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Sample records for crack depth measurement

  1. Influence of crack length on crack depth measurement by an alternating current potential drop technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, Manoj K; Mahadevan, S; Rao, B P C; Behera, S P; Jayakumar, T; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    An alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique is used for sizing depth of surface cracks in metallic components. Crack depth estimations are prone to large deviations when ACPD measurements are made on very shallow and finite length cracks, especially in low conducting materials such as austenitic stainless steel (SS). Detailed studies have been carried out to investigate the influence of crack length and aspect ratio (length to depth) on depth estimation by performing measurements on electric discharge machined notches with the aspect ratio in the range of 1 to 40 in SS plates. In notches with finite length, an additional path for current to flow through the surface along the length is available causing the notch depths to be underestimated. The experimentally observed deviation in notch depth estimates is explained from a simple mathematical approach using the equivalent resistive circuit model based on the additional path available for the current to flow. A scheme is proposed to accurately measure the depth of cracks with finite lengths in SS components

  2. Impulse response measurements as dependent on crack depth. Delamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulriksen, Peter

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the project is to investigate the impulse-response method's ability to detect delamination at different depths. This method is of particular interest, since some of it's realizations strongly resembles established methods like 'bomknackning' . Since the personnel that will be responsible for future measurements with new technology, should feel confidence in new methods, it is an advantage if the new methods connect to older, accepted methods. The project consists of three parts and a fourth is planned. The first part of the investigation is made with a vibrator connected to an impedance head which in turn is connected to the surface of the concrete test specimen with internal delaminations at different depths. The vibrator is controlled by a dynamic signal analyze, which also measures the force- and acceleration signals from the impedance head and convert them to impedance. Since the impedance head must be glued to the surface of the concrete this method is only of laboratory interest. This method gives a complete description of the behavior of the concrete for the frequencies investigated. Thus in following investigations the frequencies of interest are known. From the experiment it follows that delamination down to a depth of 80-100 mm can be detected through a clear and solitary resonance peak. This resonance frequency is a function of concrete slab thickness and extension, so if the extension can be measured it may be possible to calculate depth. The second part of the investigation is about using an instrumented hammer to hit the different delamination specimens. The hammer is equipped with a force transducer giving an opportunity to measure the force exerted by the strike against the concrete surface. When a hammer is struck against a concrete surface a spectrum of vibrations is created, dependent on the weight of the hammer and the elasticity of the concrete. A light hammer generates higher frequencies than a heavy one. Three different hammer

  3. Development of measurement technique for crack depth in weld zone of thick stainless steel pipe with ultrasonic phased array TOFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Phased array TOFD (time of flight diffraction) method which makes possible to detect tip diffraction echoes and measure crack depth in an austenitic stainless steel weld zone with a thickness of more than 25 mm to which region it was difficult to apply ultrasonic test due to scattering of ultrasonic waves has been developed. The developed method uses a single array transducer to have a short distance between incident points of transmitter and receiver in order to propagate waves in shorter pass in the weld region. Transmitting and receiving ultrasonic beams from a single array probe can be set a crossing point and a focal point at desired depth. This method makes possible to scan with 16 kinds of combination of crossing points and focal pints of ultrasonic beam at a time. We have examined fundamental characteristics of depth measurement with electric discharge machining slits on base metal of a stainless steel with a thickness of 35 mm. As the results: (1) We could measure the slit depth with 0.2mm error from the slit depth with a estimating method of a lateral wave propagation time with back wall echo. (2) The largest error of the depth measurement from the slit depth with the ultrasonic beam crossing point set at the 4mm different point from the tip of the slit was 0.3 mm. (3) The largest error of the depth measurements due to the difference of focal point depth of ultrasonic beam was 0.2 mm. (4) The highest tip diffraction echo could be observed with the ultrasonic beam cross point set at the tip of the slit. The difference of 4 mm between the cross point and the tip of the slit caused attenuation of tip diffraction echo height in -6.8 dB. Furthermore we have measured a depth of electric discharge machining slits, fatigue cracks and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stainless steel welded pipe specimens with a thickness of 35 mm. As the results: (1) We could detect the tip diffraction echoes which have a signal noise ratio with more than 2.4 from the fatigue

  4. Induction Thermography for Surface Crack Detection and Depth Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Oswald-Tranta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, induction thermography has been established as a non-destructive testing method for localizing surface cracks in metals. The sample to be inspected is heated with a short induced electrical current pulse, and the infrared camera records—during and after the heating pulse—the temperature distribution at the surface. Transforming the temporal temperature development for each pixel to phase information makes not only highly reliable detection of the cracks possible but also allows an estimation of its depth. Finite element simulations were carried out to investigate how the phase contrast depends on parameters such as excitation frequency, pulse duration, material parameters, crack depth, and inclination angle of the crack. From these results, generalized functions for the dependency of the phase difference on all these parameters were derived. These functions can be used as an excellent guideline as to how measurement parameters should be optimized for a given material to be able to detect cracks and estimate their depth. Several experiments on different samples were also carried out, and the results compared with the simulations showed very good agreement.

  5. Application of ultrasonic inspection technique for crack depth sizing on nickel based alloy weld. Part 3. Establishment of UT procedure for crack depth sizing by phased array UT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji; Okada, Hisao; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it is reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) was occurred at the nickel based alloy weld components such as steam generator safe end weld, reactor vessel safe end weld, and so on, in PWR. Defect detection and sizing is important in order to ensure the reliable operation and life extension of nuclear power plants. In the reactor vessel safe end weld, it was impossible to measure crack depth of PWSCC. The crack was detected in the axial direction of the safe end weld. Furthermore, the crack had some features such as shallow, large aspect ratio (ratio of crack depth and length), sharp geometry of crack tip, and so on. Therefore, development and improvement of defect detection and sizing capabilities for ultrasonic testing (UT) is required. Phased array technique was applied to nickel based alloy weld specimen with SCC cracks. From the experimental results, good accuracy of crack depth sizing by phased array UT for the inside inspection was shown. From these results, UT procedure for crack depth sizing was verified. Therefore, effectiveness of phased array UT for crack depth sizing in the nickel based alloy welds was shown. (author)

  6. Determination of crack depth in aluminum using eddy currents and GMR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Ribeiro, A.; Pasadas, D.; Ramos, H. G.; Rocha, T.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we use eddy currents to determine the depth of linear cracks in aluminum plates. A constant field probe is used to generate the spatially uniform excitation field and a single axis giant magneto-resistor (GMR) sensor is used to measure the eddy currents magnetic field. Different depths were machined in one aluminum plate with 4 mm of thickness. By scanning those cracks the magnetic field components parallel and perpendicular to the crack's line were measured when the eddy currents were launched perpendicularly to the crack's line. To characterize one crack in a plate of a given thickness and material, the experimental procedure was defined. The plate surface is scanned to detect and locate one crack. The acquired data enables the determination of the crack's length and orientation. A second scanning is performed with the excitation current perpendicular to the crack and the GMR sensing axis perpendicular and parallel to the crack's line.

  7. Development of phased array UT procedure for crack depth sizing on nickel based alloy weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji; Okada, Hisao; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it is reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been occurred at the nickel based alloy weld components such as steam generator safe end weld, reactor vessel safe end weld, and so on, in PWR. Defect detection and sizing is important in order to ensure the reliable operation and life extension of nuclear power plants. In the reactor vessel safe end weld, it was impossible to measure crack depth of PWSCC. The crack was detected in the axial direction of the safe end weld. Furthermore, the crack had some features such as shallow, large aspect ratio (ratio of crack depth and length), sharp geometry of crack tip, and so on. Therefore, development and improvement of defect detection and sizing capabilities for ultrasonic inspection technique is required. Phased array UT technique was applied to nickel based alloy weld specimen with SCC cracks. From the experimental results, good accuracy of crack depth sizing by phased array UT for the inside inspection was shown. From these results, UT procedure for crack depth sizing was verified. Therefore, effectiveness of phased array UT for crack depth sizing in the nickel based alloy welds was shown. (author)

  8. Measuring depth in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of determining the depth of rock strata and other features of a borehole. It may be employed with particular advantage when access to the top of the borehole is difficult, for example in underwater operations. A radioactive marker, such as a source of gamma rays, is positioned near the top of the riser of a sub-sea wellhead structure. A radiation detector is lowered between the marker and a radioactive stratum and the length of line supplied is measured on the floating platform. This enables the depth of the stratum to be measured irrespective of tidal variations of the height of the platform. (U.K.)

  9. Eddy-current inversion in the thin-skin limit: Determination of depth and opening for a long crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, S. K.

    1994-09-01

    A method for crack size determination using eddy-current nondestructive evaluation is presented for the case of a plate containing an infinitely long crack of uniform depth and uniform crack opening. The approach is based on the approximate solution to Maxwell's equations for nonmagnetic conductors in the limit of small skin depth and relies on least-squares polynomial fits to a normalized coil impedance function as a function of skin depth. The method is straightforward to implement and is relatively insensitive to both systematic and random errors. The procedure requires the computation of two functions: a normalizing function, which depends both on the coil parameters and the skin depth, and a crack-depth function which depends only on the coil parameters in addition to the crack depth. The practical perfomance of the method was tested using a set of simulated cracks in the form of electro-discharge machined slots in aluminum alloy plates. The crack depths and crack opening deduced from the eddy-current measurements agree with the actual crack dimensions to within 10% or better. Recommendations concerning the optimum conditions for crack sizing are also made.

  10. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Gardner, D.; Prachuktam, S.; Chang, T.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdown. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered since the material is non-notch sensitive. Non-linear finite element analyses are carried out to determine the burst pressures of steam generator tubes containing longitudinal cracks located on the outer surface of the tubes. The non-linearities considered herein include elastic-plastic material behaviour and large deformations. A non-proprietary general purpose non-linear finite element program, NFAP was adopted for the analysis. Due to the asymmetric nature of the cracks, two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional finite element analyses, were performed. The analysis clearly shows that for short cracks axial effects play a significant role. For long cracks, they are not important since two-dimensional conditions predominate and failure is governed by circumferential or hoop stress conditions. (Auth.)

  11. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Gardner, D.; Prachuktam, S.; Chang, T.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdowns. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered since the material is non-notch sensitive. Non-linear finite element analyses are carried out to determine the burst pressures of steam generator tubes containing longitudinal cracks located on the outer surface of the tubes. The non-linearities considered herein include elastic-plastic material behavior and large deformations. A non-proprietary general purpose non-linear finite element program, NFAP was adopted for the analysis. Due to the asymmetric nature of the cracks, two-dimensional, as well as three-dimensional finite element analyses, were performed. The two-dimensional element and its formulations are similar to those of NONSAP. The three-dimensional isoparametric element with elastic-plastic material characteristics together with the large deformation formulations used in NFAP are described in the Report BNL-20684. The numerical accuracy of the program was investigated and checked with known solutions of benchmark problems. In addition to the three-dimensional element which was specifically inserted into NFAP for this problem, other features such as direct pressure inputs for isoparametric elements, automatic load increment adjustments for convergent non-linear solutions, and automatic bandwidth reduction schemes are incorporated into the program thus allowing for a more economical evaluation of three-dimensional inelastic analysis. In summary the analysis clearly shows that for short cracks axial effects play a significant role. For long cracks, they are not important since two-dimensional conditions predominate and failure is governed by circumferential or hoop stress conditions

  12. Nondestructive estimation of depth of surface opening cracks in concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arne, Kevin; In, Chiwon; Kurtis, Kimberly; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and thus assessment of damage in concrete structures is of the utmost importance from both a safety point of view and a financial point of view. Of particular interest are surface opening cracks that extend through the concrete cover, as this can expose the steel reinforcement bars underneath and induce corrosion in them. This corrosion can lead to significant subsequent damage in concrete such as cracking and delamination of the cover concrete as well as rust staining on the surface of concrete. Concrete beams are designed and constructed in such a way to provide crack depths up to around 13 cm. Two different types of measurements are made in-situ to estimate depths of real surface cracks (as opposed to saw-cut notches) after unloading: one based on the impact-echo method and the other one based on the diffuse ultrasonic method. These measurements are compared to the crack depth visually observed on the sides of the beams. Discussions are given as to the advantages and disadvantages of each method

  13. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuting; Gan, Fangji; Wan, Zhengjun; Liao, Junbi; Li, Wenqiang

    2015-10-01

    Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  14. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Franesqui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA. The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled “Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves” (Franesqui et al., 2017 [1].

  15. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franesqui, Miguel A; Yepes, Jorge; García-González, Cándida

    2017-08-01

    This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA). The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled "Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves" (Franesqui et al., 2017) [1].

  16. Benefits and drawbacks of TOFD and SAFT for crack depth measurement at thick-walled vessels; Vor- und Nachteile von TOFD und SAFT zur Risstiefenmessung an dickwandigen Behaeltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, V.; Mueller, W. [IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany); Hecht, A. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    1999-08-01

    The results presented in the paper show that TOFD can be applied in many cases as a low-cost and reliable testing method, but is less suitable for some cases. These are: Description of cracks in welded joints which yield a multitude of data, as e.g. microstructural data, so that the method is less suitable for austenitic weld testing; detection of small cracks. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Aus den gezeigten Beispielen ergibt sich, dass TOFD in einer Vielzahl von Anwendungsfaellen als preisguenstiges und zuverlaessiges Pruefverfahren eingesetzt werden kann, dass es aber fuer einige Anwendungsfaelle weniger geeignet ist: Diese Anwendungsfaelle sind: (1) Nachweis von Rissen in Schweissnaehten mit vielen Anzeigen, z.B. Gefuegeanzeigen, d.h. insbesondere bei austenitischen Schweissnaehten, und (2) Nachweis von kleinen Rissen. Der Nachweis auch von kleinen Rissen wird dahingegen beim Impuls-Echo Verfahren aufgrund des vorliegenden Winkelspiegeleffektes durchaus moeglich sein. Durch eine nachgeschaltete SAFT-Auswertung werden zum einen stoerendes Gefuegerauschen unterdrueckt und zum anderen Echos von Fehlstellen angehoben. Diese Verbesserung des Signal-Rausch-Abstandes fuehrt zu einer Verbesserung der Fehlererkennbarkeit und der Fehlerbewertung. (orig.)

  17. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Prachuktam, S.; Gardner, D.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdowns. Typical PWR steam generator units contain thousands of long straight tubes with U-bend sections. These tubes are primarily made from alloy 600 and their sizes vary between 3 / 4 '' and 7 / 8 '' (1.905 cm and 2.223 cm) in diameter with nominal thicknesses of 0.043'' to 0.053'' (0.109 cm to 0.135 cm). Since alloy 600 (and the previously used 304-SS tubes) are ductile, high toughness materials LEFM (linear elastic fracture mechanics) criteria do not apply. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered

  18. Simulation and experiment for depth sizing of cracks in anchor bolts by ultrasonic phased array technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan

    2018-04-01

    There have been lots of reports about the occurrence of cracks in bolts in aging nuclear and thermal power plants. Sizing of such cracks is crucial for assessing the integrity of bolts. Currently, hammering and visual tests are used to detect cracks in bolts. However, they are not applicable for sizing cracks. Although the tip diffraction method is well known as a crack sizing technique, reflection echoes from threads make it difficult to apply this technique to bolts. This paper addresses a method for depth sizing of cracks in bolts by means of ultrasonic phased array technology. Numerical results of wave propagation in bolts by the finite element method (FEM) shows that a peak associated within the vicinity of a crack tip can be observed in the curve of echo intensity versus refraction angle for deep cracks. The refraction angle with respect to this peak decreases as crack depth increases. Such numerical results are verified by experiments on bolt specimens that have electrical discharge machining notches or fatigue cracks with different depths. In the experiment, a 10-MHz linear array probe is used. Depth of cracks in bolts using the refraction angle associated with the peak is determined and compared to actual depths. The comparison shows that accurately determining a crack depth from the inspection results is possible.

  19. Potential drop crack measurement systems for CANDU components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahney, R [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    A project to develop an automated crack measurement system for CANDU pressure tube burst testing is currently underway. The system will utilize either Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) or Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) techniques for crack measurement. The preliminary stage of the project involves testing and comparison of both ACPD and DCPD methods on a Zr - 2.5% Nb alloy plate with saw cuts (used to simulate cracks). Preliminary results show that both ACPD and DCPD techniques are capable of detecting cracks; further testing is in progress to determine the ability of each of the two systems to make accurate crack depth measurements. This paper will describe the two potential drop techniques and will present test results from the experimental program. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  1. Spectrometric kidney depth measurement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.; Soussaline, F.; Raynaud, C.

    1976-01-01

    The method proposed uses the single posterior surface measurement of the kidney radioactivity distribution. The ratio C/P of the number of scattered photons to the number of primary photons, which is a function of the tissue depth penetrated, is calculated for a given region. The parameters on which the C/P value depends are determined from studies on phantoms. On the basis of these results the kidney depth was measured on a series of 13 patients and a correlation was established between the value thus calculated and that obtained by the profile method. The reproducibility of the method is satisfactory [fr

  2. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuting; Gan Fangji; Wan Zhengjun; Liao Junbi; Li Wenqiang

    2015-01-01

    Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of s...

  3. Investigation of UT procedure for crack depth sizing by phased array UT in Ni-based alloy weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has occurred in nickel based alloy weld components such as steam generator safe end weld, reactor vessel safe end weld, and so on, in PWR. Defect detection and sizing are important in order to ensure the reliable operation and life extension of nuclear power plants. In the reactor vessel safe end weld, it was impossible to measure crack depth of PWSCC. The cracks have occurred in the axial direction of the safe end weld. Furthermore, the cracks had some features such as deep, large aspect ratio (ratio of crack depth and length), sharp geometry of crack tip, and so on. Therefore, development and improvement of defect depth sizing capabilities by ultrasonic testing (UT) have been required. Phased array UT technique was applied with regard to defect depth sizing at the inside inspection in Ni-based alloy welds. Phased array UT was examined a standard block specimen with side drilled holes (SDHs). From the experimental results, the performance of linear array probes and dual matrix array probe were investigated. In the basis of the results, UT procedure for defect depth sizing was investigated and proposed. The UT procedure was applied to the defect depth measurement in Ni-based alloy weld specimen with electric discharge machine (EDM) notches. From these results, good accuracy of defect depth sizing by phased array UT for the inside inspection was shown. Therefore, it was clarified the effectiveness of the UT procedure for defect depth sizing in Ni-based alloy weld. (author)

  4. Detection and measurement of fatigue cracks in welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    A direct current potential drop system was developed for the detection and measurement of very small fatigue cracks that grow from the toes of welds. Measurement of crack growth less than 0.01 mm and of crack growth rates less than 10 -10 m/cycle, even for cracks less than 1.0 mm deep, is made possible by using a high stability measurement apparatus and an adjustment based on initial conditions. Thus far, the measurement system has successfully examined several aspects of fatigue in welded elements. Crack growth results justified the use of a linear elastic expression for the stress intensity factor and provided an evaluation of a growth law which includes the threshold stress intensity factor. Needle peening fillet welded joints did not change the small proportion of crack initiation life to total fatigue life observed for untreated (not improved) welded joints. However, the measurement system demonstrated that needle peening retarded crack growth rates up to 1 mm depth below the weld toe

  5. Intercomparison On Depth Dose Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmah, N; Akhadi, M

    1996-01-01

    Intercomparation on personal dose evaluation system has been carried out between CSRSR-NAEA of Indonesia toward Standard Laboratory of JAERI (Japan) and ARL (Australia). The intercomparison was in 10 amm depth dose measurement , Hp (10), from the intercomparison result could be stated that personal depth dose measurement conducted by CSRSR was sufficiently good. Deviation of dose measurement result using personal dosemeter of TLD BG-1 type which were used by CSRSR in the intercomparison and routine photon personal dose monitoring was still in internationally agreed limit. Maximum deviation of reported doses by CSRSR compared to delivered doses for dosemeter irradiation by JAERI was -10.0 percent and by ARL was +29 percent. Maximum deviation permitted in personal dose monitoring is ± 50 percent

  6. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuting

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  7. a Cost-Effective Method for Crack Detection and Measurement on Concrete Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, M. M.; Ali, T. A.; Abdelfatah, A.; Yehia, S.; Elaksher, A.

    2017-11-01

    Crack detection and measurement in the surface of concrete structures is currently carried out manually or through Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) such as imaging or scanning. The recent developments in depth (stereo) cameras have presented an opportunity for cost-effective, reliable crack detection and measurement. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the new inexpensive depth camera (ZED) for crack detection and measurement. This depth camera with its lightweight and portable nature produces a 3D data file of the imaged surface. The ZED camera was utilized to image a concrete surface and the 3D file was processed to detect and analyse cracks. This article describes the outcome of the experiment carried out with the ZED camera as well as the processing tools used for crack detection and analysis. Crack properties that were also of interest were length, orientation, and width. The use of the ZED camera allowed for distinction between surface and concrete cracks. The ZED high-resolution capability and point cloud capture technology helped in generating a dense 3D data in low-lighting conditions. The results showed the ability of the ZED camera to capture the crack depth changes between surface (render) cracks, and crack that form in the concrete itself.

  8. A COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR CRACK DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT ON CONCRETE SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Crack detection and measurement in the surface of concrete structures is currently carried out manually or through Non-Destructive Testing (NDT such as imaging or scanning. The recent developments in depth (stereo cameras have presented an opportunity for cost-effective, reliable crack detection and measurement. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the new inexpensive depth camera (ZED for crack detection and measurement. This depth camera with its lightweight and portable nature produces a 3D data file of the imaged surface. The ZED camera was utilized to image a concrete surface and the 3D file was processed to detect and analyse cracks. This article describes the outcome of the experiment carried out with the ZED camera as well as the processing tools used for crack detection and analysis. Crack properties that were also of interest were length, orientation, and width. The use of the ZED camera allowed for distinction between surface and concrete cracks. The ZED high-resolution capability and point cloud capture technology helped in generating a dense 3D data in low-lighting conditions. The results showed the ability of the ZED camera to capture the crack depth changes between surface (render cracks, and crack that form in the concrete itself.

  9. Application possibility of the direct current conduction method for nondestructive crack measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedl, R.

    1982-01-01

    An important value to determine the danger of cracks is the determination of crack depths. The crack depth can be determined quite accurate by means of the direct current conduction method, if one holds onto certain rules. Often complicated experimental set-ups are applied. However, portable commercial devices can be obtained that can be used for partial fluxation, that yield good results. By means of two examples: crack conduction samples in which the built-up of a constant-cracking is persued up to a certain depth, as well as the persuasion of an continuing crack in a bearing cylinder, shall be demonstrated that is very well possible to record accurate profiles with commercial devices and to avoid expensive measurement devices. (orig.) [de

  10. Depth-Sizing Technique for Crack Indications in Steam Generator Tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hong Deok

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear power plants have been safely operated by plugging the steam generator tubes which have the crack indications. Tube rupture events can occur if analysts fail to detect crack indications during in-service inspection. There are various types of crack indication in steam generator tubes and they have been detected by the eddy current test. The integrity assessment should be performed using the crack-sizing results from eddy current data when the crack indication is detected. However, it is not easy to evaluate the crack-depth precisely and consistently due to the complexity of the methods. The current crack-sizing methods were reviewed in this paper and the suitable ones were selected through the laboratory tests. The retired steam generators of Kori Unit 1 were used for this study. The round robin tests by the domestic qualified analysts were carried out and the statistical models were introduced to establish the appropriate depth-sizing techniques. It is expected that the proposed techniques in this study can be utilized in the Steam Generator Management Program

  11. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses for reducers with constant-depth internal circumferential surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Szu-Ying; Tsai, Bor-Jiun; Chen, Jien-Jong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a 3-D automatic elastic-plastic finite element mesh generator is established to accurately predict the J-integral value of an arbitrary reducer with a constant-depth internal circumferential surface crack under bending and axial force. The contact pairs are used on the crack surfaces to simulate the actual contact behaviors of the crack model under loadings. In order to verify the accuracy of the proposed elastic-plastic finite element model for a reducer with a surface crack, the cracked straight pipe models are generated according to a special modeling procedure for a flawed reducer. The J-integral values along the crack front of surface crack are calculated and compared with the straight pipe models which have been verified in the previous published studies. Based on the comparison of computed results, good agreements are obtained to show the accuracy of present numerical models. More confidence on using the 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis for reducers with internal circumferential surface cracks can be thus established in this work

  12. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin.

  13. Experimental study of the crack depth ratio threshold to analyze the slow crack growth by creep of high density polyethylene pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, Lucien; Devilliers, Clémence; Lucatelli, Jean Marc; Gaudichet-Maurin, Emmanuelle; Brossard, Jean Michel

    2014-01-01

    To assess the durability of drinking water connection pipes subjected to oxidation and slow crack growth, a comprehensive database was constructed on a novel specimen geometry: the pre-cracked NOL ring. 135 tests were carried out consisting of initial crack depth ratio ranging from 0.08 to 0.6; single or double longitudinal cracks: tensile with steady strain rate and creep loading. A threshold value of the crack depth ratio of 0.2, induced by the oxidation was determined by analyzing several mechanical parameters. This threshold value was shown to be independent on the strain rate effects, single or double crack configuration and the kind of loading: tensile or creep. Creep test results with crack depth ratio larger than 0.2 were then utilized to establish a failure assessment diagram. A methodology allowing the prediction of residual lifetime of in-service pipes was proposed, using this diagram. - Highlights: • Experimental data on pre-cracked rings featuring a longitudinally cracked HDPE pipe. • Crack depth ratio threshold for slow crack growth study consecutive to oxidation. • Investigation of the effects of the single/double notch(es) and of the strain rate. • Original results obtained from tests performed with tensile and creep loadings. • Correlation between creep initiation time and C* with DENT and ring specimens

  14. Influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Bryson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Recently, it has been shown that, in notched beam testing, shallow cracks tend to exhibit an elevated toughness as a result of a loss of constraint at the crack tip. The loss of constraint takes place when interaction occurs between the elastic-plastic crack-tip stress field and the specimen surface nearest the crack tip. An increased shallow-crack fracture toughness is of interest to the nuclear industry because probabilistic fracture-mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the probability of vessel failure during postulated pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) events. Tests have been performed on beam specimens loaded in 3-point bending using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel material (A533 B). Testing has been conducted using specimens with a constant beam depth (W = 94 mm) and within the lower transition region of the toughness curve for A533 B. Test results indicate a significantly higher fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens compared to the fracture toughness determined using deep-crack (a/W = 0.5) specimens. Test data also show little influence of thickness on the fracture toughness for the current test temperature (-60 degree C). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Failure Assessment for the High-Strength Pipelines with Constant-Depth Circumferential Surface Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas transportation system over long distance, application of high-strength pipeline steels can efficiently reduce construction and operation cost by increasing operational pressure and reducing the pipe wall thickness. Failure assessment is an important issue in the design, construction, and maintenance of the pipelines. The small circumferential surface cracks with constant depth in the welded pipelines are of practical interest. This work provides an engineering estimation procedure based upon the GE/EPRI method to determine the J-integral for the thin-walled pipelines with small constant-depth circumferential surface cracks subject to tension and bending loads. The values of elastic influence functions for stress intensity factor and plastic influence functions for fully plastic J-integral estimation are derived in tabulated forms through a series of three-dimensional finite element calculations for different crack geometries and material properties. To check confidence of the J-estimation solution in practical application, J-integral values obtained from detailed finite element (FE analyses are compared with those estimated from the new influence functions. Excellent agreement of FE results with the proposed J-estimation solutions for both tension and bending loads indicates that the new solutions can be applied for accurate structural integrity assessment of high-strength pipelines with constant-depth circumferential surface cracks.

  16. Minimum critical crack depths in pressure vessels guidelines for nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, M.R.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1983-09-01

    Estimates of the minimum critical depths which can be expected in high quality vessels designed to certain British and American Code rules are given. A simple means of allowing for fatigue crack growth in service is included. The data which are presented can be used to decide what sensitivity and what reporting levels should be employed during an ultrasonic inspection of a pressure vessel. It is emphasised that the minimum crack depths are those which would be relevant to a vessel in which the material is stressed to its maximum permitted value during operation. Stresses may, in practice, be significantly less than this. Less restrictive inspection standards may be established, if it were considered worthwhile to carry out a detailed stress analysis of the particular vessel under examination. (author)

  17. Failure Assessment for the High-Strength Pipelines with Constant-Depth Circumferential Surface Cracks

    OpenAIRE

    X. Liu; Z. X. Lu; Y. Chen; Y. L. Sui; L. H. Dai

    2018-01-01

    In the oil and gas transportation system over long distance, application of high-strength pipeline steels can efficiently reduce construction and operation cost by increasing operational pressure and reducing the pipe wall thickness. Failure assessment is an important issue in the design, construction, and maintenance of the pipelines. The small circumferential surface cracks with constant depth in the welded pipelines are of practical interest. This work provides an engineering estimation pr...

  18. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  19. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, V.; Rabinovitch, A.; Bahat, D.

    2006-01-01

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality

  20. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, V. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: vfrid@bgu.ac.il; Rabinovitch, A. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Bahat, D. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2006-07-31

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality.

  1. Pavement cracking measurements using 3D laser-scan images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, W; Xu, B

    2013-01-01

    Pavement condition surveying is vital for pavement maintenance programs that ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper first introduces an automated pavement inspection system which uses a three-dimensional (3D) camera and a structured laser light to acquire dense transverse profiles of a pavement lane surface when it carries a moving vehicle. After the calibration, the 3D system can yield a depth resolution of 0.5 mm and a transverse resolution of 1.56 mm pixel −1 at 1.4 m camera height from the ground. The scanning rate of the camera can be set to its maximum at 5000 lines s −1 , allowing the density of scanned profiles to vary with the vehicle's speed. The paper then illustrates the algorithms that utilize 3D information to detect pavement distress, such as transverse, longitudinal and alligator cracking, and presents the field tests on the system's repeatability when scanning a sample pavement in multiple runs at the same vehicle speed, at different vehicle speeds and under different weather conditions. The results show that this dedicated 3D system can capture accurate pavement images that detail surface distress, and obtain consistent crack measurements in repeated tests and under different driving and lighting conditions. (paper)

  2. Analysis on the Initial Cracking Parameters of Cross-Measure Hydraulic Fracture in Underground Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Lu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Initial cracking pressure and locations are important parameters in conducting cross-measure hydraulic fracturing to enhance coal seam permeability in underground coalmines, which are significantly influenced by in-situ stress and occurrence of coal seam. In this study, stress state around cross-measure fracturing boreholes was analyzed using in-situ stress coordinate transformation, then a mathematical model was developed to evaluate initial cracking parameters of borehole assuming the maximum tensile stress criterion. Subsequently, the influences of in-situ stress and occurrence of coal seams on initial cracking pressure and locations in underground coalmines were analyzed using the proposed model. Finally, the proposed model was verified with field test data. The results suggest that the initial cracking pressure increases with the depth cover and coal seam dip angle. However, it decreases with the increase in azimuth of major principle stress. The results also indicate that the initial cracking locations concentrated in the second and fourth quadrant in polar coordinate, and shifted direction to the strike of coal seam as coal seam dip angle and azimuth of maximum principle stress increase. Field investigation revealed consistent rule with the developed model that the initial cracking pressure increases with the coal seam dip angle. Therefore, the proposed mathematical model provides theoretical insight to analyze the initial cracking parameters during cross-measure hydraulic fracturing for underground coalmines.

  3. Noncontact measurement of guided ultrasonic wave scattering for fatigue crack characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, P.

    2013-04-01

    Fatigue cracks can develop in aerospace structures at locations of stress concentration such as fasteners. For the safe operation of the aircraft fatigue cracks need to be detected before reaching a critical length. Guided ultrasonic waves offer an efficient method for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in large aerospace structures. Noncontact excitation of guided waves was achieved using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT). The transducers were developed for the specific excitation of the A0 Lamb mode. Based on the induced eddy currents in the plate a simple theoretical model was developed and reasonably good agreement with the measurements was achieved. However, the detection sensitivity for fatigue cracks depends on the location and orientation of the crack relative to the measurement locations. Crack-like defects have a directionality pattern of the scattered field depending on the angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and on the ratio of the characteristic defect size to wavelength. The detailed angular dependency of the guided wave field scattered at crack-like defects in plate structures has been measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement with 3D Finite Element simulation predictions was achieved for machined part-through and through-thickness notches. The amplitude of the scattered wave was quantified for a variation of angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and the defect depth. These results provide the basis for the defect characterization in aerospace structures using guided wave sensors.

  4. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spending time in a rehab facility or getting cognitive-behavioral therapy or other treatments. Right now, there are no medicines to treat a crack addiction. If you smoke crack, talking with a counselor ...

  5. Measurements of delayed hydride cracking propagation rate in the radial direction of Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, T., E-mail: kubo@nfd.co.jp [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [M.O.X. Co., Ltd., 1828-520 Hirasu-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 311-0853 (Japan); Uchikoshi, H. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The delayed hydride cracking (DHC) velocity of Zircaloy-2 was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The velocity followed the Arrhenius law up to 270 Degree-Sign C. Activation energy was 49 kJ/mol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The threshold stress intensity factor for the DHC was from 4 to 6 MPa m{sup 1/2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in material strength accelerated the DHC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation and fracture of hydrides at a crack tip is responsible for the DHC. - Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) tests of Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes were performed in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to directly observe the crack propagation and measure the crack velocity in the radial direction of the tubes. Pre-cracks were produced at the outer surfaces of the tubes. Hydrogen contents of the tubes were from 90 ppm to 130 ppm and test temperatures were from 225 Degree-Sign C to 300 Degree-Sign C. The crack velocity followed the Arrhenius law at temperatures lower than about 270 Degree-Sign C with apparent activation energy of about 49 kJ/mol. The upper temperature limit for DHC, above which DHC did not occur, was about 280 Degree-Sign C. The threshold stress intensity factor for the initiation of the crack propagation, K{sub IH}, was from about 4 MPa m{sup 1/2} to 6 MPa m{sup 1/2}, almost independent of temperature. An increase in 0.2% offset yield stress of the material accelerated the crack velocity and slightly decreased K{sub IH}. Detailed observations of crack tip movement showed that cracks propagated in an intermittent fashion and the propagation gradually approached the steady state as the crack depth increased. The SEM observations also showed that hydrides were formed at a crack tip and a number of micro-cracks were found in the hydrides. It was presumed from these observations that the repetition of precipitation and fracture of hydrides at the crack tip would be

  6. Automatic measurement for monitoring crack growth with electric potential technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Nobuya; Kikuchi, Masaaki; Shima, Seishi

    1981-10-01

    In the study of fracture mechanics, it is one of the most important problems to monitor the crack growth phenomena. Recently, many experimental methods have been developed. In this report, the Direct Current (DC) potential method is employed for measuring the crack growth length in the pressuried high temperature water. The objective of the current investigation is to develop an experimental method to quantify the sensitivity of this method in the air environment using the Compact Tension (CT) specimen. The main results obtained are as follows: 1) It is ignored that the electrical potential changes with plastic deformation at the crack tip of the specimen. 2) Using the Reversible Direct Current (RDC) Method, the measurement system gives no effect on the electrical stability for a long time. 3) For the fatigue and statical crack growth length, good relation is observed between the crack length-to-specimen width ratio (a/W) and potential ratio (Va/Vo). (author)

  7. Fusing complementary images for pavement cracking measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Ming; Zhao, Zuyun; Xu, Bugao; Yao, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cracking is a major pavement distress that jeopardizes road serviceability and traffic safety. Automated pavement distress survey (APDS) systems have been developed using digital imaging technology to replace human surveys for more timely and accurate inspections. Most APDS systems require special lighting devices to illuminate pavements and prevent shadows of roadside objects that distort cracks in the image. Most artificial lighting devices are laser based, and are either hazardous to unprotected people or require dedicated power supplies on the vehicle. This study was aimed to develop a new imaging system that can scan pavement surface at highway speed and determine the level of severity of pavement cracking without using any artificial lighting. The new system consists of dual line-scan cameras that are installed side by side to scan the same pavement area as the vehicle moves. Cameras are controlled with different exposure settings so that both sunlit and shadowed areas can be visible in two separate images. The paired images contain complementary details useful for reconstructing an image in which the shadows are eliminated. This paper intends to present (1) the design of the dual line-scan camera system, (2) a new calibration method for line-scan cameras to rectify and register paired images, (3) a customized image-fusion algorithm that merges the multi-exposure images into one shadow-free image for crack detection, and (4) the results of the field tests on a selected road over a long period. (paper)

  8. Junction depth measurement using carrier illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Carrier Illumination [trade mark] (CI) is a new method recently developed to meet the need for a non-destructive, high throughput junction depth measurement on patterned wafers. A laser beam creates a quasi-static excess carrier profile in the semiconductor underlying the activated junction. The excess carrier profile is fairly constant below the junction, and drops rapidly in the junction, creating a steep index of refraction gradient at the junction edge. Interference with light reflected from this index gradient provides a signal that is analyzed to determine the junction depth. The paper summarizes evaluation of performance in full NMOS and PMOS process flows, on both bare and patterned wafers. The aims have been to validate (1) performance in the presence of underlying layers typically found at the source/drain (S/D) process steps and (2) measurement on patterned wafers. Correlation of CI measurements to SIMS and transistor drive current are shown. The data were obtained from NMOS structures using As S/D and LDD implants. Correlations to SRP, SIMS and sheet resistance are shown for PMOS structures using B 11 LDD implants. Gage capability measurements are also presented

  9. Fatigue crack growth thresholds measurements in structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, R.; Lidar, P.; Rosborg, B.

    1999-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth thresholds and da/dN-data at low Δk I -values ( 1/2 ) have been determined for type 304 stainless steel, nickel-base weld metal Alloy 182, nickel-base metal Alloy 600, and low-alloy steel in air at ambient temperature and in high-temperature water and steam. The stainless alloys have been tested in water with 0.2 ppm O 2 at 288 deg C and the low-alloy steel in steam at 286 deg C. The fatigue crack growth threshold was defined as the ΔK I -value resulting in a crack growth rate of 10 -7 mm per cycle. The measured fatigue crack growth thresholds (at frequencies from 0.5 to 20 Hz) are quite similar independent of the material and the environment. A relatively inexpensive and time-saving method for measuring fatigue crack growth thresholds, and fatigue crack growth rates at low ΔK I -values, has been used in the tests. The method is a ΔK I -decreasing test with constant K I Max

  10. Crack arrest toughness measurements with A533B steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, Seppo.

    1979-11-01

    This work covers crack arrest toughness measurements on A533B steel done at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. These measurements are one part of a multinational effort, involving 30 laboratories. The aim of the cooperative test program is to examine two test procedures for measuring the crack arrest toughness, to give information about their reproducibility, and to identify the factors affecting the interpretation. The principles given for the testing were easy to apply in general and the results were satisfactory. Some factors in the test runs and in the specimen's behaviour are indicated which can cause error in the results or make implementation of the test more difficult. By comparing the results from our laboratory with average values from the test program a good agreement can be seen. Crack arrest toughness values derived from the compared procedures with a static analysis agree closely, but values calculated using a dynamic analysis differ considerably. (author)

  11. Crack-depth effects in the cylindrically guided wave technique for bolt and pump-shaft inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.M.; Liu, S.N.; Light, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have experienced the failures of bolts and pump shafts. The industry is concerned about nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that can be applied to these components. The cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) has been developed to detect the simulated circumferential defects in long bolts and studs. The ultrasonic CGWT employs the zero-degree longitudinal waves constrained to travel within the boundary of the components with cylindrical shape during inspection. When longitudinal waves are guided to travel along a cylinder, and impinge onto a circumferential defect, the waves are scattered at the crack on the cylinder surface. In this work, the wave scattering at the circumferential crack on a long cylinder is investigated. The transfer factor of the scattered waves is calculated for a wide range of frequency spectra. The scattered waveform at a distance away from a crack is calculated. The effect that crack depth exerts to the waveform in CGWT is shown. CGWT signals, waveform calculation and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  12. [Measurement of the depth of anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G N; Müller, J; Bischoff, P

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important mandates of the anaesthesiologist is to control the depth of anaesthesia. An unsolved problem is that a straight definition of the depth of anaesthesia does not exist. Concerning this it is rational to separate hypnosis from analgesia, from muscle relaxation and from block of cardiovascular reactions. Clinical surrogate parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate are not well-suited for a valid statement about the depth of hypnosis. To answer this question the brain has become the focus of interest as the target of anaesthesia. It is possible to visualize the brain's electrical activity from anelectroencephalogram (EEG). The validity of the spontaneous EEG as an anesthetic depth monitor is limited by the multiphasic activity, especially when anaesthesia is induced (excitation) and in deep anaesthesia (burst suppression). Recently, various commercial monitoring systems have been introduced to solve this problem. These monitoring systems use different interpretations of the EEG or auditory-evoked potentials (AEP). These derived and calculated variables have no pure physiological basis. For that reason a profound knowledge of the algorithms and a validation of the monitoring systems is an indispensable prerequisite prior to their routine clinical use. For the currently available monitoring systems various studies have been reported. At this time it is important to know that the actual available monitors can only value the sedation and not the other components of anaesthesia. For example, they cannot predict if a patient will react to a painful stimulus or not. In the future it would be desirable to develop parameters which allow an estimate of the other components of anaesthesia in addition to the presently available monitoring systems to estimate sedation and muscle relaxation. These could be sensoric-evoked potentials to estimate analgesia and AEPs for the detection of awareness.

  13. Depth profile measurement with lenslet images of the plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Wang, Zhaomin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Hongying; Qu, Weijuan; Zhao, Haimeng; Asundi, Anand; Yan, Lei

    2018-03-01

    An approach for carrying out depth profile measurement of an object with the plenoptic camera is proposed. A single plenoptic image consists of multiple lenslet images. To begin with, these images are processed directly with a refocusing technique to obtain the depth map, which does not need to align and decode the plenoptic image. Then, a linear depth calibration is applied based on the optical structure of the plenoptic camera for depth profile reconstruction. One significant improvement of the proposed method concerns the resolution of the depth map. Unlike the traditional method, our resolution is not limited by the number of microlenses inside the camera, and the depth map can be globally optimized. We validated the method with experiments on depth map reconstruction, depth calibration, and depth profile measurement, with the results indicating that the proposed approach is both efficient and accurate.

  14. Effect of Voltage Measurement on the Quantitative Identification of Transverse Cracks by Electrical Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2016-03-24

    Electrical tomography can be used as a structural health monitoring technique to identify different damage mechanisms in composite laminates. Previous work has established the link between transverse cracking density and mesoscale conductivity of the ply. Through the mesoscale relationship, the conductivity obtained from electrical tomography can be used as a measure of the transverse cracking density. Interpretation of this measure will be accurate provided the assumptions made during homogenization are valid. One main assumption of mesoscale homogenization is that the electric field is in the plane. Here, we test the validity of this assumption for laminates with varying anisotropy ratios and for different distances between the cracked ply and surface that is instrumented with electrodes. We also show the equivalence in electrical response between measurements from cracked laminates and their equivalent mesoscale counterparts. Finally, we propose some general guidelines on the measurement strategy for maximizing the accuracy of transverse cracks identification.

  15. Effect of Voltage Measurement on the Quantitative Identification of Transverse Cracks by Electrical Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    of the ply. Through the mesoscale relationship, the conductivity obtained from electrical tomography can be used as a measure of the transverse cracking density. Interpretation of this measure will be accurate provided the assumptions made during

  16. Standard test method for crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness measurement

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of critical crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) values at one or more of several crack extension events, and may be used to measure cleavage crack initiation toughness for materials that exhibit a change from ductile to brittle behavior with decreasing temperature, such as ferritic steels. This test method applies specifically to notched specimens sharpened by fatigue cracking. The recommended specimens are three-point bend [SE(B)], compact [C(T)], or arc-shaped bend [A(B)] specimens. The loading rate is slow and influences of environment (other than temperature) are not covered. The specimens are tested under crosshead or clip gage displacement controlled loading. 1.1.1 The recommended specimen thickness, B, for the SE(B) and C(T) specimens is that of the material in thicknesses intended for an application. For the A(B) specimen, the recommended depth, W, is the wall thickness of the tube or pipe from which the specimen is obtained. Superficial surface machini...

  17. Seed drill instrumentation for spatial coulter depth measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard Nielsen, Søren; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    coulter depth varied up to ±5 mm between the blocks. In addition, significant depth variations between the individual coulters were found. The mean depths varied between −14.2 and −25.9 mm for the eleven coulters. The mean shallowest coulter depth (−14.2 mm) was measured for the coulter running...... in the wheel track of the tractor. The power spectral densities (distribution) of the coulter depth oscillation frequencies showed that the majority of oscillations occurred below 0.5 Hz without any natural vibration frequency. The study concluded that the instrumentation concept was functional for on...

  18. Standard test method for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fatigue crack growth rates from near-threshold to Kmax controlled instability. Results are expressed in terms of the crack-tip stress-intensity factor range (ΔK), defined by the theory of linear elasticity. 1.2 Several different test procedures are provided, the optimum test procedure being primarily dependent on the magnitude of the fatigue crack growth rate to be measured. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength so long as specimens are of sufficient thickness to preclude buckling and of sufficient planar size to remain predominantly elastic during testing. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size is variable to be adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness may be varied independent of planar size. 1.5 The details of the various specimens and test configurations are shown in Annex A1-Annex A3. Specimen configurations other than t...

  19. Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph; Reuter, Walter Graham; Weinberg, David Michael

    1999-01-01

    Electric potential measurement (EPM) technology offers an attractive alternative to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for monitoring crack growth in harsh environments. Where conventional NDE methods typically require localized human interaction, the EPM technique developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) can be operated remotely and automatically. Once a crack-like defect is discovered via conventional means, EPM can be applied to monitor local crack size changes. This is of particular interest in situations where an identified structural defect is not immediately rejectable from a fitness-for-service viewpoint, but due to operational and environmental conditions may grow to an unsafe size with continuing operation. If the location is in a harsh environment where periodic monitoring by normal means is either too costly or not possible, a very expensive repair may be immediately mandated. However, the proposed EPM methodology may offer a unique monitoring capability that would allow for continuing service. INEEL has developed this methodology, supporting equipment, and calibration information to apply EPM in a field environment for just this purpose. Laboratory and pilot scale tests on full-size engineering structures (pressure vessels and piping) have been successfully performed. The technique applicable is many severe environments because the sensitive equipment (electronics, operators) can be situated in a remote location, with only current and voltage probe electrical leads entering into the harsh environment. Experimental results showing the utility of the methodology are presented, and unique application concepts that have been examined by multiple experiments are discussed

  20. A method to measure depth distributions of implanted ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnesen, A.; Noreland, T.

    1977-04-01

    A new variant of the radiotracer method for depth distribution determinations has been tested. Depth distributions of radioactive implanted ions are determined by dissolving thin, uniform layers of evaporated material from the surface of a backing and by measuring the activity before and after the layer removal. The method has been used to determine depth distributions for 25 keV and 50 keV 57 Co ions in aluminium and gold. (Auth.)

  1. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  2. Development of Validated Crack Measurement System for Vibrating Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ratwani, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    ...) solutions in AFGROW or other crack growth codes could not be used for accurate prediction of crack growth because of absence of methodology accounting for dynamic stresses and frequency effects...

  3. Measurements of seasonal frost depth by frost tube in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Yoshikawa, K.; Iwahana, G.; Stanilovskaya, J. V.; Sawada, Y.; Sone, T.

    2017-12-01

    Since 2011 winter season, frost depths have been measured as an outreach program in Hokkaido, northern part of Japan, where seasonal ground freezing occurs in winter. Frost depths were measured in elementary, junior high and high schools in order to emphasis their interest for earth sciences. At schools, using simple frost tube, measurements were conducted directly once a week by students or teacher during ground freezing under no snow-removal condition. A lecture was made in class and a frost tube was set at schoolyard, as the same tube and protocol as UAF's Permafrost Outreach Program, using clear tube with blue-colored water. In 2011 winter season, we started measurements at three schools, and the number of school extended to 32 in 2016 season, 26 elementary schools, 5 junior high schools and one high school. We visited schools in summer time or just before frost season to talk about the method of measurement, and measurements by students started just after ground freezing. After the end of frozen period, we visited schools again to explain results of each school or another schools in Japan, Alaska, Canada or Russia. The measured frost depths in Hokkaido ranged widely, from only a few centimeter to more than 50 cm. However, some schools had no frost depth due to heavy snow. We confirmed that the frost depth strongly depends on air temperature and snow depth. The lecture was made to student why the frost depth ranged widely, and the effect of snow was explained by using the example of igloo. In order to validate the effect of snow and to compare frost depths, we tried to measure frost depths under snow-removal and no snow-removal conditions at the same elementary school. At the end of December, depths had no significant difference between these conditions, and the difference went to 14 cm after one month, with about 30 cm of snow depth. After these measurements and lectures, students noticed snow has a role as insulator and affects the frost depth.

  4. Prediction and measurement of the reflection of the fundamental anti-symmetric Lamb wave from cracks and notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Kao, J-Y; Diligent, O.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of the fundamental antisymmetric Lamb wave (a o ) with cracks and with notches of different depth and width has been investigated both experimentally and by finite element analysis. Excellent agreement between the predictions and the measurements has been obtained. It has been shown that the reflection coefficient is a function of both the notch width to wavelength and notch depth to wavelength ratios. Both the relationship between the reflection coefficient and notch, depth, and the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient, are very different for the a o mode compared to the s o mode which was studied earlier. Physical insight into the reasons for the different behavior is given by examination of the stress fields and opening displacements at the crack or notch

  5. Depth Measurement Based on Infrared Coded Structured Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Depth measurement is a challenging problem in computer vision research. In this study, we first design a new grid pattern and develop a sequence coding and decoding algorithm to process the pattern. Second, we propose a linear fitting algorithm to derive the linear relationship between the object depth and pixel shift. Third, we obtain depth information on an object based on this linear relationship. Moreover, 3D reconstruction is implemented based on Delaunay triangulation algorithm. Finally, we utilize the regularity of the error curves to correct the system errors and improve the measurement accuracy. The experimental results show that the accuracy of depth measurement is related to the step length of moving object.

  6. Detection and closure measurement of short fatigue crack initiated at notch root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-Hyung; Kobayashi, Hideo

    1985-01-01

    Short fatigue cracks initiated at the notch root were successfully detected at a fairly high accuracy by the ultrasonic amplitude calibration method for the notched compact specimens of an A508-3 steel. Crack closure measurements by the ultrasonic and back-face strain compliance methods were also performed. Crack growth characteristics at the notch root are similar to those of delyed retardation caused by a single peak overload. Also, transitional behavior from short cracks to long cracks was interpreted in terms of effective stress intensity ΔKsub(eff). The relation between crack growth rate da/dN and ΔKsub(eff) for short cracks shows a fairly good agreement with those for long cracks. (author)

  7. Wind profiler mixing depth and entrainment measurements with chemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angevine, W.M.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D.D.; Buhr, M.P.; Fehsenfeld, F.C. [NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Kok, G.L. [NCAR Research Aviation Facility, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Wind profiling radars operating at 915 MHz have been present at a number of regional air quality studies. The profilers can provide a continuous, accurate record of the depth of the convective mixed layer with good time resolution. Profilers also provide information about entrainment at the boundary layer top. Mixing depth data from several days of the Rural Oxidants in the Southern Environment II (ROSE II) study in Alabama in June, 1992 are presented. For several cases, chemical measurements from aircraft and ground-based instruments are shown to correspond to mixing depth and entrainment zone behavior observed by the profiler.

  8. Estimation of the failure risk of a maxillary premolar with different crack depths with endodontic treatment by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Li; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Hsieh, Shih-Kai; Chang, Wen-Jen

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the risk of failure for an endodontically treated premolar with different crack depths, which was shearing toward the pulp chamber and was restored by using 3 different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic restoration configurations. Three 3-dimensional finite element models designed with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations were constructed to perform simulations. The Weibull function was incorporated with finite element analysis to calculate the long-term failure probability relative to different load conditions. The results indicated that the stress values on the enamel, dentin, and luting cement for endocrown restorations exhibited the lowest values relative to the other 2 restoration methods. Weibull analysis revealed that the overall failure probabilities in a shallow cracked premolar were 27%, 2%, and 1% for the onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations, respectively, in the normal occlusal condition. The corresponding values were 70%, 10%, and 2% for the depth cracked premolar. This numeric investigation suggests that the endocrown provides sufficient fracture resistance only in a shallow cracked premolar with endodontic treatment. The conventional crown treatment can immobilize the premolar for different cracked depths with lower failure risk. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of fatigue crack growth rate of reactor structural material in air based on DCPD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Donghai; Chen Kai; Yu Lun; Zhang Lefu; Shi Xiuqiang; Xu Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    The principles and details of direct current potential drop (DCPD) in monitoring the crack growth of reactor structural materials was introduced in this paper. Based on this method, the fatigue crack growth rate (CGR) of typical structural materials in nuclear power systems was measured. The effects of applied load, load ratio and loading frequency on the fatigue crack growth rate of reactor structural materials were discussed. The result shows that the fatigue crack growth rate of reactor structural materials depends on the hardness of materials, and the harder the material is, the higher the rate of crack growth is. (authors)

  10. Agreement between anatomic and ultrasound measurements of femoral trochlear depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Westrup, Ulrik; Eriksen, Thomas

    and ultrasonographic measurements of trochlear depth using the red fox hind limb as a canine surrogate, dividing the trochlea into five regions from the origin of the caudal cruciate ligament to the proximal aspect of the trochlea. We found reasonable agreement between anatomic and ultrasonographic measurements...

  11. Effects of Crack Measurement Methods on The Determination of Fracture Toughness of IG-110 Isotropic Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Dae Jong; Jang, Chang Heui

    2010-02-01

    This report represents experimental data on the differences in the fracture toughness values due to different crack length measurement methods, i.e. direct current potential drop method (DCPD), traveling microscope method (TM), and dye penetration method (DP). SENB specimens made of IG-11 fine grained isotropic graphite (specimen size: 200(L) x 20(W) x 15(B) mm 3 ) were used. Results on crack length estimation showed that the TM and the DP methods resulted in similar crack length changing behaviors, and the crack length estimated by DCPD was the shortest. Comparisons of crack growth resistance curves (K R curves) showed that the DCPD showed the lowest and a decreasing K R curve with a crack extension. Both the curves from TM and DP showed increasing K R curves with a crack extension, but the curve from DP was unstable. The K R curve estimated from TM appeared to be the most stable one

  12. Delayed hydride cracking velocity and crack growth measurement using DCPD technique in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Kishore, R.; Roychaudhury, S.; Unnikrishnan, M.; Sinha, T.K.; De, P.K.; Banerjee, S.; Kumar, Santosh

    2000-12-01

    Nuclear structural materials have to perform under most demanding and exotic environmental conditions. Due to its unique properties dilute zirconium alloys are the only choice for in-core structural materials in water cooled nuclear reactors. Hydrogen related problems have been recognized as the life-limiting factor for the core components of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR). Delayed Hydride Cracking (Dhc) is one of them. In this study, Dhc crack growth has been monitored using Direct Current Potential Drop (Dcp) technique. Calibration curve between normalized Dcp output and normalized crack length was established at different test temperatures. Dhc velocity was measured along the axial direction of the Zirconium-2.5Niobium pressure tube material at 203 and 250 degree C. (author)

  13. Soil gas measurements at high permeabilities and below foundation depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, H.U; Surbeck, H.

    2000-01-01

    We started a project of soil gas measurements beneath houses. Since the foundations of houses often lie deeper than 0.5 to 1 m - the depth where soil gas measurements are often made - the first approach was to apply the method developed previously to deeper soil layers. The radon availability index (RAI), which was defined empirically, proved to be a reliable indicator for radon problems in nearby houses. The extreme values of permeability, non-Darcy flow and scale dependence of permeability stimulated the development of a multi-probe method. A hydrological model was applied to model the soil gas transport. The soil gas measurements below foundation depth provided a wealth of new information. A good classification of soil properties could be achieved. If soil gas measurements are to be made, the low permeability layer has to be traversed. A minimum depth of 1 .5 m is suggested, profiles to below the foundation depth are preferable. There are also implications for mitigation works. A sub-slab suction system should reach the permeable layer to function well. This also holds for radon wells. If a house is located on a slope, it is most convenient to install the sub-slab suction system on the hillside, as the foundation reaches the deepest levels there

  14. Measurements of fatigue crack length at elevated temperature by D. C. electrical potential method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Masakatsu; Yamauchi, Isamu; Kodaira, Tsuneo

    1982-07-01

    The direct current (d.c.) electrical potential method was used to automatically and continuously measure the crack length in cyclic crack growth test at elevated temperature. This report describes some results concerning the calibration curves, i.e. the relation between electrical potential change and amount of crack extention, using SUS 304 and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steels. It can be concluded that the measurements of fatigue crack length is possible even at elevated temperature as well as at room temperature with the equivalent accuracy. (author)

  15. Measuring impact crater depth throughout the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; Watters, Wesley A.; Chappelow, John E.; Bray, Veronica J.; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Craddock, Robert A.; Beyer, Ross A.; Landis, Margaret E.; Ostrach, Lillian; Tornabene, Livio L.; Riggs, Jamie D.; Weaver, Brian P.

    2018-01-01

    One important, almost ubiquitous, tool for understanding the surfaces of solid bodies throughout the solar system is the study of impact craters. While measuring a distribution of crater diameters and locations is an important tool for a wide variety of studies, so too is measuring a crater's “depth.” Depth can inform numerous studies including the strength of a surface and modification rates in the local environment. There is, however, no standard data set, definition, or technique to perform this data‐gathering task, and the abundance of different definitions of “depth” and methods for estimating that quantity can lead to misunderstandings in and of the literature. In this review, we describe a wide variety of data sets and methods to analyze those data sets that have been, are currently, or could be used to derive different types of crater depth measurements. We also recommend certain nomenclature in doing so to help standardize practice in the field. We present a review section of all crater depths that have been published on different solar system bodies which shows how the field has evolved through time and how some common assumptions might not be wholly accurate. We conclude with several recommendations for researchers which could help different data sets to be more easily understood and compared.

  16. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hongxuan; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  17. Polarimetric borehole radar measurement near Nojima fault and its application to subsurface crack characterization; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru Nojima danso shuhen no chika kiretsu keisoku jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Miwa, T.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ikeda, R. [National Research Institute for Disaster Prevention, Tsukuba (Japan); Makino, K. [Geophysical Surveying and Consulting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Practical application of subsurface crack characterization by the borehole radar measurement to which the radar polarimetric method was introduced was attempted to measuring objects for which the borehole radar has not been much used, for example, the inside of low loss rock mass or fracture zone where cracks tightly exist. A system was trially manufactured which makes the radar polarimetric measurement possible in the borehole at a 1000m depth and with a about 10cm diameter, and a field experiment was conducted for realizing the subsurface crack characterization near the Nojima fault. For the measuring experiment by the polarimetric borehole radar, used were Iwaya borehole and Hirabayashi borehole drilled in the north of Awaji-shima, Hyogo-ken. In a comparison of both polarization systems of Hirabayashi borehole, reflected waves at depths of 1038m and 1047m are relatively stronger in both polarization systems than those with the same polarization form and at different depths, whereas reflected waves around a 1017m depth are strong only as to the parallel polarization system. Characteristics of the polarization in this experiment indirectly reflect crack structures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...... into response. A good agreement was observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although a slight underestimation of the calculated values in the Bragg peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use...... of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields....

  19. Handheld White Light Interferometer for Measuring Defect Depth in Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Simmons, Stephen; Cox, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of defects (scratches and impacts) is vital to the certification of flight hardware and other critical components. The amount of damage to a particular component contributes to the performance, reliability, and safety of a system, which ultimately affects the success or failure of a mission or test. The launch-commit criteria on a Space Shuttle Orbiter window are governed by the depth of the defects that are identified by a visual inspection. This measurement of a defect is not easy to obtain given the environment, size of the defect, and location of the window(s). The determination of depth has typically been performed by taking a mold impression and measuring the impression with an optical profiling instrument. Another method of obtaining an estimate of the depth is by using a refocus microscope. To use a refocus microscope, the surface of the glass and bottom of the defect are, in turn, brought into focus by the operator. The amount of movement between the two points corresponds to the depth of the defect. The refocus microscope requires a skilled operator and has been proven to be unreliable when used on Orbiter windows. White light interferometry was chosen as a candidate to replace the refocus microscope. The White Light Interferometer (WLI) was developed to replace the refocus microscope as the instrument used for measuring the depth of defects in Orbiter windows. The WLI consists of a broadband illumination source, interferometer, detector, motion control, displacement sensor, mechanical housing, and support electronics. The illumination source for the WLI is typically a visible light emitting diode (LED) or a near-infrared superluminescent diode (SLD) with power levels of less than a milliwatt. The interferometer is a Michelson configuration consisting of a 1-in. (2.5-cm) cube beam splitter, a 0.5-in. (1.3-cm) optical window as a movable leg (used to closely match the return intensity of the fixed leg from the window), and a

  20. Measures of struggle against appearance of cracks in earth dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraeva Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a method calculation of the basic parameters of the transverse rows of pile of simple printed or precast dam. As well, in this article have been shown all the necessary formulas for this calculation and have been proposed solutions to prevent cracking in the dams.

  1. Measurement of crack in rock using transmitted elastic wave; Toka danseiha ni yoru ganbannai kiretsu keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomishima, Y [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    With an objective to measure at high accuracy the positions and sizes of cracks existing in rocks, a theoretical study has been carried out on a method which utilizes initial movement characteristics of P-wave. The P-wave which diffracts and propagates at a crack tip has a characteristic that its phase may reverse according to the positional relationship between vibration transmitting and receiving points. This positional relationship is decided by the Poisson ratio of media alone. Therefore, when the P-wave is measured while the vibration transmitting and receiving points are moved sandwiching a crack, the polarity of received waveform is changed from negative to positive at a certain position as a boundary. In order to measure this change at high accuracy, an elastic wave of high frequency is required, but it is not easy to obtain the wave in situ. In contrast, utilizing the initial movement polarity can not only identify the change in the polarity, but also perform measurement at high accuracy. The present study discussed a case where cracks are parallel with a free surface and a case where the cracks have angles with the free surface, whereas it was shown that positions of the upper and lower tips of a crack, and length of the crack can be measured accurately. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Research progress on expansive soil cracks under changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Zheng, Cheng-feng; Wu, Jin-kun

    2014-01-01

    Engineering problems shunned previously rise to the surface gradually with the activities of reforming the natural world in depth, the problem of expansive soil crack under the changing environment becoming a control factor of expansive soil slope stability. The problem of expansive soil crack has gradually become a research hotspot, elaborates the occurrence and development of cracks from the basic properties of expansive soil, and points out the role of controlling the crack of expansive soil strength. We summarize the existing research methods and results of expansive soil crack characteristics. Improving crack measurement and calculation method and researching the crack depth measurement, statistical analysis method, crack depth and surface feature relationship will be the future direction.

  3. Measures against concrete cracking in underground type light oil tank pit construction work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Takeo; Kadowaki, Kazuhiko; Date, Masanao

    2017-01-01

    The underground type light oil tank pit set at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station is a tripartite underground pit structure made of reinforced concrete. This is a mass concrete made of deck slab / outer wall of 1.5 m in thickness and inner wall / top slab of 1.0 m in thickness. Since concrete placement season was July for the deck slab and October for the walls, the occurrence of thermal cracking was highly conceivable. As a result of investigating crack suppression measures based on the crack width of 0.2 mm or less as a guide, the application of fly ash cement and the addition of expansion material to the walls were judged effective and adopted. Thanks to these preliminary studies and careful construction control, it was possible to minimize the occurrence of cracks, but several through cracks of 0.2 mm or less were confirmed on part of the outer walls. As a countermeasure, repair by means of surface impregnation method was adopted, and quality and schedule could be secured. This paper outlines crack suppression measures and repair of the cracks that occurred after the implementation. (A.O.)

  4. A passive quantitative measurement of airway resistance using depth data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Bulach, Christoph; Ku, David N; Anderson, Larry J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. RSV often causes increased airway resistance, clinically detected as wheezing by chest auscultation. In this disease, expiratory flows are significantly reduced due to the high resistance in patient's airway passages. A quantitative method for measuring resistance can have a great benefit to diagnosis and management of children with RSV infections as well as with other lung diseases. Airway resistance is defined as the lung pressure divided by the airflow. In this paper, we propose a method to quantify resistance through a simple, non-contact measurement of chest volume that can act as a surrogate measure of the lung pressure and volumetric airflow. We used depth data collected by a Microsoft Kinect camera for the measurement of the lung volume over time. In our experimentation, breathing through a number of plastic straws induced different airway resistances. For a standard spirometry test, our volume/flow estimation using Kinect showed strong correlation with the flow data collected by a commercially-available spirometer (five subjects, each performing 20 breathing trials, correlation coefficient = 0.88, with 95% confidence interval). As the number of straws decreased, emulating a higher airway obstruction, our algorithm was sufficient to distinguish between several levels of airway resistance.

  5. Tool Measures Depths of Defects on a Case Tang Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, M. Bryan; Montgomery, Ronald B.; Mecham, Brent A.; Keirstead, Bums W.

    2005-01-01

    A special-purpose tool has been developed for measuring the depths of defects on an O-ring seal surface. The surface lies in a specially shaped ringlike fitting, called a capture feature tang, located on an end of a cylindrical segment of a case that contains a solid-fuel booster rocket motor for launching a space shuttle. The capture feature tang is a part of a tang-and-clevis, O-ring joint between the case segment and a similar, adjacent cylindrical case segment. When the segments are joined, the tang makes an interference fit with the clevis and squeezes the O-ring at the side of the gap.

  6. On the measurement of the crack tip stress field as a means of determining Delta K(sub eff) under conditions of fatigue crack closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Ian R.; Edwards, Lyndon; Poole, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The optical method of caustics has been successfully extended to enable stress intensity factors as low as 1MPa square root of m to be determined accurately for central fatigue cracks in 2024-T3 aluminium alloy test panels. The feasibility of using this technique to study crack closure, and to determine the effective stress intensity factor range, Delta K(sub eff), has been investigated. Comparisons have been made between the measured values of stress intensity factor, K(sub caus), and corresponding theoretical values, K(sub theo), for a range of fatigue cracks grown under different loading conditions. The values of K(sub caus) and K(sub theo) were in good agreement at maximum stress, where the cracks are fully open, while K(sub caus) exceeded K(sub theo) at minimum stress, due to crack closure. However, the levels of crack closure and values of Delta K(sub eff) obtained could not account for the variations of crack growth rate with loading conditions. It is concluded that the values of Delta K(sub eff), based on caustic measurements in a 1/square root of r stress field well outside the plastic zone, do not fully reflect local conditions which control crack tip behavior.

  7. Comparative evaluation of preventive measures against primary side stress corrosion cracking of mill annealed Inconel 600 steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, G.; Hernalsteen, P.

    1986-01-01

    Significant amounts of primary side cracking have been reported in the mechanically expanded area of the tubes of PWR steam generators in Europe, in Japan and to a lesser extent in the USA. The Belgian utilities are faced with the same problem. At Doel 2, where the tubes are rolled for only a part of the tubesheet, primary side cracking appeared in the roll transition. The Doel 3 and Tihange 2 steam generators, whose tubes are expanded for the full depth of the tube sheet, have experienced cracking after about 10 000 h of operation not only in the roll transition but also at roll overlaps. While some leaks and eddy current indications are associated with tubesheet or rolling anomalies, many of them are found on normal tubes. A programme was launched by the Belgian utilities and was further co-sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to develop preventive actions applicable not only to hot steam generators but also to cold steam generators already installed on site. These preventive measures include stress relaxation and metallurgical improvement of the material by an in situ heat treatment of the whole tube sheet (a steam generator model was used to evaluate the feasibility of this treatment), and the introduction of residual compressive stresses on ID by rotopeening or shotpeening without inducing unacceptable tensile stresses on OD. A comparative evaluation of these measures was established on the basis of tests performed on representative mock-ups and specimens. (author)

  8. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    Five of the world's best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory's own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  9. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, Peter L. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Five of the world`s best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory`s own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  10. On the detectability of transverse cracks in laminated composites using electrical potential change measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2015-03-01

    Real-time health monitoring of structures made of laminated composites is necessary as significant damage may occur without any visible signs on the surface. Inspection by electrical tomography (ET) seems a viable approach that relies on voltage measurements from a network of electrodes across the inspected domain to infer conductivity change within the bulk material. If conductivity decreases significantly with increasing damage, the obtained conductivity map can be correlated to the degradation state of the material. We focus here on detection of transverse cracks. As transverse cracks modify the in-plane transverse conductivity of a single ply, we expect them to be detectable by electrical measurements. Yet, the quality of detection is directly related to the sensitivity of the measurements to the presence of cracks. We use numerical experiments to demonstrate that the sensitivity depends on several material and geometrical parameters. Based on the results, the applicability of ET to detect transverse cracks is discussed. One conclusion from the study is that detecting transverse cracks using ET is more reliable in some laminate configurations than in others. Recommendations about the properties of either the pristine material or the inspected structures are provided to establish if ET is reliable in detecting transverse cracks.

  11. Measurement system for depth dose distribution in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hirotsugu; Tsutaka, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Ikuo

    1999-01-01

    An accurate estimation of an absorbed dose distribution in human tissue is indispensable to efficiently perform radiotherapy in humans. Previously, various methods for such estimation have been developed, however, there is some problem in those methods, it takes too long times (3-4 hours) to determine the absorbed dose distribution through scanning by ionization chamber in water phantom. So, a determination system of depth dose was developed with an aim to determine the absorbed dose of X-ray or electron beam in materials similar to human body. This system was composed of a detector including scintillation fibers which allows emission due to radio-interaction, CCD camera for determination of light distribution of the emission and personal computer for data processing. Though the accuracy of this system was ±2% similar to that of the conventional measuring method, measuring time was reduced to almost 5 min, markedly shorter than that of the conventional water phantom (3-4 hours). The efficacy of works including the adjustment of irradiation system, planning, etc. would be improved by application of this system. (M.N.)

  12. Measuring penetration depth of electron beam welds. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.W.; Collins, M.C.; Mentesana, C.P.; Watterson, C.E.

    1975-07-01

    The feasibility of evaluating electron beam welds using state-of-the-art techniques in the fields of holographic interferometry, micro-resistance measurements, and heat transfer was studied. The holographic study was aimed at evaluating weld defects by monitoring variations in weld strength under mechanical stress. The study, along with successful work at another facility, proved the feasibility of this approach for evaluating welds, but it did not assign any limitations to the technique. The micro-resistance study was aimed at evaluating weld defects by measuring the electrical resistance across the weld junction as a function of distance along the circumference. Experimentation showed this method, although sensitive, is limited by the same factors affecting other conventional nondestructive tests. Nevertheless, it was successful at distinguishing between various depths of penetration. It was also shown to be a sensitive thickness gage for thin-walled parts. The infrared study was aimed at evaluating weld defects by monitoring heat transfer through the weld under transient thermal conditions. Experimentation showed that this theoretically sound technique is not workable with the infrared equipment currently available at Bendix Kansas City. (U.S.)

  13. Simulation of surface cracks measurement in first walls by laser spot array thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Cuixiang; Qiu, Jinxin; Liu, Haocheng; Chen, Zhenmao, E-mail: chenzm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    The inspection of surface cracks in first walls (FW) is very important to ensure the safe operation of the fusion reactors. In this paper, a new laser excited thermography technique with using laser spot array source is proposed for the surface cracks imaging and evaluation in the FW with an intuitive and non-contact measurement method. Instead of imaging a crack by scanning a single laser spot and superimposing the local discontinuity images with the present laser excited thermography methods, it can inspect a relatively large area at one measurement. It does not only simplify the measurement system and data processing procedure, but also provide a faster measurement for FW. In order to investigate the feasibility of this method, a numerical code based on finite element method (FEM) is developed to simulate the heat flow and the effect of the crack geometry on the thermal wave fields. An imaging method based on the gradient of the thermal images is proposed for crack measurement with the laser spot array thermography method.

  14. Extended depth measurement for a Stokes sample imaging polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Alexander W.; Taberner, Andrew J.; Nash, Martyn P.; Nielsen, Poul M. F.

    2018-02-01

    A non-destructive imaging technique is required for quantifying the anisotropic and heterogeneous structural arrangement of collagen in soft tissue membranes, such as bovine pericardium, which are used in the construction of bioprosthetic heart valves. Previously, our group developed a Stokes imaging polarimeter that measures the linear birefringence of samples in a transmission arrangement. With this device, linear retardance and optic axis orientation; can be estimated over a sample using simple vector algebra on Stokes vectors in the Poincaré sphere. However, this method is limited to a single path retardation of a half-wave, limiting the thickness of samples that can be imaged. The polarimeter has been extended to allow illumination of narrow bandwidth light of controllable wavelength through achromatic lenses and polarization optics. We can now take advantage of the wavelength dependence of relative retardation to remove ambiguities that arise when samples have a single path retardation of a half-wave to full-wave. This effectively doubles the imaging depth of this method. The method has been validated using films of cellulose of varied thickness, and applied to samples of bovine pericardium.

  15. Critical experiments, measurements, and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.

    1977-01-01

    Substantial progress was made in three important areas: crack propagation and arrest theory, two-dimensional dynamic crack propagation analyses, and a laboratory test method for the material property data base. The major findings were as follows: Measurements of run-arrest events lent support to the dynamic, energy conservation theory of crack arrest. A two-dimensional, dynamic, finite-difference analysis, including inertia forces and thermal gradients, was developed. The analysis was successfully applied to run-arrest events in DCB (double-cantilever-beam) and SEN (single-edge notched) test pieces. A simplified procedure for measuring K/sub D/ and K/sub Im/ values with ordinary and duplex DCB specimens was demonstrated. The procedure employs a dynamic analysis of the crack length at arrest and requires no special instrumentation. The new method was applied to ''duplex'' specimens to measure the large K/sub D/ values displayed by A533B steel above the nil-ductility temperature. K/sub D/ crack velocity curves and K/sub Im/ values of two heats of A533B steel and the corresponding values for the plane strain fracture toughness associated with static initiation (K/sub Ic/), dynamic initiation (K/sub Id/), and the static stress intensity at crack arrest (K/sub Ia/) were measured. Possible relations among these toughness indices are identified. During the past year the principal investigators of the participating groups reached agreement on a crack arrest theory appropriate for the pressure vessel problem. 7 figures

  16. Study of deflection and crack interrelation that use deck slab's automatic measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Woo; Park, Yung Suk; Joo, Kwon Yong

    2004-01-01

    Reinforce concrete slab executes finish work if 6 - 8 hours pass since concrete placing. Specially, because minimize process composition slab occasion early space-time that use structure deck plate, concrete strength revelation is very important. The reason is that when strength revelation is not made, fine shock and deflection can provoke concrete crack. Executed radio automatic measure to prevent these crack initiation cause in the advance. Apply radio automatic measure is il-san culture center building and pasta measure period 03/09/06 - 03/10/08.

  17. A New Method to Measure Crack Extension in Nuclear Graphite Based on Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigang Lai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite components, used as moderators, reflectors, and core-support structures in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, play an important role in the safety of the reactor. Specifically, they provide channels for the fuel elements, control rods, and coolant flow. Fracture is the main failure mode for graphite, and breaching of the above channels by crack extension will seriously threaten the safety of a reactor. In this paper, a new method based on digital image correlation (DIC is introduced for measuring crack extension in brittle materials. Cross-correlation of the displacements measured by DIC with a step function was employed to identify the advancing crack tip in a graphite beam specimen under three-point bending. The load-crack extension curve, which is required for analyzing the R-curve and tension softening behaviors, was obtained for this material. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis of the threshold value employed for the cross-correlation parameter in the crack identification process was conducted. Finally, the results were verified using the finite element method.

  18. Measurement of fatigue crack growth using low-profile eddy-current sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchburn, R.J.; Ibrahim, M.E.; Burke, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Conformable spiral coils show promise as permanently mounted eddy-current sensors for the detection and monitoring of surface-breaking cracks in electrically conductive structures. Flexibility and a low profile (typically less than 0.5 mm) are key advantages that allow the sensors to be unobtrusively mounted on curved surfaces and beneath surface coatings. Furthermore, these sensors can be permanently mounted in areas that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to reach without significant disassembly. The sensors can be activated and interrogated using the same well-established electromagnetic measurement principles in eddy-current nondestructive inspection. A material test machine was used to grow through-thickness fatigue crack in a compact-tension specimen made from the aerospace-grade aluminium alloy AA2014. The growth of the crack was examined by measuring the small impedance changes of planar spiral-coil sensors attached to the specimen. The results indicate that permanently attached conformable spiral coils can be used to detect a deep crack once it has grown beneath the sensor, and then to monitor subsequent crack growth.

  19. Laser measure of sea salinity, temperature and turbidity in depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, J. G.; Wouters, A. W.; Byrne, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described in which a pulsed laser is used to probe the sea. Backscattered light is analyzed in time, intensity and wavelength. Tyndall, Raman and Brillouin scattering are used to obtain the backscatter turbidity, sound velocity, salinity, and the temperature as a function of depth.

  20. Analytical modeling of the effect of crack depth, specimen size, and biaxial stress on the fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Yuh-Jin

    1995-01-01

    Fracture, toughness values for A533-B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel obtained from test programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and University of Kansas (KU) are interpreted using the J-A 2 analytical model. The analytical model is based on the critical stress concept and takes into consideration the constraint effect using the second parameter A 2 in addition to the generally accepted first parameter J which represents the loading level. It is demonstrated that with the constraint level included in the model effects of crack depth (shallow vs deep), specimen size (small vs. large), and loading type (uniaxial vs biaxial) on the fracture toughness from the test programs can be interpreted and predicted

  1. A new methodology for non-contact accurate crack width measurement through photogrammetry for automated structural safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahanshahi, Mohammad R; Masri, Sami F

    2013-01-01

    In mechanical, aerospace and civil structures, cracks are important defects that can cause catastrophes if neglected. Visual inspection is currently the predominant method for crack assessment. This approach is tedious, labor-intensive, subjective and highly qualitative. An inexpensive alternative to current monitoring methods is to use a robotic system that could perform autonomous crack detection and quantification. To reach this goal, several image-based crack detection approaches have been developed; however, the crack thickness quantification, which is an essential element for a reliable structural condition assessment, has not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper, a new contact-less crack quantification methodology, based on computer vision and image processing concepts, is introduced and evaluated against a crack quantification approach which was previously developed by the authors. The proposed approach in this study utilizes depth perception to quantify crack thickness and, as opposed to most previous studies, needs no scale attachment to the region under inspection, which makes this approach ideal for incorporation with autonomous or semi-autonomous mobile inspection systems. Validation tests are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, and the results show that the new proposed approach outperforms the previously developed one. (paper)

  2. Measurement with total scatter calibrate factor at different depths in the calculation of prescription dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lijun; Zhu Haijun; Zhang Xinzhong; Li Feizhou; Song Hongyu

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the method of measurement of total scatter calibrate factor (Sc, p). Methods: To measure the Sc, p at different depths on central axis of 6MV, 15MV photon beams through different ways. Results: It was found that the measured data of Sc, p changed with the different depths to a range of 1% - 7%. Using the direct method, the Sc, p measured depth should be the same as the depth in dose normalization point of the prescription dose. If the Sc, p (fsz, d) was measured at the other depths, it could be obtained indirectly by the calculation formula. Conclusions: The Sc, p in the prescription dose can be obtained either by the direct measure method or the indirect calculation formula. But emphasis should be laid on the proper measure depth. (authors)

  3. Work of adhesion measurements by a periodic cracking technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davutoglu, A.; Aksay, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a recent study, Chow et al. introduced a technique for determining the energy associated with interfacial separation of a two-layer composite which consisted of a polymeric substrate and a brittle film overcoat. The technique is based on a model which assumes a perfectly elastic composite. In the present study, it s shown that as long as only the film component of the composite is brittle, the technique is also applicable to the composites where the substrates may display plastic deformation prior to adhesive failure of the film. Strain measurements, instead of load, eliminate the difficulties introduced by the plastic behavior of the substrate. Experimental work was performed on systems containing brittle amorphous selenium films on aluminum and Mylar substrates. These systems with selenium films were of interest due to their usage in photoreceptor technology

  4. Critical experiments, measurements and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels. First annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.; Gehlen, P.C.; Hoagland, R.G.; Kanninen, M.F.; Popelar, C.; Rosenfield, A.R.; deCampos, V.S.

    1975-08-01

    The one-dimensional, Timoshenko beam-on-a-generalized elastic foundation treatment has been extended to contoured-DCB specimens and to the conditions attending tensile loading in an ordinary testing machine. Preliminary calculations show that the crack propagation and arrest events in contoured DCB specimens are very similar to those calculated for regular DCB-specimens for comparable initiation conditions. In both cases the calculated K/sub Ia/-values are between 44 and 100 percent of K/sub ID,min/ and show a systematic variation with the initiation K/sub Q/-level. In contrast with stiff wedge loading, which favors a continuous event, the calculations for rectangular and contoured DCB specimens in series with an idealized testing machine load train display one or more halts and restarts before the final arrest. A series of experiments designed to distinguish between the K/sub D/ and K/sub a/ approaches to predicting crack arrest are described. Studies of the effect of side grooves in rectangular DCB specimens confirm that grooves with depths representing up to 60 percent of the cross section have no significant effect on either K/sub ID/ or K/sub Ia/ measurements. (auth)

  5. Option-4 algorithm for Florida pocket depth probe: reduction in the variance of site-specific probeable crevice depth measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, H J; Rogers, P; Johnson, N W; Slaney, R

    1999-08-01

    Clinical periodontal measurement is plagued by many sources of error which result in aberrant values (outliers). This study sets out to compare probeable crevice depth measurements (PCD) selected by the option-4 algorithm against those recorded with a conventional double-pass method and to quantify any reduction in site-specific PCD variances. A single clinician recorded full-mouth PCD at 1 visit in 32 subjects (mean age 45.5 years) with moderately advanced chronic adult periodontitis. PCD was recorded over 2 passes at 6 sites per tooth with the Florida Pocket Depth Probes, a 3rd generation probe. The option-4 algorithm compared the 1st pass site-specific PCD value (PCD1) to the 2nd pass site-specific PCD value (PCD2) and, if the difference between these values was >1.00 mm, allowed the recording of a maximum of 2 further measurements (3rd and 4th pass measurements PCD3 and PCD4): 4 site-specific measure-meets were considered to be the maximum subject and tissue tolerance. The algorithm selected the 1st 2 measurements whose difference was difference Y) (Y=[(A-B)/A]X 100) and a 75% reduction in the median site-specific variance of PCD1/PCD2.

  6. Possibilities of crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) measurement under boiling and pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehling, W.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics investigations carried out so far in laboratory conditions cover only part of the material stresses, as effects which occur in nuclear powerstations, in particular, such as corrosion and radioactive radiation are largely left out of account. Therefore experiments including these effects were recently carried out in autoclaves, test rigs simulating reactors (HRD experimental plant) and in experimental reactors. An important parameter of experimental fracture mechanics is the measurement of crack opening displacement (COD). The crack opening is measured with socalled clip gauges (transmitters based on strain gauges, which convert mechanical deformation of springs into electrical signals) on standard samples in the laboratory. It was therefore sensible to use these high temperature strain gauges (HTD) for the development of a measuring system for travel for pressurized water and boiling water reactor conditions. (orig.) [de

  7. Actual light deflections in regions of crack tips and their influence on measurements in photomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Friedrich W.; Pindera, Jerzy T.; Wen, Baicheng

    Crack-tip photomechanics procedures are based on certain simplifying assumptions that are seldom discussed. In a recent paper the theoretical bases of the shadow optical methods of caustics have been analysed and tested using the results obtained by three analytical-experimental procedures, namely classical strain gage techniques, isodynes, and strain-gradient index method. It has been concluded that the straing-radient index method appears to be a suitable tool for analysis of stress states near crack tips and notches and, in particular, for testing the predictive power of the pertinent singular solutions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics and the ranges of their applicability. In the present paper, a more detailed analysis of all results obtained in light deflection experiments allows to quantify the contribution of both involved effects and to determine the distortion of the faces of the investigated plates along their crack planes. The ability of the strain-gradient light bending method to analyse some features of the three-dimensional stress-state is reported. Finally, the presented experimental evidence allows to draw conclusions related to limits of applicability of certain photomechanical measurements near crack tips. An extensive summary of this paper is published in the Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Photomechanics and Speckle Metrology, Vol. 1554A, part of SPIE's 1991 International Symposium on Optical Applied Science and Engineering, 22-26 July 1991, San Diego, CA, USA. 1

  8. Residual stress measurement of large scaled welded pipe using neutron diffraction method. Effect of SCC crack propagation and repair weld on residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Tobita, Tohru; Morii, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The RESA-1 neutron engineering diffractometer in the JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which is used for stress measurements, was upgraded to realize residual stress measurements of large scaled mechanical components. A series of residual stress measurements was made to obtain through-thickness residual stress distributions in a Type 304 stainless steel butt-welded pipe of 500A-sch.80 using the upgraded RESA-1 diffractometer. We evaluated effects of crack propagation such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and a part-circumference repair weld on the residual stress distributions induced by girth welding. Measured residual stress distributions near original girth weld revealed good agreement with typical results shown in some previous works using finite element method, deep hole drilling as well as neutron diffraction. After introducing a mock crack with 10 mm depth in the heat affected zone on the inside wall of the pipe by electro discharge machining, the axial residual stresses were found to be released in the part of the mock crack. However, changes in the through-wall bending stress component and the self-equilibrated stress component were negligible and hence the axial residual stress distribution in the ligament was remained in the original residual stresses near girth weld without the mock crack. Furthermore, changes in hoop and radial residual stress were also small. The residual stress distributions after a part repair welding on the outer circumference of the girth weld were significantly different from residual stress distributions near the original girth weld. The through-thickness average axial residual stress was increased due to increase of the tensile membrane stress and mitigation of the bending stress after repair welding. Throughout above studies, we evidenced that the neutron diffraction technique is useful and powerful tool for measuring residual stress distributions in large as well as thick mechanical

  9. Determining clinical photon beam spectra from measured depth dose with the Cimmino algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, P.; Altschuler, M.D.; Bjaerngard, B.E.; Kassaee, A.; McDonough, J.

    2000-01-01

    A method to determine the spectrum of a clinical photon beam from measured depth-dose data is described. At shallow depths, where the range of Compton-generated electrons increases rapidly with photon energy, the depth dose provides the information to discriminate the spectral contributions. To minimize the influence of contaminating electrons, small (6x6cm2 ) fields were used. The measured depth dose is represented as a linear combination of basis functions, namely the depth doses of monoenergetic photon beams derived by Monte Carlo simulations. The weights of the basis functions were obtained with the Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which examines in each iteration the discrepancy between predicted and measured depth dose. For 6 and 15 MV photon beams of a clinical accelerator, the depth dose obtained from the derived spectral weights was within about 1% of the measured depth dose at all depths. Because the problem is ill conditioned, solutions for the spectrum can fluctuate with energy. Physically realistic smooth spectra for these photon beams appeared when a small margin (about ±1%) was attributed to the measured depth dose. The maximum energy of both derived spectra agreed with the measured energy of the electrons striking the target to within 1 MeV. The use of a feasibility method on minimally relaxed constraints provides realistic spectra quickly and interactively. (author)

  10. Defect Depth Measurement of Straight Pipe Specimen Using Shearography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ho Seob; Kim, Kyung Suk

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, wall thinning defect of straight pipe occur the enormous loss in life evaluation and safety evaluation. To use non-destructive technique, we measure deformation, vibration, defect evaluation. But, this techniques are a weak that is the measurement of the wide area is difficult and the time is caught long. In the secondary side of nuclear power plants mostly used steel pipe, artificiality wall thinning defect make in the side and different thickness make to the each other, wall thinning defect part of deformation measure by using shearography. In addition, optical measurement through deformation, vibration, defect evaluation evaluate pipe and thickness defects of pressure vessel is to evaluate quantitatively. By shearography interferometry to measure the pipe's internal wall thinning defect and the variation of pressure use the proposed technique, the quantitative defect is to evaluate the thickness of the surplus. The amount of deformation use thickness of surplus prediction of the actual thickness defect and approximately 7 percent error by ensure reliability. According to pressure the amount of deformation and the thickness of the surplus through DB construction, nuclear power plant pipe use wall thinning part soundness evaluation. In this study, pressure vessel of thickness defect measure proposed nuclear pipe of wall thinning defect prediction and integrity assessment technology development. As a basic research defected theory and experiment, pressure vessel of advanced stability and soundness and maintainability is expected to contribute foundation establishment

  11. The development of crack measurement system using the direct current potential drop method for use in the hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do-Sik; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Lee, Key-Soon; Kim, Yong-Suk; Kwon, Sang-Chul

    1999-01-01

    The crack length measurement system using the direct current potential drop (DCPD) method was developed for the detection of crack growth initiation and subsequent crack growth. The experimental precautions and data processing procedure required for its application were also described find discussed. The system presented herein was specially built for use in fracture toughness testing of unirradiated or irradiated pressure tube materials from nuclear reactor. The application of this system for fracture toughness determination was illustrated from the test of curved compact tension specimens removed from CANDU reactor pressure tubes. The crack extension was monitored using the DCPD method. It is found that the changes of the potential drop and the changes of the crack length have a linear relationship. The final crack front was marked by heat-tinting after the test and the specimen broken open for determination of the initial and final physical crack length. The physical crack lengths, obtained by the 9-point average method described in ASTM E1737-96 on heat-tinted fracture surface, were used to calibrate the DCPD method for each test on an individual basis by matching the change in voltage to the crack extension. It is found that this system can be recommended for determination of the J-integral resistance (J-R) curve of unirradiated or irradiation materials in the hot cell, especially when testing at elevated temperature and in the environment chamber or furnace. (author)

  12. Prototype development or multi-cavity ion chamber for depth dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, M.K.; Sahu, T.K.; Haridas, G.; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Tripathi, R.M.; Nandedkar, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    In high energy electron accelerators, when the electrons interact with vacuum chamber or surrounding structural material, Bremsstrahlung x-rays are produced. It is having a broad spectrum extending up to the electron energies. Dose measured as a function of depth due to electromagnetic cascade will give rise to depth dose curve. To measure the online depth dose profile in an absorber medium, when high energy electron or Bremsstrahlung is incident, a prototype Multi-Cavity Ion Chamber (MCIC) detector is developed. The paper describes the design and development of the MCIC for measurement of depth dose profile

  13. Measurements of Epidural Space Depth Using Preexisting CT Scans Correlate with Loss of Resistance Depth during Thoracic Epidural Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel H. Greene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thoracic epidural catheters provide the best quality postoperative pain relief for major abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures, but placement is one of the most challenging procedures in the repertoire of an anesthesiologist. Most patients presenting for a procedure that would benefit from a thoracic epidural catheter have already had high resolution imaging that may be useful to assist placement of a catheter. Methods. This retrospective study used data from 168 patients to examine the association and predictive power of epidural-skin distance (ESD on computed tomography (CT to determine loss of resistance depth acquired during epidural placement. Additionally, the ability of anesthesiologists to measure this distance was compared to a radiologist, who specializes in spine imaging. Results. There was a strong association between CT measurement and loss of resistance depth (P35 changed this relationship (P=0.007. The ability of anesthesiologists to make CT measurements was similar to a gold standard radiologist (all individual ICCs>0.9. Conclusions. Overall, this study supports the examination of a recent CT scan to aid in the placement of a thoracic epidural catheter. Making use of these scans may lead to faster epidural placements, fewer accidental dural punctures, and better epidural blockade.

  14. Measurement and accompanying numerical simulation of fast crack propagation in modified DCB specimens made of Araldit B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckl, H.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical simulations of fracture-mechanical experiments with the aim of determining the stress intensity factor and its relation to the fracture velocity from the measured data of the crack length are problematic with the conventional DCB specimen loaded through wedge and bolt namely because of the not clearly definable limiting conditions. Experiments were therefore carried out with modified DCB specimens made of ARALDIT B, with the loading wedge pressed directly into the crack mouth. In the case of suitable specimen dimensions, K I already in the initial phase of crack propagation before arrival of the first reflected waves covers a great part of the relevant range. Numerical simulations agree well with the shadow-optical measurements in this phase. A specimen variant with T-shaped extension at the counterbearing is suitable especially for crack arrest investigations, since high fracture velocities and brief crack jump lengths can be combined in tests with this specimen. The constant member in the series development of the stress distribution at the crack tip according to Williams determines the directional stability of the crack. The theories established by Cotterell, Schindler, Streit and Finnie are discussed by means of the kinking cracks observed during some experiments. (orig.) [de

  15. The deconvolution of sputter-etching surface concentration measurements to determine impurity depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Katardjiev, I.V.; Nobes, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The quasi-linear partial differential continuity equations that describe the evolution of the depth profiles and surface concentrations of marker atoms in kinematically equivalent systems undergoing sputtering, ion collection and atomic mixing are solved using the method of characteristics. It is shown how atomic mixing probabilities can be deduced from measurements of ion collection depth profiles with increasing ion fluence, and how this information can be used to predict surface concentration evolution. Even with this information, however, it is shown that it is not possible to deconvolute directly the surface concentration measurements to provide initial depth profiles, except when only ion collection and sputtering from the surface layer alone occur. It is demonstrated further that optimal recovery of initial concentration depth profiles could be ensured if the concentration-measuring analytical probe preferentially sampled depths near and at the maximum depth of bombardment-induced perturbations. (author)

  16. Thermometric measurements in notches and crack tips in steels under cyclic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, K.

    1989-01-01

    The present study reports on temperature measurements with notched samples with and without incipient cracks of unalloyed steels (St 37-2 and Ck 45). Investigations were conducted on thermometric stress determination and on cyclic deformation behaviour. A thermometric concept is presented with which an effective threshold value of cyclic stress intensity can be successfully determined at a low cost with the help of a thermometric estimation method. Thermocouple measurements were performed in all of the experiments, measurements which permitted the registration of temperature range due to thermoelastic effect, besides the registration of the dissipation of deformation work due, particularly, to plastic deformations. (orig./MM) [de

  17. Cracked pellet gap conductance model: comparison of FRAP-S calculations with measured fuel centerline temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1975-03-01

    Fuel pellets crack extensively upon irradiation due both to thermal stresses induced by power changes and at high burnup, to accumulation of gaseous fission products at grain boundaries. Therefore, the distance between the fuel and cladding will be circumferentially nonuniform; varying between that calculated for intact operating fuel pellets and essentially zero (fuel segments in contact with the cladding wall). A model for calculation of temperatures in cracked pellets is proposed wherein the effective fuel to cladding gap conductance is calculated by taking a zero pressure contact conductance in series with an annular gap conductance. Comparisons of predicted and measured fuel centerline temperatures at beginning of life and at extended burnup are presented in support of the model. 13 references

  18. On the detectability of transverse cracks in laminated composites through measurements of electrical potential change

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2015-01-07

    For structures made of laminated composites, real-time structural health monitoring is necessary as significant damage may occur without any visible signs on the surface. Inspection by electrical tomography seems a viable approach as the technique relies on voltage measurements from a network of electrodes over the boundary of the inspected domain to infer the change in conductivity within the bulk material. The change in conductivity, if significant, can be correlated to the degradation state of the material, allowing damage detection. We focus here on the detection of the transverse cracking mechanism which modifies the in-plane transverse conductivity of ply. The quality of detection is directly related to the sensitivity of the voltage measurements with respect to the presence of cracks. We demonstrate here from numerical experiments that the sensitivity depends on several parameters, such as the anisotropy in the electrical conductivity of the baseline composite ply or the geometricalparameters of the structure. Based on these results, applicability of electrical tomography to detect transverse cracks in a laminate is discussed.

  19. Polymerization stresses in low-shrinkage dental resin composites measured by crack analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Kubota, Yu; Momoi, Yasuko; Ferracane, Jack L

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare several dental restoratives currently advertised as low-shrinkage composites (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kalore, Reflexions XLS Dentin and Venus Diamond) with a microfill composite (Heliomolar) in terms of polymerization stress, polymerization shrinkage and elastic modulus. Cracks were made at several distances from the edge of a precision cavity in a soda-lime glass disk. The composites were placed into the cavity and lengths of the cracks were measured before and after light curing. Polymerization stresses generated in the glass at 2 and 10 min after the irradiation were calculated from the crack lengths and K(c) of the glass. Polymerization shrinkage and elastic modulus of the composites also were measured at 2 and 10 min after irradiation using a video-imaging device and a nanoindenter, respectively. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVAs and Tukey's test (pelastic moduli of Clearfil Majesty Posterior and Reflexions XLS Dentin were greatest at 2 and 10 min, respectively. Among the four low-shrinkage composites, two demonstrated significantly reduced polymerization stress compared to Heliomolar, which has previously been shown in in vitro tests to generate low curing stress. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Convenient measurement of the residual stress using X-ray penetration depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Takayoshi; Shibano, Junichi

    1994-01-01

    The residual stress measured with a characteristic X-ray is usually evaluated as a surface stress. However, it is a weighted mean value over all penetration depth of X-ray. Thus, the classical sin 2 Ψ method with the characteristic X-ray is difficult to use for measuring the steep gradient of residual stress that occurs along the depth direction in a subsurface layer of the material after cold rolling and grinding. This paper presents a convenient method of the residual stress measurement along the depth direction in a subsurface layer using the penetration depth depending on a characteristic X-ray. The residual stress distribution of JIS SKS51 steel plate was measured as an example of applying this method. As a result, it could be confirmed that a residual stress distribution along the depth direction in a subsurface layer could be evaluated nondestructively by this convenient method. (author)

  1. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Alec Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  2. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  3. Depth profile of In and As in Si measured by RBS with He and C ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q; Fang, Z [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1994-12-31

    The depth profile of As and In implanted into Si have been measured by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) with 2 MeV He ions and 6 MeV C ions. Advantages of enhanced depth and mass resolution with C ions have been demonstrated over the conventional He RBS. More reliable information for the depth profile of In and As in Si has been obtained. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Depth profile of In and As in Si measured by RBS with He and C ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q.; Fang, Z. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1993-12-31

    The depth profile of As and In implanted into Si have been measured by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) with 2 MeV He ions and 6 MeV C ions. Advantages of enhanced depth and mass resolution with C ions have been demonstrated over the conventional He RBS. More reliable information for the depth profile of In and As in Si has been obtained. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  5. The measurement of internal stress fields in weldments and around cracks using high resolution neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, A.J.; Hutchings, M.T.; Windsor, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes and illustrates the capability of neutron diffraction to measure the complete internal lattice macrostrain field, and hence the stress field, within steel components and weldments arising from their fabrication. A brief outline is given of the theory of the neutron method. The experimental considerations are discussed. The method is illustrated by its application to the measurement of the stress distribution in a:- uniaxially stressed mild steel rod, a double - V test weld, a tube-plate weld, and a cracked fatigue test specimen. (U.K.)

  6. Proceedings: Primary water stress corrosion cracking: 1989 EPRI remedial measures workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, J.A.

    1990-04-01

    A meeting on ''PWSCC Remedial Measures'' was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas and plans with regard to development and application of remedial measures directed against the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: utility experience and strategies; nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for PWSCC; technical topics ranging from predictive methods for occurrence of PWSCC to results of corrosion tests; and services provided by vendors that can help prevent the occurrence of PWSCC or can help address problems caused by PWSCC once it occurs

  7. Crack displacement sensing and measurement in concrete using circular grating moire fringes and pattern matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H. M.; Yen, K. S.; Ratnam, M. M.

    2008-09-01

    The moire method has been extensively studied in the past and applied in various engineering applications. Several techniques are available for generating the moire fringes in these applications, which include moire interferometry, projection moire, shadow moire, moire deflectometry etc. Most of these methods use the superposition of linear gratings to generate the moire patterns. The use of non-linear gratings, such as circular, radial and elongated gratings has received less attention from the research community. The potential of non-linear gratings in engineering measurement has been realized in a limited number of applications, such as rotation measurement, measurement of linear displacement, measurement of expansion coefficients of materials and measurement of strain distribution. In this work, circular gratings of different pitch were applied to the sensing and measurement of crack displacement in concrete structures. Gratings of pitch 0.50 mm and 0.55 mm were generated using computer software and attached to two overlapping acrylic plates that were bonded to either side of the crack. The resulting moire patterns were captured using a standard digital camera and compared with a set of reference patterns generated using a precision positioning stage. Using several image pre-processing stages, such as filtering and morphological operations, and pattern matching the magnitude displacements along two orthogonal axes can be detected with a resolution of 0.05 mm.

  8. Tomographic visualization of stress corrosion cracks in tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.; Kruger, R.P.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1979-06-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine the possibility of detecting and sizing cracks in reactor cooling water tubes using tomographic techniques. Due to time and financial constraints, only one tomographic reconstruction using the best technique available was made. The results indicate that tomographic reconstructions can, in fact, detect cracks in the tubing and might possibly be capable of measuring the depth of the cracks. Limits of detectability and sensitivity have not been determined but should be investigated in any future work

  9. Crack identification method in beam-like structures using changes in experimentally measured frequencies and Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatir, Samir; Dekemele, Kevin; Loccufier, Mia; Khatir, Tawfiq; Abdel Wahab, Magd

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a technique is presented for the detection and localization of an open crack in beam-like structures using experimentally measured natural frequencies and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) method. The technique considers the variation in local flexibility near the crack. The natural frequencies of a cracked beam are determined experimentally and numerically using the Finite Element Method (FEM). The optimization algorithm is programmed in MATLAB. The algorithm is used to estimate the location and severity of a crack by minimizing the differences between measured and calculated frequencies. The method is verified using experimentally measured data on a cantilever steel beam. The Fourier transform is adopted to improve the frequency resolution. The results demonstrate the good accuracy of the proposed technique.

  10. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  11. Distortion of depth perception in virtual environments using stereoscopic displays: quantitative assessment and corrective measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, Michael; Winkelholz, Carsten

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the presented research was to quantify the distortion of depth perception when using stereoscopic displays. The visualization parameters of the used virtual reality system such as perspective, haploscopic separation and width of stereoscopic separation were varied. The experiment was designed to measure distortion in depth perception according to allocentric frames of reference. The results of the experiments indicate that some of the parameters have an antithetic effect which allows to compensate the distortion of depth perception for a range of depths. In contrast to earlier research which reported underestimation of depth perception we found that depth was overestimated when using true projection parameters according to the position of the eyes of the user and display geometry.

  12. Secchi depth analysis using bio-optical parameters measured in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Naik, P.; Bandishte, M.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    spatial and temporal variability of Secchi depth and their dependence on the optical properties beam attenuation and diffuse attenuation the biological parameter of Chlorophyll. The in-situ measured inherent and apparent optical properties have been used...

  13. Concrete Crack Measurement and Analysis Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has become one of the potential technologies for an object three-dimensional (3D information acquisition. The using vibration analysis for early detection of cracks has gained popularity over the years and in the last decade substantial progress has been made in that direction. However, the crack detection using TLS is also a good method. In the experimental part of this study, the effect of crack width and location on modal properties of the beam was investigated. The recent paper provides a method for automatic concrete cracks detection from the data that was obtained by TLS. The method of cracks detection is achieved by six steps. The objective of this study is to analyze the crack of concrete beams both experimentally and using MATLAB analysis. Besides this, information about the width, location and percentage of cracks in cracked concrete beams can be obtained using this technique.

  14. Measurement of the depth of narrow slotted sections in eddy current reference standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Young-gil; Ahn, Bongyoung; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2007-02-01

    The dimensions of the slots in eddy current (EC) reference standards are too narrow to be measured by general depth measurement methods such as the optical (laser) or stylus methods. However, measurement of the dimensions of the machined slots is a prerequisite to using the blocks as references. The present paper suggests a measurement method for the slotted section using an ultrasonic test. The width and depth of the slots measured in our study are roughly 0.1 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. The time of flight (TOF) of the ultrasonic wave was measured precisely. The ultrasonic velocity in the material of the EC reference standard was calculated with the measured values of the TOF and its thickness. Reflected waves from the tip of the slot and the bottom surface of the EC standard were successfully classified. Using this method we have successfully determined the depth of the slotted section.

  15. Composite depth dose measurement for total skin electron (TSE) treatments using radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, Lisa M; Farrell, Thomas J; Jones, Glenn W; Hayward, Joseph E

    2003-01-01

    Total skin electron (TSE) radiotherapy is routinely used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and can be implemented using a modified Stanford technique. In our centre, the composite depth dose for this technique is achieved by a combination of two patient positions per day over a three-day cycle, and two gantry angles per patient position. Due to patient morphology, underdosed regions typically occur and have historically been measured using multiple thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We show that radiochromic film can be used as a two-dimensional relative dosimeter to measure the percent depth dose in TSE radiotherapy. Composite depth dose curves were measured in a cylindrical, polystyrene phantom and compared with TLD data. Both multiple films (1 film per day) and a single film were used in order to reproduce a realistic clinical scenario. First, three individual films were used to measure the depth dose, one per treatment day, and then compared with TLD data; this comparison showed a reasonable agreement. Secondly, a single film was used to measure the dose delivered over three daily treatments and then compared with TLD data; this comparison showed good agreement throughout the depth dose, which includes doses well below 1 Gy. It will be shown that one piece of radiochromic film is sufficient to measure the composite percent depth dose for a TSE beam, hence making radiochromic film a suitable candidate for monitoring underdosed patient regions

  16. The implementation of depth measurement and related algorithms based on binocular vision in embedded AM5728

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiwei; Li, Xicai; Shi, Junsheng; Huang, Xiaoqiao; Li, Feiyan

    2018-01-01

    Depth measurement is the most basic measurement in various machine vision, such as automatic driving, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), robot and so on. And it has a wide range of use. With the development of image processing technology and the improvement of hardware miniaturization and processing speed, real-time depth measurement using dual cameras has become a reality. In this paper, an embedded AM5728 and the ordinary low-cost dual camera is used as the hardware platform. The related algorithms of dual camera calibration, image matching and depth calculation have been studied and implemented on the hardware platform, and hardware design and the rationality of the related algorithms of the system are tested. The experimental results show that the system can realize simultaneous acquisition of binocular images, switching of left and right video sources, display of depth image and depth range. For images with a resolution of 640 × 480, the processing speed of the system can be up to 25 fps. The experimental results show that the optimal measurement range of the system is from 0.5 to 1.5 meter, and the relative error of the distance measurement is less than 5%. Compared with the PC, ARM11 and DMCU hardware platforms, the embedded AM5728 hardware is good at meeting real-time depth measurement requirements in ensuring the image resolution.

  17. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  18. Uncertainty characterization of particle depth measurement using digital in-line holography and the hybrid method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Guildenbecher, Daniel R; Reu, Phillip L; Chen, Jun

    2013-11-04

    In the detection of particles using digital in-line holography, measurement accuracy is substantially influenced by the hologram processing method. In particular, a number of methods have been proposed to determine the out-of-plane particle depth (z location). However, due to the lack of consistent uncertainty characterization, it has been unclear which method is best suited to a given measurement problem. In this work, depth determination accuracies of seven particle detection methods, including a recently proposed hybrid method, are systematically investigated in terms of relative depth measurement errors and uncertainties. Both synthetic and experimental holograms of particle fields are considered at conditions relevant to particle sizing and tracking. While all methods display a range of particle conditions where they are most accurate, in general the hybrid method is shown to be the most robust with depth uncertainty less than twice the particle diameter over a wide range of particle field conditions.

  19. Automated sulcal depth measurement on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk Jin Yun

    Full Text Available Sulcal depth that is one of the quantitative measures of cerebral cortex has been widely used as an important marker for brain morphological studies. Several studies have employed Euclidean (EUD or geodesic (GED algorithms to measure sulcal depth, which have limitations that ignore sulcal geometry in highly convoluted regions and result in under or overestimated depth. In this study, we proposed an automated measurement for sulcal depth on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci, which named the adaptive distance transform (ADT. We first defined the volume region of cerebrospinal fluid between the 3D convex hull and the cortical surface, and constructed local coordinates for that restricted region. Dijkstra's algorithm was then used to compute the shortest paths from the convex hull to the vertices of the cortical surface based on the local coordinates, which may be the most proper approach for defining sulcal depth. We applied our algorithm to both a clinical dataset including patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD and 25 normal controls and a simulated dataset whose shape was similar to a single sulcus. The mean sulcal depth in the mild AD group was significantly lower than controls (p = 0.007, normal [mean±SD]: 7.29±0.23 mm, AD: 7.11±0.29 and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was relatively high, showing the value of 0.818. Results from clinical dataset that were consistent with former studies using EUD or GED demonstrated that ADT was sensitive to cortical atrophy. The robustness against inter-individual variability of ADT was highlighted through simulation dataset. ADT showed a low and constant normalized difference between the depth of the simulated data and the calculated depth, whereas EUD and GED had high and variable differences. We suggest that ADT is more robust than EUD or GED and might be a useful alternative algorithm for measuring sulcal depth.

  20. On the relationships between higher and lower bit-depth system measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Doe, Joshua M.

    2018-04-01

    The quality of an imaging system can be assessed through controlled laboratory objective measurements. Currently, all imaging measurements require some form of digitization in order to evaluate a metric. Depending on the device, the amount of bits available, relative to a fixed dynamic range, will exhibit quantization artifacts. From a measurement standpoint, measurements are desired to be performed at the highest possible bit-depth available. In this correspondence, we described the relationship between higher and lower bit-depth measurements. The limits to which quantization alters the observed measurements will be presented. Specifically, we address dynamic range, MTF, SiTF, and noise. Our results provide guidelines to how systems of lower bit-depth should be characterized and the corresponding experimental methods.

  1. Depth profiling of extended defects in silicon by Rutherford backscattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruska, B.; Goetz, G.

    1981-01-01

    Depth profiling of dislocations and stacking faults is carried out by analyzing axial and planar channeling data from As + -and P + -implanted silicon samples annealed at high temperatures. The analyzing procedure is based on the simple two-beam model. The results show that depth profiling of dislocations using planar channeling data is connected with a broadening of the real distributions. A degradation of the defect concentration and a deformation of the profile result for very high defect concentrations (> 5 x 10 5 cm/cm 2 ). All these effects can be neglected by analyzing axial channeling data. Depth profiling of stacking faults is restricted to the determination of the depth distribution of displaced atomic rows or planes. For both the procedures, axial as well as planar channeling measurements, the same depth profiles of displaced atomic rows are obtained. (author)

  2. Direct depth distribution measurement of deuterium in bulk tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Taylor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding tritium retention and permeation in plasma-facing components is critical for fusion safety and fuel cycle control. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES is shown to be an effective tool to reveal the depth profile of deuterium in tungsten. Results confirm the detection of deuterium. A ∼46 μm depth profile revealed that the deuterium content decreased precipitously in the first 7 μm, and detectable amounts were observed to depths in excess of 20 μm. The large probing depth of GD-OES (up to 100s of μm enables studies not previously accessible to the more conventional techniques for investigating deuterium retention. Of particular applicability is the use of GD-OES to measure the depth profile for experiments where high deuterium concentration in the bulk material is expected: deuterium retention in neutron irradiated materials, and ultra-high deuterium fluences in burning plasma environment.

  3. Volume measurement of the leg with the depth camera for quantitative evaluation of edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomitsu, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kamijo, Naohiro; Ogawa, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-02-01

    Volume measurement of the leg is important in the evaluation of leg edema. Recently, method for measurement by using a depth camera is proposed. However, many depth cameras are expensive. Therefore, we propose a method using Microsoft Kinect. We obtain a point cloud of the leg by Kinect Fusion technique and calculate the volume. We measured the volume of leg for three healthy students during three days. In each measurement, the increase of volume was confirmed from morning to evening. It is known that the volume of leg is increased in doing office work. Our experimental results meet this expectation.

  4. Constraining the CMB optical depth through the dispersion measure of cosmological radio transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure of extragalactic radio transients can be used to measure the column density of free electrons in the intergalactic medium. The same electrons also scatter the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons, affecting precision measurements of cosmological parameters. We explore the connection between the dispersion measure of radio transients existing during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the total optical depth for the CMB showing that the existence of such transients would provide a new sensitive probe of the CMB optical depth. As an example, we consider the population of FRBs. Assuming they exist during the EoR, we show that: (i) such sources can probe the reionization history by measuring the optical depth to sub-percent accuracy, and (ii) they can be detected with high significance by an instrument such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  5. Constraining the CMB optical depth through the dispersion measure of cosmological radio transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A., E-mail: anastasia.fialkov@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Teory and Computation, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The dispersion measure of extragalactic radio transients can be used to measure the column density of free electrons in the intergalactic medium. The same electrons also scatter the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons, affecting precision measurements of cosmological parameters. We explore the connection between the dispersion measure of radio transients existing during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the total optical depth for the CMB showing that the existence of such transients would provide a new sensitive probe of the CMB optical depth. As an example, we consider the population of FRBs. Assuming they exist during the EoR, we show that: (i) such sources can probe the reionization history by measuring the optical depth to sub-percent accuracy, and (ii) they can be detected with high significance by an instrument such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  6. Real-time depth measurement for micro-holes drilled by lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Hsiang; Powell, Rock A.; Jiang, Lan; Xiao, Hai; Chen, Shean-Jen; Tsai, Hai-Lung

    2010-02-01

    An optical system based on the confocal principle has been developed for real-time precision measurements of the depth of micro-holes during the laser drilling process. The capability of the measuring system is theoretically predicted by the Gaussian lens formula and experimentally validated to achieve a sensitivity of 0.5 µm. A nanosecond laser system was used to drill holes, and the hole depths were measured by the proposed measuring system and by the cut-and-polish method. The differences between these two measurements are found to be 5.0% for hole depths on the order of tens of microns and 11.2% for hundreds of microns. The discrepancies are caused mainly by the roughness of the bottom surface of the hole and by the existence of debris in the hole. This system can be easily implemented in a laser workstation for the fabrication of 3D microstructures.

  7. Estimation of subsurface-fracture orientation with the three-component crack-wave measurement; Kiretsuha sanjiku keisoku ni yoru chika kiretsumen no hoko suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, K; Sato, K [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan); Niitsuma, H [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports experiments carried out to estimate subsurface-fracture orientation with the three-component crack-wave measurement. The experiments were performed by using existing subsurface cracks and two wells in the experimental field. An air gun as a sound source was installed directly above a subsurface crack intersection in one of the wells, and a three-component elastic wave detector was fixed in the vicinity of a subsurface crack intersection in the other well. Crack waves from the sound source were measured in a frequency bandwidth from 150 to 300 Hz. A coherence matrix was constituted relative to triaxial components of vibration in the crack waves; a coherent vector was sought that corresponds to a maximum coherent value of the matrix; and the direction of the longer axis in an ellipse (the direction being perpendicular to the crack face) was approximated in particle motions of the crack waves by using the vector. The normal line direction of the crack face estimated by using the above method was found to agree nearly well with the direction of the minimum crust compression stress measured in the normal line direction of the crack face existed in core samples collected from the wells, and measured at nearly the same position as the subsurface crack. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, W.; Turnbull, A.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.03 and is structured as follows: General aspects of SCC testing; Non-precracked specimens; Precracked specimens - the fracture mechanics approach to SCC; Crack growth measurement; Limitations of the LEFM approach to SCC; The use of SCC data; Guide to selection of mechanical scc test method

  9. In-vitro accuracy and reproducibility evaluation of probing depth measurements of selected periodontal probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Al Shayeb

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Depth measurements with the Chapple UB-CF-15 probe were more accurate and reproducible compared to measurements with the Vivacare TPS and Williams 14 W probes. This in vitro model may be useful for intra-examiner calibration or clinician training prior to the clinical evaluation of patients or in longitudinal studies involving periodontal evaluation.

  10. Opto-thermal moisture content and moisture depth profile measurements in organic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, P.; Guo, X.; Cui, Y.Y.; Imhof, R.; Bicanic, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry(OTTER) is a infrared remote sensing technique, which has been successfully used in in vivo skin moisture content and skin moisture depth profiling measurements.In present paper, we extend this moisture content measurement capability to analyze the moisture

  11. Cracking susceptibility of stainless steel subjected to plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, H.

    1995-01-01

    The similarities and differences in the cracking susceptibility between welding and resolidification after plasma disruption were examined experimentally using a number of primary candidate alloy samples with different chemical compositions. The product of the number density and the average depth of the cracks was measured after simulated disruption, employing a hydrogen ion beam as the heat source, and was compared with the Varestraint test result. An adequate correlation was observed between them, which indicates that the cracking susceptibility during plasma disruption can be well estimated from the welding cracking susceptibility. (orig.)

  12. Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, L.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center

    1997-02-01

    This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

  13. REPEATABILITY AND ACCURACY OF EXOPLANET ECLIPSE DEPTHS MEASURED WITH POST-CRYOGENIC SPITZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingalls, James G.; Krick, J. E.; Carey, S. J.; Stauffer, John R.; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Capak, Peter; Glaccum, William; Laine, Seppo; Surace, Jason; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Boulevard, Mail Code 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Buzasi, Derek [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL 33965 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Stevenson, Kevin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, EX4 4QL Exeter (United Kingdom); Morello, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1 E6BT (United Kingdom); Wong, Ian, E-mail: ingalls@ipac.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We examine the repeatability, reliability, and accuracy of differential exoplanet eclipse depth measurements made using the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope during the post-cryogenic mission. We have re-analyzed an existing 4.5 μ m data set, consisting of 10 observations of the XO-3b system during secondary eclipse, using seven different techniques for removing correlated noise. We find that, on average, for a given technique, the eclipse depth estimate is repeatable from epoch to epoch to within 156 parts per million (ppm). Most techniques derive eclipse depths that do not vary by more than a factor 3 of the photon noise limit. All methods but one accurately assess their own errors: for these methods, the individual measurement uncertainties are comparable to the scatter in eclipse depths over the 10 epoch sample. To assess the accuracy of the techniques as well as to clarify the difference between instrumental and other sources of measurement error, we have also analyzed a simulated data set of 10 visits to XO-3b, for which the eclipse depth is known. We find that three of the methods (BLISS mapping, Pixel Level Decorrelation, and Independent Component Analysis) obtain results that are within three times the photon limit of the true eclipse depth. When averaged over the 10 epoch ensemble,  5 out of 7 techniques come within 60 ppm of the true value. Spitzer exoplanet data, if obtained following current best practices and reduced using methods such as those described here, can measure repeatable and accurate single eclipse depths, with close to photon-limited results.

  14. The measurement of dose at 70 micrometres' depth using thermoluminescent dosimeters (tlds)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement of dose with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) at a tissue-equivalent depth of 70 μm can be done in three ways. These are by using: very thin TLDs (made by cementing fine, powdered, TLD particles to a high-temperature plastic film); opaque TLDs whose surface alone is sensitive. (Light emitted at a greater depth has a low probability of emergence and, thus, they behave as if they were thin.); at least three TLDs covered with absorbers of differing thickness. The approaches were studied using examples of dosimeter arrangements of the three types. The characteristics which were measured to form a basis of comparison were: the performance at high and low doses; the effect of changing angle of incidence and beta-ray energy; the effect on performance of repeated irradiation, annealing and reading. It was concluded that the very thin TLDs (powdered) are the best suited to the measurement of doses at 70 μm depth

  15. Standard test method for measurement of creep crack growth times in metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep crack growth (CCG) in metals at elevated temperatures using pre-cracked specimens subjected to static or quasi-static loading conditions. The time (CCI), t0.2 to an initial crack extension δai = 0.2 mm from the onset of first applied force and creep crack growth rate, ˙a or da/dt is expressed in terms of the magnitude of creep crack growth relating parameters, C* or K. With C* defined as the steady state determination of the crack tip stresses derived in principal from C*(t) and Ct (1-14). The crack growth derived in this manner is identified as a material property which can be used in modeling and life assessment methods (15-25). 1.1.1 The choice of the crack growth correlating parameter C*, C*(t), Ct, or K depends on the material creep properties, geometry and size of the specimen. Two types of material behavior are generally observed during creep crack growth tests; creep-ductile (1-14) and creep-brittle (26-37). In creep ductile materials, where cr...

  16. Measurement of depth-dose distributions by means of the LiF-fluoroplastic thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaks, A.I.; Uryaev, I.A.; Trifonov, V.A.; Reshetnikova, L.V.

    1977-01-01

    Depth-dose distributions have been studied by means of thin-layer thermoluminescent detectors LiF-fluoroplast (8 mg/cm 2 ). Dosimetric characteristics of the detectors are described. They are: tissue-equivalence, dependence of sensitivity on the dose, dose rate and angle of incidence of radiation, and time-dependent storage, of the total light absorbed. Comparison of the results obtained with the measurements taken with an extrapolation chamber has demonstrated the possibility of measuring the depth-dose distributions by means of LiF-fluoroplast detectors

  17. Determining the influential depth for surface reflectance of sediment by BRDF measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Voss, K; Reid, R

    2003-10-20

    We measure the Bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of ooid sand layers with three particle size distributions (0.5-1mm, 0.25-0.5mm and 0.125-0.25mm) and layer thicknesses on a reflecting mirror to determine the influential depth in the optical region at wavelengths of 658 nm (red), 570 nm (green) and 457 nm (blue). The hemispherical reflectance (albedo) was used as an indicator of BRDF changes between different layers. Measurements are carried out on both dry and water wetted grains. The results indicate that for both dry and wet and all size distributions, the influential depth is at most 2mm.

  18. Determination of representative renal depth for accurate attenuation corred in measurement of glomerular filtration rate in transplanted kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Soon Nam; Kim, Sung Hoon; Rha, Sung Eun; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Lee, Sung Young; Chung, Soo Kyo

    2002-01-01

    To measure reliable glomerular filtration rate by using the representative values of transplanted renal depths, which are measured with ultrasonography. We included 54 patients (26 men, 28 women), with having both renal scintigraphy and ultrasonography after renal transplantation. We measured DFR with Gates' method using the renal depth measured by ultrasonography, and median and mean ones in each patient. We compared GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depth with GFR derived from median and mean renal depths. The correlation coefficients were obtained among GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depths, median and mean renal depth under linear regression analysis. We determined whether GFR derived from median or mean renal depth could substitute GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depth with Bland-Altman method. We analyze the expected errors of the GFR using representative renal depth in terms of age, sex, weight, height, creatinine value, and body surface. The transplanted renal depths range from 3.20 cm to 5.96 cm. The mean value and standard deviation of renal depths measured by ultrasonography are 4.09±0.65 cm in men, and 4.24±0.78 cm in women. The median value of renal depths measured by ultrasonography is 4.36 cm in men and 4.14 cm in women. The GFR derived from median renal depth is more consistent with GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depth than GFR derived from mean renal depth. Differences of GFR derived from median and ultrasonography-measured renal depth are not significantly different in the groups classified with creatinine value, age, sex, height, weight and body surface. When median value is adapted as a representative renal depth, we could obtain reliable GFR in transplanted kidney simply

  19. IAEA co-ordinated research program. 'Round Robin' on measuring the velocity of delayed hydride cracking (DHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, V.; Jakobsson, R.

    1999-09-01

    The International Atomic Agency (IAEA) has initiated a new Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Hydrogen and hydride induced degradation of the mechanical and physical properties of Zirconium-based alloys. In the first phase of this CRP the methodology for measuring the velocity of Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) should be established and participating laboratories from about nine countries around the world carry out identical tests in 'round robin'. The objective of the present work is to establish at Studsvik laboratory the method of a constant load cracking test on unirradiated Zr-2.5Nb and attain a comparison of results between laboratories. Constant load tests are performed on specimens cut from unirradiated CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube and the rate of crack propagation is determined in each test. Pre-hydrided specimens for testing are supplied from the host laboratory. Six specimens have been tested for delayed hydride cracking (DHC) at 250 deg C. The axial crack growth velocities measured in the tests are within the interval of 8.62x10 -8 - 1.06x10 -7 m/s. The results obtained agree well with the earlier published data for similar materials and test conditions

  20. Ultrasonic Measurement of Corrosion Depth Development in Concrete Exposed to Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yingfang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion depth of concrete can reflect the damage state of the load-carrying capacity and durability of the concrete structures servicing in severe environment. Ultrasonic technology was studied to evaluate the corrosion depth quantitatively. Three acidic environments with the pH level of 3.5, 2.5, and 1.5 were simulated by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solutions in the laboratory. 354 prism specimens with the dimension of 150 mm × 150 mm × 300 mm were prepared. The prepared specimens were first immersed in the acidic mixture for certain periods, followed by physical, mechanical, computerized tomography (CT and ultrasonic test. Damage depths of the concrete specimen under different corrosion states were obtained from both CT and ultrasonic test. Based on the ultrasonic test, a bilinear regression model is proposed to estimate the corrosion depth. It is shown that the results achieved by ultrasonic and CT test are in good agreement with each other. Relation between the corrosion depth of concrete specimen and the mechanical indices such as mass loss, compressive strength, and elastic modulus is discussed in detail. It can be drawn that the ultrasonic test is a reliable nondestructive way to measure the damage depth of concrete exposed to acidic environment.

  1. Measurement of underground water-soil radioactivity at different depths in arsenic prone areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, D.; Deb, A.; Patra, K.K.; Sengupta, R.; Nag, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    Studies on the presence of alpha emitting nuclides in the environment assume importance since they are found to be carcinogenic. Measurement of radioactivity in arsenic contaminated drinking water has already been reported. To perform a detail study we have undertaken a programme to measure radioactivity in drinking water and soil samples in three different places of North 24 Parganas in West Bengal, India, where arsenic contamination is severe. A detail investigation on soil samples at different depths and soil-water samples at same depth have been made with CR-39 plates -a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) -a commonly used detector for alpha radiation. The data indicates high alpha activity in soil than water and this ratio is different at different places varying from 1.22 to 2.63. The dependence of the alpha activity in soil on depth is also different at different sites. The data shows some interesting results. (author)

  2. Genetic Algorithm for Opto-thermal Skin Hydration Depth Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Xiao, Perry; Imhof, R. E.

    2013-09-01

    Stratum corneum is the outermost skin layer, and the water content in stratum corneum plays a key role in skin cosmetic properties as well as skin barrier functions. However, to measure the water content, especially the water concentration depth profile, within stratum corneum is very difficult. Opto-thermal emission radiometry, or OTTER, is a promising technique that can be used for such measurements. In this paper, a study on stratum corneum hydration depth profiling by using a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. The pros and cons of a GA compared against other inverse algorithms such as neural networks, maximum entropy, conjugate gradient, and singular value decomposition will be discussed first. Then, it will be shown how to use existing knowledge to optimize a GA for analyzing the opto-thermal signals. Finally, these latest GA results on hydration depth profiling of stratum corneum under different conditions, as well as on the penetration profiles of externally applied solvents, will be shown.

  3. Development and validation of a method for measuring depth of understanding in constructivist learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Lucia Falsetti

    A method for measuring depth of understanding of students in the middle-level science classroom was developed and validated. A common theme in the literature on constructivism in science education is that constructivist pedagogy, as opposed to objectivist pedagogy, results in a greater depth of understanding. Since few instruments measuring this construct exist at the present time, the development of such a tool to measure this construct was a significant contribution to the current body of assessment technologies in science education. The author's Depth of Understanding Assessment (DUA) evolved from a writing measure originally designed as a history assessment. The study involved 230 eighth grade science students studying a chemical change unit. The main research questions were: (1) What is the relationship between the DUA and each of the following independent variables: recall, application, and questioning modalities as measured by the Cognitive Preference Test; deep, surface, achieving, and deep-achieving approaches as measured by the Learning Process Questionnaire; achievement as measured by the Chemical Change Quiz, and teacher perception of student ability to conceptualize science content? (2) Is there a difference in depth of understanding, as measured by the DUA, between students who are taught by objectivist pedagogy and students who are taught by constructivist pedagogy favoring the constructivist group? (3) Is there a gender difference in depth of understanding as measured by the DUA? (4) Do students who are taught by constructivist pedagogy perceive their learning environment as more constructivist than students who are taught by objectivist pedagogy? Six out of nine hypothesis tests supported the validity of the DUA. The results of the qualitative component of this study which consisted of student interviews substantiated the quantitative results by providing additional information and insights. There was a significant difference in depth of

  4. Distribution of base rock depth estimated from Rayleigh wave measurement by forced vibration tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Hibino; Toshiro Maeda; Chiaki Yoshimura; Yasuo Uchiyama

    2005-01-01

    This paper shows an application of Rayleigh wave methods to a real site, which was performed to determine spatial distribution of base rock depth from the ground surface. At a certain site in Sagami Plain in Japan, the base rock depth from surface is assumed to be distributed up to 10 m according to boring investigation. Possible accuracy of the base rock depth distribution has been needed for the pile design and construction. In order to measure Rayleigh wave phase velocity, forced vibration tests were conducted with a 500 N vertical shaker and linear arrays of three vertical sensors situated at several points in two zones around the edges of the site. Then, inversion analysis was carried out for soil profile by genetic algorithm, simulating measured Rayleigh wave phase velocity with the computed counterpart. Distribution of the base rock depth inverted from the analysis was consistent with the roughly estimated inclination of the base rock obtained from the boring tests, that is, the base rock is shallow around edge of the site and gradually inclines towards the center of the site. By the inversion analysis, the depth of base rock was determined as from 5 m to 6 m in the edge of the site, 10 m in the center of the site. The determined distribution of the base rock depth by this method showed good agreement on most of the points where boring investigation were performed. As a result, it was confirmed that the forced vibration tests on the ground by Rayleigh wave methods can be useful as the practical technique for estimating surface soil profiles to a depth of up to 10 m. (authors)

  5. Displacement correction factor versus effective point of measurement in depth dose curve measurements at {sup 60}Co gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruna, A [Universidad Nacional, Cordoba (Argentina). Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica; Velez, G R [Hospital San Roque, Cordoba (Argentina). Dept. de Radioterapia; Brunetto, M [Centro Medico Rivado Dean Funes, Cordoba (Argentina)

    1996-08-01

    The discrepancies in data sets of values of the Displacement Factor p{sub d} recommended by different codes of practices for calibration purpose still demand further investigation to clarify this point. In this paper, we propose an experimental method to determine the displacement factor for cylindrical ionization chambers (thimble chambers) in photon beams. Measurements of p{sub d} for several depths were performed for {sup 60}Co gamma rays. From these results we calculated the shift of the effective point of measurement (z-z{sub eff}) for different depths. The results obtained in this work shown: (a) there is no significant change in p{sub d} from 2 cm to 17 cm of depth in water; (b) the value of p{sub d} for a ion-chamber Farmer type (inner radius r = 3.15 cm) is p{sub d} 0.988; (c) the shift of the effective point of measurement has a smooth variation with depth; (d) the value of (z-z{sub eff}) at the recommended calibration depth for {sup 60}Co beams (5 cm) is 0.6r (with r: inner radius of the chamber). The result (b) confirms the value of p{sub d} suggested by the SEFM and NACP protocols and differs with that of the AAPM. The value obtained for (z - z{sub eff}) (d) is very closed to that recommended by the IAEA TRS-277. Finally, the results (a) and (c) suggest that it should be preferable to use the displacement factor instead of effective point of measurement to perform measurements of depth dose curves, since the use of z{sub eff} should take into account its dependence on depth. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs.

  6. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction deconvolution method for the measurement of residual stress in thermal barrier coatings as a function of depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Jacques, S D M; Chen, Y; Daisenberger, D; Xiao, P; Markocsan, N; Nylen, P; Cernik, R J

    2016-12-01

    The average residual stress distribution as a function of depth in an air plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia top coat used in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems was measured using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on station I15 at Diamond Light Source, UK, employing a series of incidence angles. The stress values were calculated from data deconvoluted from diffraction patterns collected at increasing depths. The stress was found to be compressive through the thickness of the TBC and a fluctuation in the trend of the stress profile was indicated in some samples. Typically this fluctuation was observed to increase from the surface to the middle of the coating, decrease a little and then increase again towards the interface. The stress at the interface region was observed to be around 300 MPa, which agrees well with the reported values. The trend of the observed residual stress was found to be related to the crack distribution in the samples, in particular a large crack propagating from the middle of the coating. The method shows promise for the development of a nondestructive test for as-manufactured samples.

  7. Snow depth retrieval from L-band satellite measurements on Arctic and Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, N.; Kaleschke, L.; Wever, N.; Lehning, M.; Nicolaus, M.; Rossmann, H. L.

    2017-12-01

    The passive microwave mission SMOS provides daily coverage of the polar regions and measures at a low frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band). SMOS observations have been used to operationally retrieve sea ice thickness up to 1 m and to estimate snow depth in the Arctic for thicker ice. Here, we present how SMOS-retrieved snow depths compare with airborne measurements from NASA's Operation IceBridge mission (OIB) and with AMSR-2 satellite retrievals at higher frequencies, and we show first applications to Antarctic sea ice. In previous studies, SMOS and OIB snow depths showed good agreement on spatial scales from 50 to 1000 km for some days and disagreement for other days. Here, we present a more comprehensive comparison of OIB and SMOS snow depths in the Arctic for 2011 to 2015. We find that the SMOS retrieval works best for cold conditions and depends on auxiliary information on ice surface temperature, here provided by MODIS thermal imagery satellite data. However, comparing SMOS and OIB snow depths is difficult because of the different spatial resolutions (SMOS: 40 km, OIB: 40 m). Spatial variability within the SMOS footprint can lead to different snow conditions as seen from SMOS and OIB. Ideally the comparison is made for uniform conditions: Low lead and open water fraction, low spatial and temporal variability of ice surface temperature, no mixture of multi- and first-year ice. Under these conditions and cold temperatures (surface temperatures below -25°C), correlation coefficients between SMOS and OIB snow depths increase from 0.3 to 0.6. A finding from the comparison with AMSR-2 snow depths is that the SMOS-based maps depend less on the age of the sea ice than the maps derived from higher frequencies. Additionally, we show first results of SMOS snow depths for Antarctic sea ice. SMOS observations are compared to measurements of autonomous snow buoys drifting in the Weddell Sea since 2014. For a better comparability of these point measurements with SMOS data, we use

  8. Effective aerosol optical depth from pyranometer measurements of surface solar radiation (global radiation) at Thessaloniki, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Lindfors, A. V.; Kouremeti, N.; Arola, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Bais, A. F.; Laaksonen, A.

    2013-01-01

    Pyranometer measurements of the solar surface radiation (SSR) are available at many locations worldwide, often as long time series covering several decades into the past. These data constitute a potential source of information on the atmospheric aerosol load. Here, we present a method for estimating the aerosol optical depth (AOD) using pyranometer measurements of the SSR together with total water vapor column information. The method, which is based on radiative transfer simulations, w...

  9. Sodar measurements of the mixed-layer depth over a large city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurygin, E.A. [Russia Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    The results of synchronous sodar`s measurements on a territory of city and suburban area have shown: (a) The types of stratification over centre of the city and periphery considerably differ, and these distinctions are more often displayed in morning and evening transition period. The agreement between types of stratification in the centre and on the periphery was observed in 40% of cases; (b) At equal temperature stratification the mixed-layer depth in centre of the city is about 50-150 m higher at inversions in comparison with a periphery, at advanced convection - these depths are identical; (c) At different stratification between the city and periphery the distinction in the mixed-layer depth can reach 200. (au)

  10. Eddy current technique for detecting and sizing surface cracks in steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecco, V.S.; Carter, J.R.; Sullivan, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    Cracking has occurred in pressure vessel nozzles and girth welds due to thermal fatigue. Pipe welds, welds in support structures, and welds in reactor vault liner panels in nuclear facilities have failed because of cracks. Cracking can also occur in turbine rotor bore surfaces due to high cycle fatigue. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and other surface NDT methods are used to detect cracks but cannot be used for depth sizing. Crack depth can be measured with various NDT methods such as ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD), potential drop, and eddy current. The TOFD technique can be difficult to implement on nozzle welds and is best suited for sizing deep cracks (>5 mm). The conventional eddy current method is easy to implement, but crack sizing is normally limited to shallow cracks ( 2 mm) cracks. Eddy current testing (ET) techniques are readily amenable to remote/automatic inspections. These new probes could augment present magnetic particle (MT) and dye penetrant (PT) testing through provision of reliable defect depth information. Reliable crack sizing permits identification of critical cracks for plant life extension and licensing purposes. In addition, performing PT and MT generates low level radioactive waste in some inspection applications in nuclear facilities. Replacing these techniques with ET for some components will eliminate some of this radioactive waste. (author)

  11. Measurement of Optic Disc Cup Surface Depth Using Cirrus HD-OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kook; Ha, Ahnul; Lee, Won June; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Park, Ki Ho

    2017-12-01

    To introduce the measurement method of optic disc cup surface depth using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and then evaluate the rates of cup surface depression at 3 different stages of glaucoma. We retrospectively identified 52 eyes with preperimetric glaucoma, 56 with mild-or-moderate glaucoma and 50 with severe glaucoma and followed them for at least 48 months. Eyes were imaged using SD-OCT (Cirrus HD-OCT) at 12-month intervals. The mean cup surface depth was calculated using the following formula: Cup volume/(disc area×average cup-to-disc ratio)-200 μm. The rates of mean cup surface depression (μm/y) were significantly greater in mild-or-moderate glaucoma (-7.96±1.03) than in preperimetric (-3.11±0.61) and severe glaucoma (-0.70±0.12; all Pcup surface depression (%/y) were significantly greater than those of average of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning (%/y) in preperimetric glaucoma (-1.64±0.12 vs. -1.11±0.07; Pcup surface depth changed slower than did average RNFL thickness (-0.64±0.06 vs. -0.75±0.08%/y; Pcup surface depth changed faster than did the RNFL thickness. These results signify the possibility that SD-OCT-based estimation of cup surface depth might be useful for monitoring of glaucoma development and progression.

  12. Comparative study of direct and inverse problems of cracked beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahieddine Chettah

    2018-01-01

    supported beam obtained from measurements as inputs. The two approaches are compared with a number of numerical examples for simply supported beams including one crack. The theoretical results show that the accuracy of the Rayleigh’s method to predict natural frequencies decreases for higher modes when crack depth increases. It is also found that for the inverse problem, the transfer matrix method show a good agreement with those obtained from previous works done in this field.

  13. Noninvasive measurement of burn wound depth applying infrared thermal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E.; Maltha, Ilse M.; Klaessens, John H.; Vet, Henrica C.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Zuijlen, Paul P.

    2016-02-01

    In burn wounds early discrimination between the different depths plays an important role in the treatment strategy. The remaining vasculature in the wound determines its healing potential. Non-invasive measurement tools that can identify the vascularization are therefore considered to be of high diagnostic importance. Thermography is a non-invasive technique that can accurately measure the temperature distribution over a large skin or tissue area, the temperature is a measure of the perfusion of that area. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinimetric properties (i.e. reliability and validity) of thermography for measuring burn wound depth. In a cross-sectional study with 50 burn wounds of 35 patients, the inter-observer reliability and the validity between thermography and Laser Doppler Imaging were studied. With ROC curve analyses the ΔT cut-off point for different burn wound depths were determined. The inter-observer reliability, expressed by an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.99, was found to be excellent. In terms of validity, a ΔT cut-off point of 0.96°C (sensitivity 71%; specificity 79%) differentiates between a superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burn. A ΔT cut-off point of -0.80°C (sensitivity 70%; specificity 74%) could differentiate between a deep partial-thickness and a full-thickness burn wound. This study demonstrates that thermography is a reliable method in the assessment of burn wound depths. In addition, thermography was reasonably able to discriminate among different burn wound depths, indicating its potential use as a diagnostic tool in clinical burn practice.

  14. DEPTH MEASUREMENT OF DISRUPTED LAYER ON SILICON WAFER SURFACE USING AUGER SPECTROSCOPY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodukha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for depth measurement of a disrupted layer on silicon wafer surface which is based on application of Auger spectroscopy with the precision sputtering of surface silicon layers and registration of the Auger electron yield intensity. In order to measure the disrupted layer with the help of Auger spectroscopy it is necessary to determine dependence of the released Auger electron amount on sputtering time (profile and then the dependence is analyzed. Silicon amount in the disrupted layer is less than in the volume. While going deeper the disruptive layer is decreasing that corresponds to an increase of atom density in a single layer. The essence of the method lies in the fact the disruptive layer is removed by ion beam sputtering and detection of interface region is carried out with the help of registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from the sputtered surface up to the moment when it reaches the value which is equal to the Auger electron yield intensity for single-crystal silicon. While removing surface silicon layers the registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from silicon surface makes it possible to control efficiently a presence of the disrupted layer on the silicon wafer surface. In this case depth control locality is about 1.0 nm due to some peculiarities of Auger spectroscopy method. The Auger electron yield intensity is determined automatically while using Auger spectrometer and while removing the disrupted layer the intensity is gradually increasing. Depth of the disrupted layer is determined by measuring height of the step which has been formed as a result of removal of the disrupted layer from the silicon wafer surface. Auger spectroscopy methods ensures an efficient depth control surface disruptions at the manufacturing stages of silicon wafers and integrated circuits. The depth measurement range of disruptions constitutes 0.001–1.000 um.

  15. Measurement of moisture depth distribution in composite materials using positron lifetime technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.J.; Holt, W.H.; Mock, W. Jr.; Mall, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced resin matrix composites reportedly suffer significant degradation in their mechanical properties when exposed to hot, moist, environments for extended periods. Moisture weakens the fiber matrix bond as well as the matrix shear strength. An important factor in determining the extent of degradation is the depth distribution of moisture in the resin matrix. Despite the importance of measuring moisture distribution and its effects on composite material properties, not enough data are available on suitable nondestructive techniques for detecting and measuring moisture diffusion in organic composite materials. This paper addresses itself to the problem of measuring the moisture content of such materials, with special emphasis on its depth distribution, using positron lifetime technique

  16. DEEP LEARNING AND IMAGE PROCESSING FOR AUTOMATED CRACK DETECTION AND DEFECT MEASUREMENT IN UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Panella

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the combination of Deep-Learning (DL and image processing to produce an automated cracks recognition and defect measurement tool for civil structures. The authors focus on tunnel civil structures and survey and have developed an end to end tool for asset management of underground structures. In order to maintain the serviceability of tunnels, regular inspection is needed to assess their structural status. The traditional method of carrying out the survey is the visual inspection: simple, but slow and relatively expensive and the quality of the output depends on the ability and experience of the engineer as well as on the total workload (stress and tiredness may influence the ability to observe and record information. As a result of these issues, in the last decade there is the desire to automate the monitoring using new methods of inspection. The present paper has the goal of combining DL with traditional image processing to create a tool able to detect, locate and measure the structural defect.

  17. Geometry of X-ray based measurement of residual strain at desired penetration depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawiec, A. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Krakow (Poland)

    2017-10-15

    X-ray based measurement of residual lattice strains at chosen penetration depth is one of the methods for investigating strain inhomogeneities in near-surface layers of polycrystalline materials. The measurement relies on determining shifts of Bragg peaks for various directions of the scattering vector with respect to the specimen. At each of these directions, to reach a given the penetration depth, a proper specimen orientation is required. The task of determining such orientations, albeit elementary, is quite intricate. The existing literature describes only partial solutions with unspecified domains of application, which fail if applied to beyond the domains. Therefore, geometric aspects of the measurement are analyzed in details. Explicit bounds on measurement parameters are given. The equation fundamental for the procedure is solved with respect to specimen orientations. For a given direction of the scattering vector, there are generally four different specimen orientations leading to the same penetration depth. This simple fact (overlooked in previous analyses) can be used for improving reliability of measurement results. Analytical formulas for goniometer angles representing these orientations are provided. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Independent evaluation of the SNODAS snow depth product using regional scale LiDAR-derived measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, A.; Marshall, H.-P.; Winstral, A.; Elder, K.; Yueh, S.; Cline, D.

    2014-06-01

    Repeated Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) surveys are quickly becoming the de facto method for measuring spatial variability of montane snowpacks at high resolution. This study examines the potential of a 750 km2 LiDAR-derived dataset of snow depths, collected during the 2007 northern Colorado Cold Lands Processes Experiment (CLPX-2), as a validation source for an operational hydrologic snow model. The SNOw Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) model framework, operated by the US National Weather Service, combines a physically-based energy-and-mass-balance snow model with satellite, airborne and automated ground-based observations to provide daily estimates of snowpack properties at nominally 1 km resolution over the coterminous United States. Independent validation data is scarce due to the assimilating nature of SNODAS, compelling the need for an independent validation dataset with substantial geographic coverage. Within twelve distinctive 500 m × 500 m study areas located throughout the survey swath, ground crews performed approximately 600 manual snow depth measurements during each of the CLPX-2 LiDAR acquisitions. This supplied a dataset for constraining the uncertainty of upscaled LiDAR estimates of snow depth at the 1 km SNODAS resolution, resulting in a root-mean-square difference of 13 cm. Upscaled LiDAR snow depths were then compared to the SNODAS-estimates over the entire study area for the dates of the LiDAR flights. The remotely-sensed snow depths provided a more spatially continuous comparison dataset and agreed more closely to the model estimates than that of the in situ measurements alone. Finally, the results revealed three distinct areas where the differences between LiDAR observations and SNODAS estimates were most drastic, suggesting natural processes specific to these regions as causal influences on model uncertainty.

  19. Independent evaluation of the SNODAS snow depth product using regional-scale lidar-derived measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, A.; Marshall, H.-P.; Winstral, A.; Elder, K.; Yueh, S.; Cline, D.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated light detection and ranging (lidar) surveys are quickly becoming the de facto method for measuring spatial variability of montane snowpacks at high resolution. This study examines the potential of a 750 km2 lidar-derived data set of snow depths, collected during the 2007 northern Colorado Cold Lands Processes Experiment (CLPX-2), as a validation source for an operational hydrologic snow model. The SNOw Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) model framework, operated by the US National Weather Service, combines a physically based energy-and-mass-balance snow model with satellite, airborne and automated ground-based observations to provide daily estimates of snowpack properties at nominally 1 km resolution over the conterminous United States. Independent validation data are scarce due to the assimilating nature of SNODAS, compelling the need for an independent validation data set with substantial geographic coverage. Within 12 distinctive 500 × 500 m study areas located throughout the survey swath, ground crews performed approximately 600 manual snow depth measurements during each of the CLPX-2 lidar acquisitions. This supplied a data set for constraining the uncertainty of upscaled lidar estimates of snow depth at the 1 km SNODAS resolution, resulting in a root-mean-square difference of 13 cm. Upscaled lidar snow depths were then compared to the SNODAS estimates over the entire study area for the dates of the lidar flights. The remotely sensed snow depths provided a more spatially continuous comparison data set and agreed more closely to the model estimates than that of the in situ measurements alone. Finally, the results revealed three distinct areas where the differences between lidar observations and SNODAS estimates were most drastic, providing insight into the causal influences of natural processes on model uncertainty.

  20. Optical depth retrievals from Delta-T SPN1 measurements of broadband solar irradiance at ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelles, Victor; Serrano, David; Segura, Sara; Wood, John; Webb, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The SPN1 radiometer, manufactured by Delta-T Devices Ltd., is an instrument designed for the measurement of global solar irradiance and its components (diffuse, direct) at ground level. In the present study, the direct irradiance component has been used to retrieve an effective total optical depth, by applying the Beer-Lambert law to the broadband measurements. The results have been compared with spectral total optical depths derived from two Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01 sun-sky radiometers, located at the Burjassot site in Valencia (Spain), during years 2013 - 2015. The SPN1 is an inexpensive and versatile instrument for the measurement of the three components of the solar radiation without any mobile part and without any need to azimuthally align the instrument to track the sun (http://www.delta-t.co.uk). The three components of the solar radiation are estimated from a combination of measurements performed by 7 different miniature thermopiles. In turn, the Beer-Lambert law has been applied to the broadband direct solar component to obtain an effective total optical depth, representative of the total extinction in the atmosphere. For the assessment of the total optical depth values retrieved with the SPN1, two different sun-sky radiometers (Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01L) have been employed. Both instruments belong to the international networks AERONET and SKYNET. The modified SUNRAD package has been applied in both Cimel and Prede instruments. Cloud affected data has been removed by applying the Smirnov cloud-screening procedure in the SUNRAD algorithm. The broadband SPN1 total optical depth has been analysed by comparison with the spectral total optical depth from the sun-sky radiometer measurements at wavelengths 440, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. The slopes and intercepts have been estimated to be 0.47 - 0.98 and 0.055 - 0.16 with increasing wavelength. The average correlation coefficients and RMSD were 0.80 - 0.83 and 0.034 - 0.036 for all the channels. The

  1. Direct measurement of dose at depth in breast cancer using lithium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawes, P J.D.K.; Aird, E G; Crawshaw, I P

    1988-05-01

    In 23 cases of breast cancer treated conservatively using external beam and interstitial radiotherapy, lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used to measure the radiation dose received by the breast tissue at depth. Thirty-six investigations were made using a number of lithium fluoride micro-rods for each investigation. Three results could not be analysed because of measurement problems in two and insufficient information in one. Twenty-eight results were obtained at a depth in tissue greater than the build-up zone, 23 of the 28 falling within +- 5% and 27 of the 28 falling within +- 10% of the computer-calculated prescribed dose. Of five results obtained within the build-up zone, two fell within +- 5% and four within +- 10% of the prescribed dose.

  2. Direct measurement of dose at depth in breast cancer using lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawes, P.J.D.K.; Aird, E.G.; Crawshaw, I.P.

    1988-01-01

    In 23 cases of breast cancer treated conservatively using external beam and interstitial radiotherapy, lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used to measure the radiation dose received by the breast tissue at depth. Thirty-six investigations were made using a number of lithium fluoride micro-rods for each investigation. Three results could not be analysed because of measurement problems in two and insufficient information in one. Twenty-eight results were obtained at a depth in tissue greater than the build-up zone, 23 of the 28 falling within ± 5% and 27 of the 28 falling within ± 10% of the computer-calculated prescribed dose. Of five results obtained within the build-up zone, two fell within ± 5% and four within ± 10% of the prescribed dose. (author)

  3. Measurement setup for the magnetic penetration depth and superfluid stiffness in thin superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Lorenz; Brunner, Markus Christopher Paul; Schneider, Ina; Kronfeldner, Klaus; Strunk, Christoph [Institute for exp. and appl. Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Bousquet, Jessica; Bustarret, Etienne [Institut NEEL, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    A mutual inductance measurement setup has been established in order to determine the magnetic penetration depths of thin film superconductors. By measuring the variation of the mutual inductance M, the temperature dependent penetration depth can be evaluated. The setup has been characterized using thin aluminum and niobium films as a reference. Temperature dependence of λ of B-doped diamond films is determined down to 0.3 K and compared with theoretical expectations. The impact of the doping ratio B/C and film thickness on λ and T{sub c} is investigated. Correlation between the film impedance σ = σ{sub 1} - i σ{sub 2} and λ is examined.

  4. Studying unsaturated epikarst water storage properties by time lapse surface to depth gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, S.; Champollion, C.; chery, J.; Doerflinger, E.; Le Moigne, N.; Bayer, R.; Vernant, P.

    2011-12-01

    The assessment of water storage in the unsaturated zone in karstic areas is particularly challenging. Indeed, water flow path and water storage occur in quite heterogeneous ways through small scale porosity, fractures, joints and large voids. Due to this large heterogeneity, it is therefore difficult to estimate the amount of water circulating in the vadose zone by hydrological means. One indirect method consists to measure the gravity variation associated to water storage and withdrawal. Here, we apply a gravimetric method in which the gravity is measured at the surface and at depth on different sites. Then the time variations of the surface to depth (STD) gravity differences are compared for each site. In this study we attempt to evaluate the magnitude of epikarstic water storage variation in various karst settings using a CG5 portable gravimeter. Surface to depth gravity measurements are performed two times a year since 2009 at the surface an inside caves at different depths on three karst aquifers in southern France : 1. A limestone site on the Larzac plateau with a vadose zone thickness of 300m On this site measurements are done on five locations at different depths going from 0 to 50 m; 2. A dolomitic site on the Larzac plateau (Durzon karst aquifer) with a vadose zone thickness of 200m; Measurements are taken at the surface and at 60m depth 3. A limestone site on the Hortus karst aquifer and "Larzac Septentrional karst aquifer") with a vadose zone thickness of only 35m. Measurements are taken at the surface and at 30m depth Therefore, our measurements are used in two ways : First, the STD differences between dry and wet seasons are used to estimate the capacity of differential storage of each aquifer. Surprisingly, the differential storage capacity of all the sites is relatively invariant despite their variable geological of hydrological contexts. Moreover, the STD gravity variations on site 1 show that no water storage variation occurs beneath 10m depth

  5. Depth measurements of drilled holes in bone by laser triangulation for the field of oral implantology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quest, D.; Gayer, C.; Hering, P.

    2012-01-01

    Laser osteotomy is one possible method of preparing beds for dental implants in the human jaw. A major problem in using this contactless treatment modality is the lack of haptic feedback to control the depth while drilling the implant bed. A contactless measurement system called laser triangulation is presented as a new procedure to overcome this problem. Together with a tomographic picture the actual position of the laser ablation in the bone can be calculated. Furthermore, the laser response is sufficiently fast as to pose little risk to surrounding sensitive areas such as nerves and blood vessels. In the jaw two different bone structures exist, namely the cancellous bone and the compact bone. Samples of both bone structures were examined with test drillings performed either by laser osteotomy or by a conventional rotating drilling tool. The depth of these holes was measured using laser triangulation. The results and the setup are reported in this study.

  6. New measurement technique of ductility curve for ductility-dip cracking susceptibility in Alloy 690 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Uegaki, Takanori; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2016-08-30

    The coupling of a hot tensile test with a novel in situ observation technique using a high-speed camera was investigated as a high-accuracy quantitative evaluation method for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Several types of Alloy 690 filler wire were tested in this study owing to its susceptibility to DDC. The developed test method was used to directly measure the critical strain for DDC and high temperature ductility curves with a gauge length of 0.5 mm. Minimum critical strains of 1.3%, 4.0%, and 3.9% were obtained for ERNiCrFe-7, ERNiCrFe-13, and ERNiCrFe-15, respectively. The DDC susceptibilities of ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 were nearly the same and quite low compared with that of ERNiCrFe-7. This was likely caused by the tortuosity of the grain boundaries arising from the niobium content of around 2.5% in the former samples. Besides, ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 indicated higher minimum critical strains even though these specimens include higher content of sulfur and phosphorus than ERNiCrFe-7. Thus, containing niobium must be more effective to improve the susceptibility compared to sulfur and phosphorous in the alloy system.

  7. New measurement technique of ductility curve for ductility-dip cracking susceptibility in Alloy 690 welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoi, Kota; Uegaki, Takanori; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of a hot tensile test with a novel in situ observation technique using a high-speed camera was investigated as a high-accuracy quantitative evaluation method for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Several types of Alloy 690 filler wire were tested in this study owing to its susceptibility to DDC. The developed test method was used to directly measure the critical strain for DDC and high temperature ductility curves with a gauge length of 0.5 mm. Minimum critical strains of 1.3%, 4.0%, and 3.9% were obtained for ERNiCrFe-7, ERNiCrFe-13, and ERNiCrFe-15, respectively. The DDC susceptibilities of ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 were nearly the same and quite low compared with that of ERNiCrFe-7. This was likely caused by the tortuosity of the grain boundaries arising from the niobium content of around 2.5% in the former samples. Besides, ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 indicated higher minimum critical strains even though these specimens include higher content of sulfur and phosphorus than ERNiCrFe-7. Thus, containing niobium must be more effective to improve the susceptibility compared to sulfur and phosphorous in the alloy system.

  8. Angle-Beam Shear Wave Scattering from Buried Crack-like Defects in Bonded Specimens (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    defects: such as understanding the scattering behavior of fatigue cracks emanating from fastener holes in aluminum structural components [2]. Angle...Ultrasonic NDE techniques using angle-beam wedges coupled to PZT transducers have also been utilized in measuring the depth of surface-breaking cracks

  9. On the control of irrigation through soil moisture measurement using a neutron depth probe in horizontal subsurface measuring circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaecke, B.; Schaecke, E.

    1977-01-01

    An outline is given of the advantages inherent in soil moisture measurement by means of a neutron probe in horizontal subsurface measuring circuits for irrigation control. Preliminary experience for the setting up of a field calibration curve and for practical measurement are submitted. This technique includes the following advantages: almost complete covering of the upper soil range which is of interest to irrigation control; good measuring density; suitable distribution of measuring points per unit area; possibility of continuous probe passage; optimal repeatability of measurements; exploration of a unit area with but few measuring circuits; no obstacles to tillage, drilling, intercultivation and harvest operations; and complete conservation of crop and plot which is not reached with any other soil moisture measurement technique so far available. Making use of the above advantages, the new technique allows automatic irrigation control with only one neutron depth probe. (author)

  10. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, P.; Hashemi, M.; Hoppe, S.; Wessel, S.; Hagens, R.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Rübhausen, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  11. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Behm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  12. Measurement of components of load parallel to cracks in a proof of safety against fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amstutz, H.; Seeger, T.

    1992-01-01

    Largely standardized processes are now available in the R6 concept, the engineering approach and the engineering treatment model (ETM) according to Schwalbe, which make judgment and quantitative assessment of the fracture and failure behaviour of components with cracks and faults similar to cracks possible. When using the process on components with a multi-axial basic stress state, the question arises for pure mode I stresses, to what extent and in what form the effect of the load parallel to the cracks can be included in the concepts. Based on a numerical study with finite elements, the connections between global bi-axial load and local stress conditions are shown in the article, using the example of the J integral, and are discussed regarding taken them into account in the proof of safety against fracture. (orig.) [de

  13. Ultrasonic sizing of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    Surface and buried fatigue cracks in steel plates have been sized using immersion probes as transmitters-receivers, angled to produce shear waves in the steel. Sizes have been estimated by identifying the ultrasonic waves diffracted from the crack tip and by measuring the time taken for a signal to travel to and from the crack tip. The effects of compression normal to a fatigue crack and of crack front curvature are discussed. Another diffraction technique, developed by UKAEA, Harwell, is reviewed

  14. The application of RBI-concept to ultrasonic measurement of fatigue cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Saerkiniemi, P.; Kauppinen, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    In many power plants there are problem areas, which are not included in the official inspection programs. Flaws can be induced during service due to the service conditions in components and welded joints. These can lead to failures, which cause unforeseen shutdowns during operation and unscheduled repairs have to be earned out. The basic idea of Risk Based Inspection (RBI) methodology is to include this kind of objects in the inspection program. In this presentation two possible objects for RBI are described - thermal fatigue cracking in process piping and fatigue cracking in spinning fly wheel. (orig.) 4 refs.

  15. The application of RBI-concept to ultrasonic measurement of fatigue cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J; Saerkiniemi, P; Kauppinen, P [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-12-31

    In many power plants there are problem areas, which are not included in the official inspection programs. Flaws can be induced during service due to the service conditions in components and welded joints. These can lead to failures, which cause unforeseen shutdowns during operation and unscheduled repairs have to be earned out. The basic idea of Risk Based Inspection (RBI) methodology is to include this kind of objects in the inspection program. In this presentation two possible objects for RBI are described - thermal fatigue cracking in process piping and fatigue cracking in spinning fly wheel. (orig.) 4 refs.

  16. Novel Methods for Measuring Depth of Anesthesia by Quantifying Dominant Information Flow in Multichannel EEGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kab-Mun Cha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose novel methods for measuring depth of anesthesia (DOA by quantifying dominant information flow in multichannel EEGs. Conventional methods mainly use few EEG channels independently and most of multichannel EEG based studies are limited to specific regions of the brain. Therefore the function of the cerebral cortex over wide brain regions is hardly reflected in DOA measurement. Here, DOA is measured by the quantification of dominant information flow obtained from principle bipartition. Three bipartitioning methods are used to detect the dominant information flow in entire EEG channels and the dominant information flow is quantified by calculating information entropy. High correlation between the proposed measures and the plasma concentration of propofol is confirmed from the experimental results of clinical data in 39 subjects. To illustrate the performance of the proposed methods more easily we present the results for multichannel EEG on a two-dimensional (2D brain map.

  17. Intercomparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from Brewer Ozone spectrophotometers and CIMEL sunphotometers measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cheymol

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Langley plot method applied on the Brewer Ozone measurements can provide accurate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD in the UV-B. We present seven intercomparisons between AOD retrieved from Brewer Ozone measurements at 320 nm and AOD measured by CIMEL sunphotometer at 340 nm or 440 nm (shifted to 320 nm in using the Angström's law, which are stored in the international AERONET database. Only the intercomparisons between co-located instruments can be used to validate the Langley Plot Method applied to the Brewer measurements: in this case, all the correlation coefficients are above 0.82. If the instruments are not at the same site, the correlation between the AOD retrieved by both instruments is much lower. In applying the Angström's law the intercomparison is improved compared to previous study.

  18. Evaluation of the depth-integration method of measuring water discharge in large rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    The depth-integration method oor measuring water discharge makes a continuos measurement of the water velocity from the water surface to the bottom at 20 to 40 locations or verticals across a river. It is especially practical for large rivers where river traffic makes it impractical to use boats attached to taglines strung across the river or to use current meters suspended from bridges. This method has the additional advantage over the standard two- and eight-tenths method in that a discharge-weighted suspended-sediment sample can be collected at the same time. When this method is used in large rivers such as the Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio, a microwave navigation system is used to determine the ship's position at each vertical sampling location across the river, and to make accurate velocity corrections to compensate for shift drift. An essential feature is a hydraulic winch that can lower and raise the current meter at a constant transit velocity so that the velocities at all depths are measured for equal lengths of time. Field calibration measurements show that: (1) the mean velocity measured on the upcast (bottom to surface) is within 1% of the standard mean velocity determined by 9-11 point measurements; (2) if the transit velocity is less than 25% of the mean velocity, then average error in the mean velocity is 4% or less. The major source of bias error is a result of mounting the current meter above a sounding weight and sometimes above a suspended-sediment sampling bottle, which prevents measurement of the velocity all the way to the bottom. The measured mean velocity is slightly larger than the true mean velocity. This bias error in the discharge is largest in shallow water (approximately 8% for the Missouri River at Hermann, MO, where the mean depth was 4.3 m) and smallest in deeper water (approximately 3% for the Mississippi River at Vickbsurg, MS, where the mean depth was 14.5 m). The major source of random error in the discharge is the natural

  19. Measurements and estimation of the columnar optical depth of tropospheric aerosols in the UV spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Cachorro

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We report values of the columnar tropospheric aerosol optical depth at UV wavelengths based on experimental measurements of the direct spectral irradiances carried out by a commercial spectroradiometer (Li1800 of Licor company covering the range from 300–1100 nm at two stations with different climate characteristics in Spain. The first station is located in a rural site in north central Spain with continental climate. The data extend from March to the end of October of 1995. The other station is a coastal site in the Gulf of Cádiz (southwest Spain of maritime climate type. This study is mainly focused on the capability of estimating aerosol optical depth values in the UV region based on the extracted information in the visible and near infrared ranges. A first method has been used based on the Ångström turbidity parameters. However, since this method requires detailed spectral information, a second method has also been used, based on the correlation between wavelengths. A correlation has been established between the experimental aerosol optical depth values at 350 nm and 500 nm wavelengths. Although the type of aerosol seems to be the key factor that determines the quality of these estimations, the evaluation of the associated error is necessary to know the behaviour of these estimations in each area of study.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; transmission and scattering of radiation; troposphere – composition and chemistry

  20. Measurements and estimation of the columnar optical depth of tropospheric aerosols in the UV spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Cachorro

    Full Text Available We report values of the columnar tropospheric aerosol optical depth at UV wavelengths based on experimental measurements of the direct spectral irradiances carried out by a commercial spectroradiometer (Li1800 of Licor company covering the range from 300–1100 nm at two stations with different climate characteristics in Spain. The first station is located in a rural site in north central Spain with continental climate. The data extend from March to the end of October of 1995. The other station is a coastal site in the Gulf of Cádiz (southwest Spain of maritime climate type. This study is mainly focused on the capability of estimating aerosol optical depth values in the UV region based on the extracted information in the visible and near infrared ranges. A first method has been used based on the Ångström turbidity parameters. However, since this method requires detailed spectral information, a second method has also been used, based on the correlation between wavelengths. A correlation has been established between the experimental aerosol optical depth values at 350 nm and 500 nm wavelengths. Although the type of aerosol seems to be the key factor that determines the quality of these estimations, the evaluation of the associated error is necessary to know the behaviour of these estimations in each area of study.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; transmission and scattering of radiation; troposphere – composition and chemistry

  1. Depth of interaction resolution measurements for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive avalanche photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Silverman, Robert W; Shah, Kanai S; McClish, Mickel A; Farrell, Richard; Entine, Gerald; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-01-01

    We explore dual-ended read out of LSO arrays with two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) as a high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications. Flood histograms, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for unpolished LSO arrays with individual crystal sizes of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 mm, and for a polished LSO array with 1.3 mm pixels. The thickness of the crystal arrays was 20 mm. Good flood histograms were obtained for all four arrays, and crystals in all four arrays can be clearly resolved. Although the amplitude of each PSAPD signal decreases as the interaction depth moves further from the PSAPD, the sum of the two PSAPD signals is essentially constant with irradiation depth for all four arrays. The energy resolutions were similar for all four arrays, ranging from 14.7% to 15.4%. A DOI resolution of 3-4 mm (including the width of the irradiation band which is ∼2 mm) was obtained for all the unpolished arrays. The best DOI resolution was achieved with the unpolished 1 mm array (average 3.5 mm). The DOI resolution for the 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm unpolished arrays was 3.7 and 4.0 mm respectively. For the polished array, the DOI resolution was only 16.5 mm. Summing the DOI profiles across all crystals for the 1 mm array only degraded the DOI resolution from 3.5 mm to 3.9 mm, indicating that it may not be necessary to calibrate the DOI response separately for each crystal within an array. The DOI response of individual crystals in the array confirms this finding. These results provide a detailed characterization of the DOI response of these PSAPD-based PET detectors which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner making use of this detector approach

  2. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  3. An EPR methodology for measuring the London penetration depth for the ceramic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvin, B.; Mahl, T. A.; Dalal, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    The use is discussed of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a quick and easily accessible method for measuring the London penetration depth, lambda for the high T(sub c) superconductors. The method utilizes the broadening of the EPR signal, due to the emergence of the magnetic flux lattice, of a free radical adsorbed on the surface of the sample. The second moment, of the EPR signal below T(sub c) is fitted to the Brandt equation for a simple triangular lattice. The precision of this method compares quite favorably with those of the more standard methods such as micro sup(+)SR, Neutron scattering, and magnetic susceptibility.

  4. Photoirradiation system with depth optical dosimetry control in initial oxygen saturation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintanar, L.; Stolik, S.; Rosa, J. de la; Moreno, E.

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a technique in which a photosensitizing substance is applied that is activated by light and it generates reactive oxygen species which cause selective cell destruction. The efficiency of the therapy is affected by the parameters dose. In this work it is shown a photo-irradiation system for superficial Photodynamic Therapy, using as a light source a light emitting diode with an automatic control of optical power based on a model of the distribution of light in depth that was tested in tissue phantoms. It also has a reflective pulse oximeter for the measurement of the initial oxygen saturation. (Author)

  5. A comparison of two methods to measure choroidal thickness by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Lars Kristian; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Vergmann, Anna Stage

    Introduction The choroid is believed to be involved in the pathophysiology of several vision threatening diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy, inflammatory disorders and myopic macular degeneration. Enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical...... millimeter in each direction of fovea. Only the horizontal and vertical sections were selected for analysis. A total of 9 targets per eye that represented anatomically different choroidal locations were analysed for every subject. We used 2 different methods from the Heidelberg Explorer software to measure...

  6. Study of gas pipelines cracks using transmission and scattering measures with nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Marcela F.; Salgado, César M.

    2017-01-01

    Most of the natural gas production is transported through pipelines that require periodic inspections to evaluate the structural integrity of the pipelines due to possible defects caused by degradation that can rupture causing leakage of the fluid causing major disasters. Based on this, the project presents a methodology for predicting cracks in pipe used in gas pipelines. The approximation is based on the principles of gamma densitometry to calculate the density of the pipe wall in order to investigate possible cracks. The natural gas fluid is found in such systems and interferes in the density calculations and therefore will be considered in the simulations. The detection system uses a narrow beam geometry appropriately, comprising gamma ray source ( 137 Cs) and NaI(Tl) 3 ″ x 3 ″ detectors for calculating transmitted and scattered photons. Different positioning angles of the detector are investigated. In this study, the MCNP-X code is used to perform the simulations, in order to develop a counting geometry. Simulations of different thicknesses of the crack were also used to determine the minimum thickness detected by the two NaI(Tl) detectors. Having equipment that can estimate cracks present in pipes used in gas pipelines, in addition to predicting their location can reduce costs and make a major contribution to this sector. (author)

  7. Study of gas pipelines cracks using transmission and scattering measures with nuclear technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Marcela F.; Salgado, César M., E-mail: marcelafreita@gmail.com, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Most of the natural gas production is transported through pipelines that require periodic inspections to evaluate the structural integrity of the pipelines due to possible defects caused by degradation that can rupture causing leakage of the fluid causing major disasters. Based on this, the project presents a methodology for predicting cracks in pipe used in gas pipelines. The approximation is based on the principles of gamma densitometry to calculate the density of the pipe wall in order to investigate possible cracks. The natural gas fluid is found in such systems and interferes in the density calculations and therefore will be considered in the simulations. The detection system uses a narrow beam geometry appropriately, comprising gamma ray source ({sup 137}Cs) and NaI(Tl) 3 ″ x 3 ″ detectors for calculating transmitted and scattered photons. Different positioning angles of the detector are investigated. In this study, the MCNP-X code is used to perform the simulations, in order to develop a counting geometry. Simulations of different thicknesses of the crack were also used to determine the minimum thickness detected by the two NaI(Tl) detectors. Having equipment that can estimate cracks present in pipes used in gas pipelines, in addition to predicting their location can reduce costs and make a major contribution to this sector. (author)

  8. Measurement of the magnetic penetration depth in p-doped superconducting diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Lorenz; Brunner, Markus C.P.; Schneider, Ina; Kronfeldner, Klaus [University of Regensburg (Germany); Bousquet, Jessica; Bustarret, Etienne; Strunk, Christoph [Institut Neel, Grenoble (France)

    2016-07-01

    Boron-doped diamond becomes superconducting once a critical doping concentration of 4.5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is reached. Mutual inductance measurements with a two-coil setup have been performed to determine the magnetic penetration depth λ(T), which is a measure for the superfluid stiffnes θ ∝ 1/λ{sup 2}(T). Two superconducting p-doped diamond films with thicknesses of 145 nm and 345 nm were investigated. At low temperatures these values agree reasonably with the values expected within BCS-theory using T{sub c}, carrier density and mean free path determined from electric transport measurements. Magnetic penetration depths of 3.7 μm for the thinner and 2.6 μm for the thicker film have been found. λ decreases and accordingly θ increases with increasing film thickness. On the other hand, the superfluid stiffness drops by a factor of 2 or even more at T{sub c}/2, i.e., much faster than expected from BCS-theory, but remains finite between T{sub c}/2 < T < T{sub c}. At present it is unclear, whether this behavior results from the proliferation of phase fluctuations already far below T{sub c} or from a spatial inhomogeneity of the films.

  9. Retrieval of Saharan desert dust optical depth from thermal infrared measurements by IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, S.; Kochenova, S.; Vandaele, A.-C.; Kumps, N.; De Mazière, M.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols are a major actor in the climate system. They are responsible for climate forcing by both direct (by emission, absorption and scattering) and indirect effects (for example, by altering cloud microphysics). A better knowledge of aerosol optical properties, of the atmospheric aerosol load and of aerosol sources and sinks may therefore significantly improve the modeling of climate changes. Aerosol optical depth and other properties are retrieved on an operational basis from daytime measurements in the visible and near infrared spectral range by a number of instruments, like the satellite instruments MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, MISR and ground-based sunphotometers. Aerosol retrievals from day and night measurements at thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths (for example, from SEVIRI, AIRS and IASI satellite instruments) are less common, but they receive growing interest in more recent years. Among those TIR measuring instruments, IASI on METOP has one major advantage for aerosol retrievals: its large continuous spectral coverage, allowing to better capture the broadband signature of aerosols. Furthermore, IASI has a high spectral resolution (0.5cm-1 after apodization) which allows retrieving a large number of trace gases at the same time, it will nominally be in orbit for 15 years and offers a quasi global Earth coverage twice a day. Here we will show recently obtained results of desert aerosol properties (concentration, altitude, optical depth) retrieved from IASI TIR measurements, using the ASIMUT software (BIRA-IASB, Belgium) linked to (V)LIDORT (R. Spurr, RTsolutions Inc, US) and to SPHER (M. Mishchenko, NASA GISS, USA). In particular, we will address the case of Saharan desert dust storms, which are a major source of desert dust particles in the atmosphere. Those storms frequently transport sand to Europe, Western Asia or even South America. We will show some test-case comparisons between our retrievals and measurements from other instruments like those listed

  10. Turbulence Measurements from a Moored Platform at Mid-Depth in a Swift Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alex; Lueck, Rolf; Wolk, Fabian; McMillan, Justine

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from a turbulence experiment with a 3-m long streamlined floatation body, instrumented with velocity shear probes, fast-response thermistors, a 1 MHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (AD2CP), and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). The system was deployed over seven tidal cycles at mid-depth in a 30-m deep tidal channel in the lower Bay of Fundy, Canada. Peak flow speeds exceeded 2 m s-1, and while 10-min time scale average speeds were similar between ebb and flood, the variances were markedly higher during flood. Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rates measured with the shear probes exhibit a pronounced flood/ebb contrast: O(10-4) W kg-1 peak values during flood, but lower by an order of magnitude during ebb. Dissipation rates follow u3 scaling over a wide range of flow speeds between 0.5 and 2.5 m s-1. Below 0.5 m s-1 an asymmetry in the mounting arrangement caused the floatation body to pitch upward, biasing the measured dissipation values high. The ADV on the platform registered mean speed - used to implement Taylor's hypothesis - which was corroborated with the platform-mounted ADCP. Additional ADCPs were also deployed on a nearby bottom pod, sampling at turbulence resolving rates - up to 8 Hz. Comparisons between the shear probe and acoustic estimates of the TKE spectrum and dissipation rate - at comparable depths - are presented.

  11. Crack detection using image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, M.A.A

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contains five main subjects in eight chapters and two appendices. The first subject discus Wiener filter for filtering images. In the second subject, we examine using different methods, as Steepest Descent Algorithm (SDA) and the Wavelet Transformation, to detect and filling the cracks, and it's applications in different areas as Nano technology and Bio-technology. In third subject, we attempt to find 3-D images from 1-D or 2-D images using texture mapping with Open Gl under Visual C ++ language programming. The fourth subject consists of the process of using the image warping methods for finding the depth of 2-D images using affine transformation, bilinear transformation, projective mapping, Mosaic warping and similarity transformation. More details about this subject will be discussed below. The fifth subject, the Bezier curves and surface, will be discussed in details. The methods for creating Bezier curves and surface with unknown distribution, using only control points. At the end of our discussion we will obtain the solid form, using the so called NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline); which depends on: the degree of freedom, control points, knots, and an evaluation rule; and is defined as a mathematical representation of 3-D geometry that can accurately describe any shape from a simple 2-D line, circle, arc, or curve to the most complex 3-D organic free-form surface or (solid) which depends on finding the Bezier curve and creating family of curves (surface), then filling in between to obtain the solid form. Another representation for this subject is concerned with building 3D geometric models from physical objects using image-based techniques. The advantage of image techniques is that they require no expensive equipment; we use NURBS, subdivision surface and mesh for finding the depth of any image with one still view or 2D image. The quality of filtering depends on the way the data is incorporated into the model. The data should be treated with

  12. On the Use of Line Depth Ratios to Measure Starspot Properties on Magnetically Active Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Douglas

    2006-07-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic techniques have proven to be effective ways to measure the properties of dark, cool starspots on magnetically active stars. Recently, a technique was introduced using atomic line depth ratios (LDRs) to measure starspot properties. Carefully reproducing this technique using a new set of spectroscopic observations of active stars, we find that the LDR technique encounters difficulties, specifically by overestimating spot temperatures (because the atomic lines blend with titanium oxide absorption in cooler spots) and by not tightly constraining the filling factor of spots. While the use of LDRs for active star studies has great promise, we believe that these concerns need to be addressed before the technique is more widely applied. This paper includes data taken at McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin.

  13. Can state or response entropy be used as a measure of sleep depth?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, P

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: In this prospective observational study we examined the potential of the spectral entropy measures \\'state\\' and \\'response\\' entropy (Entropy monitor), as measures of sleep depth in 12 healthy adult subjects. Both median state and response entropy values varied significantly with sleep stage (p = 0.017 and p = 0.014 respectively; ANOVA). Median state or response entropy did not decrease significantly during the transition from awake to stage I sleep (p > 0.017). State entropy values decreased significantly between sleep stages I and II (p < 0.001). Both state and response entropy values were significantly less (40 and 45 arbitrary units respectively) in stage III (slow wave sleep) vs stage II sleep (p = 0.008). We conclude that state and response entropy values, when expressed as a function of time, may be a useful means of quantifying aspects of sleep.

  14. Comparison of anterior chamber depths measured using the Pentacam, the IOLMaster, and ultrasound pachymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate and compare anterior chamber depths(ACDsmeasured using the Pentacam, the IOLMaster, and ultrasound pachymetry(US.METHODS: The present study was observational in nature. ACDs were measured in 138 eyes of 69 myopic patients, by the same operator, using the Pentacam, the IOLMaster, and US. We assessed the agreement among the three methods using Bland-Altman plots. The repeatability among the three methods was evaluated by within-subject standard deviation. RESULTS: The means±SDs of ACDs measured using the Pentacam, the IOLMaster, and US were 3.77±0.24, 3.73±0.23, and 3.69±0.22mm respectively. Bland-Altman analysis showed that Pentacam and IOLMaster data were in good agreement(CoA, 0.04mm; LoA,0.05 to 0.13mm, as were US and IOLMaster data(CoA, 0.04mm; LoA, 0.17 to 0.08mm, but the Pentacam ACD values were slightly greater than the US figures(CoA, 0.08mm; LoA, 0.06 to 0.22mm. Measurements of the ACD with the three devices also showed high repeatability(Sw=0.03, 0.02, and 0.03; 2.77 Sw=0.08, 0.06, and 0.08, respectively. The three depth estimates were positively correlated(r=0.946, 0.987, and 0.951; PCONCLUSION: Measurement of ACDs using the Pentacam, the IOLMaster, and US showed good agreement and repeatability. The Pentacam and IOLMaster ACDs, and the IOLMaster and US ACDs, agreed reasonably well, but agreement between the Pentacam and US data was poorer. However, both the absolute differences and the coefficients of variation were small, and the observed variability was likely not clinically significant.

  15. Rock stress measurements in ONKALO underground characterisation facility at Olkiluoto at depth of 120 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fecker, E.

    2007-04-01

    In November and December 2006 overcoring stress measurements have been conducted in the boreholes ONK-PP74, ONK-PP75 and ONK-PP77 in a niche of the access tunnel of the ONKALO underground characterisation facility at the Olkiluoto site. Measurements have been done using the CSIRO 3D stress measuring cell. This cell is one of the mostly used cells in the whole world for estimation of the state of stress in rock when doing the borehole measurements. The boreholes are at a depth of about 120 m under the ground surface. The rock where the measurements have been conducted is a foliated migmatitic gneiss (subtypes veined and diatexitic gneiss). Parallel to the overcoring measurements a glue test has been conducted in the laboratory to check the quality of the bonding of the stress cells to the rock. The result showed that the glue makes a good contact between the rock and the stress cell, but air bubbles, which have normally been observed within the glue and at the edges, proved this time to be disadvantageous. Normally such air bubbles have dimensions of about one millimetre, but sometimes certain bubbles may become notably bigger. In the ONKALO overcored probes sawn apart such air bubbles were found both in wet and dry probe conditions. In the test series eight stress measurements have been provided, three of them failed for technical reasons. At one of these three tests the glue has extruded too early, at the other two tests the overcoring was not conducted deep enough. At the remaining five tests in spite of the glue test results a calculation of the stress tensor could be made. Four of these five measurements can be seen as relatively successful. The results of these measurements show a major principal stress of 14.8 MPa in average, trending northwest - southeast, and with a dipping of 11 degrees in average. (orig.)

  16. Results from the Fourth WMO Filter Radiometer Comparison for aerosol optical depth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Kouremeti, Natalia; Diémoz, Henri; Gröbner, Julian; Forgan, Bruce W.; Campanelli, Monica; Estellés, Victor; Lantz, Kathleen; Michalsky, Joseph; Carlund, Thomas; Cuevas, Emilio; Toledano, Carlos; Becker, Ralf; Nyeki, Stephan; Kosmopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Tatsiankou, Viktar; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Denn, Frederick M.; Ohkawara, Nozomu; Ijima, Osamu; Goloub, Philippe; Raptis, Panagiotis I.; Milner, Michael; Behrens, Klaus; Barreto, Africa; Martucci, Giovanni; Hall, Emiel; Wendell, James; Fabbri, Bryan E.; Wehrli, Christoph

    2018-03-01

    This study presents the results of the Fourth Filter Radiometer Comparison that was held in Davos, Switzerland, between 28 September and 16 October 2015. Thirty filter radiometers and spectroradiometers from 12 countries participated including reference instruments from global aerosol networks. The absolute differences of all instruments compared to the reference have been based on the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) criterion defined as follows: 95% of the measured data has to be within 0.005 ± 0.001/m (where m is the air mass). At least 24 out of 29 instruments achieved this goal at both 500 and 865 nm, while 12 out of 17 and 13 out of 21 achieved this at 368 and 412 nm, respectively. While searching for sources of differences among different instruments, it was found that all individual differences linked to Rayleigh, NO2, ozone, water vapor calculations and related optical depths and air mass calculations were smaller than 0.01 in aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 and 865 nm. Different cloud-detecting algorithms used have been compared. Ångström exponent calculations showed relatively large differences among different instruments, partly because of the high calculation uncertainty of this parameter in low AOD conditions. The overall low deviations of these AOD results and the high accuracy of reference aerosol network instruments demonstrated a promising framework to achieve homogeneity, compatibility and harmonization among the different spectral AOD networks in the near future.

  17. Automated measurement of mouse social behaviors using depth sensing, video tracking, and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weizhe; Kennedy, Ann; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Navonne, Santiago G; Perona, Pietro; Anderson, David J

    2015-09-22

    A lack of automated, quantitative, and accurate assessment of social behaviors in mammalian animal models has limited progress toward understanding mechanisms underlying social interactions and their disorders such as autism. Here we present a new integrated hardware and software system that combines video tracking, depth sensing, and machine learning for automatic detection and quantification of social behaviors involving close and dynamic interactions between two mice of different coat colors in their home cage. We designed a hardware setup that integrates traditional video cameras with a depth camera, developed computer vision tools to extract the body "pose" of individual animals in a social context, and used a supervised learning algorithm to classify several well-described social behaviors. We validated the robustness of the automated classifiers in various experimental settings and used them to examine how genetic background, such as that of Black and Tan Brachyury (BTBR) mice (a previously reported autism model), influences social behavior. Our integrated approach allows for rapid, automated measurement of social behaviors across diverse experimental designs and also affords the ability to develop new, objective behavioral metrics.

  18. A Comparison of Multiscale Permutation Entropy Measures in On-Line Depth of Anesthesia Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Cui; Liang, Zhenhu; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Duan; Li, Yongwang; Ursino, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Multiscale permutation entropy (MSPE) is becoming an interesting tool to explore neurophysiological mechanisms in recent years. In this study, six MSPE measures were proposed for on-line depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitoring to quantify the anesthetic effect on the real-time EEG recordings. The performance of these measures in describing the transient characters of simulated neural populations and clinical anesthesia EEG were evaluated and compared. Six MSPE algorithms-derived from Shannon permutation entropy (SPE), Renyi permutation entropy (RPE) and Tsallis permutation entropy (TPE) combined with the decomposition procedures of coarse-graining (CG) method and moving average (MA) analysis-were studied. A thalamo-cortical neural mass model (TCNMM) was used to generate noise-free EEG under anesthesia to quantitatively assess the robustness of each MSPE measure against noise. Then, the clinical anesthesia EEG recordings from 20 patients were analyzed with these measures. To validate their effectiveness, the ability of six measures were compared in terms of tracking the dynamical changes in EEG data and the performance in state discrimination. The Pearson correlation coefficient (R) was used to assess the relationship among MSPE measures. CG-based MSPEs failed in on-line DoA monitoring at multiscale analysis. In on-line EEG analysis, the MA-based MSPE measures at 5 decomposed scales could track the transient changes of EEG recordings and statistically distinguish the awake state, unconsciousness and recovery of consciousness (RoC) state significantly. Compared to single-scale SPE and RPE, MSPEs had better anti-noise ability and MA-RPE at scale 5 performed best in this aspect. MA-TPE outperformed other measures with faster tracking speed of the loss of unconsciousness. MA-based multiscale permutation entropies have the potential for on-line anesthesia EEG analysis with its simple computation and sensitivity to drug effect changes. CG-based multiscale permutation

  19. Effective aerosol optical depth from pyranometer measurements of surface solar radiation (global radiation at Thessaloniki, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Lindfors

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyranometer measurements of the solar surface radiation (SSR are available at many locations worldwide, often as long time series covering several decades into the past. These data constitute a potential source of information on the atmospheric aerosol load. Here, we present a method for estimating the aerosol optical depth (AOD using pyranometer measurements of the SSR together with total water vapor column information. The method, which is based on radiative transfer simulations, was developed and tested using recent data from Thessaloniki, Greece. The effective AOD calculated using this method was found to agree well with co-located AERONET measurements, exhibiting a correlation coefficient of 0.9 with 2/3 of the data found within ±20% or ±0.05 of the AERONET AOD. This is similar to the performance of current satellite aerosol methods. Differences in the AOD as compared to AERONET can be explained by variations in the aerosol properties of the atmosphere that are not accounted for in the idealized settings used in the radiative transfer simulations, such as variations in the single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent. Furthermore, the method is sensitive to calibration offsets between the radiative transfer simulations and the pyranometer SSR. The method provides an opportunity of extending our knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol load to locations and times not covered by dedicated aerosol measurements.

  20. Reliable micro-measurement of strontium is the key to cracking the life-history code in the fish otolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F.; Trompetter, W.J.; Dioses, T.; Gauldie, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    The fish otolith is a calcium carbonate (usually aragonite) crystal that grows continuously by accretion over the life of the fish and unlike bone is not continuously re-metabolised. Consequently, the otolith has long been regarded as a potential store of information about the life history of an individual fish, and this information is encoded in the deposition pattern of trace elements in the otolith. The code has been difficult to crack. However, recent developments have show that: (1) Sr is one of the few non-mobile trace elements in the otolith; and (2) the pattern of Sr deposition summarises the effects of environment changes that affect the growth rate of the otolith crystal. The remaining difficulties in cracking the chemical code in the otolith have hinged about making reliable micro-measurements of the stable Sr content at spatial resolutions of 10 μm or less; this interval represents about 4-6 days of otolith growth in most species of fish. This paper describes high beam resolution 2 μm linear measurements, and 6 μm square measurements over narrow windows of about 300 μm square, and links these micro-measures to macro-measures of 2D maps of the entire surface of sections of otoliths up to 5 mm square at beam resolutions of 25 μm square. The otoliths used in this study are from the Jurel, or Peruvian Jack mackerel, Trachurus murphyi (Carangidae: Teleostei)

  1. Detection and Sizing of Fatigue Cracks in Steel Welds with Advanced Eddy Current Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, E. I.; Mohr, W. C.; Lozev, M. G.

    2008-02-01

    Butt-welded specimens were fatigued to produce cracks in the weld heat-affected zone. Advanced eddy current (AEC) techniques were used to detect and size the cracks through a coating. AEC results were compared with magnetic particle and phased-array ultrasonic techniques. Validation through destructive crack measurements was also conducted. Factors such as geometry, surface treatment, and crack tightness interfered with depth sizing. AEC inspection techniques have the potential of providing more accurate and complete sizing flaw data for manufacturing and in-service inspections.

  2. Measurements of UV aerosol optical depth in the French Southern Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lenoble

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Routine measurements of global and diffuse UV irradiances at Briançon station (1310 m a.s.l. are used to retrieve the direct solar irradiance and the aerosol optical depth (AOD, for cloudless days. Data of three years (2003, 2004, 2005 are analyzed; the results confirm those of a preliminary analysis for 2001, 2002.

    The atmosphere is very clear in winter, with AODs between 0.05 and 0.1. The turbidity increases slowly in spring, starting end of February, with AODs around 0.2–0.3 in mid summer, some values reaching 0.4. A similar behaviour is observed for all years, with somewhat higher values in late summer for the year 2003.

  3. Measuring Compositions in Organic Depth Profiling: Results from a VAMAS Interlaboratory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shard, A. G.; Havelund, Rasmus; Spencer, Steve J.; Gilmore, I. S.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Angerer, Tina B.; Aoyagi, Satoka; Barnes, Jean P.; Benayad, Anass; Bernasik, Andrzej; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D.; Deeks, Christopher; Fletcher, John S.; Graham, Daniel J.; Heuser, Christian; Lee, Tae G.; Marie, Camille; Marzec, Mateusz M.; Mishra, Gautam; Rading, Derk; Renault, Oliver; Scurr, David J.; Shon, Hyun K.; Spampinato, Valentina; Tian, Hua; Wang, Fuyi; Winograd, Nicholas; Wu, Kui; Wucher, Andreas; Zhou, Yufan; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-07-23

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) interlaboratory study on the measurement of composition in organic depth profiling. Layered samples with known binary compositions of Irganox 1010 and either Irganox 1098 or Fmoc-pentafluoro-L-phenylalanine in each layer were manufactured in a single batch and distributed to more than 20 participating laboratories. The samples were analyzed using argon cluster ion sputtering and either X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) or Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to generate depth profiles. Participants were asked to estimate the volume fractions in two of the layers and were provided with the compositions of all other layers. Participants using XPS provided volume fractions within 0.03 of the nominal values. Participants using ToF-SIMS either made no attempt, or used various methods that gave results ranging in error from 0.02 to over 0.10 in volume fraction, the latter representing a 50% relative error for a nominal volume fraction of 0.2. Error was predominantly caused by inadequacy in the ability to compensate for primary ion intensity variations and the matrix effect in SIMS. Matrix effects in these materials appear to be more pronounced as the number of atoms in both the primary analytical ion and the secondary ion increase. Using the participants’ data we show that organic SIMS matrix effects can be measured and are remarkably consistent between instruments. We provide recommendations for identifying and compensating for matrix effects. Finally we demonstrate, using a simple normalization method, that virtually all ToF-SIMS participants could have obtained estimates of volume fraction that were at least as accurate and consistent as XPS.

  4. Sizing of small surface-breaking tight cracks by using laser-ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Kuroda, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Onodera, T.

    2004-01-01

    On the nondestructive testing, not only detection but also sizing of crack is desirable because the crack depth is one of the most important parameter to evaluate the impact of the crack to the material, to estimate crack growth and ultimately to predict lifetime of the component. Moreover, accurate measurement of the crack depth optimizes countermeasures and timing of repairs, and eventually reduces total cost for plant maintenance. Laser-ultrasonic is a technique that uses two laser beams; one with a short pulse for the generation of ultrasound and another one, long pulse or continuous, coupled to an optical interferometer for detection. The technique features a large detection bandwidth, which is important for small defect inspection. Another feature of laser-ultrasonics is the remote optical scanning of generation and detection points, which enables to inspect components in narrow space and/or having complex shapes. A purpose of this paper is to describe the performance of a laser-ultrasonic testing (LUT) system on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) inspection. We have developed a new technique for sizing shallow cracks, say 0.5-1.5mm, based on the laser-induced surface wave and its frequency analysis. First, sizing capability of the system will be demonstrated by using an artificial surface-breaking slot having depth of 0-2mm in a stainless steel plate. Evaluated depths show good agreement with the machined slot depths within the accuracy of about a few hundred micrometers. Then, SCCs in a stainless steel plate are examined by using the system. Depth of SCC is evaluated every 0.2mm over the crack aperture length. The evaluated depths are compared with the depths measured by the destructive testing. (author)

  5. Different Response of Sap Flow at Different Measurement Depths after Thinning in a Japanese Cypress Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C. W.; Gomi, T.; Onda, Y.; Kato, H.; Sakashita, W.; Sun, X.

    2017-12-01

    Thinning experiments in forests can alter light conditions and further affect growth rate and transpiration of the remained trees. Previous studies suggested transpiration was increased one year after thinning experiment due to improved canopy light condition. On the other hand, the anatomical and morphological responses to thinning are not react immediately because of the tree adaptation to the new surrounding conditions. It has been hypothesized that lower crown is connected to the inner part of sapwood and need more years to adapt new light conditions after thinning. However, our knowledge for the relationship between tree crown development and water movement inside the trunk after several years from thinning experiment was still limited due to lack of long-term field measurement after thinning. Therefore, in this study, we aim to examine the interannual variability of water movement inside the trunk accompanied the development of tree crown after thinning experiment. To do that, we applied sap flow measurement and terrestrial LiDAR survey from 2011 to 2017 in a Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) plantation in Japan, where 50% strip thinning experiment was conducted in the end of 2011. Consequently, we found sap flow densities at different measurement depths were not always increased year by year and those may relate to the crown development after thinning.

  6. Combining snow depth and innovative skier flow measurements in order to improve snow grooming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, Carlo Maria; Albrecht, Stéphane; Hargoaa, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, ski resort managers have massively improved their snow management practices, in order to adapt their strategies to the inter-annual variability in snow conditions and to the effects of climate change. New real-time informations, such as snow depth measurements carried out on the ski slopes by grooming machines during their daily operations, have become available, allowing high saving, efficiency and optimization gains (reducing for instance the groomer fuel consumption and operation time and the need for machine-made snow production). In order to take a step forward in improving the grooming techniques, it would be necessary to keep into account also the snow erosion by skiers, which depends mostly on the snow surface properties and on the skier attendance. Today, however, most ski resort managers have only a vague idea of the evolution of the skier flows on each slope during the winter season. In this context, we have developed a new sensor (named Skiflux) able to measure the skier attendance using an infrared beam crossing the slopes. Ten Skiflux sensors have been deployed during the 2016/17 winter season at Val Thorens ski area (French Alps), covering a whole sector of the resort. A dedicated software showing the number of skier passages in real time as been developed as well. Combining this new Skiflux dataset with the snow depth measurements from grooming machines (Snowsat System) and the snow and meteorological conditions measured in-situ (Liberty System from Technoalpin), we were able to create a "real-time skiability index" accounting for the quality of the surface snow and its evolution during the day. Moreover, this new framework allowed us to improve the preparation of ski slopes, suggesting new strategies for adapting the grooming working schedule to the snow quality and the skier attendance. In the near future, this work will benefit from the advances made within the H2020 PROSNOW project ("Provision of a prediction system allowing

  7. Central corneal thickness and anterior chamber depth measurement by Sirius® Scheimpflug tomography and ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available J Jorge,1 JL Rosado,2 JA Díaz-Rey,1 JM González-Méijome11Clinical and Experimental Optometry Research Laboratory, Center of Physics (Optometry, School of Sciences, University of Minho, Braga, 2Opticlinic, Lisboa, PortugalBackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of the new Sirius® Scheimpflug anterior segment examination device for measurement of central corneal thickness (CCT and anterior chamber depth (ACD with that of CCT measurements obtained by ultrasound pachymetry and ACD measurements obtained by ultrasound biometry, respectively.Methods: CCT and ACD was measured in 50 right eyes from 50 healthy subjects using a Sirius Scheimpflug camera, SP100 ultrasound pachymetry, and US800 ultrasound biometry.Results: CCT measured with the Sirius was 546 ± 39 µm and 541 ± 35 µm with SP100 ultrasound pachymetry (P = 0.003. The difference was statistically significant (mean difference 4.68 ± 10.5 µm; limits of agreement −15.8 to 25.20 µm. ACD measured with the Sirius was 2.96 ± 0.3 mm compared with 3.36 ± 0.29 mm using US800 ultrasound biometry (P < 0.001. The difference was statistically significant (mean difference −0.40 ± 0.16 mm; limits of agreement −0.72 to 0.07 mm. When the ACD values obtained using ultrasound biometry were corrected according to the values for CCT measured by ultrasound, the agreement increased significantly between both technologies for ACD measurements (mean difference 0.15 ± 0.16 mm; limits of agreement −0.16 to 0.45 mm.Conclusion: CCT and ACD measured by Sirius and ultrasound methods showing good agreement between repeated measurements obtained in the same subjects (repeatability with either instrument. However, CCT and ACD values, even after correcting ultrasound ACD by subtracting the CCT value obtained with either technology should not be used interchangeably.Keywords: Scheimpflug corneal tomography, ultrasound biometry, ultrasound pachymetry, limits of agreement

  8. Analysis of short and long crack behavior and single overload effect by crack opening stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sam Hong; Lee, Kyeong Ro

    1999-01-01

    The study analyzed the behaviors of short and long crack as well as the effect of single tensile overload on the crack behaviors by using fatigue crack opening behavior. Crack opening stress is measured by an elastic compliance method which may precisely and continuously provide many data using strain gages during experiment. The unusual growth behaviors of short crack and crack after the single tensile overload applied, was explained by the variations of crack opening stress. In addition, fatigue crack growth rate was expressed as a linear form for short crack as for long crack by using effective stress intensity factor range as fracture mechanical parameter, which is based on crack closure concept. And investigation is performed with respect to the relation between plastic zone size formed at the crack tip and crack retardation, crack length and the number of cycles promoted or retarded, and the overload effect on the fatigue life

  9. A Hydraulic Stress Measurement System for Investigations at Depth in Slim Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ask, M. V. S.; Ask, D.; Cornet, F. H.; Nilsson, T.; Talib, M.; Sundberg, J.

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of the state of stress is essential to most underground work in rock mechanics as it provides means to analyze the mechanical behavior of a rock mass, serve as boundary condition in rock engineering problems, and help understand rock mass stability and groundwater flow. Luleå University of Technology (LTU) has developed and built a wire-line system for hydraulic rock stress measurements in slim boreholes together with the University of Strasbourg and Geosigma AB. The system consists of a downhole- and a surface unit. The downhole unit consists of hydraulic fracturing equipment (straddle packers and downhole imaging tool) and their associated data acquisition systems. The surface unit comprises of a 40-foot container permanently mounted on a trailer, which is equipped with a tripod, wire-line winches, water hydraulics, and a generator. The surface unit serves as a climate-independent on-site operations center, as well as a self-supporting transport vessel for the entire system. Three hydraulic stress testing methods can be applied: hydraulic fracturing, sleeve fracturing and hydraulic testing of pre-existing fractures. The three-dimensional stress tensor and its variation with depth within a continuous rock mass can be determined in a scientific unambiguously way by integrating results from the three test methods. The testing system is state of the art in several aspects including: (1) Large depth range (3 km), (2) Ability to test three borehole dimensions, (3) Resistivity imager maps the orientation of tested fracture (which is highlighted); (4) Highly stiff and resistive to corrosion downhole testing equipment; and (5) Very detailed control on the injection flow rate and cumulative volume is obtained by a hydraulic injection pump with variable piston rate, and a highly sensitive flow-meter. These aspects highly reduce measurement-related uncertainties of stress determination. Commissioning testing and initial field tests are scheduled to occur in a 1200

  10. Crack identification based on synthetic artificial intelligent technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Mun Bo; Suh, Myung Won

    2001-01-01

    It has been established that a crack has an important effect on the dynamic behavior of a structure. This effect depends mainly on the location and depth of the crack. To identify the location and depth of a crack in a structure, a method is presented in this paper which uses synthetic artificial intelligent technique, that is, Adaptive-Network-based Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) solved via hybrid learning algorithm(the back-propagation gradient descent and the least-squares method) are used to learn the input(the location and depth of a crack)-output(the structural eigenfrequencies) relation of the structural system. With this ANFIS and a Continuous Evolutionary Algorithm(CEA), it is possible to formulate the inverse problem. CEAs based on genetic algorithms work efficiently for continuous search space optimization problems like a parameter identification problem. With this ANFIS, CEAs are used to identify the crack location and depth minimizing the difference from the measured frequencies. We have tried this new idea on a simple beam structure and the results are promising

  11. A room temperature LSO/PIN photodiode PET detector module that measures depth of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Melcher, C.L.; Manente, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of a 4 element PET detector module that uses a 2x2 array of 3 mm square PIN photodiodes to both measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and identify the crystal of interaction. Each photodiode is coupled to one end of a 3x3x25 mm LSO crystal, with the opposite ends of all 4 crystals attached to a single PMT that provides a timing signal and initial energy discrimination. Each LSO crystal is coated with a open-quotes lossyclose quotes reflector, so the ratio of light detected in the photodiode and PMT depends on the position of interaction in the crystal, and is used to determine this position on an event by event basis. This module is operated at +25 degrees C with a photodiode amplifier peaking time of 2 μs. When excited by a collimated beam of 511 keV photons at the photodiode end of the module (i.e. closest to the patient), the DOI resolution is 4 mm fwhm and the crystal of interaction is identified correctly 95% of the time. When excited at the opposite end of the module, the DOI resolution is 13 mm fwhm and the crystal of interaction is identified correctly 73% of the time. The channel to channel variations in performance are minimal

  12. Finite-Element Analysis of Crack Arrest Properties of Fiber Reinforced Composites Application in Semi-Elliptical Cracked Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyuan; Song, Shulei; Deng, Hongbo; Zhong, Kai

    2018-04-01

    In nowadays, repair method using fiber reinforced composites as the mainstream pipe repair technology, it can provide security for X100 high-grade steel energy long-distance pipelines in engineering. In this paper, analysis of cracked X100 high-grade steel pipe was conducted, simulation analysis was made on structure of pipes and crack arresters (CAs) to obtain the J-integral value in virtue of ANSYS Workbench finite element software and evaluation on crack arrest effects was done through measured elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter J-integral and the crack arrest coefficient K, in a bid to summarize effect laws of composite CAs and size of pipes and cracks for repairing CAs. The results indicate that the K value is correlated with laying angle λ, laying length L2/D1, laying thickness T1/T2of CAs, crack depth c/T1 and crack length a/c, and calculate recommended parameters for repairing fiber reinforced composite CAs in terms of two different crack forms.

  13. High spatial resolution measurement of depth-of-interaction of a PET LSO crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, A.; Kalinka, G.; Novak, D.; Sipos, A.; Vegh, J.; Molnar, J.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A new type of experimental technique to investigate the depth-of-interaction (DOI) dependence in small scintillator elements designed for high-resolution animal PET [1] has been introduced at our institute, recently. A lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystal (2x2x10 mm 3 ) was irradiated with a highly focused 2 MeV He + beam at the ATOMKI nuclear microprobe laboratory. Pulse height spectra from a photomultiplier (PMT) attached to one end of the LSO crystal were collected in list mode. Sequential scans of 1000x1000 μm 2 areas along the 10 mm long crystal were made to get high lateral resolution images of pulse height spectra at different distances from the window of the PMT. A mean pulse height algorithm was applied to each pixel to generate two dimensional intensity images and the corresponding spectra of 100 μmx1 mm areas. Representative pulse height spectra are shown in Fig. 1 for different distances between the position of irradiation and the PMT. The mean value of the pulse height spectrum describing the position of the full energy peak is a way to measure DOI effects. It is seen that the closer the DOI to the PMT-end of the crystal the higher the energy of the peak. The centre of the detected peak varies about 30 % along the lateral side of the crystal. This effect is due to the increasing number of reflections with associated loss of light when the distance between the DOI position and the light collecting PMT grows. Further these results, no difference in the light intensity was found depending on which position across (perpendicular to the length of) the crystal was irradiated with the microbeam. The obtained results of the overall DOI dependence confirm previous measurements on LSO crystals with similar geometry and wrapping but based on collimated gamma-ray irradiation. Since the present experimental setup allows obtaining data with several orders of magnitude better spatial resolution (from μm up to mm) than with

  14. Measuring soil frost depth in forest ecosystems with ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Butnor; John L. Campbell; James B. Shanley; Stanley. Zarnoch

    2014-01-01

    Soil frost depth in forest ecosystems can be variable and depends largely on early winter air temperatures and the amount and timing of snowfall. A thorough evaluation of ecological responses to seasonally frozen ground is hampered by our inability to adequately characterize the frequency, depth, duration and intensity of soil frost events. We evaluated the use of...

  15. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  16. Compressive residual stresses as a preventive measure against stress corrosion cracking on turbine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Ewald, J.; Fischer, K.; Gruendler, O.; Potthast, E.; Stuecker, E.; Winzen, G.

    1987-01-01

    Disk type low pressure turbine rotors have been designed for a large variety of power plant applications. Developing disk type rotors required a concerted effort to design a shaft/disk shrink fit with a minimum of tensile stress concentrations in order to aim for the lowest possible susceptibility to corrosive attack, i.e. stress corrosion cracking. As a result of stresses, the regions of greatest concern are the shrink fit boundaries and the keyways of turbine disks. These stresses are caused by service loading, i.e. centrifugal and shrinkage stresses and by manufacturing procedure, i.e. residual stresses. The compressive residual stresses partly compensate the tensile service stresses so that an increase of compressive residual stresses decreases the whole stress state of the component. Special manufacturing procedures, e.g. accelerated cooling after tempering can induce compressive residual stresses up to about 400 MPa in the hub bore region of turbine disk

  17. On-line depth measurement for laser-drilled holes based on the intensity of plasma emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chao-Ching; Chiu, Chih-Mu; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Kuo, Chia-Lung

    2014-09-01

    The direct time-resolved depth measurement of blind holes is extremely difficult due to the short time interval and the limited space inside the hole. This work presents a method that involves on-line plasma emission acquisition and analysis to obtain correlations between the machining processes and the optical signal output. Given that the depths of laser-machined holes can be estimated on-line using a coaxial photodiode, this was employed in our inspection system. Our experiments were conducted in air under normal atmospheric conditions without gas assist. The intensity of radiation emitted from the vaporized material was found to correlate with the depth of the hole. The results indicate that the estimated depths of the laser-drilled holes were inversely proportional to the maximum plasma light emission measured for a given laser pulse number.

  18. Quantitative optical fluorescence microprobe measurements of stresses around indentations in Al2O3 and Al2O3/SiC nanocomposites: The influence of depth resolution and specimen translucency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Sheng; Todd, R.I.

    2011-01-01

    Residual stresses around 1 kg Vickers indentations in Al 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 /SiC nanocomposites were measured using high-resolution Cr 3+ fluorescence microscopy. Experiments and modelling showed that the use of non-confocal microscopes can lead to significant underestimation of the surface stress in Al 2 O 3 because of the sampling of subsurface regions where the stresses are lower. The nanocomposites were less sensitive to the depth resolution of the microscope because their strong absorption limited the depth from which fluorescent radiation was collected. The use of confocal microscope settings allowed accurate measurements to be made and the indentation stresses were found to be very similar in Al 2 O 3 and the Al 2 O 3 /SiC nanocomposites. The stresses measured were significantly different from the predictions of the Yoffe model for indentation stresses. This was because of indentation cracking, which is not accounted for in the model. Cracking was also considered to be important in determining the plastic zone size in ceramics, which is much smaller relative to the indentation size than in metals.

  19. Estimating drain flow from measured water table depth in layered soils under free and controlled drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Samaneh; Bowling, Laura; Frankenberger, Jane; Kladivko, Eileen

    2018-01-01

    Long records of continuous drain flow are important for quantifying annual and seasonal changes in the subsurface drainage flow from drained agricultural land. Missing data due to equipment malfunction and other challenges have limited conclusions that can be made about annual flow and thus nutrient loads from field studies, including assessments of the effect of controlled drainage. Water table depth data may be available during gaps in flow data, providing a basis for filling missing drain flow data; therefore, the overall goal of this study was to examine the potential to estimate drain flow using water table observations. The objectives were to evaluate how the shape of the relationship between drain flow and water table height above drain varies depending on the soil hydraulic conductivity profile, to quantify how well the Hooghoudt equation represented the water table-drain flow relationship in five years of measured data at the Davis Purdue Agricultural Center (DPAC), and to determine the impact of controlled drainage on drain flow using the filled dataset. The shape of the drain flow-water table height relationship was found to depend on the selected hydraulic conductivity profile. Estimated drain flow using the Hooghoudt equation with measured water table height for both free draining and controlled periods compared well to observed flow with Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values above 0.7 and 0.8 for calibration and validation periods, respectively. Using this method, together with linear regression for the remaining gaps, a long-term drain flow record for a controlled drainage experiment at the DPAC was used to evaluate the impacts of controlled drainage on drain flow. In the controlled drainage sites, annual flow was 14-49% lower than free drainage.

  20. Depth-resolved phase retardation measurements for laser-assisted non-ablative cartilage reshaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Jong-In [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Vargas, Gracie [Center for Bioengineering, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Wong, Brian J F [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Milner, Thomas E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2005-05-07

    Since polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is emerging as a new technique for determining phase retardation in biological materials, we measured phase retardation changes in cartilage during local laser heating for application to laser-assisted cartilage reshaping. Thermally-induced changes in phase retardation of nasal septal cartilage following Nd:YAG laser irradiation were investigated using a PS-OCT system. A PS-OCT system and infrared imaging radiometer were used to record, respectively, depth-resolved images of the Stokes parameters of light backscattered from ex vivo porcine nasal septal cartilage and radiometric temperature changes following laser irradiation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded before (control), during and after laser irradiation. From the measured Stokes parameters (I, Q, U and V), an estimate of the relative phase retardation between two orthogonal polarizations was computed to determine birefringence in cartilage. Phase retardation images of light backscattered from cartilage show significant changes in retardation following laser irradiation. To investigate the origin of retardation changes in response to local heat generation, we differentiated two possible mechanisms: dehydration and thermal denaturation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded after dehydration in glycerol and thermal denaturation in heated physiological saline. In our experiments, observed retardation changes in cartilage are primarily due to dehydration. Since dehydration is a principal source for retardation changes in cartilage over the range of heating profiles investigated, our studies suggest that the use of PS-OCT as a feedback control methodology for non-ablative cartilage reshaping requires further investigation.

  1. Depth-resolved phase retardation measurements for laser-assisted non-ablative cartilage reshaping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Jong-In; Vargas, Gracie; Wong, Brian J F; Milner, Thomas E

    2005-01-01

    Since polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is emerging as a new technique for determining phase retardation in biological materials, we measured phase retardation changes in cartilage during local laser heating for application to laser-assisted cartilage reshaping. Thermally-induced changes in phase retardation of nasal septal cartilage following Nd:YAG laser irradiation were investigated using a PS-OCT system. A PS-OCT system and infrared imaging radiometer were used to record, respectively, depth-resolved images of the Stokes parameters of light backscattered from ex vivo porcine nasal septal cartilage and radiometric temperature changes following laser irradiation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded before (control), during and after laser irradiation. From the measured Stokes parameters (I, Q, U and V), an estimate of the relative phase retardation between two orthogonal polarizations was computed to determine birefringence in cartilage. Phase retardation images of light backscattered from cartilage show significant changes in retardation following laser irradiation. To investigate the origin of retardation changes in response to local heat generation, we differentiated two possible mechanisms: dehydration and thermal denaturation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded after dehydration in glycerol and thermal denaturation in heated physiological saline. In our experiments, observed retardation changes in cartilage are primarily due to dehydration. Since dehydration is a principal source for retardation changes in cartilage over the range of heating profiles investigated, our studies suggest that the use of PS-OCT as a feedback control methodology for non-ablative cartilage reshaping requires further investigation

  2. Surface crack growth in cylindrical hollow specimen subject to tension and torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject for studies is an aluminium cylindrical hollow specimen with external axial and part circumferential semi-elliptical surface crack undergoing fatigue loads. Both the optical microscope measurements and the crack opening displacement (COD method are used to monitor and calculate both crack depth and crack length during the tests. The variation of crack growth behaviour is studied under cyclic axial tension, pure torsion and combined tension+torsion fatigue loading. For the particular surface flaw geometries considered, the elastic and plastic in-plane and out-of-plane constraint parameters, as well as the governing parameter for stress fields in the form of In-integral and plastic stress intensity factor, are obtained as a function of the aspect ratio, dimensionless crack length and crack depth. The combined effect of tension and torsion loading and initial surface flaw orientation on the crack growth for two type of aluminium alloys is made explicit. The experimental and numerical results of the present study provided the opportunity to explore the suggestion that fatigue crack propagation may be governed more strongly by the plastic stress intensity factor rather than the magnitude of the elastic SIFs alone. One advantage of the plastic SIF is its sensitivity to combined loading due to accounting for the plastic properties of the material.

  3. Confocal examination of subsurface cracking in ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etman, Maged K

    2009-10-01

    The original ceramic surface finish and its microstructure may have an effect on crack propagation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between crack propagation and ceramic microstructure following cyclic fatigue loading, and to qualitatively evaluate and quantitatively measure the surface and subsurface crack depths of three types of ceramic restorations with different microstructures using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Twenty (8 x 4 x 2 mm(3)) blocks of AllCeram (AC), experimental ceramic (EC, IPS e.max Press), and Sensation SL (SSL) were prepared, ten glazed and ten polished of each material. Sixty antagonist enamel specimens were made from the labial surfaces of permanent incisors. The ceramic abraders were attached to a wear machine, so that each enamel specimen presented at 45 degrees to the vertical movement of the abraders, and immersed in artificial saliva. Wear was induced for 80K cycles at 60 cycles/min with a load of 40 N and 2-mm horizontal deflection. The specimens were examined for cracks at baseline, 5K, 10K, 20K, 40K, and 80K cycles. Twenty- to 30-microm deep subsurface cracking appeared in SSL, with 8 to 10 microm in AC, and 7 microm close to the margin of the wear facets in glazed EC after 5K cycles. The EC showed no cracks with increasing wear cycles. Seventy-microm deep subsurface cracks were detected in SSL and 45 microm in AC after 80K cycles. Statistically, there was significant difference among the three materials (p 0.05) in crack depth within the same ceramic material with different surface finishes. The ceramic materials with different microstructures showed different patterns of subsurface cracking.

  4. Evaluation on ultrasonic examination methods applied to Ni-base alloy weld including cracks due to stress corrosion cracking found in BWR reactor internal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Shinichi; Shimizu, Sadato

    2005-01-01

    A Ni-base alloy weld, including cracks due to stress corrosion cracking found in the reactor internal of the oldest BWR in Japan, Tsuruga unit 1, in 1999, was examined by three (3) types of UT method. After this examination, a depth of each crack was confirmed by carrying out a little excavation with a grinder and PT examination by turns until each crack disappeared. Then, the depth measured by the former method was compared with the one measured by the latter method. In this fashion, performances of the UT methods were verified. As a result, a combination of the three types of UT method was found to meet the acceptance criteria given by ASME Sec.XI Appendix VIII, Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems-Supplement 6. In this paper, the results of the UT examination described above and their evaluation are discussed. (author)

  5. Monitoring Induced Fractures with Electrical Measurements using Depth to Surface Resistivity: A Field Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, M.; Nieuwenhuis, G.; Sun, S.; MacLennan, K.

    2016-12-01

    Electrical methods offer an attractive option to map induced fractures because the recovered anomaly is related to the electrical conductivity of the injected fluid in the open (propped) section of the fracture operation. This is complementary to existing micro-seismic technology, which maps the mechanical effects of the fracturing. In this paper we describe a 2014 field case where a combination of a borehole casing electrode and a surface receiver array was used to monitor hydrofracture fracture creation and growth in an unconventional oil field project. The fracture treatment well was 1 km long and drilled to a depth of 2.2 km. Twelve fracture events were induced in 30 m intervals (stages) in the 1 km well. Within each stage 5 events (clusters) were initiated at 30 m intervals. Several of the fracture stages used a high salinity brine, instead of fresh water, to enhance the electrical signal. The electrical experiment deployed a downhole source in a well parallel to the treatment well and 100 m away. The source consisted of an electrode attached to a wireline cable into which a 0.25 Hz square wave was injected. A 60-station electrical field receiver array was placed above the fracture and extending for several km. Receivers were oriented to measure electrical field parallel with the presumed fracture direction and those perpendicular to it. Active source electrical data were collected continuously during 7 frac stages, 3 of which used brine as the frac fluid over a period of several days. Although the site was quite noisy and the electrical anomaly small we managed to extract a clear frac anomaly using field separation, extensive signal averaging and background noise rejection techniques. Preliminary 3D modeling, where we account for current distribution of the casing electrode and explicitly model multiple thin conductive sheets to represent fracture stages, produces a model consistent with the field measurements and also highlights the sensitivity of the

  6. Cracking in Flexural Reinforced Concrete Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    The system of cracks developing in reinforced concrete is in many aspects essential when modelling structures in both serviceability- and ultimate limit state. This paper discusses the behavior concerning crack development in flexural members observed from tests and associates it with two different...... existing models. From the investigations an approach is proposed on how to predict the crack pattern in flexural members involving two different crack systems; primary flexural cracks and local secondary cracks. The results of the approach is in overall good agreement with the observed tests and captures...... the pronounced size effect associated with flexural cracking in which the crack spacing and crack widths are approximately proportional to the depth of the member....

  7. Critical experiments, measurements and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels. Sixth quarterly progress report, January--March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.; Gehlen, P.C.; Hoagland, R.G.; Kanninen, M.F.; Popelar, C.; Rosenfield, A.R.

    1976-07-01

    Governing equations for a complete two-dimensional analysis of fast fracture and crack arrest (including inertia and thermal gradients) are derived. Strain energy and compliance values calculated for an SEN specimen agree with experiment. In the case of a nonstationary crack, the strain energy release rate is computed from the nodal displacements in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip. This value of G is sensitive to the spacings between nodes in the x and y direction. Results of two-dimensional analyses of propagation and arrest in the SEN test piece are also described; they are in general accord with one propagation event measured in an SEN A533B steel test piece. Compliance measurements were carried out on the rectangular DCB specimen to test the accuracy of the compliance values calculated with the one-dimensional beam-on-elastic-foundation model. These compliance values and the derivatives of compliance with crack length are used to relate the loads or displacements at fracture onset and at arrest to K/sub Q/, K/sub D/, and K/sub a/. Efforts were also made to test the assumption that energy losses arising from damping remote from the crack tip can be neglected. Measurements of damped oscillations in an A533B DCB specimen with a stationary crack indicate that total damping rates are relatively low, and that oscillations of the load pins in the pinhole account for the bulk of the damping. Finally, a new procedure for measuring K/sub D/ and K/sub m/ values is described; it is based on a dynamic analysis of the crack length at arrest and dynamically stiff wedge loading (the tie-down device) and eliminates the need for crack velocity measurements. It can also be applied to both small and large crack jumps and to ordinary and duplex-DCB specimens. Results for A533B steel agree with K/sub D/-values obtained from velocity measurements. The new procedure is also used to analyze results for a series of ship steels

  8. Critical experiments, measurements and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels. Task 62. Second annual progress report, 1 July 1975 to 30 June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.; Gehlen, P.C.; Hoagland, R.G.; Marschall, C.W.; Kanninen, M.F.; Popelar, C.; Rosenfield, A.R.

    1976-10-01

    Developments of the theory, the analyses and the materials characterization for assessments of crack arrest in heavy walled nuclear pressure vessels are described. A two-dimensional, dynamic, finite difference analysis of crack propagation and arrest, including inertia forces and thermal stresses is derived. The analysis is used to treat run-arrest events in DCB- and SEN-specimens. Calculations based on the one-dimensional analysis are compared with detailed measurements of run-arrest in two polymeric materials. The agreements between calculations and experiments support the dynamic, energy conservation theory of crack arrest. Implications of a K/sub ID/-crack velocity curve with a negative slope are examined. The quantity K/sub Im/, the minimum propagating crack toughness, is identified as the crack arrest material property for engineering applications. Considerations entering the design of a crack arrest property measuring procedure, including specimen shape, size, thickness and the crack jump are discussed. The influence of side grooves on the propensity for crack branching is examined. Compliance measurements for rectangular DCB-specimens are presented and analyzed. Energy losses arising from damping remote from the crack tip in an A533B steel DCB specimen are described, and classed as negligible. Interactions between test pieces and the loading system are examined. A simplified procedure for measuring K/sub D/-, K/sub m/-, and K/sub a/-values, based on the dynamic analysis of the crack length at arrest is demonstrated. Measurements of K/sub D/ at temperatures in the range (NDT-66)C to (NDT +34)C and for crack velocities in the range 200 ms -1 to 1000 ms -1 are presented. The connection between propagating crack toughness values and the rapidly loaded stationary crack toughness K/sub Id/ is examined

  9. Detection of a surface breaking crack by using the centroid variations of laser ultrasonic spectrums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Baik, Sung Hoon; Lim, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Sang; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Cha, Hyung Ki; Kang, Young June

    2006-01-01

    A laser ultrasonic system is a non-contact inspection device with a wide-band spectrum and a high spatial resolution. It provides absolute measurements of the moving distance and it can be applied to hard-to-access locations including curved or rough surfaces like in a nuclear power plant. In this paper, we have investigated the detection methods of the depth of a surface-breaking crack by using the surface wave of a laser ultrasound. The filtering function of a surface-breaking crack is a kind of a low-pass filter. The higher frequency components are more highly decreased in proportion to the crack depth. Also, the center frequency value of each ultrasound spectrum is decreased in proportion to the crack depth. We extracted the depth information of a surface-breaking crack by observing the centroid variation of the frequency spectrum. We describe the experimental results to detect the crack depth information by using the peak-to-valley values in the time domain and the center frequency values in the frequency domain.

  10. Comparison of theoretical estimates and experimental measurements of fatigue crack growth under severe thermal shock conditions (part one - experimental observations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, D.; Green, D.; Parker, R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment in which a severe thermal cycle comprising of alternate upshocks and downshocks has been applied to an axisymmetric feature with an internal, partial penetration weld and crevice. The direction of cracking and crack growth rate were observed experimentally and detailed records made of the thermal cycle. A second part to the paper, reported separately, compares a linear elastic fracture mechanics assessment of the cracking to the experimental observations

  11. Microscopic measurement of penetration depth in YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films by scanning Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral, A.; Bending, S.J.; Humphreys, R.G.; Henini, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have used a low noise scanning Hall probe microscope to measure the penetration depth microscopically in a YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ thin film as a function of temperature. The instrument has high magnetic field (approx. 2.9x10 -8 T Hz -1/2 at 77 K) and spatial resolution (approx. 0.85 μm). Magnetic field profiles of single vortices in the superconducting film have been successfully measured and the microscopic penetration depth of the superconductor has been extracted. We find surprisingly large variations in values of λ for different vortices within the scanning field. (author)

  12. A Decade of Change: Measuring the Extent, Depth and Severity of Food Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Rates of food insecurity in the US have been rising since 2000 spiking with the onset of the Great Recession in 2008, and have remained essentially unchanged since then despite improvements in the economy. The present study employed a series of indices adapted from the poverty literature to examine the depth and severity of food insecurity across the decade by race and ethnicity among low-income households with and without children. The most rapid increases in the depth and severity of food insecurity were found among low-income households without children. Non-Hispanic White households with and without children had lower prevalence rates but steeper increases in the depth and severity of food insecurity throughout the decade. Non-Hispanic Black households with and without children were at the most disadvantaged among low-income populations. PMID:28239245

  13. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  14. Dynamic Crack Branching - A Photoelastic Evaluation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    0.41 mPai and a 0.18 MPa, and predicted a theoretical kinking angle of 84°whichagreed well with experimentally measured angle. After crack kinking...Consistent crack branching’at KIb = 2.04 MPaI -i- and r = 1.3 mm verified this crack branching criterion. The crack branching angle predicted by--.’ DD

  15. Sizing of cracks by ultrasonic testing - Diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, K.; Sattari-Far, I.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    The work has been concentrated on manual ultrasonic testing of plates in carbon and austenitic steel with thicknesses of 10-40 mm. Evaluation of data was performed by studying the amplitude, accuracy (crack depth) and visibility. The experience from the project showed that identification of the weak signals from the crack tips requires well-trained personnel. Besides that, the following can be recommended: Estimate if the crack has compressive stresses. Especially shallow cracks are exposed for compressive stresses. Chose a refraction angle ≥ 60 degrees if the crack is deep. Try both low (approx equivalent to 2MHz) and high (approx equivalent to 4-5MHz) frequency. Lower frequencies often increase amplitude response. Avoid the combination of refraction angle greater than 60 degrees and low frequency. Inspect with half as well as full skip. Sometimes a stronger signal is received for full skip, because the amplitude of the diffracted signal is higher from the cracked side. Use complementary measurements with mode conversion techniques. Focused probes can improve the results, especially for complicated geometries. Do not use reference reflectors of EDM-notch type for verification of signal amplitude. No correlation between amplitude from an EDM-notch tip and a crack tip exists. Reference reflectors of EDM-notch type can be used to verify the resolution of the system. A shallow EDM-notch can show if the probe can separate the tip and corner. It is our experience that general solutions does not exist, and each case needs an individual solution

  16. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  17. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Ponzoni, Lucio M.E.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (t inc ), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  18. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Said; Julan, Emricka; Tran, Xuan-Van; Robert, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  19. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  20. IAEA co-ordinated research program. 'Round Robin' on measuring the velocity of delayed hydride cracking (DHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, V.; Jakobsson, R. [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-09-01

    The International Atomic Agency (IAEA) has initiated a new Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Hydrogen and hydride induced degradation of the mechanical and physical properties of Zirconium-based alloys. In the first phase of this CRP the methodology for measuring the velocity of Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) should be established and participating laboratories from about nine countries around the world carry out identical tests in 'round robin'. The objective of the present work is to establish at Studsvik laboratory the method of a constant load cracking test on unirradiated Zr-2.5Nb and attain a comparison of results between laboratories. Constant load tests are performed on specimens cut from unirradiated CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube and the rate of crack propagation is determined in each test. Pre-hydrided specimens for testing are supplied from the host laboratory. Six specimens have been tested for delayed hydride cracking (DHC) at 250 deg C. The axial crack growth velocities measured in the tests are within the interval of 8.62x10{sup -8} - 1.06x10{sup -7} m/s. The results obtained agree well with the earlier published data for similar materials and test conditions.

  1. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  2. Radar Plant and Measurement Technique for Determination of the Orientation and the Depth of Buried Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A plant for generation of information indicative of the depth and the orientation of an object positioned below the surface of the ground is adapted to use electromagnetic radiation emitted from and received by an antenna system associated with the plant. The plant has a transmitter and a receive...

  3. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10(18) eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Barbosa, A. F.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X-max, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10(18) eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are

  4. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations : part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, Frits F. M.; George, Nibu A.; Qiu, Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K.

    2009-01-01

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is

  5. Method of measurement of near tip field of fast propagating cracks by means of interferometry; Hikari kansho ni yoru kosoku shinten kiretsu sentanbu no oryokuba keisokuho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, s.; Miyazaki, F. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Nakane, K. [Nitto Denko Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-15

    The measurement by an interference method at the tip of fast propagating cracks was investigated. To clarify the direction-dependent problem of dynamic cracks in a higher-order term, a high-precision stress field must be measured in every direction. In this method, the propagated interference fringes near the crack tip are shot at a speed of some hundreds of m/sec, and the coefficient of dynamic stress extension is obtained from the expression given when the number of fringes (`m`) in the interferences fringes is differentiated partially. The information below was obtained. The stress field in every direction can be analyzed by the interference method. However, the interference fringes in an area of absolute {theta} < 120{degree} are radially spread from the crack tip, so the precision of the interference fringes in the {gamma} direction deteriorates. In this area, the above partial differential is higher in precision when {alpha}m/{alpha}{theta} is used instead of {alpha}m/{alpha}{gamma}. The stress extension coefficient obtained by a caustic method can be verified if a stress field of {theta} = {plus_minus}72{degree} is analyzed by the interference method. By shooting in this optical system, the COD measurement, the K-value measurement of caustic light, and the stress field measurement by an interference method can be done simultaneously. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60° and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions, we define Xmaxμ as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of Xmaxμ as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

  7. Depth estimation of laser glass drilling based on optical differential measurements of acoustic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodesky, Niv; Ozana, Nisan; Berg, Yuval; Dolev, Omer; Danan, Yossef; Kotler, Zvi; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-09-01

    We present the first steps of a device suitable for characterization of complex 3D micro-structures. This method is based on an optical approach allowing extraction and separation of high frequency ultrasonic sound waves induced to the analyzed samples. Rapid, non-destructive characterization of 3D micro-structures are limited in terms of geometrical features and optical properties of the sample. We suggest a method which is based on temporal tracking of secondary speckle patterns generated when illuminating a sample with a laser probe while applying known periodic vibration using an ultrasound transmitter. In this paper we investigated lasers drilled through glass vias. The large aspect ratios of the vias possess a challenge for traditional microscopy techniques in analyzing depth and taper profiles of the vias. The correlation of the amplitude vibrations to the vias depths is experimentally demonstrated.

  8. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  9. Depth discrimination in acousto-optic cerebral blood flow measurement simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalach, A.; Schiffer, Z.; Ratner, E.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial, as inadequate perfusion, even for relatively short periods of time, may lead to brain damage or even death. Thus, significant research efforts are directed at developing reliable monitoring tools that will enable continuous, bed side, simple and cost-effective monitoring of CBF. All existing non invasive bed side monitoring methods, which are mostly NIRS based, such as Laser Doppler or DCS, tend to underestimate CBF in adults, due to the indefinite effect of extra-cerebral tissues on the obtained signal. If those are to find place in day to day clinical practice, the contribution of extra-cerebral tissues must be eliminated and data from the depth (brain) should be extracted and discriminated. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133Xe SPECT and laser Doppler. We have assembled a comprehensive computerized simulation, modeling this acousto-optic technique in a highly scattering media. Using the combination of light and ultrasound, we show how depth information may be extracted, thus distinguishing between flow patterns taking place at different depths. Our algorithm, based on the analysis of light modulated by ultrasound, is presented and examined in a computerized simulation. Distinct depth discrimination ability is presented, suggesting that using such method one can effectively nullify the extra-cerebral tissues influence on the obtained signals, and specifically extract cerebral flow data.

  10. Identification of hydrological model parameters for flood forecasting using data depth measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauße, T.; Cullmann, J.

    2011-03-01

    The development of methods for estimating the parameters of hydrological models considering uncertainties has been of high interest in hydrological research over the last years. Besides the very popular Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods which estimate the uncertainty of model parameters in the settings of a Bayesian framework, the development of depth based sampling methods, also entitled robust parameter estimation (ROPE), have attracted an increasing research interest. These methods understand the estimation of model parameters as a geometric search of a set of robust performing parameter vectors by application of the concept of data depth. Recent studies showed that the parameter vectors estimated by depth based sampling perform more robust in validation. One major advantage of this kind of approach over the MCMC methods is that the formulation of a likelihood function within a Bayesian uncertainty framework gets obsolete and arbitrary purpose-oriented performance criteria defined by the user can be integrated without any further complications. In this paper we present an advanced ROPE method entitled the Advanced Robust Parameter Estimation by Monte Carlo algorithm (AROPEMC). The AROPEMC algorithm is a modified version of the original robust parameter estimation algorithm ROPEMC developed by Bárdossy and Singh (2008). AROPEMC performs by merging iterative Monte Carlo simulations, identifying well performing parameter vectors, the sampling of robust parameter vectors according to the principle of data depth and the application of a well-founded stopping criterion applied in supervised machine learning. The principals of the algorithm are illustrated by means of the Rosenbrock's and Rastrigin's function, two well known performance benchmarks for optimisation algorithms. Two case studies demonstrate the advantage of AROPEMC compared to state of the art global optimisation algorithms. A distributed process-oriented hydrological model is calibrated and

  11. Signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop measurement for crack detection of conductive substrate with tunable coating materials through finite element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Simha Sandeep; Zhao, Huijuan; Liu, Ming; Peng, Fei; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We adopt a finite element numerical modeling approach to investigate the electromagnetic coupling effect of two parallel electric conductors with tunable electric conductivity σ and magnetic permeability μ . For two parallel conductors C and S ( μ C   ⋅  σ C   ≤  μ S   ⋅  σ S ), we find that the shape of current density profile of conductor S is dependent on the product of μ C   ⋅  σ C , while the magnitude is determined by the AC current frequency f . On the other hand, the frequency f affects not only the shape but also the magnitude of the current density profile of conductor C. We further adopt a coplanar model to investigate the signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement for both surface crack and inner crack detection. We find that with modified coating materials (lower electric conductivity and higher magnetic permeability, compared with the substrate material properties), the crack detection signal sensitivity can be greatly enhanced for both the cracks within the coating and at the coating/substrate interface, where cracks are most commonly encountered in real situations. (paper)

  12. Assessing the Portion of the Crack Length Contributing to Water Sorption in Concrete Using X-ray Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Couch, Jon; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2009-01-01

    While it is generally known that cracks accelerate fluid movements, there is a need to quantify how cracks influence the controlling transport mechanism(s) for more accurate service life modeling. This paper describes an experimental approach using x-ray absorption measurements to quantify the in......-ray absorption measurements over time. The effect cracks have on sorption is discussed and compared to the behavior of pristine concrete. In addition, the maximum water sorption depth after one hour of exposure is compared to crack lengths determined by the cracked hinge model.......While it is generally known that cracks accelerate fluid movements, there is a need to quantify how cracks influence the controlling transport mechanism(s) for more accurate service life modeling. This paper describes an experimental approach using x-ray absorption measurements to quantify...... the influence of cracks with varying width and length on water sorption in concrete. Concrete wedge splitting specimens, conditioned to 50% relative humidity, were loaded to varying crack openings. Water sorption was monitored for ponded specimens with varying crack widths and lengths by taking multiple x...

  13. On multiple crack detection in beam structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Shapour; Kargozarfard, Mohammad [Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    This study presents an inverse procedure to identify multiple cracks in beams using an evolutionary algorithm. By considering the crack detection procedure as an optimization problem, an objective function can be constructed based on the change of the eigenfrequencies and some strain energy parameters. Each crack is modeled by a rotational spring. The changes in natural frequencies due to the presence of the cracks are related to a damage index vector. Then, the bees algorithm, a swarm-based evolutionary optimization technique, is used to optimize the objective function and find the damage index vector, whose positive components show the number and position of the cracks. A second objective function is also optimized to find the crack depths. Several experimental studies on cracked cantilever beams are conducted to ensure the integrity of the proposed method. The results show that the number of cracks as well as their sizes and locations can be predicted well through this method.

  14. Shaft Crack Identification Based on Vibration and AE Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiu Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shaft crack is one of the main serious malfunctions that often occur in rotating machinery. However, it is difficult to locate the crack and determine the depth of the crack. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE signal and vibration response are used to diagnose the crack. The wavelet transform is applied to AE signal to decompose into a series of time-domain signals, each of which covers a specific octave frequency band. Then an improved union method based on threshold and cross-correlation method is applied to detect the location of the shaft crack. The finite element method is used to build the model of the cracked rotor, and the crack depth is identified by comparing the vibration response of experiment and simulation. The experimental results show that the AE signal is effective and convenient to locate the shaft crack, and the vibration signal is feasible to determine the depth of shaft crack.

  15. Measurement of residual stress in a sphere by x-ray under the consideration of its penetration depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Osamu; Ukai, Takayoshi

    1981-01-01

    It was pointed out in the case of a plate that when stress gradient is large, the use of the X-ray with large penetration depth caused large measurement error. In this paper, the theoretical equations for measuring the residual stress in a sphere with X-ray, taking penetration depth into account, are proposed, and the example of application is shown. As the method of measuring the residual stress in a hollow sphere with X-ray, only the method of combining external surface removal and external surface irradiation is practically in use. It was assumed that a sphere is isotropic, and that the residual stress is a function of the radius only. First, the theory of measuring the residual stress in a sphere with X-ray taking penetration depth into account is explained, and the equations for calculating the residual stresses in tangential and radial directions are derived. As the example of applying this theory, the distribution of the residual stress in a steel ball for a ball bearing was measured with Cr characteristic X-ray. The ball of 30 mm diameter was made of high-carbon chromium bearing steel, grade 2, (JIS SUJ2) and quenched and tempered. The removal of the thin layer was made by chemical etching and electrolysis. The measured values and the calculated values are shown. (Kako, I.)

  16. IMPROVING INTERFEROMETRIC NULL DEPTH MEASUREMENTS USING STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS: THEORY AND FIRST RESULTS WITH THE PALOMAR FIBER NULLER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, C.; Riaud, P.; Absil, O.; Mennesson, B.; Martin, S.; Liewer, K.; Loya, F.; Mawet, D.; Serabyn, E.

    2011-01-01

    A new 'self-calibrated' statistical analysis method has been developed for the reduction of nulling interferometry data. The idea is to use the statistical distributions of the fluctuating null depth and beam intensities to retrieve the astrophysical null depth (or equivalently the object's visibility) in the presence of fast atmospheric fluctuations. The approach yields an accuracy much better (about an order of magnitude) than is presently possible with standard data reduction methods, because the astrophysical null depth accuracy is no longer limited by the magnitude of the instrumental phase and intensity errors but by uncertainties on their probability distributions. This approach was tested on the sky with the two-aperture fiber nulling instrument mounted on the Palomar Hale telescope. Using our new data analysis approach alone-and no observations of calibrators-we find that error bars on the astrophysical null depth as low as a few 10 -4 can be obtained in the near-infrared, which means that null depths lower than 10 -3 can be reliably measured. This statistical analysis is not specific to our instrument and may be applicable to other interferometers.

  17. Effect of error in crack length measurement on maximum load fracture toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Sunil, Saurav; Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2016-03-01

    Recently it was found that maximum load toughness (J max ) for Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material was practically unaffected by error in Δ a . To check the sensitivity of the J max to error in Δ a measurement, the J max was calculated assuming no crack growth up to the maximum load (P max ) for as received and hydrogen charged Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material. For load up to the P max , the J values calculated assuming no crack growth (J NC ) were slightly higher than that calculated based on Δ a measured using DCPD technique (JDCPD). In general, error in the J calculation found to be increased exponentially with Δ a . The error in J max calculation was increased with an increase in Δ a and a decrease in J max . Based on deformation theory of J, an analytic criterion was developed to check the insensitivity of the J max to error in Δ a . There was very good linear relation was found between the J max calculated based on Δ a measured using DCPD technique and the J max calculated assuming no crack growth. This relation will be very useful to calculate J max without measuring the crack growth during fracture test especially for irradiated material. (author)

  18. MOSFET dosimeter depth-dose measurements in heterogeneous tissue-equivalent phantoms at diagnostic x-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.K.; Pazik, F.D.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Bolch, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the use of the TN-1002RD metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter for measuring tissue depth dose at diagnostic photon energies in both homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue-equivalent materials. Three cylindrical phantoms were constructed and utilized as a prelude to more complex measurements within tomographic physical phantoms of pediatric patients. Each cylindrical phantom was constructed as a stack of seven 5-cm-diameter and 1-cm-thick discs of materials radiographically representative of either soft tissue (S), bone (B), or lung tissue (L) at diagnostic photon energies. In addition to a homogeneous phantom of soft tissue (SSSSSSS), two heterogeneous phantoms were constructed: SSBBSSS and SBLLBSS. MOSFET dosimeters were then positioned at the interface of each disc, and the phantoms were then irradiated at 66 kVp and 200 mAs. Measured values of absorbed dose at depth were then compared to predicated values of point tissue dose as determined via Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling. At depths exceeding 2 cm, experimental results matched the computed values of dose with high accuracy regardless of the dosimeter orientation (epoxy bubble facing toward or away from the x-ray beam). Discrepancies were noted, however, between measured and calculated point doses near the surface of the phantom (surface to 2 cm depth) when the dosimeters were oriented with the epoxy bubble facing the x-ray beam. These discrepancies were largely eliminated when the dosimeters were placed with the flat side facing the x-ray beam. It is therefore recommended that the MOSFET dosimeters be oriented with their flat sides facing the beam when they are used at shallow depths or on the surface of either phantoms or patients

  19. Interpretation of the depths of maximum of extensive air showers measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.

    2013-02-01

    To interpret the mean depth of cosmic ray air shower maximum and its dispersion, we parametrize those two observables as functions of the first two moments of the ln A distribution. We examine the goodness of this simple method through simulations of test mass distributions. The application of the parameterization to Pierre Auger Observatory data allows one to study the energy dependence of the mean ln A and of its variance under the assumption of selected hadronic interaction models. We discuss possible implications of these dependences in term of interaction models and astrophysical cosmic ray sources.

  20. Thermal fatigue cracking in T-fittings of feed water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, J.

    1983-03-01

    The existence of thermal fatigue cracks can be determined by ultrasonic methods. The depth of the cracks will be of importance for evaluation of the seriousness of the situation. Currently, no method is available for determining depth of cracks without cutting and grinding. Methods for gaining information of crack depth have been discussed with leading European materials testing institutes. More elaborate ultrasonic methods have been tested with negative results. On testing signals from crack corners flood possible signals from the crack tips. At present no reliable technique based on ultrasonics exist (in Europe, that will give information of crack depth.(P.Aa.)

  1. How accurate are measurements of skin-lesion depths on prebiopsy supine chest computed tomography for transthoracic needle biopsies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Joo Yeon; Kim, Yookyung; Shim, Sung Shine; Lee, Jin Hwa; Chang, Jung Hyun; Ryu, Yon Ju; Lee, Rena J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of depth measurements on supine chest computed tomography (CT) for transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB). Materials and methods: We measured skin-lesion depths from the skin surface to nodules on both prebiopsy supine CT scans and CT scans obtained during cone beam CT-guided TNB in the supine (n = 29) or prone (n = 40) position in 69 patients, and analyzed the differences between the two measurements, based on patient position for the biopsy and lesion location. Results: Skin-lesion depths measured on prebiopsy supine CT scans were significantly larger than those measured on CT scans obtained during TNB in the prone position (p < 0.001; mean difference ± standard deviation (SD), 6.2 ± 5.7 mm; range, 0–18 mm), but the differences showed marginal significance in the supine position (p = 0.051; 3.5 ± 3.9 mm; 0–13 mm). Additionally, the differences were significantly larger for the upper (mean ± SD, 7.8 ± 5.7 mm) and middle (10.1 ± 6.5 mm) lung zones than for the lower lung zones (3.1 ± 3.3 mm) in the prone position (p = 0.011), and were larger for the upper lung zone (4.6 ± 5.0 mm) than for the middle (2.4 ± 2.0 mm) and lower (2.3 ± 2.3 mm) lung zones in the supine position (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Skin-lesion depths measured on prebiopsy supine chest CT scans were inaccurate for TNB in the prone position, particularly for nodules in the upper and middle lung zones.

  2. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M; Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method

  3. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  4. Measurements of europium-152 depth profile of stone embankments exposed the Nagasaki atomic bomb for neutron spectrum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi-Miyajima, Junko; Shimasaki, Tatsuya; Okajima, Shunzo; Takada, Jitsuya; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki; Okumura, Yutaka; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of neutron-induced radionuclide of 152 Eu in rocks near the hypocenter (ground center of the atomic bomb explosion) in Nagasaki was performed to obtain the depth profiles and calculate the neutron energy spectrum. Core samples were drilled and taken from the stone embankments on both sides of river within a radius of 500 m from the hypocenter. After cutting each core into about 27 mm-thick sections, each section was measured its gamma-ray spectrum with a pure germanium semiconductor detector and analyzed a content of natural europium by the activation method. The highest value 8.0 x 10 -2 Bq/μg of 152 Eu at the time of the blast was obtained from the surface plates of rock cores collected near the hypocenter. The surface activity of cores was reduced with increasing the slant distances from the hypocenter. The slopes of the depth profiles were similar among samples taken from the same location. In order to analyze the depth profile of 152 Eu activity in rock andesite, experiments using a fast neutron reactor and thermal neutron reactor were carried out. Comparing the measurements on the A-bomb exposure rock with the simulated results at the reactors, among the experiments, the depth profile using the neutron moderator of 10 mm polyethylene was closed to that obtained from the A-bomb exposed samples. The experiment of thermal neutron incidence only could not reproduce the profiles from the A-bomb exposed samples. This fact indicates that the depth profiles of 152 Eu in rock exposed to the A-bomb include valuable information concerning the neutron spectrum and intensity. (author)

  5. A LSO scintillator array for a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.S.; Moses, W.W.; Andreaco, M.S.; Petterson, O.

    2000-01-01

    We present construction methods and performance results for a production scintillator array of 64 optically isolated, 3 mm x 3 mm x 30 mm sized LSO crystals. This scintillator array has been developed for a PET detector module consisting of the 8x8 LSO array coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PD). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse and initial energy discrimination, the PD identifies the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction (DOI). Unlike the previous LSO array prototypes, we now glue Lumirror reflector material directly onto 4 sides of each crystal to obtain an easily manufactured, mechanically rugged array with our desired depth dependence. With 511 keV excitation, we obtain a total energy signal of 3600 electrons, pulse-height resolution of 25% fwhm, and 6-15 mm fwhm DOI resolution

  6. Measurement of density distribution of a cracking catalyst in experimental riser with a sampling procedure for gamma ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, C.C.; Melo, S.B.; Oliveira, E.F.; Simoes, F.P.M.; Santos, M.G. dos; Santos, V.A. dos

    2008-01-01

    By scanning a riser the number of the gamma ray trajectories and the beam width involve temporal, spatial and density resolutions as they are closely correlated parameters. Therefore, evaluation of parameters and their interaction quantification, certainly, are required in the imaging process. Measuring the density distribution of the catalyst from the FCC - fluid cracking catalytic process in an experimental riser in single beam tomographic system, density resolution is evaluated and correlated with spatial resolution. The beam width Δs inside riser is measured and a criterion for determining spatial resolution is proposed. Experiments are carried out to demonstrate resolution effects of three Δs values: 3.30 x 10 -3 , 6.20 x 10 -3 and 12.00 x 10 -3 m. The gamma beam profile is modeled and a sampling rate according to Nyquist criterion is analyzed. The 4.3%, 8.1% and 15.6% ratios of Δs/R to internal riser radius are correlated to counting time in the sampling procedure. Results are discussed by comparison with values from literature

  7. The interaction of pulsed eddy current with metal surface crack for various coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.-C.; Tai, C.-C.

    2002-01-01

    We study the interaction of pulsed eddy current (PEC) with metal surface cracks using various coils that have different geometric sizes. In the previous work, we have showed that the PEC technique can be used to inspect electrical-discharge-machined (EDM) notches with depth from 0.5 mm to 9 mm. The results showed that the relationship between PEC signals and crack depth is obvious. In this work, we further try a series of coils with different radii, heights, turns and shapes. We will discuss the effects of these coil parameters on the PEC signal. Some other critical problems of PEC measurements such as signal drift that caused by heating effect of coil currents will be studied. We also show more experiments on fatigue cracks to demonstrate the capability of PEC technique for cracks inspection

  8. Seismic measures and defence in depth of nuclear power plant. Lessons learned from the great east Japan earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro

    2011-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred in March 11, 2011 brought about severe accident at nuclear power plant, which gave significant lessons to nuclear experts concerned with safety measures. Concepts of defence in depth was basic philosophy to assure safety of nuclear power plant even against uncertainties exceeding design basis. This concept consisted of prevention, monitoring, and action to mitigate consequences of failures such as a series of physical barriers between the reactor core and the environment, which were called multiple safety systems, each with backup and designed to accommodate human error. As for natural disaster, depth of recognition of characteristic of natural phenomena and its effect and engineering judgment was of prime importance. Different waveforms of ground motion at Fukushima and Onagawa at the Great East Japan Earthquake showed that design ground motion should have large uncertainties. To cope with uncertainties of ground motion, robust seismic measures based on experience were such as design of static seismic intensity and rigid structure of natural period less than 0.1 sec. As for tsunami, defence in depth measures were prepared for the cooling of reactor core, spent fuel and related electric generation equipment with taking into account 1) time lag between tsunami generation and arrival, 2) tsunami affected area could be limited by coastal levee or anti-inundation measure, 3) system redundancy could be assured by different locations of equipments and 4) repair works could be done by shipment of replacement equipment from outside due to limitation of affected regional area. Success examples of Onagawa, Tokai unit 2, Fukushima Daiichi unit 6 and Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plants could suggest definite tsunami defence in depth measures. Containment vent system as final heat sink and emergency condenser as reactor core cooling at outage should be properly utilized for Fukushima Daiichi unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Overview of SAFOD Phases 1 and 2: Drilling, Sampling and Measurements in the San Andreas Fault Zone at Seismogenic Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M. D.; Hickman, S.; Ellsworth, W.

    2005-12-01

    In this talk we provide an overview of on-site drilling, sampling and downhole measurement activities associated with the first two Phases of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth. SAFOD is located at the transition between the creeping and locked sections of the fault, 9 km NW of Parkfield, CA. A 2.1 km deep vertical pilot hole was drilled at the site in 2002. The SAFOD main borehole was drilled vertically to a depth of 1.5 km and then deviated at an average angle of 55° to vertical, passing beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas fault, 1.8 km to the NW at a depth of 3.2 km. Repeating microearthquakes on the San Andreas define the main active fault trace at depth, as well as a secondary active fault about 250 m to the SW (i.e., closer to SAFOD). The hole was rotary drilled, comprehensive cuttings were obtained and a real-time analysis of gases in the drilling mud was carried out. Spot cores were obtained at three depths (at casing set points) in the shallow granite and deeper sedimentary rocks penetrated by the hole, augmented by over fifty side-wall cores. Continuous coring of the San Andreas Fault Zone will be carried out in Phase 3 of the project in the summer of 2007. In addition to sampling mud gas, discrete fluid and gas samples were obtained at several depths for geochemical analysis. Real-time geophysical measurements were made while drilling through most of the San Andreas Fault Zone. A suite of "open hole" geophysical measurements were also made over essentially the entire depth of the hole. Construction of the multi-component SAFOD observatory is well underway, with a seismometer and tiltmeter operating at 1 km depth in the pilot hole and a fiber-optic laser strainmeter cemented behind casing in the main hole. A seismometer deployed at depth in the hole between Phases 1 and 2 detected one of the target earthquakes. A number of surface-to-borehole seismic experiments have been carried out to characterize seismic velocities and structures at

  10. Experimental study on the crack detection with optimized spatial wavelet analysis and windowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Mardasi, Amir; Wu, Nan; Wu, Christine

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a high sensitive crack detection is experimentally realized and presented on a beam under certain deflection by optimizing spatial wavelet analysis. Due to the crack existence in the beam structure, a perturbation/slop singularity is induced in the deflection profile. Spatial wavelet transformation works as a magnifier to amplify the small perturbation signal at the crack location to detect and localize the damage. The profile of a deflected aluminum cantilever beam is obtained for both intact and cracked beams by a high resolution laser profile sensor. Gabor wavelet transformation is applied on the subtraction of intact and cracked data sets. To improve detection sensitivity, scale factor in spatial wavelet transformation and the transformation repeat times are optimized. Furthermore, to detect the possible crack close to the measurement boundaries, wavelet transformation edge effect, which induces large values of wavelet coefficient around the measurement boundaries, is efficiently reduced by introducing different windowing functions. The result shows that a small crack with depth of less than 10% of the beam height can be localized with a clear perturbation. Moreover, the perturbation caused by a crack at 0.85 mm away from one end of the measurement range, which is covered by wavelet transform edge effect, emerges by applying proper window functions.

  11. Thermal shock experiment analysis, the use of crack arrest toughness measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.; Chavaillard, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    The main purpose of thermal shock experiment is to assess the procedure codified in the ASME XI appendix 1 or RCC-M-B appendix ZG, and allow comparisons with numerical simulations. The analysis of the integrity of the PWR vessel belt line under accidental transients is based on reference curves. The test-piece is a cylinder of SA 508 cl.3 steel. Arrest toughness measured agrees with reference curve

  12. Measurement of the penetration depth and coherence length of MgB2 in all directions using transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loudon, J. C.; Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that images of flux vortices in a superconductor taken with a transmission electron microscope can be used to measure the penetration depth and coherence length in all directions at the same temperature and magnetic field. This is particularly useful for MgB2, where these quantities...... vary with the applied magnetic field and values are difficult to obtain at low field or in the c direction. We obtained images of flux vortices from a MgB2 single crystal cut in the ac plane by focused ion beam milling and tilted to 45 degrees. with respect to the electron beam about...... the crystallographic a axis. A new method was developed to simulate these images that accounted for vortices with a nonzero core in a thin, anisotropic superconductor and a simplex algorithm was used to make a quantitative comparison between the images and simulations to measure the penetration depths and coherence...

  13. Genetic parameters for carcass traits and in vovo measured muscle and fat depth in Danish Texel and Shropshire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxa, Jan; Norberg, Elise; Berg, Peer

    2007-01-01

    Genetic parameters for carcass traits and ultrasonic scanning measurements were estimated for Danish Texel and Shropshire, the most common sheep breeds in Denmark. Data used in this study were collected from 1990 to 2005 by the Danish Agricultural Advisory Service. A multivariate animal model.......12 for Shropshire. Carcass conformation was highly heritable, 0.45 for Texel and 0.36 for Shropshire. The heritability for FAT was 0.11 for Texel and 0.19 for Shropshire. Genetic correlations between MD and FORM, and FD and FAT were positive and favourable. It was concluded that ultrasound measures on live animals...... was used for estimation of (co)variance components for muscle depth (MD), fat depth (FD), carcass conformation score (FORM) and carcass fatness (FAT). Heritabilities for MD were 0.29 and 0.28 for Texel and Shropshire, respectively. Diverging heritabilities were found for FD - 0.39 for Texel and 0...

  14. A method for determining the analytical form of a radionuclide depth distribution using multiple gamma spectrometry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Steven Clifford, E-mail: sdewey001@gmail.com [United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Environmental Health Division, Health Physics Branch, Radiation Analysis Laboratories, 2350 Gillingham Drive, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235 (United States); Whetstone, Zachary David, E-mail: zacwhets@umich.edu [Radiological Health Engineering Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, 1906 Cooley Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Kearfott, Kimberlee Jane, E-mail: kearfott@umich.edu [Radiological Health Engineering Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, 1906 Cooley Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    When characterizing environmental radioactivity, whether in the soil or within concrete building structures undergoing remediation or decommissioning, it is highly desirable to know the radionuclide depth distribution. This is typically modeled using continuous analytical expressions, whose forms are believed to best represent the true source distributions. In situ gamma ray spectroscopic measurements are combined with these models to fully describe the source. Currently, the choice of analytical expressions is based upon prior experimental core sampling results at similar locations, any known site history, or radionuclide transport models. This paper presents a method, employing multiple in situ measurements at a single site, for determining the analytical form that best represents the true depth distribution present. The measurements can be made using a variety of geometries, each of which has a different sensitivity variation with source spatial distribution. Using non-linear least squares numerical optimization methods, the results can be fit to a collection of analytical models and the parameters of each model determined. The analytical expression that results in the fit with the lowest residual is selected as the most accurate representation. A cursory examination is made of the effects of measurement errors on the method. - Highlights: > A new method for determining radionuclide distribution as a function of depth is presented. > Multiple measurements are used, with enough measurements to determine the unknowns in analytical functions that might describe the distribution. > The measurements must be as independent as possible, which is achieved through special collimation of the detector. > Although the effects of measurements errors may be significant on the results, an improvement over other methods is anticipated.

  15. Geostatistical mapping of Cs-137 contamination depth in building structures by integrating ISOCS measurements of different spatial supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, S.; Jacques, D. [Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Rogiers, B. [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, KU Leuven - University of Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200e - bus 2410, BE-3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Reliable methods to determine the contamination depth in nuclear building structures are very much needed for minimizing the radioactive waste volume and the decontamination workload. This paper investigates the geostatistical integration of in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of different spatial supports. A case study is presented from the BR3 decommissioning project, yielding an estimated reduction of waste volume of ∼35%, and recommendations are made for future application of the proposed methodology. (authors)

  16. Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy: The Measurement of VX Depth Profiles in Hairless Guinea Pig Skin and the Evaluation of RSDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    USAMRICD-TR-15-01 Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy: The Measurement of VX Depth Profiles in Hairless Guinea Pig Skin and the Evaluation...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER guinea pig skin and the evaluation of RSDL 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Braue, EH...upper skin layers of hairless guinea pigs and to determine the ability of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) to remove or degrade VX from

  17. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes.

  18. Dynamic strain distribution measurement and crack detection of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint under cyclic loading using embedded FBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Xiaoguang; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Kanai, Makoto; Ohsawa, Isamu; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic strain distribution measurement of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint was carried out in a cyclic load test using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded into the adhesive/adherend interface along the overlap length direction. Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrates were bonded by epoxy resin to form the joint, and the FBG sensor was embedded into the surface of one substrate during its curing. The measurement was carried out with a sampling rate of 5 Hz by the sensing system, based on the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) throughout the test. A finite element analysis (FEA) was performed for the measurement evaluation using a three-dimensional model, which included the embedded FBG sensor. The crack detection method, based on the longitudinal strain distribution measurement, was introduced and performed to estimate the cracks that occurred at the adhesive/adherend interface in the test. (paper)

  19. Spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry for phase-sensitive measurement of Faraday rotation at multiple depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Jou; Black, Adam J; Akkin, Taner

    2013-10-10

    We describe a method for differential phase measurement of Faraday rotation from multiple depth locations simultaneously. A polarization-maintaining fiber-based spectral-domain interferometer that utilizes a low-coherent light source and a single camera is developed. Light decorrelated by the orthogonal channels of the fiber is launched on a sample as two oppositely polarized circular states. These states reflect from sample surfaces and interfere with the corresponding states of the reference arm. A custom spectrometer, which is designed to simplify camera alignment, separates the orthogonal channels and records the interference-related oscillations on both spectra. Inverse Fourier transform of the spectral oscillations in k-space yields complex depth profiles, whose amplitudes and phase difference are related to reflectivity and Faraday rotation within the sample, respectively. Information along a full depth profile is produced at the camera speed without performing an axial scan for a multisurface sample. System sensitivity for the Faraday rotation measurement is 0.86 min of arc. Verdet constants of clear liquids and turbid media are measured at 687 nm.

  20. Evaluation of nondestructive evaluation size measurement for integrity assessment of axial outside diameter stress corrosion cracking in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Kyung Mun; Hong, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the initiation of outside diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) at the tube support plate region of domestic steam generators (SG) with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes has been increasing. As a result, SGs with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes must be replaced early or are scheduled to be replaced prior to their designed lifetime. ODSCC is one of the biggest threats to the integrity of SG tubes. Therefore, the accurate evaluation of tube integrity to determine ODSCC is needed. Eddy current testing (ECT) is conducted periodically, and its results could be input as parameters for evaluating the integrity of SG tubes. The reliability of an ECT inspection system depends on the performance of the inspection technique and ability of the analyst. The detection probability and ECT sizing error of degradation are considered to be the performance indices of a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. This paper introduces an optimized evaluation method for ECT, as well as the sizing error, including the analyst performance. This study was based on the results of a round robin program in which 10 inspection analysts from 5 different companies participated. The analysis of ECT sizing results was performed using a linear regression model relating the true defect size data to the measured ECT size data.

  1. Evaluation of nondestructive evaluation size measurement for integrity assessment of axial outside diameter stress corrosion cracking in steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Kyung Mun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Ltd., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jun Hee [Dept. of mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Recently, the initiation of outside diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) at the tube support plate region of domestic steam generators (SG) with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes has been increasing. As a result, SGs with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes must be replaced early or are scheduled to be replaced prior to their designed lifetime. ODSCC is one of the biggest threats to the integrity of SG tubes. Therefore, the accurate evaluation of tube integrity to determine ODSCC is needed. Eddy current testing (ECT) is conducted periodically, and its results could be input as parameters for evaluating the integrity of SG tubes. The reliability of an ECT inspection system depends on the performance of the inspection technique and ability of the analyst. The detection probability and ECT sizing error of degradation are considered to be the performance indices of a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. This paper introduces an optimized evaluation method for ECT, as well as the sizing error, including the analyst performance. This study was based on the results of a round robin program in which 10 inspection analysts from 5 different companies participated. The analysis of ECT sizing results was performed using a linear regression model relating the true defect size data to the measured ECT size data.

  2. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a 'limited propagation' argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J ox ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NANO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J ox are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained. (author)

  3. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a limited propagation argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J OX ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NaNO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J OX are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained

  4. Methodical comparison of neutron depth probes and long-term soil moisture measurements on loess, sandy loess, and boulder clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neue, H.U.

    1980-01-01

    Three measuring instruments were tested: 0.05 mCi Cf-252, 100 mCi Am-241/Be, 500 mCi Am-241/Be. The advantages - measurement in undisturbed soil profiles, large depths of measurement, reproducibility of measurements in the same place over several years - and the disadvantages - radiation protection, resolution, variations of measured volume in dependence of moisture, background influences etc. - have been critically checked by experiment. In addition, annual soil moisture curves have been measured over two years by parallel use of the free probes on a loess, sandy loess, and boulder clay site. The results were compared and discussed with a view to the soil water dynamics of these sites. (orig./HP) [de

  5. A probabilistic model of brittle crack formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Probability of a brittle crack formation in an elastic solid with fluctuating strength is considered. A set Omega of all possible crack trajectories reflecting the fluctuation of the strength field is introduced. The probability P(X) that crack penetration depth exceeds X is expressed as a functional integral over Omega of a conditional probability of the same event taking place along a particular path. Various techniques are considered to evaluate the integral. Under rather nonrestrictive assumptions, the integral is reduced to solving a diffusion-type equation. A new characteristic of fracture process, 'crack diffusion coefficient', is introduced. An illustrative example is then considered where the integration is reduced to solving an ordinary differential equation. The effect of the crack diffusion coefficient and of the magnitude of strength fluctuations on probability density of crack penetration depth is presented. Practical implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  6. A characterization of Arctic aerosols on the basis of aerosol optical depth and black carbon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Stone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aerosols, transported from distant source regions, influence the Arctic surface radiation budget. When deposited on snow and ice, carbonaceous particles can reduce the surface albedo, which accelerates melting, leading to a temperature-albedo feedback that amplifies Arctic warming. Black carbon (BC, in particular, has been implicated as a major warming agent at high latitudes. BC and co-emitted aerosols in the atmosphere, however, attenuate sunlight and radiatively cool the surface. Warming by soot deposition and cooling by atmospheric aerosols are referred to as “darkening” and “dimming” effects, respectively. In this study, climatologies of spectral aerosol optical depth AOD (2001–2011 and Equivalent BC (EBC (1989–2011 from three Arctic observatories and from a number of aircraft campaigns are used to characterize Arctic aerosols. Since the 1980s, concentrations of BC in the Arctic have decreased by more than 50% at ground stations where in situ observations are made. AOD has increased slightly during the past decade, with variations attributed to changing emission inventories and source strengths of natural aerosols, including biomass smoke and volcanic aerosol, further influenced by deposition rates and airflow patterns.

  7. Measuring Sandy Bottom Dynamics by Exploiting Depth from Stereo Video Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musumeci, Rosaria E.; Farinella, Giovanni M.; Foti, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an imaging system for measuring sandy bottom dynamics is proposed. The system exploits stereo sequences and projected laser beams to build the 3D shape of the sandy bottom during time. The reconstruction is used by experts of the field to perform accurate measurements and analysis...

  8. Accuracy and reliability of facial soft tissue depth measurements using cone beam computer tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    2010-01-01

    It is important to have accurate and reliable measurements of soft tissue thickness for specific landmarks of the face and scalp when producing a facial reconstruction. In the past several methods have been created to measure facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) in cadavers and in the living. The

  9. Quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow in a juvenile porcine model by depth-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Diop, Mamadou; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lawrence, Keith St.

    2010-05-01

    Nearly half a million children and young adults are affected by traumatic brain injury each year in the United States. Although adequate cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential to recovery, complications that disrupt blood flow to the brain and exacerbate neurological injury often go undetected because no adequate bedside measure of CBF exists. In this study we validate a depth-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that provides quantitative CBF measurement despite significant signal contamination from skull and scalp tissue. The respiration rates of eight anesthetized pigs (weight: 16.2+/-0.5 kg, age: 1 to 2 months old) are modulated to achieve a range of CBF levels. Concomitant CBF measurements are performed with NIRS and CT perfusion. A significant correlation between CBF measurements from the two techniques is demonstrated (r2=0.714, slope=0.92, p<0.001), and the bias between the two techniques is -2.83 mL.min-1.100 g-1 (CI0.95: -19.63 mL.min-1.100 g-1-13.9 mL.min-1.100 g-1). This study demonstrates that accurate measurements of CBF can be achieved with depth-resolved NIRS despite significant signal contamination from scalp and skull. The ability to measure CBF at the bedside provides a means of detecting, and thereby preventing, secondary ischemia during neurointensive care.

  10. A Feasibility Study for Measuring Accurate Chest Compression Depth and Rate on Soft Surfaces Using Two Accelerometers and Spectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Ruiz de Gauna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR feedback devices are being increasingly used. However, current accelerometer-based devices overestimate chest displacement when CPR is performed on soft surfaces, which may lead to insufficient compression depth. Aim. To assess the performance of a new algorithm for measuring compression depth and rate based on two accelerometers in a simulated resuscitation scenario. Materials and Methods. Compressions were provided to a manikin on two mattresses, foam and sprung, with and without a backboard. One accelerometer was placed on the chest and the second at the manikin’s back. Chest displacement and mattress displacement were calculated from the spectral analysis of the corresponding acceleration every 2 seconds and subtracted to compute the actual sternal-spinal displacement. Compression rate was obtained from the chest acceleration. Results. Median unsigned error in depth was 2.1 mm (4.4%. Error was 2.4 mm in the foam and 1.7 mm in the sprung mattress (p<0.001. Error was 3.1/2.0 mm and 1.8/1.6 mm with/without backboard for foam and sprung, respectively (p<0.001. Median error in rate was 0.9 cpm (1.0%, with no significant differences between test conditions. Conclusion. The system provided accurate feedback on chest compression depth and rate on soft surfaces. Our solution compensated mattress displacement, avoiding overestimation of compression depth when CPR is performed on soft surfaces.

  11. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Cracked Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    directed by: CAPT Te!Ty Webb, D.D.S., M.S. A " cracked tooth" is defined as a thin surface enamel and dentin disruption of unknown depth, and is often...OUTCOME OF ENDODONTICALL Y TREATED CRACKED TEETH by David Michael Dow II, D.D.S. Lieutenant Commander, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript titled: "Outcome ofEndodontically Treated Cracked Teeth" is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond

  12. Detection of cracks with low vertical offset in clayey formations from galleries by using seismic methods. Tournemire experimental station. First part: problem analysis and measurement sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretaudeau, Francois; Gelis, Celine; Cabrera, Justo; Leparoux, Donatienne; Cote, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Within the frame of the expertise of the ANDRA file on the project of storage of radioactive wastes in clayey formations, the detection of natural cracks which could locally alter the argillite containment properties is a crucial issue. As some previous studies showed that some cracks exhibiting a low vertical offset could not be detected in clayey formations from the surface, this document reports a study which aimed at assessing the possibility of detection of such a crack by means of seismic methods directly implemented from underground works. It reports a detailed analysis of the seismic imagery problem, the characterization of different areas of the investigated environment, the assessment and validation of various hypotheses by using experimental data obtained in an experimental station and numerical simulations. The potential of each envisaged method (migration, tomography, wave form inversion) is assessed, notably with respect to synthetic seismic data obtained by numerical modelling. Preliminary results are used to size a complete seismic measurement campaign aimed at the characterization of the crack area, and at the assessment of detection limitations of the different methods

  13. Validation of ultrasound as a noninvasive tool to measure subcutaneous fat depth in leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Heather S.; Benson, Scott R.; James, Michael C.; Martin, Kelly J.; Stacy, Brian A.; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Rist, Paul M.; Work, Thierry M.; Balazs, George H.; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) undergo substantial cyclical changes in body condition between foraging and nesting. Ultrasonography has been used to measure subcutaneous fat as an indicator of body condition in many species but has not been applied in sea turtles. To validate this technique in leatherback turtles, ultrasound images were obtained from 36 live-captured and dead-stranded immature and adult turtles from foraging and nesting areas in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Ultrasound measurements were compared with direct measurements from surgical biopsy or necropsy. Tissue architecture was confirmed histologically in a subset of turtles. The dorsal shoulder region provided the best site for differentiation of tissues. Maximum fat depth values with the front flipper in a neutral (45–90°) position demonstrated good correlation with direct measurements. Ultrasound-derived fat measurements may be used in the future for quantitative assessment of body condition as an index of health in this critically endangered species.

  14. VALIDATION OF ULTRASOUND AS A NONINVASIVE TOOL TO MEASURE SUBCUTANEOUS FAT DEPTH IN LEATHERBACK SEA TURTLES (DERMOCHELYS CORIACEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Heather S; Benson, Scott R; James, Michael C; Martin, Kelly J; Stacy, Brian A; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Rist, Paul M; Work, Thierry M; Balazs, George H; Seminoff, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-01

    Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) undergo substantial cyclical changes in body condition between foraging and nesting. Ultrasonography has been used to measure subcutaneous fat as an indicator of body condition in many species but has not been applied in sea turtles. To validate this technique in leatherback turtles, ultrasound images were obtained from 36 live-captured and dead-stranded immature and adult turtles from foraging and nesting areas in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Ultrasound measurements were compared with direct measurements from surgical biopsy or necropsy. Tissue architecture was confirmed histologically in a subset of turtles. The dorsal shoulder region provided the best site for differentiation of tissues. Maximum fat depth values with the front flipper in a neutral (45-90°) position demonstrated good correlation with direct measurements. Ultrasound-derived fat measurements may be used in the future for quantitative assessment of body condition as an index of health in this critically endangered species.

  15. Residual stress measurement by x-ray under the consideration of its penetration depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Osamu; Ukai, Takayoshi

    1983-01-01

    The authors derived the fundamental relations between the measured stress by X-ray and the residual stress distribution from the consideration of the contribution of internal stress in definite subsurface layer of metal to X-ray diffraction and proposed the exact formulas and their applications of residual stress measurements by successive thin layer removal in a plate, a hollow cylinder and a hollow sphere. (author)

  16. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  17. Penetration depth of YBa2Cu3O7 measured by polarised neutron reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J.M.; Nunez, V.; Boothroyd, A.T.; Bucknall, D.G.; Penfold, J.

    1998-01-01

    We have applied the technique of polarised neutron reflectometry (PNR) to investigate the magnetic field profile near the surface of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 films at 4.3 K. The samples comprised 700-1400 nm of c-axis oriented, single crystal YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 deposited by laser ablation on SrTiO 3 substrates. The measurements were carried out on the CRISP reflectometer at the ISIS facility. The PNR technique measures the magnetic induction profile perpendicular to the surface, and so in our case the decay of flux in the c-direction was measured with a field applied parallel to the ab plane. We present preliminary data for the polarised and unpolarised reflectivity (orig.)

  18. Interobserver reliability when using the Van Herick method to measure anterior chamber depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Javed

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The Van Herick score has a good interobserver reliability for Grades 1 and 4; however, Grades 2 and 3 require further tests such as gonioscopy or ocular coherence tomography. Temporal and nasal scores demonstrated good agreement; therefore, if the nasal score cannot be measured due to nasal bridge size, the temporal can be used as an approximation.

  19. The effect of crack branching on the residual lifetime of machine components containing stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdowski, R.M.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Speidel, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations concerning the effect of crack branching on the reduction of stress intensity at the tip of single cracks. The results indicate that the division of a single crack into n branches reduces the stress intensity at the branch tips by a factor of about 1/√n. This permits branched cracks to grow to larger depths before becoming critical. The implication is that longer residual lifetimes and longer operating times between inspections can be calculated for machine components with growing branched stress corrosion cracks. (author)

  20. Robust depth selectivity in mesoscopic scattering regimes using angle-resolved measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, P; Kim, A D; Moscoso, M

    2013-03-01

    We study optical imaging of tissues in the mesoscopic scattering regime in which light multiply scatters in tissues but is not fully diffusive. We use the radiative transport equation to model light propagation and an ℓ1-optimization method to solve the inverse source problem. We show that recovering the location and strength of several point-like sources that are close to each other is not possible when using angle-averaged measurements. The image reliability is limited by a spatial scale that is on the order of the transport mean-free path, even under the most ideal conditions. However, by using just a few angle-resolved measurements, the proposed method is able to overcome this limitation.

  1. Muon-spin-rotation measurements of the London penetration depths in YBa2Cu3O6.97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puempin, B.; Keller, H.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Savic, I.M.; Schneider, J.W.; Simmler, H.; Zimmermann, P.; Kaldis, E.; Rusiecki, S.; Maeno, Y.; Rossel, C.

    1990-01-01

    Muon-spin-rotation (μSR) experiments on a high-quality sintered YBa 2 Cu 3 O x sample [x=6.970(1)] were performed, in order to obtain an accurate knowledge of the magnitude and the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth in this copper oxide superconductor. Special attention was given to the data analysis. In particular, the systematic errors introduced by different types of analyses were estimated. Our results show that the temperature dependence of the effective penetration depth λ eff into the sintered sample is well described by the two-fluid model, with λ eff (0)=155(10) nm. This behavior of λ eff (T) is consistent with conventional s-wave pairing. With the anisotropy ratio γ=λ c /λ ab =5(1) measured in a previous μSR experiment, the penetration depths λ ab (0)=130(10) nm and λ c (0)=500--800 nm (parallel and perpendicular to the CuO 2 planes, respectively) were extracted. Our results are compared with those obtained by other experimental techniques and theoretical predictions

  2. Measurement of penetration depths of plutonium and americium in sediment from the ocean floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, S.; Friedman, A.; Hines, J.; Sjoblom, R.; Schmitz, G.; Schreiner, F.

    1979-01-01

    The clay-like sediment covering the ocean floor constitutes the last barrier that shields the biosphere from contamination by radionuclides stemming from the nuclear wastes of a subseabed repository. In the event of a failure of the engineered barriers the mobility of the released radionuclides in the sediment determines the rate and the extent of entry into the water of the ocean. The initial results of measurements designed to determine the mobility of transuranium elements in sediment from the ocean floor are presented. Data indicate very low migration rates and imply strong chemisorptive interaction with the sediment

  3. Evaluation of fracturing process of soft rocks at great depth by AE measurement and DEM simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kenji; Mito, Yoshitada; Kurokawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroya; Niunoya, Sumio; Minami, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    The authors developed the stress-based evaluation system of EDZ by AE monitoring and Distinct Element Method (DEM) simulation. In order to apply this system to the soft rock site, the authors try to grasp the relationship between AE parameters, stress change and rock fracturing process by performing the high stiffness tri-axial compression tests including AE measurements on the soft rock samples, and its simulations by DEM using bonded particle model. As the result, it is found that change in predominant AE frequency is effective to evaluate fracturing process in sedimentary soft rocks, and the relationship between stress change and fracturing process is also clarified. (author)

  4. Penetration depth measurement of a 6 MeV electron beam in water by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Hammer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI visualization of a 6 MeV electron beam in ferrous-doped water; a 25 mm penetration depth was measured. Time domain nuclear magnetic resonance was used to investigate the effect of generated free radicals on the free induction decay (FID in nondoped water; no apparent effects to the FID were observed. We show that MRI visualization of charged particle beams used in medical applications will require exogenous agents to provide contrast enhancement.

  5. Application of the resonant 52(p,γ)53Mn reaction to the measurement of chromium depth distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Switkowski, Z.E.; Petty, R.J.; Clark, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    A resonance in the 52 Cr(p,γ) 53 Mn reaction has been investigated as a probe for the quantitative determination of chromium depth distributions. The relevant nuclear parameters of this resonance were measured to be: resonance energy, Esub(p)1005.2 +- 0.2 keV, total width GAMMA < 100 eV, and resonance strength, (2J+1)GAMMAsub(p)GAMMAsub(γ)/GAMMA = 0.89 +-0.11 eV. As an example of the use of the nuclear resonance technique, the chromium profile of an electroplated chrome black solar absorber surface has been studied and the results are presented

  6. A probabilistic approach to crack instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1989-01-01

    A probabilistic model of brittle fracture is examined with reference to two-dimensional problems. The model is illustrated by using experimental data obtained for 25 macroscopically identical specimens made of short-fiber-reinforced composites. It is shown that the model proposed here provides a predictive formalism for the probability distributions of critical crack depth, critical loads, and crack arrest depths. It also provides similarity criteria for small-scale testing.

  7. Capacity fading of LiAlyNi1-x-yCoxO2 cathode for lithium-ion batteries during accelerated calendar and cycle life tests (effect of depth of discharge in charge-discharge cycling on the suppression of the micro-crack generation of LiAlyNi1-x-yCoxO2 particle)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shoichiro; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Hosokawa, Takashi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Nakura, Kensuke

    2014-08-01

    Cycle performance of a LiAl0.10Ni0.76Co0.14O2 (NCA) cathode/graphite cell closely depended on the range of depth of discharge in charge-discharge processes (ΔDOD). When ΔDOD was 10-70%, cycle performance at 25 °C was maintained even at 60 °C. Deterioration phenomena were analyzed by electrochemical method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and micro-cracks in NCA particles were analyzed with cross-sectional views by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Many micro-cracks were observed only after a 0-100% DOD region cycle test. Cycle tests in several restricted ΔDOD conditions showed that the deterioration was closely related to not the upper and lower limits of DOD or operation voltage but the width of ΔDOD.

  8. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, Ch.W.; Ros, A.; Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  9. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Ros, A. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  10. Comparison of peripapillary choroidal thickness measurements via spectral domain optical coherence tomography with and without enhanced depth imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz, Onder; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; Ozge, Gokhan; Koylu, Mehmet Talay; Ozgonul, Cem; Gokce, Gokcen; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Durukan, Ali Hakan; Mutlu, Fatih Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    To compare peripapillary choroidal thickness (PP-CT) measurements using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) device with and without enhanced depth imaging (EDI). Sixty healthy subjects aged from 18 to 40 years were included in this study. PP-CTs were measured in the right eyes by manual segmentation via SD-OCT both with and without EDI. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each technique and comparison of PP-CT measurements between two techniques were evaluated. The correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and PP-CT was also explored on images of SD-OCT without EDI. The PP-CT measurements of 55 subjects were evaluated. The ICC was 0.999 (95% CI: 0.998-1.0, p  0.05). Additionally, there was no correlation between RNFL thickness and PP-CT (r = -0.109; p = 0.335). The PP-CT measurements via SD-OCT without EDI were consistent with the measurements via SD-OCT with EDI. Ophthalmologists who do not have access to EDI technology can use images of SD-OCT without EDI to measure the peripapillary choroid for research purposes. However, thicker peripapillary choroids cannot be measured using this technique and require further modifications or newer technologies, such as SD-OCT with EDI.

  11. Williams expansion-based approximation of the stress field in an al 2024 body with a crack from optical measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seitl, Stanislav; Malíková, Lucie; Sobek, J.; Frantík, P.; Lopez; Crespo, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 41 (2017), s. 323-331 ISSN 1971-8993 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Crack tip fields * Higher - order terms * Multi - parameter approximetion * Optical data processing Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  12. A study on the evolution of crack networks under thermal fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Taheri, Said

    2008-01-01

    The crack network is a typical cracking morphology caused by thermal fatigue loading. It was pointed out that the crack network appeared under relatively small temperature fluctuations and did not grow deeply. In this study, the mechanism of evolution of crack network and its influence on crack growth was examined by numerical calculation. First, the stress field near two interacting cracks was investigated. It was shown that there are stress-concentration and stress-shielding zones around interacting cracks, and that cracks can form a network under the bi-axial stress condition. Secondly, a Monte Carlo simulation was developed in order to simulate the initiation and growth of cracks under thermal fatigue loading and the evolution of the crack network. The local stress field formed by pre-existing cracks was evaluated by the body force method and its role in the initiation and growth of cracks was considered. The simulation could simulate the evolution of the crack network and change in number of cracks observed in the experiments. It was revealed that reduction in the stress intensity factor due to stress feature in the depth direction under high cycle thermal fatigue loading plays an important role in the evolution of the crack network and that mechanical interaction between cracks in the network affects initiation rather than growth of cracks. The crack network appears only when the crack growth in the depth direction is interrupted. It was concluded that the emergence of the crack network is preferable for the structural integrity of cracked components

  13. Password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Χριστοφάκης, Μιχαήλ Κ.

    2014-01-01

    Information security is the next big thing in computers society because of the rapidly growing security incidents and the outcomes of those. Hacking and cracking existed even from the start of the eighties decade when there was the first step of the interconnection through the internet between humans. From then and ever after there was a big explosion of such incidents mostly because of the worldwide web which was introduced in the early nineties. Following the huge steps forward of computers...

  14. Maritime Aerosol Network optical depth measurements and comparison with satellite retrievals from various different sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles; Holben, Brent N.

    2017-10-01

    The paper reports on the current status of the Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) which is a component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). A public domain web-based data archive dedicated to MAN activity can be found at https://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html . Since 2006 over 450 cruises were completed and the data archive consists of more than 6000 measurement days. In this work, we present MAN observations collocated with MODIS Terra, MODIS Aqua, MISR, POLDER, SeaWIFS, OMI, and CALIOP spaceborne aerosol products using a modified version of the Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) framework. Because of different spatio-temporal characteristics of the analyzed products, the number of MAN data points collocated with spaceborne retrievals varied between 1500 matchups for MODIS to 39 for CALIOP (as of August 2016). Despite these unavoidable sampling biases, latitudinal dependencies of AOD differences for all satellite sensors, except for SeaWIFS and POLDER, showed positive biases against ground truth (i.e. MAN) in the southern latitudes (<50° S), and substantial scatter in the Northern Atlantic "dust belt" (5°-15° N). Our analysis did not intend to determine whether satellite retrievals are within claimed uncertainty boundaries, but rather show where bias exists and corrections are needed.

  15. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements Using a Ground-based Lunar Photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Tim; Omar, Ali; Haggard, Charles; Pippin, Margaret; Tasaddaq, Aasam; Stone, Tom; Rodriguez, Jon; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; hide

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was proposed to combine AERONET network photometer capabilities with a high precision lunar model used for satellite calibration to retrieve columnar nighttime AODs. The USGS lunar model can continuously provide pre-atmosphere high precision lunar irradiance determinations for multiple wavelengths at ground sensor locations. When combined with measured irradiances from a ground-based AERONET photometer, atmospheric column transmissions can determined yielding nighttime column aerosol AOD and Angstrom coefficients. Additional demonstrations have utilized this approach to further develop calibration methods and to obtain data in polar regions where extended periods of darkness occur. This new capability enables more complete studies of the diurnal behavior of aerosols, and feedback for models and satellite retrievals for the nighttime behavior of aerosols. It is anticipated that the nighttime capability of these sensors will be useful for comparisons with satellite lidars such as CALIOP and CATS in additional to ground-based lidars in MPLNET at night, when the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than daytime and more precise AOD comparisons can be made.

  16. PRECISE MEASUREMENT OF THE REIONIZATION OPTICAL DEPTH FROM THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC HEATING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: anastasia.fialkov@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    As a result of our limited data on reionization, the total optical depth for electron scattering, τ, limits precision measurements of cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It was recently shown that the predicted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen contains enough information to reconstruct τ with sub-percent accuracy, assuming that the neutral gas was much hotter than the CMB throughout the entire epoch of reionization (EoR). Here we relax this assumption and use the global 21 cm signal alone to extract τ for realistic X-ray heating scenarios. We test our model-independent approach using mock data for a wide range of ionization and heating histories and show that an accurate measurement of the reionization optical depth at a sub-percent level is possible in most of the considered scenarios even when heating is not saturated during the EoR, assuming that the foregrounds are mitigated. However, we find that in cases where heating sources had hard X-ray spectra and their luminosity was close to or lower than what is predicted based on low-redshift observations, the global 21 cm signal alone is not a good tracer of the reionization history.

  17. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mul, Frits F M de; George, Nibu A; Qiu Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K [Department of Biomedical Engineering BMSA, Faculty of Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen UMCG, University of Groningen, PO Box 196, 9700 AD Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: ffm@demul.net

    2009-07-07

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents-for the first time-a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  18. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mul, Frits F M de; George, Nibu A; Qiu Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K

    2009-01-01

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents-for the first time-a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  19. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Christian; Peter, Christiane; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Jörg; Kara, Eugen; Zink, Klemens; Rödel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla

    2009-08-01

    Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm(3) thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm(2) because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector.

  20. PRECISE MEASUREMENT OF THE REIONIZATION OPTICAL DEPTH FROM THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC HEATING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    As a result of our limited data on reionization, the total optical depth for electron scattering, τ, limits precision measurements of cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It was recently shown that the predicted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen contains enough information to reconstruct τ with sub-percent accuracy, assuming that the neutral gas was much hotter than the CMB throughout the entire epoch of reionization (EoR). Here we relax this assumption and use the global 21 cm signal alone to extract τ for realistic X-ray heating scenarios. We test our model-independent approach using mock data for a wide range of ionization and heating histories and show that an accurate measurement of the reionization optical depth at a sub-percent level is possible in most of the considered scenarios even when heating is not saturated during the EoR, assuming that the foregrounds are mitigated. However, we find that in cases where heating sources had hard X-ray spectra and their luminosity was close to or lower than what is predicted based on low-redshift observations, the global 21 cm signal alone is not a good tracer of the reionization history

  1. Measuring depths of sub-micron tracks in a CR-39 detector from replicas using Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.N.; Ng, F.M.F.; Nikezic, D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenging tasks in the application of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) is the measurement of the depth of the tracks, in particular, the shallow ones resulting from short etching periods. In the present work, a method is proposed to prepare replicas of tracks from α particles in the CR-39 SSNTDs and to measure their heights using atomic force microscopy (AFM). After irradiation, the detectors were etched in a 6.25N aqueous solution of NaOH maintained at 70 deg. C. The etched detectors were immersed into a beaker of the replicating fluid, which was placed in a water bath under ultrasonic vibration and maintained at room temperature to facilitate the filling of the etched tracks with the replicating fluid. As an example of application, these results have been used to derive a V function for the CR-39 detectors used in the present study (for the specified etching conditions)

  2. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U.; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

    2010-02-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  3. Effect of lapping slurry on critical cutting depth of spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhan-kui; Wang, Zhuan-kui; Zhu, Yong-wei; Su, Jian-xiu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Measured spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different slurries. • Evaluated the softened layer thickness in different slurries. • Discussed the effect of slurries on critical cutting depth of spinel. - Abstract: The critical cutting depth for lapping process is very important because it influences the mode of material removal. In this paper, a serial of microscopic indentation experiments were carried out for measuring spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different lapping slurries. Their critical cutting depth and fracture toughness were calculated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also employed to study the surface chemical composition and softened layer thickness of wafers in different slurries. Experimental results indicate that the softened layers of spinel wafers are formed due to the corrosion of lapping slurries, which leads to a lower hardness and a larger fracture toughness of samples, and increases the critical cutting depth. Among them, the critical cutting depth in ethylene glycol solution is the largest and up to 21.8 nm. The increase of critical cutting depth is helpful to modify the surface quality of the work-piece being lapped via ductile removal mode instead of brittle fracture mode

  4. Measurements of nitrogen depth distribution in the surface of steel with the 14N(d,p0)15N reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didriksson, R.; Goenczi, L.; Sundqvist, B.

    1980-01-01

    The 14 N(d,p 0 ) 15 N nuclear reaction has been used to measure the nitrogen depth distribution in the surface of steel samples. With a beam energy of 2.5 MeV a depth of 15μm could be analyzed. The depth resolution was 0.7 μm (FWHM) and nitrogen contents down to 0.02 percent could be determined. (author)

  5. Development of formulas for the estimation of renal depth and application in the measurement of glomerular filtration rate in Koreans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Yong An

    2000-01-01

    There is no established formula for estimating renal depths in Korean. As a result, we undertook this study to develop a new formula, and to apply this formula in the calculation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We measured the renal depth (RD) on the abdominal CT obtained in 300 adults (M:F=167:133, mean age 50.9 years) without known renal diseases. The RDs measured by CT were compared with the estimated RDs based on the Tonnesen and Taylor equations. New formulas were derived from the measured RDs in 200 out of 300 patients based on several variables such as sex, age, weight, and height by multiple regression analysis. The RDs estimated from the new formulas were compared with the measured RDs in the remaining 100 patients as a control. In 48 patients who underwent Tc-99m DTPA renal scintigraphy, GFR was measured with three equations (new formula, Tonnesen and Taylor equations), respectively, and compared with each other. The mean values of the RDs measured from CT were 6.9 cm for right kidney of the men (MRK), 6.7 cm for left kidney of the men (MLK), 6.7 cm for right kidney of the women (WRK), and 6.6 cm for left kidney of the men (WLK). The RDs estimated from Tonnesen equation were shorter than the ones measured from CT significantly. The newly derived formulas were 12.813 (weight/height) +0.002 (age) +2.264 for MRK, 15.344 (weight/height)+0.011 (age)+0.557 for for MLK,12.936 (weight/height)+0.014 (age)+1.462 for WRK and 13.488 (weight/height)+0.019 (age)+0.762 for WLK. The correlation coefficients of the RD measured from CT and estimated from the new formula were 0.529 in MRK, 0.729 in MLK, 0.601 in WRK, and 0.724 in WLK, respectively. The GFRs from the new formula were significantly higher than those from the Tonnesen equation significantly, which was the most similar to normal GFR values. We generated new formulas for estimating RD in Korean from the data by CT. By adopting these formulas, we expect that GFR can be measured by the Gates method accurately

  6. Recent advances in modelling creep crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, H.

    1988-08-01

    At the time of the previous International Conference on Fracture, the C* integral had long been recognized as a promising load parameter for correlating crack growth rates in creep-ductile materials. The measured crack growth rates as a function of C* and of the temperature could be understood on the basis of micromechanical models. The distinction between C*-controlled and K I -controlled creep crack growth had been clarified and first attempts had been made to describe creep crack growth in the transient regime between elastic behavior and steady-state creep. This paper describes the progress in describing transient crack growth including the effect of primary creep. The effect of crack-tip geometry changes by blunting and by crack growth on the crack-tip fields and on the validity of C* is analyzed by idealizing the growing-crack geometry by a sharp notch and using recent solutions for the notch-tip fields. A few new three-dimensional calculations of C* are cited and important theoretical points are emphasized regarding the three-dimensional fields at crack tips. Finally, creep crack growth is described by continuum-damage models for which similarity solutions can be obtained. Crack growth under small-scale creep conditions turns out to be difficult to understand. Slightly different models yield very different crack growth rates. (orig.) With 4 figs

  7. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  8. Numerical evaluation and optimization of depth-oriented temperature measurements for the investigation of thermal influences on groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Mandy; Haendel, Falk; Epting, Jannis; Binder, Martin; Müller, Matthias; Huggenberger, Peter; Liedl, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Increasing groundwater temperatures have been observed in many urban areas such as London (UK), Tokyo (Japan) and also in Basel (Switzerland). Elevated groundwater temperatures are a result of different direct and indirect thermal impacts. Groundwater heat pumps, building structures located within the groundwater and district heating pipes, among others, can be addressed to direct impacts, whereas indirect impacts result from the change in climate in urban regions (i.e. reduced wind, diffuse heat sources). A better understanding of the thermal processes within the subsurface is urgently needed for decision makers as a basis for the selection of appropriate measures to reduce the ongoing increase of groundwater temperatures. However, often only limited temperature data is available that derives from measurements in conventional boreholes, which differ in construction and instrumental setup resulting in measurements that are often biased and not comparable. For three locations in the City of Basel models were implemented to study selected thermal processes and to investigate if heat-transport models can reproduce thermal measurements. Therefore, and to overcome the limitations of conventional borehole measurements, high-resolution depth-oriented temperature measurement systems have been introduced in the urban area of Basel. In total seven devices were installed with up to 16 sensors which are located in the unsaturated and saturated zone (0.5 to 1 m separation distance). Measurements were performed over a period of 4 years (ongoing) and provide sufficient data to set up and calibrate high-resolution local numerical heat transport models which allow studying selected local thermal processes. In a first setup two- and three-dimensional models were created to evaluate the impact of the atmosphere boundary on groundwater temperatures (see EGU Poster EGU2013-9230: Modelling Strategies for the Thermal Management of Shallow Rural and Urban Groundwater bodies). For Basel

  9. Fatigue crack nucleation of type 316LN stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2000-01-01

    Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) life decreases drastically with increasing temperature but increases with the addition of nitrogen at room and high temperatures. The effect of nitrogen on LCF life may be related to crack nucleation at high temperatures in austenitic stainless steel because the fraction of crack nucleation in LCF life is about 40%. The influence of nitrogen on the crack nucleation of LCF in type 316LN stainless steel is investigated by observations of crack population and crack depth after testing at 40% of fatigue life. Nitrogen increases the number of cycles to nucleate microcracks of 100 μm but decreases the crack population

  10. Crack closure and healing studies in WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] salt using compressional wave velocity and attenuation measurements: Test methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, N.S.

    1990-11-01

    Compressional wave ultrasonic data were used to qualitatively assess the extent of crack closure during hydrostatic compression of damaged specimens of WIPP salt. Cracks were introduced during constant strain-rate triaxial tests at low confining pressure (0.5 MPa) as specimens were taken to either 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 percent axial strain. For three specimens taken to 1.0 percent axial strain, the pressure was increased to 5, 10 or 15 MPa. For the remaining specimens, pressure was raised to 15 MPa. Waveforms for compressional waves traveling both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum principal stress were measured in the undamaged state, during constant strain-rate tests, and then monitored as functions of time while the specimens were held at pressure. Both wave velocities and amplitudes increased over time at pressure, indicating that cracks closed and perhaps healed. The recovery of ultrasonic wave characteristics depended upon both pressure and damage level. The higher the pressure, the greater the velocity recovery; however, amplitude recovery showed no clear correlation with pressure. For both amplitudes and velocities, recoveries were greatest in the specimens with the least damage. 13 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  11. Determination of the columnar aerosol size distribution by inversion of spectral aerosol optical depth measurements at different areas in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Metwally, M.; Madkour, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosols have a great effects on nuclear safety calculations and atmospheric environment. The aerosol optical depth measurements are carried out at four areas in Egypt: Cairo and Helwan as urban/industrial areas, Aswan as an arid area and Mansoura as an agricultural area covering the period from Jun 1992 to May 1993. These measurements were recorded by ground-based pyrheliometers with large band-pass filters. Monthly average values of aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed a pronounced temporal trend, with a maximum AOD during summer and the transition seasons (spring and autumn) at all sites. Levels of AODs are higher at both urban and industrial areas than at other areas. Variation of Angstrom exponent a with the AOD was clear at most sites and the a value depends on the spectral range used in its determination. The mean contribution of anthropogenic sources to AOD over Cairo was at the range of 25.1-54.3%, whereas those values in Helwan were at the range of 34.5-59.8%. Finally, columnar aerosol size distributions have been inferred by inverting particularly AOD measurements as a function of wavelength. The Junge (type I) and bimodal (type III) distributions are dominant at urban and arid areas (Cairo and Aswan), whereas mono dispersion distribution (type II) are dominant in industrial and agricultural areas (Helwan and Mansoura). In Cairo and Aswan, the peak of columnar size distribution for the fine mode at radius r is around 0.1 and 0.2 μm respectively, while it is around 1.0 and 2.0 μm for the coarse mode. .Also, the peak of size distribution for the mono dispersion mode was marked at radius around 0.2 μm at both Helwan and Mansoura. A comprehensive comparison of our results with literature size distributions is very sparse, nevertheless, our size distributions in general agree with them

  12. Correlation between average tissue depth data and quantitative accuracy of forensic craniofacial reconstructions measured by geometric surface comparison method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Joon; Wilkinson, Caroline M; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Lee, Sang-Mi

    2015-05-01

    Accuracy is the most important factor supporting the reliability of forensic facial reconstruction (FFR) comparing to the corresponding actual face. A number of methods have been employed to evaluate objective accuracy of FFR. Recently, it has been attempted that the degree of resemblance between computer-generated FFR and actual face is measured by geometric surface comparison method. In this study, three FFRs were produced employing live adult Korean subjects and three-dimensional computerized modeling software. The deviations of the facial surfaces between the FFR and the head scan CT of the corresponding subject were analyzed in reverse modeling software. The results were compared with those from a previous study which applied the same methodology as this study except average facial soft tissue depth dataset. Three FFRs of this study that applied updated dataset demonstrated lesser deviation errors between the facial surfaces of the FFR and corresponding subject than those from the previous study. The results proposed that appropriate average tissue depth data are important to increase quantitative accuracy of FFR. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Cracking hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forwood, G F; Lane, M; Taplay, J G

    1921-10-07

    In cracking and hydrogenating hydrocarbon oils by passing their vapors together with steam over heated carbon derived from shale, wood, peat or other vegetable or animal matter, the gases from the condenser are freed from sulfuretted hydrogen, and preferably also from carbon dioxide, and passed together with oil vapors and steam through the retort. Carbon dioxide may be removed by passage through slaked lime, and sulfuretted hydrogen by means of hydrated oxide of iron. Vapors from high-boiling oils and those from low-boiling oils are passed alternately through the retort, so that carbon deposited from the high-boiling oils is used up during treatment of low-boiling oils.

  14. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  15. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  16. Sulfate reduction in Black Sea sediments: in situ and laboratory radiotracer measurements from the shelf to 2000m depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, A.; Riess, W.; Wenzhoefer, F.

    2001-01-01

    anoxic basin. The highest rates measured on an areal basis for the upper 0-15 cm were 1.97 mmol m(-2) d(-1) on the shelf and 1.54 mmol m(-2) d(-1) at 181 m water depth just below the chemocline. At all stations sulfate reduction rates decreased to values 50% just above the chemocline to 100% just below...... sediments showed that the present results tend to be higher in shelf sediments and lower in the deep-sea than most other data. Based on the present water column H2S inventory and the H2S flux out of the sediment, the calculated turnover time of H2S below the chemocline is 2100 years. (C) 2001 Elsevier...

  17. A Simplified Method to Measure Choroidal Thickness Using Adaptive Compensation in Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Preeti; Sidhartha, Elizabeth; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Wong, Tien-Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a simplified method to measure choroidal thickness (CT) using commercially available enhanced depth imaging (EDI) spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods We measured CT in 31 subjects without ocular diseases using Spectralis EDI SD-OCT. The choroid-scleral interface of the acquired images was first enhanced using a post-processing compensation algorithm. The enhanced images were then analysed using Photoshop. Two graders independently graded the images to assess inter-grader reliability. One grader re-graded the images after 2 weeks to determine intra-grader reliability. Statistical analysis was performed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot analyses. Results Using adaptive compensation both the intra-grader reliability (ICC: 0.95 to 0.97) and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.93 to 0.97) were perfect for all five locations of CT. However, with the conventional technique of manual CT measurements using built-in callipers provided with the Heidelberg explorer software, the intra- (ICC: 0.87 to 0.94) and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.90 to 0.93) for all the measured locations is lower. Using adaptive compensation, the mean differences (95% limits of agreement) for intra- and inter-grader sub-foveal CT measurements were −1.3 (−3.33 to 30.8) µm and −1.2 (−36.6 to 34.2) µm, respectively. Conclusions The measurement of CT obtained from EDI SD-OCT using our simplified method was highly reliable and efficient. Our method is an easy and practical approach to improve the quality of choroidal images and the precision of CT measurement. PMID:24797674

  18. A simplified method to measure choroidal thickness using adaptive compensation in enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Gupta

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate a simplified method to measure choroidal thickness (CT using commercially available enhanced depth imaging (EDI spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. METHODS: We measured CT in 31 subjects without ocular diseases using Spectralis EDI SD-OCT. The choroid-scleral interface of the acquired images was first enhanced using a post-processing compensation algorithm. The enhanced images were then analysed using Photoshop. Two graders independently graded the images to assess inter-grader reliability. One grader re-graded the images after 2 weeks to determine intra-grader reliability. Statistical analysis was performed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman plot analyses. RESULTS: Using adaptive compensation both the intra-grader reliability (ICC: 0.95 to 0.97 and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.93 to 0.97 were perfect for all five locations of CT. However, with the conventional technique of manual CT measurements using built-in callipers provided with the Heidelberg explorer software, the intra- (ICC: 0.87 to 0.94 and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.90 to 0.93 for all the measured locations is lower. Using adaptive compensation, the mean differences (95% limits of agreement for intra- and inter-grader sub-foveal CT measurements were -1.3 (-3.33 to 30.8 µm and -1.2 (-36.6 to 34.2 µm, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of CT obtained from EDI SD-OCT using our simplified method was highly reliable and efficient. Our method is an easy and practical approach to improve the quality of choroidal images and the precision of CT measurement.

  19. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherf, Christian; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Joerg; Kara, Eugen; Roedel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla; Peter, Christiane; Zink, Klemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. Material and Methods: The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm 3 thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. Results: The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm 2 because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Conclusion: Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector. (orig.)

  20. Crack propagation tests on the fundamental structure under cyclic thermal transients. Results of nondestructive inspection for cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Horikiri, M.

    2001-06-01

    This report shows the results of crack inspection in crack propagation tests that were carried out at the Air-cooling Thermal Transient Test Facility (ATTF). Test specimens were made of 304 type austenitic stainless steel, and they were the same cylindrical shape, 1,500 mm in height, 130 mm in outer diameter and 30 mm in thickness. And they had initial slits machined on inner surfaces. Firstly the specimens were heated up to 650degC in a furnace, then cooled by pressurized air blowing through the specimen for 90 seconds. These cyclic changes of temperature gradients in the wall of specimens were loaded. Specimens were tested for several years. The specimen No. CPTT-102 with machined two circumferential slits and two semi-elliptical slits was tested up to 10,000 cycles. And the specimen No. CPTT-103 with machined six semi-elliptical slits of different length respectively was tested up to 5,000 cycles. Cracks of specimens were inspected nondestructively for a giving cycle in these tests. Applied inspection methods were ultra-sonic testing, potential-drop method and inner surface observation. Ultra-sonic testing was carried out by applying the pulse-echo method. Potential-drop testing was carried out by measurement of localized constant direct current beyond cracks. Photographs of the inner surface of specimens were taken using a bore-scope. The results of ultra-sonic testing have been close to destructive test results. The depth of crack by the potential-drop method was almost corresponding to destructive test results, too. Photographs of the inner surface were synthesized by the computer, and connection between main crack and hair crack was observed. (author)

  1. Stress-intensity factor equations for cracks in three-dimensional finite bodies subjected to tension and bending loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Stress intensity factor equations are presented for an embedded elliptical crack, a semielliptical surface crack, a quarter elliptical corner crack, a semielliptical surface crack along the bore of a circular hole, and a quarter elliptical corner crack at the edge of a circular hole in finite plates. The plates were subjected to either remote tension or bending loads. The stress intensity factors used to develop these equations were obtained from previous three dimensional finite element analyses of these crack configurations. The equations give stress intensity factors as a function of parametric angle, crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and, where applicable, hole radius. The ratio of crack depth to plate thickness ranged from 0 to 1, the ratio of crack depth to crack length ranged from 0.2 to 2, and the ratio of hole radius to plate thickness ranged from 0.5 to 2. The effects of plate width on stress intensity variation along the crack front were also included.

  2. Rattlesnake Mountain Observator (46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W) multispectral optical depth measurements, 1979--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, R.C. [ed.

    1995-09-22

    Surface measurements of solar irradiance of the atmosphere were made by a multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory. The observatory is located at 46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W at an elevation of 1088 m above mean sea level. The photometer measures the attenuation of direct solar radiation for different wavelengths using 12 filters. Five of these filters (ie., at 428 nm, 486 nm, 535 nm, 785 nm, and 1010 nm, with respective half-power widths of 2, 2, 3, 18, and 28 nm) are suitable for monitoring variations in the total optical depth of the atmosphere. Total optical depths for the five wavelength bands were derived from solar irradiance measurements taken at the observatory from August 5, 1979, to September 2, 1994; these total optical depth data are distributed with this numeric data package (NDP). To determine the contribution of atmospheric aerosols to the total optical depths, the effects of Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption were subtracted (other molecular scattering was minimal for the five filters) to obtain total column aerosol optical depths. The total aerosol optical depths were further decomposed into tropospheric and stratospheric components by calculating a robustly smoothed mean background optical depth (tropospheric component) for each wavelength using data obtained during periods of low stratospheric aerosol loading. By subtracting the smoothed background tropospheric aerosol optical depths from the total aerosol optical depths, residual aerosol optical depths were obtained. These residuals are good estimates of the stratospheric aerosol optical depth at each wavelength and may be used to monitor the long-term effects of volcanic eruptions on the atmosphere. These data are available as an NDP from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), and the NDP consists of this document and a set of computerized data files.

  3. Angular dependence of the response of the nanoDot OSLD system for measurements at depth in clinical megavoltage beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Joerg; Dunn, Leon; Lye, Jessica E.; Kenny, John W.; Alves, Andrew D. C.; Cole, Andrew; Asena, Andre; Kron, Tomas; Williams, Ivan M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to assess the angular dependence of a commercial optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) dosimetry system in MV x-ray beams at depths beyondd max and to find ways to mitigate this dependence for measurements in phantoms. Methods: Two special holders were designed which allow a dosimeter to be rotated around the center of its sensitive volume. The dosimeter's sensitive volume is a disk, 5 mm in diameter and 0.2 mm thick. The first holder rotates the disk in the traditional way. It positions the disk perpendicular to the beam (gantry pointing to the floor) in the initial position (0°). When the holder is rotated the angle of the disk towards the beam increases until the disk is parallel with the beam (“edge on,” 90°). This is referred to as Setup 1. The second holder offers a new, alternative measurement position. It positions the disk parallel to the beam for all angles while rotating around its center (Setup 2). Measurements with five to ten dosimeters per point were carried out for 6 MV at 3 and 10 cm depth. Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 were performed to simulate the response of the active detector material for several angles. Detector and housing were simulated in detail based on microCT data and communications with the manufacturer. Various material compositions and an all-water geometry were considered. Results: For the traditional Setup 1 the response of the OSLD dropped on average by 1.4% ± 0.7% (measurement) and 2.1% ± 0.3% (Monte Carlo simulation) for the 90° orientation compared to 0°. Monte Carlo simulations also showed a strong dependence of the effect on the composition of the sensitive layer. Assuming the layer to completely consist of the active material (Al 2 O 3 ) results in a 7% drop in response for 90° compared to 0°. Assuming the layer to be completely water, results in a flat response within the simulation uncertainty of about 1%. For the new Setup 2, measurements and

  4. Corneal ablation depth readout of the MEL 80 excimer laser compared to Artemis three-dimensional very high-frequency digital ultrasound stromal measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the ablation depth readout for the MEL 80 excimer laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec). Artemis 1 very high-frequency digital ultrasound measurements were obtained before and at least 3 months after LASIK in 121 eyes (65 patients). The Artemis-measured ablation depth was calculated as the maximum difference in stromal thickness before and after treatment. Laser in situ keratomileusis was performed using the MEL 80 excimer laser and the Hansatome microkeratome (Bausch & Lomb). The Aberration Smart Ablation profile was used in 56 eyes and the Tissue Saving Ablation profile was used in 65 eyes. All ablations were centered on the corneal vertex. Comparative statistics and linear regression analysis were performed between the laser readout ablation depth and Artemis-measured ablation depth. The mean maximum myopic meridian was -6.66±2.40 diopters (D) (range: -1.50 to -10.00 D) for Aberration Smart Ablation-treated eyes and -6.50±2.56 D (range: -1.34 to -11.50 D) for Tissue Saving Ablation-treated eyes. The MEL 80 readout was found to overestimate the Artemis-measured ablation depth by 20±12 μm for Aberration Smart Ablation and by 21±12 μm for Tissue Saving Ablation profiles. The accuracy of ablation depth measurement was improved by using the Artemis stromal thickness profile measurements before and after surgery to exclude epithelial changes. The MEL 80 readout was found to overestimate the achieved ablation depth. The linear regression equations could be used by MEL 80 users to adjust the ablation depth for predicted residual stromal thickness calculations without increasing the risk of ectasia due to excessive keratectomy depth as long as a suitable flap thickness bias is included. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Factors controlling nitrate cracking of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Nitrite and hydroxide ions inhibit the growth of nitrate stress corrosion cracks in mild steel. Crack growth measurements showed that sufficient concentrations of nitrite and hydroxide ions can prevent crack growth; however, insufficient concentrations of these ions did not influence the Stage II growth rate or the threshold stress intensity, but extended the initiation time. Stage III growth was discontinuous. Oxide formed in the grain boundaries ahead of the crack tip and oxide dissolution (Stage II) and fracture (Stage III) are the proposed mechanisms of nitrate stress corrosion crack growth

  6. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  7. Monitoring reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced cracking using non-destructive x-ray attenuation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    To test the applicability of the x-ray attenuation method to monitor the movement of corrosion products as well as the formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials reinforced mortar samples were prepared and tested under accelerated corrosion conditions. It is evident from the ex...... of the corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel, obtained by the x-ray attenuation method, was found to be in very good agreement with the mass loss obtained by gravimetric method as well as Faraday's law....

  8. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C. [Industrial Technology Research Inst., Taiwan (China); Yeh, T.K. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  9. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  10. Stress-intensity factor equations for cracks in three-dimensional finite bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical stress intensity factor equations are presented for embedded elliptical cracks, semi-elliptical surface cracks, quarter-elliptical corner cracks, semi-elliptical surface cracks at a hole, and quarter-elliptical corner cracks at a hole in finite plates. The plates were subjected to remote tensile loading. Equations give stress intensity factors as a function of parametric angle, crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and where applicable, hole radius. The stress intensity factors used to develop the equations were obtained from three dimensional finite element analyses of these crack configurations.

  11. Measurement of relative depth-dose distribution in radiochromic film dosimeters irradiated with 43-70 keV electron beam for industrial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Shinjiro; Hattori, Takeaki; Nonaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Yuki; Morita, Ippei; Kondo, Junichi; Ishikawa, Masayoshi; Mori, Yoshitaka

    2018-05-01

    The relative dose in a layer, which is thinner than the thickness of the dosimeter is evaluated using simulated depth-dose distributions, and the measured responses of dosimeters with acceleration voltages from 43 to 70 kV, via ultra-low-energy electron beam (ULEB) irradiation. By stacking thin film dosimeters, we confirmed that the simulated depth-dose distributions coincided with the measured depth-dose curve within the measurement uncertainty (k = 2). Using the measurement dose of the 47 μm dosimeter and the simulated depth-dose distribution, the dose of 11 μm dosimeters in the surface was evaluated within the measurement uncertainty (k = 2). We also verified the effectiveness of this method for a thinner layer by changing the acceleration voltage of the irradiation source. We evaluated the relative dose for an adjusted depth of energy deposition from 4.4 μm to 22.8 μm. As a result, this method was found to be effective for a thickness, which is less than the thickness of the dosimeter. When irradiation conditions are well known with accuracy, using the confirmed relative depth-dose distributions across any dosimeter thickness range, a dose evaluation, in several μm steps will possibly improve the design of industrial ULEB processes.

  12. XO-2b: A HOT JUPITER WITH A VARIABLE HOST STAR THAT POTENTIALLY AFFECTS ITS MEASURED TRANSIT DEPTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A. [Department of Planetary Sciences, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Pearson, Kyle A.; Fitzpatrick, M. Ryleigh; Teske, Johanna K.; Biddle, Lauren I. [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Turner, Jake D. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael H., E-mail: rzellem@lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: griffith@lpl.arizona.edu [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., P.O. Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The transiting hot Jupiter XO-2b is an ideal target for multi-object photometry and spectroscopy as it has a relatively bright (V-mag = 11.25) K0V host star (XO-2N) and a large planet-to-star contrast ratio (R{sub p}/R{sub s} ≈ 0.015). It also has a nearby (31.″21) binary stellar companion (XO-2S) of nearly the same brightness (V-mag = 11.20) and spectral type (G9V), allowing for the characterization and removal of shared systematic errors (e.g., airmass brightness variations). We have therefore conducted a multiyear (2012–2015) study of XO-2b with the University of Arizona’s 61″ (1.55 m) Kuiper Telescope and Mont4k CCD in the Bessel U and Harris B photometric passbands to measure its Rayleigh scattering slope to place upper limits on the pressure-dependent radius at, e.g., 10 bar. Such measurements are needed to constrain its derived molecular abundances from primary transit observations. We have also been monitoring XO-2N since the 2013–2014 winter season with Tennessee State University’s Celestron-14 (0.36 m) automated imaging telescope to investigate stellar variability, which could affect XO-2b’s transit depth. Our observations indicate that XO-2N is variable, potentially due to cool star spots, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.0049 ± 0.0007 R-mag and a period of 29.89 ± 0.16 days for the 2013–2014 observing season and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.0035 ± 0.0007 R-mag and 27.34 ± 0.21 day period for the 2014–2015 observing season. Because of the likely influence of XO-2N’s variability on the derivation of XO-2b’s transit depth, we cannot bin multiple nights of data to decrease our uncertainties, preventing us from constraining its gas abundances. This study demonstrates that long-term monitoring programs of exoplanet host stars are crucial for understanding host star variability.

  13. XO-2b: A HOT JUPITER WITH A VARIABLE HOST STAR THAT POTENTIALLY AFFECTS ITS MEASURED TRANSIT DEPTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Pearson, Kyle A.; Fitzpatrick, M. Ryleigh; Teske, Johanna K.; Biddle, Lauren I.; Turner, Jake D.; Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    The transiting hot Jupiter XO-2b is an ideal target for multi-object photometry and spectroscopy as it has a relatively bright (V-mag = 11.25) K0V host star (XO-2N) and a large planet-to-star contrast ratio (R p /R s ≈ 0.015). It also has a nearby (31.″21) binary stellar companion (XO-2S) of nearly the same brightness (V-mag = 11.20) and spectral type (G9V), allowing for the characterization and removal of shared systematic errors (e.g., airmass brightness variations). We have therefore conducted a multiyear (2012–2015) study of XO-2b with the University of Arizona’s 61″ (1.55 m) Kuiper Telescope and Mont4k CCD in the Bessel U and Harris B photometric passbands to measure its Rayleigh scattering slope to place upper limits on the pressure-dependent radius at, e.g., 10 bar. Such measurements are needed to constrain its derived molecular abundances from primary transit observations. We have also been monitoring XO-2N since the 2013–2014 winter season with Tennessee State University’s Celestron-14 (0.36 m) automated imaging telescope to investigate stellar variability, which could affect XO-2b’s transit depth. Our observations indicate that XO-2N is variable, potentially due to cool star spots, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.0049 ± 0.0007 R-mag and a period of 29.89 ± 0.16 days for the 2013–2014 observing season and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.0035 ± 0.0007 R-mag and 27.34 ± 0.21 day period for the 2014–2015 observing season. Because of the likely influence of XO-2N’s variability on the derivation of XO-2b’s transit depth, we cannot bin multiple nights of data to decrease our uncertainties, preventing us from constraining its gas abundances. This study demonstrates that long-term monitoring programs of exoplanet host stars are crucial for understanding host star variability

  14. Measurement of the Muon Atmospheric Production Depth with the Water Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Bueno, Laura [Univ. of Granada (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) are particles of uncertain origin and composition, with energies above 1 EeV (1018 eV or 0.16 J). The measured flux of UHECR is a steeply decreasing function of energy. The largest and most sensitive apparatus built to date to record and study cosmic ray Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is the Pierre Auger Observatory. The Pierre Auger Observatory has produced the largest and finest amount of data ever collected for UHECR. A broad physics program is being carried out covering all relevant topics of the field. Among them, one of the most interesting is the problem related to the estimation of the mass composition of cosmic rays in this energy range. Currently the best measurements of mass are those obtained by studying the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic part of the EAS with the Fluorescence Detector. However, the collected statistics is small, specially at energies above several tens of EeV. Although less precise, the volume of data gathered with the Surface Detector is nearly a factor ten larger than the fluorescence data. So new ways to study composition with data collected at the ground are under investigation. The subject of this thesis follows one of those new lines of research. Using preferentially the time information associated with the muons that reach the ground, we try to build observables related to the composition of the primaries that initiated the EAS. A simple phenomenological model relates the arrival times with the depths in the atmosphere where muons are produced. The experimental confirmation that the distributions of muon production depths (MPD) correlate with the mass of the primary particle has opened the way to a variety of studies, of which this thesis is a continuation, with the aim of enlarging and improving its range of applicability. We revisit the phenomenological model which is at the root of the analysis and discuss a new way to improve some aspects of the model. We carry

  15. Spatial and temporal interpolation of satellite-based aerosol optical depth measurements over North America using B-splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Nicolas; O'Neill, Norman T.; Aube, Martin; Nguyen, Minh-Nghia; Bechamp-Laganiere, Xavier; Besnier, Albert; Corriveau, Louis; Gasse, Geremie; Levert, Etienne; Plante, Danick

    2005-08-01

    Satellite-based measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) over land are obtained from an inversion procedure applied to dense dark vegetation pixels of remotely sensed images. The limited number of pixels over which the inversion procedure can be applied leaves many areas with little or no AOD data. Moreover, satellite coverage by sensors such as MODIS yields only daily images of a given region with four sequential overpasses required to straddle mid-latitude North America. Ground based AOD data from AERONET sun photometers are available on a more continuous basis but only at approximately fifty locations throughout North America. The object of this work is to produce a complete and coherent mapping of AOD over North America with a spatial resolution of 0.1 degree and a frequency of three hours by interpolating MODIS satellite-based data together with available AERONET ground based measurements. Before being interpolated, the MODIS AOD data extracted from different passes are synchronized to the mapping time using analyzed wind fields from the Global Multiscale Model (Meteorological Service of Canada). This approach amounts to a trajectory type of simplified atmospheric dynamics correction method. The spatial interpolation is performed using a weighted least squares method applied to bicubic B-spline functions defined on a rectangular grid. The least squares method enables one to weight the data accordingly to the measurement errors while the B-splines properties of local support and C2 continuity offer a good approximation of AOD behaviour viewed as a function of time and space.

  16. Thermografic measurement of crack initiation and propagation at thin sheet joints; Rissentstehung thermometrisch ermitteln. Zerstoerungsfreie Bestimmung der Rissinitiierung in mechanisch gefuegten und widerstandpunktgeschweissten Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathke, W.; Stahlfeld, G. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe V.5 - Sicherheit in der Fuegetechnik

    2000-07-01

    This contribution demonstrates how a thermometric procedure might be applied to determine crack initiation during fatigue testing of joints at steel sheets. The procedure is based on the measurement of the temperature increase which is produced by the heat at the respective joint caused by deformation energy. Such investigations are aimed at detection of crack initiation before it becomes visible at the specimen surface. Thermografic measurements at different mechanical joints and resistance welded spots are compared and various applications are suggested. (orig.) [German] In diesem Beitrag wird gezeigt, wie sich ein thermometrisches Verfahren einsetzen laesst, um die Rissentstehung waehrend der Dauerschwingpruefung von Stahlblechen zu erfassen. Vergleichend werden Messungen an Proben, die durch Stanznieten, Clinchen und Widerstandspunktschweissen gefuegt wurden, gegenuebergestellt. Hierzu wird die am Fuegepunkt waehrend der Pruefung in Waerme umgewandelte Formaenderungsenergie kontinuierlich in Form der Temperaturerhoehung gemessen. Ziel dieser Untersuchungen ist es, solche Temperaturerhoehungen zur Erkennung der Rissentstehung zu verwenden, bevor der Riss die Blechoberflaeche erreicht hat und visuell erkennbar wird. Zudem werden verschiedene Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten vorgeschlagen. (orig.)

  17. Crack-closing of cement mortar beams using NiTi cold-drawn SMA short fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Chung, Young-Soo; Kim, Hee Sun; Jung, Chungsung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, crack-closing tests of mortar beams reinforced by shape memory alloy (SMA) short fibers were performed. For this purpose, NiTi SMA fibers with a diameter of 0.965 mm and a length of 30 mm were made from SMA wires of 1.0 mm diameter by cold drawing. Four types of SMA fibers were prepared, namely, straight and dog-bone-shaped fiber and the two types of fibers with paper wrapping in the middle of the fibers. The paper provides an unbonded length of 15 mm. For bending tests, six types of mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B×H×L) were prepared. The SMA fibers were placed at the bottom center of the beams along with an artificial crack of 10 mm depth and 1 mm thickness. This study investigated the influence of SMA fibers on the flexural strength of the beams from the measured force- deflection curves. After cracking, the beams were heated at the bottom by fire to activate the SMA fibers. Then, the beams recovered the deflection, and the cracks were closed. This study evaluated crack-closing capacity using the degree of crack recovery and deflection-recovery factor. The first factor is estimated from the crack-width before and after crack-closing, and the second one is obtained from the downward deflection due to loading and the upward deflection due to the closing force of the SMA fibers.

  18. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water

  19. In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE s Roof Savings Calculator and Measured Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New, Joshua Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, Yu [White Box Technologies, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Sanyal, Jibonananda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, William A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Childs, Kenneth W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kriner, Scott [Green Metal Consulting, Inc., Macungie, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) was developed through collaborations among Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), White Box Technologies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Environmental Protection Agency in the context of a California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research project to make cool-color roofing materials a market reality. The RSC website and a simulation engine validated against demonstration homes were developed to replace the liberal DOE Cool Roof Calculator and the conservative EPA Energy Star Roofing Calculator, which reported different roof savings estimates. A preliminary analysis arrived at a tentative explanation for why RSC results differed from previous LBNL studies and provided guidance for future analysis in the comparison of four simulation programs (doe2attic, DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, and MicroPas), including heat exchange between the attic surfaces (principally the roof and ceiling) and the resulting heat flows through the ceiling to the building below. The results were consolidated in an ORNL technical report, ORNL/TM-2013/501. This report is an in-depth inter-comparison of four programs with detailed measured data from an experimental facility operated by ORNL in South Carolina in which different segments of the attic had different roof and attic systems.

  20. Process and device for magnetic crack testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, D.; Meili, E.; Fuchs, E.

    1983-01-01

    There is a problem of sufficient crack depth discrimination to suppress fault signals or pictures due to unevenness not caused by cracks. To solve this, when magnetising in the preferred direction of adhesion, the effect depending on the direction of the crack, before magnetic powder detection, magnetic powder is blown on, showing the fault and for the comparison of the adhesion effect crack direction characteristics it is blown on parallel to the preferred direction, or if one wants to stress the directional characteristic, it is blown on transversely to the preferred direction. In both cases one blows with the same force, without removing the magnetic powder remnants relevant to faults in the intended crack areas. This strong blowing removes the magnetic powder remnants relevant to interference and not relevant to faults. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289 degree C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 degree C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections

  2. Detection and sizing of inside-surface cracks in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Katsuo; Satoh, Kunio; Honma, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    According to the past operational experience of LWRs, most of the defects arising in reactor pressure vessels accompanying operation are cracks occurring in the build up welding of austenitic stainless steel on the internal surfaces. The detection of these cracks has been carried out by ultrasonic flaw detection from outside in BWRs and from inside in PWRs as in-service inspection. However, there are difficulties such as ultrasonic echoes often occur though defects do not exist, and the quantitative evaluation of detected cracks is difficult by this method because of its accuracy. One of the means to reduce the first difficulty is to use eddy current method together to help the judgement, and for overcoming the second, the ultrasonic method catching end peak echo, that catching diffracted waves, eddy current method and electric resistance method were tried and compared. It is desirable to detect cracks in early stage before they reach parent material. The techniques to detect cracks on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels from the inside and to measure the depth are reported in this paper. The methods of flaw detection examined and the instruments used, the experimental method and the results are reported. It was concluded that eddy current method can be used as the backup for ultrasonic remote flaw detection, and the accuracy of depth measurement was the highest in ultrasonic diffraction wave method. (Kako, I.)

  3. Natural Vibration of a Beam with a Breathing Oblique Crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method is proposed to calculate the natural frequency of a cantilever beam with a breathing oblique crack. A double-linear-springs-model is developed in the modal analysis process to describe the breathing oblique crack, and the breathing behaviour of the oblique crack is objectively simulated. The finite element method (FEM analysis software ABAQUS is used to calculate the geometric correction factors when the cracked plate is subjected to a pure bending moment at different oblique crack angles and relative depths. The Galerkin method is applied to simplify the cracked beam to a single degree of freedom system, allowing the natural frequency of the beam with the breathing oblique crack to be calculated. Compared with the natural frequencies of the breathing oblique cracked beam obtained using the ABAQUS FEM method, the proposed analytical method exhibits a high computational accuracy, with a maximum error of only 4.65%.

  4. Helium measurements of pore fluids obtained from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD, USA) drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2011-02-01

    4He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk 4He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 ± 1.3 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 at 21°C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 × 10-18 cm2 s-1 (21°C) to 3.0 × 10-15 cm2 s-1 (150°C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of 4Hewater for matrix porosity (˜3%) and tortuosity (˜6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 (21°C) and 1 × 10-7 (120°C), effectively isolating pore fluid 4He from the 4He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 ± 0.4% (SD, n = 4) and mudstones 3.1 ± 0.8% (SD, n = 4).

  5. New breathing functions for the transverse breathing crack of the cracked rotor system: Approach for critical and subcritical harmonic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shudeifat, Mohammad A.; Butcher, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    The actual breathing mechanism of the transverse breathing crack in the cracked rotor system that appears due to the shaft weight is addressed here. As a result, the correct time-varying area moments of inertia for the cracked element cross-section during shaft rotation are also determined. Hence, two new breathing functions are identified to represent the actual breathing effect on the cracked element stiffness matrix. The new breathing functions are used in formulating the time-varying finite element stiffness matrix of the cracked element. The finite element equations of motion are then formulated for the cracked rotor system and solved via harmonic balance method for response, whirl orbits and the shift in the critical and subcritical speeds. The analytical results of this approach are compared with some previously published results obtained using approximate formulas for the breathing mechanism. The comparison shows that the previously used breathing function is a weak model for the breathing mechanism in the cracked rotor even for small crack depths. The new breathing functions give more accurate results for the dynamic behavior of the cracked rotor system for a wide range of the crack depths. The current approach is found to be efficient for crack detection since the critical and subcritical shaft speeds, the unique vibration signature in the neighborhood of the subcritical speeds and the sensitivity to the unbalance force direction all together can be utilized to detect the breathing crack before further damage occurs.

  6. Influence of bending test configuration on cracking behavior of FRC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finazzi, Silvia; Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    the flexural load-deformation response of FRC. This research focuses particularly on the influence of the appearance and depth of the notch on the cracking behavior of FRC. For this purpose, several specimens, both un-notched and notched with different depths of the notch (25 mm and 45 mm), were tested....... The results obtained in the various tests are compared to determine to what extent the notch can affect cracking behavior and the resulting evaluation of the material according to the method described in the standard. Formation of cracking and the crack development has been documented by means of a digital...

  7. Severity parameters for steam cracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golombok, M.; Bijl, J.L.M.; Kornegoor, M.

    2001-01-01

    There are several ways to measure severity in steam cracking which are all a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure. Many measures of severity are not practicable for experimental purposes. Our experimental study shows that methane make is the best measure of severity because it is an

  8. Application of acoustic emission to hydride cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagat, S.; Ambler, J.F.R.; Coleman, C.E.

    1986-07-01

    Acoustic emission has been used for over a decade to study delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys. At first acoustic emission was used primarily to detect the onset of DHC. This was possible because DHC was accompanied by very little plastic deformation of the material and furthermore the amplitudes of the acoustic pulses produced during cracking of the brittle hydride phase were much larger than those from dislocation motion and twinning. Acoustic emission was also used for measuring crack growth when it was found that for a suitable amplitude threshold, the total number of acoustic emission counts was linearly related to the cracked area. Once the proportionality constant was established, the acoustic counts could be converted to the crack length. Now the proportionality between the count rate and the crack growth rate is used to provide feedback between the crack length and the applied load, using computer technology. In such a system, the stress at the crack tip can be maintained constant during the test by adjusting the applied load as the crack progresses, or it can be changed in a predetermined manner, for example, to measure the threshold stress for cracking

  9. Desiccation-crack-induced salinization in deep clay sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baram

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A study on water infiltration and solute transport in a clayey vadose zone underlying a dairy farm waste source was conducted to assess the impact of desiccation cracks on subsurface evaporation and salinization. The study is based on five years of continuous measurements of the temporal variation in the vadose zone water content and on the chemical and isotopic composition of the sediment and pore water in it. The isotopic composition of water stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H in water and sediment samples, from the area where desiccation crack networks prevail, indicated subsurface evaporation down to ~ 3.5 m below land surface, and vertical and lateral preferential transport of water, following erratic preferential infiltration events. Chloride (Cl− concentrations in the vadose zone pore water substantially increased with depth, evidence of deep subsurface evaporation and down flushing of concentrated solutions from the evaporation zones during preferential infiltration events. These observations led to development of a desiccation-crack-induced salinization (DCIS conceptual model. DCIS suggests that thermally driven convective air flow in the desiccation cracks induces evaporation and salinization in relatively deep sections of the subsurface. This conceptual model supports previous conceptual models on vadose zone and groundwater salinization in fractured rock in arid environments and extends its validity to clayey soils in semi-arid environments.

  10. Dynamic Characteristics of Electrostatically Actuated Microbeams with Slant Crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved model of the slant crack on a microbeam is presented. Based on fracture mechanics, the rotation coefficient for the slant crack is derived as a massless rotational spring accounting for the additional stress intensity factors generated by the orientation of the crack compared to the transverse crack. Comparisons between microbeams with a slant crack of different geometry parameters (slant angle, depth ratio, and crack position are investigated with regard to the dynamic mechanical behaviors and nonlinear response. By presenting a mathematical modeling, the effects of the slant crack and the electric actuation of an electrostatically actuated fixed-fixed microbeam on the dynamic characteristics are examined in detail. It is shown that the crack position has more significant influence on the pull-in voltage value than the slant angle or the depth ratio. Approaching the slant crack to the fixed end or enlarging the external incentives amplifies the nonlinearity of the microbeam system, while the effects of depth ratio and slant angle are dependent on the crack position. The resonance frequency and the resonance amplitude are affected as well.

  11. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  12. The World Optical Depth Research and Calibration Center (WORCC) quality assurance and quality control of GAW-PFR AOD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Kouremeti, Natalia; Nyeki, Stephan; Gröbner, Julian; Wehrli, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    The World Optical Depth Research Calibration Center (WORCC) is a section within the World Radiation Center at Physikalisches-Meteorologisches Observatorium (PMOD/WRC), Davos, Switzerland, established after the recommendations of the World Meteorological Organization for calibration of aerosol optical depth (AOD)-related Sun photometers. WORCC is mandated to develop new methods for instrument calibration, to initiate homogenization activities among different AOD networks and to run a network (GAW-PFR) of Sun photometers. In this work we describe the calibration hierarchy and methods used under WORCC and the basic procedures, tests and processing techniques in order to ensure the quality assurance and quality control of the AOD-retrieved data.

  13. Small fatigue cracks; Proceedings of the Second International Conference/Workshop, Santa Barbara, CA, Jan. 5-10, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Lankford, J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume include crack initiation and stage I growth, microstructure effects, crack closure, environment effects, the role of notches, analytical modeling, fracture mechanics characterization, experimental techniques, and engineering applications. Papers are presented on fatigue crack initiation along slip bands, the effect of microplastic surface deformation on the growth of small cracks, short fatigue crack behavior in relation to three-dimensional aspects and the crack closure effect, the influence of crack depth on crack electrochemistry and fatigue crack growth, and nondamaging notches in fatigue. Consideration is also given to models of small fatigue cracks, short crack theory, assessment of the growth of small flaws from residual strength data, the relevance of short crack behavior to the integrity of major rotating aero engine components, and the relevance of short fatigue crack growth data to the durability and damage tolerance analyses of aircraft.

  14. Impact of Crack on Stability of Slope with Linearly Increasing Undrained Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a procedure for assessment of the impact of tension crack on stability of slope in clays with linearly increasing undrained strength. The procedure is based on the limit equilibrium method with variational extremization. The distribution of the normal stress over slip surface is mathematically obtained for slopes in clays with the linearly increasing undrained strength and then used to determine the tension crack for clays with zero tensile strength. The seismic effect is also included using the pseudostatic approach. Closed-form solutions to the minimum safety factor and the maximum crack depth can be derived and given in the form of chart for convenient use. The results demonstrate a significant effect of the tension crack on the stability of steep slopes, especially for strong seismic conditions. In this situation, neglecting the impact of tension crack in traditional ϕ=0 analyses may overestimate the slope safety. The most adverse location of the tension crack can be also determined and presented in the charts, which may be useful in designing reinforcements and remedial measures for slope stabilization.

  15. Citizen-Enabled Aerosol Measurements for Satellites (CEAMS): A Network for High-Resolution Measurements of PM2.5 and Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, J. R.; Volckens, J.; Ford, B.; Jathar, S.; Long, M.; Quinn, C.; Van Zyl, L.; Wendt, E.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter with diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) is a pollutant that contributes to the development of human disease. Satellite-derived estimates of surface-level PM2.5 concentrations have the potential to contribute greatly to our understanding of how particulate matter affects health globally. However, these satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates are often uncertain due to a lack of information about the ratio of surface PM2.5 to aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is the primary aerosol retrieval made by satellite instruments. While modelling and statistical analyses have improved estimates of PM2.5:AOD, large uncertainties remain in situations of high PM2.5 exposure (such as urban areas and in wildfire-smoke plumes) where the health impacts of PM2.5 may be the greatest. Surface monitoring networks for co-incident PM2.5 and AOD measurements are extremely rare, even in the North America. To provide constraints for the PM2.5:AOD relationship, we have developed a relatively low-cost (application (iOS and Android). Sun photometry is performed across 4 discrete wavelengths that match those reported by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Aerosol concentration is reported using both time-integrated filter mass (analyzed in an academic laboratory and reported as a 24-48hr average) and a continuous PM sensor within the instrument. Citizen scientists use the device to report daily AOD and PM2.5 measurements made in their backyards to a central server for data display and download. In this presentation, we provide an overview of (1) AOD and PM2.5 measurement calibration; (2) citizen recruiting and training efforts; and (3) results from our pilot citizen-science measurement campaign.

  16. Beveled fiber-optic probe couples a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of layered tissue: Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaillon, Franck; Zheng Wei; Huang Zhiwei

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of designing a beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissue using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The results show that by using the probe configuration with a beveled tip collection fiber and a flat tip excitation fiber associated with a ball lens, discrimination of fluorescence signals generated in different tissue depths is achievable. In comparison with a flat-tip collection fiber, the use of a large bevel angled collection fiber enables a better differentiation between the shallow and deep tissue layers by changing the excitation-collection fiber separations. This work suggests that the beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissues

  17. Comparing the floquet stability of open and breathing fatigue cracks in an overhung rotordynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Philip; Green, Itzhak

    2017-11-01

    Rotor cracks represent an uncommon but serious threat to rotating machines and must be detected early to avoid catastrophic machine failure. An important aspect of analyzing rotor cracks is understanding their influence on the rotor stability. It is well-known that the extent of rotor instability versus shaft speed is exacerbated by deeper cracks. Consequently, crack propagation can eventually result in an unstable response even if the shaft speed remains constant. Most previous investigations of crack-induced rotor instability concern simple Jeffcott rotors. This work advances the state-of-the-art by (a) providing a novel inertial-frame model of an overhung rotor, and (b) assessing the stability of the cracked overhung rotor using Floquet stability analysis. The rotor Floquet stability analysis is performed for both an open crack and a breathing crack, and conclusions are drawn regarding the importance of appropriately selecting the crack model. The rotor stability is analyzed versus crack depth, external viscous damping ratio, and rotor inertia. In general, this work concludes that the onset of instability occurs at lower shaft speeds for thick rotors, lower viscous damping ratios, and deeper cracks. In addition, when comparing commensurate cracks, the breathing crack is shown to induce more regions of instability than the open crack, though the open crack generally predicts an unstable response for shallower cracks than the breathing crack. Keywords: rotordynamics, stability, rotor cracks.

  18. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...

  19. In-Situ Measurement of Soil Permittivity at Various Depths for the Calibration and Validation of Low-Frequency SAR Soil Moisture Models by Using GPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian N. Koyama

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available At radar frequencies below 2 GHz, the mismatch between the 5 to 15 cm sensing depth of classical time domain reflectometry (TDR probe soil moisture measurements and the radar penetration depth can easily lead to unreliable in situ data. Accurate quantitative measurements of soil water contents at various depths by classical methods are cumbersome and usually highly invasive. We propose an improved method for the estimation of vertical soil moisture profiles from multi-offset ground penetrating radar (GPR data. A semi-automated data acquisition technique allows for very fast and robust measurements in the field. Advanced common mid-point (CMP processing is applied to obtain quantitative estimates of the permittivity and depth of the reflecting soil layers. The method is validated against TDR measurements using data acquired in different environments. Depth and soil moisture contents of the reflecting layers were estimated with root mean square errors (RMSE on the order of 5 cm and 1.9 Vol.-%, respectively. Application of the proposed technique for the validation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR soil moisture estimates is demonstrated based on a case study using airborne L-band data and ground-based P-band data. For the L-band case we found good agreement between the near-surface GPR estimates and extended integral equation model (I2EM based SAR retrievals, comparable to those obtained by TDR. At the P-band, the GPR based method significantly outperformed the TDR method when using soil moisture estimates at depths below 30 cm.

  20. On governing equations for crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Botsis, J.

    1988-01-01

    Results of analysis on damage distribution of a crack layer, in a model material, supported the self-similarity hypothesis of damage evolution which has been adopted by the crack layer theory. On the basis of measurements of discontinuity density and the double layer potential technique, a solution to the crack damage interaction problem has been developed. Evaluation of the stress intensity factor illustrated the methodology. Analysis of experimental results showed that Arrhenius type constitutive relationship described very well the expansion of the active zone of a crack layer.

  1. The detectability of cracks using sonic IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidini, Marco; Cawley, Peter

    2009-05-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to study the detectability of fatigue cracks in metals using sonic IR (also known as thermosonics). The method relies on the validation of simple finite-element thermal models of the cracks and specimens in which the thermal loads have been defined by means of a priori measurement of the additional damping introduced in the specimens by each crack. This estimate of crack damping is used in conjunction with a local measurement of the vibration strain during ultrasonic excitation to retrieve the power released at the crack; these functions are then input to the thermal model of the specimens to find the resulting temperature rises (sonic IR signals). The method was validated on mild steel beams with two-dimensional cracks obtained in the low-cycle fatigue regime as well as nickel-based superalloy beams with three-dimensional "thumbnail" cracks generated in the high-cycle fatigue regime. The equivalent 40kHz strain necessary to obtain a desired temperature rise was calculated for cracks in the nickel superalloy set, and the detectability of cracks as a function of length in the range of 1-5mm was discussed.

  2. Microstructural features of environmentally assisted cracking in pipeline steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.W.; Lambert, S.B.; Zhang, X.; Plumtree, A.; Sutherby, R.

    2003-01-01

    A number of small-scale pipeline specimens containing edge or surface cracks were tested in simulated groundwater (NS4 solution) in an anaerobic environment under cyclic loading conditions. Micrographs of the crack surface showed corrosion fatigue at high frequencies and low R-ratios. Following large amounts of growth (∼200 μm) for those specimens tested at low frequencies, evidence of transgranular quasi-cleavage was detected. Green rust was found to be present at the crack tips and along their flanks. Iron sulfide, resulting from anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron carbonate were also present in the NS4 solution during testing. These corrosion products retarded crack growth in the depth direction of surface cracks. Under variable amplitude loadings conditions, the accompanying increased surface crack growth rate can be accounted for by rupture of the green rust film at the crack tip. (author)

  3. Focal depth measurements of the vaginal wall: a new method to noninvasively quantify vaginal wall thickness in the diagnosis and treatment of vaginal atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Maaike A.; Diedrich, Chantal M.; Ince, Can; Roovers, Jan-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate if vaginal focal depth measurement could be a noninvasive method to quantify vaginal wall thickness. Postmenopausal women undergoing topical estrogen therapy because of vaginal atrophy (VA) were recruited. VA was diagnosed based on the presence of symptoms and

  4. Can the Analytical Hierarchy Process Model Be Effectively Applied in the Prioritization of Information Assurance Defense In-Depth Measures? --A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Rodney T.

    2017-01-01

    Organizational computing devices are increasingly becoming targets of cyber-attacks, and organizations have become dependent on the safety and security of their computer networks and their organizational computing devices. Business and government often use defense in-depth information assurance measures such as firewalls, intrusion detection…

  5. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  6. Unsaturated Seepage Analysis of Cracked Soil including Development Process of Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks in soil provide preferential pathways for water flow and their morphological parameters significantly affect the hydraulic conductivity of the soil. To study the hydraulic properties of cracks, the dynamic development of cracks in the expansive soil during drying and wetting has been measured in the laboratory. The test results enable the development of the relationships between the cracks morphological parameters and the water content. In this study, the fractal model has been used to predict the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the cracked soil, including the developmental process of the cracks. The cracked expansive soil has been considered as a crack-pore medium. A dual media flow model has been developed to simulate the seepage characteristics of the cracked expansive soil. The variations in pore water pressure at different part of the model are quite different due to the impact of the cracks. This study proves that seepage characteristics can be better predicted if the impact of cracks is taken into account.

  7. Front-end circuit for position sensitive silicon and vacuum tube photomultipliers with gain control and depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, Vicente; Colom, Ricardo; Gadea, Rafael; Lerche, Christoph W.; Cerda, Joaquin; Sebastia, Angel; Benlloch, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers, though still under development for mass production, may be an alternative to traditional Vacuum Photomultipliers Tubes (VPMT). As a consequence, electronic front-ends initially designed for VPMT will need to be modified. In this simulation, an improved architecture is presented which is able to obtain impact position and depth of interaction of a gamma ray within a continuous scintillation crystal, using either kind of PM. A current sensitive preamplifier stage with individual gain adjustment interfaces the multi-anode PM outputs with a current division resistor network. The preamplifier stage allows to improve front-end processing delay and temporal resolution behavior as well as to increase impact position calculation resolution. Depth of interaction (DOI) is calculated from the width of the scintillation light distribution, which is related to the sum of voltages in resistor network input nodes. This operation is done by means of a high-speed current mode scheme

  8. Optimum Depth of Investigation and Conductivity Response Rejection of the Different Electromagnetic Devices Measuring Apparent Magnetic Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Benech , Christophe; Marmet , Eric

    1999-01-01

    International audience; Electromagnetic susceptibility surveys are valuable for archaeological prospection owing to their ability to cover large areas of land. Their use, however, is often compromised by the conductivity influence of the soil and the limited investigation depth of the susceptibility response. To examine these constraints further, we compared the characteristics of two types of apparatus: coincident loop (e.g. Bartington MS2 field coil) and 'Slingram' instruments (EM38, SH3, C...

  9. Fatigue crack growth in mode II of adhesively joined composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biel, Anders; Toftegaard, Helmuth Langmaack

    2017-01-01

    , experiments are performed to derive material data for a crack propagation in shear i.e. in mode II. The shear loading of the crack is achieved by use of double cantilever beam specimens loaded with uneven bending moments. The experiments are performed under a constant cyclic displacement. An initial mode I...... loading is used to make the crack start in the adhesive. The crack length is measured using a load synchronized camera. Due to the shear loading the crack deviates from the adhesive layer into the laminate. A stable crack propagation is detected in the laminate. No influence have been detected due...... to an increasing crack length. It is also observed that the crack is trapped in the laminate; if the loading is changed to mode I the crack continues to propagate in the laminate....

  10. Location of the internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery segments for non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement by multi-depth TCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamarat, Yasin; Deimantavicius, Mantas; Kalvaitis, Evaldas; Siaudvytyte, Lina; Januleviciene, Ingrida; Zakelis, Rolandas; Bartusis, Laimonas

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to locate the ophthalmic artery by using the edge of the internal carotid artery (ICA) as the reference depth to perform a reliable non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement via a multi-depth transcranial Doppler device and to then determine the positions and angles of an ultrasonic transducer (UT) on the closed eyelid in the case of located segments. High tension glaucoma (HTG) patients and healthy volunteers (HVs) undergoing non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement were selected for this prospective study. The depth of the edge of the ICA was identified, followed by a selection of the depths of the IOA and EOA segments. The positions and angles of the UT on the closed eyelid were measured. The mean depth of the identified ICA edge for HTG patients was 64.3 mm and was 63.0 mm for HVs (p = 0.21). The mean depth of the selected IOA segment for HTG patients was 59.2 mm and 59.3 mm for HVs (p = 0.91). The mean depth of the selected EOA segment for HTG patients was 48.5 mm and 49.8 mm for HVs (p = 0.14). The difference in the located depths of the segments between groups was not statistically significant. The results showed a significant difference in the measured UT angles in the case of the identified edge of the ICA and selected ophthalmic artery segments (p = 0.0002). We demonstrated that locating the IOA and EOA segments can be achieved using the edge of the ICA as a reference point. OA: ophthalmic artery; IOA: intracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery; EOA: extracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery; ICA: internal carotid artery; UT: ultrasonic transducer; HTG: high tension glaucoma; SD: standard deviation; ICP: intracranial pressure; TCD: transcranial Doppler.

  11. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low fluence irradiations suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model applied to the dechanneling spectra. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects

  12. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion-irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1976-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self-ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single-crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic-scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self-ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low-fluence irradiations, suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects. (Auth.)

  13. Elastic properties and strain-to-crack-initiation of calcium phosphate bone cements: Revelations of a high-resolution measurement technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaxon, Ingrid; Acciaioli, Alice; Lionello, Giacomo; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Öhman-Mägi, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Persson, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) should ideally have mechanical properties similar to those of the bone tissue the material is used to replace or repair. Usually, the compressive strength of the CPCs is reported and, more rarely, the elastic modulus. Conversely, scarce or no data are available on Poisson's ratio and strain-to-crack-initiation. This is unfortunate, as data on the elastic response is key to, e.g., numerical model accuracy. In this study, the compressive behaviour of brushite, monetite and apatite cements was fully characterised. Measurement of the surface strains was done using a digital image correlation (DIC) technique, and compared to results obtained with the commonly used built-in displacement measurement of the materials testers. The collected data showed that the use of fixed compression platens, as opposed to spherically seated ones, may in some cases underestimate the compressive strength by up to 40%. Also, the built-in measurements may underestimate the elastic modulus by up to 62% as compared to DIC measurements. Using DIC, the brushite cement was found to be much stiffer (24.3 ± 2.3GPa) than the apatite (13.5 ± 1.6GPa) and monetite (7.1 ± 1.0GPa) cements, and elastic moduli were inversely related to the porosity of the materials. Poisson's ratio was determined to be 0.26 ± 0.02 for brushite, 0.21 ± 0.02 for apatite and 0.20 ± 0.03 for monetite. All investigated CPCs showed low strain-to-crack-initiation (0.17-0.19%). In summary, the elastic modulus of CPCs is substantially higher than previously reported and it is concluded that an accurate procedure is a prerequisite in order to properly compare the mechanical properties of different CPC formulations. It is recommended to use spherically seated platens and measuring the strain at a relevant resolution and on the specimen surface. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of the potential-drop method to measurements of hydrogen-induced sub-critical crack growth in zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.; Clarke, C.F.

    1977-10-01

    Adaptation of the potential-drop method of crack-following to the problem of hydrogen-induced sub-critical crack growth in Zr-2.5% Nb is described. Reasons for non-linearity in the calibration of crack extension against potential drop in compact tension specimens are discussed. It is shown that despite non-linearities, careful comparison of fractographic features with the potential-drop record can lead to a continuous plot of crack velocity against time or stress intensity factor. Procedures for correcting data through temperature and load changes are also described. The application of the technique to studies of the mechanism of hydrogen crack growth is illustrated with several examples. (author)

  15. Crack Formation in Grouted Annular Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the present analysis is to identify the reason for extensive crack formation which occurred during an annulus grouting performance test, to evaluate possible consequences of the cracking, and to recommend measures to be taken in order to avoid similar problems in the future....

  16. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic thermal transient stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  17. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic transient thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  18. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  19. Affection mechanism research of initiation crack pressure of perforation parameters of horizontal well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal wells show better affect and higher success rate in low water ratio cement, complex fracture zone, crevice and heavy oil blocks, it is the main measures to expand control area of a single well. Hydraulic fracturing technology is the most financial way to improve the penetration of the reservoir to increase the production. However, compare with the vertical wells, the fracture of Horizontal wells are more complex, and lead to the initiation crack pressure is much higher than vertical wells. In this paper, defined the crack judging basis, and established the finite element model which could compute the initial crack pressure, to research the affection mechanism of perforation azimuth angle, density, diameter and depth, to provide references of perforation project's design and optimize. The research of this paper has significances on further understanding the affection mechanism of perforation parameters.

  20. Assessment of copper resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in nitrite solutions by means of joint analysis of acoustic emission measurements, deformation diagrams, qualitative and quantitative fractography, and non-linear fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanzhin, V.G.; Nikulin, S.A. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    A study of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper in 0.1M NaNO{sub 2} aqueous solution is presented. The fracture kinetics was monitored by measuring the acoustic emission (AE) signals. Macro- and micro-fractography analysis, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was employed to investigate the fracture mechanisms. Estimates of stress intensity factor, KI, and J-integral were derived in order to assess the resistance of copper to stress corrosion cracking. Two kinds of SCC tests under continuous circulation of the corrosive solution were employed in the present study: 1. Constant extension rate (2x10{sup -6}/s) tests on pre-cracked, middle tension (MT) panel specimens. 2. Tests on pre-cracked, compact tension (CT) specimens at a fixed (by a fixing bolt) opening of the crack walls ({delta} = 0.3 mm, K{sub i} = 27 MPax{radical}m). The time base for these tests was about two months. After the completion of the SCC test, the CT specimen was additionally tested, under a constant-rate (0.02 mm/s) off-center extension. In the both kinds of tests, the SCC fracture kinetics is found to exhibit two typical stages: Stage 1: SCC initiation stage (after a certain incubation period, T{sub i}, measured to be T{sub i} {approx_equal} 3-4 hours for MT specimens under constant extension, the corresponding stress was {sigma} {approx_equal} 40-70 MPa, and T{sub i} {approx_equal} 200 hours for CT specimens under a fixed crack wall opening). Stage 2: Active fracture process (SCC macro-fracture) distinguished by strong AE pulses (which are registered after time T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 8 hours for MT specimens and T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 800 hours for CT specimens). Fractography analysis has shown that the zone of SCC fracture in MT specimens extends to approximately 1,500 {mu}m. A 400-700 {mu}m deep zone of brittle transgranular fracture, which included small areas showing characteristic SCC 'striations', was observed adjacent to the fatigue pre-crack area. At higher

  1. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  2. Evaluations of environmental effect on micro crack initiation and propagation by surface observations of fatigue specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Ryosuke; Abe, Shigeki; Nakamura, Takao; Kamaya, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue life of nuclear facilities tends to be decreased by the influence of reactor coolant, which is called environmental effect. The effect accelerates crack growth rate but the influence for crack initiation is not clarified. This study intends to discuss the environmental effect in crack initiation. The crack length and the number of cracks are measured from the investigation of fatigue test specimens in reactor coolant and air. The behavior of crack initiation is revealed from the measurement of number of cracks, crack sizes and fatigue life. From this study, environmental effect of reactor coolant is considered to influence crack initiation and increase the number of micro crack. It is also estimated that the coalescence of cracks influences the acceleration of crack growth. (author)

  3. Measurements of anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter using two Scheimpflug imaging devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Domínguez-Vicent

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the ocular anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter, as measured with two different Scheimpflug imaging devices. Methods: This transversal study included 80 right eyes from 80 subjects aged from 20 to 40 years. Their spherical equivalents ranged from -4.25 to +1.00 diopters (D. Each eye's anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter, were measured for far vision using both the Galilei G4 (double Scheimpflug camera and the Pentacam HR (single Scheimpflug camera systems. Results: Mean anterior chamber depths were calculated as 3.12 ± 0.23 mm and 3.19 ± 0.24 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. The mean white-to-white distance measured was 11.84 ± 0.31 mm and 11.90 ± 0.43 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. Mean pupil diameters were measured as 3.22 ± 0.58 mm and 3.22 ± 0.52 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. Finally, the mean anterior chamber angle was 34.30 ± 2.86 degrees when it was measured with the Galilei G4, and 39.26 ± 2.85 degrees when measured with the Pentacam HR. A comparative analysis revealed that the Galilei G4 yielded a significantly lower (P0.05 for both devices were obtained for the white-to-white distance measurements. Conclusion: The Galilei G4 and Pentacam HR Scheimpflug systems cannot be used interchangeably because they produce significant measurement differences.

  4. The application of the bilateral collimator to parasternal lymphoscintigraphy: a new method to measure the depth of the lymph node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, E.; Toyama, H.; Iio, M.; Noguchi, M.; Kawaguchi, S.; Murata, H.; Chiba, K.; Yamada, H.

    1980-01-01

    The bilateral collimator has been widely adopted for obtaining two simultaneous views of the heart in nuclear cardiology. As an additional useful clinical application of the bilateral collimator, it has been used for parasternal lymphoscintigraphy. Lymphography with a contrast medium for the parasternal lymphatics is technically very difficult and the radionuclide method is adopted. Lymphoscintigraphy has been used in order to determine the existence of malignant invasion to the lymph nodes, and also to find the depth of the lymph node as a guide to operation and radiation therapy of the nodes. (author)

  5. Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at...

  6. Do the fluorescent red eyes of the marine fish Tripterygion delaisi stand out? In situ and in vivo measurements at two depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harant, Ulrike K; Santon, Matteo; Bitton, Pierre-Paul; Wehrberger, Florian; Griessler, Thomas; Meadows, Melissa G; Champ, Connor M; Michiels, Nico K

    2018-05-01

    Since the discovery of red fluorescence in fish, much effort has been invested to elucidate its potential functions, one of them being signaling. This implies that the combination of red fluorescence and reflection should generate a visible contrast against the background. Here, we present in vivo iris radiance measurements of Tripterygion delaisi under natural light conditions at 5 and 20 m depth. We also measured substrate radiance of shaded and exposed foraging sites at those depths. To assess the visual contrast of the red iris against these substrates, we used the receptor noise model for chromatic contrasts and Michelson contrast for achromatic calculations. At 20 m depth, T. delaisi iris radiance generated strong achromatic contrasts against substrate radiance, regardless of exposure, and despite substrate fluorescence. Given that downwelling light above 600 nm is negligible at this depth, we can attribute this effect to iris fluorescence. Contrasts were weaker in 5 m. Yet, the pooled radiance caused by red reflection and fluorescence still exceeded substrate radiance for all substrates under shaded conditions and all but Jania rubens and Padina pavonia under exposed conditions. Due to the negative effects of anesthesia on iris fluorescence, these estimates are conservative. We conclude that the requirements to create visual brightness contrasts are fulfilled for a wide range of conditions in the natural environment of T. delaisi .

  7. Different depth intermittent sand filters for laboratory treatment of synthetic wastewater with concentrations close to measured septic tank effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M; Walsh, G; Healy, M G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply hydraulic and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates at the upper limits of the design criteria for buried sand filters to test the sand filter depth design criteria. Over a 274-day study duration, synthetic effluent with a strength of domestic wastewater was intermittently dosed onto two sand filters of 0.2 m diameter, with depths of 0.3 and 0.4 m. Hydraulic and organic carbon loading rates of 105 L m(-2) d(-1) and 40 g COD m(-2) d(-1), respectively, were applied to the filters. The filters did not clog and had good effluent removal capabilities for 274 and 190 days, respectively. However, the 0.3 m-deep filter did experience a reduced performance towards the end of the study period. In the 0.3 and 0.4 m-deep filters, the effluent COD and SS concentrations were less than 86 and 31 mg L(-1), respectively, and nitrification was nearly complete in both these columns. Ortho-phosphorus (PO(4)-P) removal in fine sand and laterite 'upflow' filters, receiving effluent from the 0.3 m-deep filter, was 10% and 44%, respectively.

  8. Measurement and Analysis of Composition and Depth Profile of H in Amorphous Si1−xCx:H Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Hua; Shu-De, Yao; Kun, Wang; Zhi-Bo, Ding

    2008-01-01

    Composition in amorphous Si 1−X C x :H heteroepitaxial thin films on Si (100) by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is analysed. The unknown x (0.45–0.57) and the depth profile of hydrogen in the thin films are characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrum (RBS), resonance-nuclear reaction analysis (R-NRA) and elastic recoil detection (ERD), respectively. In addition, the depth profile of hydrogen in the unannealed thin films is compared to that of the annealed thin films with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) or laser spike annealing (LSA) in nitrogen atmosphere. The results indicate that the stoichiometric amorphous SiC can be produced by PECVD when the ratio of CH 4 /SiH 4 is approximately equal to 25. The content of hydrogen decreases suddenly from 35% to 1% after 1150° C annealing. RTA can reduce hydrogen in SiC films effectively than LSA. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  10. Comparison of theoretical estimates and experimental measurements of fatigue crack growth under severe thermal shock conditions (part two - theoretical assessment and comparison with experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.; Marsh, D.; Parker, R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical assessment of cracking which may occur when a severe cycle comprising alternate upshocks and downshocks is applied to an axisymmetric feature with an internal, partial penetration weld and crevice. The experimental observations of cracking are reported separately. A good agreement was noted even though extensive cycle plasticity occurred at the location of cracking. It is concluded that the LEFM solution has correlated with the experiment mainly because of the axisymmetric geometry which allows a large hydrostatic stress to exist at the internal weld crevice end. Thus the stress at the crevice can approach the singular solution required for LEFM correlations without contributing to yielding

  11. Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Tandon, R.

    2008-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured using constant stress rate testing in 2% and 95% RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and velocities for dry environments are approx. 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitivity to small changes in RH at low RH. Confidence intervals on parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation.

  12. Development of a fibre-optic dosemeter to measure the skin dose and percentage depth dose in the build-up region of therapeutic photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. A.; Yoo, W. J.; Jang, K. W.; Moon, J.; Han, K. T.; Jeon, D.; Park, J. Y.; Cha, E. J.; Lee, B.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a fibre-optic dosemeter (FOD) using an organic scintillator with a diameter of 0.5 mm for photon-beam therapy dosimetry was fabricated. The fabricated dosemeter has many advantages, including water equivalence, high spatial resolution, remote sensing and real-time measurement. The scintillating light generated from an organic-dosemeter probe embedded in a solid-water stack phantom is guided to a photomultiplier tube and an electrometer via 20 m of plastic optical fibre. Using this FOD, the skin dose and the percentage depth dose in the build-up region according to the depths of a solid-water stack phantom are measured with 6- and 15-MV photon-beam energies with field sizes of 10310 and 20320 cm 2 , respectively. The results are compared with those measured using conventional dosimetry films. It is expected that the proposed FOD can be effectively used in radiotherapy dosimetry for accurate measurement of the skin dose and the depth dose distribution in the build-up region due to its high spatial resolution. (authors)

  13. Crack Monitoring of Operational Wind Turbine Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Marcus; McAlorum, Jack; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; McKeeman, Iain; Rubert, Tim

    2017-08-21

    The degradation of onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundations is usually assessed via above-ground inspections, or through lengthy excavation campaigns that suspend wind power generation. Foundation cracks can and do occur below ground level, and while sustained measurements of crack behaviour could be used to quantify the risk of water ingress and reinforcement corrosion, these cracks have not yet been monitored during turbine operation. Here, we outline the design, fabrication and field installation of subterranean fibre-optic sensors for monitoring the opening and lateral displacements of foundation cracks during wind turbine operation. We detail methods for in situ sensor characterisation, verify sensor responses against theoretical tower strains derived from wind speed data, and then show that measured crack displacements correlate with monitored tower strains. Our results show that foundation crack opening displacements respond linearly to tower strain and do not change by more than ±5 μ m. Lateral crack displacements were found to be negligible. We anticipate that the work outlined here will provide a starting point for real-time, long-term and dynamic analyses of crack displacements in future. Our findings could furthermore inform the development of cost-effective monitoring systems for ageing wind turbine foundations.

  14. Measuring the stress field around an evolving crack in tensile deformed Mg AZ31 using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddershede, Jette; Camin, Bettina; Schmidt, Søren; Mikkelsen, Lars P.; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Lienert, Ulrich; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Reimers, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The stress field around a notch in a coarse grained Mg AZ31 sample has been measured under tensile load using the individual grains as probes in an in situ high energy synchrotron diffraction experiment. The experimental set-up, a variant of three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy, allows the position, orientation and full stress tensor of each illuminated grain to be determined and, hence, enables the study of evolving stress fields in coarse grained materials with a spatial resolution equal to the grain size. Grain resolved information like this is vital for understanding what happens when the traditional continuum mechanics approach breaks down and fracture is governed by local heterogeneities (e.g. phase or stress differences) between grains. As a first approximation the results obtained were averaged through the thickness of the sample and compared with an elastic–plastic continuum finite element simulation. It was found that a full three-dimensional simulation was required to account for the measured transition from the overall plane stress case away from the notch to the essentially plane strain case observed near the notch tip. The measured and simulated stress contours were shown to be in good agreement except at the highest applied load, at which stress relaxation at the notch tip was observed in the experimental data. This stress relaxation is attributed to the initiation and propagation of a crack. Finally, it was demonstrated that the measured lattice rotations could be used as a qualitative measure of the shape and extent of the plastic deformation zone.

  15. Numerical simulations of electric potential field for alternating current potential drop associated with surface cracks in low-alloy steel nuclear material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Ping; Huang, Jiunn-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Low-alloy steels used as structural materials in nuclear power plants are subjected to cyclic stresses during power plant operations. As a result, cracks may develop and propagate through the material. The alternating current potential drop technique is used to measure the lengths of cracks in metallic components. The depth of the penetration of the alternating current is assumed to be small compared to the crack length. This assumption allows the adoption of the unfolding technique to simplify the problem to a surface Laplacian field. The numerical modelling of the electric potential and current density distribution prediction model for a compact tension specimen and the unfolded crack model are presented in this paper. The goal of this work is to conduct numerical simulations to reduce deviations occurring in the crack length measurements. Numerical simulations were conducted on AISI 4340 low-alloy steel with different crack lengths to evaluate the electric potential distribution. From the simulated results, an optimised position for voltage measurements in the crack region was proposed.

  16. Validation of calculated tissue maximum ratio obtained from measured percentage depth dose (PPD) data for high energy photon beam ( 6 MV and 15 MV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, J.E.

    2014-07-01

    During external beam radiotherapy treatments, high doses are delivered to the cancerous cell. Accuracy and precision of dose delivery are primary requirements for effective and efficiency in treatment. This leads to the consideration of treatment parameters such as percentage depth dose (PDD), tissue air ratio (TAR) and tissue phantom ratio (TPR), which show the dose distribution in the patient. Nevertheless, tissue air ratio (TAR) for treatment time calculation, calls for the need to measure in-air-dose rate. For lower energies, measurement is not a problem but for higher energies, in-air measurement is not attainable due to the large build-up material required for the measurement. Tissue maximum ratio (TMR) is the quantity required to replace tissue air ratio (TAR) for high energy photon beam. It is known that tissue maximum ratio (TMR) is an important dosimetric function in radiotherapy treatment. As the calculation methods used to determine tissue maximum ratio (TMR) from percentage depth dose (PDD) were derived by considering the differences between TMR and PDD such as geometry and field size, where phantom scatter or peak scatter factors are used to correct dosimetric variation due to field size difference. The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of calculated tissue maximum ratio (TMR) data with measured TMR values for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beam at Sweden Ghana Medical Centre. With the help of the Blue motorize water phantom and the Omni pro-Accept software, Pdd values from which TMRs are calculated were measured at 100 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD) for various square field sizes from 5x5 cm to 40x40 cm and depth of 1.5 cm to 25 cm for 6 MV and 15 MV x-ray beam. With the same field sizes, depths and energies, the TMR values were measured. The validity of the calculated data was determined by making a comparison with values measured experimentally at some selected field sizes and depths. The results show that; the reference depth of maximum

  17. Cracked rotors. A survey on static and dynamic behaviour including modelling and diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachschmid, Nicolo; Pennacchi, Paolo; Tanzi, Ezio [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Cracks can develop in rotating shafts and can propagate to relevant depths without affecting consistently the normal operating conditions of the shaft. In order to avoid catastrophic failures, accurate vibration analyses have to be performed for crack detection. The identification of the crack location and depth is possible by means of a model based diagnostic approach, provided that the model of the crack and the model of the cracked shaft dynamical behavior are accurate and reliable. This monograph shows the typical dynamical behavior of cracked shafts and presents tests for detecting cracks. The book describes how to model cracks, how to simulate the dynamical behavior of cracked shaft, and compares the corresponding numerical with experimental results. All effects of cracks on the vibrations of rotating shafts are analyzed, and some results of a numerical sensitivity analysis of the vibrations to the presence and severity of the crack are shown. Finally the book describes some crack identification procedures and shows some results in model based crack identification in position and depth. The book is useful for higher university courses in mechanical and energetic engineering, but also for skilled technical people employed in power generation industries. (orig.)

  18. Probability of crack-initiation and application to NDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prantl, G [Nuclear Safety Inspectorate HSK, (Switzerland)

    1988-12-31

    Fracture toughness is a property with a certain variability. When a statistical distribution is assumed, the probability of crack initiation may be calculated for a given problem defined by its geometry and the applied stress. Experiments have shown, that cracks which experience a certain small amount of ductile growth can reliably be detected by acoustic emission measurements. The probability of crack detection by AE-techniques may be estimated using this experimental finding and the calculated probability of crack initiation. (author).

  19. Development of a multi-layer ion chamber for measurement of depth dose distributions of heavy-ion therapeutic beam for individual patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Munefumi; Futami, Yasuyuki; Yusa, Ken; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Urakabe, Eriko; Yamashita, Haruo; Akagi, Takashi; Higashi, Akio

    2000-01-01

    In heavy-ion radiotherapy, an accelerated beam is modified to realize a desired dose distribution in patients. The set-up of the beam-modifying devices in the irradiation system is changed according to the patient, and it is important to check the depth dose distributions in the patient. In order to measure dose distributions realized by an irradiation system for heavy-ion radiotherapy, a multi-layer ionization chamber (MLIC) was developed. The MLIC consists of 64 ionization chambers, which are stacked mutually. The interval between each ionization chamber is about 4.1 mm water. There are signal and high voltage plates in the MLIC, which are used as electrodes of the ionization chambers and phantom. Depth dose distribution from 5.09 mm to 261.92 mm water can be measured in about 30 seconds using this MLIC. Thus, it is possible to check beam quality in a short amount of time. (author)

  20. Measurement of the London penetration depths in YBa2Cu3Ox by means of muon spin rotation (μ SR) experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumpin, B.; Keller, H.; Kundig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Savic, I.M.; Schneider, J.W.; Simmler, H.; Zimmermann, P.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on experiments conducted to get accurate values of the London penetration depths in YBa 2 Cu 3 O x , μSR measurements were performed on a high quality, sintered sample and a c-axis-oriented polycrystal. For the sintered sample the temperature dependence of the effective penetration depthλ eff is well described by the two-fluid model, withλ eff (0) = 155(10) nm. This behavior ofλ eff (T) is consistent with conventional s-wave pairing. The anisotropy ratioλ c /λ ab ≅5(1) was determined from measurements on the polycrystal. These results were used to calculateλ ab (0) = 130(10) nm andλ c (0)≅ 500-800 nm

  1. Measurements of the London penetration depths in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x by means of muon spin rotation (. mu. SR) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puempin, B.; Keller, H.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Savic, I.M.; Schneider, J.W.; Simmler, H.; Zimmermann, P. (Physik-Inst., Univ. Zuerich (Switzerland)); Bednorz, J.G.; Maeno, Y.; Mueller, K.A.; Rossel, C. (IBM Research Div., Zuerich Research Lab., Rueschlikon (Switzerland)); Kaldis, E.; Rusiecki, S. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)); Assmus, W.; Kowalewski, J. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Frankfurt (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-12-01

    To get accurate values of the London penetration depths in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, {mu}SR measurements were performed on a high quality, sintered sample and a c-axis-oriented polycrystal. For the sintered sample the temperature dependence of the effective penetration depth {lambda}{sub eff} is well described by the two-fluid model, with {lambda}{sub eff}(0) = 155(10) nm. This behavior of {lambda}{sub eff}(T) is consistent with conventional s-wave pairing. The anisotropy ratio {lambda}{sub c}/{lambda}{sub ab} {approx equal} 5(1) was determined from measurements on the polycrystal. These results were used to calculate {lambda}{sub ab}(0) = 130(10) nm and {lambda}{sub c}(0) {approx equal} 500-800 nm. (orig.).

  2. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  3. Crack detecting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michiko; Aida, Shigekazu

    1998-01-01

    A penetration liquid or a slow drying penetration liquid prepared by mixing a penetration liquid and a slow drying liquid is filled to the inside of an artificial crack formed to a member to be detected such as of boiler power generation facilities and nuclear power facilities. A developing liquid is applied to the periphery of the artificial crack on the surface of a member to be detected. As the slow-drying liquid, an oil having a viscosity of 56 is preferably used. Loads are applied repeatedly to the member to be detected, and when a crack is caused to the artificial crack, the permeation liquid penetrates into the crack. The penetration liquid penetrated into the crack is developed by the developing liquid previously coated to the periphery of the artificial crack of the surface of the member to be detected. When a crack is caused, since the crack is developed clearly even if it is a small opening, the crack can be recognized visually reliably. (I.N.)

  4. Crack embryo formation before crack initiation and growth in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Koji; Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Crack growth measurements were performed in high temperature water and in air to examine the role of creep on IGSCC growth using cold rolled non-sensitized Type316(UNS S31600), TT690 alloy, MA600 alloy, and Carbon steel (STPT42). In addition, crack initiation tests were performed also in high temperature water and in air using specially designed CT specimen. The obtained major results are as follows: (1) TT690 did crack in intergranularly in hydrogenated high temperature water if material is cold worked in heavily. (2) Cold worked carbon steel also cracked in intergranularly in dearated high temperature water. (3) Intergranular crack growth was recognized on cold worked 316, TT690, MA600, and carbon steel even in air which might be crack embryo of IGSCC. (4) Simple Arrhenius type temperature dependence was observed on IGSCC in high temperature water and creep crack growth in air. This suggested that intergranular crack growth rate was determined by some thermal activated reaction. (5) Vacancy condensation was recognized at just ahead of the crack tips of IGSCC and creep crack of cold worked steel. This showed that IGSCC and creep crack growth was controlled by same mechanism. (6) Clear evidence of vacancies condensation was recognized at just beneath the surface before crack initiation. This proved that crack did initiate as the result of diffusion of vacancies in the solid. And the incubation time seems to be controlled by the required time for the condensation of vacancies to the stress concentrated zone. (7) Diffusion of subsituational atoms was also driven by stress gradient. This is the important knowledge to evaluate the SCC initiation after long term operation in LWR's. Based on the observed results, IGSCC initiation and growth mechanism were proposed considering the diffusion process of cold worked induced vacancies. (author)

  5. Evaluation of creep-fatigue crack growth for large-scale FBR reactor vessel and NDE assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hun; Yoo, Bong

    2001-03-01

    Creep fatigue crack growth contributes to the failure of FRB reactor vessels in high temperature condition. In the design stage of reactor vessel, crack growth evaluation is very important to ensure the structural safety and setup the in-service inspection strategy. In this study, creep-fatigue crack growth evaluation has been performed for the semi-elliptical surface cracks subjected to thermal loading. The thermal stress analysis of a large-scale FBR reactor vessel has been carried out for the load conditions. The distributions of axial, radial, hoop, and Von Mises stresses were obtained for the loading conditions. At the maximum point of the axial and hoop stress, the longitudinal and circumferential surface cracks (i.e. PTS crack, NDE short crack and shallow long crack) were postulated. Using the maximum and minimum values of stresses, the creep-fatigue crack growth of the proposed cracks was simulated. The crack growth rate of circumferential cracks becomes greater than that of longitudinal cracks. The total crack growth of the largest PTS crack is very small after 427 cycles. The structural integrity of a large-scale reactor can be maintained for the plant life. The crack depth growth of the shallow long crack is faster than that of the NDE short crack. In the ISI of the large-scale FBR reactor vessel, the ultrasonic inspection is beneficial to detect the shallow circumferential cracks.

  6. Use of the strength ratio for pre-cracked Charpy specimens for the measuring, of the dynamic toughness of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.C.; Darwish, F.A.I.

    1981-01-01

    The specimen strength ratio (R sub(sb)) determined for precraked Charpy specimens fractured in dynamic bending was correlated with plane strain fracture toughness (K sub(Id)) obtained through valid measurements of the J-integral at the moment of fracture initiation in various microstructures of the AISI 4140 steel. The results indicate a linear relationship between K sub(Id) and R sub(sb) for the microstructures considered in this work. The range of validity of this linear correlation is presented and discussed in terms of the ASTM E399 specimen size criterion. (Author) [pt

  7. Predicting Soil Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen in the Russian Chernozem from Depth and Wireless Color Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, E. A.; Stiglitz, R. Y.; Post, C. J.; Schlautman, M. A.; Sharp, J. L.; Gerard, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    Color sensor technologies offer opportunities for affordable and rapid assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in the field, but the applicability of these technologies may vary by soil type. The objective of this study was to use an inexpensive color sensor to develop SOC and TN prediction models for the Russian Chernozem (Haplic Chernozem) in the Kursk region of Russia. Twenty-one dried soil samples were analyzed using a Nix Pro™ color sensor that is controlled through a mobile application and Bluetooth to collect CIEL*a*b* (darkness to lightness, green to red, and blue to yellow) color data. Eleven samples were randomly selected to be used to construct prediction models and the remaining ten samples were set aside for cross validation. The root mean squared error (RMSE) was calculated to determine each model's prediction error. The data from the eleven soil samples were used to develop the natural log of SOC (lnSOC) and TN (lnTN) prediction models using depth, L*, a*, and b* for each sample as predictor variables in regression analyses. Resulting residual plots, root mean square errors (RMSE), mean squared prediction error (MSPE) and coefficients of determination ( R 2, adjusted R 2) were used to assess model fit for each of the SOC and total N prediction models. Final models were fit using all soil samples, which included depth and color variables, for lnSOC ( R 2 = 0.987, Adj. R 2 = 0.981, RMSE = 0.003, p-value < 0.001, MSPE = 0.182) and lnTN ( R 2 = 0.980 Adj. R 2 = 0.972, RMSE = 0.004, p-value < 0.001, MSPE = 0.001). Additionally, final models were fit for all soil samples, which included only color variables, for lnSOC ( R 2 = 0.959 Adj. R 2 = 0.949, RMSE = 0.007, p-value < 0.001, MSPE = 0.536) and lnTN ( R 2 = 0.912 Adj. R 2 = 0.890, RMSE = 0.015, p-value < 0.001, MSPE = 0.001). The results suggest that soil color may be used for rapid assessment of SOC and TN in these agriculturally important soils.

  8. Measurement of low permeabilities and of pinpoint hydraulic load variations as a function of depth in crystalline formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    As part of the programme on management and storage of radioactive wastes, the PIEZOFOR system was improved in two directions, with a view to hydrogeological measurements in low permeability crystalline formations: - the special casing of the boreholes, on the one hand; - the measurement probe, on the other hand. In parallel, a specific software package for automatic interpretation of the measurements was put into operation [fr

  9. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.; Kuzay, T.; Rybicki, E.F.; Stonesifer, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Piping in light-water-reactor power systems has been affected by several types of environmental degradation. This paper presents results from studies of (1) stress corrosion crack growth in fracture mechanics specimens of modified Type 347 SS and Type 304/308L SS weld overlay material, (2) heat-to-heat variations in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Types 316NG and 347 SS, (3) SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS in water with cupric ion or organic acid impurities, (4) electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements under gamma irradiation, (5) SCC of ferritic steels, (6) strain-controlled fatigue of Type 316NG SS in air at ambient temperature, and (7) through-wall residual stress measurements and finite-element calculation of residual stresses in weldments treated by a mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). Fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate tests on Type 316NG SS have shown that transgranular cracking can occur even in high purity environments, whereas no crack growth was observed in Type 347 SS even in impurity environments. In tests on weld overlay specimens, no cracks penetrated into the overlay even in impurity environments. Instead, the cracks branched when they approached the overlay, and then grew parallel to interface. In SCC tests on sensitized Type 304 SS, cupric ions at concentrations greater than ∼1 ppm were found to be deleterious, whereas organic acids at this concentration were not detrimental. Tests on several ferritic steels indicate a strong correlation between the sulfur content of the steels and susceptibility to SCC. External gamma radiation fields produced a large positive shift in the ECP of Type 304 SS at low dissolved-oxygen concentrations (<5 ppb), whereas in the absence of an external gamma field there was no difference in the ECP values of irradiated and nonirradiated material. Fatigue data for Type 316NG SS are consistent with the ASME code mean curve at high strains, but fall below the curve at low strains. Calculations of the

  10. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  11. Microwave based method of monitoring crack formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, Sergej; Aman, Alexander; Majcherek, Soeren; Hirsch, Soeren; Schmidt, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    The formation of cracks in glass particles was monitored by application of linearly polarized microwaves. The breakage behavior of glass spheres coated with a thin gold layer of about 50 nm, i.e. a thickness that is lower than the microwave penetration depth, was tested. In this way the investigation of fracture behavior of electronic circuits was simulated. A shielding current was induced in the gold layer by the application of microwaves. During the crack formation the distribution of this current changed abruptly and a scattered microwave signal appeared at the frequency of the incident microwaves. The time behavior of the scattered signal reflects the microscopic processes occurring during the fracture of the specimen. The duration of the increasing signal corresponds to the crack formation time in the tested specimen. This time was estimated as particle size divided by crack development speed in glass. An intense emission of electrons occurs during the formation of cracks. Due to this, coherent Thomson scattering of microwaves by emitted electrons becomes significant with a delay of a few microseconds after the initial phase of crack formation. In this time the intensity of the microwave signal increases. (paper)

  12. Ductile crack initiation in the Charpy V-notch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Norris, D.M. Jr.; Prado, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    Initiation and growth of a crack in the Charpy V-notch test was investigated by performing both static and impact controlled deflection tests. Test specimens were deformed to various deflections, heat-tinted to mark crack extension and broken apart at low temperature to allow extension measurements. Measurement of the crack extension provided an estimate of crack initiation as defined by different criteria. Crack initiation starts well before maximum load, and is dependent on the definition of ''initiation''. Using a definition of first micro-initiation away from the ductile blunting, computer model predictions agreed favorably with the experimental results

  13. Using Noise and Fluctuations for In Situ  Measurements of Nitrogen Diffusion Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Samoila

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In manufacturing processes involving diffusion (of C, N, S, etc., the evolution of the layer depth is of the utmost importance: the success of the entire process depends on this parameter. Currently, nitriding is typically either calibrated using a “post process” method or controlled via indirect measurements (H2, O2, H2O + CO2. In the absence of “in situ” monitoring, any variation in the process parameters (gas concentration, temperature, steel composition, distance between sensors and furnace chamber can cause expensive process inefficiency or failure. Indirect measurements can prevent process failure, but uncertainties and complications may arise in the relationship between the measured parameters and the actual diffusion process. In this paper, a method based on noise and fluctuation measurements is proposed that offers direct control of the layer depth evolution because the parameters of interest are measured in direct contact with the nitrided steel (represented by the active electrode. The paper addresses two related sets of experiments. The first set of experiments consisted of laboratory tests on nitrided samples using Barkhausen noise and yieded a linear relationship between the frequency exponent in the Hooge equation and the nitriding time. For the second set, a specific sensor based on conductivity noise (at the nitriding temperature was built for shop‐floor experiments. Although two different types of noise were measured in these two sets of experiments, the use of the frequency exponent to monitor the process evolution remained valid.

  14. Effects of Chemistry Parameters of Primary Water affecting Leakage of Steam Generator Tube Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, D. M.; Cho, N. C.; Kang, Y. S.; Lee, K. H. [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Degradation of steam generator (SG) tubes can affect pressure boundary tightness. As a defense-in-depth measure, primary to secondary leak monitoring program for steam generators is implemented, and operation is allowed under leakage limits in nuclear power plants. Chemistry parameters that affect steam generator tube leakage due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) are investigated in this study. Tube sleeves were installed to inhibit leakage and improve tube integrity as a part of maintenance methods. Steam generators occurred small leak during operation have been replaced with new steam generators according to plant maintenance strategies. The correlations between steam generator leakage and chemistry parameters are presented. Effects of primary water chemistry parameters on leakage from tube cracks were investigated for the steam generators experiencing small leak. Unit A experienced small leakage from steam generator tubes in the end of operation cycle. It was concluded that increased solubility of oxides due to high pHT could make leakage paths, and low boron concentration lead to less blockage in cracks. Increased dissolved hydrogen may retard crack propagations, but it did not reduce leak rate of the leaking steam generator. In order to inhibit and reduce leakage, pH{sub T} was controlled by servicing cation bed operation. The test results of decreasing pHT indicate low pHT can reduce leak rate of PWSCC cracks in the end of cycle.

  15. Effects of Chemistry Parameters of Primary Water affecting Leakage of Steam Generator Tube Cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, D. M.; Cho, N. C.; Kang, Y. S.; Lee, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of steam generator (SG) tubes can affect pressure boundary tightness. As a defense-in-depth measure, primary to secondary leak monitoring program for steam generators is implemented, and operation is allowed under leakage limits in nuclear power plants. Chemistry parameters that affect steam generator tube leakage due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) are investigated in this study. Tube sleeves were installed to inhibit leakage and improve tube integrity as a part of maintenance methods. Steam generators occurred small leak during operation have been replaced with new steam generators according to plant maintenance strategies. The correlations between steam generator leakage and chemistry parameters are presented. Effects of primary water chemistry parameters on leakage from tube cracks were investigated for the steam generators experiencing small leak. Unit A experienced small leakage from steam generator tubes in the end of operation cycle. It was concluded that increased solubility of oxides due to high pHT could make leakage paths, and low boron concentration lead to less blockage in cracks. Increased dissolved hydrogen may retard crack propagations, but it did not reduce leak rate of the leaking steam generator. In order to inhibit and reduce leakage, pH_T was controlled by servicing cation bed operation. The test results of decreasing pHT indicate low pHT can reduce leak rate of PWSCC cracks in the end of cycle

  16. SU-C-213-04: Application of Depth Sensing and 3D-Printing Technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Patient Measurement and Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, B; Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Jenkins, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an innovative method of using depth sensing cameras and 3D printing techniques for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatment planning and compensator fabrication. Methods: A tablet with motion tracking cameras and integrated depth sensing was used to scan a RANDOTM phantom arranged in a TBI treatment booth to detect and store the 3D surface in a point cloud (PC) format. The accuracy of the detected surface was evaluated by comparison to extracted measurements from CT scan images. The thickness, source to surface distance and off-axis distance of the phantom at different body section was measured for TBI treatment planning. A 2D map containing a detailed compensator design was calculated to achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the phantom. The compensator was fabricated using a 3D printer, silicone molding and tungsten powder. In vivo dosimetry measurements were performed using optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs). Results: The whole scan of the anthropomorphic phantom took approximately 30 seconds. The mean error for thickness measurements at each section of phantom compare to CT was 0.44 ± 0.268 cm. These errors resulted in approximately 2% dose error calculation and 0.4 mm tungsten thickness deviation for the compensator design. The accuracy of 3D compensator printing was within 0.2 mm. In vivo measurements for an end-to-end test showed the overall dose difference was within 3%. Conclusion: Motion cameras and depth sensing techniques proved to be an accurate and efficient tool for TBI patient measurement and treatment planning. 3D printing technique improved the efficiency and accuracy of the compensator production and ensured a more accurate treatment delivery.

  17. SU-C-213-04: Application of Depth Sensing and 3D-Printing Technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Patient Measurement and Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M; Suh, T; Han, B; Xing, L; Jenkins, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate an innovative method of using depth sensing cameras and 3D printing techniques for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatment planning and compensator fabrication. Methods: A tablet with motion tracking cameras and integrated depth sensing was used to scan a RANDOTM phantom arranged in a TBI treatment booth to detect and store the 3D surface in a point cloud (PC) format. The accuracy of the detected surface was evaluated by comparison to extracted measurements from CT scan images. The thickness, source to surface distance and off-axis distance of the phantom at different body section was measured for TBI treatment planning. A 2D map containing a detailed compensator design was calculated to achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the phantom. The compensator was fabricated using a 3D printer, silicone molding and tungsten powder. In vivo dosimetry measurements were performed using optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs). Results: The whole scan of the anthropomorphic phantom took approximately 30 seconds. The mean error for thickness measurements at each section of phantom compare to CT was 0.44 ± 0.268 cm. These errors resulted in approximately 2% dose error calculation and 0.4 mm tungsten thickness deviation for the compensator design. The accuracy of 3D compensator printing was within 0.2 mm. In vivo measurements for an end-to-end test showed the overall dose difference was within 3%. Conclusion: Motion cameras and depth sensing techniques proved to be an accurate and efficient tool for TBI patient measurement and treatment planning. 3D printing technique improved the efficiency and accuracy of the compensator production and ensured a more accurate treatment delivery

  18. A Feasibility Study on the Use of a Structured Light Depth-Camera for Three-Dimensional Body Measurements of Dairy Cows in Free-Stall Barns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pezzuolo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Frequent checks on livestock’s body growth can help reducing problems related to cow infertility or other welfare implications, and recognizing health’s anomalies. In the last ten years, optical methods have been proposed to extract information on various parameters while avoiding direct contact with animals’ body, generally causes stress. This research aims to evaluate a new monitoring system, which is suitable to frequently check calves and cow’s growth through a three-dimensional analysis of their bodies’ portions. The innovative system is based on multiple acquisitions from a low cost Structured Light Depth-Camera (Microsoft Kinect™ v1. The metrological performance of the instrument is proved through an uncertainty analysis and a proper calibration procedure. The paper reports application of the depth camera for extraction of different body parameters. Expanded uncertainty ranging between 3 and 15 mm is reported in the case of ten repeated measurements. Coefficients of determination R² > 0.84 and deviations lower than 6% from manual measurements where in general detected in the case of head size, hips distance, withers to tail length, chest girth, hips, and withers height. Conversely, lower performances where recognized in the case of animal depth (R² = 0.74 and back slope (R² = 0.12.

  19. A Feasibility Study on the Use of a Structured Light Depth-Camera for Three-Dimensional Body Measurements of Dairy Cows in Free-Stall Barns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Frequent checks on livestock’s body growth can help reducing problems related to cow infertility or other welfare implications, and recognizing health’s anomalies. In the last ten years, optical methods have been proposed to extract information on various parameters while avoiding direct contact with animals’ body, generally causes stress. This research aims to evaluate a new monitoring system, which is suitable to frequently check calves and cow’s growth through a three-dimensional analysis of their bodies’ portions. The innovative system is based on multiple acquisitions from a low cost Structured Light Depth-Camera (Microsoft Kinect™ v1). The metrological performance of the instrument is proved through an uncertainty analysis and a proper calibration procedure. The paper reports application of the depth camera for extraction of different body parameters. Expanded uncertainty ranging between 3 and 15 mm is reported in the case of ten repeated measurements. Coefficients of determination R² > 0.84 and deviations lower than 6% from manual measurements where in general detected in the case of head size, hips distance, withers to tail length, chest girth, hips, and withers height. Conversely, lower performances where recognized in the case of animal depth (R² = 0.74) and back slope (R² = 0.12). PMID:29495290

  20. The 14N(d,0)15N nuclear reaction method for nitrogen depth distribution measurements in wheat and barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goenczi, L.; Didriksson, R.; Berggren, H.; Sundqvist, B.; Lindh, U.; Awal, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The 14 N(d,p 0 ) 15 N reaction has been used to measure nitrogen depth distributions in single grains of wheat and barley. With the beam energy used (6 MeV) a depth of 225 μm was reached. In order to test the applicability of the method for plant breeding purposes we have studied 1000 grains of wheat and grains of barley, which are part of a larger material of about 50 000 grains grown and harvested under controlled biological conditions. The measured nitrogen distributions in wheat show striking correlations with parameters describing the nitrogen level of fertilizer, the time of harvesting, the grain position in a head and the analyzed variety of wheat. Contributions to the spectra from silicon in the hull of barley are demonstrated. Contributions from interfering elements in the aleuron layer in wheat placed a limit of 120 μm to the depth region analyzed. The importance of effects like pileup, heating of the grains by the beam and grain asymmetries were studied in detail. The possibility to use the technique for selection purposes in plant breeding will be discussed. (author)

  1. Measurement and modeling of the low-temperature penetration-depth anomaly in high-quality MgB{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agassi, Y.D. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, Bethesda, MD 20817 (United States); Oates, D.E., E-mail: OATES@LL.MIT.EDU [MIT-Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA 02420 (United States); Moeckly, B.H. [STI, Inc. Santa Barbara, CA 93111 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Based on our measurements of intermodulation distortion in MgB{sub 2}, we have previously proposed that the {pi} energy-gap in MgB{sub 2} entails six nodal lines [Y.D. Agassi, D.E. Oates, and B.H. Moeckly, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 174522]. Here we report high-precision measurements in MgB{sub 2} stripline resonators that show an increase of the penetration depth as the temperature is decreased below 5 K. This increase is consistent with the Script-Small-L = 6 symmetry of the {pi} energy gap that we have proposed. We interpret the increase as a manifestation of Andreev surface-attached states that are associated with the nodal lines of the {pi} energy gap. Penetration-depth calculations are in good agreement with our data. To reconcile the present interpretation with existing literature, we review other penetration-depth data, magnetic-impurity and tunneling experiments, and data on the paramagnetic Meissner effect. We conclude that these data do not rule out the interpretation of our experimental data based on a nodal {pi} energy gap.

  2. Measurement of residual stress in a cylinder by x-ray under the consideration of its penetration depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Osamu; Ukai, Takayoshi

    1983-01-01

    The authors propose an exact theory of residual stress measurement by successive thin layer removal in a hollow cylinder under the consideration of the contribution of residual stress within a definite subsurface, and show an example of its application. (author)

  3. A Small Crack Length Evaluation Technique by Electronic Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sang; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The results of crack evaluation by conventional UT(Ultrasonic Test)is highly depend on the inspector's experience or knowledge of ultrasound. Phased array UT system and its application methods for small crack length evaluation will be a good alternative method which overcome present UT weakness. This study was aimed at checking the accuracy of crack length evaluation method by electronic scanning and discuss about characteristics of electronic scanning for crack length evaluation. Especially ultrasonic phased array with electronic scan technique was used in carrying out both sizing and detect ability of crack as its length changes. The response of ultrasonic phased array was analyzed to obtain the special method of determining crack length without moving the transducer and detectability of crack minimal length and depth from the material. A method of crack length determining by electronic scanning for the small crack is very real method which has it's accuracy and verify the effectiveness of method compared to a conventional crack length determination

  4. Radiation efficiency during slow crack propagation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestin, Camille; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Creeping faults are known to host a significant aseismic deformation. However, the observations of micro-earthquake activity related to creeping faults (e.g. San Andreas Faults, North Anatolian Fault) suggest the presence of strong lateral variabilities of the energy partitioning between radiated and fracture energies. The seismic over aseismic slip ratio is rather difficult to image over time and at depth because of observational limitations (spatial resolution, sufficiently broad band instruments, etc.). In this study, we aim to capture in great details the energy partitioning during the slow propagation of mode I fracture along a heterogeneous interface, where the toughness is strongly varying in space.We lead experiments at laboratory scale on a rock analog model (PMMA) enabling a precise monitoring of fracture pinning and depinning on local asperities in the brittle-creep regime. Indeed, optical imaging through the transparent material allows the high resolution description of the fracture front position and velocity during its propagation. At the same time, acoustic emissions are also measured by accelerometers positioned around the rupture. Combining acoustic records, measurements of the crack front position and the loading curve, we compute the total radiated energy and the fracture energy. We deduce from them the radiation efficiency, ηR, characterizing the proportion of the available energy that is radiated in form of seismic wave. We show an increase of ηR with the crack rupture speed computed for each of our experiments in the sub-critical crack propagation domain. Our experimental estimates of ηR are larger than the theoretical model proposed by Freund, stating that the radiation efficiency of crack propagation in homogeneous media is proportional to the crack velocity. Our results are demonstrated to be in agreement with existing studies which showed that the distribution of crack front velocity in a heterogeneous medium can be well described by a

  5. Detection of a Surface-Breaking Crack by Using the Surface Wave of a Laser Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Hyun-Kyu; Joo, Young-Sang; Cha, Hyung-Ki; Kang, Young-June

    2006-01-01

    A laser ultrasonic system is a non-contact inspection device with a high spatial resolution and a wide-band spectrum. Also it provides absolute measurements of the moving distance and can be applied to the hard-to access locations with curved or rough surfaces like a nuclear power plant. Several laser ultrasonic techniques are applied for the detection of micro cracks in a nuclear power plant. Also, laser ultrasonic techniques are used to measure the grain size of materials and to detect cracks in railroads and aircrafts. Though the laser ultrasonic inspection system is widely applicable, it is comparatively expensive and it provides a low signal-to-noise ratio when compared to the conventional piezoelectric transducers. Many studies have been carried out to improve the system performance. One of the widely used measurement devices of a ultrasound is the Confocal Fabry-Perot Interferometer(CFPI) with a dynamic stabilizer. The dynamic stabilizer improves the stability of the CFPI by adaptively maintaining the optimum working status at the measuring time of the CFPI. In this paper, we have investigated the detection methods of the depth of a surface-breaking crack by using the surface wave of a laser ultrasound. We have fabricated a laser ultrasonic inspection system on an optical table by using a pulse laser, a CFPI with a dynamic stabilizer and a computer. The computer acquires the laser ultrasound by using a high speed A/D converter with a sampling rate of 1000 MHz. The dynamic stabilizer stabilizes the CFPI by adaptively maintaining it at an optimum status when the laser ultrasound is generated. The computer processes the ultrasonic signal in real time to extract the depth information of a surface-breaking crack. We extracted the depth information from the peak-to-valley values in the time domain and also from the center frequencies of the spectrum in the frequency domain

  6. Method of evaluation of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Iwao; Yoshida, Toshimi; Ikeda, Shinzo; Masaoka, Isao; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, by an evaluation in out-pile test, the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes in the reactor environment. Method: A plurality of electrodes are mounted in the circumferential direction on the entire surface of cladding tubes. Of the electrodes, electrodes at two adjacent places are used as measuring terminals and electrodes at another two places adjacent thereto are used as constant-current terminals. With a specific current flowing in the constant-current terminals, measurements are made of a potential difference between the terminals to be measured, and from a variation in the potential difference the depth of cracking of the cladding tube surface is presumed to determine the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the cladding tube. To check the entire surface of the cladding tube, the cladding tube is moved by each block in the circumferential direction by a contact changeover system, repeating the measurements of the potential difference. Contact type electrodes are secured with an insulator and held in uniform contact with the cladding tube by a spring. It is detachable by use of a locking system and movable as desired. Thus the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility can be determined without mounting the cladding tube through and also a fuel failure can be prevented. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Correlation between Initial BIC and the Insertion Torque/Depth Integral Recorded with an Instantaneous Torque-Measuring Implant Motor: An in vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capparé, Paolo; Vinci, Raffaele; Di Stefano, Danilo Alessio; Traini, Tonino; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Gherlone, Enrico Felice; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative intraoperative evaluation of bone quality at implant placement site and postinsertion implant primary stability assessment are two key parameters to perform implant-supported rehabilitation properly. A novel micromotor has been recently introduced allowing to measure bone density at implant placement site and to record implant insertion-related parameters, such as the instantaneous, average and peak insertion torque values, and the insertion torque/depth integral. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo if any correlation existed between initial bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone density and integral values recorded with the instrument. Twenty-five patients seeking for implant-supported rehabilitation of edentulous areas were consecutively treated. Before implant placement, bone density at the insertion site was measured. For each patient, an undersized 3.3 × 8-mm implant was placed, recording the insertion torque/depth integral values. After 15 minutes, the undersized implant was retrieved with a 0.5 mm-thick layer of bone surrounding it. Standard implants were consequently placed. Retrieved implants were analyzed for initial BIC quantification after fixation, dehydration, acrylic resin embedment, sections cutting and grinding, and toluidine-blue and acid fuchsine staining. Correlation between initial BIC values, bone density at the insertion site, and the torque/depth integral values was investigated by linear regression analysis. A significant linear correlation was found to exist between initial BIC and (a) bone density at the insertion site (R = 0.96, explained variance R(2)  = 0.92) and (b) torque/depth integral at placement (R = 0.81, explained variance R(2)  = 0.66). The system provided quantitative, reliable data correlating significantly with immediate postinsertion initial BIC, and could therefore represent a valuable tool both for clinical research and for the oral implantologist in his/her daily clinical

  8. Characterization of Cracking Mechanisms of Carbon Anodes Used in Aluminum Industry by Optical Microscopy and Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, Salah; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Bhattacharyay, Dipankar; Bouazara, Mohamed; Morais, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the different mechanisms of crack formation in dense anodes used in the aluminum industry. The first approach used is based on the qualitative characterization of the surface cracks and the depth of these cracks. The second approach, which constitutes a quantitative characterization, is carried out by determining the distribution of the crack width along its length as well as the percentage of the surface containing cracks. A qualitative analysis of crack formation was also carried out using 3D tomography. It was observed that mixing and forming conditions have a significant effect on crack formation in green anodes. The devolatilization of pitch during baking causes the formation and propagation of cracks in baked anodes in which large particles control the direction of crack propagation.

  9. Simulation of the transient eddy current measurement for the characterization of depth and conductivity of a plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Weiying; Komura, Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    A transient eddy current measurement method is presented to determine the thickness and conductivity of a conductive plate. The conductive plate is induced by an air-cored coil, the magnetic flux density along the axial is measured and the various signals corresponding to plates with different thickness and conductivity are calculated using a 3D transient eddy current simulator. Characteristic features are obtained from the transient response. A similarity-based modeling method is utilized in this study to estimate the thickness and conductivity of the conductive plate. (author)

  10. Comparison of crack arrest methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The ASTM Cooperative Test Program Data were used to compare the static (K/sub Ia/) and dynamic (K/sud ID/, K/sub IDm/) approaches to crack arrest. K/sub Ia/ is not dependent on K/sub Q/. This is consistent with the requirements of the static approach, but not the dynamic one which requires that K/sub Ia/ decrease with K/sub Q/ if K/sub ID/ (= K/sub IDm/) is a constant. K/sub ID/ increases systematically with K/sub Q/ at a rate that is consistent with calculations based on the use of a constant value for K/sub Ia/ which is equal to its measured mean value. Only in the limiting case of very short crack jumps (associated with very low average crack speeds) can K/sub ID/ be identified as a minimum value at which K/sub ID/ = K/sub IDm/. In this case K/sub IDm/ approx. K/sub Ia/ approx. K/sub Im/. The latter is the idealized minimum value of K that will support the continued propagation of a running crack

  11. Cracks in functionally graded materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, H.-A.; Balke, H.; Fett, T.; Hofinger, I.; Kirchhoff, G.; Munz, D.; Neubrand, A.; Semenov, A.S.; Weiss, H.-J.; Yang, Y.Y.

    2003-01-01

    The weight function method is described to analyze the crack growth behavior in functionally graded materials and in particular materials with a rising crack growth resistance curve. Further, failure of graded thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under cyclic surface heating by laser irradiation is modeled on the basis of fracture mechanics. The damage of both graded and non-graded TBCs is found to develop in several distinct stages: vertical cracking→delamination→blistering→spalling. This sequence can be understood as an effect of progressive shrinkage due to sintering and high-temperature creep during thermal cycling, which increases the energy-release rate for vertical cracks which subsequently turn into delamination cracks. The results of finite element modeling, taking into account the TBC damage mechanisms, are compatible with experimental data. An increase of interface fracture toughness due to grading and a decrease due to ageing have been measured in a four-point bending test modified by a stiffening layer. Correlation with the damage observed in cyclic heating is discussed. It is explained in which way grading is able to reduce the damage

  12. Oxygenation measurement by multi-wavelength oxygen-dependent phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence: catchment depth and application in intact heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Specht, Patricia A. C.; Ince, Can; Mik, Egbert G.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen delivery and metabolism represent key factors for organ function in health and disease. We describe the optical key characteristics of a technique to comprehensively measure oxygen tension (PO(2)) in myocardium, using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence of

  13. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  14. Depth-of-interaction measurement in a single-layer crystal array with a single-ended readout using digital silicon photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    We present the first experimental evaluation of a depth-of-interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). To measure DOI information from a mono-layer array of scintillation crystals with a single-ended readout, our group has previously proposed and developed a new method based on light spread using triangular reflectors. Since this method relies on measurement of the light distribution, dSiPM, which has a fully digital interface, has several merits for our DOI measurement. The DOI PET detector comprised of a dSiPM sensor (DPC-3200-22-44) coupled with a 14   ×   14 array of 2 mm  ×  2 mm  ×  20 mm unpolished LGSO crystals. All crystals were covered with triangular reflectors. To obtain a good performance of the DOI PET detector, several parameters of detector were selected as a preliminary experiment. Detector performance was evaluated with the selected parameters and the optimal experimental setup, and a DOI measurement was conducted by irradiating the crystal block at five DOI positions spaced at intervals of 4 mm. Maximum-likelihood estimation was employed for DOI positioning and the optimal DOI estimation scheme was also investigated in this study. As a result, the DOI PET detector showed clear crystal identification. The energy resolution (full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)) averaged over all depths was 10.21%  ±  0.15% at 511 keV, and time resolution averaged over all depths was 1198.61   ±   39.70 ps FWHM. The average DOI positioning accuracy for all depths was 74.22%  ±  6.77%, which equates to DOI resolution of 4.67 mm. Energy and DOI resolutions were uniform over all crystal positions except for the back parts of the array. Furthermore, additional simulation studies were conducted to verify the results of our DOI measurement method that is combined with dSiPM technology. In conclusion, our continuous DOI PET detector

  15. Characterization of mixed mode crack opening in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas Sejersbøl; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Olesen, John Forbes

    2012-01-01

    components of the mixed mode displacement are measured using a custom made orthogonal gauge, and the measurements are used directly as the closed loop control signals. A double notch, concrete specimen is used for the crack investigation. The tests are divided into two steps, a pure Mode I opening step......In real concrete structures cracks often open in mixed mode after their initiation. To capture the direct material behavior of a mixed mode crack opening a stiff biaxial testing machine, capable of imposing both normal and shear loads on a given crack area, has been applied. The opening and sliding......, where a macro crack is initiated in the specimen followed by the mixed mode opening step. The high stiffness of the set-up together with the closed control loop ensures a stable crack initiation followed by a controllable mixed mode opening. The deep notches result in a plane crack, only influenced...

  16. Delayed hydrogen cracking test design for pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Roberto; Loberse, Antonio N.; Yawny, Alejandro A.; Riquelme, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    CANDU nuclear power stations pressure tubes of alloy Zr-2,5 % Nb present a cracking phenomenon known as delayed hydrogen cracking (DHC). This is a brittle fracture of zirconium hydrides that are developed by hydrogen due to aqueous corrosion on the metal surface. This hydrogen diffuses to the crack tip where brittle zirconium hydrides develops and promotes the crack propagation. A direct current potential decay (DCPD) technique has been developed to measure crack propagation rates on compact test (CT) samples machined from a non irradiated pressure tube. Those test samples were hydrogen charged by cathodic polarization in an acid solution and then pre cracked in a fatigue machine. This technique proved to be useful to measure crack propagation rates with at least 1% accuracy for DHC in pressure tubes. (author)

  17. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  18. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  19. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth resolved from geoelectromagnetic pedotransfer function and depth of investigation resolved from geoelectrical measurements: A case study of coastal formation, southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, N. J.; Obiora, D. N.; Ekanem, A. M.; Akpan, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    The task involved in the interpretation of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) data is how to get unique results in the absence/limited number of borehole information, which is usually limited to information on the spot. Geological and geochemical mapping of electrical properties are usually limited to direct observations on the surface and therefore, conclusions and extrapolations that can be drawn about the system electrical characteristics and possible underlying structures may be masked as geology changes with positions. The electrical resistivity study pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been linked with the electromagnetic (EM) resolved PTFs at chosen frequencies of skin/penetration depth corresponding to the VES resolved investigation depth in order to determine the local geological attributes of hydrogeological repository in the coastal formation dominated with fine sand. The illustrative application of effective skin depth depicts that effective skin depth has direct relation with the EM response of the local source over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aid for estimating the optimum depth and electrical parameters through comparative analysis. Though the VES and EM resolved depths of investigation at appropriate effective and theoretical frequencies have wide gaps, diagnostic relations characterising the subsurface depth of interest have been established. The determining factors of skin effect have been found to include frequency/period, resistivity/conductivity, absorption/attenuation coefficient and energy loss factor. The novel diagnostic relations and their corresponding constants between 1-D resistivity data and EM skin depth are robust PTFs necessary for checking the accuracy associated with the non-unique interpretations that characterise the 1-D resistivity data, mostly when lithostratigraphic data are not available.

  20. K{sub I}-T estimations for embedded flaws in pipes - Part I: Axially oriented cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xudong, E-mail: cveqx@nus.edu.s [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2010-04-15

    This study reports a numerical investigation on the linear-elastic K{sub I} and T-stress values over the front of elliptical cracks axially embedded in the wall of a pipe/cylindrical structure, under a uniform pressure applied on the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical procedure employs an interaction integral approach to compute the linear-elastic stress intensity factor (SIF) K{sub I} and T-stress values from very detailed crack-front meshes. The verification study confirms the accuracy of the adopted numerical procedure in computing the K{sub I} values based on existing results for external axial surface cracks in the wall of a cylindrical structure. The parametric investigation covers a wide range of geometric parameters including: the wall thickness to the inner radius ratio of the pipe (t/R{sub i}), the crack depth over the wall thickness ratio (a/t), the crack aspect ratio (a/c) and the crack location measured by the ratio of the distance from the centerline of the crack to the outer surface of the pipe over the pipe wall thickness (e{sub M}/t). Subsequent efforts develop, from a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure, a new set of equations to estimate the T-stress and K{sub I} values at three critical front locations of the axial elliptical cracks: the crack-front point O nearest to the outer surface of the pipe, the crack-front point I nearest to the inner surface of the pipe and the crack-front point M on the centerline of the axial crack. These equations combine a second-order polynomial with a power-law expression to predict the pronounced variations in the T-stress and K{sub I} values with respect to the geometric parameters. The coefficients of the new K{sub I} and T-stress equations either take a constant value or incorporate the linear variation with respect to the pipe wall thickness over the inner radius ratio, t/R{sub i}. The proposed equations demonstrate a close agreement with the finite element (FE) results, which indicate very strong

  1. ASK Procedure for Instrumented Pre-cracked Charpy-Type Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, T.; Njo, D.H.; Prantl, G.

    1981-01-01

    The essential technical content of the ASK procedure originated from development work in Switzerland since 1963, and practical experiences gained since 1972. The remainder of the content and the format of the procedure are based on the ASTM E 24.03.03. (Tentative Draft Copy) 'Proposed Method for Pre-cracked Charpy Impact and Slow-Bend Testing of Metallic Materials' by C. E. Harbower, 1973. Two different velocities, 5 m/s and 0.1 m/s were used with a Schnadt-type machine of rigid construction. The stiffness of the machine proved to be very suitable for instrumented testing. The instrumented Schnadt-Type machine was equipped with strain gauges both on the top of the pendulum and on the chisel. A static force calibration was followed by energy calibration, comparing potential energy losses with the area under the force-deflection curve. Deflection was measured using a high frequency eddy current method on the pendulum, and for slow testing by means of an inductive gauge on the chisel. Charpy-Type specimens of 1.0 mm max notch depth and 0.12 mm max notch radius were pre-cracked using a resonant fatigue testing machine, or an eccentric drive machine. Crack propagation rate da/dN was measured using 'Russenberger' measuring gauges. In addition a new technique for the detection of dynamic crack initiation, developed at the Institute of Research and Technology (TVFA) in Vienna is discussed and some results presented

  2. Validating MODIS Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieved from Color Ratio Algorithm Using Direct Measurements Made by NASA's Airborne AATS and 4STAR Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Spurr, Rob

    2016-01-01

    We present the validation analysis of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) retrieved from the color ratio method applied to MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance measurements using the limited direct measurements made by NASAs airborne Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) sensors. A thorough search of the airborne database collection revealed a total of five significant events in which an airborne sun photometer, coincident with the MODIS overpass, observed partially absorbing aerosols emitted from agricultural biomass burning, dust, and wildfires over a low-level cloud deck during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS 2013 campaigns, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne match ups revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square difference less than 0.1), with most match ups falling within the estimated uncertainties associated with the MODIS retrievals (about -10 to +50 ). The co-retrieved cloud optical depth was comparable to that of the MODIS operational cloud product for ACE-ASIA and SEAC4RS, however, higher by 30-50% for the SAFARI-2000 case study. The reason for this discrepancy could be attributed to the distinct aerosol optical properties encountered during respective campaigns. A brief discussion on the sources of uncertainty in the satellite-based ACAOD retrieval and co-location procedure is presented. Field experiments dedicated to making direct measurements of aerosols above cloud are needed for the extensive validation of satellite based retrievals.

  3. A dosimetry system for fast measurement of 3D depth-dose profiles in charged-particle tumor therapy with scanning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusasco, C.; Voss, B.; Schardt, D.; Kraemer, M.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    The high complexity and high instantaneous dose rates of the intensity modulated treatment plans performed using carbon beams at GSI require a good granularity of the dose verification procedures. As a consequence, a new detector system was developed in order to obtain a 3D reconstruction of the relative depth-dose distributions in a short time, with high granularity and over large volumes. The system takes advantage of the active beam delivery system operative in the therapy facility of GSI and consists of one position sensitive detector with a stack of ionization chambers and a range-shifter. After a technical description of the apparatus, the procedure to reconstruct the 3D measurements is explained and the possible sources of errors in the measurements are analyzed. Finally, the results of the measurement of some treatment plans are shown

  4. A Novel Method for Measureme