling between the radial and angular dependence of the stress fields exists, the evolving stress field can still be normalised with the applied J. The effect on the increase in stress level can closely be characterised by the difference in hardening exponent, {delta}n, termed the hardening mismatch, and is more or less independent of the absolute level of hardening in the two materials. Paper II and Ill deal with the effects of geometry, specimen size, hardening level and yield stress mismatch in relation to ductile crack growth. The ductile crack growth is simulated through use of the Gurson model. In Paper H the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is investigated for deep cracked bend and shallow cracked tensile specimens. At small amounts of crack growth the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is small, but a more significant effect is found for larger amounts of crack growth. The crack growth resistance decreases in smaller specimens loaded in tension, whereas the opposite is

  8. Characterization of Cracking Mechanisms of Carbon Anodes Used in Aluminum Industry by Optical Microscopy and Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, Salah; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Bhattacharyay, Dipankar; Bouazara, Mohamed; Morais, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the different mechanisms of crack formation in dense anodes used in the aluminum industry. The first approach used is based on the qualitative characterization of the surface cracks and the depth of these cracks. The second approach, which constitutes a quantitative characterization, is carried out by determining the distribution of the crack width along its length as well as the percentage of the surface containing cracks. A qualitative analysis of crack formation was also carried out using 3D tomography. It was observed that mixing and forming conditions have a significant effect on crack formation in green anodes. The devolatilization of pitch during baking causes the formation and propagation of cracks in baked anodes in which large particles control the direction of crack propagation.

  9. Finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure under plane strain state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Joo; Kang, Jae Youn; Song, Ji Ho

    2004-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure is performed for plane strain conditions. The stabilization behavior of crack opening level and the effect of mesh size on the crack opening stress are investigated. In order to obtain a stabilized crack opening level for plane strain conditions, the crack must be advanced through approximately four times the initial monotonic plastic zone. The crack opening load tends to increase with the decrease of mesh size. The mesh size nearly equal to the theoretical plane strain cyclic plastic zone size may provide reasonable numerical results comparable with experimental crack opening data. The crack opening behavior is influenced by the crack growth increment and discontinuous opening behavior is observed. A procedure to predict the most appropriate mesh size for different stress ratio is suggested. Crack opening loads predicted by the FE analysis based on the procedure suggested resulted in good agreement with experimental ones within the error of 5 %. Effect of the distance behind the crack tip on the crack opening load determined by the ASTM compliance offset method based on the load-displacement relation and by the rotational offset method based on the load-differential displacement relation is investigated. Optimal gage location and method to determine the crack opening load is suggested

  10. Recent evaluations of crack-opening-area in circumferentially cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Miura, N.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. The leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of the through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section XI. The objectives of this study were to review, evaluate, and refine current predictive models for performing crack-opening-area analyses of circumferentially cracked pipes. The results from twenty-five full-scale pipe fracture experiments, conducted in the Degraded Piping Program, the International Piping Integrity Research Group Program, and the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program, were used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess quantitatively the accuracy of the predictive models. The evaluation also involved finite element analyses for determining the crack-opening profile often needed to perform leak-rate calculations.

  11. Detection of a Surface-Breaking Crack by Using the Surface Wave of a Laser Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Hyun-Kyu; Joo, Young-Sang; Cha, Hyung-Ki; Kang, Young-June

    2006-01-01

    A laser ultrasonic system is a non-contact inspection device with a high spatial resolution and a wide-band spectrum. Also it provides absolute measurements of the moving distance and can be applied to the hard-to access locations with curved or rough surfaces like a nuclear power plant. Several laser ultrasonic techniques are applied for the detection of micro cracks in a nuclear power plant. Also, laser ultrasonic techniques are used to measure the grain size of materials and to detect cracks in railroads and aircrafts. Though the laser ultrasonic inspection system is widely applicable, it is comparatively expensive and it provides a low signal-to-noise ratio when compared to the conventional piezoelectric transducers. Many studies have been carried out to improve the system performance. One of the widely used measurement devices of a ultrasound is the Confocal Fabry-Perot Interferometer(CFPI) with a dynamic stabilizer. The dynamic stabilizer improves the stability of the CFPI by adaptively maintaining the optimum working status at the measuring time of the CFPI. In this paper, we have investigated the detection methods of the depth of a surface-breaking crack by using the surface wave of a laser ultrasound. We have fabricated a laser ultrasonic inspection system on an optical table by using a pulse laser, a CFPI with a dynamic stabilizer and a computer. The computer acquires the laser ultrasound by using a high speed A/D converter with a sampling rate of 1000 MHz. The dynamic stabilizer stabilizes the CFPI by adaptively maintaining it at an optimum status when the laser ultrasound is generated. The computer processes the ultrasonic signal in real time to extract the depth information of a surface-breaking crack. We extracted the depth information from the peak-to-valley values in the time domain and also from the center frequencies of the spectrum in the frequency domain

  12. On short cracks that depart from elastoplastic notch tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Miquelin Machado

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of short cracks that depart from elastoplastic notch tips is modeled to estimate the stresses required to initiate and to propagate cracks in notched structural components, and to evaluate the size of tolerable crack-like defects under general loading conditions. This analysis can model both fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking problems; can evaluate notch sensitivity in both cases; and can as well be used to establish design or acceptance criteria for tolerable non-propagating crack-like defects in such cases. The growth of short cracks is assumed driven by the applied stresses and by the stress gradient ahead the notch tip, and supported by the material resistances to crack initiation and to long crack propagation by fatigue or EAC. In the elastoplastic case, the stress gradient ahead of the notch tip is quantified by a J-field to consider the short crack behavior. The tolerable short crack predictions made by this model are evaluated by suitable fatigue and EAC tests of notched specimens specially designed to start nonpropagating cracks from the notch tips, both under elastic and elastoplastic conditions.

  13. Evaluation of intergranular cracks on the ring header cross at Grand Gulf Unit No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    A metallurgical investigation was performed on a sample of cracked ring header cross material from the Grand Gulf Unit No. 1 Nuclear Power Station. The cracks were located in a 6-7 in (15-17.5 cm) width band running circumferentially below the cross to cap weld with a similar band above the cross to discharger pipe weld. The indications were up to 19 mm in length and 6.0 mm in depth. This particular sample was cut from a cross which had not seen actual service but which had been used to qualify the induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) technique for the Grand Gulf units. The base material was SA 182 material manufactured to SA 403-type WP 304 stainless steel. The investigation consisted of visual/dye penetrant examination, chemical analysis, hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The evaluated cracks were intergranular and initiated on the forging's exterior surface. The grain size of the material was larger than ASTM 00 and no definitive corrosive species were found by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The cracking is considered to be the result of the forging having been overheated/burned during manufacture. (author)

  14. Fatigue crack growth studies on a tee junction using ultrasonic non-destructive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Thavasimuthu, M.; Ramesh, A.S.; Jayakumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Fatigue cracks need to be detected and sized to maintain structural integrity. The significance of cracks detected in service must also be assessed. This paper describes the on-line ultrasonic testing carried out on a Tee joint subjected to fatigue loading. The initiation and growth of the cracks were monitored for every 5,000 cycles up to 40,000 cycles. The study demonstrated the use of ultrasonic testing for fatigue crack growth detection and sizing. (author)

  15. Influence of MSD crack pattern on the residual strength of flat stiffened sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, K.-F.

    A parameter study of the residual strength for a multiple site damaged (MSD) stiffened sheet is presented. The analysis is based on an elastic-plastic fracture analysis using the yield-strip model for interaction between a lead crack and the smaller MSD cracks. Two crack growth criteria, one with a pronounced crack growth resistance and one with no crack growth resistance and five different MSD crack patterns, are analysed for different sizes of the lead crack and the smaller MSD cracks. The analysis indicates that the residual strength reduction depends on all these parameters and that MSD may totally erode the crack arrest capability of a tear strap. Another important outcome is that for certain combinations also very small MSD cracks may induce a significant residual strength reduction.

  16. Numerical analysis for prediction of fatigue crack opening level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeon Chang

    2004-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is the most popular numerical method to simulate plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure and can predict fatigue crack closure behavior. Finite element analysis under plane stress state using 4-node isoparametric elements is performed to investigate the detailed closure behavior of fatigue cracks and the numerical results are compared with experimental results. The mesh of constant size elements on the crack surface can not correctly predict the opening level for fatigue crack as shown in the previous works. The crack opening behavior for the size mesh with a linear change shows almost flat stress level after a crack tip has passed by the monotonic plastic zone. The prediction of crack opening level presents a good agreement with published experimental data regardless of stress ratios, which are using the mesh of the elements that are in proportion to the reversed plastic zone size considering the opening stress intensity factors. Numerical interpolation results of finite element analysis can precisely predict the crack opening level. This method shows a good agreement with the experimental data regardless of the stress ratios and kinds of materials

  17. Refinement and evaluation of crack-opening-area analyses for circumferential through-wall cracks in pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Wilkowski, G.; Choi, Y.H.; Moberg, F.; Brickstad, B.

    1995-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. These leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of a through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses, which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section 11. This study was requested by the NRC to review, evaluate, and refine current analytical models for crack-opening-area analyses of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks. Twenty-five pipe experiments were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the predictive models. Several practical aspects of crack-opening such as; crack-face pressure, off-center cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, cracks in thickness transition regions, weld residual stresses, crack-morphology models, and thermal-hydraulic analysis, were also investigated. 140 refs., 105 figs., 41 tabs

  18. Comparison of finite element J-integral evaluations for the blunt crack model and the sharp crack model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.C.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    In assessing the safety of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), a major concern is that of hot sodium coming into contact with either unprotected concrete or steel-lined concrete equipment cells and containment structures. An aspect of this is the potential of concrete cracking which would significantly influence the safety assessment. Concrete cracking in finite element analysis can be modeled as a blunt crack in which the crack is assumed to be uniformly distributed throughout the area of the element. A blunt crack model based on the energy release rate and the effective strength concepts which was insensitive to the element size was presented by Bazant and Cedolin. Some difficulties were encountered in incorporating their approach into a general purpose finite element code. An approach based on the J-integral to circumvent some of the difficulties was proposed by Pan, Marchertas, and Kennedy. Alternatively, cracking can also be modeled as a sharp crack where the crack surface is treated as the boundary of the finite element mesh. The sharp crack model is adopted by most researchers and its J-integral has been well established. It is desirable to establish the correlation between the J-integrals, or the energy release rates, for the blunt crack model and the sharp crack model so that data obtained from one model can be used on the other

  19. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  20. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  1. Automatic Detection of Inactive Solar Cell Cracks in Electroluminescence Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2017-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for automatic determination of the electroluminescence (EL) signal threshold level corresponding to inactive solar cell cracks, resulting from their disconnection from the electrical circuit of the cell. The method enables automatic quantification of the cell crack size an...

  2. Automatic Detection of Inactive Solar Cell Cracks in Electroluminescence Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2017-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for automatic determination of the electroluminescence (EL) signal threshold level corresponding to inactive solar cell cracks, resulting from their disconnection from the electrical circuit of the cell. The method enables automatic quantification of the cell crack size...

  3. Discrete dislocation plasticity modeling of short cracks in single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    The mode-I crack growth behavior of geometrically similar edge-cracked single crystal specimens of varying size subject to both monotonic and cyclic axial loading is analyzed using discrete dislocation dynamics. Plastic deformation is modeled through the motion of edge dislocations in an elastic

  4. Fatigue crack behaviour in mine excavator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Y.; Grondin, G.Y.; Elwi, A.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-05-15

    Fatigue cracking in excavation equipment represents a significant operating cost for oil sands operators. It is caused by high impact loads, the high frequency of load cycles, and large component sizes found in oil sands processing facilities. Monitoring and repair strategies for fatigue cracks are typically based on vendor specifications and the experience of maintenance personnel. This paper provided details of an optimized crack management program applied to a BE 395B shovel boom. The proposed crack management tool uses a chart to predict the remaining life of a corner crack in the shovel boom. Predictions are based on limited field measurements of operating loads as well as on data obtained from fatigue testing of boom material, and a finite element analysis of the shovel boom. Field and laboratory data are used along with fracture mechanics and finite element modelling to predict crack life. It was concluded that the tool will allow inspectors and planners to schedule repairs based on safe service life. The tool is applicable for any components subjected to fatigue loading. 3 refs., 21 tabs., 64 figs.

  5. Thermal shock cracking of GSO single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kazunari; Tamura, Takaharu; Kurashige, Kazuhisa; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Susa, Kenzo

    1998-01-01

    The quantitative estimation of the failure stress of a gadolinium orthosilicate (Gd 2 SiO 5 , hereafter abbreviated as GSO) single crystal due to thermal shock was investigated. A cylindrical test specimen was heated in a silicone oil bath, then subjected to thermal shock by pouring room temperature silicone oil. Cracking occurred during cooling. The heat conduction analysis was performed to obtain temperature distribution in a GSO single crystal at cracking, using the surface temperatures measured in the thermal shock cracking test. Then the thermal stress was calculated using temperature profile of the test specimen obtained from the heat conduction analysis. It is found from the results of the thermal stress analysis and the observation of the cracking in test specimens that the thermal shock cracking occurs in a cleavage plane due to the stress normal to the plane. Three-point bending tests were also performed to examine the relationship between the critical stress for thermal shock cracking and the three-point bending strength obtained from small-sized test specimens. (author)

  6. Crack propagation on spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Roche, R.

    1975-01-01

    The risk presented by a crack on a pressure vessel built with a ductile steel cannot be well evaluated by simple application of the rules of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, which only apply to brittle materials. Tests were carried out on spherical vessels of three different scales built with the same steel. Cracks of different length were machined through the vessel wall. From the results obtained, crack initiation stress (beginning of stable propagation) and instable propagation stress may be plotted against the lengths of these cracks. For small and medium size, subject to ductile fracture, the resulting curves are identical, and may be used for ductile fracture prediction. Brittle rupture was observed on larger vessels and crack propagation occurred at lower stress level. Preceedings curves are not usable for fracture analysis. Ultimate pressure can be computed with a good accuracy by using equivalent energy toughness, Ksub(1cd), characteristic of the metal plates. Satisfactory measurements have been obtained on thin samples. The risks of brittle fracture may then judged by comparing Ksub(1cd) with the calculated K 1 value, in which corrections for vessel shape are taken into account. It is thus possible to establish the bursting pressure of cracked spherical vessels, with the help of two rules, one for brittle fracture, the other for ductile instability. A practical method is proposed on the basis of the work reported here

  7. Thermal analysis of cracked bodies using finite element techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellen, T.K.; Price, R.H.; Harrison, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    The paper develops the potential energy equation in terms of finite element theory including thermal loads. Following this, the energy release rate and consequently the stress intensity factors are derived. Considerations of the classical near crack tip equations are made and deficiencies with the popular substitution methods are highlighted. A method of removing these deficiencies is described. Various energy methods are reconsidered in terms of the role of the thermal energy contribution to the potential energy. These methods include work of crack closure, energy compliance and virtual crack extensions with no other change in nodal geometry, and therefore only requires the recalculation of the stiffness matrices of the crack tip elements. An example of a quadratic temperature gradient parallel to the crack plane in an edge cracked plate is described. Comparisons of the various finite element methods are made and generally show good agreement. A second application compares the virtual crack extension method with an approximate analytical solution in determining stress intensity factors for a thick hollow cylinder with an axial crack for various depths through the wall thickness and for different times. Initially the cylinder is at a uniform high temperature and is then subjected to a sustained cooling shock. Analytical solutions are available for temperature and stress distributions in the uncracked pipe. The stress intensity for a shallow crack in the early stages of the transient has been determined using a superposition procedure. Comparison of the analytical and computed results shows good agreement between the methods

  8. Cracked gas generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abthoff, J; Schuster, H D; Gabler, R

    1976-11-17

    A small cracked-gas generator in a vehicle driven, in particular, by an air combustion engine has been proposed for the economic production of the gases necessary for low toxicity combustion from diesel fuel. This proceeds via catalytic crack-gasification and exploitation of residual heat from exhaust gases. This patent application foresees the insertion of one of the catalysts supporting the cracked-gas reaction in a container through which the reacting mixture for cracked-gas production flows in longitudinal direction. Further, air ducts are embedded in the catalyst through which exhaust gases and fresh air flow in counter direction to the cracked gas flow in the catalyst. The air vents are connected through heat conduction to the catalyst. A cracked gas constituting H/sub 2//CO/CO/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O can be produced from the air-fuel mixture using appropriate catalysts. By the addition of 5 to 25% of cracked gas to the volume of air drawn in by the combustion engine, a more favourable combustion can be achieved compared to that obtained under normal combustion conditions.

  9. a Cost-Effective Method for Crack Detection and Measurement on Concrete Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, M. M.; Ali, T. A.; Abdelfatah, A.; Yehia, S.; Elaksher, A.

    2017-11-01

    Crack detection and measurement in the surface of concrete structures is currently carried out manually or through Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) such as imaging or scanning. The recent developments in depth (stereo) cameras have presented an opportunity for cost-effective, reliable crack detection and measurement. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the new inexpensive depth camera (ZED) for crack detection and measurement. This depth camera with its lightweight and portable nature produces a 3D data file of the imaged surface. The ZED camera was utilized to image a concrete surface and the 3D file was processed to detect and analyse cracks. This article describes the outcome of the experiment carried out with the ZED camera as well as the processing tools used for crack detection and analysis. Crack properties that were also of interest were length, orientation, and width. The use of the ZED camera allowed for distinction between surface and concrete cracks. The ZED high-resolution capability and point cloud capture technology helped in generating a dense 3D data in low-lighting conditions. The results showed the ability of the ZED camera to capture the crack depth changes between surface (render) cracks, and crack that form in the concrete itself.

  10. A COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR CRACK DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT ON CONCRETE SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Crack detection and measurement in the surface of concrete structures is currently carried out manually or through Non-Destructive Testing (NDT such as imaging or scanning. The recent developments in depth (stereo cameras have presented an opportunity for cost-effective, reliable crack detection and measurement. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the new inexpensive depth camera (ZED for crack detection and measurement. This depth camera with its lightweight and portable nature produces a 3D data file of the imaged surface. The ZED camera was utilized to image a concrete surface and the 3D file was processed to detect and analyse cracks. This article describes the outcome of the experiment carried out with the ZED camera as well as the processing tools used for crack detection and analysis. Crack properties that were also of interest were length, orientation, and width. The use of the ZED camera allowed for distinction between surface and concrete cracks. The ZED high-resolution capability and point cloud capture technology helped in generating a dense 3D data in low-lighting conditions. The results showed the ability of the ZED camera to capture the crack depth changes between surface (render cracks, and crack that form in the concrete itself.

  11. Application possibility of the direct current conduction method for nondestructive crack measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedl, R.

    1982-01-01

    An important value to determine the danger of cracks is the determination of crack depths. The crack depth can be determined quite accurate by means of the direct current conduction method, if one holds onto certain rules. Often complicated experimental set-ups are applied. However, portable commercial devices can be obtained that can be used for partial fluxation, that yield good results. By means of two examples: crack conduction samples in which the built-up of a constant-cracking is persued up to a certain depth, as well as the persuasion of an continuing crack in a bearing cylinder, shall be demonstrated that is very well possible to record accurate profiles with commercial devices and to avoid expensive measurement devices. (orig.) [de

  12. Fatigue crack growth behaviour of semi-elliptical surface cracks for an API 5L X65 gas pipeline under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaari, M. S.; Akramin, M. R. M.; Ariffin, A. K.; Abdullah, S.; Kikuchi, M.

    2018-02-01

    The paper is presenting the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of semi-elliptical surface cracks for API X65 gas pipeline using S-version FEM. A method known as global-local overlay technique was used in this study to predict the fatigue behavior that involve of two separate meshes each specifically for global (geometry) and local (crack). The pre-post program was used to model the global geometry (coarser mesh) known as FAST including the material and boundary conditions. Hence, the local crack (finer mesh) will be defined the exact location and the mesh control accordingly. The local mesh was overlaid along with the global before the numerical computation taken place to solve the engineering problem. The stress intensity factors were computed using the virtual crack closure-integral method (VCCM). The most important results is the behavior of the fatigue crack growth, which contains the crack depth (a), crack length (c) and stress intensity factors (SIF). The correlation between the fatigue crack growth and the SIF shows a good growth for the crack depth (a) and dissimilar for the crack length (c) where stunned behavior was resulted. The S-version FEM will benefiting the user due to the overlay technique where it will shorten the computation process.

  13. Self-repair of cracks in brittle material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most effective uses for self repair is in material systems that crack because the cracks can allow the repair chemical to flow into the crack damage sites in all three dimensions. In order for the repair chemical to stay in the damage site and flow along to all the crack and repair there must be enough chemical to fill the entire crack. The repair chemical must be designed appropriately for the particular crack size and total volume of cracks. In each of the three examples of self repair in crackable brittle systems, the viscosity and chemical makeup and volume of the repair chemicals used is different for each system. Further the chemical delivery system has to be designed for each application also. Test results from self repair of three brittle systems are discussed. In "Self Repair of Concrete Bridges and Infrastructure" two chemicals were used due to different placements in bridges to repair different types of cracks- surface shrinkage and shear cracks, In "Airplane Wings and Fuselage, in Graphite" the composite has very different properties than the concrete bridges. In the graphite for airplane components the chemical also had to survive the high processing temperatures. In this composite the cracks were so definite and deep and thin that the repair chemical could flow easily and repair in all layers of the composite. In "Ceramic/Composite Demonstrating Self Repair" the self repair system not only repaired the broken ceramic but also rebounded the composite to the ceramic layer

  14. Biaxial fatigue crack propagation behavior of perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Shi, Shouwen; Wang, Lei; Chen, Xu; Chen, Gang

    2018-04-01

    Perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes have long been used as the typical electrolyte for polymer-electrolyte fuel cells, which not only transport proton and water but also serve as barriers to prevent reactants mixing. However, too often the structural integrity of perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes is impaired by membrane thinning or cracks/pinholes formation induced by mechanical and chemical degradations. Despite the increasing number of studies that report crack formation, such as crack size and shape, the underlying mechanism and driving forces have not been well explored. In this paper, the fatigue crack propagation behaviors of Nafion membranes subjected to biaxial loading conditions have been investigated. In particular, the fatigue crack growth rates of flat cracks in responses to different loading conditions are compared, and the impact of transverse stress on fatigue crack growth rate is clarified. In addition, the crack paths for slant cracks under both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions are discussed, which are similar in geometry to those found after accelerated stress testing of fuel cells. The directions of initial crack propagation are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental observations, which are in good agreement. The findings reported here lays the foundation for understanding of mechanical failure of membranes.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking experience in steam generators at Bruce NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.J.; Gonzalez, F.; Brown, J.

    1993-01-01

    In late 1990 and through 1991, units 1 and 2 at the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (BNGS-A) experienced a number of steam generator tube leaks. Tube failures were identified by eddy current to be circumferential cracks at U-bend supports on the hot-leg side of the boilers. In late 1991, tubes were removed from these units for failure characterization. Two active failure modes were found: corrosion fatigue in both units 1 and 2 and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in unit 2. In unit 2, lead was found in deposits, on tubes, and in cracks, and the cracking was mixed-mode: transgranular and intergranular. This convincingly indicated the involvement of lead in the stress corrosion cracking failures. A program of inspection and tube removals was carried out to investigate more fully the extent of the problem. This program found significant cracking only in lead-affected boilers in unit 2, and also revealed a limited extent of non-lead-related intergranular stress corrosion cracking in other boilers and units. Various aspects of the failures and tube examinations are presented in this paper. Included is discussion of the cracking morphology, measured crack size distributions, and chemical analysis of tube surfaces, crack faces, and deposits -- with particular emphasis on lead

  16. Fatigue crack Behaviour in a High Strength Tool Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, Christian; Carstensen, Jesper V.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2002-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on fatigue crack initiation and crack growth of a hardened and tempered high speed steel was investigated. The evolution of fatigue cracks was followed in four point bending at room temperature. It was found that a carbide damage zone exists above a threshold load...... value of maximally 80% of the yield strength of the steel. The size of this carbide damage zone increases with increasing load amplitude, and the zone is apparently associated with crack nucleation. On fatigue crack propagation plastic deformation of the matrix occurs in a radius of approximately 4...... microns in front of the fatigue crack tip, which is comparable with the relevant mean free carbide spacing....

  17. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    usual approaches are adapted in used conditions ( 280 ≤ T max ≤ 550 deg C, 100 ≤ □T ≤ 300 deg C): they are simply based on thermal loading mechanical loading equivalence. However, they appear not to be well adapted when additional factors exist such as roughness, residual stresses... Furthermore, Scanning Electron Microscopy observations show that damage is initiated well before the 'engineer initiation', as previously detected using optical microscopy on SPLASH specimen. First stage damage evolutions are thus a new task. Strain and stress fields generated during test are estimated thanks to finite element method computations (FEM), using CASTEM-2000 CEA software. Information coming from these FEM computations monitor lower-scale modelling: Discrete dislocation Dynamics (MICROMEGAS software). In order to continue that task, a new specimen has been adapted to the CYTHIA facility. Specimens consist of removable disks in which different and well-controlled conditions may be enforced. In order to estimate propagation of long crack, conventional fracture mechanic approach seems to be well adapted. The effective Stress Intensity Factor calculation takes into account of plastic strain. Furthermore, it is assumed that crack is opened during 60 % of cyclic loading. Shielding effect is clearly underlined by all the observations: on surface, on cross side section, and after sub-surface step-by-step removal. Multiple crack propagation (in the depth direction) is simulated using the previous single crack modelling. An auto-adaptative meshing allows simulating growth of 10 cracks up to 35,000 cycles. Two-development tasks are now in progress. The first task is oriented on the multiple crack growth and stability after an additional mechanical loading. The second task deals with the first damage stage up to the 'engineer crack initiation'. (author)

  18. Mode Shape Analysis of Multiple Cracked Functionally Graded Timoshenko Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Van Lien

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper addresses free vibration of multiple cracked Timoshenko beams made of Functionally Graded Material (FGM. Cracks are modeled by rotational spring of stiffness calculated from the crack depth and material properties vary according to the power law throughout the beam thickness. Governing equations for free vibration of the beam are formulated with taking into account actual position of the neutral plane. The obtained frequency equation and mode shapes are used for analysis of the beam mode shapes in dependence on the material and crack parameters. Numerical results validate usefulness of the proposed herein theory and show that mode shapes are good indication for detecting multiple cracks in Timoshenko FGM beams.

  19. Transient thermal stress problem for a circumferentially cracked hollow cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The transient thermal stress problem for a hollow elasticity cylinder containing an internal circumferential edge crack is considered. It is assumed that the problem is axisymmetric with regard to the crack geometry and the loading, and that the inertia effects are negligible. The problem is solved for a cylinder which is suddenly cooled from inside. First the transient temperature and stress distributions in an uncracked cylinder are calculated. By using the equal and opposite of this thermal stress as the crack surface traction in the isothermal cylinder the crack problem is then solved and the stress intensity factor is calculated. The numerical results are obtained as a function of the Fourier number tD/b(2) representing the time for various inner-to-outer radius ratios and relative crack depths, where D and b are respectively the coefficient of diffusivity and the outer radius of the cylinder.

  20. Potential drop crack measurement systems for CANDU components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahney, R [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    A project to develop an automated crack measurement system for CANDU pressure tube burst testing is currently underway. The system will utilize either Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) or Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) techniques for crack measurement. The preliminary stage of the project involves testing and comparison of both ACPD and DCPD methods on a Zr - 2.5% Nb alloy plate with saw cuts (used to simulate cracks). Preliminary results show that both ACPD and DCPD techniques are capable of detecting cracks; further testing is in progress to determine the ability of each of the two systems to make accurate crack depth measurements. This paper will describe the two potential drop techniques and will present test results from the experimental program. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  2. Cracking the Gender Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennison, Betina Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    extensive work to raise the proportion of women. This has helped slightly, but women remain underrepresented at the corporate top. Why is this so? What can be done to solve it? This article presents five different types of answers relating to five discursive codes: nature, talent, business, exclusion...... in leadership management, we must become more aware and take advantage of this complexity. We must crack the codes in order to crack the curve....

  3. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  4. Natural zeolite bitumen cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznicki, S.M.; McCaffrey, W.C.; Bian, J.; Wangen, E.; Koenig, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate how low cost heavy oil upgrading in the field could reduce the need for diluents while lowering the cost for pipelining. Low cost field upgrading could also contribute to lowering contaminant levels. The performance of visbreaking processes could be improved by using disposable cracking agents. In turn, the economics of field upgrading of in-situ derived bitumen would be improved. However, in order to be viable, such agents would have to be far less expensive than current commercial cracking catalysts. A platy natural zeolite was selected for modification and testing due to its unique chemical and morphological properties. A catalyst-bearing oil sand was then heat-treated for 1 hour at 400 degrees C in a sealed microreactor. Under these mild cracking conditions, the catalyst-bearing oil sand produced extractable products of much lower viscosity. The products also contained considerably more gas oil and middle distillates than raw oil sand processed under the same conditions as thermal cracking alone. According to model cracking studies using hexadecane, these modified mineral zeolites may be more active cracking agents than undiluted premium commercial FCC catalyst. These materials hold promise for partial upgrading schemes to reduce solvent requirements in the field. tabs., figs.

  5. Techniques for intergranular crack formation and assessment in alloy 600 base and alloy 182 weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hyun; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Hong Deok; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A technique developed to produce artificial intergranular stress corrosion cracks in structural components was applied to thick, forged alloy 600 base and alloy 182 weld metals for use in the qualification of nondestructive examination techniques for welded components in nuclear power plants. An externally controlled procedure was demonstrated to produce intergranular stress corrosion cracks that are comparable to service-induced cracks in both the base and weld metals. During the process of crack generation, an online direct current potential drop method using array probes was used to measure and monitor the sizes and shapes of the cracks. A microstructural characterization of the produced cracks revealed realistic conformation of the crack faces unlike those in machined notches produced by an electrodischarge machine or simple fatigue loading using a universal testing machine. A comparison with a destructive metallographic examination showed that the characteristics, orientations, and sizes of the intergranular cracks produced in this study are highly reproducible.

  6. Meter-scale thermal contraction crack polygons on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, A.-T.; Groussin, O.; Jorda, L.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Bouley, S.; Séjourné, A.; Gaskell, R.; Capanna, C.; Davidsson, B.; Marchi, S.; Höfner, S.; Lamy, P. L.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Güttler, C.; Hviid, S.; Ip, W.-H.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Massironi, M.; Michalik, H.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Pommerol, A.; Sabau, L.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.; Vincent, J.-B.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the detection and characterization of more than 6300 polygons on the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, using images acquired by the OSIRIS camera onboard Rosetta between August 2014 and March 2015. They are found in consolidated terrains and grouped in localized networks. They are present at all latitudes (from North to South) and longitudes (head, neck, and body), sometimes on pit walls or following lineaments. About 1.5% of the observed surface is covered by polygons. Polygons have an homogeneous size across the nucleus, with 90% of them in the size range 1 - 5 m and a mean size of 3.0 ± 1.4 m. They show different morphologies, depending on the width and depth of their trough. They are found in networks with 3- or 4-crack intersection nodes. The polygons observed on 67P are consistent with thermal contraction crack polygons formed by the diurnal or seasonal temperature variations in a hard (MPa) and consolidated sintered layer of water ice, located a few centimeters below the surface. Our thermal analysis shows an evolution of thermal contraction crack polygons according to the local thermal environment, with more evolved polygons (i.e. deeper and larger troughs) where the temperature and the diurnal and seasonal temperature range are the highest. Thermal contraction crack polygons are young surface morphologies that probably formed after the injection of 67P in the inner solar system, typically 100,000 years ago, and could be as young as a few orbital periods, following the decreasing of its perihelion distance in 1959 from 2.7 to 1.3 a.u. Meter scale thermal contraction crack polygons should be common features on the nucleus of Jupiter family comets.

  7. A consistent partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Jesper L.; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2007-01-01

    Present extended finite element method (XFEM) elements for cohesive crack growth may often not be able to model equal stresses on both sides of the discontinuity when acting as a crack-tip element. The authors have developed a new partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth with extra...... enrichments to the cracked elements. The extra enrichments are element side local and were developed by superposition of the standard nodal shape functions for the element and standard nodal shape functions for a sub-triangle of the cracked element. With the extra enrichments, the crack-tip element becomes...... capable of modelling variations in the discontinuous displacement field on both sides of the crack and hence also capable of modelling the case where equal stresses are present on each side of the crack. The enrichment was implemented for the 3-node constant strain triangle (CST) and a standard algorithm...

  8. A crack growth evaluation method for interacting multiple cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    When stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue occurs, multiple cracks are frequently initiated in the same area. According to section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, multiple cracks are considered as a single combined crack in crack growth analysis, if the specified conditions are satisfied. In crack growth processes, however, no prescription for the interference between multiple cracks is given in this code. The JSME Post-Construction Code, issued in May 2000, prescribes the conditions of crack coalescence in the crack growth process. This study aimed to extend this prescription to more general cases. A simulation model was applied, to simulate the crack growth process, taking into account the interference between two cracks. This model made it possible to analyze multiple crack growth behaviors for many cases (e.g. different relative position and length) that could not be studied by experiment only. Based on these analyses, a new crack growth analysis method was suggested for taking into account the interference between multiple cracks. (author)

  9. Crack identification for rotating machines based on a nonlinear approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalini, A. A., Jr.; Sanches, L.; Bachschmid, N.; Steffen, V., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous contribution, a crack identification methodology based on a nonlinear approach was proposed. The technique uses external applied diagnostic forces at certain frequencies attaining combinational resonances, together with a pseudo-random optimization code, known as Differential Evolution, in order to characterize the signatures of the crack in the spectral responses of the flexible rotor. The conditions under which combinational resonances appear were determined by using the method of multiple scales. In real conditions, the breathing phenomenon arises from the stress and strain distribution on the cross-sectional area of the crack. This mechanism behavior follows the static and dynamic loads acting on the rotor. Therefore, the breathing crack can be simulated according to the Mayes' model, in which the crack transition from fully opened to fully closed is described by a cosine function. However, many contributions try to represent the crack behavior by machining a small notch on the shaft instead of the fatigue process. In this paper, the open and breathing crack models are compared regarding their dynamic behavior and the efficiency of the proposed identification technique. The additional flexibility introduced by the crack is calculated by using the linear fracture mechanics theory (LFM). The open crack model is based on LFM and the breathing crack model corresponds to the Mayes' model, which combines LFM with a given breathing mechanism. For illustration purposes, a rotor composed by a horizontal flexible shaft, two rigid discs, and two self-aligning ball bearings is used to compose a finite element model of the system. Then, numerical simulation is performed to determine the dynamic behavior of the rotor. Finally, the results of the inverse problem conveyed show that the methodology is a reliable tool that is able to estimate satisfactorily the location and depth of the crack.

  10. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  11. Crack identification based on synthetic artificial intelligent technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Mun Bo; Suh, Myung Won

    2001-01-01

    It has been established that a crack has an important effect on the dynamic behavior of a structure. This effect depends mainly on the location and depth of the crack. To identify the location and depth of a crack in a structure, a method is presented in this paper which uses synthetic artificial intelligent technique, that is, Adaptive-Network-based Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) solved via hybrid learning algorithm(the back-propagation gradient descent and the least-squares method) are used to learn the input(the location and depth of a crack)-output(the structural eigenfrequencies) relation of the structural system. With this ANFIS and a Continuous Evolutionary Algorithm(CEA), it is possible to formulate the inverse problem. CEAs based on genetic algorithms work efficiently for continuous search space optimization problems like a parameter identification problem. With this ANFIS, CEAs are used to identify the crack location and depth minimizing the difference from the measured frequencies. We have tried this new idea on a simple beam structure and the results are promising

  12. Mitigation strategies for autogenous shrinkage cracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2004-01-01

    As the use of high-performance concrete has increased, problems with early-age cracking have become prominent. The reduction in water-to-cement ratio, the incorporation of silica fume, and the increase in binder content of high-performance concretes all contribute to this problem. In this paper......, the fundamental parameters contributing to the autogenous shrinkage and resultant early-age cracking of concrete are presented. Basic characteristics of the cement paste that contribute to or control the autogenous shrinkage response include the surface tension of the pore solution, the geometry of the pore...... of early-age cracking due to autogenous shrinkage. Mitigation strategies discussed in this paper include: the addition of shrinkage-reducing admixtures more commonly used to control drying shrinkage, control of the cement particle size distribution, modification of the mineralogical composition...

  13. Mechanism of crack healing at room temperature revealed by atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Fang, Q.H.; Liu, B.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.W.; Wen, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are systematically carried out to reveal the mechanism of the crack healing at room temperature, in terms of the dislocation shielding and the atomic diffusion to control the crack closure, in a copper (Cu) plate suffering from a shear loading. The results show that the process of the crack healing is actualized through the dislocation emission at a crack tip accompanied with intrinsic stacking faults ribbon forming in the crack tip wake, the dislocation slipping in the matrix and the dislocation annihilation in the free surface. Dislocation included stress compressing the crack tip is examined from the MD simulations and the analytical models, and then the crack closes rapidly due to the assistance of the atomic diffusion induced by the thermal activation when the crack opening displacement is less than a threshold value. This phenomenon is very different from the previous results for the crack propagation under the external load applied because of the crack healing (advancing) largely dependent on the crystallographic orientations of crack and the directions of external loading. Furthermore, based on the energy characteristic and considering the crack size effect, a theoretical model is established to predict the relationships between the crack size and the shear stress which qualitatively agree well with that obtained in the MD simulations

  14. Behavior of underclad cracks in reactor pressure vessels - evaluation of mechanical analyses with tests on cladded mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Rousselier, G.; Bethmont, M.

    1993-01-01

    Innocuity of underclad flaws in the reactor pressure vessels must be demonstrated in the French safety analyses, particularly in the case of a severe transient at the end of the pressure vessel lifetime, because of the radiation embrittlement of the vessel material. Safety analyses are usually performed with elastic and elasto-plastic analyses taking into account the effect of the stainless steel cladding. EDF has started a program including experiments on large size cladded specimens and their interpretations. The purpose of this program is to evaluate the different methods of fracture analysis used in safety studies. Several specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C1 3 with stainless steel cladding, containing small artificial defects, are loaded in four-point bending. Experiments are performed at very low temperature to simulate radiation embrittlement and to obtain crack instability by cleavage fracture. Three tests have been performed on mock-ups containing a small underclad crack (with depth about 5 mn) and a fourth test has been performed on one mock-up with a larger crack (depth about 13 mn). In each case, crack instability occurred by cleavage fracture in the base metal, without crack arrest, at a temperature of about - 170 deg C. Each test is interpreted using linear elastic analysis and elastic-plastic analysis by two-dimensional finite element computations. The fracture are conservatively predicted: the stress intensity factors deduced from the computations (K cp or K j ) are always greater than the base metal toughness. The comparison between the elastic analyses (including two plasticity corrections) and the elastic-plastic analyses shows that the elastic analyses are often conservative. The beneficial effect of the cladding in the analyses is also shown : the analyses are too conservative if the cladding effects is not taken into account. (authors). 9 figs., 6 tabs., 10 refs

  15. Theoretical and experimental studies on the electric impedance of active piezoelectric sensors bonded on cracked beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Y D; Chen, C Y; Shi, S Q; Chan, P K L; He, X Q

    2010-01-01

    The electric impedance of symmetrically surface-bonded piezoelectric sensors on a cracked beam is studied. To investigate the effect of the crack on the electric impedance in a convenient fashion, an analytical expression is derived that is correlated to the physical parameters of the crack and the host beam. The beam segment covered with piezoelectric patches and the cracked region are regarded as a bimorph segment and an equivalent spring, respectively, and the entire beam system is then represented by three elastic beam segments and a bimorph segment together with the spring. Electric impedance experiments are also conducted for uncracked beams and for cracked beams with single-edge or double-edge cracks. The experimental results agree with those generated by the analytical expression. The crack depth has little effect on the corresponding mode frequency for cracks located at the mode node of a beam. For cracks located away from the mode node, the corresponding mode frequency decreases as the crack depth increases. Moreover, the closer the crack to the anti-node of the mode, the greater the decrease in the corresponding mode frequency. The mechanism of these changes is discussed. The findings should prove helpful for structural health monitoring using active piezoelectric sensors

  16. Nonlinear crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshun, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic features of the deformation and failure of actual materials in the vicinity of a crack tip are due to their physical nonlinearity in the stress-concentration zone, which is a result of plasticity, microfailure, or a nonlinear dependence of the interatomic forces on the distance. Therefore, adequate models of the failure mechanics must be nonlinear, in principle, although linear failure mechanics is applicable if the zone of nonlinear deformation is small in comparison with the crack length. Models of crack mechanics are based on analytical solutions of the problem of the stress-strain state in the vicinity of the crack. On account of the complexity of the problem, nonlinear models are bason on approximate schematic solutions. In the Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale nonlinear model, one of the best known, the actual two-dimensional plastic zone (the nonlinearity zone) is replaced by a narrow one-dimensional zone, which is then modeled by extending the crack with a specified normal load equal to the yield point. The condition of finite stress is applied here, and hence the length of the plastic zone is determined. As a result of this approximation, the displacement in the plastic zone at the abscissa is nonzero

  17. Evaluation of strength and failure of brittle rock containing initial cracks under lithospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Qi, Chengzhi; Shao, Zhushan; Ma, Chao

    2018-02-01

    Natural brittle rock contains numerous randomly distributed microcracks. Crack initiation, growth, and coalescence play a predominant role in evaluation for the strength and failure of brittle rocks. A new analytical method is proposed to predict the strength and failure of brittle rocks containing initial microcracks. The formulation of this method is based on an improved wing crack model and a suggested micro-macro relation. In this improved wing crack model, the parameter of crack angle is especially introduced as a variable, and the analytical stress-crack relation considering crack angle effect is obtained. Coupling the proposed stress-crack relation and the suggested micro-macro relation describing the relation between crack growth and axial strain, the stress-strain constitutive relation is obtained to predict the rock strength and failure. Considering different initial microcrack sizes, friction coefficients and confining pressures, effects of crack angle on tensile wedge force acting on initial crack interface are studied, and effects of crack angle on stress-strain constitutive relation of rocks are also analyzed. The strength and crack initiation stress under different crack angles are discussed, and the value of most disadvantaged angle triggering crack initiation and rock failure is founded. The analytical results are similar to the published study results. Rationality of this proposed analytical method is verified.

  18. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  19. Crack propagation and arrest simulation of X90 gas pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fengping; Huo, Chunyong; Luo, Jinheng; Li, He; Li, Yang

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether X90 steel pipe has enough crack arrest toughness or not, a damage model was suggested as crack arrest criterion with material parameters of plastic uniform percentage elongation and damage strain energy per volume. Fracture characteristic length which characterizes fracture zone size was suggested to be the largest mesh size on expected cracking path. Plastic uniform percentage elongation, damage strain energy per volume and fracture characteristic length of X90 were obtained by five kinds of tensile tests. Based on this criterion, a length of 24 m, Φ1219 × 16.3 mm pipe segment model with 12 MPa internal gas pressure was built and computed with fluid-structure coupling method in ABAQUS. Ideal gas state equation was used to describe lean gas behavior. Euler grid was used to mesh gas zone inside the pipe while Lagrangian shell element was used to mesh pipe. Crack propagation speed and gas decompression speed were got after computation. The result shows that, when plastic uniform percentage elongation is equal to 0.054 and damage strain energy per volume is equal to 0.64 J/mm"3, crack propagation speed is less than gas decompression speed, which means the simulated X90 gas pipe with 12 MPa internal pressure can arrest cracking itself. - Highlights: • A damage model was suggested as crack arrest criterion. • Plastic uniform elongation and damage strain energy density are material parameters. • Fracture characteristic length is suggested to be largest mesh size in cracking path. • Crack propagating simulation with coupling of pipe and gas was realized in ABAQUS. • A Chinese X90 steel pipe with 12 MPa internal pressure can arrest cracking itself.

  20. Confocal examination of subsurface cracking in ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etman, Maged K

    2009-10-01

    The original ceramic surface finish and its microstructure may have an effect on crack propagation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between crack propagation and ceramic microstructure following cyclic fatigue loading, and to qualitatively evaluate and quantitatively measure the surface and subsurface crack depths of three types of ceramic restorations with different microstructures using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Twenty (8 x 4 x 2 mm(3)) blocks of AllCeram (AC), experimental ceramic (EC, IPS e.max Press), and Sensation SL (SSL) were prepared, ten glazed and ten polished of each material. Sixty antagonist enamel specimens were made from the labial surfaces of permanent incisors. The ceramic abraders were attached to a wear machine, so that each enamel specimen presented at 45 degrees to the vertical movement of the abraders, and immersed in artificial saliva. Wear was induced for 80K cycles at 60 cycles/min with a load of 40 N and 2-mm horizontal deflection. The specimens were examined for cracks at baseline, 5K, 10K, 20K, 40K, and 80K cycles. Twenty- to 30-microm deep subsurface cracking appeared in SSL, with 8 to 10 microm in AC, and 7 microm close to the margin of the wear facets in glazed EC after 5K cycles. The EC showed no cracks with increasing wear cycles. Seventy-microm deep subsurface cracks were detected in SSL and 45 microm in AC after 80K cycles. Statistically, there was significant difference among the three materials (p 0.05) in crack depth within the same ceramic material with different surface finishes. The ceramic materials with different microstructures showed different patterns of subsurface cracking.

  1. Statistical crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is possible to simulate the ground blast from a single explosive shot with a simple computer algorithm and appropriate constants, the most commonly used modelling methods do not account for major changes in geology or shot energy because mechanical features such as tectonic stresses, fault structure, microcracking, brittle-ductile transition, and water content are not represented in significant detail. An alternative approach for modelling called Statistical Crack Mechanics is presented in this paper. This method, developed in the seventies as a part of the oil shale program, accounts for crack opening, shear, growth, and coalescence. Numerous photographs and micrographs show that shocked materials tend to involve arrays of planar cracks. The approach described here provides a way to account for microstructure and give a representation of the physical behavior of a material at the microscopic level that can account for phenomena such as permeability, fragmentation, shear banding, and hot-spot formation in explosives

  2. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth did not depend on the heat transfer coefficient and only slightly depended on the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  3. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth was almost the same regardless of the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  4. Ultrasonic testing of fatigue cracks under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, T.J.; Cameron, A.G.B.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable detection of the fatigue cracks was possible under all conditions studied. Applied load affected the ultrasonic response in a variety of ways but never more than by 20dB and generally considerably less. Material variations affected the response under applied load by up to 20dB. Oxide in the crack and crack morphology affected the response by up to 9dB (12dB under load). Crack size variations and presence of water had little effect. Sizing accuracy was generally within 2mm although there was a tendency to undersize. The time of flight sizing technique gave the best accuracy if a tensile load was applied

  5. Crack identification and evolution law in the vibration failure process of loaded coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwu; Ai, Dihao; Sun, Xiaoyuan; Xie, Beijing

    2017-08-01

    To study the characteristics of coal cracks produced in the vibration failure process, we set up a static load and static and dynamic combination load failure test simulation system, prepared with different particle size, formation pressure, and firmness coefficient coal samples. Through static load damage testing of coal samples and then dynamic load (vibration exciter) and static (jack) combination destructive testing, the crack images of coal samples under the load condition were obtained. Combined with digital image processing technology, an algorithm of crack identification with high precision and in real-time is proposed. With the crack features of the coal samples under different load conditions as the research object, we analyzed the distribution of cracks on the surface of the coal samples and the factors influencing crack evolution using the proposed algorithm and a high-resolution industrial camera. Experimental results showed that the major portion of the crack after excitation is located in the rear of the coal sample where the vibration exciter cannot act. Under the same disturbance conditions, crack size and particle size exhibit a positive correlation, while crack size and formation pressure exhibit a negative correlation. Soft coal is more likely to lead to crack evolution than hard coal, and more easily causes instability failure. The experimental results and crack identification algorithm provide a solid basis for the prevention and control of instability and failure of coal and rock mass, and they are helpful in improving the monitoring method of coal and rock dynamic disasters.

  6. Cracking the Cipher Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Singh, Simon

    2002-01-01

    In the back of 'The Code Book', a history of cryptography, Simon Singh included a series of 10 encoded messages, each from a different period of history. The first person to crack all 10 messages would win a prize of £10,000. Now that the prize has been won, Simon can reveal the story behind the Cipher Challenge. Along the way he will show how mathematics can be used to crack codes, the role it played in World War Two and how it helps to guarantee security in the Information Age.

  7. Thermal fatigue crack growth on a thick wall tube containing a semi elliptical circumferential crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschanels, H.; Wakai, T.; Lacire, M.H.; Michel, B.

    2001-01-01

    In order to check the ability of the simplified assessment procedure (A16 guide) to predict fatigue crack growth, a benchmark problem was conducted. This work is carried out under the project ''agreement on the Exchange of Information and Collaboration in the field of Research and Development of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) between Europe (EU) and Japan''. Experimental work is conducted by PNC using Air cooled Thermal transient Test Facility (ATTF). Specimen is a thick wall tube containing a semi elliptical (3-D) circumferential crack and subjected to cyclic thermal transients. The constitutive material is the 304 austenitic stainless steel type SUS304. Due to thermal shock (650 C-300 C) the stress distribution through the wall is non-linear and well approximated using a 3 rd order polynomial. When comparing computations and tests data we observe a good agreement for the crack propagation in length. In crack depth, accurate results are obtained in the first part of the test, but on the later stage of the experiment the computations slightly underestimate the propagation (deep crack). In addition, we notice the importance of good evaluation of fracture mechanics parameters for non-linear stress distribution through the wall. At present A16 guide handbook gives stress intensity factor solutions for non-linear stress distribution through the wall. (author)

  8. Crack Characterisation for In-service Inspection Planning - An Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waale, Jan [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    ; Mechanical fatigue; and Solidification cracking in weld metal. The evaluated parameters were divided into visually detectable and metallurgical parameters, which need to be evaluated from a cross-section. The visually detectable parameters are; location, orientation and shape in surface direction and finally the number of cracks in the cracked region. The metallurgical parameters are; orientation and shape in the through thickness direction, macroscopic branching, crack tip radius, crack surface roughness, crack width and finally discontinuous appearance. The morphology parameters were statistically processed and the results are presented as minimum, maximum. mean, median and scatter values for each data group, both in tables and in various graphs. Finally each morphology parameter is compared between the seven data groups. A brief description of typical characteristics of each data group is given below. Most IGSCC develop next to welds with straight or winding cracks oriented almost parallel to the weld. Single cracking is most common but occasionally two cracks are formed on each side of the weld. In the through thickness direction IGSCC is typically winding or lightly bend and macroscopic branching is rare. The surface roughness is normally on a grain size magnitude and the cracks are particularly narrow providing secondary corrosion is small. Similar characteristics to IGSCC in austenitic stainless steels may be expected. However, cracking close to weld are less frequent and macroscopic branching is more common for IGSCC in nickel base alloys compared to austenitic stainless steels. Typically IDSCC is winding or straight, single cracking in the weld metal transverse to the weld. In the through thickness direction IDSCC cause typically winding, non branched cracks with large surface roughness due to course solidification microstructure. The crack width often shows large variation along the crack and a width close to zero at the surface intersection is common. Typically

  9. Crack Characterisation for In-service Inspection Planning - An Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waale, Jan

    2006-05-01

    ; Mechanical fatigue; and Solidification cracking in weld metal. The evaluated parameters were divided into visually detectable and metallurgical parameters, which need to be evaluated from a cross-section. The visually detectable parameters are; location, orientation and shape in surface direction and finally the number of cracks in the cracked region. The metallurgical parameters are; orientation and shape in the through thickness direction, macroscopic branching, crack tip radius, crack surface roughness, crack width and finally discontinuous appearance. The morphology parameters were statistically processed and the results are presented as minimum, maximum. mean, median and scatter values for each data group, both in tables and in various graphs. Finally each morphology parameter is compared between the seven data groups. A brief description of typical characteristics of each data group is given below. Most IGSCC develop next to welds with straight or winding cracks oriented almost parallel to the weld. Single cracking is most common but occasionally two cracks are formed on each side of the weld. In the through thickness direction IGSCC is typically winding or lightly bend and macroscopic branching is rare. The surface roughness is normally on a grain size magnitude and the cracks are particularly narrow providing secondary corrosion is small. Similar characteristics to IGSCC in austenitic stainless steels may be expected. However, cracking close to weld are less frequent and macroscopic branching is more common for IGSCC in nickel base alloys compared to austenitic stainless steels. Typically IDSCC is winding or straight, single cracking in the weld metal transverse to the weld. In the through thickness direction IDSCC cause typically winding, non branched cracks with large surface roughness due to course solidification microstructure. The crack width often shows large variation along the crack and a width close to zero at the surface intersection is common. Typically

  10. Contribution to the Evaluation of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar for Fracture Toughness Determination of Reactor Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scibetta, M.

    1999-06-01

    The subject of this PhD dissertation is the use of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar (CRB) for fracture toughness measurements. The main advantages of CRB are the relatively small size requirements of the testing specimens, the low cost to machine the specimen, the rotating bending fatigue allowing for easy precracking of specimens, the use of standard tensile test fixture and the axisymmetry of the specimen that avoids time consuming 3D finite element calculations. An in-depth study of the most widely used precracking technique for CRB, namely the rotating bending fatigue, is made

  11. Contribution to the Evaluation of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar for Fracture Toughness Determination of Reactor Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scibetta, M

    1999-06-01

    The subject of this PhD dissertation is the use of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar (CRB) for fracture toughness measurements. The main advantages of CRB are the relatively small size requirements of the testing specimens, the low cost to machine the specimen, the rotating bending fatigue allowing for easy precracking of specimens, the use of standard tensile test fixture and the axisymmetry of the specimen that avoids time consuming 3D finite element calculations. An in-depth study of the most widely used precracking technique for CRB, namely the rotating bending fatigue, is made.

  12. Microstructural modelling of creep crack growth from a blunted crack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; Giessen, E. van der

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crack tip blunting on the initial stages of creep crack growth is investigated by means of a planar microstructural model in which grains are represented discretely. The actual linking-up process of discrete microcracks with the macroscopic crack is simulated, with full account of the

  13. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  14. Stress intensity factors of eccentric cracks in bi-materials plate under mode I loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, A. E. [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Bi-material plates were generally used to joint electronic devices or mechanical components requiring dissimilar materials to be attached. During services, mechanical failure can be occurred due to the formation of cracks at the interfacial joint or away from the centre. Generally, linear elastic fracture mechanics approach is used to characterize these cracks based on stress intensity factors (SIF). Based on the literature survey, the SIFs for the central cracks were easily available. However, the SIFs for eccentric cracks were difficult to obtain. Therefore, this paper presented the SIFs for eccentric cracks subjected to mode I tension loading. Three important parameters were used such as relative crack depth, a/L, relative offset distance, b/L and elastic mismatch, E{sub 1}/E{sub 2} or α. It was found that such parameters significantly affected the characteristic of SIFs and it was depend on the location of cracks.

  15. Linear Cracking in Bridge Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Concrete cracking in bridge decks remains an important issue relative to deck durability. Cracks can allow increased penetration of chlorides, which can result in premature corrosion of the reinforcing steel and subsequent spalling of the concrete de...

  16. Evaluation of a leaking crack in an irradiated CANDU pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Simpson, L.A.

    1988-06-01

    Leak-before-break is used in CANDU reactors as part of the defence against rupture of the pressure tubes. Two important features of this technique are the action time available for detection of a leaking crack and the size of the leak allowing crack location. Support for continued reliance on leak-before-break is being obtained from experiments, on irradiated Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tubes attached to their end fittings, that simulate the behaviour of a leaking crack in a reactor. At reactor operating temperatures leaking cracks grow more slowly than dry cracks in the laboratory because they are cooled when pressurised water flashes to steam on their surface. These cracks remain stable till they are at least 70 mm long. From the results of these experiments the action time is at least 100 h. The leak rate increases rapidly when a through-wall crack extends a small amount, thus greatly assisting with crack location

  17. Crack detection '86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The participants of the conference heard 36 papers of which 13 were incorporated in INIS. The incorporated papers deal with the quality control of the equipment of nuclear power plants, with technical specifications and possibilities of diverse crack detection devices, as well as with personnel training for nondestructive materials testing. (E.S.)

  18. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  19. Shallow-crack toughness results for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Shum, D.K.M.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. To complete this investigation, techniques were developed to determine the fracture toughness from shallow-crack specimens. A total of 38 deep and shallow-crack tests have been performed on beam specimens about 100 mm deep loaded in 3-point bending. Two crack depths (a ∼ 50 and 9 mm) and three beam thicknesses (B ∼ 50, 100, and 150 mm) have been tested. Techniques were developed to estimate the toughness in terms of both the J-integral and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). Analytical J-integral results were consistent with experimental J-integral results, confirming the validity of the J-estimation schemes used and the effect of flaw depth on fracture toughness. Test results indicate a significant increase in the fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens in the lower transition region compared to the deep-crack fracture toughness. There is, however, little or no difference in toughness on the lower shelf where linear-elastic conditions exist for specimens with either deep or shallow flaws. The increase in shallow-flaw toughness compared with deep-flaw results appears to be well characterized by a temperature shift of 35 degree C

  20. Angle-Beam Shear Wave Scattering from Buried Crack-like Defects in Bonded Specimens (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    defects: such as understanding the scattering behavior of fatigue cracks emanating from fastener holes in aluminum structural components [2]. Angle...Ultrasonic NDE techniques using angle-beam wedges coupled to PZT transducers have also been utilized in measuring the depth of surface-breaking cracks

  1. Crack closure, a literature study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, M.

    1993-08-01

    In this report crack closure is treated. The state of the art is reviewed. Different empirical formulas for determining the crack closure are compared with each other, and their benefits are discussed. Experimental techniques for determining the crack closure stress are discussed, and some results from fatigue tests are also reported. Experimental data from the literature are reported.

  2. A study on fatigue crack growth behavior subjected to a single tensile overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Liaw, P.K.; Choo, H.; Rogge, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electric potential experiments were carried out to investigate the growth behavior of a fatigue crack subjected to a single tensile overload. The specific objectives were to (i) probe the crack tip deformation and fracture behaviors under applied loads; (ii) examine the overload-induced transient crack growth micromechanism; (iii) validate the effective stress intensity factor range based on the crack closure approach as the fatigue crack tip driving force; and (iv) establish a quantitative relationship between the crack tip driving force and crack growth behavior. Immediately after a single tensile overload was introduced and then unloaded, the crack tip became blunt and enlarged compressive residual stresses in both magnitude and zone size were observed around the crack tip. The results show that the combined contributions of the overload-induced enlarged compressive residual stresses and crack tip blunting with secondary cracks are responsible for the observed changes in the crack opening load and the resultant post-overload transient crack growth behavior.

  3. Detection and measurement of fatigue cracks in welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    A direct current potential drop system was developed for the detection and measurement of very small fatigue cracks that grow from the toes of welds. Measurement of crack growth less than 0.01 mm and of crack growth rates less than 10 -10 m/cycle, even for cracks less than 1.0 mm deep, is made possible by using a high stability measurement apparatus and an adjustment based on initial conditions. Thus far, the measurement system has successfully examined several aspects of fatigue in welded elements. Crack growth results justified the use of a linear elastic expression for the stress intensity factor and provided an evaluation of a growth law which includes the threshold stress intensity factor. Needle peening fillet welded joints did not change the small proportion of crack initiation life to total fatigue life observed for untreated (not improved) welded joints. However, the measurement system demonstrated that needle peening retarded crack growth rates up to 1 mm depth below the weld toe

  4. Detection of cracks in shafts with the Approximated Entropy algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Diego Luchesi; Nicoletti, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    The Approximate Entropy is a statistical calculus used primarily in the fields of Medicine, Biology, and Telecommunication for classifying and identifying complex signal data. In this work, an Approximate Entropy algorithm is used to detect cracks in a rotating shaft. The signals of the cracked shaft are obtained from numerical simulations of a de Laval rotor with breathing cracks modelled by the Fracture Mechanics. In this case, one analysed the vertical displacements of the rotor during run-up transients. The results show the feasibility of detecting cracks from 5% depth, irrespective of the unbalance of the rotating system and crack orientation in the shaft. The results also show that the algorithm can differentiate the occurrence of crack only, misalignment only, and crack + misalignment in the system. However, the algorithm is sensitive to intrinsic parameters p (number of data points in a sample vector) and f (fraction of the standard deviation that defines the minimum distance between two sample vectors), and good results are only obtained by appropriately choosing their values according to the sampling rate of the signal.

  5. Fatigue Behavior of Long and Short Cracks in Wrought and Powder Aluminum Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    The effects of cyclic frequency, electrochemical potential and bulk solution composition on the kinetics of small corrosion fatigue cracks have not...threshold behavior between cast iron (co = 113 MPa) and maraging steel (co = 1906 MPa), as a function of surface roughness (to simulate crack size) (after...4130 steel the crack size effect on corrosion fatigue, Fig. 2, is predicted in part based on linear superposition of stress corrosion growth rates for

  6. Effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1977-03-01

    The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were employed to characterize the effect of temperature upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of mill-annealed Inconel 625 in an air environment over the range 75 0 - 1200 0 F (24 0 - 649 0 C). In general, fatigue-crack growth rates increased with increasing test temperature. Two different specimen sizes were employed at each test temperature, and no effects of specimen size upon crack growth were noted

  7. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  8. The vibrational behaviour of a cracked turbine rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, B.

    1978-01-01

    In order to detect an incipient crack on a turbine rotor with the aid of measurement of the shaft vibrations, these must be known in the first place the effects of a crack on the vibrational behavior of a rotor. For this purpose a method using the modal analysis is presented here. The rigidity depending on the angle of rotation at the position of the crack is accounted for by means of a model. Because of the composition of the computer code there may also be worked with measured values for the rigidity. The results of the calculations show that within the range of speeds, in which for many turbines the operating speed lies, a crack will cause distinct variations of the shaft vibrations. The crack stimulates vibrations with frequencies of rotation and frequencies of double-rotation. Both may be used for crack detection. Because of the strong dependence of the size of the amplitudes of vibration on the design of the rotor and the position of the crack each rotor should be subject to a detailed crack calculation for a better judgement of the measured values. (orig.) [de

  9. Crack-tip constraint analyses and constraint-dependent LBB curves for circumferential through-wall cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.L.; Wang, G.Z., E-mail: gzwang@ecust.edu.cn; Xuan, F.Z.; Tu, S.T.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Solution of constraint parameter τ* for through-wall cracked pipes has been obtained. • Constraint increases with increasing crack length and radius–thickness ratio of pipes. • Constraint-dependent LBB curve for through-wall cracked pipes has been constructed. • For increasing accuracy of LBB assessments, constraint effect should be considered. - Abstract: The leak-before-break (LBB) concept has been widely applied in the structural integrity assessments of pressured pipes in nuclear power plants. However, the crack-tip constraint effects in LBB analyses and designs cannot be incorporated. In this paper, by using three-dimensional finite element calculations, the modified load-independent T-stress constraint parameter τ* for circumferential through-wall cracked pipes with different geometries and crack sizes has been analyzed under different loading conditions, and the solutions of the crack-tip constraint parameter τ* have been obtained. Based on the τ* solutions and constraint-dependent J–R curves of a steel, the constraint-dependent LBB (leak-before-break) curves have been constructed. The results show that the constraint τ* increases with increasing crack length θ, mean radius R{sub m} and radius–thickness ratio R{sub m}/t of the pipes. In LBB analyses, the critical crack length calculated by the J–R curve of the standard high constraint specimen for pipes with shorter cracks is over-conservative, and the degree of conservatism increases with decreasing crack length θ, R{sub m} and R{sub m}/t. Therefore, the constraint-dependent LBB curves should be constructed to modify the over-conservatism and increase accuracy of LBB assessments.

  10. Crack tip field in circumferentially-cracked round bar (CCRB in tension affected by loss of axial symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toribio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the stress intensity factor (SIF is computed in a circumferentially-cracked round bar (CCRB subjected to tensile loading, considering that the resistant ligament is circular and exhibits certain eccentricity in relation to the cylinder axis. The computation was performed by means of the finite element method (FEM using a three dimensional (3D model and the J-integral, the analyzed variable being the eccentricity of the circular ligament. Results show that the SIF is higher at the deepest point of the crack and that an increase of eccentricity (in relation to the bar axis raises the difference between the SIF values along the crack front. From a certain value of the misalignment a bending effect appears, so that the crack remains closed in the area near the point of lower depth.

  11. The catalytic cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolysis char on tar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Z.; Huibin, H.; Xiangling, S.; Zhenhua, M.; Lei, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of different pyrolysis conditions for tar catalytic cracking will be analyzed according to the lignite pyrolysis char as catalyst on pyrolytic tar in this paper. The pyrolysis char what is the by-product of the cracking of coal has an abundant of pore structure and it has good catalytic activity. On this basis, making the modified catalyst when the pyrolysis char is activation and loads Fe by impregnation method. The cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolytic tar is explored by applying gas chromatograph to analyze splitting products of tar. The experimental results showed that: (1) The effect of tar cracking as the pyrolysis temperature, the heating rate, the volatilization of pyrolysis char and particle size increasing is better and better. The effect of the catalytic and cracking of lignite pyrolysis char in tar is best when the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature, the volatiles of pyrolysis char, particle size is in specific conditions.(2) The activation of pyrolysis char can improve the catalytic effect of pyrolysis char on the tar cracking. But it reduces the effect of the tar cracking when the pyrolysis char is activation loading Fe. (author)

  12. Influence of Crack Morphology on Leak Before Break Margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weilin Zang

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the deterministic LBB-margins for different pipe systems in a Swedish PWR-plant and using different crack morphology parameters. Results: - The influence of crack morphology on Leak Before Break (LBB) margins is studied. The subject of the report is a number of LBB-submittals to SKI where deterministic LBB-margins are reported. These submittals typically uses a surface roughness of 0.0762 mm (300 microinch) and number of turns equal to zero and an in-house code for the leak rate evaluations. The present report has shown that these conditions give the largest LBB-margins both in terms of the quotient between the critical crack length and the leakage crack size and for the leak rate margin. - Crack morphology parameters have a strong influence on the leak rate evaluations. Using the SQUIRT code and more recent recommendations for crack morphology parameters, it is shown that in many cases the evaluated margins, using 1 gpm as the reference leak rate detection limit, are below the safety factor of 2 on crack size and 10 on leak rate, which is generally required for LBB approval. - The effect of including weld residual stresses on the LBB margins is also investigated. It is shown that for the two examples studied, weld residual stresses were important for the small diameter thin wall pipe whereas it was negligible for the large diameter thick wall pipe which had a self-balanced weld residual stress distribution

  13. Micro-crack detection in high-performance cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Guang, Ye; Tanaka, Kyoji

    2005-01-01

    of high-performance cement pastes in silicone moulds that exert minimal external restraint. Cast-in steel rods with varying diameter internally restrain the autogenous shrinkage and lead to crack formation. Dimensions of the steel rods are chosen so that the size of this restraining inclusion resembles......-ray tomography, do not allow sufficient resolution of microcracks. A new technique presented in this paper allows detection of microcracks in cement paste while avoiding artefacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying or temperature variations. The technique consists in casting small circular cylindrical samples...... aggregate size. Gallium intrusion of the cracks and subsequent examination by electron probe micro analysis, EPMA, are used to identify the cracks. The gallium intrusion technique allows controllable impregnation of cracks in the cement paste. A distinct contrast between gallium and the surrounding material...

  14. Two-phase flow experiments through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flows rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  15. Fracture statistics of brittle materials with intergranular cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batdorf, S.B.

    1975-01-01

    When brittle materials are used for structural purposes, the initial design must take their relatively large dispersion in fracture stress properly into account. This is difficult when failure probabilities must be extremely low, because empirically based statistical theories of fracture, such as that of Weibull, cannot reliably predict the stresses corresponding to failure probabilities much lower than n -1 , where n is the number of specimens tested. Recently McClintock proposed a rational method of predicting the size distribution of intergranular cracks. The method assumed that large cracks are random aggregations of cracked grain boundaries. The present paper employs this method to find the size distribution of penny-shaped cracks, and also P(f), the probability of failure of a specimen of volume V subjected to a tensile stress sigma. The present paper is a pioneering effort, which should be applicable to ceramics and related materials

  16. Estimation of flow rates through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flow rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  17. Heat affected zone and fatigue crack propagation behavior of high performance steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Won; Kang, Dong Hwan; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jong Kwan

    2009-01-01

    The effect of heat affected zone in high performance steel on fatigue crack propagation behavior, which is related to the subsequent microstructure, was investigated. A modified Paris-Erdogan equation was presented for the analysis of fatigue crack propagation behavior corresponding to the heat affected zone conditions. Fatigue crack propagation tests under 0.3 stress ratio and 0.1 load frequency were conducted for both finegrained and coarse-grained heat affected zones, respectively. As shown in the results, much higher crack growth rate occurred in a relatively larger mean grain size material under the same stress intensity range of fatigue crack propagation process for the material.

  18. Risk estimation for LCF crack initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Sebastian; Rollmann, Georg; Gottschalk, Hanno; Krause, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    An accurate risk assessment for fatigue damage is of vital importance for the design and service of today's turbomachinery components. We present an approach for quantifying the probability of crack initiation due to surface driven low-cycle fatigue (LCF). This approach is based on the theory of failure-time processes and takes inhomogeneous stress fields and size effects into account. The method has been implemented as a finite-element postprocessor which uses quadrature formulae of higher o...

  19. Fatigue crack growth analysis of a 450 PWR - lateral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taupin, P.; Flamand, F.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth analysis of a 5 mm deep surface crack in the crotch region of a 45 0 Lateral (12 inch diameter) was performed on a 3-Loop 900 MWe PWR Plant under Normal and upset loading conditions. Stress Intensity factors were computed using the weight-function technique. The latter were obtained for a polynomial stress distribution at the corner of the lateral under contract with the Pressure Vessel Research Committee of the WRC. The study shows that after 40 years of normal operation the size of the end of life crack is limited to about 25 mm for the chosen lateral with a thickness of 300 mm

  20. Engineering Solution for the Uniform Strength of Partially Cracked Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elin A.; Hansen, Will; Brincker, Rune

    2005-01-01

    Significant computational resources are required to predict the remaining strength from numerical fracture analysis of a jointed plain concrete pavement that contains a partial depth crack. It is, therefore, advantageous when the failure strength can be adequately predicted with an engineering...

  1. 3-D analysis of fatigue crack behaviour in a shot peened steam turbine blade material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, B.Y., E-mail: Binyan.he@soton.ac.uk [Engineering Materials, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Katsamenis, O.L. [muVIS X-ray Imaging Centre, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Mellor, B.G.; Reed, P.A.S. [Engineering Materials, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-26

    Serial mechanical sectioning and high resolution X-ray tomography have been used to study the three-dimensional morphology of small fatigue cracks growing in a 12 Cr tempered martensitic steam turbine blade material. A range of surface conditions has been studied, namely polished and shot peened (with varying levels of intensity). In the polished (unpeened) condition, inclusions (alumina and manganese sulphide) played an important role in initiating and controlling early fatigue crack behaviour. When fatigue cracks initiated from an alumina stringer, the crack morphology was normally dominated by single stringers, which were always in the centre of the fatigue crack, indicating its primary role in initiation. Manganese sulphide inclusion groups however seemed to dominate and affect the crack path along both the surface and depth crack growth directions. The more intensely shot peened condition did not however evidence inclusion or stringer affected fatigue crack initiation or growth behaviour; sub-surface crack coalescence being clearly observed by both serial sectioning and computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques at a depth of about 150–180 μm. These sub-surface crack coalescences can be linked to both the extent of the compressive residual stress as well as the depth of the plastic deformation arising from the intense shot peening process. Shot peening appears to provide a different defect population that initiates fatigue cracks and competes with the underlying metallurgical defect populations. The most beneficial shot peening process would in this case appear to “deactivate” the original metallurgical defect population and substitute a known defect distribution from the shot peening process from which fatigue cracks grow rather slowly in the strain hardened surface layer which also contains compressive residual stresses. A benefit to fatigue life in bending, even under Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) conditions, has been observed in these tests if a

  2. Crack propagation under thermal cycling loading inducing a thermal gradient in the specimen thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.N.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to figure out the crack growth phenomenon by thermal fatigue induced by thermal gradient through thickness of specimen. Firstly, an experimental facility has been developed: a rectangular parallelepiped specimen is subjected to thermal cycling between 350 C and 100 C; the specimen is freed to expand and contract. Two semi-circular notches (0,1 mm depth and 4 mm length) have been machined on the surface of the specimen. A series of interrupted tests has been carried out to characterize and quantify the crack growth in depth and surface of the pre-existing crack. Next, a three-dimensional crack growth simulation has been implemented in ABAQUS. Automation using Python was used to simulate the propagation of a crack under thermal cycling, with re-meshing at crack front after each calculation step. No assumption has been taken on the crack front during the crack propagation. A comparison with test results showed very good agreement on the evolution of crack front shape and on the kinetics of propagation on the edge and the heart of pre-existing crack. An analytical approach was also developed based on the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIC). A two-dimensional approach was first introduced enabling us to better understand the influence of various thermal and geometric parameters. Finally, a three dimensional approach, with an elliptical assumption crack shape during the propagation, leading to a prediction of crack growth on the surface and in depth which is very similar to that obtained numerically, but with computational time much lower. (author)

  3. Choked flow through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feburie, V.; Giot, M.; Granger, S.; Seynhaeve, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The leaks through steam-generator cracks are the subject of a research carried out in cooperation between EDF and UCL. A software called ECREVISSE to predict the mass flow rate has been developed and has been successfully validated. The purpose of the paper is to present the mathematical model used in ECREVISSE as well as some comparison between the results and the presently available data. The model takes into account the persistence of some metastable liquid in the crack and the special flow pattern which appears in such particular geometry. Although the model involves the use of several correlations (friction, heat transfer), no adjustment of parameters against the data has been needed, neither in the single-phase part of the flow, or in the two-phase part. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs

  4. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Ponzoni, Lucio M.E.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (t inc ), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  5. Modeling of multibranched crosslike crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canessa, E.; Tanatar, B.

    1991-06-01

    Multibranched crosslike crack patterns formed in concentrically loaded square plates are studied in terms of fractal geometry, where the associated fractal dimension d f is calculated for their characterization. We apply simplest deterministic and stochastic approaches at a phenomenological level in an attempt to find generic features as guidelines for future experimental and theoretical work. The deterministic model for fracture propagation we apply, which is a variant of the discretized Laplace approach for randomly ramified fractal cracks proposed by Takayasu, reproduces the basic ingredients of observed complex fracture patters. The stochastic model, although is not strictly a model for crack propagation, is based on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) for fractal growth and produces slightly more realistic assessment of the crosslike growth of the cracks in asymmetric multibranches. Nevertheless, this simple ad-hoc DLA-version for modeling the present phenomena as well as the deterministic approach for fracture propagation give fractal dimensionality for the fracture pattern in accord with our estimations made from recent experimental data. It is found that there is a crossover of two fractal dimensions, corresponding to the core (higher d f ) and multibranched crosslike (lower D f ) regions, that contains loops, that are interpreted as representing different symmetry regions within the square plates of finite size. (author). 26 refs, 5 figs

  6. Metallurgical investigation of disc cracking in the LP-2 turbine at a nuclear power station. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burghard, H.C.

    1982-07-01

    An investigation of combined face cracking and rim cracking in discs of an LP steam turbine rotor was performed. The incident in question involved the development of major cracks in the hub/web transition on the outlet face of the disc as well as major cracking of the blade attachment steeples. Both types of cracking occurred in the No. 1 discs at both ends of a particular rotor. The program was based on a metallurgical evaluation of hub and rim samples of discs removed from the turbine rotor after approximately 31,000 hours of operation. In-depth metallographic and fractographic examinations of representative face cracks and rim cracks were conducted. In addition, the mechanical properties and chemical composition of each of the disc samples were determined. Analyses of crack surface deposits and bulk turbine deposits were also performed

  7. Fatigue Crack Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    alloys (2). [--I Fig. 6. Fatigue fracture in Nitrile- butadien rubber ( NBR ). Fig. 7. The characteristic features of fatigue fracture in press moulded...in plastics and even in rubber . It follows therefore, that fatigue fractures must also occur in the mineral layers of our earth or in the rock on...effective until the weakest point yields and forms a crack. To get a feeling for this process, you can imagine that the stressed article is made of rubber

  8. Distributed password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Crumpacker, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Password cracking requires significant processing power, which in today's world is located at a workstation or home in the form of a desktop computer. Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) is the conduit to this significant source of processing power and John the Ripper is the key. BOINC is a distributed data processing system that incorporates client-server relationships to generically process data. The BOINC structu...

  9. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  10. Cracking hydrocarbons. [British patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyl, G E

    1926-05-06

    The vapors from a still in which oils, coal tar, pitch, creosote, and c. or solid carbonaccous material such as coal or shale are cracked by being heated to 600/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/C. are passed through a fractionating column to remove high-boiling constituents which are passed into a second cracking still. The vapors from this still are treated to separate high-boiling fractions which are passed into a third still. The sills preferably contain removable troughs or liners, which are freed from carbon deposits either after removal from the still or by a scraping disc which is rotated in and moved along the trough. Oil to be cracked is forced by a pump through a preheater to a still. Vapours pass through a carbon separator and dephlegmator to a condenser. The reflux from the dephlegmator is forced by a pump to a still, the vapors from which pass through a carbon separator and a dephlegmator, the reflux from which is passed into a third still fitted with a separate carbon separator, dephlegmator and final condenser.

  11. Remote detection of stress corrosion cracking: Surface composition and crack detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Jovanovic, Igor; Motta, Arthur T.; Xiao, Xuan; Le Berre, Samuel; Fobar, David; Cho, Hwanjeong; Choi, Sungho

    2018-04-01

    Chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel is a potential issue in long term dry storage of spent nuclear fuel canisters. In order for SCC to occur there must be a corrosive environment, a susceptible material, and a driving force. Because it is likely that the material in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of welded stainless steel structures has been sensitized as a result of chromium depletion at the grain boundaries and a thermal residual stress driving force is likely present if solution annealing is not performed, two issues are critical. Is the environment corrosive, i.e., are chlorides present in solution on the surface? And then, are there cracks that could propagate? Remote detection of chlorides on the surface can be accomplished by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), while cracks can be detected by shear horizontal guided waves generated by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs). Both are noncontact methods that are amenable to robotic delivery systems and harsh environments. The sensitivity to chlorine on stainless steel of a LIBS system that employs optical fiber for pulse delivery is demonstrated. Likewise, the ability of the EMAT system to detect cracks of a prescribed size and orientation is shown. These results show the potential for remote detection of Cl and cracks in dry storage spent fuel canisters.

  12. Multiscale model of short cracks in a random polycrystalline aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovski, I.; Cizelj, L.; Petric, Z.

    2006-01-01

    A plane-strain finite element crystal plasticity model of microstructurally small stationary crack emanating at a surface grain in a 316L stainless steel is proposed. The model consisting of 212 randomly shaped, sized and oriented grains is loaded monotonically in uniaxial tension to a maximum load of 1.12Rp0.2 (280MPa). The influence that a random grain structure imposes on a Stage I crack is assessed by calculating the crack tip opening (CTOD) and sliding displacements (CTSD) for single crystal as well as for polycrystal models, considering also different crystallographic orientations. In the single crystal case the CTOD and CTSD may differ by more than one order of magnitude. Near the crack tip slip is activated on all the slip planes whereby only two are active in the rest of the model. The maximum CTOD is directly related to the maximal Schmid factors. For the more complex polycrystal cases it is shown that certain crystallographic orientations result in a cluster of soft grains around the crack-containing grain. In these cases the crack tip can become a part of the localized strain, resulting in a large CTOD value. This effect, resulting from the overall grain orientations and sizes, can have a greater impact on the CTOD than the local grain orientation. On the other hand, when a localized soft response is formed away from the crack, the localized strain does not affect the crack tip directly, resulting in a small CTOD value. The resulting difference in CTOD can be up to a factor of 4, depending upon the crystallographic set. Grains as far as 6 times the value of crack length significantly influence that crack tip parameters. It was also found that a larger crack containing grain tends to increase the CTOD. Finally, smaller than expected drop in the CTOD (12.7%) was obtained as the crack approached the grain boundary. This could be due to the assumption of the unchanged crack direction, only monotonic loading and simplified grain boundary modelling. (author)

  13. Pipe stress intensity factors and coupled depressurization and dynamic crack propagation. 1976 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, A.F.; Kobayashi, A.S.; Love, W.J.

    1978-04-01

    This report contains the description of predictive models for the initiation and propagation of cracks in pipes and the numerical results obtained. The initiation of the crack was studied by evaluating stress intensity factors under static conditions for a series of representative flaws. Three-dimensional static stress intensity factors were determined for quarter-elliptical cracks at the corner of a hole in an infinite plate and at the corner of a bore in a rotating disk. Semi-elliptical cracks for plates in bending and in pressurized and thermally stressed hollow cylinders were also evaluated. The stress fields, in the absence of a crack, were used in the ''alternating technique'' to compute the stress intensity factors along the crack front. Parametric studies were made to assess the effects of crack thickness, the ratio of the major and minor axes of the ellipse and the thickness of the cylinders or plates. These parametric results may be used to predict critical flaw sizes for the initiation of the running crack. The initiation and propagation of axial through cracks in pressurized pipes was studied by using an elastic-plastic finite different shell code coupled with a one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code which computed the leakage through the crack opening and the depressurization of the fluid in the pipe. The effects of large deflections and different fluid pressure profiles were investigated. The results showed that the crack opening shape is dependent upon the fracture criterion used and upon the average pressure on the crack flaps, but not upon the specific pressure profile. The consideration of large deflections changed the opening size of the crack and through the coupling with the pipe pressures, strongly affected the crack tip speed. However, for equal crack lengths, there was little difference between calculations made for large and small deflection

  14. Influence of cracks on rebar corrosion in carbonated concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghantous, R.M.; L'Hostis, V.; Poyet, S.; Francois, R.; Tran, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental program allowing the determination of the effect of pre-cracks and their orientations on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation in different environmental conditions, in order to propose an operational model allowing the evaluation of the kinetic of corrosion of the reinforcement steel in cooling towers of nuclear power plants. The cracking mode that generates cracks which are representative of those appearing on the cooling towers is a three-point bending test performed on prismatic samples of 7*7*28 cm 3 size with 6 mm steel bars. The length of damaged steel / concrete interface, which appears following a three-point bending test, is then quantified. This length could be determining in the initiation and the propagation of corrosion. Results show that this length is dependent on the residual crack opening and that the length of damaged interface in its lower part is larger than that on the upper part due to the Top Bar effect. After cracking, the samples will be exposed to carbon dioxide to ensure carbonation of the steel bar localized at the bottom of the crack and the concrete/steel interface, damaged by the load applied during the three-point bending test. After carbonation of the interface, samples will be submitted to corrosion in different environmental conditions whose effect on the kinetics of corrosion will be determined. The work done so far permits the definition of the cracking protocol (three points bending) that allows obtaining cracks which are representative of those existing on cooling towers. Moreover, the length of steel/concrete damaged interface with respect to crack opening is quantified. It was found that this length is proportional to the crack opening. In addition, it was shown that the Top Bar effect increases the damaged interface length at the lower part of steel bars

  15. Dynamic propagation and cleavage crack arrest in bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaj, M.

    2006-06-01

    In complement of the studies of harmfulness of defects, generally realized in term of initiation, the concept of crack arrest could be used as complementary analyses to the studies of safety. The stop occurs when the stress intensity factor becomes lower than crack arrest toughness (KIa) calculated in elasto-statics (KI ≤ KIa). The aim of this thesis is to understand and predict the stop of a crack propagating at high speed in a 18MND5 steel used in the pressure water reactor (PWR). The test chosen to study crack arrest is the disc thermal shock test. The observations under the scanning electron microscope of the fracture surface showed that the crack arrest always occurs in cleavage mode and that the critical microstructural entity with respect to the propagation and crack arrest corresponds to at least the size of the prior austenitic grain. The numerical analyses in elasto-statics confirm the conservatism of the codified curve of the RCC-M with respect to the values of KIa. The dynamic numerical analyses show that the deceleration of the crack measured at the end of the propagation is related to the global dynamic of the structure (vibrations). The transferability to components of crack arrest toughness obtained from tests analysed in static is thus not assured. The disc thermal shock tests were also modelled by considering a criterion of propagation and arrest of the type 'RKR' characterized by a critical stress sc which depends on the temperature. The results obtained account well for the crack jump measured in experiments as well as the shape of the crack arrest front. (author)

  16. Observation and simulation of crack growth in Zry-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Graciela; Meyer, Gabriel; Perez Ipina, J

    2003-01-01

    Security and life extension of components of nuclear reactors are the most motivating aspects that encourage to study embrittlement processes of zirconium alloys by reaction with hydrogen.Here, the use of fracture mechanics tests are suitable to monitor the material resistance of components under service.Because many times is difficult to obtain normalized probes from real size components, researchers look for alternative experimental techniques or crack growth simulation from the knowledge of particular material properties.In this work we present the results obtained after experimental observation and computer simulation of crack growth in Zry-4 probes.Experimental observation were obtained by performing flexion tests in three point probes SSEN(B) of 3 x 7 x 32 mm 3 located in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope, measuring in situ the crack length and opening when an external load is applied.Using the information obtained from stress-displacement measurements after tensile tests and the empiric relationship between crack opening and crack length, the crack growth process was simulated.Displacement field in the zone close to the crack tip was obtained by finite elements technique (Castem, DMT, CEA) assuming plain stress, a plastic bilinear homogeneous material and neglecting texture or directional anisotropy.To compare experimental observation and simulation, a grid (10 x 10 μm 2 each square) was drawn in the zone close to the crack tip by selective sputtering.Following the movement of two (three) points of the surface allows to compare uni (bi) dimensional deformation.A good agreement between observation and simulation was observed: after the crack opening grew 28 times (from 1.5 to 42 μm) the base-height relationship of a triangle involving the crack tip change 40% (35%) in the experimental observation (simulation)

  17. Neutron diffraction studies on lattice strain evolution around a crack-tip during tensile loading and unloading cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yinan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)]. E-mail: ysun1@utk.edu; Choo, Hahn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Lu Yulin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Yang Bing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brown, Donald W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Elastic lattice-strain profiles ahead of a fatigue-crack-tip were measured during tensile loading and unloading cycles using neutron diffraction. The crack-closure phenomenon after an overload was observed. Furthermore, the plastic-zone size in front of the crack-tip was estimated from the diffraction-peak broadening, which showed good agreement with the calculated result.

  18. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  19. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    the same strength as a plain Dugdale model. The critical energy release rates Gamma_CR, however, become different. Expressions (with easy computer algorithms) are presented in the paper which relate critical energy release rates and crack geometry to arbitrary cohesive stress distributions.For future...... lifetime analysis of viscoelastic materials strain energy release rates, crack geometries, and cohesive stress distributions are considered as related to sub-critical loads sigma stress-deformation tests......The Dugdale crack model is widely used in materials science to predict strength of defective (cracked) materials. A stable Dugdale crack in an elasto-plastic material is prevented from spreading by uniformly distributed cohesive stresses acting in narrow areas at the crack tips. These stresses...

  20. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked type-304 stainless steel pipes in tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    Circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to tensile load were analyzed for finite length and constant depth part-through cracks located at the inside of the pipe wall. The analysis postulated loads sufficient to cause net-section yielding of the flawed section. It was demonstrated that a propensity for predominantly radial growth exists for part-through cracks loaded in tension. This result is similar to the result for bend loading, except that bend loading causes more favorable conditions for wall breakthrough than tension loading. Numerical results were developed for 4-in. and 24-in-dia pipes. Safety margins for displacement controlled loads were described by a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve delineating leak from fracture in a space of nondimensional crack length and crack depth. 4-india schedule 80 Type-304 stainless steel pipes with length to radius ratio (L/R) of up to 100 exhibited leak-before-break behavior.

  1. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked type-304 stainless steel pipes in tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to tensile load were analyzed for finite length and constant depth part-through cracks located at the inside of the pipe wall. The analysis postulated loads sufficient to cause net-section yielding of the flawed section. It was demonstrated that a propensity for predominantly radial growth exists for part-through cracks loaded in tension. This result is similar to the result for bend loading, except that bend loading causes more favorable conditions for wall breakthrough than tension loading. Numerical results were developed for 4-in. and 24-in-dia pipes. Safety margins for displacement controlled loads were described by a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve delineating leak from fracture in a space of nondimensional crack length and crack depth. 4-india schedule 80 Type-304 stainless steel pipes with length to radius ratio (L/R) of up to 100 exhibited leak-before-break behavior

  2. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crack initiation behaviors of metallic walls subjected to high heat flux expected at plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Uno, Masayoshi; Seki, Masahiro.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were performed to investigate crack initiation behavior near a surface of stainless steel and tungsten when subjected to extremely high heat flux. The improved electron beam test facility was used as the heat source. Two-dimensional thermal and elasto-plastic stress analyses were also performed. From the results for stainless steel, micro-cracks about 0.1 mm deep only initiated in the resolidified layer along dendrites. No cracks propagated into the non-melted zone, and repeated heating of up to 20 times did not affect the depth and population of the cracks. According to the elasto-plastic stress analyses, no fatigue cracks were expected. Cracks with a depth of more than a few millimeters were observed in a tungsten plate. The cracks initiated at a boundary between heated and unheated areas. They grew into the non-melted zone, and curved towards the center part of the heated area. The elasto-plastic stress analyses indicated that the cracks were initiated due to the residual tensile strain after heated at the surface of the test specimen. When the heat flux was repeated, the cracks propagated and penetrated to the rear side of the test specimen in several repetition. (author)

  4. Surface crack growth in cylindrical hollow specimen subject to tension and torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject for studies is an aluminium cylindrical hollow specimen with external axial and part circumferential semi-elliptical surface crack undergoing fatigue loads. Both the optical microscope measurements and the crack opening displacement (COD method are used to monitor and calculate both crack depth and crack length during the tests. The variation of crack growth behaviour is studied under cyclic axial tension, pure torsion and combined tension+torsion fatigue loading. For the particular surface flaw geometries considered, the elastic and plastic in-plane and out-of-plane constraint parameters, as well as the governing parameter for stress fields in the form of In-integral and plastic stress intensity factor, are obtained as a function of the aspect ratio, dimensionless crack length and crack depth. The combined effect of tension and torsion loading and initial surface flaw orientation on the crack growth for two type of aluminium alloys is made explicit. The experimental and numerical results of the present study provided the opportunity to explore the suggestion that fatigue crack propagation may be governed more strongly by the plastic stress intensity factor rather than the magnitude of the elastic SIFs alone. One advantage of the plastic SIF is its sensitivity to combined loading due to accounting for the plastic properties of the material.

  5. Crack retardation by load reduction during fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Nam, Ki Woo; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Do, Jae Yoon

    2003-01-01

    Fracture life and crack retardation behavior were examined experimentally using CT specimens of aluminum alloy 5083. Crack retardation life and fracture life were a wide difference between 0.8 and 0.6 in proportion to ratio of load reduction. The wheeler model retardation parameter was used successfully to predict crack growth behavior. By using a crack propagation rule, prediction of fracture life can be evaluated quantitatively. A statistical approach based on Weibull distribution was applied to the test data to evaluate the dispersion in the retardation life and fracture life by the change of load reduction

  6. Eddy current characterization of small cracks using least square support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelabi, M.; Hacib, T.; Le Bihan, Y.; Ikhlef, N.; Boughedda, H.; Mekideche, M. R.

    2016-04-01

    Eddy current (EC) sensors are used for non-destructive testing since they are able to probe conductive materials. Despite being a conventional technique for defect detection and localization, the main weakness of this technique is that defect characterization, of the exact determination of the shape and dimension, is still a question to be answered. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of small crack sizing using signals acquired from an EC sensor. We report our effort to develop a systematic approach to estimate the size of rectangular and thin defects (length and depth) in a conductive plate. The achieved approach by the novel combination of a finite element method (FEM) with a statistical learning method is called least square support vector machines (LS-SVM). First, we use the FEM to design the forward problem. Next, an algorithm is used to find an adaptive database. Finally, the LS-SVM is used to solve the inverse problems, creating polynomial functions able to approximate the correlation between the crack dimension and the signal picked up from the EC sensor. Several methods are used to find the parameters of the LS-SVM. In this study, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) are proposed for tuning the LS-SVM. The results of the design and the inversions were compared to both simulated and experimental data, with accuracy experimentally verified. These suggested results prove the applicability of the presented approach.

  7. The effect of transverse crack upon parametric instability of a rotor-bearing system with an asymmetric disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that either the asymmetric disk or transverse crack brings parametric inertia (or stiffness) excitation to the rotor-bearing system. When both of them appear in a rotor system, the parametric instability behaviors have not gained sufficient attentions. Thus, the effect of transverse crack upon parametric instability of a rotor-bearing system with an asymmetric disk is studied. First, the finite element equations of motion are established for the asymmetric rotor system. Both the open and breathing transverse cracks are taken into account in the model. Then, the discrete state transition matrix (DSTM) method is introduced for numerically acquiring the instability regions. Based upon these, some computations for a practical asymmetric rotor system with open or breathing transverse crack are conducted, respectively. Variations of the primary and combination instability regions induced by the asymmetric disk with the crack depth are observed, and the effect of the orientation angle between the crack and asymmetric disk on various instability regions are discussed in detail. It is shown that for the asymmetric angle around 0, the existence of transverse (either open or breathing) crack has attenuation effect upon the instability regions. Under certain crack depth, the instability regions could be vanished by the transverse crack. When the asymmetric angle is around π/2, increasing the crack depth would enhance the instability regions.

  8. Fracture mechanics characterisation of medium-size adhesive joint specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Medium-size specimens (glass-fibre beams bonded together by an adhesive layer were tested in four point bending to determine their load carrying capacity. Specimens having different thickness were tested. Except for onespecimen, the cracking occurred as cracking...... along the adhesive layer; initially cracking occurred along the adhesive/laminate interface, but after some crack extension the cracking took place inside the laminate (for one specimen the later part of thecracking occurred unstably along the adhesive/ laminate interface). Crack bridging by fibres...

  9. Sweep excitation with order tracking: A new tactic for beam crack analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dongdong; Wang, KeSheng; Zhang, Mian; Zuo, Ming J.

    2018-04-01

    Crack detection in beams and beam-like structures is an important issue in industry and has attracted numerous investigations. A local crack leads to global system dynamics changes and produce non-linear vibration responses. Many researchers have studied these non-linearities for beam crack diagnosis. However, most reported methods are based on impact excitation and constant frequency excitation. Few studies have focused on crack detection through external sweep excitation which unleashes abundant dynamic characteristics of the system. Together with a signal resampling technique inspired by Computed Order Tracking, this paper utilize vibration responses under sweep excitations to diagnose crack status of beams. A data driven method for crack depth evaluation is proposed and window based harmonics extracting approaches are studied. The effectiveness of sweep excitation and the proposed method is experimentally validated.

  10. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a 'limited propagation' argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J ox ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NANO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J ox are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained. (author)

  11. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a limited propagation argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J OX ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NaNO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J OX are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained

  12. Vibration analysis of partially cracked plate submerged in fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shashank; Jain, N. K.; Joshi, P. V.

    2018-01-01

    The present work proposes an analytical model for vibration analysis of partially cracked rectangular plates coupled with fluid medium. The governing equation of motion for the isotropic plate based on the classical plate theory is modified to accommodate a part through continuous line crack according to simplified line spring model. The influence of surrounding fluid medium is incorporated in the governing equation in the form of inertia effects based on velocity potential function and Bernoulli's equations. Both partially and totally submerged plate configurations are considered. The governing equation also considers the in-plane stretching due to lateral deflection in the form of in-plane forces which introduces geometric non-linearity into the system. The fundamental frequencies are evaluated by expressing the lateral deflection in terms of modal functions. The assessment of the present results is carried out for intact submerged plate as to the best of the author's knowledge the literature lacks in analytical results for submerged cracked plates. New results for fundamental frequencies are presented as affected by crack length, fluid level, fluid density and immersed depth of plate. By employing the method of multiple scales, the frequency response and peak amplitude of the cracked structure is analyzed. The non-linear frequency response curves show the phenomenon of bending hardening or softening and the effect of fluid dynamic pressure on the response of the cracked plate.

  13. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to bending loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    A plastic fracture mechanics methodology is presented for part-through cracks in pipes under bending. A previous analysis result on the behavior of part-through cracks in pipes is reviewed. Example quantitative results for the initiation and instability of radial growth of part-through cracks are presented and compared with the experimental data to demonstrate the applicability of the method. The analyses in our previous work are further developed to include the instability of circumferential growth of part-through cracks. Numerical results are then presented for a compliant piping system, under displacement controlled bending, which focus on (1) instability of radial growth (unstable wall breakthrough) and (2) instability of circumferential growth of the resulting throughthe-thickness crack. The combined results of the above two types of analyses are presented on a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve of critical combination of length and depth of part-through cracks which delineates leak from fracture. The effect of piping compliance on the leak-before-break assessment is discussed

  14. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to bending loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-10-01

    A plastic fracture mechanics methodology is presented for part-through cracks in pipes under bending. A previous analysis result on the behavior of part-through cracks in pipes is reviewed. Example quantitative results for the initiation and instability of radial growth of part-through cracks are presented and compared with the experimental data to demonstrate the applicability of the method. The analyses in our previous work are further developed to include the instability of circumferential growth of part-through cracks. Numerical results are then presented for a compliant piping system, under displacement controlled bending, which focus on (1) instability of radial growth (unstable wall breakthrough) and (2) instability of circumferential growth of the resulting throughthe-thickness crack. The combined results of the above two types of analyses are presented on a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve of critical combination of length and depth of part-through cracks which delineates leak from fracture. The effect of piping compliance on the leak-before-break assessment is discussed.

  15. Effects of Crack Measurement Methods on The Determination of Fracture Toughness of IG-110 Isotropic Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Dae Jong; Jang, Chang Heui

    2010-02-01

    This report represents experimental data on the differences in the fracture toughness values due to different crack length measurement methods, i.e. direct current potential drop method (DCPD), traveling microscope method (TM), and dye penetration method (DP). SENB specimens made of IG-11 fine grained isotropic graphite (specimen size: 200(L) x 20(W) x 15(B) mm 3 ) were used. Results on crack length estimation showed that the TM and the DP methods resulted in similar crack length changing behaviors, and the crack length estimated by DCPD was the shortest. Comparisons of crack growth resistance curves (K R curves) showed that the DCPD showed the lowest and a decreasing K R curve with a crack extension. Both the curves from TM and DP showed increasing K R curves with a crack extension, but the curve from DP was unstable. The K R curve estimated from TM appeared to be the most stable one

  16. Sensitivity of using blunt and sharp crack models in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.C.; Kennedy, J.M.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    J-integral values are calculated for both the blunt (smeared) crack and the sharp (discrete) crack models in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics problems involving metallic materials. A sensitivity study is performed to show the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two cracking models. It is concluded that the blunt crack model is less dependent on the orientation of the mesh. For the mesh which is in line with the crack direction, however, the sharp crack model is less sensitive to the mesh size. Both models yield reasonable results for a properly discretized finite-element mesh. A subcycling technique is used in this study in the explicit integration scheme so that large time steps can be used for the coarse elements away from the crack tip. The savings of computation time by this technique are reported. 6 refs., 9 figs

  17. Process of cracking in reinforced concrete beams (simulation and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Shardakov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the mechanisms of crack formation in reinforced concrete beams subjected to quasi-static bending. The boundary-value problem has been formulated in the framework of brittle fracture mechanics and solved using the finite-element method. Numerical simulation of the vibrations of an uncracked beam and a beam with cracks of different size serves to determine the pattern of changes in the spectrum of eigenfrequencies observed during crack evolution. A series of sequential quasi-static 4-point bend tests leading to the formation of cracks in a reinforced concrete beam were performed. At each loading step, the beam was subjected to an impulse load to induce vibrations. Two stages of cracking were detected. During the first stage the nonconservative process of deformation begins to develope, but has not visible signs. The second stage is an active cracking, which is marked by a sharp change in eingenfrequencies. The boundary of a transition from one stage to another is well registered. The vibration behavior was examined for the ordinary concrete beams and the beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber polymer. The obtained results show that the vibrodiagnostic approach is an effective tool for monitoring crack formation and assessing the quality of measures aimed at strengthening concrete structures

  18. A numerical analysis of crack growth in brittle microcracking composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was performed to elucidate the mechanism of microcracking on the observed fracture behavior of brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results indicate that the energy expenditure due the microcrack nucleation seems not to contribute significantly to the resistance to crack growth. The main controlling parameter appears to be elastic interaction of the microcracks with the main crack in the absence of a reinforcing phase; therefore, the microcrack density plays an important role. In the case of the composites, the interaction of the main crack with the stress fields of the reinforcing phase, rather than interaction of microcracks, is the controlling parameter for the resistance to the crack growth even in the presence of a large population of microcracks. It will be also shown that the crack branching and crack kinking can readily develop as a result of microcracking

  19. Cracking of anisotropic cylindrical polytropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardan, S.A. [University of the Management and Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Azam, M. [University of Education, Division of Science and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    We study the appearance of cracking in charged anisotropic cylindrical polytropes with generalized polytropic equation. We investigate the existence of cracking in two different kinds of polytropes existing in the literature through two different assumptions: (a) local density perturbation with conformally flat condition, and (b) perturbing polytropic index, charge and anisotropy parameters. We conclude that cracking appears in both kinds of polytropes for a specific range of density and model parameters. (orig.)

  20. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  1. Detection of a surface breaking crack by using the centroid variations of laser ultrasonic spectrums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Baik, Sung Hoon; Lim, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Sang; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Cha, Hyung Ki; Kang, Young June

    2006-01-01

    A laser ultrasonic system is a non-contact inspection device with a wide-band spectrum and a high spatial resolution. It provides absolute measurements of the moving distance and it can be applied to hard-to-access locations including curved or rough surfaces like in a nuclear power plant. In this paper, we have investigated the detection methods of the depth of a surface-breaking crack by using the surface wave of a laser ultrasound. The filtering function of a surface-breaking crack is a kind of a low-pass filter. The higher frequency components are more highly decreased in proportion to the crack depth. Also, the center frequency value of each ultrasound spectrum is decreased in proportion to the crack depth. We extracted the depth information of a surface-breaking crack by observing the centroid variation of the frequency spectrum. We describe the experimental results to detect the crack depth information by using the peak-to-valley values in the time domain and the center frequency values in the frequency domain.

  2. HSST crack-arrest studies overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Whitman, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is given of the efforts underway in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program to better understand and model crack-arrest behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels. The efforts are both experimental and analytical. The experimental work provides K/sub Ia/ data from laboratory-sized specimens, from thick-wall cylinders which exhibit essentially-full restraint and from nonisothermal wide-plate specimens. These data serve to define toughness-temperature trends and to provide validation data under prototypical reactor conditions. The analytical efforts interpret and correlate the data, plus provide LEFM, elastodynamic and viscoplastic methods for analyzing crack run-arrest behavior in reactor vessels. The analysis methods are incorporated into finite element computer programs which are under development at three separate laboratories. 22 refs., 10 figs

  3. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  4. Low-cycle fatigue-cracking mechanisms in fcc crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Qu, S.; Duan, Q. Q.; Wu, S. D.; Li, S. X.; Wang, Z. G.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue (LCF) cracking behavior in various face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline materials, including Cu single crystals, bicrystals and polycrystals, Cu-Al and Cu-Zn alloys, ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al-Cu and Cu-Zn alloys, was systematically investigated and reviewed. In Cu single crystals, fatigue cracking always nucleates along slip bands and deformation bands. The large-angle grain boundary (GB) becomes the preferential site in bicrystals and polycrystals. In addition, fatigue cracking can also nucleate along slip bands and twin boundaries (TBs) in polycrystalline materials. However, shear bands and coarse deformation bands are observed to the preferential sites for fatigue cracking in UFG materials with a large number of GBs. Based on numerous observations on fatigue-cracking behavior, the fatigue-cracking mechanisms along slip bands, GBs, TBs, shear bands and deformation bands were systematically compared and classified into two types, i.e. shear crack and impingement crack. Finally, these fatigue-cracking behaviors are discussed in depth for a better understanding of their physical nature and the transition from intergranular to transgranular cracking in various fcc crystalline materials. These comprehensive results for fatigue damage mechanisms should significantly aid in obtaining the optimum design to further strengthen and toughen metallic materials in practice.

  5. Crack path and fracture surface modifications in cement composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a tremendous increase in the use of high strength and high performance self-consolidating cementitious composites due to their superior workability and mechanical strengths. Cement composites are quasi-brittle in nature and possess extremely low tensile strength as compared to their compressive strength. Due to the low tensile strength capacity, cracks develop in cementitious composites due to the drying shrinkage, plastic settlements and/or stress concentrations (due to external restrains and/or applied stresses etc. These cracks developed at the nanoscale may grow rapidly due to the applied stresses and join together to form micro and macro cracks. The growth of cracks from nanoscale to micro and macro scale is very rapid and may lead to sudden failure of the cement composites. The present paper reports the modifications in the crack growth pattern of the high performance cement composites to achieve enhanced ductility and toughness. The objective was accomplished by the incorporation of the micro sized inert particulates in the cement composite matrix. The results indicate that the incorporation of micro sized inert particles acted as the obstacles in the growth of the cracks thus improving the ductility and the energy absorption capacity of the self-consolidating cementitious composites.

  6. Biaxial loading effects on the growth of cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.W.; Miller, K.J.; Walker, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth under different biaxial stress states is considered for both small scale yielding and high bulk stress conditions. Analytical and elastic finite element results are compared favourably alongside experimental results on a AISI 316 stainless steel at both room and elevated temperatures. Differences in crack growth rates are compared against different crack tip cyclic plastic zone sizes for various degrees of mixed mode loading, thereby overcoming the limitations of the Paris Law and LEFM. The usefulness of the approach is indicated for studies in the behaviour of materials subjected to thermal shock. Where steep temperature gradients are introduced due to rapid thermal transients, high strains are produced which propagate fatigue cracks under cyclic conditions. Since stress gradients are generally associated with thermal shock situations, the cracks grow through a plastically deformed region near the surface into an elastic region. A unified approach to fatigue behaviour, encompassing both linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, will enable analysis of thermal shock situations. The approach to crack propagation developed here shows that cyclic growth rates are a function of a severe strain zone size in which local stresses exceed the tensile strength, i.e. monotonic instability. The effects of stress biaxiality and mixed mode loading are included in the analysis, which may be extended to general yielding situations. (orig.)

  7. Modal method for crack identification applied to reactor recirculation pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.; Brook, R.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have been operating and producing useful electricity for many years. Within the last few years, several plants have found cracks in the reactor coolant pump shaft near the thermal barrier. The modal method and results described herein show the analytical results of using a Modal Analysis test method to determine the presence, size, and location of a shaft crack. The authors have previously demonstrated that the test method can analytically and experimentally identify shaft cracks as small as five percent (5%) of the shaft diameter. Due to small differences in material property distribution, the attempt to identify cracks smaller than 3% of the shaft diameter has been shown to be impractical. The rotor dynamics model includes a detailed motor rotor, external weights and inertias, and realistic total support stiffness. Results of the rotor dynamics model have been verified through a comparison with on-site vibration test data

  8. Probabilistic and microstructural aspects of fatigue cracks initiation in Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, F.

    2004-03-01

    Thermomechanical treatments have been recently developed to produce Inconel 718DA (Direct Aged). This alloy optimisation leads to an increase of the fatigue life but also the scatter. The aim of this study is on the one hand the understanding of the fatigue crack initiation mechanisms and on the other hand the modelling of the fatigue life and the scatter. An experimental study showed that the fatigue cracks were initiated from carbide particles in fine grain alloy. Interrupted tensile tests show that the particles cracking occurred at the first quarter of the fatigue cycle. Fatigue behaviour tests were also performed on various grain size 718 alloys. The last experimental part was devoted to measurements of the low cycle fatigue crack growth rates using a high focal distance microscope. For these tests, EDM micro-defects were used for the fatigue crack initiation sites. This method was also used to observe the small fatigue crack coalescence. A fatigue life model is proposed. It is based on the three fatigue crack initiation mechanisms competition: particle crack initiation on the surface, internal particle crack initiation and Stade I crack initiation. The particle fatigue crack initiation is supposed instantaneous at a critical stress level. The Tanaka and Mura model is used for analysing the Stage I crack initiation number of cycles. The fatigue crack growth rate was analysed using the Tomkins model identified on the small fatigue crack growth rate measurements. The proposed fatigue life model decomposed in three levels: a deterministic one and two probabilistic with and without crack coalescence. (author)

  9. Sub-10-micrometer toughening and crack tip toughness of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Siang Fung; Schulz, Anja; Pacher Fernandes, Rodrigo; Schneider, Gerold A

    2011-04-01

    In previous studies, enamel showed indications to occlude small cracks in-vivo and exhibited R-curve behaviors for bigger cracks ex-vivo. This study quantifies the crack tip's toughness (K(I0),K(III0)), the crack's closure stress and the cohesive zone size at the crack tip of enamel and investigates the toughening mechanisms near the crack tip down to the length scale of a single enamel crystallite. The crack-opening-displacement (COD) profile of cracks induced by Vickers indents on mature bovine enamel was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mode I crack tip toughness K(I0) of cracks along enamel rod boundaries and across enamel rods exhibit a similar range of values: K(I0,Ir)=0.5-1.6MPa m(0.5) (based on Irwin's 'near-field' solution) and K(I0,cz)=0.8-1.5MPa m(0.5) (based on the cohesive zone solution of the Dugdale-Muskhelishvili (DM) crack model). The mode III crack tip toughness K(III0,Ir) was computed as 0.02-0.15MPa m(0.5). The crack-closure stress at the crack tip was computed as 163-770 MPa with a cohesive zone length and width 1.6-10.1μm and 24-44 nm utilizing the cohesive zone solution. Toughening elements were observed under AFM and SEM: crack bridging due to protein ligament and hydroxyapatite fibres (micro- and nanometer scale) as well as microcracks were identified. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  11. Crack closure and growth behavior of short fatigue cracks under random loading (part I : details of crack closure behavior)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Young; Song, Ji Ho

    2000-01-01

    Crack closure and growth behavior of physically short fatigue cracks under random loading are investigated by performing narrow-and wide-band random loading tests for various stress ratios. Artificially prepared two-dimensional, short through-thickness cracks are used. The closure behavior of short cracks under random loading is discussed, comparing with that of short cracks under constant-amplitude loading and also that of long cracks under random loading. Irrespective of random loading spectrum or block length, the crack opening load of short cracks is much lower under random loading than under constant-amplitude loading corresponding to the largest load cycle in a random load history, contrary to the behavior of long cracks that the crack opening load under random loading is nearly the same as or slightly higher than constant-amplitude results. This result indicates that the largest load cycle in a random load history has an effect to enhance crack opening of short cracks

  12. Weighted halfspace depth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotík, Lukáš; Hlubinka, D.; Vencálek, O.

    Vol. 46, č. 1 (2010), s. 125-148 ISSN 0023-5954 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : data depth * nonparametric multivariate analysis * strong consistency of depth * mixture of distributions Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.461, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/SI/kotik-weighted halfspace depth.pdf

  13. Evaluation on ultrasonic examination methods applied to Ni-base alloy weld including cracks due to stress corrosion cracking found in BWR reactor internal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Shinichi; Shimizu, Sadato

    2005-01-01

    A Ni-base alloy weld, including cracks due to stress corrosion cracking found in the reactor internal of the oldest BWR in Japan, Tsuruga unit 1, in 1999, was examined by three (3) types of UT method. After this examination, a depth of each crack was confirmed by carrying out a little excavation with a grinder and PT examination by turns until each crack disappeared. Then, the depth measured by the former method was compared with the one measured by the latter method. In this fashion, performances of the UT methods were verified. As a result, a combination of the three types of UT method was found to meet the acceptance criteria given by ASME Sec.XI Appendix VIII, Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems-Supplement 6. In this paper, the results of the UT examination described above and their evaluation are discussed. (author)

  14. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune

    In this paper the problem of describing the asymptotic fields around a slowly growing crack in a linearly viscoelastic material is considered. It is shown that for plane mixed mode problems the asymptotic fields must be described by 6 parameters: 2 stress intensity factors and 4 deformation...... intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  15. An evaluation on the effect of reversed plastic zone on the fatigue crack opening behavior under 2-D plane stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeon Chang

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between fatigue crack opening behavior and the reversed plastic zone sizes is studied. An elastic-plastic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is performed to examine the opening behavior of fatigue crack, where the contact elements are used in the mesh of the crack tip area. The smaller element size than reversed plastic zone size is used for evaluating the distribution of reversed plastic zone. In the author's previous results the FEA could predict the crack opening level, which crack tip elements were in proportion to the theoretical reversed plastic zone size. It is found that the calculated reversed plastic zone size is related to the theoretical reversed plastic zone size and crack opening level. The calculated reversed plastic zone sizes are almost equal to the reversed plastic zone considering crack opening level obtained by experimental results. It can be possible to predict the crack opening level from the reversed plastic zone size calculated by finite element method. We find that the experimental crack opening levels correspond with the opening values of contact nodes on the calculated reversed plastic zone of finite element simulation

  16. STAC -- a new Swedish code for statistical analysis of cracks in SG-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poern, K.

    1997-01-01

    Steam generator (SG) tubes in pressurized water reactor plants are exposed to various types of degradation processes, among which stress corrosion cracking in particular has been observed. To be able to evaluate the safety importance of such cracking of SG-tubes one has to have a good and empirically founded knowledge about the scope and the size of the cracks as well as the rate of their continuous growth. The basis of experience is to a large extent constituted of the annually performed SG-inspections and crack sizing procedures. On the basis of this experience one can estimate the distribution of existing crack lengths, and modify this distribution with regard to maintenance (plugging) and the predicted rate of crack propagation. Finally, one can calculate the rupture probability of SG-tubes as a function of a given critical crack length. On account of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate an introductory study has been performed in order to get a survey of what has been done elsewhere in this field. The study resulted in a proposal of a computerizable model to be able to estimate the distribution of true cracks, to modify this distribution due to the crack growth and to compute the probability of tube rupture. The model has now been implemented in a compute code, called STAC (STatistical Analysis of Cracks). This paper is aimed to give a brief outline of the model to facilitate the understanding of the possibilities and limitations associated with the model

  17. Natural frequencies of Euler-Bernoulli beam with open cracks on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Jae; Yun, Jong Hak; Seong, Kyeong Youn; Kim, Jae Ho; Kang, Sung Hwang

    2006-01-01

    A study of the natural vibrations of beam resting on elastic foundation with finite number of transverse open cracks is presented. Frequency equations are derived for beams with different end restraints. Euler-Bernoulli beam on Winkler foundation and Euler-Bernoulli beam on Paster nak foundation are investigated. The cracks are modeled by massless substitute spring. The effects of the crack location, size and its number and the foundation constants, on the natural frequencies of the beam, are investigated

  18. Flaw preparations for HSST program vessel fracture mechanics testing: mechanical-cyclic pumping and electron-beam weld-hydrogen-charge cracking schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, P.P.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the document is to present schemes for flaw preparations in heavy section steel. The ability of investigators to grow representative sharp cracks of known size, location, and orientation is basic to representative field testing to determine data for potential flaw propagation, fracture behavior, and margin against fracture for high-pressure-, high-temperature-service steel vessels subjected to increasing pressurization and/or thermal shock. Gaging for analytical stress and strain procedures and ultrasonic and acoustic emission instrumentation can then be applied to monitor the vessel during testing and to study crack growth. This report presents flaw preparations for HSST fracture mechanics testing. Cracks were grown by two techniques: (1) a mechanical method wherein a premachined notch was sharpened by pressurization and (2) a method combining electron-beam welds and hydrogen charging to crack the chill zone of a rapidly placed autogenous weld. The mechanical method produces a naturally occurring growth shape controlled primarily by the shape of the machined notch; the welding-electrochemical method produces flaws of uniform depth from the surface of a wall or machined notch. Theories, details, discussions, and procedures are covered for both of the flaw-growing schemes

  19. Pitting and Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Nanostructured Al-Mg Alloys in Natural and Artificial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mala M.; Ziemian, Constance W.

    2008-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of two developmental nanocrystalline 5083 alloys with varied composition and processing conditions was studied. The results were compared to a commercial aluminum AA 5083 (H111) alloy. The pitting densities, size and depths, and residual tensile strengths were measured after alternate immersion in artificial seawater and atmospheric exposure under different loading conditions. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDX was used to analyze the fracture surfaces of failed specimen after removal at selected intervals and tensile testing. One of the nanostructured Al-Mg alloys exhibited significantly superior pitting resistance when compared to conventional microstructured AA 5083. Under conditions where pitting corrosion showed up as local tunnels toward phase inclusions, transgranular cracking was observed, whereas under conditions when pitting corrosion evolved along grain boundaries, intergranular cracking inside the pit was observed. Pit initiation resistance of the nano alloys appears to be better than that of the conventional alloys. However, long-term pit propagation is a concern and warrants further study. The objective of this investigation was to obtain information regarding the role that ultra-fine microstructures play in their degradation in marine environments and to provide insight into the corrosion mechanisms and damage processes of these alloys.

  20. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties...... crack propagation. This resulted in threshold curves that can be used for assessment of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking as a function of operating pressure and hydrogen content - having the flaw size as discrete parameter. The results are to be used mainly on a conceptual basis......, but it was indicated that the requirements for crack propagation include an overprotective CP-condition, a severe sulphate-reducing environment, as well as a large flaw (8 mm or a leak in the present case). A 1 mm flaw (which may be the maximum realistic flaw size) is believed to be unable to provoke crack propagation...

  1. Fatigue crack retardation of high strength steel in saltwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Imai, T.; Kojima, T.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel was studied in 3 percent saltwater to investigate the effects of a corrosive environment and sheer thickness on fatigue crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of 0 and frequency of 10 H /SUB z/ . A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, and the crack propagation rate at first increased, followed by fairly rapid decrease to a minimum value and then increased gradually to its steady-state value, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size and the retardation cycles increased with decreasing sheet thickness, just as they did in air. However, the zone size and the cycles were larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the crack propagation rates through the overload affected zone were not affected by the test environment, the longer retardation cycles in 3 percent saltwater were attributed to an enlargement of the overload affected zone size. The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept

  2. Prediction of Crack Growth Aqueous Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS SRI International 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, CA 94025 II...34no crack" has at least a vestigial rupture, associated with cyclic loading of the oxide film at the crack tip. The curve labeled "crack" was obtained...be an effect of crack opening. For the data set labeled "crack", the vestigial crack, although short, is very tight and the impedance is large. Under

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel base alloys characterization and prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.; Pinard-Legry, G.

    1988-01-01

    For many years, studies have been carried out in several laboratories to characterize the IGSCC (Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) behaviour of nickel base alloys in aqueous environments. For their relative shortness, CERTs (Constant Extension Rate Tests) have been extensively used, especially at the Corrosion Department of the CEA. However, up to recently, the results obtained with this method remained qualitative. This paper presents a first approach to a quantitative interpretation of CERT results. The basic datum used is the crack trace depth distribution determined on a specimen section at the end of a CERT. It is shown that this information can be used for the calculation of initiation and growth parameters which quantitatively characterize IGSCC phenomenon. Moreover, the rationale proposed should lead to the determination of intrinsic cracking parameters, and so, to in-service behaviour prediction

  4. Transport and Corrosion Behavior of Cracked Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin

    Reinforced concrete, due to its inherent versatility and durability as a building material, has been implemented for use in a multitude of structural applications which are exposed to widely varying environmental conditions. Often times these structures are designed for lengthy service lives....... The exposure conditions may vary from industrial products, chemicals, and gases, to annual variations in temperature, to chloride-rich environments such as marine structures and structures exposed to deicing salts. These chloride-rich environments are of central concern in Denmark and throughout the world....... In addition, cracks develop in concrete through various physical and chemical processes, which occur at varying periods of the lifetime of a structure, resulting in varying crack parameters (i.e. width, depth, and tortuosity). These cracks provide easy access of aggressive substances from the environment...

  5. Further studies on stress intensity factors of semi-elliptical cracks in pressurized cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, A.S.; Emery, A.F.; Love, W.J.; Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    The authors have used, in the past, the three-dimensional stress intensity magnification factor, Msub(KS), for a semi-elliptical surface crack in a flat plate with a curvature correction factor, Msub(C), to estimate the stress intensity magnification factor, Msub(K) = Msub(C) x Msub(KS), for unpressurized and pressurized inner semi-elliptical cracks and unpressurized outer semi-elliptical cracks in pressurized and thermally shocked cylinders. Recent papers by Atluri/Kathiresan, Welliot/Labbens/Pellissier-Tanon and McGowan/Raymund, however, showed that while this plate analogy with curvature correction provided reasonable estimates of the stress intensity factors at the deepest crack penetration, it underestimated the stress intensity factors at the cylindrical surface. The source of this discrepancy was traced to the curvature correction factor Msub(C), which was re-evaluated for various crack configurations and cylindrical geometries studied. Using the updated Msub(C) together with the previously derived Msub(KS), stress intensity factor magnification factor, Msub(K), was rederived for: (1) Pressurized and unpressurized inner semi-elliptical cracks of two crack aspects ratios of b/a = 0.2 and 0.98 at crack depth of b/(Rsub(o)-Rsub(i)) = 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 in pressurized cylinders with outside-to-inside radius ratios of Rsub(o)/Rsub(i) = 3/2, 5/4, 7/6, and 10/9. (2) Unpressurized outer semi-elliptical cracks of two crack aspect ratios of b/a = 0.2 and 0.98 at crack depths of b/(Rsub(o)-Rsub(i)) = 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 in pressurized cylinders with outside-to-inside radius ratio of Rsub(o)/Rsub(i) = 3/2, 5/4, 7/6, and 10/9. (orig.)

  6. Biogenic Cracks in Porous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms growing on and inside porous rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of porous media. We designed a model porous medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the porous medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within porous medium until saturation of the porous space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and porous media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the porous sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model porous medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.

  7. Fracture mechanical investigations about crack resistance behaviour in non-transforming ceramics in particular aluminum oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, K.K.O.; Kleist, G.; Nickel, H.

    1991-03-01

    The aim of this work is the clearification of R-curve behaviour of non-transforming ceramics, in particular aluminum oxide exhibiting incrystalline fracture. Investigations of crack growth in controlled bending experiments were performed using 3-Pt- and 4-Pt-bending samples of differing sizes under inert conditions. The fracture experiments were realized using several loading techniques, for example constant and varying displacement rates, load rupture (P = 0) and relaxation tests (v = 0). In addition unloading and reloading experiments were performed to investigate hysteresis curves and residual displacements in accordance with R-curve behaviour. During the crack-growth experiments, the crack extension was measured in situ using a high resolution immersion microscope. With this technique, the fracture processes near the crack tip (crack activity zone) was observed as well. The crack resistance as a function of crack extension (R-curve) was determined using differing calculation methods. All of the methods used resulted in approximately identical R-curves, within the statistical error band. The crack resistance at initiation R 0 was 20 N/m. The crack resistance increased during approximately 3 mm of growth to a maximum of 90 N/m. A decrease in the crack resistance was determined for large a/W (crack length normalized with sample height) values, independant of the calculation methods. The R-curve behaviour was interpreted as due to a functional resistance behind the observed crack tip, which arises from a volume dilatation in the crack activity zone while the crack proceeds. (orig.) [de

  8. Influence of intermetallic particles on short fatigue crack initiation in AA2050-T8 and AA7050-T7451

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizery Erembert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue crack initiation at particles is studied in hot rolled 2050-T8 and 7050-T7451 material, using 1 to 4 mm cross section specimens. Both size and aspect ratio of particles are observed to affect their probability of being damaged. In 2050-T8 material, the probability that a matrix crack initiate at a cracked particle increases with its size, and no effect of aspect ratio is observed. In 2050-T8 specimens, matrix cracks initiate at both precracked (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn particles and particles cracked during cycling. Initiation in 7050-T74 specimens occur on Mg2Si particles which may be cracked or debonded, and Al7Cu2Fe particles that are cracked during cyclic loading.

  9. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  10. A method for crack profiles identification in eddy current testing by the multi-directional scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Fumio; Ikeda, Takuya; Nguyen, Doung

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a method for identification of crack shape in conducting materials. Multi-directional scanning strategies using Eddy Current Testing is performed for sizing complex natural crackings. Two dimensional measurements by means of multi-directional scan are used in a output least square identifications. (author)

  11. Description of the initiation and progress of cracks for hot cracks in temperature resistant 1% CrMoV castings under creep or fatigue stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareiss, J.; Maile, K.; Berger, C.; Mayer, K.H.; Weiss, M.

    1994-01-01

    The results available so far have shown that under vibration stress at room temperature and at 530 C, the simplified equations of fracture mechanics are sufficient (in spite of the complicated fault geometries), in order to conservatively describe the behaviour of fault positions (open or partly-healed hot cracks) with regard to their crack initiation behaviour if combined with the findings US test technique. Here the sample castings which in the initial state showed fault indications of US type EET near the surface, tend to earlier initiation of a crack compared to lower fault positions of the samples. Internal fault positions (partially healed hot cracks) often only showed local cracks (trans-crystalline deformation cracks) within the fault area with an order of magnitude of about 10-50 μm, in spite of exceeding the threshold value Δ Ko. The comparison of the crack propagation behaviour of the sample castings, determined via the potential sensor method on medium lengths of fault with the results of crack growth of fracture mechanics samples in the da/dN- Δ K diagram showed for the evaluated sample castings with a relatively great initial depth or length of fault that the upper scatter band limit of the Paris Law determined for the material can be used to estimate the fault position behaviour. (orig./RHM) [de

  12. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd [Institute for Composite Materials (IVW GmbH) Technical University of Kaiserslautern, 67633 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  13. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  14. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  15. Weibull modeling of particle cracking in metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.A.; Withers, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation into the occurrence of reinforcement cracking within a particulate ZrO 2 /2618 Al alloy metal matrix composite under tensile plastic straining has been carried out, special attention being paid to the dependence of fracture on particle size and shape. The probability of particle cracking has been modeled using a Weibull approach, giving good agreement with the experimental data. Values for the Weibull modulus and the stress required to crack the particles were found to be within the range expected for the cracking of ceramic particles. Additional information regarding the fracture behavior of the particles was provided by in-situ neutron diffraction monitoring of the internal strains, measurement of the variation in the composite Young's modulus with straining and by direct observation of the cracked particles. The values of the particle stress required for the initiation of particle cracking deduced from these supplementary experiments were found to be in good agreement with each other and with the results from the Weibull analysis. Further, it is shown that while both the current experiments, as well as the previous work of others, can be well described by the Weibull approach, the exact values of the Weibull parameters do deduced are very sensitive to the approximations and the assumptions made in constructing the model

  16. Restrained Shrinkage Cracking of Fiber-Reinforced High-Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Saradar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Concrete shrinkage and volume reduction happens due to the loss of moisture, which eventually results in cracks and more concrete deformation. In this study, the effect of polypropylene (PP, steel, glass, basalt, and polyolefin fibers on compressive and flexural strength, drying shrinkage, and cracking potential, using the ring test at early ages of high-strength concrete mixtures, was investigated. The restrained shrinkage test was performed on concrete ring specimens according to the ASTM C1581 standard. The crack width and age of restrained shrinkage cracking were the main parameters studied in this research. The results indicated that the addition of fiber increases the compressive strength by 16%, 20%, and 3% at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days, respectively, and increases the flexural toughness index up to 7.7 times. Steel and glass fibers had a better performance in flexural strength, but relatively poor action in the velocity reduction and cracking time of the restrained shrinkage. Additionally, cracks in all concrete ring specimens except for the polypropylene-containing mixture, was developed to a full depth crack. The mixture with polypropylene fiber indicated a reduction in crack width up to 62% and an increasing age cracking up to 84%.

  17. Crack Length Detection by Digital Image Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbye, Janus; Brincker, Rune

    1990-01-01

    It is described how digital image processing is used for measuring the length of fatigue cracks. The system is installed in a Personal Computer equipped with image processing hardware and performs automated measuring on plane metal specimens used in fatigue testing. Normally one can not achieve...... a resolution better then that of the image processing equipment. To overcome this problem an extrapolation technique is used resulting in a better resolution. The system was tested on a specimen loaded with different loads. The error σa was less than 0.031 mm, which is of the same size as human measuring...

  18. Crack Detection by Digital Image Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbye, Janus; Brincker, Rune

    It is described how digital image processing is used for measuring the length of fatigue cracks. The system is installed in a Personal, Computer equipped with image processing hardware and performs automated measuring on plane metal specimens used in fatigue testing. Normally one can not achieve...... a resolution better than that of the image processing equipment. To overcome this problem an extrapolation technique is used resulting in a better resolution. The system was tested on a specimen loaded with different loads. The error σa was less than 0.031 mm, which is of the same size as human measuring...

  19. Crystallographic fatigue crack growth in a polycrystal: simulations based on FEM and discrete dislocation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, G.; Sauzay, M.; Bertolino, G.; Doquet, V.

    2003-01-01

    An attempt to model the variability of short cracks development in high-cycle fatigue is made by coupling finite element calculations of the stresses ahead of a microcrack in a polycrystal with simulations of crack growth along slip planes based on discrete dislocations dynamics. The model predicts a large scatter in growth rates related to the roughness of the crack path. It also describes the influence of the mean grain size and the fact that overloads may suppress the endurance limit by allowing arrested cracks to cross the grain boundaries. (authors)

  20. The effect of low energy protons on silicon solar cells with simulated coverglass cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasner, S.; Anspaugh, B.; Francis, R.; Marvin, D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a series of low-energy proton (LEP) tests are presented. The purpose of the tests was to investigate the effect of low-energy protons on the electrical performance of solar cells with simulated cracked covers. The results of the tests were then related to the space environment. A matrix of LEP tests was set up using solar cells with simulated cracks to determine the effect on electrical performance as a function of fluence, energy, crack width, coverglass adhesive shielding, crack location, and solar cell size. The results of the test were, for the most part, logical, and consistent.

  1. Motivation with Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an illusional arena by offering experience in optical illusions in which students must apply critical analysis to their innate information gathering systems. Introduces different types of depth illusions for students to experience. (ASK)

  2. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  3. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  4. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  5. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. A method for detecting crack wave arrival time and crack localization in a tunnel by using moving window technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Chul; Park, Tae Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Source localization in a dispersive medium has been carried out based on the time-of-arrival-differences (TOADs) method: a triangulation method and a circle intersection technique. Recent signal processing advances have led to calculation TOAD using a joint time-frequency analysis of the signal, where a short-time Fourier transform(STFT) and wavelet transform can be included as popular algorithms. The time-frequency analysis method is able to provide various information and more reliable results such as seismic-attenuation estimation, dispersive characteristics, a wave mode analysis, and temporal energy distribution of signals compared with previous methods. These algorithms, however, have their own limitations for signal processing. In this paper, the effective use of proposed algorithm in detecting crack wave arrival time and source localization in rock masses suggest that the evaluation and real-time monitoring on the intensity of damages related to the tunnels or other underground facilities is possible. Calculation of variances resulted from moving windows as a function of their size differentiates the signature from noise and from crack signal, which lead us to determine the crack wave arrival time. Then, the source localization is determined to be where the variance of crack wave velocities from real and virtual crack localization becomes a minimum. To validate our algorithm, we have performed experiments at the tunnel, which resulted in successful determination of the wave arrival time and crack localization.

  7. Crack propagation tests on the fundamental structure under cyclic thermal transients. Results of nondestructive inspection for cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Horikiri, M.

    2001-06-01

    This report shows the results of crack inspection in crack propagation tests that were carried out at the Air-cooling Thermal Transient Test Facility (ATTF). Test specimens were made of 304 type austenitic stainless steel, and they were the same cylindrical shape, 1,500 mm in height, 130 mm in outer diameter and 30 mm in thickness. And they had initial slits machined on inner surfaces. Firstly the specimens were heated up to 650degC in a furnace, then cooled by pressurized air blowing through the specimen for 90 seconds. These cyclic changes of temperature gradients in the wall of specimens were loaded. Specimens were tested for several years. The specimen No. CPTT-102 with machined two circumferential slits and two semi-elliptical slits was tested up to 10,000 cycles. And the specimen No. CPTT-103 with machined six semi-elliptical slits of different length respectively was tested up to 5,000 cycles. Cracks of specimens were inspected nondestructively for a giving cycle in these tests. Applied inspection methods were ultra-sonic testing, potential-drop method and inner surface observation. Ultra-sonic testing was carried out by applying the pulse-echo method. Potential-drop testing was carried out by measurement of localized constant direct current beyond cracks. Photographs of the inner surface of specimens were taken using a bore-scope. The results of ultra-sonic testing have been close to destructive test results. The depth of crack by the potential-drop method was almost corresponding to destructive test results, too. Photographs of the inner surface were synthesized by the computer, and connection between main crack and hair crack was observed. (author)

  8. Effect of T-stress on the cleavage crack growth resistance resulting from plastic flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Crack growth is studied numerically for cases where fracture occurs by atomic separation, sc that the length scale of the fracture process is typically much smaller than the dislocation spacing. Thus, the crack growth mechanism is brittle, but due to plastic flow at some distance from the crack tip......, the materials show crack growth resistance. It is shown here that the resistance is strongly dependent on the value of the non-singular T-stress, acting parallel to the crack plane. The numerical technique employed makes use of a thin dislocation-free strip of elastic material inside which the crack propagates......, with the material outside described by continuum plasticity. Thus the width of the strip is a material length scale comparable to the dislocation spacing or the dislocation cell size....

  9. Influence of cracks and pitting corrosion on residual ultimate strength of stiffened plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jing

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] Ships and offshore platforms serve in the harsh sea environment for a long time. Cracks and pitting corrosion will occur in such a structure and the damage will affect its ultimate strength.[Methods] To investigate the influence of cracks and pitting corrosion on ultimate bearing capacity, the ultimate strength of a structure under axial compression is studied by using a nonlinear finite element. The mesh size of a stiffened plate with cracks and pitting corrosion is first discussed. Then the influence of the relative positions of cracks and pitting corrosion, number of corrosion points and crack length impact on the residual ultimate strength of damaged stiffened plates is discussed via a series of calculations.[Results] The results indicate that the increase in crack length and pitting corrosion significantly decreases the ultimate strength of a stiffened plate. [Conclusions] This provides a useful reference for designing and maintaining ships and offshore structures in their life cycles.

  10. Application of a nonlinear spring element to analysis of circumferentially cracked pipe under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.; Scott, P.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the US NRC's Degraded Piping Program, the concept of using a nonlinear spring element to simulate the response of cracked pipe in dynamic finite element pipe evaluations was initially proposed. The nonlinear spring element is used to represent the moment versus rotation response of the cracked pipe section. The moment-rotation relationship for the crack size and material of interest is determined from either J-estimation scheme analyses or experimental data. In this paper, a number of possible approaches for modeling the nonlinear stiffness of the cracked pipe section are introduced. One approach, modeling the cracked section moment rotation response with a series of spring-slider elements, is discussed in detail. As part of this discussion, results from a series of finite element predictions using the spring-slider nonlinear spring element are compared with the results from a series of dynamic cracked pipe system experiments from the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of effect of hydrogen atoms on crack propagation behavior of α-Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H.Y., E-mail: gsfshy@sohu.com; Zhang, L.; Xiao, M.X.

    2016-12-16

    The effect of the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen distribution on the mechanical properties of α-Fe with a pre-existing unilateral crack under tensile loading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The results reveal that the models present good ductility when the front region of crack tip has high local hydrogen concentration. The peak stress of α-Fe decreases with increasing hydrogen concentration. The studies also indicate that for the samples with hydrogen atoms, the crack propagation behavior is independent of the model size and boundaries. In addition, the crack propagation behavior is significantly influenced by the distribution of hydrogen atoms. - Highlights: • The distribution of hydrogen plays a critical role in the crack propagation. • The peak stress decrease with the hydrogen concentration increasing. • The crack deformation behavior is disclosed and analyzed.

  12. Multiscale probabilistic modeling of a crack bridge in glass fiber reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rypla R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces a probabilistic approach to simulating the crack bridging effects of chopped glass strands in cement-based matrices and compares it to a discrete rigid body spring network model with semi-discrete representation of the chopped strands. The glass strands exhibit random features at various scales, which are taken into account by both models. Fiber strength and interface stress are considered as random variables at the scale of a single fiber bundle while the orientation and position of individual bundles with respect to a crack plane are considered as random variables at the crack bridge scale. At the scale of the whole composite domain, the distribution of fibers and the resulting number of crack-bridging fibers is considered. All the above random effects contribute to the variability of the crack bridge performance and result in size-dependent behavior of a multiply cracked composite.

  13. Subsurface metals fatigue cracking without and with crack tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Shanyavskiy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue regime for metals was considered and mechanisms of the subsurface crack origination were introduced. In many metals first step of crack origination takes place with specific area formation because of material pressing and rotation that directed to transition in any volume to material ultra-high-plasticity with nano-structure appearing. Then by the border of the nano-structure takes place volume rotation and fracture surface creates with spherical particles which usually named Fine-Granular-Area. In another case there takes place First-Smooth-Facet occurring in area of origin due to whirls appearing by the one of the slip systems under discussed the same stress-state conditions. Around Fine-Granular-Area or First-Smooth-Facet there plastic zone appeared and, then, subsurface cracking develops by the same manner as for through cracks. In was discussed quantum-mechanical nature of fatigue crack growth in accordance with Yang’s modulus quantization for low level of deformations. New simply equation was considered for describing subsurface cracking in metals out of Fine-Granular-Area or Fist-Smooth-Facet.

  14. Leak on a steam generator tube: in-depth analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.; Deotto, G.; Mathon, C.; Madurel, A.; Pitner, P.; Gay, N.; Guivarch, M.

    2015-01-01

    A circumferential through crack was observed on a steam generator tube of the unit 2 of the Fessenheim plant. Destructive tests showed that the crack was due to cycle fatigue combined with the presence of inter-granular corrosion zones. An in-depth analysis based on simulations shows that the combination of 5 elements caused the crack. First, a specific position of the anti-vibration bar near this tube, secondly, a local presence of fouling, these 2 first elements led to an increase of the tube vibratory level. Thirdly, the 600 MA alloy used is known to be susceptible to corrosion. Fourthly, the trapping of chemical species on the secondary circuit side due to the presence of interstices on the crosspiece and fifthly, the presence of spots where inter-granular corrosion developed. (A.C.)

  15. Effect of defect length on rolling contact fatigue crack propagation in high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makino

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to clarify the effect of defect length in depth direction on rolling contact fatigue (RCF crack propagation in high strength steel. RCF test and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR micro CT imaging were conducted. In the case of the defect with the 15 m diameter, flaking life decreased with increasing defect length. In a comparison of the CT image and the SEM view, the shapes of defects and the locations of the horizontal cracks were almost the same respectively. The mechanism of RCF crack propagation was discussed by finite element (FE analysis. Defects led to higher tensile residual stress than that without defects in the region where the defect exists. The shear stress range at 0.1 mm in depth on the middle line of the defect and the range of mode II stress intensity factor at the bottom of a vertical crack increased with increasing defect length.

  16. Stress intensity magnification factors for fully circumferential cracks in valve bodies (thick cylinders)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toor, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The stress intensity solutions presented herein were obtained using an energy method in conjunction with a two-dimensional finite element program in order to explicitly account for curvature effect for fully circumferential cracks. The magnification factors for a specific crack depth were calculated by successively loading the crack surface by a uniform, linear, quadratic, and a cubic loading distribution. The magnification factors can be used to calculate the stress intensity factors by superposition method. The functions for each load condition in terms of radius to thickness ratio (R/t) and a fractional distance in terms of crack depth to thickness ratio (a/t) were developed. The validity of these functions is R/t = 1.5 to 10.0 and for 0.0125 ≤ a/t ≤ 0.8125. The functions agree to within 1% of the finite elements solutions for most magnification factors

  17. Mechanical factors affecting reliability of pressure components (fatigue, cracking)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Garnier, C.; Roche, R.; Barrachin, B.

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of a pressure component can be seriously affected by the formation and development of cracks. The experimental studies presented in this paper are devoted to three different aspects of crack propagation phenomena which have been relatively little described. In close connection with safety analyses of PWR, the authors study the influence of the environment by carrying out fatigue tests with samples bathed in hot pressurized water. Ferritic, austenitic and Incolloy 800 steels were used and the results are presented in the form of fatigue curves in the oligocyclic region. The second part of the paper relates to crack initiation cirteria in ductile steels weakened by notches. The CT samples used make it possible to study almost all types of fracture (ductile, intermediate and brittle). The use of two criteria based on the load limit and on the toughness of the material constitutes a practical way of evaluating crack propagation conditions. A series of tests carried out on notched spherical vessels of different size shows that large vessels are relatively brittle; fast unstable fracture is observed as size increases. Crack growth rate in PWR primary circuits (3/6 steel) is studied on piping elements (0.25 scale) subjected to cyclic stress variations (285 0 C and with pressure varying between 1 and 160 bar in each cycle). By calculating the stress intensity factor, correlation with results obtained in the laboratory on CT samples is possible. (author)

  18. Dynamic Stability of Pipe Conveying Fluid with Crack and Attached Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Tae Soo; Yoon, Han Ik; Son, In Soo; Ahn, Sung Jin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic stability of a cracked simply supported pipe conveying fluid with an attached mass is investigated. Also, the effect of attached masses on the dynamic stability of a simply supported pipe conveying fluid is presented for the different positions and depth of the crack. Based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the equation of motion can be constructed by the energy expressions using extended Hamilton's principle. The crack section is represented by a local flexibility matrix connecting two undamaged pipe segments. The crack is assumed to be in the first mode of a fracture and to be always opened during the vibrations. Finally, the critical flow velocities and stability maps of the pipe conveying fluid are obtained by changing the attached masses and crack severity

  19. The Mechanics of a Cantilever Beam with an Embedded Horizontal Crack Subjected to an End Transverse Force, Part A: Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos G. Charalambides

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the mechanics of a cracked cantilever beam subjected to a transverse force applied at it’s free end. In this Part A of a two Part series of papers, emphasis is placed on the development of a four-beam model for a beam with a fully embedded horizontal sharp crack. The beam aspect ratio, crack length and crack centre location appear as general model parameters. Rotary springs are introduced at the crack tip cross sections as needed to account for the changes in the structural compliance due to the presence of the sharp crack and augmented load transfer through the near-tip transition regions. Guided by recent finite element findings reported elsewhere, the four-beam model is advanced by recognizing two key observations, (a the free surface and neutral axis curvatures of the cracked beam at the crack center location match the curvature of a healthy beam (an identical beam without a crack under the same loading conditions, (b the neutral axis rotations (slope of the cracked beam in the region between the applied load and the nearest crack tip matches the corresponding slope of the healthy beam. The above observations led to the development of close form solutions for the resultant forces (axial and shear and moment acting in the beams above and below the crack. Axial force and bending moment predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with 2D finite element results for all normalized crack depths considered. Shear force estimates dominating the beams above and below the crack as well as transition region length estimates are also obtained. The model developed in this study is then used along with 2D finite elements in conducting parametric studies aimed at both validating the model and establishing the mechanics of the cracked system under consideration. The latter studies are reported in the companion paper Part B-Results and Discussion.

  20. Evaluation of canister weld flaw depth for concrete storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Tae Chul; Cho, Chun Hyung [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sung Hun; Lee, Young Oh; Jung, In Su [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Corp, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Domestically developed concrete storage casks include an internal canister to maintain the confinement integrity of radioactive materials. In this study, we analyzed the depth of flaws caused by loads that propagate canister weld cracks under normal, off-normal and accident conditions, and evaluated the maximum allowable weld flaw depth needed to secure the structural integrity of the canister weld and to reduce the welding time of the internal canister lid of the concrete storage cask. Structural analyses for normal, off-normal and accident conditions were performed using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ABAQUS; the allowable flaw depth was assessed according to ASME B and PV Code Section XI. Evaluation results revealed an allowable canister weld flaw depth of 18.75 mm for the concrete storage cask, which satisfies the critical flaw depth recommended in NUREG-1536.

  1. Ultrasonic determination of the size of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetterwall, T.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents results from a study of ultrasonic testing of materials. The main topic has been the determination of the size, length and deep, of cracks or defects in stainless steel plates. (K.A.E)

  2. Cracks in Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  3. Super oil cracking update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulraney, D.

    1997-01-01

    The conversion of residual fuel oil to usable middle distillates was discussed. The residue conversion processing paths are usually based on separation, carbon rejection, or hydrogen addition principles. Super Oil Cracking (SOC) uses a slurry catalyst system in a new, tubular reactor to achieve high levels of hydrothermal conversion. SOC can upgrade a variety of heavy, high metals residue feedstocks with high yields of middle distillates. The SOC products can also be further treated into feedstocks for FCC or hydrocracking. The SOC process can be incorporated easily into a refinery to obtain incremental residue conversion directly. It can also be integrated with other residue processes, acting as a demetallization and decarbonization step which results in enhanced overall conversion. The relative rate of coke formation and its handling are distinguishing characteristics between residue upgrading technologies. The SOC process operates at higher temperatures that other residue hydrocracking processes resulting in higher rates of thermal decomposition, thus preventing coke formation. SOC process can operate as a stand-alone upgrader or can be integrated with other bottoms processing steps to extend the refiner's range of options for increasing bottoms conversion.3 tabs., 14 figs

  4. Metallurgy of stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    The susceptibility of metals and alloys to stress corrosion is discussed in terms of the relationship between structural characteristics (crystal structure, grains, and second phases) and defects (vacancies, dislocations, and cracks) that exist in metals and alloys. (U.S.)

  5. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari (Boeing)

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  6. Shapes formed by interacting cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in dental enamel and cleaved silicon to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated stress geometries and different microscopic mechanisms, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths. We investigate the origins of this widely observed ``en passant'' crack pattern by fracturing a rectangular slab which is notched on each long side and subjected to quasi-static uniaxial strain from the short side. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until they pass each other, after which they curve and release a lens-shaped fragment. We find that, for materials with diverse mechanical properties, each curve has an approximately square-root shape, and that the length of each fragment is twice its width. We are able to explain the origins of this universal shape with a simple geometrical model.

  7. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  8. Dynamic Crack Branching - A Photoelastic Evaluation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    0.41 mPai and a 0.18 MPa, and predicted a theoretical kinking angle of 84°whichagreed well with experimentally measured angle. After crack kinking...Consistent crack branching’at KIb = 2.04 MPaI -i- and r = 1.3 mm verified this crack branching criterion. The crack branching angle predicted by--.’ DD

  9. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested by...

  10. Crack propagation in dynamic thermoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    We study the singular thermoelastic fields near the crack tip, in the linear strain assumption. The equations are coupled and non linear. The asymptotic expansions of the displacement and the temperature are given for the first and the second order. It is shown that the temperature is singular when the crack propagates. However, this field does not change the dominant singularity of the mechanical field which is the same as that obtained in the theory of isothermal elasticity [fr

  11. In-Plane Vibrations of Circular Curved Beams with a Transverse Open Crack

    OpenAIRE

    Öz, H. R.; Daş, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the in plane vibrations of cracked circular curved beams is investigated. The beam is an Euler-Bernoulli beam. Only bending and extension effects are included. The curvature is in a single plane. In plane vibrations is analyzed using FEM. In the analysis, elongation, bending and rotary inertia effects are included. Four degrees of freedom for in-plane vibrations is assumed. Natural frequencies of the beam with a crack in different locations and depths are calculated using FEM. ...

  12. Study of toughening mechanisms through the observations of crack propagation in nanostructured and layered metallic sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.Y.; Li, D.F.; Zhang, J.B.; Liu, F.; Liu, X.R.; Lu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A nanostructured and layered steel exhibits high strength and large ductility. → The excellent combination originates from a multiple interlaminar cracking. → The initiation and propagation of cracks are controlled by three aspects. → The cracks are deflected by interface and arrested by compressive residual stress. → Finally, the cracks are blunted by the graded grain size distribution. - Abstract: A layered and nanostructured (LN) 304 SS sheet was produced by combination of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) with warm co-rolling. The microstructure of LN sheet is characterized by a periodic distribution of nanocrystalline layers and micron-grained layers with a graded transition of grain size. Tensile test results show that exceptional properties of high yield strength and large elongation to fracture are achieved. A multiple interlaminar cracking was observed by scanning electron microscopy, which is induced by repeated crack initiation and propagation. The toughening mechanisms of the LN sheet are proposed to be controlling the crack propagation path by several strategies. The main cracks initiating at interface defects are arrested by large compressive residual stress, deflected by weak interface bonding and blunted by the graded grain size distribution.

  13. On crack initiation in notched, cross-plied polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q. D.; Schesser, D.; Niess, M.; Wright, P.; Mavrogordato, M. N.; Sinclair, I.; Spearing, S. M.; Cox, B. N.

    2015-05-01

    The physics of crack initiation in a polymer matrix composite are investigated by varying the modeling choices made in simulations and comparing the resulting predictions with high-resolution in situ images of cracks. Experimental data were acquired using synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) at a resolution on the order of 1 μm, which provides detailed measurement of the location, shape, and size of small cracks, as well as the crack opening and shear displacements. These data prove sufficient to discriminate among competing physical descriptions of crack initiation. Simulations are executed with a high-fidelity formulation, the augmented finite element method (A-FEM), which permits consideration of coupled damage mechanisms, including both discrete cracks and fine-scale continuum damage. The discrete cracks are assumed to be nonlinear fracture events, governed by reasonably general mixed-mode cohesive laws. Crack initiation is described in terms of strength parameters within the cohesive laws, so that the cohesive law provides a unified model for crack initiation and growth. Whereas the cracks investigated are typically 1 mm or less in length, the fine-scale continuum damage refers to irreversible matrix deformation occurring over gauge lengths extending down to the fiber diameter (0.007 mm). We find that the location and far-field stress for crack initiation are predicted accurately only if the variations of local stress within plies and in the presence of stress concentrators (notches, etc.) are explicitly computed and used in initiation criteria; stress redistribution due to matrix nonlinearity that occurs prior to crack initiation is accounted for; and a mixed-mode criterion is used for crack initiation. If these factors are not all considered, which is the case for commonly used failure criteria, predictions of the location and far-field stress for initiation are not accurate.

  14. Prestack depth migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Two lines form the southern North Sea, with known velocity inhomogeneities in the overburden, have been pre-stack depth migrated. The pre-stack depth migrations are compared with conventional processing, one with severe distortions and one with subtle distortions on the conventionally processed sections. The line with subtle distortions is also compared with post-stack depth migration. The results on both lines were very successful. Both have already influenced drilling decisions, and have caused a modification of structural interpretation in the respective areas. Wells have been drilled on each of the lines, and well tops confirm the results. In fact, conventional processing led to incorrect locations for the wells, both of which were dry holes. The depth migrated sections indicate the incorrect placement, and on one line reveals a much better drilling location. This paper reports that even though processing costs are high for pre-stack depth migration, appropriate use can save millions of dollars in dry-hole expense

  15. Effect of lapping slurry on critical cutting depth of spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhan-kui; Wang, Zhuan-kui; Zhu, Yong-wei; Su, Jian-xiu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Measured spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different slurries. • Evaluated the softened layer thickness in different slurries. • Discussed the effect of slurries on critical cutting depth of spinel. - Abstract: The critical cutting depth for lapping process is very important because it influences the mode of material removal. In this paper, a serial of microscopic indentation experiments were carried out for measuring spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different lapping slurries. Their critical cutting depth and fracture toughness were calculated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also employed to study the surface chemical composition and softened layer thickness of wafers in different slurries. Experimental results indicate that the softened layers of spinel wafers are formed due to the corrosion of lapping slurries, which leads to a lower hardness and a larger fracture toughness of samples, and increases the critical cutting depth. Among them, the critical cutting depth in ethylene glycol solution is the largest and up to 21.8 nm. The increase of critical cutting depth is helpful to modify the surface quality of the work-piece being lapped via ductile removal mode instead of brittle fracture mode

  16. Evaluation of crack interaction effect for in-plane surface cracks using elastic finite element analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Nam Su; Choi, Suhn; Park, Keun Bae; Kim, Jong Min; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    The crack-tip stress fields and fracture mechanics assessment parameters, such as the elastic stress intensity factor and the elastic-plastic J-integral, for a surface crack can be significantly affected by adjacent cracks. Such a crack interaction effect due to multiple cracks can magnify the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. There are many factors to be considered, for instance the relative distance between adjacent cracks, crack shape and loading condition, to quantify a crack interaction effect on the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. Thus, the current guidance on a crack interaction effect (crack combination rule), including ASME Sec. XI, BS7910, British Energy R6 and API RP579, provide different rules for combining multiple surface cracks into a single surface crack. The present paper investigates a crack interaction effect by evaluating the elastic stress intensity factor of adjacent surface cracks in a plate along the crack front through detailed 3-dimensional elastic finite element analyses. The effects of the geometric parameters, the relative distance between cracks and the crack shape, on the stress intensity factor are systematically investigated. As for the loading condition, only axial tension is considered. Based on the elastic finite element results, the acceptability of the crack combination rules provided in the existing guidance was investigated, and the relevant recommendations on a crack interaction for in-plane surface cracks in a plate were discussed

  17. Critical size of defaults inducing fast fracture of deposit stellite on a valve gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneh, B.; Gilles, P.; Champomier, F.; Abisror, A.

    1986-10-01

    The present study has been made to determine if, in the case of a valve gate, transversal cracks are the result of fatigue propagation or the result of fast fracture. The author shows that only a transversal crack, with a size up to 0.7 mm, induces a fast fracture and shows also that, at equal size, a crack located under the stellite is not also injurious than a transversal crack [fr

  18. Study on Nonlinear Vibration and Crack Fault of Rotor-bearing-seal Coupling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuegang LUO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear dynamic model of rotor-bearing-seal system with crack in shaft is set up based on the coupling model of nonlinear oil-film force and Muszyska’s nonlinear seal fluid force. The dynamic vibration characteristics of the rotor-bearing-seal system and the effects of physical and structural parameters of labyrinth seal and crack fault on movement character of the rotor were analyzed. The increases of seal length, seal pressure differential, seal radius and axial velocity are in favor of the stability of the system, and it of seal gap and crack depth are not in favor of the stability of the system.

  19. Leak-before-break due to fatigue cracks in the cold leg piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayfield, M.E.; Collier, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    This review paper presents the results of a deterministic assessment of the margin of safety against a large break in the cold leg piping system of pressurized water reactors. The paper focuses on the computation of leak rates resulting from fatigue cracks that penetrate the full wall thickness. Results are presented that illustrate the sensitivity of the leak rate to stress level, crack shape and crack orientation. Further, the leak rates for specific conditions are contrasted to detection levels, shutdown criteria, make-up capacity and the leak rate associated with final failure of the piping system. The results of these computations indicate that, in general, leaks far in excess of the present detection sensitivities would result at crack sizes well below the critical crack sizes for the upset loadings on the cold leg piping system

  20. Reheat cracking in 1/2 CrMoV steel. Heat affected zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, A.D.; Miller, R.C.; Murphy, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    Low alloy creep resisting steels are inherently susceptible to cracking during stress relief heat treatment (reheat cracking) though few welds give rise to problems in manufacture or service. Mechanical tests on simulated affected zone structures in CrMoV forgings have shown that cracking occurs when the high temperature ductility is inadequate to accommodate the residual welding strain. Differences in susceptibility result from differences in heat affected zone grain size if the purity level is sufficiently high; reheat cracking may then be avoided by ensuring complete grain refinement during welding. The susceptibility of a lower purity forging was insensitive to grain size; heat affected zone refinement is unlikely to eliminate cracking in such steel. (orig.) [de

  1. Effect of Grain Size on Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Mono- and Polycrystalline MgAl2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagielski, J.; Piatkowska, A.; Wajler, A.; Boniecki, M.; Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Aubert, P.; Labdi, S.; Maciejak, O.; Thome, L.; Debelle, A.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the size of crystalline regions on mechanical properties of irradiated oxides has been studied using a magnesium aluminate spinel MgAl 2 O 4 . The samples characterized by different dimensions of crystalline domains, varying from sintered ceramics with grains of few micrometers in size up to single crystals, were used in the experiments. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with 320 keV Ar 2+ ions up to fluences reaching 5x10 16 cm -2 . Nanomechanical properties (nanohardness and Young's modulus) were measured by using a nanoindentation technique and the resistance to crack formation by measurement of the total crack lengths made by the Vickers indenter. The results revealed several effects: correlation of nanohardness evolution with the level of accumulated damage, radiation-induced hardness increase in grain-boundary region and significant improvement of material resistance to crack formation. This last effect is especially surprising as the typical depth of cracks formed by Vickers indenter in unirradiated material exceeds several tens of micrometers, i.e. is more than hundred times larger than the thickness of the modified layer. (author)

  2. Radon depth migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, S.T.; Carroll, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A depth migration method is presented that used Radon-transformed common-source seismograms as input. It is shown that the Radon depth migration method can be extended to spatially varying velocity depth models by using asymptotic ray theory (ART) to construct wavefield continuation operators. These operators downward continue an incident receiver-array plane wave and an assumed point-source wavefield into the subsurface. The migration velocity model is constrain to have longer characteristic wavelengths than the dominant source wavelength such that the ART approximations for the continuation operators are valid. This method is used successfully to migrate two synthetic data examples: (1) a point diffractor, and (2) a dipping layer and syncline interface model. It is shown that the Radon migration method has a computational advantage over the standard Kirchhoff migration method in that fewer rays are computed in a main memory implementation

  3. Crack modelling for the assessment of stiffness loss of reinforced concrete structures under mechanical loading - determination of the permeability of the micro-cracked body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongue Boma, M.

    2007-12-01

    We propose a model describing the evolution of mechanical and permeability properties of concrete under slow mechanical loading. Calling upon the theory of continua with microstructure, the kinematic of the domain is enriched by a variable characterising size and orientation of the crack field. We call upon configurational forces to deal with crack propagation and we determine the balance equations governing both strain and propagation. The geometry of the microstructure is representative of the porous media: the permeability is obtained from the resolution of Stokes equations in an elementary volume. An example has been treated: we considered simple assumptions (uniform crack field, application of linear fracture mechanics...) and we determined the behaviour of a body under tensile loading. Strain, crack propagation and stiffness loss are completely assessed. Finally the evolution of permeability is plotted: once activated, crack propagation is the main cause of water tightness loss. (author)

  4. Measuring depth in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of determining the depth of rock strata and other features of a borehole. It may be employed with particular advantage when access to the top of the borehole is difficult, for example in underwater operations. A radioactive marker, such as a source of gamma rays, is positioned near the top of the riser of a sub-sea wellhead structure. A radiation detector is lowered between the marker and a radioactive stratum and the length of line supplied is measured on the floating platform. This enables the depth of the stratum to be measured irrespective of tidal variations of the height of the platform. (U.K.)

  5. Analyses on interaction of internal and external surface cracks in a pressurized cylinder by hybrid boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Guozhong; Fang Zhimin; Jiang Xianfeng; Li Gan

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive range of analyses on the interaction of two identical semi-elliptical surface cracks at the internal and external surfaces of a pressurized cylinder. The considered ratios of the crack depth to crack length are b/a=0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0; the ratios of the crack depth to wall thickness of the cylinder are 2b/t=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8. Forty crack configurations are analyzed and the stress intensity factors along the crack front are presented. The numerical results show that for 2b/t<0.7, the interaction leads to a decrease in the stress intensity factors for both internal and external surface cracks, compared with a single internal or external surface crack. Thus for fracture analysis of a practical pressurized cylinder with two identical semi-elliptical surface cracks at its internal and external surfaces, a conservative result is obtained by ignoring the interaction

  6. Compressive failure with interacting cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoping; Liu Xila

    1993-01-01

    The failure processes in concrete and other brittle materials are just the results of the propagation, coalescence and interaction of many preexisting microcracks or voids. To understand the real behaviour of the brittle materials, it is necessary to bridge the gap from the relatively matured one crack behaviour to the stochastically distributed imperfections, that is, to concern the crack propagation and interaction of microscopic mechanism with macroscopic parameters of brittle materials. Brittle failure in compression has been studied theoretically by Horii and Nemat-Nasser (1986), in which a closed solution was obtained for a preexisting flaw or some special regular flaws. Zaitsev and Wittmann (1981) published a paper on crack propagation in compression, which is so-called numerical concrete, but they did not take account of the interaction among the microcracks. As for the modelling of the influence of crack interaction on fracture parameters, many studies have also been reported. Up till now, some researcher are working on crack interaction considering the ratios of SIFs with and without consideration of the interaction influences, there exist amplifying or shielding effects of crack interaction which are depending on the relative positions of these microcracks. The present paper attempts to simulate the whole failure process of brittle specimen in compression, which includes the complicated coupling effects between the interaction and propagation of randomly distributed or other typical microcrack configurations step by step. The lengths, orientations and positions of microcracks are all taken as random variables. The crack interaction among many preexisting random microcracks is evaluated with the help of a simple interaction matrix (Yang and Liu, 1991). For the subcritically stable propagation of microcracks in mixed mode fracture, fairly known maximum hoop stress criterion is adopted to compute branching lengths and directions at each tip of the crack

  7. High-accuracy defect sizing for CRDM penetration adapters using the ultrasonic TOFD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, I.

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) is the preferred technique for critical sizing of throughwall orientated defects in a wide range of components, primarily because it is intrinsically more accurate than amplitude-based techniques. For the same reason, TOFD is the preferred technique for sizing the cracks in control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetration adapters, which have been the subject of much recent attention. Once the considerable problem of restricted access for the UT probes has been overcome, this inspection lends itself to very high accuracy defect sizing using TOFD. In qualification trials under industrial conditions, depth sizing to an accuracy of ≤ 0.5 mm has been routinely achieved throughout the full wall thickness (16 mm) of the penetration adapters, using only a single probe pair and without recourse to signal processing. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C. [Industrial Technology Research Inst., Taiwan (China); Yeh, T.K. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  9. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  10. Dynamic Initiation and Propagation of Multiple Cracks in Brittle Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Ren

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Brittle materials such as rock and ceramic usually exhibit apparent increases of strength and toughness when subjected to dynamic loading. The reasons for this phenomenon are not yet well understood, although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. Based on dynamic fracture mechanics, the present work offers an alternate insight into the dynamic behaviors of brittle materials. Firstly, a single crack subjected to stress wave excitations is investigated to obtain the dynamic crack-tip stress field and the dynamic stress intensity factor. Second, based on the analysis of dynamic stress intensity factor, the fracture initiation sizes and crack size distribution under different loading rates are obtained, and the power law with the exponent of −2/3 is derived to describe the fracture initiation size. Third, with the help of the energy balance concept, the dynamic increase of material strength is directly derived based on the proposed multiple crack evolving criterion. Finally, the model prediction is compared with the dynamic impact experiments, and the model results agree well with the experimentally measured dynamic increasing factor (DIF.

  11. Opening of through-wall cracks in BWR coolant lines due to the application of severe overloads II: a simple approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple theoretical analysis gives an estimate of the opening area associated with a through-wall crack in a pipe when this is subject to an imposed rotation at its ends. The crack-opening area is expressed in terms of the crack size, and the plastic rotation at the cracked cross-section, where plastic deformation is assumed to be confined. The results are relevant to the integrity of boiling water reactor coolant systems during accident conditions

  12. Why bother about depth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter A.; Obrador, Biel; Christensen, Jesper Philip

    We present results from a newly developed method to determine depth specific rates of GPP, NEP and R using frequent automated profiles of DO and temperature. Metabolic rate calculations were made for three lakes of different trophic status using a diel DO methodology that integrates rates across...

  13. Defining depth of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S L; Stanski, D R

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, drawn largely from the synthesis of material that we first presented in the sixth edition of Miller's Anesthesia, Chap 31 (Stanski and Shafer 2005; used by permission of the publisher), we have defined anesthetic depth as the probability of non-response to stimulation, calibrated against the strength of the stimulus, the difficulty of suppressing the response, and the drug-induced probability of non-responsiveness at defined effect site concentrations. This definition requires measurement of multiple different stimuli and responses at well-defined drug concentrations. There is no one stimulus and response measurement that will capture depth of anesthesia in a clinically or scientifically meaningful manner. The "clinical art" of anesthesia requires calibration of these observations of stimuli and responses (verbal responses, movement, tachycardia) against the dose and concentration of anesthetic drugs used to reduce the probability of response, constantly adjusting the administered dose to achieve the desired anesthetic depth. In our definition of "depth of anesthesia" we define the need for two components to create the anesthetic state: hypnosis created with drugs such as propofol or the inhalational anesthetics and analgesia created with the opioids or nitrous oxide. We demonstrate the scientific evidence that profound degrees of hypnosis in the absence of analgesia will not prevent the hemodynamic responses to profoundly noxious stimuli. Also, profound degrees of analgesia do not guarantee unconsciousness. However, the combination of hypnosis and analgesia suppresses hemodynamic response to noxious stimuli and guarantees unconsciousness.

  14. Detection and Analysis of Enamel Cracks by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Mi-Kyoung; Ku, Hye-Min; Kim, Euiseong; Kim, Hee-Eun; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-03-01

    The ability to accurately detect tooth cracks and quantify their depth would allow the prediction of crack progression and treatment success. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the capabilities of quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology in the detection of enamel cracks. Ninety-six extracted human teeth were selected for examining naturally existing or suspected cracked teeth surfaces using a photocuring unit. QLF performed with a digital camera (QLF-D) images were used to assess the ability to detect enamel cracks based on the maximum fluorescence loss value (ΔFmax, %), which was then analyzed using the QLF-D software. A histologic evaluation was then performed in which the samples were sectioned and observed with the aid of a polarized light microscope. The relationship between ΔFmax and the histology findings was assessed based on the Spearman rank correlation. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated to evaluate the validity of using QLF-D to analyze enamel inner-half cracks and cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. There was a strong correlation between the results of histologic evaluations of enamel cracks and the ΔFmax value, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. The diagnostic accuracy of QLF-D had a sensitivity of 0.87 and a specificity of 0.98 for enamel inner-half cracks and a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 1.0 for cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. These results indicate that QLF technology would be a useful clinical tool for diagnosing enamel cracks, especially given that this is a nondestructive method. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental study on the crack detection with optimized spatial wavelet analysis and windowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Mardasi, Amir; Wu, Nan; Wu, Christine

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a high sensitive crack detection is experimentally realized and presented on a beam under certain deflection by optimizing spatial wavelet analysis. Due to the crack existence in the beam structure, a perturbation/slop singularity is induced in the deflection profile. Spatial wavelet transformation works as a magnifier to amplify the small perturbation signal at the crack location to detect and localize the damage. The profile of a deflected aluminum cantilever beam is obtained for both intact and cracked beams by a high resolution laser profile sensor. Gabor wavelet transformation is applied on the subtraction of intact and cracked data sets. To improve detection sensitivity, scale factor in spatial wavelet transformation and the transformation repeat times are optimized. Furthermore, to detect the possible crack close to the measurement boundaries, wavelet transformation edge effect, which induces large values of wavelet coefficient around the measurement boundaries, is efficiently reduced by introducing different windowing functions. The result shows that a small crack with depth of less than 10% of the beam height can be localized with a clear perturbation. Moreover, the perturbation caused by a crack at 0.85 mm away from one end of the measurement range, which is covered by wavelet transform edge effect, emerges by applying proper window functions.

  16. The analysis of optimal crack ratio for PWR pressure vessel cladding using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Susmikanti; Roziq Himawan; Jos Budi Sulistyo

    2018-01-01

    Several aspects of material failure have been investigated, especially for materials used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) cladding. One aspect that needs to be analyzed is the crack ratio. The crack ratio is a parameter that compares the depth of the gap to its width. The optimal value of the crack ratio reflects the material's resistance to the fracture. Fracture resistance of the material to fracture mechanics is indicated by the value of Stress Intensity Factor (SIF). This value can be obtained from a J-integral calculation that expresses the energy release rate. The detection of the crack ratio is conducted through the calculation of J-integral value. The Genetic Algorithm (GA) is one way to determine the optimal value for a problem. The purpose of this study is to analyze the possibility of fracture caused by crack. It was conducted by optimizing the crack ratio of AISI 308L and AISI 309L stainless steels using GA. Those materials are used for RPV cladding. The minimum crack ratio and J-Integral values were obtained for AISI 308L and AISI 309L. The SIF value was derived from the J-Integral calculation. The SIF value was then compared with the fracture toughness of those material. With the optimal crack ratio, it can be predicted that the material boundaries are protected from damaged events. It can be a reference material for the durability of a mechanical fracture event. (author)

  17. Analysis of the Generating and Influencing Factors of Vertical Cracking in Abutments during Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Xue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the causes of cracking in abutments subject to concrete shrinkage and temperature variation during the construction process and to determine factors affecting the mechanical properties of the abutment, nonlinear calculations capturing abutment behavior are conducted with Midas/FEA software. Using these calculations, the cracking mechanism is identified, and the influence of the evaluated factors is analyzed. It is concluded that the deformation between the pile cap and abutment backwall as constrained by a pile foundation when subjected to concrete shrinkage and temperature changes is the basic cause of abutment cracks during construction; these cracks form over the piles and develop upward. For a given reinforcement ratio, the distribution of horizontal crack-control steel using small, closely spaced bars is more beneficial. When pile-bearing capacity meets the standard, the width of the generated cracks tends to decrease with the decrease in the diameter of the piles. The existence of a postcast strip in the abutment backwall also contributes to the decrease in the depth of the crack. Finally, the impact of age difference between the pile cap concrete and abutment backwall concrete on cracking is inconsequential.

  18. Fault feature analysis of cracked gear based on LOD and analytical-FE method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiateng; Yang, Yu; Yang, Xingkai; Cheng, Junsheng

    2018-01-01

    At present, there are two main ideas for gear fault diagnosis. One is the model-based gear dynamic analysis; the other is signal-based gear vibration diagnosis. In this paper, a method for fault feature analysis of gear crack is presented, which combines the advantages of dynamic modeling and signal processing. Firstly, a new time-frequency analysis method called local oscillatory-characteristic decomposition (LOD) is proposed, which has the attractive feature of extracting fault characteristic efficiently and accurately. Secondly, an analytical-finite element (analytical-FE) method which is called assist-stress intensity factor (assist-SIF) gear contact model, is put forward to calculate the time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) under different crack states. Based on the dynamic model of the gear system with 6 degrees of freedom, the dynamic simulation response was obtained for different tooth crack depths. For the dynamic model, the corresponding relation between the characteristic parameters and the degree of the tooth crack is established under a specific condition. On the basis of the methods mentioned above, a novel gear tooth root crack diagnosis method which combines the LOD with the analytical-FE is proposed. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) are contrasted with the LOD by gear crack fault vibration signals. The analysis results indicate that the proposed method performs effectively and feasibility for the tooth crack stiffness calculation and the gear tooth crack fault diagnosis.

  19. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiya, P.S.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1989-09-01

    Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS), Incoloy 825, Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al have been selected as candidate materials for the containment of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. The susceptibility of these materials to stress corrosion cracking has been investigated by slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in water which simulates that from well J-13 (J-13 water) and is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. The SSRTs were performed on specimens exposed to simulated J-13 water at 93 degree C and at a strain rate 10 -7 s -1 under crevice conditions and at a strain rate of 10 -8 s -1 under both crevice and noncrevice conditions. All the tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strains of 1--4%. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed some crack initiation in virtually all specimens. Optical microscopy of metallographically prepared transverse sections of Type 304L SS suggests that the crack depths are small (<10 μm). Preliminary results suggest that a lower strain rate increases the severity of cracking of Types 304L and 316L SS, Incoloy 825, and Cu but has virtually no effect on Cu-30%Ni and Cu-7%Al. Differences in susceptibility to cracking were evaluated in terms of a stress ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the increase in stress after local yielding in the environment to the corresponding stress increase in an identical test in air, both computed at the same strain. On the basis of this stress ratio, the ranking of materials in order of increasing resistance to cracking is: Types 304L SS < 316L SS < Incoloy 825 congruent Cu-30%Ni < Cu congruent Cu-7%Al. 9 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  1. The Relation Between Alloy Chemistry and Hot-Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Talia, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    Hot cracking is a problem in welding 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy. Weld wire additives seem to reduce the problem. This study proposes a model intended to clarify the way alloying elements affect hot-cracking. The brittle temperature range of an alloy extends wherever the tensile stress required to move the meniscus of the liquid film at the grain/dendrite boundaries is less than the bulks flow stress Sigma(sub B) of the grains: 2gamma/delta alloys outgas.) If the above condition is not met, the grains deform under stress and the liquid film remains in place. Curves of 2gamma/delta and sigma(sub B) vs. temperature in the range just below the melting temperature determine the hot cracking susceptibility of an alloy. Both are zero at onset of solidification. sigma(sub B) rises as the thermal activation of the slip mechanism is reduced. 2gamma/delta rises as the film thickness delta which can be estimated from the Scheil equation, drops. But, given an embrittled alloy, whether the alloy actually cracks is determined by the strain imposed upon it in the embrittled condition. A critical strain is estimated, Epsilon(sub C) on the order of Epsilon(sub C) is approximately delta/l where L = grain size and where the the volume increment due to the strain, concentrated at the liquid film, is on the order of the liquid film volume. In the early 80's an empirical critical strain cracking envelope Epsilon(sub C)(T) was incorporated into a damage criterion to estimate the effect of welding parameters on the formation of microfissures in a superalloy with good results. These concepts, liquid film decoherence vs. grain bulk deformation and critical strain, form the key elements of a quantitative theory of hot-cracking applicable for assessing the effect of alloying elements on hot-cracking during welding.

  2. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels

  3. Techniques for intergranular crack formation and assessment in alloy 600 base and alloy 182 weld metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyun Lee

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: A comparison with a destructive metallographic examination showed that the characteristics, orientations, and sizes of the intergranular cracks produced in this study are highly reproducible.

  4. Improvement of elastic-plastic fatigue crack growth evaluation method. 2. Crack opening behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yukio [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Evaluation of crack growth behavior under cyclic loading is often required in the structural integrity assessment of cracked components. Closing and re-opening of the crack give large influence on crack growth rate through the change of fracture mechanics parameters. Based on the finite element analysis for a center-cracked plate, dependency of crack opening ratio on applied stress range and mean stress was examined. Simple formulae for representing the results were derived for plane stress and plane strain conditions. (author)

  5. An evaluation of detection ability of ultrasonic testing with a large aperture transducer for axial cracks in cast stainless steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Yoshito; Ishida, Hitoshi; Kurozumi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is difficult to apply to cast stainless steel which is the material of the main coolant pipes in pressurized water reactors, because of the large attenuation and scattering of ultrasonic waves caused by its macro structure. In this study, ultrasonic testing for progression of axial fatigue cracks of a welded area in the test piece of cast stainless steel pipe was performed using double big-size ultrasonic probes which were formerly developed in INSS. It was found that detection of defects that were over 6% of the target depth for the specimen thickness of 69mm is possible, and detection of defects with over 10% of the target depth is possible for all test conditions. (author)

  6. Standard test method for measurement of creep crack growth times in metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep crack growth (CCG) in metals at elevated temperatures using pre-cracked specimens subjected to static or quasi-static loading conditions. The time (CCI), t0.2 to an initial crack extension δai = 0.2 mm from the onset of first applied force and creep crack growth rate, ˙a or da/dt is expressed in terms of the magnitude of creep crack growth relating parameters, C* or K. With C* defined as the steady state determination of the crack tip stresses derived in principal from C*(t) and Ct (1-14). The crack growth derived in this manner is identified as a material property which can be used in modeling and life assessment methods (15-25). 1.1.1 The choice of the crack growth correlating parameter C*, C*(t), Ct, or K depends on the material creep properties, geometry and size of the specimen. Two types of material behavior are generally observed during creep crack growth tests; creep-ductile (1-14) and creep-brittle (26-37). In creep ductile materials, where cr...

  7. Statistical analysis of fatigue crack growth behavior for grade B cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.; Sakai, T.; Li, Q.; Wang, P.

    2011-01-01

    Tests for fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) were performed to clarify the fatigue crack growth behavior of a railway grade B cast steel. The threshold values of this steel with specific survival probabilities are evaluated, in which the mean value is 8.3516 MPa m 1/2 , very similar to the experimental value, about 8.7279 MPa m 1/2 . Under the conditions of plane strain and small-scale yielding, the values of fracture toughness for this steel with specific survival probabilities are converted from the corresponding critical CTOD values, in which the mean value is about 138.4256 MPa m 1/2 . In consideration of the inherent variability of crack growth rates, six statistical models are proposed to represent the probabilistic FCGR curves of this steel in entire crack propagation region from the viewpoints of statistical evaluation on the number of cycles at a given crack size and the crack growth rate at a given stress intensity factor range, stochastic characteristic of crack growth as well as statistical analysis of coefficient and exponent in FCGR power law equation. Based on the model adequacy checking, result shows that all models are basically in good agreement with test data. Although the probabilistic damage-tolerant design based on some models may involve a certain amount of risk in stable crack propagation region, they just accord with the fact that the dispersion degree of test data in this region is relatively smaller.

  8. Dynamic ductile fracture of a central crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. M.

    1976-01-01

    A central crack, symmetrically growing at a constant speed in a two dimensional ductile material subject to uniform tension at infinity, is investigated using the integral transform methods. The crack is assumed to be the Dugdale crack, and the finite stress condition at the crack tip is satisfied during the propagation of the crack. Exact expressions of solution are obtained for the finite stress condition at the crack tip, the crack shape, the crack opening displacement, and the energy release rate. All those expressions are written as the product of explicit dimensional quantities and a nondimensional dynamic correction function. The expressions reduce to the associated static results when the crack speed tends to zero, and the nondimensional dynamic correction functions were calculated for various values of the parameter involved.

  9. Fatigue cracking in road pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, P.

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the problem of modelling fatigue phenomena occurring in the road pavement. The example of two selected pavements shows the changes occurring under the influence of the load in different places of the pavement layers. Attention is paid to various values of longitudinal and transverse strains generated at the moment of passing the wheel on the pavement. It was found that the key element in the crack propagation analysis is the method of transferring the load to the pavement by the tire and the strain distribution in the pavement. During the passage of the wheel in the lower layers of the pavement, a complex stress state arises. Then vertical, horizontal and tangent stresses with various values appear. The numerical analyses carried out with the use of finite element methods allowed to assess the strain and stress changes occurring in the process of cracking road pavement. It has been shown that low-thickness pavements are susceptible to fatigue cracks arising "bottom to top", while pavements thicker are susceptible to "top to bottom" cracks. The analysis of the type of stress allowed to determine the cracking mechanism.

  10. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  11. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic sta