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Sample records for crack depth measurement

  1. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  2. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  3. Accurate depth measurement of small surface-breaking cracks using an ultrasonic array post-processing technique

    OpenAIRE

    Felice, Maria; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the half-skip configuration of the Total Focusing Method (TFM) is used to image and size surface-breaking cracks. The TFM is an ultrasonic array post-processing technique which is used to synthetically focus at every image point in a target region. This paper considers the case of inspecting for cracks which have initiated from the far surface of a parallel-sided sample using an array on the near surface. Typically, only direct ray paths between the array and image points are i...

  4. Crack elongation and its width of large depth reinforced concrete beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Jun-feng; ZHAO Shun-bo; HUANG Cheng-kui

    2010-01-01

    In order to meet the requirement of structural inspection,the crack spacing and crack width at various heights in the tensile zone of six large depth reinforced concrete beams were measured under several loading levels of serviceability state.The effects of the depth of normal section beams on the crack spacing and crack width were analyzed,and the modified model is proposed for calculating the average crack spacing by thinking about the depth of normal section,the reinforcement arrangement and the effective reinforcement ratio.The relationships of crack widths at any position in the tensile zone and at the reinforcement level on the side surface of beam were studied.By theoretical and statistical analysis,a method is proposed to calculate the ratios of crack widths between any position and the reinforcement level on the side surface of large depth reinforced concrete beams.

  5. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Crack Depth and Crack Opening On the Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamrul Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the effect of crack depth and opening on the girder, finite element method (FEM has been used in this paper. In FE analysis, six nodded two dimensional plane elements (PLANE-2 are considered. Each node has two degree of freedom such as UX and UY. For the plane elements, a plane stress width/thickness option is chosen. For analytical model of crack of the concrete bridge girder, crack opening was increased from 0.2 mm to 1mm at an interval 0.2 mm and crack depth also increased from 30 mm to 150 mm at an interval 30 mm. The models were discreatized by a triangular mesh and convergence test was executed to obtain satisfactory results from the Plane-2 element. From the numerical result, it is seen that the principal stress become a higher with increased the crack depth and also crack opening with respect to load increasing. But the crack depth at 90 mm and crack opening at 0.6 mm, it has more effect on the girder because the stress concentration is higher than other crack depth and opening.

  6. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Franesqui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA. The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled “Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves” (Franesqui et al., 2017 [1].

  7. Ultrasound data for laboratory calibration of an analytical model to calculate crack depth on asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franesqui, Miguel A; Yepes, Jorge; García-González, Cándida

    2017-08-01

    This article outlines the ultrasound data employed to calibrate in the laboratory an analytical model that permits the calculation of the depth of partial-depth surface-initiated cracks on bituminous pavements using this non-destructive technique. This initial calibration is required so that the model provides sufficient precision during practical application. The ultrasonic pulse transit times were measured on beam samples of different asphalt mixtures (semi-dense asphalt concrete AC-S; asphalt concrete for very thin layers BBTM; and porous asphalt PA). The cracks on the laboratory samples were simulated by means of notches of variable depths. With the data of ultrasound transmission time ratios, curve-fittings were carried out on the analytical model, thus determining the regression parameters and their statistical dispersion. The calibrated models obtained from laboratory datasets were subsequently applied to auscultate the evolution of the crack depth after microwaves exposure in the research article entitled "Top-down cracking self-healing of asphalt pavements with steel filler from industrial waste applying microwaves" (Franesqui et al., 2017) [1].

  8. Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Surface Breaking Crack Using Rayleigh Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Foo Wei; Chai, Hwa Kian; Lim, Kok Sing

    2016-03-05

    An improved single sided Rayleigh wave (R-wave) measurement was suggested to characterize surface breaking crack in steel reinforced concrete structures. Numerical simulations were performed to clarify the behavior of R-waves interacting with surface breaking crack with different depths and degrees of inclinations. Through analysis of simulation results, correlations between R-wave parameters of interest and crack characteristics (depth and degree of inclination) were obtained, which were then validated by experimental measurement of concrete specimens instigated with vertical and inclined artificial cracks of different depths. Wave parameters including velocity and amplitude attenuation for each case were studied. The correlations allowed us to estimate the depth and inclination of cracks measured experimentally with acceptable discrepancies, particularly for cracks which are relatively shallow and when the crack depth is smaller than the wavelength.

  9. Benefits and drawbacks of TOFD and SAFT for crack depth measurement at thick-walled vessels; Vor- und Nachteile von TOFD und SAFT zur Risstiefenmessung an dickwandigen Behaeltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, V.; Mueller, W. [IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany); Hecht, A. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    1999-08-01

    The results presented in the paper show that TOFD can be applied in many cases as a low-cost and reliable testing method, but is less suitable for some cases. These are: Description of cracks in welded joints which yield a multitude of data, as e.g. microstructural data, so that the method is less suitable for austenitic weld testing; detection of small cracks. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Aus den gezeigten Beispielen ergibt sich, dass TOFD in einer Vielzahl von Anwendungsfaellen als preisguenstiges und zuverlaessiges Pruefverfahren eingesetzt werden kann, dass es aber fuer einige Anwendungsfaelle weniger geeignet ist: Diese Anwendungsfaelle sind: (1) Nachweis von Rissen in Schweissnaehten mit vielen Anzeigen, z.B. Gefuegeanzeigen, d.h. insbesondere bei austenitischen Schweissnaehten, und (2) Nachweis von kleinen Rissen. Der Nachweis auch von kleinen Rissen wird dahingegen beim Impuls-Echo Verfahren aufgrund des vorliegenden Winkelspiegeleffektes durchaus moeglich sein. Durch eine nachgeschaltete SAFT-Auswertung werden zum einen stoerendes Gefuegerauschen unterdrueckt und zum anderen Echos von Fehlstellen angehoben. Diese Verbesserung des Signal-Rausch-Abstandes fuehrt zu einer Verbesserung der Fehlererkennbarkeit und der Fehlerbewertung. (orig.)

  10. Effects of crack depth and specimen size on ductile crack growth of SENT and SENB specimens for fracture mechanics evaluation of pipeline steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Richard Birkelands vei 1a, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China); Zhang, Z.L., E-mail: zhiliang.zhang@ntnu.n [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Richard Birkelands vei 1a, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Ostby, E.; Nyhus, B. [SINTEF, Materials and Chemistry, N-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Sun, D.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2009-12-15

    A strong geometry dependence of ductile crack growth resistance emerges under large scale yielding. The geometry dependence is associated with different levels of crack tip constraint conditions. However, in a recent attempt to identify appropriate fracture mechanics specimens for pipeline steels, an 'independent' relationship between the crack growth resistance curves and crack depths for SENT specimens has been observed experimentally. In this paper, we use the complete Gurson model to study the effects of crack depth and specimen size on ductile crack growth behavior. Crack growth resistance curves for plane strain, mode I crack growth under large scale yielding conditions have been computed. SENB and SENT specimens with three different specimen sizes, each specimen size with three different crack depths, have been selected. It has been found that crack tip constraint (Q-parameter) has a weak dependence on the crack depth for specimens in the low constraint regime.

  11. Depth of Cracking beneath Impact Craters: New Constraint for Impact Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Xia, Kaiwen; Coker, Demirkan

    2002-01-01

    Both small-scale impact craters in the laboratory and less than 5 km in diameter bowl-shaped craters on the Earth are strength (of rock) controlled. In the strength regime, crater volumes are nearly proportional to impactor kinetic energy. The depth of the cracked rock zone beneath such craters depends on both impactor energy and velocity. Thus determination of the maximum zone of cracking constrains impact velocity. We show this dependency for small-scale laboratory craters where the cracked...

  12. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuting

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  13. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  14. Open crack depth sizing by multi-speed continuous laser stimulated lock-in thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, C.; Holé, S.

    2017-06-01

    A crack located in the thermal diffusion zone of a heat source behaves like a thermal barrier modifying the heat diffusion. For a moving continuous source, the sample surface is heated on a little area near the crack for a duration which depends on the speed of the thermal source. A lock-in process synchronized by the displacement of the continuous heat source along the crack is studied. The thermal signature of the crack is extracted via a space operator applied to the amplitude and the phase of surface temperature images for various speeds of the thermal source. With the technical solution presented in this article, the thermal signature images are analysed according to a length representative of the thermal diffusion length to give a local evaluation of the crack depth (around 3 mm at the maximum) for crack lengths of about few centimetres long. The multi-speed lock-in thermography approach is initially studied with finite element method simulations. Experimental tests using an infra-red camera validate the method in a second part. The results do not depend on the heating source if its power is sufficient to produce a temperature rise detectable by an infra-red camera. The depth estimations are obtained independently of the crack width and heat source trajectory. The multi-speed lock-in thermography is a method without contact, without sample preparation, non-polluting, non-destructive and with simple optical adjustments.

  15. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin.

  16. Differential potential noise measurement during crack initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettiarachchi, S. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Sunol, California (United States)]. E-mail: samson.hettiarachchi@gene.ge.com

    2007-07-01

    Electrochemical potential and current noise have been used over the past two decades as methods of detecting general corrosion, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, corrosion in concrete and corrosion under coatings. The methods involved the use of self-generated potential noise/current noise or both, of the material of choice in a given environment. In a variety of these studies, data processing involved techniques such as fast fourier transforms (FFT) to generate the power spectrum that provided the unique signature associated with the type of the corrosion process. This paper deals with a more simplistic method of monitoring differential potential noise measured between two identical slow strain rate test (SSRT) specimens placed close to each other, in a high temperature aqueous environment, while one is being subjected to dynamic strain and the other maintained under static conditions. The differential potential noise (DPN) was monitored as the applied load increased on the slow strain rate test specimen. Unlike self-generated noise, differential potential noise is less affected by electrical noise in the surroundings, and is able to signal the point of oxide film cracking or crack initiation more conveniently without extensive data processing. This method also allows the in-situ detection of crack initiation without interruption of the SSRT test. The DPN signal at the crack initiation stage is different from the signals acquired as cracking progressed due to continuing dynamic strain. Furthermore, the nature of the DPN signal response depends on the type of material used in this study, Type 304 stainless steel or Inconel 182. (author)

  17. Underwater camera with depth measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Lin, Keng-Ren; Tsui, Chi L.; Schipf, David; Leang, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an RGB-D (video + depth) camera that provides three-dimensional image data for use in the haptic feedback of a robotic underwater ordnance recovery system. Two camera systems were developed and studied. The first depth camera relies on structured light (as used by the Microsoft Kinect), where the displacement of an object is determined by variations of the geometry of a projected pattern. The other camera system is based on a Time of Flight (ToF) depth camera. The results of the structural light camera system shows that the camera system requires a stronger light source with a similar operating wavelength and bandwidth to achieve a desirable working distance in water. This approach might not be robust enough for our proposed underwater RGB-D camera system, as it will require a complete re-design of the light source component. The ToF camera system instead, allows an arbitrary placement of light source and camera. The intensity output of the broadband LED light source in the ToF camera system can be increased by putting them into an array configuration and the LEDs can be modulated comfortably with any waveform and frequencies required by the ToF camera. In this paper, both camera were evaluated and experiments were conducted to demonstrate the versatility of the ToF camera.

  18. Crack Offset Measurement With the Projected Laser Target Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The device and associated analysis methodology summarized in this report were developed for the purpose of estimating the size of discontinuities in the surface of the foam that covers the Space Shuttle External Tank. These surface offsets are thought to be due to subsurface cracks in the foam insulation. The mathematical analysis and procedure described here provide a method to quantity the dimensions of the crack offset in a direction perpendicular to the surface, making use of the projected laser target device (PLTD) tool and a laser line projector. The keys to the construction and use of the PLTD are the following geometrical design requirements: Laser dots are on a square grid: length on a side. Laser beams are perpendicular to projected surface. Beams are parallel out to the distance being projected. The PLTD can be used to (1) calibrate fixed cameras of unknown magnification and orientation (far-field solution); (2) provide equivalent calibration to multiple cameras, previously achieved only by the use of known target points, for example, in 3.D foreign-object debris tracking on a fixed launch platform; (3) compute scaling for conventional 2.D images, and depth of field for 3.D images (near-field solution); and (4) in conjunction with a laser line projector, achieve accurate measurements of surface discontinuity (cracks) in a direction perpendicular to the surface.

  19. Remotely Measuring Snow Depth in Inaccessible Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D.; Boon, S.

    2010-12-01

    In watershed-scale studies of snow accumulation, high alpine areas are typically important accumulation areas. While snow depth measurements may not be collected in these regions due to avalanche danger, failing to include them in basin-wide estimates of snow accumulation may lead to large underestimates of basin-scale water yield. We present a new method to measure spatially distributed point snow depths remotely. Previously described methods using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) systems, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) systems, and hand-held laser distance meters have several limitations related to cost, data processing, and accuracy, thus reducing their applicability. The use of a modern robotic total station attempts to resolve these limitations. Total stations have much greater measurement accuracy than laser distance meters, and are significantly less expensive then TLS and LiDAR systems. Data can be output in common data formats, simplifying data processing and management. Measurement points can also be resampled repeatedly throughout the season with high accuracy and precision. Simple trigonometry is used to convert total station measurements into estimates of snow depth perpendicular to the slope. We present results of remote snow depth measurements using a Leica Geosystems TCRP 1201+ robotic total station. Snow depth estimates from the station are validated against measured depths in a field trial. The method is then applied in a basin-scale study to collect and calculate high elevation snow depth, in combination with traditional snow surveys at lower elevations.

  20. Crack status analysis for concrete dams based on measured entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU BangBin; WU ZhongRu; CHEN Bo; SU HuaiZhi; BAO TengFei; WANG ShaoWei

    2016-01-01

    The integrity and safety of concrete dams are seriously affected by the existing cracks in dam bodies,and some serious cracks may cause dam failure or disaster.The propagation of cracks in concrete dams is accompanied by changes in energy distribution,which can be represented by changes in the structure's system entropy.Therefore,the entropy theory can be used in analyzing the behavior of dam cracks.Due to the randomness and locality of crack propagation,it is difficult to predict the location of cracks by traditional monitoring methods.To solve this problem,the influence of spatial positions of monitoring points on inspection zones is represented by a weight index,and the weight index is determined by the distance measure method proposed in this paper.Through the weighted linear fusion method,the entropy of multiple monitoring points is obtained for analyzing the behavior of dam cracks in the selected zones.Meanwhile,the catastrophe theory is used as the variation criterion of an entropy sequence in order to predict the instability time of dam cracks.Case studies are put forward on a high arch dam,and the fusion entropy is calculated according to the monitoring data from strain gauges.Results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the occurrence time and location of dam cracks regardless of the layout of monitoring instruments,and it is a new way to analyze the occurrence and propagation of dam cracks.

  1. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  2. Simultaneous Measurements of Harmonic Waves at Fatigue-Cracked Interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyunjo Jeong; Dan Barnard

    2011-01-01

    @@ Nonlinear harmonic waves generated at cracked interfaces are investigated theoretically and experimentally.A compact tension specimen is fabricated and the amplitude of the transmitted wave is analyzed as a function of position along the fatigued crack surface.In order to measure as many nonlinear harmonic components as possible, broadband lithium niobate (LiNbO3) transducers are employed together with a calibration technique for making absolute amplitude measurements with fluid-coupled receiving transducers.Cracked interfaces are shown to generate high acoustic nonlinearities, which are manifested as harmonics in the power spectrum of the received signal.The first subharmonic f/2 and the second harmonic 2f waves are found to be dominant nonlinear components for an incident toneburst signal of frequency f .To explain the observed nonlinear behavior,a partially closed crack is modeled by planar half interfaces that can account for crack parameters, such as crack opening displacement and crack surface conditions.The simulation results show reasonable agreement with the experimental results

  3. Extraction of depth profiles of third-order elastic constants in cracked media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjelka, Marek; Koehler, Bernd; Mayer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Elastic constants of components are usually determined by tensile tests in combination with ultrasonic experiments. However, these properties may change due to e.g. mechanical treatments or service conditions during their lifetime. Knowledge of the actual material parameters is key to the determination of quantities like residual stresses present in the medium. In this work the acoustic nonlinearity parameter (ANP) for surface acoustic waves is examined through the derivation of an evolution equation for the amplitude of the second harmonic. Given a certain depth profile of the third-order elastic constants, the dependence of the ANP with respect to the input frequency is determined and on the basis of these results, an appropriate inversion method is developed. This method is intended for the extraction of the depth dependence of the third-order elastic constants of the material from second-harmonic generation and guided wave mixing experiments, assuming that the change in the linear Rayleigh wave velocity is small. The latter assumption is supported by a 3D-FEM model study of a medium with randomly distributed micro-cracks as well as theoretical works on this topic in the literature.

  4. Depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the f

  5. Depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the

  6. Crack Orientation and Depth Estimation in a Low-Pressure Turbine Disc Using a Phased Array Ultrasonic Transducer and an Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenshuang Chang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracks (SCC in low-pressure steam turbine discs are serious hidden dangers to production safety in the power plants, and knowing the orientation and depth of the initial cracks is essential for the evaluation of the crack growth rate, propagation direction and working life of the turbine disc. In this paper, a method based on phased array ultrasonic transducer and artificial neural network (ANN, is proposed to estimate both the depth and orientation of initial cracks in the turbine discs. Echo signals from cracks with different depths and orientations were collected by a phased array ultrasonic transducer, and the feature vectors were extracted by wavelet packet, fractal technology and peak amplitude methods. The radial basis function (RBF neural network was investigated and used in this application. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in crack estimation tasks.

  7. Crack orientation and depth estimation in a low-pressure turbine disc using a phased array ultrasonic transducer and an artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Shili; Jin, Shijiu; Chang, Wenshuang

    2013-09-13

    Stress corrosion cracks (SCC) in low-pressure steam turbine discs are serious hidden dangers to production safety in the power plants, and knowing the orientation and depth of the initial cracks is essential for the evaluation of the crack growth rate, propagation direction and working life of the turbine disc. In this paper, a method based on phased array ultrasonic transducer and artificial neural network (ANN), is proposed to estimate both the depth and orientation of initial cracks in the turbine discs. Echo signals from cracks with different depths and orientations were collected by a phased array ultrasonic transducer, and the feature vectors were extracted by wavelet packet, fractal technology and peak amplitude methods. The radial basis function (RBF) neural network was investigated and used in this application. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in crack estimation tasks.

  8. Effect of Voltage Measurement on the Quantitative Identification of Transverse Cracks by Electrical Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2016-03-24

    Electrical tomography can be used as a structural health monitoring technique to identify different damage mechanisms in composite laminates. Previous work has established the link between transverse cracking density and mesoscale conductivity of the ply. Through the mesoscale relationship, the conductivity obtained from electrical tomography can be used as a measure of the transverse cracking density. Interpretation of this measure will be accurate provided the assumptions made during homogenization are valid. One main assumption of mesoscale homogenization is that the electric field is in the plane. Here, we test the validity of this assumption for laminates with varying anisotropy ratios and for different distances between the cracked ply and surface that is instrumented with electrodes. We also show the equivalence in electrical response between measurements from cracked laminates and their equivalent mesoscale counterparts. Finally, we propose some general guidelines on the measurement strategy for maximizing the accuracy of transverse cracks identification.

  9. Standard test method for crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness measurement

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of critical crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) values at one or more of several crack extension events, and may be used to measure cleavage crack initiation toughness for materials that exhibit a change from ductile to brittle behavior with decreasing temperature, such as ferritic steels. This test method applies specifically to notched specimens sharpened by fatigue cracking. The recommended specimens are three-point bend [SE(B)], compact [C(T)], or arc-shaped bend [A(B)] specimens. The loading rate is slow and influences of environment (other than temperature) are not covered. The specimens are tested under crosshead or clip gage displacement controlled loading. 1.1.1 The recommended specimen thickness, B, for the SE(B) and C(T) specimens is that of the material in thicknesses intended for an application. For the A(B) specimen, the recommended depth, W, is the wall thickness of the tube or pipe from which the specimen is obtained. Superficial surface machini...

  10. Fracture Resistance Measurement Method for in situ Observation of Crack Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, A.; Jørgensen, O.

    1998-01-01

    observation and acoustic emission, As an example, crack growth in a cubic-phase yttria-stabilized zirconia is detected easily by in situ observation of the crack-tip region, Many fracture toughness measurements are obtained for each specimen, giving high confidence in the measured fracture toughness value......, In situ observation is useful for the study of toughening mechanisms and subcritical crack-growth behavior and to sort out erroneous measurements (e.g., due to crack branching)....

  11. Study on Causes of Cracks & its Preventive Measures in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Nama

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cracking in building is becoming a difficult puzzle for engineers nowadays. Cracking is an unavoidable response of any structure while designers are trying to eliminate many of the causes of cracking and design tolerance for other factors. We all want our building structurally safe but it is not so easy. Some faulty steps during construction and some unavoidable reasons different type of cracks starts to appear on various structural and non- structural parts of the building. So, timely identification of such cracks and adopting preventive measure are essential. The repair materials and repair technique are different depending upon forms of cracks according to their positions in structure. Some types of cracks seriously need attention as they are structurally hazardous. In this paper, we will discuss about the problem engineers are facing i.e. of cracking after construction and what preventive measures should be taken along with the techniques to cure cracks.

  12. Multi-cracks identification method for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections based on measured natural frequency changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Cantilever beam's crack identification can provide critical information which is helpful to determine whether the structure be healthy or not. Among all crack identification methods, the methods based on measured structure's natural frequency changes own advantages of simplicity and easy for operation in practical engineering. To accurately identify multi-cracks' characteristics for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections, a mathematical model, which is based on the concept of modal strain energy, is established in this investigation. And to obtain cantilever beam's natural frequency result with higher resolution, a signal processing method based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is also proposed, which can overcome the disadvantage of fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the aspect of frequency resolution and incapability of handling nonlinear vibration caused by crack breathing phenomenon. Based on above mathematical model and signal processing method, the method of identifying multi-cracks on cantilever beam with variable cross-sections is presented. To verify the accuracy of this multi-cracks identification method, experimental examples are conducted, and the results show that the method proposed in this investigation can accurately identify the cracks' characteristics, including their locations and relative depths.

  13. Crack Growth Monitoring in Harsh Environments by Electric Potential Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph; Reuter, Walter Graham; Weinberg, David Michael

    1999-09-01

    Electric potential measurement (EPM) technology offers an attractive alternative to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for monitoring crack growth in harsh environments. Where conventional NDE methods typically require localized human interaction, the EPM technique developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) can be operated remotely and automatically. Once a crack-like defect is discovered via conventional means, EPM can be applied to monitor local crack size changes. This is of particular interest in situations where an identified structural defect is not immediately rejectable from a fitness-for-service viewpoint, but due to operational and environmental conditions may grow to an unsafe size with continuing operation. If the location is in a harsh environment where periodic monitoring by normal means is either too costly or not possible, a very expensive repair may be immediately mandated. However, the proposed EPM methodology may offer a unique monitoring capability that would allow for continuing service. INEEL has developed this methodology, supporting equipment, and calibration information to apply EPM in a field environment for just this purpose. Laboratory and pilot scale tests on full-size engineering structures (pressure vessels and piping) have been successfully performed. The technique applicable is many severe environments because the sensitive equipment (electronics, operators) can be situated in a remote location, with only current and voltage probe electrical leads entering into the harsh environment. Experimental results showing the utility of the methodology are presented, and unique application concepts that have been examined by multiple experiments are discussed.

  14. Standard test method for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fatigue crack growth rates from near-threshold to Kmax controlled instability. Results are expressed in terms of the crack-tip stress-intensity factor range (ΔK), defined by the theory of linear elasticity. 1.2 Several different test procedures are provided, the optimum test procedure being primarily dependent on the magnitude of the fatigue crack growth rate to be measured. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength so long as specimens are of sufficient thickness to preclude buckling and of sufficient planar size to remain predominantly elastic during testing. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size is variable to be adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness may be varied independent of planar size. 1.5 The details of the various specimens and test configurations are shown in Annex A1-Annex A3. Specimen configurations other than t...

  15. Direct Measurements of Critical Stresses and Cracking in Thin Films of Colloid Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Weining; Russel, William B.

    2008-05-01

    Useful films can be formed by drying colloidal dispersions, but the negative capillary pressure generated often promotes cracks. Complex lateral flows during drying compromised previous measurements of the pressure required for cracking. Here we report data for the onset of cracking, and the additional cracks that appear at higher pressures, from high-pressure ultrafiltration experiments on homogeneously compressed films. A comparison of the data with expectations from theory confirms that cracking is controlled by elastic recovery, though an energy criterion only provides a lower bound. Our experiments also identify the role of flaws as nucleation sites that initiate cracks.

  16. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  17. Experimental Study on Measurement of Carbonation Depth of Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the test results, the differences of the carbonized depth of concrete measured by phenolphthalein indicator and rainbow indicator were discussed, the effects of the water to cement ratio of concrete, the carbonized age and the relative humidity of environment on the carbonized depth of concrete and the depth of half-carbonized zone corresponding to green zone measured by rainbow indicator were also analyzed.It is proved that the depth measured by phenolphthalein indicator is always smaller than that measured by rainbow indicator, and the half-carbonized zone can only be measured by rainbow indicator. The carbonized and half-carbonized depths of concrete are influenced by the carbonation age, the water to cement ratio of concrete and the relative humidity of environment. It is suggested that the phenolphthalein indicator can be used to measure the carbonized depth of concrete when the strength grade of concrete is below C45, otherwise, the rainbow indicator should be utilized.

  18. The transfer of technology to measure skin burn depth in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here is the use of ultrasonic techniques originally used to locate cracks in metal structues to measure burn wound depth in humans. Acoustic impedance, performance tests, and the theoretical model are discussed. Measurements of skin burns on anesthetized pigs made with the the ultrasonic instrumentation were in agreement with diagnoses made by a physician, and subsequently confirmed by the healing process. Researchers felt that the concept proved useful in a clinical setting and that the instrument and concept were ready to extend to the manufacturer.

  19. Multi-scale crack closure measurements with digital image correlation on Haynes 230

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Beretta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental campaign was developed to study fatigue crack growth in Haynes 230, a Ni-based superalloy. The effects of crack closure were investigated with digital image correlation, by applying two different approaches. Initially, full field regression algorithms were applied to extract the effective stress intensity factor ranges from the singular displacement field measured at crack tips. Local closure measurements were then performed by considering crack flanks relative displacements. Two points virtual extensometers were applied in this phase. Experimental results were then compared to the reference da/dN –ΔKeff curve: it was found that the correct estimation of crack opening levels shifts all the experimental points on the reference curve, showing that DIC can be successfully applied to measure crack closure effects.

  20. Ice berg cracking events as identified from underwater ambient noise measurements in the shallow waters of Ny-Alesund, Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokan, M.; Latha, G.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Raguraman, G.; Venkatesan, R.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the work carried out on the analysis of preliminary underwater ambient noise measurements in the shallow waters of Kongsfjorden fjord, Arctic in the summer season, in which the ice berg cracking noise is identified. In the summer period, the melting of ice cover is fast and hence the ice bergs are free to move and float in the ocean. Underwater ambient noise has been acquired in the Kongsfjorden fjord, Arctic sea on 19th July 2015 at 5 m water depth, where the ocean depth is 50 m. Due to the tensile cracks at the surface of the sea ice by thermal expansion, ice berg calving and bobbing occurred near the experiment site. Analysis of power spectra shows that ice berg calving noise falls in the frequency band 100 Hz-500 Hz and the ice berg bobbing noise falls in the frequency band 200 Hz-400 Hz.

  1. Depth Measurement Based on Infrared Coded Structured Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Depth measurement is a challenging problem in computer vision research. In this study, we first design a new grid pattern and develop a sequence coding and decoding algorithm to process the pattern. Second, we propose a linear fitting algorithm to derive the linear relationship between the object depth and pixel shift. Third, we obtain depth information on an object based on this linear relationship. Moreover, 3D reconstruction is implemented based on Delaunay triangulation algorithm. Finally, we utilize the regularity of the error curves to correct the system errors and improve the measurement accuracy. The experimental results show that the accuracy of depth measurement is related to the step length of moving object.

  2. Outreach program by measurements of frost depth in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Yoshikawa, K.; Iwahana, G.; Stanilovskaya, J. V.; Sawada, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to emphasis their interest for earth sciences, an outreach program through measurements of frost depth is conducting in Japan since 2011. This program is made at elementary, junior high and high schools in Hokkaido, northern part of Japan where seasonal ground freezing occurs in winter. At schools, a lecture was made and a frost tube was set at schoolyard, as the same tube and protocol as UAF's Permafrost Outreach Program, using clear tube with blue-colored water. Frost depth was measured directly once a week at each school by students during ground freezing under no snow-removal condition. In 2011 season, we started this program at three schools, and the number of participated school is extended to 29 schools in 2014 winter season, 23 elementary schools, 5 junior high schools and one high school. We visited schools summer time and just before frost season to talk about the method of measurement. After the end of measured period, we also visited schools to explain measured results by each school and the other schools in Japan, Alaska, Canada and Russia. The measured values of frost depth in Hokkaido were ranged between 0cm and more than 50cm. We found that the frost depth depends on air temperature and snow depth. We discussed with student why the frost depth ranged widely and explained the effect of snow by using the example of igloo. In order to validate the effect of snow and to compare frost depths, we tried to measure frost depths under snow-removal and no snow-removal conditions at one elementary school. At the end of December, depths had no significant difference between these conditions, 11cm and 10cm, and the difference went to 14cm, 27cm and 13cm after one month, with about 30cm of snow depth. After these measurements and lectures, students noticed snow has a role as insulator and affects the frost depth. The network of this program will be expected to expand, finally more than a hundred schools.

  3. Case Depth Measurement of Induction Hardening Using Image Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kitti Pongsathaporn; Pramuk Jenkittiyon; Siriporn Daopiset; Somnuk Watanasriyakul

    2004-01-01

    Case depth measurement of the induction hardened steel parts is necessary for quality control. Vickers microhardness test is the most industrially accepted method to identify the case depth. But this method is a time consuming one and it requires expensive equipment. The aim of this study is to develop a different method to determine the case depth using image processing. The surface hardened steel samples were cross cut, ground and etched with Nital. The etched macrosectioned specimens were scanned by a scanner. The scanned images were evaluated by the developed software. The principle of the software is to identify the gray level difference. The effective case depths of the surface hardened specimens obtained by Vickers microhardness test and the developed method were compared. It was found that the deviation of the developed method was ±0.12 mm at the case depth range of 0.6 - 2.0 mm and ±0.14 mm at the case depth range of 2.1 - 4.3 mm. The measuring time was only 20% of Vickers microhardness test. The deviation range is much lower than the tolerance case depth specification for induction hardening in general.

  4. Depth measurement using structured light and spatial frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shih-Yu; Shih, Hsi-Fu; Chen, Jenq-Shyong

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel design of an optical system for depth measurement, adopting a computer-generated hologram to project a periodic line pattern from which a coaxial triangulation is performed. The spatial periodicity of diffraction images captured in the system is converted to the frequency domain, and the relative depth of the plane of interest is acquired. The experimental results show that the system could achieve resolution in the range of 1 mm over a relative depth range of ∼300-600  mm from the camera. The standard deviations are 0.71 and 0.46 mm for two experiments.

  5. Precise measurement of stellar temperatures using line-depth ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, D.F.; Johanson, H.L. (Western Ontario, University, London (Canada))

    1991-05-01

    The ratio of line depth for two spectral lines is used to determine stellar temperatures with a precision = 10 K = 0.2 percent. For stars between late-F and early-K spectral types, the V I 6251 to Fe I 6253 depth ratio is easy to measure. It is also applicable to other temperature regimes if suitable lines can be found. 14 refs.

  6. Remote Measurement of Shallow Media Depth Using Polarization Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Steven E.

    Active noncontact range measurement sensors transmit electromagnetic radiation onto a remote target and process the received scattered signals to resolve the separation distance, or range, between the sensor and target. For lidar sensors, range is resolved by halving the roundtrip transit time multiplied by the speed of light, accounting for the refractive indices of the transit media. The ranging technique enables remote measurement of depth by resolving the range to sequential surfaces. Depth measurement in the shallow regime has conventionally been limited by the presence of ambiguous, overlapping optical pulses scattered from sequential surfaces. Enhanced performance in the shallow regime has conventionally come at the expense of the increased cost and complexity associated with high performance componentry. The issue of remote shallow depth measurement presents an opportunity for a novel approach to lidar sensor development. In this work, I discuss how the issue of ambiguity in the shallow depth measurement may be addressed by exploiting the polarization orientation of the transmitted and received optical signals, the components of which are modified during the range observation by naturally-occurring phenomena. Conventional pulsed time of flight laser ranging sensors are unable to resolve the shallow depth between overlapping pulses received from sequential surfaces due to operation in the scalar lidar regime, where the intensity of the received scattered signal is measured with no regard for polarization information. Enhanced performance by scalar lidar sensors in the shallow media regime has been conventionally enabled through incorporation of picosecond pulse width lasers and fast photodetectors, along with their associated increase in cost and complexity. The polarization lidar approach to shallow depth measurement developed in the dissertation facilitates the use of common lasers, optics, and detection componentry, making it comparatively less complex

  7. Polarimetric borehole radar measurement near Nojima fault and its application to subsurface crack characterization; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru Nojima danso shuhen no chika kiretsu keisoku jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Miwa, T.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ikeda, R. [National Research Institute for Disaster Prevention, Tsukuba (Japan); Makino, K. [Geophysical Surveying and Consulting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Practical application of subsurface crack characterization by the borehole radar measurement to which the radar polarimetric method was introduced was attempted to measuring objects for which the borehole radar has not been much used, for example, the inside of low loss rock mass or fracture zone where cracks tightly exist. A system was trially manufactured which makes the radar polarimetric measurement possible in the borehole at a 1000m depth and with a about 10cm diameter, and a field experiment was conducted for realizing the subsurface crack characterization near the Nojima fault. For the measuring experiment by the polarimetric borehole radar, used were Iwaya borehole and Hirabayashi borehole drilled in the north of Awaji-shima, Hyogo-ken. In a comparison of both polarization systems of Hirabayashi borehole, reflected waves at depths of 1038m and 1047m are relatively stronger in both polarization systems than those with the same polarization form and at different depths, whereas reflected waves around a 1017m depth are strong only as to the parallel polarization system. Characteristics of the polarization in this experiment indirectly reflect crack structures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Measurement and simulation of crack growth rate and direction under non-proportional loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of fatigue experiments on thin-walled tubes under tension and torsion, the experimental results – crack path and crack growth life – are measured and compared. It is observed that the cracks follow a curvature from a tensile to a shear dominated growth with increasing crack length. The results are enforced by the high amplitudes applied to the specimens causing large cyclic plastic deformations and crack growth rates in the order of 10-3 mm/cycle. The non-linear nature of the cyclic deformation has been taken into account by applying a cyclic plasticity model, and plasticity-induced crack closure is captured by a contact formulation. Already for the uniaxial reference case the current limitations in modelling plasticity induced crack closure – a prerequisite for achieving realistic simulation results – have become obvious. Measurements have shown that friction and roughness induced closure processes come up, especially for non-planar crack surfaces, challenge to be met in the future.

  9. Acoustic harmonic generation measurement applications: Detection of tight cracks in powder metallurgy compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, D. J.; Foley, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Standard linear ultrasonic testing techniques have long been employed for locating and characterizing relatively open cracks in a wide variety of materials, from metallic alloys and ceramics to composites. In all these materials, the detection of open cracks easily accomplished because the void between the two crack surfaces provides sufficient acoustic impedance mismatch to reflect the incident energy. Closed or partially closed cracks, however, may often go undetected because contacting interfaces allow transmission of ultrasound. In the green (unsintered) state, powder metallurgy compacts typically contain high residual stresses that have the ability to close cracks formed during the compaction process, a result of oxide films, improper powder lubricant, mold design, etc. After sintering, the reduction of residual stresses may no longer be sufficient to close the crack. Although the crack may be more easily detected, it is obvious most desirable to discover defects prior to sintering. It has been shown that the displacements of an interface may be highly nonlinear if a stress wave of sufficient intensity propagates across it, a result of the stress wave either opening or closing the interface. Current efforts involve the application of nonlinear acoustic techniques, in particular acoustic harmonic generation measurements, for the detection and characterization of tightly closed cracks in powder metallurgy parts. A description of the equipment and the measurement technique will be discussed and initial experimental results on sintered and green compacts will be presented.—This work was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under USDOE Contract No. W-7405-ENG-82.

  10. Measures of struggle against appearance of cracks in earth dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraeva Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a method calculation of the basic parameters of the transverse rows of pile of simple printed or precast dam. As well, in this article have been shown all the necessary formulas for this calculation and have been proposed solutions to prevent cracking in the dams.

  11. SUPERFUND GROUND WATER ISSUE - ACCURACY OF DEPTH TO WATER MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accuracy of depth to water measurements is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers as they attempt to determine directions of ground-water flow, areas of recharge of discharge, the hydraulic characteristics of aquifers, or the effects of manmade...

  12. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo;

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...

  13. Measurement and Modeling of Hydrogen Environment-Assisted Cracking in Monel K-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Ha, Hung M.; Burns, James T.; Scully, John R.

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen environment-assisted cracking (HEAC) of Monel K-500 is quantified using slow-rising stress intensity loading with electrical potential monitoring of small crack propagation and elastoplastic J-integral analysis. For this loading, with concurrent crack tip plastic strain and H accumulation, aged Monel K-500 is susceptible to intergranular HEAC in NaCl solution when cathodically polarized at -800 mVSCE ( E A, vs saturated calomel) and lower. Intergranular cracking is eliminated by reduced cathodic polarization more positive than -750 mVSCE. Crack tip diffusible H concentration rises, from near 0 wppm at E A of -765 mVSCE, with increasing cathodic polarization. This behavior is quantified by thermal desorption spectroscopy and barnacle cell measurements of hydrogen solubility vs overpotential for planar electrodes, plus measured-local crevice potential, and pH scaled to the crack tip. Using crack tip H concentration, excellent agreement is demonstrated between measurements and decohesion-based model predictions of the E A dependencies of threshold stress intensity and Stage II growth rate. A critical level of cathodic polarization must be exceeded for HEAC to occur in aged Monel K-500. The damaging-cathodic potential regime likely shifts more negative for quasi-static loading or increasing metallurgical resistance to HEAC.

  14. Measuring stress variation with depth using Barkhausen signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypris, O.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis (BNA) is an established technique for the characterization of stress in ferromagnetic materials. An important application is the evaluation of residual stress in aerospace components, where shot-peening is used to strengthen the part by inducing compressive residual stresses on its surface. However, the evaluation of the resulting stress-depth gradients cannot be achieved by conventional BNA methods, where signals are interpreted in the time domain. The immediate alternative of using x-ray diffraction stress analysis is less than ideal, as the use of electropolishing to remove surface layers renders the part useless after inspection. Thus, a need for advancing the current BNA techniques prevails. In this work, it is shown how a parametric model for the frequency spectrum of Barkhausen emissions can be used to detect variations of stress along depth in ferromagnetic materials. Proof of concept is demonstrated by inducing linear stress-depth gradients using four-point bending, and fitting the model to the frequency spectra of measured Barkhausen signals, using a simulated annealing algorithm to extract the model parameters. Validation of our model suggests that in bulk samples the Barkhausen frequency spectrum can be expressed by a multi-exponential function with a dependence on stress and depth. One practical application of this spectroscopy method is the non-destructive evaluation of residual stress-depth profiles in aerospace components, thus helping to prevent catastrophic failures.

  15. Measurements of Sub and Super Harmonic Waves at the Interfaces of Fatigue-Cracked CT Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong Hyun Jo [Wonkwnag University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Barnard, Dan [Iowa State University, Ames (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Nonlinear harmonic waves generated at cracked interfaces are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A compact tension specimen is fabricated and the amplitude of transmitted wave is analyzed as a function of position along the fatigued crack surface. In order to measure as many nonlinear harmonic components as possible a broadband Lithium Niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) transducers are employed together with a calibration technique for making absolute amplitude measurements with fluid-coupled receiving transducers. Cracked interfaces are shown to generate high acoustic nonlinearities which are manifested as harmonics in the power spectrum of the received signal. The first subharmonic (f/2) and the second harmonic (2f) waves are found to be dominant nonlinear components for an incident toneburst signal of frequency f. To explain the observed nonlinear behavior a partially closed crack is modeled by planar half interfaces that can account for crack parameters such as crack opening displacement and crack surface conditions. The simulation results show reasonable agreements with the experimental results

  16. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system. The results of initial base-line field test results of NASA airborne oceanographic lidar in the bathymetry mode are given, with water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat taken at the same time as overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. The nadir-angle tests and field-of-view data are presented; this laser bathymetry system is an improvement over prior models in that (1) the surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using a 30 deg full-angle conical scanner.

  17. On the detectability of transverse cracks in laminated composites using electrical potential change measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2015-03-01

    Real-time health monitoring of structures made of laminated composites is necessary as significant damage may occur without any visible signs on the surface. Inspection by electrical tomography (ET) seems a viable approach that relies on voltage measurements from a network of electrodes across the inspected domain to infer conductivity change within the bulk material. If conductivity decreases significantly with increasing damage, the obtained conductivity map can be correlated to the degradation state of the material. We focus here on detection of transverse cracks. As transverse cracks modify the in-plane transverse conductivity of a single ply, we expect them to be detectable by electrical measurements. Yet, the quality of detection is directly related to the sensitivity of the measurements to the presence of cracks. We use numerical experiments to demonstrate that the sensitivity depends on several material and geometrical parameters. Based on the results, the applicability of ET to detect transverse cracks is discussed. One conclusion from the study is that detecting transverse cracks using ET is more reliable in some laminate configurations than in others. Recommendations about the properties of either the pristine material or the inspected structures are provided to establish if ET is reliable in detecting transverse cracks.

  18. Handheld White Light Interferometer for Measuring Defect Depth in Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Simmons, Stephen; Cox, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of defects (scratches and impacts) is vital to the certification of flight hardware and other critical components. The amount of damage to a particular component contributes to the performance, reliability, and safety of a system, which ultimately affects the success or failure of a mission or test. The launch-commit criteria on a Space Shuttle Orbiter window are governed by the depth of the defects that are identified by a visual inspection. This measurement of a defect is not easy to obtain given the environment, size of the defect, and location of the window(s). The determination of depth has typically been performed by taking a mold impression and measuring the impression with an optical profiling instrument. Another method of obtaining an estimate of the depth is by using a refocus microscope. To use a refocus microscope, the surface of the glass and bottom of the defect are, in turn, brought into focus by the operator. The amount of movement between the two points corresponds to the depth of the defect. The refocus microscope requires a skilled operator and has been proven to be unreliable when used on Orbiter windows. White light interferometry was chosen as a candidate to replace the refocus microscope. The White Light Interferometer (WLI) was developed to replace the refocus microscope as the instrument used for measuring the depth of defects in Orbiter windows. The WLI consists of a broadband illumination source, interferometer, detector, motion control, displacement sensor, mechanical housing, and support electronics. The illumination source for the WLI is typically a visible light emitting diode (LED) or a near-infrared superluminescent diode (SLD) with power levels of less than a milliwatt. The interferometer is a Michelson configuration consisting of a 1-in. (2.5-cm) cube beam splitter, a 0.5-in. (1.3-cm) optical window as a movable leg (used to closely match the return intensity of the fixed leg from the window), and a

  19. Controlling fatigue crack paths for crack surface marking and growth investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is well known that fatigue crack growth in metals that display confined slip, such as high strength aluminium alloys, develop crack paths that are responsive to the loading direction and the local microstructural orientation, it is less well known that such paths are also responsive to the loading history. In these materials, certain loading sequences can produce highly directional slip bands ahead of the crack tip and by adjusting the sequence of loads, distinct fracture surface features or progression marks, even at very small crack depths can result. Investigating the path a crack selects in fatigue testing when particular combinations of constant and variable amplitude load sequences are applied is providing insight into crack growth. Further, it is possible to design load sequences that allow very small amounts of crack growth to be measured, at very small crack sizes, well below the conventional crack growth threshold in the aluminium alloy discussed here. This paper reports on observations of the crack path phenomenon and a novel test loading method for measuring crack growth rates for very small crack depths in aluminium alloy 7050-T7451 (an important aircraft primary structural material. The aim of this work was to firstly generate short- crack constant amplitude growth data and secondly, through the careful manipulation of the applied loading, to achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in the material being investigated. A particular focus of this work is the identification of the possible sources of crack growth retardation and closure in these small cracks. Interpreting these results suggests a possible mechanism for why small fatigue crack growth through this material under variable amplitude loading is faster than predicted from models based on constant amplitude data alone.

  20. Effects of Carbon Depth Profile on INS Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielopolski, L.

    2007-12-01

    Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) is a new system for measuring carbon in soil in situ that is non-destructive. In addition the INS can be used in stationary or scanning modes of operation enabling type of measurements not possible till now. It is based on counting 4.44 MeV characteristic gamma rays emitted from carbon nuclei undergoing inelastic neutron scattering with fast, 14 MeV, neutrons. Because of the attenuation of the neutrons, on their way in, and of the gamma rays, on their way out, the large volume of about 0.3 m3 sampled by the INS system causes it to respond preferentially to carbon atoms located near the surface. Thus, the carbon signal depends on the variations in the carbon depth profile; however, this dependence is reduced by an averaging process resulting from the large footprint of about 1 m2 of the INS system. The encountered variability in the depth profiles on small 30 cm scale and on large field size scale is presented for various fields. We also show results of Monte Carlo simulations of the INS response to various carbon depth profiles. Experimentally we show that depending on the field conditions, i.e. profound variability in the carbon depth profile or extensive changes in the carbon distribution in the field, the scanning results with the INS system may differ from the mean value calculated from few INS discrete stationary measurements. Since the static measurements are analogous to conventional chemical analysis using soil cores, it raises the question which type of measurement is more representative of the field carbon content; the discrete chemical analysis using geostatistical considerations or continuous field scanning made possible with the INS system. Clearly the new INS methodology introduces novel capabilities for soil carbon analysis not possible with the conventional approach of dry combustion. The advantages and pitfalls of the INS system with the need to defining practical new calibration concepts for it are discussed in

  1. Center crack detection during continuous casting of aluminum by laser ultrasonic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Hubert; Mitter, Thomas; Roither, Jürgen; Betz, Andreas; Bozorgi, Salar; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Crack detection during continuous direct chill casting of aluminum is a matter of economics. Determining cracks during production process saves money, energy and raw material. Of course, a non-destructive method is required for this evaluation. Because of temperature concerns conventional ultrasound is not applicable. One non-contact alternative is laser ultrasonics. In laser ultrasonics short laser pulses illuminate the sample. The electromagnetic energy gets absorbed at the surface of the sample and results in local heating followed by expansion. Thereby broadband ultrasonic waves are launched which propagate through the sample and get back reflected or scattered at interfaces (cracks, blowholes,…) like conventional ultrasonic waves. Therefore laser ultrasonics is an alternative thermal infrared technology. By using an interferometer also the detection of the ultrasonic waves at the sample surface is done in a remote manner. During preliminary examinations in the lab by scanning different aluminum studs it was able to distinguish between studs with and without cracks. The prediction of the dimension of the crack by evaluation of the damping of the broadband ultrasonic waves was possible. With simple image reconstruction methods one can localize the crack and give an estimation of its extent and even its shape. Subsequent first measurements using this laser ultrasonic setup during the continuous casting of aluminum were carried out and showed the proof of principle in an industrial environment with elevated temperatures, dust, cooling water and vibrations.

  2. Agreement between anatomic and ultrasound measurements of femoral trochlear depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Westrup, Ulrik; Eriksen, Thomas

    over the five regions examined. Measurement reliability for the ultrasonographic examinations was markedly less that for the skyline views (repeatability coefficient of 0.5mm vs 0.25mm), but still adequate for clinical use. A likely reason is the relative amount of detail recorded in the respective...... and ultrasonographic measurements of trochlear depth using the red fox hind limb as a canine surrogate, dividing the trochlea into five regions from the origin of the caudal cruciate ligament to the proximal aspect of the trochlea. We found reasonable agreement between anatomic and ultrasonographic measurements...... as assessed by Bland-Altman difference charting and limits of agreement (approximately ±0.7mm). Differences may be accounted for by ultrasound probe positioning errors, which should be taken into consideration during clinical investigations. Skyline views were difficult to standardise to a distinct position...

  3. Crack detection in a beam with an arbitrary number of transverse cracks using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaji, N. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrjoo, M. [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a crack detection approach is presented for detecting depth and location of cracks in beam-like structures. For this purpose, a new beam element with an arbitrary number of embedded transverse edge cracks, in arbitrary positions of beam element with any depth, is derived. The components of the stiffness matrix for the cracked element are computed using the conjugate beam concept and Betti's theorem, and finally represented in closed-form expressions. The proposed beam element is efficiently employed for solving forward problem (i.e., to gain precise natural frequencies and mode shapes of the beam knowing the cracks' characteristics). To validate the proposed element, results obtained by new element are compared with two-dimensional (2D) finite element results and available experimental measurements. Moreover, by knowing the natural frequencies and mode shapes, an inverse problem is established in which the location and depth of cracks are determined. In the inverse approach, an optimization problem based on the new finite element and genetic algorithms (GAs) is solved to search the solution. It is shown that the present algorithm is able to identify various crack configurations in a cracked beam. The proposed approach is verified through a cracked beam containing various cracks with different depths.

  4. Embedded optical fiber Bragg grating sensors for the measurement of crack-bridging forces in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Michel; Peters, Kara J.; Botsis, John

    2002-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composites offer increased resistance to fracture as compared to isotropic materials. In addition, they have demonstrated great potential to support embedded sensor systems. However, to develop a truly reliable, embedded sensor for composites, the failure modes of such materials, including the influence of the embedded fiber sensor, must be known. Crack bridging by intact fibers is considered to be one of the most efficient mechanisms to slow down transverse crack propagation in a fiber reinforced composite. This paper presents non-invasive, direct measurements of bridging fiber stresses in a model epoxy/glass composite, using long gage length optical fiber Bragg gratings. Several central crack specimens, containing artificially bridged cracks, were fabricated and tested. The Bragg grating gage length of 12 mm permitted measurement of the force distribution in the reinforcing fiber extending from the crack surface to the far field region. A T-matrix simulation was used to model the grating response. Results from specimens involving both a strong and mixed interface are presented. The measured strain distribution in the bridging fibers compared well with previous analytical models. Discussion of the application of these results to structurally embedded sensors for damage detection is also presented.

  5. Ocular microtremor: a tool for measuring depth of anaesthesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanic, S; Simpson, T; Bolger, C

    2001-04-01

    Ocular microtremor (OMT) is a fine high frequency tremor of the eyes caused by extra-ocular muscle activity stimulated by impulses emanating in the brain stem. Several studies have shown that the frequency of this tremor is reduced in patients whose consciousness is reduced by anaesthesia or head injury. Therefore, OMT may possibly be used to determine depth of anaesthesia. Twenty-two unpre-medicated subjects undergoing surgery with general anaesthesia were studied. OMT activity was measured at admission using the open eye piezoelectric strain gauge technique. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol using a target controlled infusion delivery system (Diprifusor). OMT activity was then recorded at predicted plasma propofol concentrations of 1, 2, 3 and 5 microg ml(-1). The patient's level of consciousness (response to command or stimulation) was assessed after each OMT measurement. OMT activity was reduced progressively at predicted plasma concentrations of propofol of I and 2 microg ml(-1) and then plateaued between 3 and 5 microg ml(-1). There was a significant difference between the last awake OMT recording and the first recording at loss of consciousness (P < 0.001). OMT recording holds promise as a practical indicator of the depth of anaesthesia.

  6. A passive quantitative measurement of airway resistance using depth data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Bulach, Christoph; Ku, David N; Anderson, Larry J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. RSV often causes increased airway resistance, clinically detected as wheezing by chest auscultation. In this disease, expiratory flows are significantly reduced due to the high resistance in patient's airway passages. A quantitative method for measuring resistance can have a great benefit to diagnosis and management of children with RSV infections as well as with other lung diseases. Airway resistance is defined as the lung pressure divided by the airflow. In this paper, we propose a method to quantify resistance through a simple, non-contact measurement of chest volume that can act as a surrogate measure of the lung pressure and volumetric airflow. We used depth data collected by a Microsoft Kinect camera for the measurement of the lung volume over time. In our experimentation, breathing through a number of plastic straws induced different airway resistances. For a standard spirometry test, our volume/flow estimation using Kinect showed strong correlation with the flow data collected by a commercially-available spirometer (five subjects, each performing 20 breathing trials, correlation coefficient = 0.88, with 95% confidence interval). As the number of straws decreased, emulating a higher airway obstruction, our algorithm was sufficient to distinguish between several levels of airway resistance.

  7. A method to generate conformal finite-element meshes from 3D measurements of microstructurally small fatigue-crack propagation: 3D Meshes of Microstructurally Small Crack Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, A. D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City UT USA; Hochhalter, J. D. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA USA; Cerrone, A. R. [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna NY USA; Li, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA USA; Lind, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA USA; Suter, R. M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA USA; Ingraffea, A. R. [School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca NY USA

    2016-04-27

    In an effort to reproduce computationally the observed evolution of microstructurally small fatigue cracks (MSFCs), a method is presented for generating conformal, finite-element (FE), volume meshes from 3D measurements of MSFC propagation. The resulting volume meshes contain traction-free surfaces that conform to incrementally measured 3D crack shapes. Grain morphologies measured using near-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy are also represented within the FE volume meshes. Proof-of-concept simulations are performed to demonstrate the utility of the mesh-generation method. The proof-of-concept simulations employ a crystal-plasticity constitutive model and are performed using the conformal FE meshes corresponding to successive crack-growth increments. Although the simulations for each crack increment are currently independent of one another, they need not be, and transfer of material-state information among successive crack-increment meshes is discussed. The mesh-generation method was developed using post-mortem measurements, yet it is general enough that it can be applied to in-situ measurements of 3D MSFC propagation.

  8. Contraction stresses in dental composites adjacent to and at the bonded interface as measured by crack analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Nishide, Akihito; Swain, Michael V; Ferracane, Jack L; Sakaguchi, Ronald L; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses produced by polymerization contraction in regions surrounding a dental resin composite restoration. Initial cracks were made with a Vickers indenter at various distances from the edge of a cylindrical hole in a soda-lime glass disk. Indentation crack lengths were measured parallel to tangents to the hole edge. Resin composites (three brands) were placed in the hole and polymerized (two light irradiation protocols) at equal radiation exposures. The crack lengths were re-measured at 2 and 10 min after irradiation. Radial tensile stresses due to polymerization contraction at the location of the cracks (σ(crack)) were calculated from the incremental crack lengths and the fracture toughness K(c) of the glass. Contraction stresses at the composite-glass bonded interface (σ(interface)) were calculated from σ(crack) on the basis of the simple mechanics of an internally pressurized thick-walled cylinder. The greater the distance or the shorter the time following polymerization, the smaller was σ(crack). Distance, material, irradiation protocol and time significantly affected σ(crack). Two-step irradiation resulted in a significant reduction in the magnitude of σ(interface) for all resin composites. The contraction stress in soda-lime glass propagated indentation cracks at various distances from the cavity, enabling calculation of the contraction stresses.

  9. A new methodology for non-contact accurate crack width measurement through photogrammetry for automated structural safety evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, Mohammad R.; Masri, Sami F.

    2013-03-01

    In mechanical, aerospace and civil structures, cracks are important defects that can cause catastrophes if neglected. Visual inspection is currently the predominant method for crack assessment. This approach is tedious, labor-intensive, subjective and highly qualitative. An inexpensive alternative to current monitoring methods is to use a robotic system that could perform autonomous crack detection and quantification. To reach this goal, several image-based crack detection approaches have been developed; however, the crack thickness quantification, which is an essential element for a reliable structural condition assessment, has not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper, a new contact-less crack quantification methodology, based on computer vision and image processing concepts, is introduced and evaluated against a crack quantification approach which was previously developed by the authors. The proposed approach in this study utilizes depth perception to quantify crack thickness and, as opposed to most previous studies, needs no scale attachment to the region under inspection, which makes this approach ideal for incorporation with autonomous or semi-autonomous mobile inspection systems. Validation tests are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, and the results show that the new proposed approach outperforms the previously developed one.

  10. Intercomparison of desert dust optical depth from satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carboni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work provides a comparison of satellite retrievals of Saharan desert dust aerosol optical depth (AOD during a strong dust event through March 2006. In this event, a large dust plume was transported over desert, vegetated, and ocean surfaces. The aim is to identify the differences between current datasets. The satellite instruments considered are AATSR, AIRS, MERIS, MISR, MODIS, OMI, POLDER, and SEVIRI. An interesting aspect is that the different algorithms make use of different instrument characteristics to obtain retrievals over bright surfaces. These include multi-angle approaches (MISR, AATSR, polarisation measurements (POLDER, single-view approaches using solar wavelengths (OMI, MODIS, and the thermal infrared spectral region (SEVIRI, AIRS. Differences between instruments, together with the comparison of different retrieval algorithms applied to measurements from the same instrument, provide a unique insight into the performance and characteristics of the various techniques employed. As well as the intercomparison between different satellite products, the AODs have also been compared to co-located AERONET data. Despite the fact that the agreement between satellite and AERONET AODs is reasonably good for all of the datasets, there are significant differences between them when compared to each other, especially over land. These differences are partially due to differences in the algorithms, such as assumptions about aerosol model and surface properties. However, in this comparison of spatially and temporally averaged data, it is important to note that differences in sampling, related to the actual footprint of each instrument on the heterogeneous aerosol field, cloud identification and the quality control flags of each dataset can be an important issue.

  11. Static and cyclic pullout behavior of cast-in-place headed and bonded anchors with large embedment depths in cracked concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delhomme, F., E-mail: fabien.delhomme@insa-lyon.fr [University of Lyon, INSA-Lyon, LGCIE, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Roure, T.; Arrieta, B. [EDF SEPTEN Compagny, Civil Engineering, Villeurbanne (France); Limam, A. [University of Lyon, INSA-Lyon, LGCIE, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Optimizing the design and identifying margin of the headed fasteners used in French nuclear power plants. • Static and cyclic pullout tests on cast in place anchorage composed of an anchor plate welded to four headed or bonded rods. • Experimental data base on tests on anchor plates. • Anchor with large embedment depths in cracked concrete. • Edge effects. - Abstract: The equipment of French nuclear power plants is fixed on reinforced concrete structures with base plate with headed fasteners. EDF decided to carry out an experimental research program in partnership with LGCIE in order to optimize the design of the headed fasteners and identify margin. This article introduces the results of pullout tests on anchors with large embedment cast in place in a reinforced concrete block. The anchorage are composed of an anchor plate welded to four ribbed bars or headed smooth studs. The studied parameters are: the type of loading (static or cyclic), the edge distance, the state of cracking of the concrete block. The anchors with headed rods or ribbed bars have a steel rod failure mode in agreement with their initial design. However, an optimization of the size on the headed anchors seems to be expected in order to improve their installation. This experimental campaign will provide a data base enabling the development of numerical models in order to improve the design.

  12. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Maria J; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-07-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed.

  13. NEW METHOD FOR MEASURING RANDOM THRESHOLDS F LONG FATIGUE CRACK PROPAGATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong-xiang; YANG Bing; LIANG Hong-qin; WU Ping-bo; ZENG Jing

    2005-01-01

    A so-called "local probabilistic Paris relation method" was presented for measuring the random thresholds of long fatigue crack propagation. A check was made to the conventional method, in which the thresholds were measured statistically and directly by the test data. It was revealed that this method was not reasonable because the test data have seldom a unified level of crack growth rates. Differently,in the presented method the Paris-Erdogan equation was applied to model the local test data around the thresholds. Local probabilistic relations with both the survival probability and the confidence were established on a lognormal distribution of the stress density factors.And then, the probabilistic thresholds were derived from the probabilistic factors with a given critical level of growth rate. An analysis on the test data of LZ50 axle steel for the Chinese railway vehicles verifies that the present method is feasible and available.

  14. On the detectability of transverse cracks in laminated composites through measurements of electrical potential change

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2015-01-07

    For structures made of laminated composites, real-time structural health monitoring is necessary as significant damage may occur without any visible signs on the surface. Inspection by electrical tomography seems a viable approach as the technique relies on voltage measurements from a network of electrodes over the boundary of the inspected domain to infer the change in conductivity within the bulk material. The change in conductivity, if significant, can be correlated to the degradation state of the material, allowing damage detection. We focus here on the detection of the transverse cracking mechanism which modifies the in-plane transverse conductivity of ply. The quality of detection is directly related to the sensitivity of the voltage measurements with respect to the presence of cracks. We demonstrate here from numerical experiments that the sensitivity depends on several parameters, such as the anisotropy in the electrical conductivity of the baseline composite ply or the geometricalparameters of the structure. Based on these results, applicability of electrical tomography to detect transverse cracks in a laminate is discussed.

  15. Analysis of Current Status of Steam Cracking Feed Production and Measures for Maximization of Steam Cracking Feed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In recent years China has seen speedy development of its ethylene industry. Compared to other advanced countries the per capita ethylene consumption in China is still low. With successive startup of grassroots ethylene projects in China after 2006 and debottlenecking and expansion of existing ethylene units China will be confronted with the major issues related with increase of feedstocks for steam cracking. Naphtha is the main feedstock for producing ethylene, and the hydrocracked tail oil is increasing its share in the steam cracker feedstock pool over recent years. This article has analyzed the possibility for maximization of steam cracking feedstock and estimated steam cracker feedstock output based on processing 5 Mt/a of different crudes including the mixed crude transferred through Lu-Ning pipeline and Arabian light crude using corresponding process technologies at the refinery.

  16. Measurement depth enhancement in terahertz imaging of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Jae; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jeong, Kiyoung; Park, Yeonji; Huh, Yong-Min; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2013-09-09

    We demonstrate the use of a THz penetration-enhancing agent (THz-PEA) to enhance the terahertz (THz) wave penetration depth in tissues. The THz-PEA is a biocompatible material having absorption lower than that of water, and it is easily absorbed into tissues. When using glycerol as a THz-PEA, the peak value of the THz signal which was transmitted through the fresh tissue and reflected by a metal target, was almost doubled compared to that of tissue without glycerol. THz time-of-flight imaging (B-scan) was used to display the sequential glycerol delivery images. Enhancement of the penetration depth was confirmed after an artificial tumor was located below fresh skin. We thus concluded that the THz-PEA technique can potentially be employed to enhance the image contrast of the abnormal lesions below the skin.

  17. Reduced surface wave transmission function and neural networks for crack evaluation of concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung Woo; Yun, Chung Bang; Furuta, Hitoshi; Popovics, John S.

    2007-04-01

    Determination of crack depth in field using the self-calibrating surface wave transmission measurement and the cutting frequency in the transmission function (TRF) is very difficult due to variations of the measurement conditions. In this study, it is proposed to use the measured full TRF as a feature for crack depth assessment. A principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to generate a basis of the measured TRFs for various crack cases. The measured TRFs are represented by their projections onto the most significant principal components. Then artificial neural network (ANN) using the PCA-compressed TRFs is applied to assess the crack in concrete. Experimental study is carried out for five different crack cases to investigate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results reveal that the proposed method can be effectively used for the crack depth assessment of concrete structures.

  18. Influence of Additives on the Formation of Electrode posits in the Concrete Cracks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Hongqiang; WANG Peiming

    2011-01-01

    The electrodeposition method for rehabilitation of the cracked reinforced concrete,based on the electrochemical technique, was presented here. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of additive on the formation of electrodeposits in the concrete cracks. Cracked mortar specimens of size 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm were immersed in electrolyte solufions(ZnSO4, MgSO4),and a constant current was applied between the reinforced steel and the external electrode for 15 days.Rate of surface coating, rate of crack closure and rate of crack filling depth were measured and the appearance of eleetrodeposits in the cracks was observed. The experimental results demonstrate that,under the experimental conditions, rate of surface coating and crack filling depth increase, while rate of crack closure decreases as the percengtage of additive increases. In addition, the electrodeposits become more denser and the microstructure varies with additive content, while the compositions of electrodeposits do not change.

  19. Analysis of Hardened Depth Variability, Process Potential, and Measurement Error in Case Carburized Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Olga K.; Keil, Gary D.; Clements, Tom E.

    2014-12-01

    Hardened depth (effective case depth) measurement is one of the most commonly used methods for carburizing performance evaluation. Variation in direct hardened depth measurements is routinely assumed to represent the heat treat process variation without properly correcting for the large uncertainty frequently observed in industrial laboratory measurements. These measurement uncertainties may also invalidate application of statistical control requirements on hardened depth. Gage R&R studies were conducted at three different laboratories on shallow and deep case carburized components. The primary objectives were to understand the magnitude of the measurement uncertainty and heat treat process variability, and to evaluate practical applicability of statistical control methods to metallurgical quality assessment. It was found that ~75% of the overall hardened depth variation is attributed to the measurement error resulting from the accuracy limitation of microhardness equipment and the linear interpolation technique. The measurement error was found to be proportional to the hardened depth magnitude and may reach ~0.2 mm uncertainty at 1.3 mm nominal depth and ~0.8 mm uncertainty at 3.2mm depth. A case study was discussed to explain a methodology for analyzing a large body of hardened depth information, determination of the measurement error, and calculation of the true heat treat process variation.

  20. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  1. Cracks Detection Using Active Modal Damping and Piezoelectric Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Chomette

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a system and its safety can be considerably affected by the presence of cracks. Health monitoring strategies attract so a great deal of interest from industry. Cracks detection methods based on modal parameters variation are particularly efficient in the case of large cracks but are difficult to implement in the case of small cracks due to measurement difficulties in the case of small parameters variation. Therefore the present study proposes a new method to detect small cracks based on active modal damping and piezoelectric components. This method uses the active damping variation identificated with the Rational Fraction Polynomial algorithm as an indicator of cracks detection. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical simulations corresponding to different crack depth and locations in the case of a finite element model of a clamped-clamped beam including four piezoelectric transducers.

  2. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Toledo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds. In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10−3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  3. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  4. Small-crack test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  5. Mystery Shopping: In-depth measurement of customer satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hesselink; A. van der Wiele (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper will discuss the phenomenon Mystery Shopping in the field of customer satisfaction measurement techniques. By using the literature about Mystery Shopping definitions and restrictions of this instrument will be presented. Also, possible ways to present and use the gathered data

  6. Mystery Shopping: In-depth measurement of customer satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hesselink; A. van der Wiele (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper will discuss the phenomenon Mystery Shopping in the field of customer satisfaction measurement techniques. By using the literature about Mystery Shopping definitions and restrictions of this instrument will be presented. Also, possible ways to present and use the gathered data

  7. Measurements of Epidural Space Depth Using Preexisting CT Scans Correlate with Loss of Resistance Depth during Thoracic Epidural Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel H. Greene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thoracic epidural catheters provide the best quality postoperative pain relief for major abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures, but placement is one of the most challenging procedures in the repertoire of an anesthesiologist. Most patients presenting for a procedure that would benefit from a thoracic epidural catheter have already had high resolution imaging that may be useful to assist placement of a catheter. Methods. This retrospective study used data from 168 patients to examine the association and predictive power of epidural-skin distance (ESD on computed tomography (CT to determine loss of resistance depth acquired during epidural placement. Additionally, the ability of anesthesiologists to measure this distance was compared to a radiologist, who specializes in spine imaging. Results. There was a strong association between CT measurement and loss of resistance depth (P35 changed this relationship (P=0.007. The ability of anesthesiologists to make CT measurements was similar to a gold standard radiologist (all individual ICCs>0.9. Conclusions. Overall, this study supports the examination of a recent CT scan to aid in the placement of a thoracic epidural catheter. Making use of these scans may lead to faster epidural placements, fewer accidental dural punctures, and better epidural blockade.

  8. Mystery Shopping: In-depth measurement of customer satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hesselink, M.; Wiele, Ton

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper will discuss the phenomenon Mystery Shopping in the field of customer satisfaction measurement techniques. By using the literature about Mystery Shopping definitions and restrictions of this instrument will be presented. Also, possible ways to present and use the gathered data will be shown. After the literature part of the paper some practical research will be presented. A Dutch Flexcompany introduced the instrument Mystery Shopping in addition to the already used meas...

  9. Estimation of subsurface-fracture orientation with the three-component crack-wave measurement; Kiretsuha sanjiku keisoku ni yoru chika kiretsumen no hoko suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, K.; Sato, K. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan); Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports experiments carried out to estimate subsurface-fracture orientation with the three-component crack-wave measurement. The experiments were performed by using existing subsurface cracks and two wells in the experimental field. An air gun as a sound source was installed directly above a subsurface crack intersection in one of the wells, and a three-component elastic wave detector was fixed in the vicinity of a subsurface crack intersection in the other well. Crack waves from the sound source were measured in a frequency bandwidth from 150 to 300 Hz. A coherence matrix was constituted relative to triaxial components of vibration in the crack waves; a coherent vector was sought that corresponds to a maximum coherent value of the matrix; and the direction of the longer axis in an ellipse (the direction being perpendicular to the crack face) was approximated in particle motions of the crack waves by using the vector. The normal line direction of the crack face estimated by using the above method was found to agree nearly well with the direction of the minimum crust compression stress measured in the normal line direction of the crack face existed in core samples collected from the wells, and measured at nearly the same position as the subsurface crack. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  10. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, A.Y.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  11. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Alec Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  12. Depth profile of In and As in Si measured by RBS with He and C ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q.; Fang, Z. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1993-12-31

    The depth profile of As and In implanted into Si have been measured by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) with 2 MeV He ions and 6 MeV C ions. Advantages of enhanced depth and mass resolution with C ions have been demonstrated over the conventional He RBS. More reliable information for the depth profile of In and As in Si has been obtained. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  14. Standard test method for measurement of creep crack growth times in metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep crack growth (CCG) in metals at elevated temperatures using pre-cracked specimens subjected to static or quasi-static loading conditions. The time (CCI), t0.2 to an initial crack extension δai = 0.2 mm from the onset of first applied force and creep crack growth rate, ˙a or da/dt is expressed in terms of the magnitude of creep crack growth relating parameters, C* or K. With C* defined as the steady state determination of the crack tip stresses derived in principal from C*(t) and Ct (1-14). The crack growth derived in this manner is identified as a material property which can be used in modeling and life assessment methods (15-25). 1.1.1 The choice of the crack growth correlating parameter C*, C*(t), Ct, or K depends on the material creep properties, geometry and size of the specimen. Two types of material behavior are generally observed during creep crack growth tests; creep-ductile (1-14) and creep-brittle (26-37). In creep ductile materials, where cr...

  15. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  16. Results of the Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the opening load in fatigue crack growth tests was conducted on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. The Round Robin evaluated the current level of consistency of opening load measurements among laboratories and to identify causes for observed inconsistency. Eleven laboratories participated in the testing of compact and middle-crack specimens. Opening-load measurements were made for crack growth at two stress-intensity factor levels, three crack lengths, and following an overload. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimen compliance data. When all of the results reported (from all participants, all measurement methods, and all data analysis methods) for a given test condition were pooled, the range of opening loads was very large--typically spanning the lower half of the fatigue loading cycle. Part of the large scatter in the reported opening-load results was ascribed to consistent differences in results produced by the various methods used to measure specimen compliance and to evaluate the opening load from the compliance data. Another significant portion of the scatter was ascribed to lab-to-lab differences in producing the compliance data when using nominally the same method of measurement.

  17. Measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shusen Xie(谢树森); Hui Li(李晖); Buhong Li(李步洪)

    2003-01-01

    Experimental techniques for measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue are presented, respectively. Optical penetration depth can be obtained from the measurement of the relative fluence-depth distribution inside the target tissue. The depth of normal and carcinomatous human lung tissues irradiated with the wavelengths of 406.7, 632.8 and 674.4 nm in vitro are respectively determined. In addition, a novel simple method based on total internal reflection for measuring the refractive index of biotissue in vivo is developed, and the refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color are measured. Their refractive indices are almost same and the average is 1.533.

  18. Measuring perceived depth in natural images and study of its relation with monocular and binocular depth cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Pierre; Raake, Alexander; Barkowsky, Marcus; Le Callet, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The perception of depth in images and video sequences is based on different depth cues. Studies have considered depth perception threshold as a function of viewing distance (Cutting and Vishton, 1995), the combination of different monocular depth cues and their quantitative relation with binocular depth cues and their different possible type of interactions (Landy, l995). But these studies only consider artificial stimuli and none of them attempts to provide a quantitative contribution of monocular and binocular depth cues compared to each other in the specific context of natural images. This study targets this particular application case. The evaluation of the strength of different depth cues compared to each other using a carefully designed image database to cover as much as possible different combinations of monocular (linear perspective, texture gradient, relative size and defocus blur) and binocular depth cues. The 200 images were evaluated in two distinct subjective experiments to evaluate separately perceived depth and different monocular depth cues. The methodology and the description of the definition of the different scales will be detailed. The image database (DC3Dimg) is also released for the scientific community.

  19. Opto-thermal Moisture Content and Moisture Depth Profile Measurements in Organic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Peng; GUO Xin-xin; CUI Ying-xin; Robert E. Imhof; Dane Bicanic

    2004-01-01

    Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry(OTTER) is a infrared remote sensing technique, which has been successfully used in in vivo skin moisture content and skin moisture depth profiling measurements. In present paper, we extend this moisture content measurement capability to analyze the moisture content of fruit (tomato, grape, etc. ) skins, and to study the relationship between fruits ripening process and their surface moisture and moisture depth profiles.

  20. Acoustic determination of cracks in welded joints. [by resonant structural vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltanoiu, M.; Criciotoiu, E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic analysis method permits detection of any cracks that might take place and their manner of propagation. The study deals with the cracks produced in experiments to determine the welding technology for a welded gray cast iron workpiece by using piezoelectric transducers to determine vibration acceleration.

  1. Results of the second Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on crack closure measurement and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    A second experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the crack opening load in fatigue crack growth tests has been completed by the ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. Fourteen laboratories participated in the testing of aluminum alloy compact tension specimens. Opening-load measurements were made at three crack lengths during constant Delta K, constant stress ratio tests by most of the participants. Four participants made opening-load measurements during threshold tests. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimens compliance behavior, where the displacement/strain was measured either at the crack mouth or the mid-height back face location. The Round Robin data were analyzed for opening load using two non-subjective analysis methods: the compliance offset and the correlation coefficient methods. The scatter in the opening load results was significantly reduced when some of the results were excluded from the analysis population based on an accept/reject criterion for raw data quality. The compliance offset and correlation coefficient opening load analysis methods produced similar results for data populations that had been screened to eliminate poor quality data.

  2. Precision depth measurement of through silicon vias (TSVs) on 3D semiconductor packaging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jonghan; Kim, Jae Wan; Kang, Chu-Shik; Kim, Jong-Ahn; Lee, Sunghun

    2012-02-27

    We have proposed and demonstrated a novel method to measure depths of through silicon vias (TSVs) at high speed. TSVs are fine and deep holes fabricated in silicon wafers for 3D semiconductors; they are used for electrical connections between vertically stacked wafers. Because the high-aspect ratio hole of the TSV makes it difficult for light to reach the bottom surface, conventional optical methods using visible lights cannot determine the depth value. By adopting an optical comb of a femtosecond pulse laser in the infra-red range as a light source, the depths of TSVs having aspect ratio of about 7 were measured. This measurement was done at high speed based on spectral resolved interferometry. The proposed method is expected to be an alternative method for depth inspection of TSVs.

  3. Direct measurement procedure for three-dimensional local crack driving force using synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, H. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: toda@pse.tut.ac.jp; Yamamoto, S.; Kobayashi, M. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Uesugi, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1, Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Zhang, H. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    X-ray microtomography has been utilized for the observation of ductile fractures in an aluminum alloy with an Al/Al-Si dual phase structure. A procedure for analyzing a series of tomographic images is proposed for extracting the variation in the local crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD), and its feasibility is confirmed. Complicated crack growth behavior and the formation of uncracked ligaments ahead of a crack tip are observed in the alloy owing to the marked difference in local fracture toughness between the two phases. The proposed technique has provided a quantitative interpretation for such phenomena. It is clarified that a conventional measurement significantly overestimates the CTOD level. The transition behavior in CTOD has been revealed over a certain distance across an interface between the two phases, suggesting the existence of scaling effects that influence the microstructure/fracture relationship. Overall the current method could offer a highly effective way of assessing three-dimensional local fracture behavior.

  4. Automated sulcal depth measurement on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk Jin Yun

    Full Text Available Sulcal depth that is one of the quantitative measures of cerebral cortex has been widely used as an important marker for brain morphological studies. Several studies have employed Euclidean (EUD or geodesic (GED algorithms to measure sulcal depth, which have limitations that ignore sulcal geometry in highly convoluted regions and result in under or overestimated depth. In this study, we proposed an automated measurement for sulcal depth on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci, which named the adaptive distance transform (ADT. We first defined the volume region of cerebrospinal fluid between the 3D convex hull and the cortical surface, and constructed local coordinates for that restricted region. Dijkstra's algorithm was then used to compute the shortest paths from the convex hull to the vertices of the cortical surface based on the local coordinates, which may be the most proper approach for defining sulcal depth. We applied our algorithm to both a clinical dataset including patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD and 25 normal controls and a simulated dataset whose shape was similar to a single sulcus. The mean sulcal depth in the mild AD group was significantly lower than controls (p = 0.007, normal [mean±SD]: 7.29±0.23 mm, AD: 7.11±0.29 and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was relatively high, showing the value of 0.818. Results from clinical dataset that were consistent with former studies using EUD or GED demonstrated that ADT was sensitive to cortical atrophy. The robustness against inter-individual variability of ADT was highlighted through simulation dataset. ADT showed a low and constant normalized difference between the depth of the simulated data and the calculated depth, whereas EUD and GED had high and variable differences. We suggest that ADT is more robust than EUD or GED and might be a useful alternative algorithm for measuring sulcal depth.

  5. Direct depth distribution measurement of deuterium in bulk tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C. N.; Shimada, M.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding tritium retention and permeation in plasma-facing components is critical for fusion safety and fuel cycle control. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES) is shown to be an effective tool to reveal the depth profile of deuterium in tungsten. Results confirm the detection of deuterium. A ˜46 μm depth profile revealed that the deuterium content decreased precipitously in the first 7 μm, and detectable amounts were observed to depths in excess of 20 μm. The large probing depth of GD-OES (up to 100s of μm) enables studies not previously accessible to the more conventional techniques for investigating deuterium retention. Of particular applicability is the use of GD-OES to measure the depth profile for experiments where high deuterium concentration in the bulk material is expected: deuterium retention in neutron irradiated materials, and ultra-high deuterium fluences in burning plasma environment.

  6. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, W.J. [P and L Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Gokhale, A.M. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Antolovich, S.D. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  7. Volume measurement of the leg with the depth camera for quantitative evaluation of edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomitsu, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kamijo, Naohiro; Ogawa, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-02-01

    Volume measurement of the leg is important in the evaluation of leg edema. Recently, method for measurement by using a depth camera is proposed. However, many depth cameras are expensive. Therefore, we propose a method using Microsoft Kinect. We obtain a point cloud of the leg by Kinect Fusion technique and calculate the volume. We measured the volume of leg for three healthy students during three days. In each measurement, the increase of volume was confirmed from morning to evening. It is known that the volume of leg is increased in doing office work. Our experimental results meet this expectation.

  8. Effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure influences fatigue crack growth rate and must be included in the design of components. Plasticity induced crack closure is intimately linked with the crack tip plastic deformation, which becomes residual as the crack propagates. The objective here is to study numerically the effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields. The transient effect observed at the beginning of crack propagation is linked to the hardening behavior of material. The effect of mesh refinement is studied, and a singular behavior is evident, which is explained by the sharp crack associated with mesh topology, composed of a regular pattern of square elements. The plastic zone size measured perpendicularly to crack flank in the residual plastic wake is quantified and compared with literature models. Finally, the removal of material at the first node behind crack tip with load cycling was observed for plane strain state and some hardening models in plane stress state.

  9. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  10. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  11. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice for neutrino astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Breder, D.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Day, C. T.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Imlay, R. L.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Knops, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Leich, H.; Lennarz, D.; Lucke, A.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McParland, C. P.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miyamoto, H.; Mohr, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Patton, S.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Potthoff, N.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schukraft, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terranova, C.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; Vogt, C.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walter, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wiedemann, A.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; IceCube Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at ˜5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  12. Fundamental study of molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizota, Hirohisa; Nagashima, Yoshiaki; Obana, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The molten pool depth measurement method using an ultrasonic phased array system has been developed. The molten pool depth distribution is evaluated by comparing the times taken by the ultrasonic wave to propagate through a molten pool and a solid-phase and through only the solid-phase near the molten pool. Maximum molten pool depths on a flat type-304 stainless-steel plate, formed with a gas tungsten arc welding machine for different welding currents from 70 to 150 A, were derived within an error of ±0.5 mm.

  13. Crack length measurement in high-pressure components by means of 3D ultrasonic mapping; Risslaengenbestimmung in Hochdruckbauteilen durch dreidimensionale Ultraschallabbildung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schickert, Martin; Thumser, Rayk; Gerth, Uwe; Kleemann, Susanne [Materialforschungs- und -pruefanstalt der Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    High-pressure components under cyclic stress are found, e.g. in the injection section of common rail diesel engines. A simulation model for crack detection and growth in these components was tested experimentally by means of fatigue tests in non-autofretted and autofretted components with crossed bores. The induced volume cracks were visualized by means of an ultrasonic imaging system, and crack lengths were measured. Measurements were made in a submerged scanning system on planar grids with a resolution of 0.2 mm using a focusing 10 MHz test probe. 3D images of the cracks were generated from the measured signals and were then visualized by 3D iso-surface images. Differences between the real crack geometry and the ultrasonic image are discussed in the contribution. This includes the acoustic transparency of the cracks in ambient conditions (crack closing effect) that was investigated at internatl pressures between one and 2.120 bar. The length of the ultrasonic crack images was determined semi-automatically from deep sections using various amplitude criteria. Preliminary calibration to crack lengths determined by light microscopy was made on the basis of linear and square regression curves.

  14. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging of closed cracks using global preheating and local cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Koji; Ino, Yoshihiro; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-10-01

    Closed cracks are the main cause of underestimation in ultrasonic inspection, because the ultrasound transmits through the crack. Specifically, the measurement of closed-crack depth in coarse-grained materials, which are highly attenuative due to linear scatterings at the grains, is the most difficult issue. To solve this problem, we have developed a temporary crack opening method, global preheating and local cooling (GPLC), using tensile thermal stress, and a high-selectivity imaging method, load difference phased array (LDPA), based on the subtraction of phased array images between different stresses. To demonstrate our developed method, we formed a closed fatigue crack in coarse-grained stainless steel (SUS316L) specimen. As a result of applying it to the specimen, the high-selectivity imaging performance was successfully demonstrated. This will be useful in improving the measurement accuracy of closed-crack depths in coarse-grained material.

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux at 3500 m depth with the NEMO Phase-2 detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Distefano C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In March 2013, the Nemo Phase-2 tower was successfully deployed at 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy at 3500 m depth. The tower operated continuously until August 2014. We present the results of the atmospheric muon analysis from the data collected in 411 days of live time. The zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric muons was measured and results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The associated depth intensity relation was then measured and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  16. A High-Sensitivity Potential-Drop Technique for Fatigue Crack Growth Measurements,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    inappropriate to assume that crack growth characteristics at the surface are representative of crack behaviour in the specimen mid-thickness. 2.2 Ultrasonic...techniques has been described by several authors [23-25], and offers the advantages of high noise rejection and low current consumption . However, as the...Colonel B.C. Joshi, Military, Naval and Air Adviser, High Commission of India, Red Hill, A.C.T. Director, Defence Research Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

  17. In-vitro accuracy and reproducibility evaluation of probing depth measurements of selected periodontal probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Al Shayeb

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Depth measurements with the Chapple UB-CF-15 probe were more accurate and reproducible compared to measurements with the Vivacare TPS and Williams 14 W probes. This in vitro model may be useful for intra-examiner calibration or clinician training prior to the clinical evaluation of patients or in longitudinal studies involving periodontal evaluation.

  18. New measurement technique of ductility curve for ductility-dip cracking susceptibility in Alloy 690 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Uegaki, Takanori; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2016-08-30

    The coupling of a hot tensile test with a novel in situ observation technique using a high-speed camera was investigated as a high-accuracy quantitative evaluation method for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Several types of Alloy 690 filler wire were tested in this study owing to its susceptibility to DDC. The developed test method was used to directly measure the critical strain for DDC and high temperature ductility curves with a gauge length of 0.5 mm. Minimum critical strains of 1.3%, 4.0%, and 3.9% were obtained for ERNiCrFe-7, ERNiCrFe-13, and ERNiCrFe-15, respectively. The DDC susceptibilities of ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 were nearly the same and quite low compared with that of ERNiCrFe-7. This was likely caused by the tortuosity of the grain boundaries arising from the niobium content of around 2.5% in the former samples. Besides, ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 indicated higher minimum critical strains even though these specimens include higher content of sulfur and phosphorus than ERNiCrFe-7. Thus, containing niobium must be more effective to improve the susceptibility compared to sulfur and phosphorous in the alloy system.

  19. Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, L.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center

    1997-02-01

    This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

  20. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction deconvolution method for the measurement of residual stress in thermal barrier coatings as a function of depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Jacques, S D M; Chen, Y; Daisenberger, D; Xiao, P; Markocsan, N; Nylen, P; Cernik, R J

    2016-12-01

    The average residual stress distribution as a function of depth in an air plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia top coat used in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems was measured using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on station I15 at Diamond Light Source, UK, employing a series of incidence angles. The stress values were calculated from data deconvoluted from diffraction patterns collected at increasing depths. The stress was found to be compressive through the thickness of the TBC and a fluctuation in the trend of the stress profile was indicated in some samples. Typically this fluctuation was observed to increase from the surface to the middle of the coating, decrease a little and then increase again towards the interface. The stress at the interface region was observed to be around 300 MPa, which agrees well with the reported values. The trend of the observed residual stress was found to be related to the crack distribution in the samples, in particular a large crack propagating from the middle of the coating. The method shows promise for the development of a nondestructive test for as-manufactured samples.

  1. 谈现浇混凝土楼板裂缝的成因及控制措施%Talking on cracking causes and controlling measures of cast-in-situ concrete floor slab cracks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁

    2012-01-01

    To begin with the types and forms of floor slab cracks,the essay analyzes causes of cast-in-situ concrete floor slab cracks,explores the crack controlling measures,and then introduces the crack processing methods,which has significant guiding meaning for improving construction engineering quality.%从楼板裂缝的种类及形式入手,针对现浇混凝土楼板产生的原因进行了分析,探讨了裂缝的控制措施,同时介绍了裂缝的处理方法,对提高建筑工程质量具有重要的指导意义。

  2. Determination of representative renal depth for accurate attenuation corred in measurement of glomerular filtration rate in transplanted kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Soon Nam; Kim, Sung Hoon; Rha, Sung Eun; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Lee, Sung Young; Chung, Soo Kyo [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    To measure reliable glomerular filtration rate by using the representative values of transplanted renal depths, which are measured with ultrasonography. We included 54 patients (26 men, 28 women), with having both renal scintigraphy and ultrasonography after renal transplantation. We measured DFR with Gates' method using the renal depth measured by ultrasonography, and median and mean ones in each patient. We compared GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depth with GFR derived from median and mean renal depths. The correlation coefficients were obtained among GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depths, median and mean renal depth under linear regression analysis. We determined whether GFR derived from median or mean renal depth could substitute GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depth with Bland-Altman method. We analyze the expected errors of the GFR using representative renal depth in terms of age, sex, weight, height, creatinine value, and body surface. The transplanted renal depths range from 3.20 cm to 5.96 cm. The mean value and standard deviation of renal depths measured by ultrasonography are 4.09{+-}0.65 cm in men, and 4.24{+-}0.78 cm in women. The median value of renal depths measured by ultrasonography is 4.36 cm in men and 4.14 cm in women. The GFR derived from median renal depth is more consistent with GFR derived from ultrasonography-measured renal depth than GFR derived from mean renal depth. Differences of GFR derived from median and ultrasonography-measured renal depth are not significantly different in the groups classified with creatinine value, age, sex, height, weight and body surface. When median value is adapted as a representative renal depth, we could obtain reliable GFR in transplanted kidney simply.

  3. Ultrasonic Measurement of Corrosion Depth Development in Concrete Exposed to Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yingfang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion depth of concrete can reflect the damage state of the load-carrying capacity and durability of the concrete structures servicing in severe environment. Ultrasonic technology was studied to evaluate the corrosion depth quantitatively. Three acidic environments with the pH level of 3.5, 2.5, and 1.5 were simulated by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solutions in the laboratory. 354 prism specimens with the dimension of 150 mm × 150 mm × 300 mm were prepared. The prepared specimens were first immersed in the acidic mixture for certain periods, followed by physical, mechanical, computerized tomography (CT and ultrasonic test. Damage depths of the concrete specimen under different corrosion states were obtained from both CT and ultrasonic test. Based on the ultrasonic test, a bilinear regression model is proposed to estimate the corrosion depth. It is shown that the results achieved by ultrasonic and CT test are in good agreement with each other. Relation between the corrosion depth of concrete specimen and the mechanical indices such as mass loss, compressive strength, and elastic modulus is discussed in detail. It can be drawn that the ultrasonic test is a reliable nondestructive way to measure the damage depth of concrete exposed to acidic environment.

  4. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Ship, Aircraft and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, J. M.; Kapustin, V. N.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.; Covert, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We present analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements taken with a shipboard six-channel tracking sunphotometer during ACE-2. For 10 July 1997, results are also shown for measurements acquired 70 km from the ship with a fourteen-channel airborne tracking sunphotometer.

  5. Development and validation of a method for measuring depth of understanding in constructivist learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Lucia Falsetti

    A method for measuring depth of understanding of students in the middle-level science classroom was developed and validated. A common theme in the literature on constructivism in science education is that constructivist pedagogy, as opposed to objectivist pedagogy, results in a greater depth of understanding. Since few instruments measuring this construct exist at the present time, the development of such a tool to measure this construct was a significant contribution to the current body of assessment technologies in science education. The author's Depth of Understanding Assessment (DUA) evolved from a writing measure originally designed as a history assessment. The study involved 230 eighth grade science students studying a chemical change unit. The main research questions were: (1) What is the relationship between the DUA and each of the following independent variables: recall, application, and questioning modalities as measured by the Cognitive Preference Test; deep, surface, achieving, and deep-achieving approaches as measured by the Learning Process Questionnaire; achievement as measured by the Chemical Change Quiz, and teacher perception of student ability to conceptualize science content? (2) Is there a difference in depth of understanding, as measured by the DUA, between students who are taught by objectivist pedagogy and students who are taught by constructivist pedagogy favoring the constructivist group? (3) Is there a gender difference in depth of understanding as measured by the DUA? (4) Do students who are taught by constructivist pedagogy perceive their learning environment as more constructivist than students who are taught by objectivist pedagogy? Six out of nine hypothesis tests supported the validity of the DUA. The results of the qualitative component of this study which consisted of student interviews substantiated the quantitative results by providing additional information and insights. There was a significant difference in depth of

  6. Spatio-temporal measurements and analysis of snow depth in a rock face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wirz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Snow in rock faces plays a key role in the alpine environment for permafrost distribution, snow water storage or runoff in spring. However, a detailed assessment of snow depths in steep rock walls has never been attempted. To understand snow distribution in rock faces a high-resolution terrestrial laser scanner (TLS, including a digital camera, was used to obtain interpolated snow depth (HS data with a grid resolution of one metre. The mean HS, the snow covered area and their evolution in the rock face were compared to a neighbouring smoother catchment and a flat field station at similar elevation. Further we analyzed the patterns of HS distribution in the rock face after different weather periods and investigated the main factors contributing to those distributions.

    In a first step we could show that with TLS reliable information on surface data of a steep rocky surface can be obtained. In comparison to the flatter sites in the vicinity, mean HS in the rock face was lower during the entire winter, but trends of snow depth changes were similar. We observed repeating accumulation and ablation patterns in the rock face, while maximum snow depth loss always occurred at those places with maximum snow depth gain. Further analysis of the main factors contributing to the snow depth distribution in the rock face revealed terrain-wind-interaction processes to be dominant. Processes related to slope angle seem to play a role, but no simple relationship between slope angle and snow depth was found.

    Further analyses should involve measurements in rock faces with other characteristics and higher temporal resolutions to be able to distinguish individual processes better. Additionally, the relation of spatial and temporal distribution of snow depth to terrain – wind interactions should be tested.

  7. Spatio-temporal measurements and analysis of snow depth in a rock face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wirz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Snow in rock faces plays a key role in the alpine environment for permafrost distribution, snow water storage or run off in spring. However, a detailed assessment of snow depths in steep rock walls has never been attempted. To understand snow distribution in rock walls a high-resolution terrestrial laser scanner (TLS, including a digital camera, was used to obtain snow depth (HS data with a resolution of one metre. The mean HS, the snow covered area and their evolution in the rock face were compared to a neighbouring smoother catchment and a flat field station at similar elevation. Further we analyzed the patterns of HS distribution in the rock face after different periods and investigated the main factors contributing to them.

    In a first step we could show that with TLS reliable information on surface data of a steep rocky surface can be obtained. In comparison to the flatter sites in the vicinity, mean HS in the rock face was lower during the entire winter, but trends of snow depth changes were similar. We observed repeating accumulation and ablation patterns in the rock face, while maximum snow depth loss always occurred at those places with maximum snow depth gain. Further analysis of the main factors contributing to the snow depth distribution in the rock face revealed terrain-wind-interaction processes to be dominant. Processes related to slope angle seem to play a role, but no linear function of slope angle and snow depth was found.

    Further analyses should involve measurements in rock faces with other characteristics and higher temporal resolutions to be able to distinguish individual processes better. Additionally the relation of spatial and temporal distribution of snow depth to terrain-wind interactions should be tested.

  8. Eddy current measurement system evaluation for corrosion depth determination on cast aluminum aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surendra; Greving, Dan; Kinney, Andy; Vensel, Fred; Ohm, Jim; Peeler, Mike

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current (EC) technique was developed to determine the corrosion depth on a bare flange face of a cast aluminum A356-T6 aircraft engine structure. The EC response and the corrosion depths determined through metallurgical cross sections were used to develop an empirical relation between EC response and depth. The EC technique and depth determination are used to inspect the engine structures during overhaul to determine if they are fit for continued service. An accurate and reliable Non-Destructive Inspection is required to ensure that structures returned to service are safe for continued operation. NDE system reliability demonstrations of the eddy current technique are traditionally reported in terms of Probability of Detection (POD) data using MIL-HDBK-1823A. However, the calculation of POD data is based on a simple linear predictive model that is valid only if certain criteria are met. These are: 1) NDE system response is measurable (i.e. continuous data), 2) Flaw size is known and measurable (i.e. continuous data), 3) relationship between the NDE system response and flaw size is linear (or linear on a log scale), 4) variation in measured responseresponse around a predicted response for a given flaw size is normally distributed, 5) the variation around the predicted response is constant (i.e. variation does not change with flaw size), and 6) inherent variability in the NDE system is known and fully understood. In this work, a Measurement System Evaluation (MSE) of the Eddy Current System was used to address some of these concerns. This work was completed on two aircraft structures having varying corrosion depths. The data were acquired in a random manner at fifty regions of interests (ROIs). Three operators participated in this study, and each operator measured Eddy Current response three times in each ROI. In total, there were four hundred and fifty data points collected. Following this, the two structures were sectioned for measuring corrosion depth. The

  9. Influence of Mineral Admixtures on the Electro-deposition Healing Effect of Concrete Cracks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Hongqiang; JIANG Linhua; YOU Lushen; XU Ning; SONG Zijian; ZHANG Yan

    2014-01-01

    Two types of solutions (ZnSO4, MgSO4) were selected to study the influence of mineral admixtures on the electro-deposition healing effect of concrete cracks. Four parameters (i e, rates of weight gain, surface coating, crack closure and crack filling depth) were measured. The mineral composition of electro-deposits in the cracks was analyzed. The study shows that the healing effect of mortar specimens with 10%fly ash is the worst, while the healing effect of mortar specimens with 20%fly ash is better than that of the specimens without fly ash. The rates of weight gain, surface coating, crack closure and crack filling depth decrease with increasing content of the ground granulated blast-furnace slag(GGBS). The mineral admixtures have no influence on the composition of deposits.

  10. Effect of Head Position on Facial Soft Tissue Depth Measurements Obtained Using Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Jodi M; Stephan, Carl N; Gregory, Laura S; MacGregor, Donna M

    2016-01-01

    Facial soft tissue depth (FSTD) studies employing clinical computed tomography (CT) data frequently rely on depth measurements from raw 2D orthoslices. However, the position of each patient's head was not standardized in this method, potentially decreasing measurement reliability and accuracy. This study measured FSTDs along the original orthoslice plane and compared these measurements to those standardized by the Frankfurt horizontal (FH). Subadult cranial CT scans (n = 115) were used to measure FSTDs at 18 landmarks. Significant differences were observed between the methods at eight of these landmarks (p < 0.05), demonstrating that high-quality data are not generated simply by employing modern imaging modalities such as CT. Proper technique is crucial to useful results, and maintaining control over head position during FSTD data collection is important. This is easily and most readily achieved in CT techniques by rotating the head to the FH plane after constructing a 3D rendering of the data.

  11. Measuring phacoemulsification groove depth using probe tip dimensions and biometry lens thickness readings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunne K

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kevin Dunne, Alex J Buller Department of Ophthalmology, Hawkes Bay District Health Board, Hastings, New Zealand Aim: To describe a useful technique utilizing lens thickness from biometric data as well as phacoemulsification (phaco probe tip dimensions, in order to more accurately determine safe groove depth during divide and conquer techniques for cataract surgery. Methods: Single center, selection of patients for cataract surgery deemed low risk and suitable for surgical teaching cases. Individual lens thickness measurements from biometry were calculated with known phaco tip dimensions to give an individualized safe number of phaco tip depths for grooving during divide and conquer. This technique was then applied during cataract surgery. Results: Utilization of this technique allows calculation and determination of an appropriate number of phaco tip depths of grooving for each individual patient. This technique was applied as a teaching tool for surgical trainees, with subsequent successful safe cataract surgeries completed. No posterior capsule ruptures were noted for these cases. Conclusion: By combining the biometric measurements of an individual patient’s lens thickness together with known phaco tip dimensions, individualized safe groove depths can be theoretically determined and applied during divide and conquer cataract surgery. Keywords: cataract, divide and conquer, groove depth, lens thickness, probe tip

  12. Intermediate-depth circulation in the Gulf of Mexico estimated from direct measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Georges L.; Wienders, Nicolas; Romanou, Anastasia

    Data from 17 PALACE floats set in the Gulf of Mexico sampling the intermediate-depth (≈900 dbar) flow from April 1998 to February 2002 indicate a mean cyclonic circulation along the northern and western edges of the Gulf of Mexico. This flow intensified into a ≈0.10 m/s current in the western Bay of Campeche and was deflected around a topographic feature, called here the Campeche Bay Bump, in the southern Bay of Campeche. Floats launched in the eastern Gulf of Mexico tended to stay there, and those launched in the western Gulf tended to stay in the western Gulf, suggesting restricted connection at depth between the eastern and western Gulf of Mexico. Not surprisingly, the measured flow was stronger when the measured flow was under the Loop Current and warm-core rings, but the direction of the intermediated depth currents bore no apparent relation to the surface flow inferred from satellite altimeter maps. However, comparing the floats' surface drifts to their intermediate depth drifts, the floats at depth ended to track the surface flow in the Loop Current, and both indicate a cyclonic gyre in the Bay of Campeche.

  13. The application of RBI-concept to ultrasonic measurement of fatigue cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Saerkiniemi, P.; Kauppinen, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    In many power plants there are problem areas, which are not included in the official inspection programs. Flaws can be induced during service due to the service conditions in components and welded joints. These can lead to failures, which cause unforeseen shutdowns during operation and unscheduled repairs have to be earned out. The basic idea of Risk Based Inspection (RBI) methodology is to include this kind of objects in the inspection program. In this presentation two possible objects for RBI are described - thermal fatigue cracking in process piping and fatigue cracking in spinning fly wheel. (orig.) 4 refs.

  14. Tappet Chill Depth Measuring by Magnetic Permeability and Inductance Displacement Meter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is possible to measure different position along the axle direction of tappet. According to the maximum output of signal, the boundary of white iron structure and mottled iron structure can be deduced, and at the same time, it is possible to use inductance displacement meter to show the chill depth which is the distance from the boundary to the end.

  15. Deterioration of depth measurements due to interference of multiple RGB-D sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin Martin, Roberto; Lorbach, Malte T; Brock, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Depth sensors based on projected structured light have become standard in robotics research. However, when several of these sensors share the same workspace, the measurement quality can deteriorate significantly due to interference of the projected light patterns. We present a comprehensive study of

  16. Measurement of the depth of maximum of extensive air showers above 1018eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K.D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value

    2010-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, Xmax⁡, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 1018eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selec

  17. Combined lock-in thermography and heat flow measurements for analysing heat dissipation during fatigue crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bär

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During fatigue crack propagation experiments with constant force as well as constant stress intensity lock in thermography and heat flow measurements with a new developed peltier sensor have been performed. With lock in thermography space resolved measurements are possible and the evaluation allows to distinguish between elastic and dissipated energies. The specimens have to be coated with black paint to enhance the emissivity. The thickness of the coating influences the results and therefore quantitative measurements are problematic. The heat flow measurements are easy to perform and provide quantitative results but only integral in an area given by the used peltier element. To get comparable results the values measured with thermography were summarized in an area equivalent to that of the peltier element. The experiments with constant force show a good agreement between the thermography and the heat flow measurements. In case of the experiments with a constant stress intensity some differences become visible. Whereas the thermography measurements show a linear decrease of the signal with rising crack length, the heat flow measurements show a clearly nonlinear dependency. Obviously the measured energies in thermography and peltier based heat flow measurement are not comparable

  18. Repeatability and Accuracy of Exoplanet Eclipse Depths Measured with Post-Cryogenic Spitzer

    CERN Document Server

    Ingalls, James G; Carey, S J; Stauffer, John R; Lawrence, Patrick J; Grillmair, Carl J; Buzasi, Derek; Deming, Drake; Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Evans, Thomas M; Morello, G; Stevenson, Kevin B; Wong, Ian; Capak, Peter; Glaccum, William; Laine, Seppo; Surace, Jason; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    We examine the repeatability, reliability, and accuracy of differential exoplanet eclipse depth measurements made using the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope during the post-cryogenic mission. We have re-analyzed an existing 4.5{\\mu}m dataset, consisting of 10 observations of the XO-3 b system during secondary eclipse, using 7 different techniques for removing correlated noise. We find that, on average, for a given technique the eclipse depth estimate is repeatable from epoch to epoch to within 150 parts per million (ppm). Most techniques derive eclipse depths that do not vary by more than a factor 2 of the photon noise limit. Nearly all methods accurately assess their own errors: for these methods the individual measurement uncertainties are comparable to the scatter in eclipse depths over the 10-epoch sample. To assess the accuracy of the techniques as well as clarify the difference between instrumental and other sources of measurement error, we have also analyzed a simulated datas...

  19. Sodar measurements of the mixed-layer depth over a large city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurygin, E.A. [Russia Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    The results of synchronous sodar`s measurements on a territory of city and suburban area have shown: (a) The types of stratification over centre of the city and periphery considerably differ, and these distinctions are more often displayed in morning and evening transition period. The agreement between types of stratification in the centre and on the periphery was observed in 40% of cases; (b) At equal temperature stratification the mixed-layer depth in centre of the city is about 50-150 m higher at inversions in comparison with a periphery, at advanced convection - these depths are identical; (c) At different stratification between the city and periphery the distinction in the mixed-layer depth can reach 200. (au)

  20. Research on key techniques of expendable conductivity temperature depth measuring system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Guangyuan; DU; Libin; HE; Haijing; LEI; Zhuo; ZHANG; Qisheng; WU; Chengxuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper analysis the developing of expendable conductivity temperature depth measuring system(XCTD)and introduce its principle of measuring about temperature,salinity and depth of ocean.Some key techniques are put forward.According to the real needs of XCTD,conductivity sensor with high sensitivity is designed by principle of electromagnetic induce,the ocean conductivity from induced electromotive force has been calculated.Adding temperature correction circuit would help to reduce error of conductivity measurement because of sharply changing temperature.Advanced temperature measuring circuit of high precision and the constant current source is used to weaken effect of self-heating of resistance and fluctuation of the source.On respect of remote data transmission,LVDS is a good choice for the purpose of guarantee the quality of data transmitted and the transmission distance is reaching to thousand meters in the seawater.Modular programming method is also brought into this research aimed at improve the stability,reliability and maintainability of the whole measuring system.In February,2015,the trials in South China Sea demonstrate that the developed XCTD realize effective measurement at a speed of 6 knots and detection depth at 800 m.The consistency coefficient of the acquired data is greater than 0.99 and the success rate of probe launching is above 90%.

  1. A lithium depth-marker technique for rapid erosion and deposition measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, R.M., E-mail: rsulli@psfc.mit.edu; Pang, A.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Whyte, D.G.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth. • Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth. • Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth. -- Abstract: A novel, high-resolution technique has been developed for the measurement of erosion and deposition in solid material surfaces. The technique uses a combination of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth of a previously implanted marker layer consisting of {sup 7}Li. A scoping study shows that {sup 7}Li is an ideal marker candidate due to a high Q (∼18 MeV) nuclear reaction, {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He. Net erosion or deposition is measured by NRA of modified alpha energy passing through the bulk material. The reaction’s high cross-section provides for the fast time resolution needed to measure erosion from high flux plasmas, and a highly penetrating proton beam provides for a large range of erosion/deposition measurements. Additionally, the implantation of low-Z Li leads to relatively low vacancy concentrations in the solid material due to implantation. This technique thus provides greater assurance that the measured erosion rate is indicative of the solid material: due to both the low vacancy production and the fact that no films or deposits are involved. Validation was performed by comparing the measured and predicted amount of erosion based on previously measured sputtering yields; the two were found to agree, within the uncertainty of the experiment. The depth resolution of the techniques is ∼60 nm at a net erosion depth of about 1 μm. The benefits of this technique are summarized as: short time scales (minutes) to obtain results, the marker layer can be used in any solid material, greater assurance that the measured erosion is indicative of the unperturbed solid material, and the continuous monitoring of the

  2. Cone-shell Raman spectroscopy (CSRS) for depth-sensitive measurements in layered tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khan Mohammad; Majumder, Shovan Kumar; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-11-01

    We report the development of a depth-sensitive Raman spectroscopy system using the configuration of cone-shell excitation and cone detection. The system uses a 785 nm diode laser and three identical axicons for Raman excitation of the target sample in the form of a hollow conic section. The Raman scattered light from the sample, passed through the same (but solid) conic section, is collected for detection. Apart from its ability of probing larger depths (~ few mm), an important attraction of the system is that the probing depths can be varied by simply varying the separation between axicons in the excitation arm. Furthermore, no adjustment is required in the sample arm, which is a significant advantage for noncontact, depth-sensitive measurement. Evaluation of the performance of the developed setup on nonbiological phantom and biological tissue sample demonstrated its ability to recover Raman spectra of layers located at depths of ~2-3 mm beneath the surface. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Noninvasive measurement of burn wound depth applying infrared thermal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E.; Maltha, Ilse M.; Klaessens, John H.; Vet, Henrica C.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Zuijlen, Paul P.

    2016-02-01

    In burn wounds early discrimination between the different depths plays an important role in the treatment strategy. The remaining vasculature in the wound determines its healing potential. Non-invasive measurement tools that can identify the vascularization are therefore considered to be of high diagnostic importance. Thermography is a non-invasive technique that can accurately measure the temperature distribution over a large skin or tissue area, the temperature is a measure of the perfusion of that area. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinimetric properties (i.e. reliability and validity) of thermography for measuring burn wound depth. In a cross-sectional study with 50 burn wounds of 35 patients, the inter-observer reliability and the validity between thermography and Laser Doppler Imaging were studied. With ROC curve analyses the ΔT cut-off point for different burn wound depths were determined. The inter-observer reliability, expressed by an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.99, was found to be excellent. In terms of validity, a ΔT cut-off point of 0.96°C (sensitivity 71%; specificity 79%) differentiates between a superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burn. A ΔT cut-off point of -0.80°C (sensitivity 70%; specificity 74%) could differentiate between a deep partial-thickness and a full-thickness burn wound. This study demonstrates that thermography is a reliable method in the assessment of burn wound depths. In addition, thermography was reasonably able to discriminate among different burn wound depths, indicating its potential use as a diagnostic tool in clinical burn practice.

  4. DEPTH MEASUREMENT OF DISRUPTED LAYER ON SILICON WAFER SURFACE USING AUGER SPECTROSCOPY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodukha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for depth measurement of a disrupted layer on silicon wafer surface which is based on application of Auger spectroscopy with the precision sputtering of surface silicon layers and registration of the Auger electron yield intensity. In order to measure the disrupted layer with the help of Auger spectroscopy it is necessary to determine dependence of the released Auger electron amount on sputtering time (profile and then the dependence is analyzed. Silicon amount in the disrupted layer is less than in the volume. While going deeper the disruptive layer is decreasing that corresponds to an increase of atom density in a single layer. The essence of the method lies in the fact the disruptive layer is removed by ion beam sputtering and detection of interface region is carried out with the help of registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from the sputtered surface up to the moment when it reaches the value which is equal to the Auger electron yield intensity for single-crystal silicon. While removing surface silicon layers the registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from silicon surface makes it possible to control efficiently a presence of the disrupted layer on the silicon wafer surface. In this case depth control locality is about 1.0 nm due to some peculiarities of Auger spectroscopy method. The Auger electron yield intensity is determined automatically while using Auger spectrometer and while removing the disrupted layer the intensity is gradually increasing. Depth of the disrupted layer is determined by measuring height of the step which has been formed as a result of removal of the disrupted layer from the silicon wafer surface. Auger spectroscopy methods ensures an efficient depth control surface disruptions at the manufacturing stages of silicon wafers and integrated circuits. The depth measurement range of disruptions constitutes 0.001–1.000 um.

  5. Intercomparison of aerosol optical depth from Brewer ozone spectrophotometers and CIMEL sunphotometers measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cheymol

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Langley plot method applied on the Brewer Ozone measurements can provide accurate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD in the UV-B. We present seven intercomparisons between AOD retrieved from Brewer Ozone measurements and AOD measured by CIMEL sunphotometer, which are stored in the international AERONET database. Only the intercomparisons between co-located instruments can be used to validate the Langley Plot method applied to the Brewer measurements: in this case, all the correlation coefficient are above 0.83. If the instruments are not at the same site, the correlation between the AOD retrieved by both instruments is much lower.

  6. Seasonal variability of cloud optical depth over northwestern China derived from CERES/MODIS satellite measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghang Chen; Hongtao Bai; Jianping Huang; Hua Zhang; Jinming Ge; Xiaodan Guan; Xiaoqin Mao

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal variability of cloud optical depth over northwestern China derived from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint (SSF) Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Edition 1B data from July 2002 to June 2004 is presented. The regions of interest are those with Asia monsoon influence, the Tianshan and Qilian Mountains, and the Taklimakan Desert. The results show that the instantaneous measurements presented here are much higher than the previous results derived from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 monthly mean data. Generally the measurements of cloud optical depth are the highest in summer and the lowest in winter, however, Taklimakan Desert has the lowest measurements in autumn. The regional variation is quite significant over northwestern China.

  7. Optical depth measurements by shadow-band radiometers and their uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D; Kiedron, Peter; Michalsky, Joseph J; Hodges, Gary; Flynn, Connor J; Lacis, Andrew A

    2007-11-20

    Shadow-band radiometers in general, and especially the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR), are widely used for atmospheric optical depth measurements. The major programs running MFRSR networks in the United States include the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) Network, and NASA Solar Irradiance Research Network (SIRN). We discuss a number of technical issues specific to shadow-band radiometers and their impact on the optical depth measurements. These problems include instrument tilt and misalignment, as well as some data processing artifacts. Techniques for data evaluation and automatic detection of some of these problems are described.

  8. Measurement depth effects on the apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Graf

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 efflux at the soil surface is the result of respiration in different depths that are subjected to variable temperatures at the same time. Therefore, the temperature measurement depth affects the apparent temperature sensitivity of field-measured soil respiration. We summarize existing literature evidence on the importance of this effect, and describe a simple model to understand and estimate the magnitude of this potential error source for heterotrophic respiration. The model is tested against field measurements. We discuss the influence of climate (annual and daily temperature amplitude, soil properties (vertical distribution of CO2 sources, thermal and gas diffusivity, and measurement schedule (frequency, study duration, and time averaging. Q10 as a commonly used parameter describing the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is taken as an example and computed for different combinations of the above conditions. We define conditions and data acquisition and analysis strategies that lead to lower errors in field-based Q10 determination. It was found that commonly used temperature measurement depths are likely to result in an underestimation of temperature sensitivity in field experiments. Our results also apply to activation energy as an alternative temperature sensitivity parameter.

  9. Measurement depth effects on the apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Graf

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available CO2 efflux at the soil surface is the result of respiration in different depths that are subjected to variable temperatures at the same time. Therefore, the temperature measurement depth affects the apparent temperature sensitivity of field-measured soil respiration. We summarize existing literature evidence on the importance of this effect, and describe a simple model to understand and estimate the magnitude of this potential error source for heterotrophic respiration. The model is tested against field measurements. We discuss the influence of climate (annual and daily temperature amplitude, soil properties (vertical distribution of CO2 sources, thermal and gas diffusivity, and measurement schedule (frequency, study duration, and time averaging. Q10 as a commonly used parameter describing the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is taken as an example and computed for different combinations of the above conditions. We define conditions and data acquisition and analysis strategies that lead to lower errors in field-based Q10 determination. It was found that commonly used temperature measurement depths are likely to result in an underestimation of temperature sensitivity in field experiments. Our results also apply to activation energy as an alternative temperature sensitivity parameter.

  10. Validity and repeatability of a depth camera-based surface imaging system for thigh volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullas, Alice M; Choppin, Simon; Heller, Ben; Wheat, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Complex anthropometrics such as area and volume, can identify changes in body size and shape that are not detectable with traditional anthropometrics of lengths, breadths, skinfolds and girths. However, taking these complex with manual techniques (tape measurement and water displacement) is often unsuitable. Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging systems are quick and accurate alternatives to manual techniques but their use is restricted by cost, complexity and limited access. We have developed a novel low-cost, accessible and portable 3D surface imaging system based on consumer depth cameras. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and repeatability of the system in the measurement of thigh volume. The thigh volumes of 36 participants were measured with the depth camera system and a high precision commercially available 3D surface imaging system (3dMD). The depth camera system used within this study is highly repeatable (technical error of measurement (TEM) of <1.0% intra-calibration and ~2.0% inter-calibration) but systematically overestimates (~6%) thigh volume when compared to the 3dMD system. This suggests poor agreement yet a close relationship, which once corrected can yield a usable thigh volume measurement.

  11. Measuring phacoemulsification groove depth using probe tip dimensions and biometry lens thickness readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Kevin; Buller, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    To describe a useful technique utilizing lens thickness from biometric data as well as phacoemulsification (phaco) probe tip dimensions, in order to more accurately determine safe groove depth during divide and conquer techniques for cataract surgery. Single center, selection of patients for cataract surgery deemed low risk and suitable for surgical teaching cases. Individual lens thickness measurements from biometry were calculated with known phaco tip dimensions to give an individualized safe number of phaco tip depths for grooving during divide and conquer. This technique was then applied during cataract surgery. Utilization of this technique allows calculation and determination of an appropriate number of phaco tip depths of grooving for each individual patient. This technique was applied as a teaching tool for surgical trainees, with subsequent successful safe cataract surgeries completed. No posterior capsule ruptures were noted for these cases. By combining the biometric measurements of an individual patient's lens thickness together with known phaco tip dimensions, individualized safe groove depths can be theoretically determined and applied during divide and conquer cataract surgery.

  12. DIAGNOdent measurements and correlation with the depth and volume of minimally invasive cavity preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, James C; Gregory, William A; Valentine, John B

    2006-01-01

    In this clinical study, DIAGNOdent (KaVo) was used to assess previously diagnosed carious lesions in the pits and fissures of first and second molars. The measurements from this device were correlated with the depth and volume of the cavity preparations that resulted from minimal intervention to remove occlusal carious lesions. Twenty-five patients, 18 years of age and older, who were previously scheduled for an occlusal restoration due to caries, were recruited and enrolled in this clinical study. These patients had 48 qualifying teeth without previous restorations, sealants or other carious lesions. The occlusal surface of each study tooth was cleaned utilizing ProphyFlex2 (KaVo). Two dentists separately traced the pit and fissure system of each tooth using DIAGNOdent for two 15-second periods each. The peak reading of each of the four measurements was recorded. An impression of the occlusal surface of each tooth was recorded with a polyvinyl siloxane bite registration material. The carious lesions were removed with an air abrasion unit employing a 0.015-inch nozzle opening utilizing minimal operative intervention. A low viscosity polyvinyl siloxane was used to take an impression of the cavity preparation impression, using the bite registration impression to form the occlusal surface of the preparation impression. The preparation impression volume was calculated from its weight, using the known density of the impression material. The greatest depth of the preparation was measured. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to investigate any relationship between depth or volume of the preparation impression and the DIAGNOdent measurements. The correlation for preparation volume and maximum DIAGNOdent measurement was 0.191 (p = 0.189). Other logical subsets of cases also did not result in any statistically significant correlations between the DIAGNOdent readings and the depth or volume of the final cavity preparations.

  13. Optical depth retrievals from Delta-T SPN1 measurements of broadband solar irradiance at ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelles, Victor; Serrano, David; Segura, Sara; Wood, John; Webb, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The SPN1 radiometer, manufactured by Delta-T Devices Ltd., is an instrument designed for the measurement of global solar irradiance and its components (diffuse, direct) at ground level. In the present study, the direct irradiance component has been used to retrieve an effective total optical depth, by applying the Beer-Lambert law to the broadband measurements. The results have been compared with spectral total optical depths derived from two Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01 sun-sky radiometers, located at the Burjassot site in Valencia (Spain), during years 2013 - 2015. The SPN1 is an inexpensive and versatile instrument for the measurement of the three components of the solar radiation without any mobile part and without any need to azimuthally align the instrument to track the sun (http://www.delta-t.co.uk). The three components of the solar radiation are estimated from a combination of measurements performed by 7 different miniature thermopiles. In turn, the Beer-Lambert law has been applied to the broadband direct solar component to obtain an effective total optical depth, representative of the total extinction in the atmosphere. For the assessment of the total optical depth values retrieved with the SPN1, two different sun-sky radiometers (Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01L) have been employed. Both instruments belong to the international networks AERONET and SKYNET. The modified SUNRAD package has been applied in both Cimel and Prede instruments. Cloud affected data has been removed by applying the Smirnov cloud-screening procedure in the SUNRAD algorithm. The broadband SPN1 total optical depth has been analysed by comparison with the spectral total optical depth from the sun-sky radiometer measurements at wavelengths 440, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. The slopes and intercepts have been estimated to be 0.47 - 0.98 and 0.055 - 0.16 with increasing wavelength. The average correlation coefficients and RMSD were 0.80 - 0.83 and 0.034 - 0.036 for all the channels. The

  14. Measurement setup for the magnetic penetration depth and superfluid stiffness in thin superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Lorenz; Brunner, Markus Christopher Paul; Schneider, Ina; Kronfeldner, Klaus; Strunk, Christoph [Institute for exp. and appl. Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Bousquet, Jessica; Bustarret, Etienne [Institut NEEL, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    A mutual inductance measurement setup has been established in order to determine the magnetic penetration depths of thin film superconductors. By measuring the variation of the mutual inductance M, the temperature dependent penetration depth can be evaluated. The setup has been characterized using thin aluminum and niobium films as a reference. Temperature dependence of λ of B-doped diamond films is determined down to 0.3 K and compared with theoretical expectations. The impact of the doping ratio B/C and film thickness on λ and T{sub c} is investigated. Correlation between the film impedance σ = σ{sub 1} - i σ{sub 2} and λ is examined.

  15. Computer aided measurement of melanoma depth of invasion in microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Mojgan; Rezaeian, Mahdie; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Malekian, Vahid

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a novel computer aided technique for measurement of melanoma depth of invasion. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer with worldwide increasing incidences. For a conclusive diagnosis of melanoma, skin biopsies should be examined under a microscope. Visual inspection of microscopic samples is often subjective, time-consuming, cumbersome and prone to human errors. This fact demonstrates the necessity of developing an automated method which assists pathologists in evaluating histopathological samples more accurately in the busy clinical environment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a computer-assisted diagnosis algorithm has been applied in measurement of melanoma invasion depth. The proposed method uses a clustering algorithm for granular layer extraction and a pre-trained SVM classifier for detection of malignant melanocytes. The experimental results with average error of 3.9μm demonstrate that the proposed method is reliable and effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dielectric measurement in experimental burns: a new tool for burn depth determination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Anthony; Lahtinen, Tapani; Härmä, Markku; Nuutinen, Jouni; Uusaro, Ari; Alhava, Esko

    2006-03-01

    There has been a lack of methods to provide quantitative information of local tissue edema after burn injury. Noninvasive dielectric measurements provide this information. The measured value, the dielectric constant, is directly related to the amount of water in tissue. Using probes of different sizes, the measurements give information from different tissue depths. The aim of this study was to characterize edema formation at different tissue depths and to examine whether the dielectric measurements could be used to distinguish partial- and full-thickness burns in pigs. An experimental animal study with pigs (n = 6) was performed in which dielectric measurements were taken of superficial, partial-thickness, and full-thickness burns for 72 hours. There was an increase in tissue water content in the superficial dermis in the partial-thickness burns at 48 hours. In whole dermis, the superficial burns resulted in increased tissue water content at 8 hours, and the partial-thickness burns resulted in increased tissue water content at 8, 24, and 72 hours. In deep burns, the water content was significantly decreased in the superficial dermis at 24 hours. All burns resulted in a considerable increase in fat water content. The dielectric probes could be used to differentiate partial- and full-thickness burns as early as 8 hours after burn. Receiver operating curve analysis of the measurements indicated 70 to 90 percent sensitivity and 80 to 100 percent specificity after 8 hours. The dielectric measurements provide a sensitive and noninvasive method for examining tissue edema and differentiate partial- and full-thickness burns in experimental burns. Thus, they are of clinical interest for early burn depth determination.

  17. Two-dimensional Moiré phase analysis for accurate strain distribution measurement and application in crack prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Koyama, Motomichi; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2017-06-12

    Aimed at the low accuracy problem of shear strain measurement in Moiré methods, a two-dimensional (2D) Moiré phase analysis method is proposed for full-field deformation measurement with high accuracy. A grid image is first processed by the spatial phase-shifting sampling Moiré technique to get the Moiré phases in two directions, which are then conjointly analyzed for measuring 2D displacement and strain distributions. The strain especially the shear strain measurement accuracy is remarkably improved, and dynamic deformation is measurable from automatic batch processing of single-shot grid images. As an application, the 2D microscale strain distributions of a titanium alloy were measured, and the crack occurrence location was successfully predicted from strain concentration.

  18. Sizing stress corrosion cracks using laser ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Hamood; McNealy, Rick; Fingerhut, Martin [Applus-RTD. Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Marvin; Ansari, Homayoon [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kania Richard [TransCanada. Calgary, AB (Canada); Rapp, Steve [Spectra Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Despite various efforts, no reliable tools and techniques are available to enable an operator to quantify the impact of an SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) colony on the safety and integrity of a pipeline. Reliable non-destructive detection and measurement tools are not available either. There is therefore a large gap between current technology and the needs of the pipeline industry. Recent developments promise that with a concentrated effort, a comprehensive solution can be devised. This paper describes technical work performed to develop and validate both the inspection tool and the time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technique for sizing the depth of SCC. It also presents preliminary results of work on a closely related project that provides, on the basis of this technology, an integrated approach and tool for mapping, sizing, and evaluating SCC, through which significant cracks are filtered from more benign cracks within an SCC colony.

  19. A comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoisser, C. M.; Audebert, S.

    2008-05-01

    -flexibility induced by the crack in the shaft. The validated crack model is then applied to predict the dynamical behaviour of large industrial rotating machinery and to verify the crack detection capability based on the vibratory response. With respect to 900 MW turboset units, with cracks affecting LP rotors, a map of crack detection capabilities, based on 1× rev. and 2× rev. components as a function of circumferential extension ratio and crack depth, is drawn. If the crack depth is higher than 37% of the rotor diameter, on-line measurements of 2× rev. vibratory level shift allow to detect the crack. On the opposite, 1× rev. monitoring is necessary for cracks with circumferential extension superior to 270°. It is also observed that LP rotor bending mode shift monitoring theoretically allows to detect cracks with depths equal to or greater than 20% of the rotor diameter or with circumferential extension greater than 120°. The difficulties encountered for distinguishing the LP rotor bending mode frequencies, which may also evolve in time, independently from the cracks, limit the industrial application of this latter technique. Therefore new studies will focus on the analysis of torsion dynamic behaviour and on its sensitivity to cracks. With respect to RCP units, when half of the shaft section is cracked, the 2× rev. component remains very small. Whilst the result is simply due to a small excitation, a more accurate estimation of the external forces acting on the shaft could lead to more accurate numerical predictions.

  20. Exact method for determining subsurface radioactivity depth profiles from gamma spectroscopy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Van Siclen, Clinton DeW

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface radioactivity may be due to transport of radionuclides from a contaminated surface into the solid volume, as occurs for radioactive fallout deposited on soil, or from fast neutron activation of a solid volume, as occurs in concrete blocks used for radiation shielding. For purposes including fate and transport studies of radionuclides in the environment, decommissioning and decontamination of radiation facilities, and nuclear forensics, an in situ, nondestructive method for ascertaining the subsurface distribution of radioactivity is desired. The method developed here obtains a polynomial expression for the radioactivity depth profile, using a small set of gamma-ray count rates measured by a collimated detector directed towards the surface at a variety of angles with respect to the surface normal. To demonstrate its capabilities, this polynomial method is applied to the simple case where the radioactivity is maximal at the surface and decreases exponentially with depth below the surface, and to the ...

  1. Research progress of depth detection in vision measurement: a novel project of bifocal imaging system for 3D measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anhu; Ding, Ye; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yongjian; Li, Zhizhong

    2013-09-01

    The paper reviews the recent research progresses of vision measurement. The general methods of the depth detection used in the monocular stereo vision are compared with each other. As a result, a novel bifocal imaging measurement system based on the zoom method is proposed to solve the problem of the online 3D measurement. This system consists of a primary lens and a secondary one with the different focal length matching to meet the large-range and high-resolution imaging requirements without time delay and imaging errors, which has an important significance for the industry application.

  2. Measurement of depth-resolved thermal deformation distribution using phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Dong, Bo; Bai, Yulei; Ye, Shuangli; Lei, Zhenkun; Zhou, Yanzhou

    2015-10-19

    An updated B-scan method is proposed for measuring the evolution of thermal deformation fields in polymers. In order to measure the distributions of out-of-plane deformation and normal strain field, phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography (PC-SOCT) was performed with the depth range and resolution of 4.3 mm and 10.7 μm, respectively, as thermal loads were applied to three different multilayer samples. The relation between temperature and material refractive index was predetermined before the measurement. After accounting for the refractive index, the thermal deformation fields in the polymer were obtained. The measured thermal expansion coefficient of silicone sealant was approximately equal to its reference value. This method allows correctly assessing the mechanical properties in semitransparent polymers.

  3. Intercomparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from Brewer Ozone spectrophotometers and CIMEL sunphotometers measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cheymol

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Langley plot method applied on the Brewer Ozone measurements can provide accurate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD in the UV-B. We present seven intercomparisons between AOD retrieved from Brewer Ozone measurements at 320 nm and AOD measured by CIMEL sunphotometer at 340 nm or 440 nm (shifted to 320 nm in using the Angström's law, which are stored in the international AERONET database. Only the intercomparisons between co-located instruments can be used to validate the Langley Plot Method applied to the Brewer measurements: in this case, all the correlation coefficients are above 0.82. If the instruments are not at the same site, the correlation between the AOD retrieved by both instruments is much lower. In applying the Angström's law the intercomparison is improved compared to previous study.

  4. Finite-Element Analysis of Crack Arrest Properties of Fiber Reinforced Composites Application in Semi-Elliptical Cracked Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyuan; Song, Shulei; Deng, Hongbo; Zhong, Kai

    2017-07-01

    In nowadays, repair method using fiber reinforced composites as the mainstream pipe repair technology, it can provide security for X100 high-grade steel energy long-distance pipelines in engineering. In this paper, analysis of cracked X100 high-grade steel pipe was conducted, simulation analysis was made on structure of pipes and crack arresters (CAs) to obtain the J-integral value in virtue of ANSYS Workbench finite element software and evaluation on crack arrest effects was done through measured elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter J-integral and the crack arrest coefficient K, in a bid to summarize effect laws of composite CAs and size of pipes and cracks for repairing CAs. The results indicate that the K value is correlated with laying angle λ, laying length L2/D1, laying thickness T1/T2of CAs, crack depth c/T1 and crack length a/c, and calculate recommended parameters for repairing fiber reinforced composite CAs in terms of two different crack forms.

  5. Evaluation of the depth-integration method of measuring water discharge in large rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    The depth-integration method oor measuring water discharge makes a continuos measurement of the water velocity from the water surface to the bottom at 20 to 40 locations or verticals across a river. It is especially practical for large rivers where river traffic makes it impractical to use boats attached to taglines strung across the river or to use current meters suspended from bridges. This method has the additional advantage over the standard two- and eight-tenths method in that a discharge-weighted suspended-sediment sample can be collected at the same time. When this method is used in large rivers such as the Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio, a microwave navigation system is used to determine the ship's position at each vertical sampling location across the river, and to make accurate velocity corrections to compensate for shift drift. An essential feature is a hydraulic winch that can lower and raise the current meter at a constant transit velocity so that the velocities at all depths are measured for equal lengths of time. Field calibration measurements show that: (1) the mean velocity measured on the upcast (bottom to surface) is within 1% of the standard mean velocity determined by 9-11 point measurements; (2) if the transit velocity is less than 25% of the mean velocity, then average error in the mean velocity is 4% or less. The major source of bias error is a result of mounting the current meter above a sounding weight and sometimes above a suspended-sediment sampling bottle, which prevents measurement of the velocity all the way to the bottom. The measured mean velocity is slightly larger than the true mean velocity. This bias error in the discharge is largest in shallow water (approximately 8% for the Missouri River at Hermann, MO, where the mean depth was 4.3 m) and smallest in deeper water (approximately 3% for the Mississippi River at Vickbsurg, MS, where the mean depth was 14.5 m). The major source of random error in the discharge is the natural

  6. Measurements and estimation of the columnar optical depth of tropospheric aerosols in the UV spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Cachorro

    Full Text Available We report values of the columnar tropospheric aerosol optical depth at UV wavelengths based on experimental measurements of the direct spectral irradiances carried out by a commercial spectroradiometer (Li1800 of Licor company covering the range from 300–1100 nm at two stations with different climate characteristics in Spain. The first station is located in a rural site in north central Spain with continental climate. The data extend from March to the end of October of 1995. The other station is a coastal site in the Gulf of Cádiz (southwest Spain of maritime climate type. This study is mainly focused on the capability of estimating aerosol optical depth values in the UV region based on the extracted information in the visible and near infrared ranges. A first method has been used based on the Ångström turbidity parameters. However, since this method requires detailed spectral information, a second method has also been used, based on the correlation between wavelengths. A correlation has been established between the experimental aerosol optical depth values at 350 nm and 500 nm wavelengths. Although the type of aerosol seems to be the key factor that determines the quality of these estimations, the evaluation of the associated error is necessary to know the behaviour of these estimations in each area of study.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; transmission and scattering of radiation; troposphere – composition and chemistry

  7. Measurements and estimation of the columnar optical depth of tropospheric aerosols in the UV spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachorro, V.E.; Vergaz, R.; Martin, M.J.; Frutos, A.M. de [Grupo de Optica Atmosferica, Univ. de Valladolid (GOA-UVA), Valladolid (Spain); Vilaplana, J.M.; Morena, B. de la [Estacion de Sondeos Atmosfericos ESAT ' ' El Arenosillo' ' , INTA, Huelva (Spain)

    2002-04-01

    We report values of the columnar tropospheric aerosol optical depth at UV wavelengths based on experimental measurements of the direct spectral irradiances carried out by a commercial spectroradiometer (Li1800 of Licor company) covering the range from 300-1100 nm at two stations with different climate characteristics in Spain. The first station is located in a rural site in north central Spain with continental climate. The data extend from March to the end of October of 1995. The other station is a coastal site in the Gulf of Cadiz (southwest Spain) of maritime climate type. This study is mainly focused on the capability of estimating aerosol optical depth values in the UV region based on the extracted information in the visible and near infrared ranges. A first method has been used based on the Aangstroem turbidity parameters. However, since this method requires detailed spectral information, a second method has also been used, based on the correlation between wavelengths. A correlation has been established between the experimental aerosol optical depth values at 350 nm and 500 nm wavelengths. Although the type of aerosol seems to be the key factor that determines the quality of these estimations, the evaluation of the associated error is necessary to know the behavior of these estimations in each area of study. (orig.)

  8. Depth of interaction resolution measurements for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Silverman, Robert W; Shah, Kanai S; McClish, Mickel A; Farrell, Richard; Entine, Gerald; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-05-07

    We explore dual-ended read out of LSO arrays with two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) as a high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications. Flood histograms, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for unpolished LSO arrays with individual crystal sizes of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 mm, and for a polished LSO array with 1.3 mm pixels. The thickness of the crystal arrays was 20 mm. Good flood histograms were obtained for all four arrays, and crystals in all four arrays can be clearly resolved. Although the amplitude of each PSAPD signal decreases as the interaction depth moves further from the PSAPD, the sum of the two PSAPD signals is essentially constant with irradiation depth for all four arrays. The energy resolutions were similar for all four arrays, ranging from 14.7% to 15.4%. A DOI resolution of 3-4 mm (including the width of the irradiation band which is approximately 2 mm) was obtained for all the unpolished arrays. The best DOI resolution was achieved with the unpolished 1 mm array (average 3.5 mm). The DOI resolution for the 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm unpolished arrays was 3.7 and 4.0 mm respectively. For the polished array, the DOI resolution was only 16.5 mm. Summing the DOI profiles across all crystals for the 1 mm array only degraded the DOI resolution from 3.5 mm to 3.9 mm, indicating that it may not be necessary to calibrate the DOI response separately for each crystal within an array. The DOI response of individual crystals in the array confirms this finding. These results provide a detailed characterization of the DOI response of these PSAPD-based PET detectors which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner making use of this detector approach.

  9. Measured depth-dependence of waveguide invariant in shallow water with a summer profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Altan; Fialkowski, Laurie T; Schindall, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic-intensity striation patterns were measured in the time-frequency domain using an L-shaped array and two simultaneously towed broadband (350-650 Hz) sources at depths above and below the thermocline under summer profile conditions. Distributions of the waveguide invariant parameter β, extracted from the acoustic striation patterns, peak at different values when receivers are above or below the thermocline for a source that is below the thermocline. However, the distributions show similar characteristics when the source is above the thermocline. Experimental results are verified by a numerical analysis of phase slowness, group slowness, and relative amplitudes of acoustic modes.

  10. Errors in Thermographic Camera Measurement Caused by Known Heat Sources and Depth Based Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Christian E. Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal imaging has shown to be a better tool for the quantitative measurement of temperature than single spot infrared thermometers. However, thermographic cameras can encounter errors in acquiring accurate temperature measurements in the presence of other environmental heat sources. Some of these errors arise due to the inability of the thermal camera to detect objects and features in the infrared domain. In this paper, the thermal image is registered as a stereo image from a Kinect system prior to depth-based correction. Experiments demonstrating the error are presented together with the determination of the measurement errors under prior knowledge of the thermographed scene. The proposed correction scheme improves the accuracy of the thermal image through augmentation using the Kinect system.

  11. Improved measurements of the apparent resistivity for small depths in Vertical Electrical Soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleiro, E.; Asensio, G.; Moreno, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a full simulation of a Vertical Electrical Sounding of a multilayer soil using a Wenner array is performed when both the active and the measurement electrodes consist of bare rod length L buried vertically at ground level. The apparent resistivity is calculated for a wide range of values of the separation between the electrodes using the values of the potential between the measuring electrode and a proposed function that characterizes the behavior of the electrodes used which substantially improves the measurements for small depths. The results allow comparing the values of apparent resistivity obtained by known calculation expressions with the results found by using a characteristic function of the electrodes, which is proposed in this paper. In order to obtain a complete vertical sounding of the soil, the convenience of using adapted methods to the type of electrode used in the sounding is discussed.

  12. Research on the influence and correction method of depth scanning error to the underwater acoustic image measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Jidan; ZHAI Chunpin; WANGYilin; HUI Junying

    2011-01-01

    The technology of underwater acoustic image measurement was a passive locating method with high precision in near field. To improve the precision of underwater acoustic image measurement, the influence of the depth scan error was analyzed and the correcti

  13. Keraring Intrastromal Segment Depth Measured by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Eyes with Keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavia, Carlo; D'Amelio, Savino

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate agreement between measured and intended distance of Keraring (Mediphacos, Belo Horizonte, Brazil) intracorneal ring segments from the anterior and posterior corneal surfaces. Methods. Twenty-six Keraring ICRS implanted in 24 keratoconic eyes were examined. The distance from the Keraring apex to the anterior corneal surface and the distance from the inner and the outer corners to the posterior corneal surface were measured 3 months postoperatively using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Agreement between measured distance and intended distance was assessed by calculating the absolute differences and 95% limits of agreement (95% LoA). Results. The mean absolute difference was significantly lower (p < 0.001) for the measurements taken at the inner corner (23.54 ± 15.90 μm) than that for those taken at the apex (108.92 ± 62.72 μm) and the outer corner (108.35 ± 56.99 μm). The measurements taken at the inner corner were within ±25 and ±50 μm of the intended distance in 15/26 (57.7%) and 24/26 (92.3%) cases, respectively, and showed the narrowest 95% LoA with the intended distance (−57.61 to 55.15 μm). Conclusions. The distance of the inner corner from the posterior corneal surface showed the best agreement with the intended distance. This measurement is suitable for determining whether the actual Keraring depth matches the intended depth. PMID:28261495

  14. Homotopy Iteration Algorithm for Crack Parameters Identification with Composite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on homotopy iteration algorithm is proposed to identify the crack parameters in beam structures. In the forward problem, a fully open crack model with the composite element method is employed for the vibration analysis. The dynamic responses of the cracked beam in time domain are obtained from the Newmark direct integration method. In the inverse analysis, an identification approach based on homotopy iteration algorithm is studied to identify the location and the depth of a cracked beam. The identification equation is derived by minimizing the error between the calculated acceleration response and the simulated measured one. Newton iterative method with the homotopy equation is employed to track the correct path and improve the convergence of the crack parameters. Two numerical examples are conducted to illustrate the correctness and efficiency of the proposed method. And the effects of the influencing parameters, such as measurement time duration, measurement points, division of the homotopy parameter and measurement noise, are studied.

  15. Ultrasonographic measurement of the ligamentum flavum depth; is it a reliable method to distinguish true and false loss of resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Michael Haejin; Lee, Won Hyung; Ko, Young Kwon; So, Sang Young; Kim, Hyun Joong

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that if performed without radiographic guidance, the loss of resistance (LOR) technique can result in inaccurate needle placement in up to 30% of lumbar epidural blocks. To date, no study has shown the efficacy of measuring the depth of the posterior complex (ligamentum flavum, epidural space, and posterior dura) ultrasonographically to distinguish true and false LOR. 40 cervical epidural blocks were performed using the LOR technique and confirmed by epidurograms. Transverse ultrasound images of the C6/7 area were taken before each cervical epidural block, and the distances from the skin to the posterior complex, transverse process, and supraspinous ligament were measured on each ultrasound view. The number of LOR attempts was counted, and the depth of each LOR was measured with a standard ruler. Correlation of false and true positive LOR depth with ultrasonographically measured depth was also statistically analyzed. 76.5% of all cases (26 out of 34) showed false positive LOR. Concordance correlation coefficients between the measured distances on ultrasound (skin to ligamentum flavum) and actual needle depth were 0.8285 on true LOR. Depth of the true positive LOR correlated with height and weight, with a mean of 5.64 ± 1.06 cm, while the mean depth of the false positive LOR was 4.08 ± 1.00 cm. Ultrasonographic measurement of the ligamentum flavum depth (or posterior complex) preceding cervical epidural block is beneficial in excluding false LOR and increasing success rates of cervical epidural blocks.

  16. Simulation and measurement of AES depth profiles; a case study of the C/Ta/C/Si system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zommer, Ludomir; Jablonski, Alexander; Kotis, László; Safran, Gyorgy; Menyhárd, Miklós

    2010-04-01

    A multilayer sample (C (23.3 nm)/Ta (26.5 nm)/C (22.7 nm)/Si substrate) was submitted to AES depth profiling by Ar + ions of energy 1 keV and angles of incidence of 72°, 78°, and 82°. The shapes of the as-measured depth profiles were strongly different emphasizing that the ion-bombardment conditions strongly affects the shapes of measured depth profiles. We simulated the depth profile measured at an angle of incidence of 72° by calculating the backscattering factor, applying attenuation lengths available in the literature, and simulating the ion-bombardment-induced specimen alteration with a TRIDYN simulation and a trial and error method. The good agreement between the calculated and measured depth profiles justified the method applied.

  17. Turbulence Measurements from a Moored Platform at Mid-Depth in a Swift Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alex; Lueck, Rolf; Wolk, Fabian; McMillan, Justine

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from a turbulence experiment with a 3-m long streamlined floatation body, instrumented with velocity shear probes, fast-response thermistors, a 1 MHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (AD2CP), and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). The system was deployed over seven tidal cycles at mid-depth in a 30-m deep tidal channel in the lower Bay of Fundy, Canada. Peak flow speeds exceeded 2 m s-1, and while 10-min time scale average speeds were similar between ebb and flood, the variances were markedly higher during flood. Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rates measured with the shear probes exhibit a pronounced flood/ebb contrast: O(10-4) W kg-1 peak values during flood, but lower by an order of magnitude during ebb. Dissipation rates follow u3 scaling over a wide range of flow speeds between 0.5 and 2.5 m s-1. Below 0.5 m s-1 an asymmetry in the mounting arrangement caused the floatation body to pitch upward, biasing the measured dissipation values high. The ADV on the platform registered mean speed - used to implement Taylor's hypothesis - which was corroborated with the platform-mounted ADCP. Additional ADCPs were also deployed on a nearby bottom pod, sampling at turbulence resolving rates - up to 8 Hz. Comparisons between the shear probe and acoustic estimates of the TKE spectrum and dissipation rate - at comparable depths - are presented.

  18. Guided fluorescence diagnosis of childhood caries: preliminary measures correlate with depth of carious decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshchuk, Mari-Alina; Zhang, Liang; Dickinson, Brian A.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Kim, Amy S.; Baltuck, Camille T.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-02-01

    The current rise in childhood caries worldwide has increased the demand for portable technologies that can quickly and accurately detect and diagnose early stage carious lesions. These lesions, if identified at an early stage, can be reversed with remineralization treatments, education, and improvements in home care. A multi-modal optical prototype for detecting and diagnosing occlusal caries demineralization in vivo has been developed and pilot tested. The device uses a 405-nm laser as a scanned illumination source to obtain high resolution and high surface contrast reflectance images, which allows the user to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel. When a suspicious region is located, the device can be switched to perform dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405-nm and 532-nm laser excitations. These spectra are used to compute an auto-fluorescence (AF) ratio of the suspicious region and the percent difference of AF ratios from a healthy region of the same tooth. The device was tested on 7 children's teeth in vivo with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. Lesion depth was then visually estimated from the video image using the 405-nm scanned light source, and within a month the maximum drill depth was assessed by a clinician. The researcher and clinicians were masked from previous measurements in a blinded study protocol. Preliminary results show that the ratiometric percent difference measurement of the AF spectrum of the tooth correlates with the severity of the demineralization as assessed by the clinician after drilling.

  19. A novel defect depth measurement method based on Nonlinear System Identification for pulsed thermographic inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifan; Mehnen, Jörn; Sirikham, Adisorn; Roy, Rajkumar

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces a new method to improve the reliability and confidence level of defect depth measurement based on pulsed thermographic inspection by addressing the over-fitting problem. Different with existing methods using a fixed model structure for all pixels, the proposed method adaptively detects the optimal model structure for each pixel thus targeting to achieve better model fitting while using less model terms. Results from numerical simulations and real experiments suggest that (a) the new method is able to measure defect depth more accurately without a pre-set model structure (error is usually within 1 % when SNR>32 dB) in comparison with existing methods, (b) the number of model terms should be 8 for signals with SNR∈ [ 30 dB , 40 dB ] , 8-10 for SNR>40 dB and 5-8 for SNR<30 dB, and (c) a data length with at least 100 data points and 2-3 times of the characteristic time usually produces the best results.

  20. Solid-state NMR (31)P paramagnetic relaxation enhancement membrane protein immersion depth measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Hudson, Stephen M; Sahu, Indra D; Liu, Lishan; Lorigan, Gary A

    2014-04-24

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a widely used approach for measuring long-range distance constraints in biomolecular solution NMR spectroscopy. In this paper, we show that (31)P PRE solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be utilized to determine the immersion depth of spin-labeled membrane peptides and proteins. Changes in the (31)P NMR PRE times coupled with modeling studies can be used to describe the spin-label position/amino acid within the lipid bilayer and the corresponding helical tilt. This method provides valuable insight on protein-lipid interactions and membrane protein structural topology. Solid-state (31)P NMR data on the 23 amino acid α-helical nicotinic acetylcholine receptor nAChR M2δ transmembrane domain model peptide followed predicted behavior of (31)P PRE rates of the phospholipid headgroup as the spin-label moves from the membrane surface toward the center of the membrane. Residue 11 showed the smallest changes in (31)P PRE (center of the membrane), while residue 22 shows the largest (31)P PRE change (near the membrane surface), when compared to the diamagnetic control M2δ sample. This PRE SS-NMR technique can be used as a molecular ruler to measure membrane immersion depth.

  1. Can state or response entropy be used as a measure of sleep depth?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, P

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: In this prospective observational study we examined the potential of the spectral entropy measures \\'state\\' and \\'response\\' entropy (Entropy monitor), as measures of sleep depth in 12 healthy adult subjects. Both median state and response entropy values varied significantly with sleep stage (p = 0.017 and p = 0.014 respectively; ANOVA). Median state or response entropy did not decrease significantly during the transition from awake to stage I sleep (p > 0.017). State entropy values decreased significantly between sleep stages I and II (p < 0.001). Both state and response entropy values were significantly less (40 and 45 arbitrary units respectively) in stage III (slow wave sleep) vs stage II sleep (p = 0.008). We conclude that state and response entropy values, when expressed as a function of time, may be a useful means of quantifying aspects of sleep.

  2. Birefringence measurement of glass ion-exchanged waveguides: burying depth or cover layer influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamon, D.; Garayt, J. P.; Jordan, E.; Parsy, F.; Ghibaudo, E.; Neveu, S.; Broquin, J.-E.; Royer, F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with an experimental non-destructive technique for the measurement of polarization behavior of integrated optical waveguides. It is based on a high resolution polarimeter associated to an ellipsometric-type calibration which allows determining the full state of polarization of the output light. A magneto-optic perturbation is also added to generate TE/TM mode beating, whose spatial period is directly linked to the modal TE/TM birefringence. This equipment is first qualified by the measurement of modal birefringence in totally or partially buried ion exchanged waveguides. The results show that the value of the birefringence varies as a function of the diffusion aperture width or with the burying depth. By adding a magneto-optical cover layer, consisting in magnetic nanoparticles doped silica matrix obtained by a sol gel process 1, we evidence a huge increase of the beating magnitude and a decrease of the modal birefringence.

  3. A comparison of two methods to measure choroidal thickness by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Lars Kristian; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Vergmann, Anna Stage

    coherence tomography (EDI-SD OCT) has made it possible to visualize the choroid, and it is generally accepted that Heidelberg Spectralis OCT provides valid measurements of choroidal thickness (CT), although no fully automated software is commercially available. Two methods for CT-measurement are available...... the CT: 1: Segmentation method; by the use of the thickness profile window we manually edited and moved the inner limiting membrane (ILM) line to the choroid-scleral border (CSB), while we kept the automated defined Bruchs membrane (BM). Hereafter, the software calculated the vertical distance between......Introduction The choroid is believed to be involved in the pathophysiology of several vision threatening diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy, inflammatory disorders and myopic macular degeneration. Enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical...

  4. Measurement of the Muon Production Depths at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The muon content of extensive air showers is an observable sensitive to the primary composition and to the hadronic interaction properties. The Pierre Auger Observatory uses water-Cherenkov detectors to measure particle densities at the ground and therefore is sensitive to the muon content of air showers. We present here a method which allows us to estimate the muon production depths by exploiting the measurement of the muon arrival times at the ground recorded with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The analysis is performed in a large range of zenith angles, thanks to the capability of estimating and subtracting the electromagnetic component, and for energies between $10^{19.2}$ and $10^{20}$ eV.

  5. Measurement of the muon production depths at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collica, Laura

    2016-09-01

    The muon content of extensive air showers is an observable sensitive to the primary composition and to the hadronic interaction properties. The Pierre Auger Observatory uses water-Cherenkov detectors to measure particle densities at the ground and therefore is sensitive to the muon content of air showers. We present here a method which allows us to estimate the muon production depths by exploiting the measurement of the muon arrival times at the ground recorded with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The analysis is performed in a large range of zenith angles, thanks to the capability of estimating and subtracting the electromagnetic component, and for energies between 1019.2 and 1020eV.

  6. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 1018eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, Xmax⁡, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 1018eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106-21+35)g/cm2/decade below 1018.24±0.05eV, and (24±3)g/cm2/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26g/cm2. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  7. Repeatability of Choroidal Thickness Measurements on Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography Using Different Posterior Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Vivian S; Moisseiev, Elad; Cunefare, David; Farsiu, Sina; Moshiri, Ala; Yiu, Glenn

    2016-09-01

    To assess the reliability of manual choroidal thickness measurements by comparing different posterior boundary definitions of the choroidal-scleral junction on enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Reliability analysis. Two graders marked the choroidal-scleral junction with segmentation software using different posterior boundaries: (1) the outer border of the choroidal vessel lumen, (2) the outer border of the choroid stroma, and (3) the inner border of the sclera, to measure the vascular choroidal thickness (VCT), stromal choroidal thickness (SCT), and total choroidal thickness (TCT), respectively. Measurements were taken at 0.5-mm intervals from 1.5 mm nasal to 1.5 mm temporal to the fovea, and averaged continuously across the central 3 mm of the macula. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of reliability (CR) were compared to assess intergrader and intragrader reliability. Choroidal thickness measurements varied significantly with different posterior boundaries (P choroidal-scleral junction visibility was Choroidal thickness measurements are more reproducible when measured to the border of the choroid stroma (SCT) than the vascular lumen (VCT) or sclera (TCT). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of cycloplegia on axial length and anterior chamber depth measurements in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sin Wan; Chan, Rufina; Cheng, Roy Cs; Cho, Pauline

    2009-11-01

    Cycloplegia has been shown to have no effect on axial length measurement made with the IOLMaster in adults. The current study aimed at evaluating the effect of cycloplegia on axial length and anterior chamber depth (ACD) measurements made with the IOLMaster and an ultrasonic biometer in children. Pre- and post-cycloplegic axial length and ACD were measured with the IOLMaster followed by the Sonomed A-5500 in 31 children aged from seven to 15 years by the same examiner. The 95% limits of agreement (LoA) were determined, if there were no significant correlations found between the mean differences and their means. Seven subjects were excluded. Results from the remaining 24 subjects show that the effects of cycloplegia, instruments, and interaction between cycloplegia and instrument on axial length measurement were insignificant (repeated measure ANOVA F(1,23) 0.15). The 95% LoA in cycloplegia were better with the IOLMaster (-0.04 to 0.04 mm) than with the Sonomed A-5500 (-0.13 to 0.14 mm). The 95% LoA between the two instruments were similar with and without cycloplegia (pre-cycloplegia: -0.20 to 0.27 mm; post-cycloplegia: -0.17 to 0.22 mm). There was no significant interaction between cycloplegia and instrument in ACD measurement (repeated measure ANOVA F(1,23)= 0.85, p = 0.37), however, ACD was 0.05 to 0.06 mm shorter before cycloplegia (repeated measure ANOVA F(1,23)= 44.70, p Sonomed A-5500 were insignificant. In contrast, ACD measurement was significantly affected by cycloplegia and different instruments.

  9. Simulations and measurements of artificial cracks and pits in flat stainless steel plates using tone burst eddy-current thermography (TBET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, M. N.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Maxfield, B. W.; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Tone Burst Eddy current Thermography (TBET) is a new hybrid, non-contacting, Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) method which employs a combination of Pulsed Eddy current Thermography (PEC) and Thermographic Non-Destructive Evaluation (TNDE). For understanding the influence of cracking and pitting on heat generation and flow within a metallic body, a fundamental knowledge of the detailed induced current density distribution in the component under test is required. This information enables us to calculate the amount of heat produced by the defects and how that heat diffuses to the surface where it is imaged. This paper describes simulation work done for artificial pits and cracks within pits on the far surface of poorly conducting metals like stainless steel. The first phase of this investigation simulates the transient thermal distribution for artificial 2D pit and crack-like defects using the finite element package COMSOL multi-physics with the AC/DC module and general heat transfer. Considering the reflection measurement geometry where thermal excitation and temperature monitoring are on the same surface, pitting reduces the material volume thereby contributing to a larger temperature rise for the same thermal energy input. A crack within a pit gives a further increase in temperature above the pure pit baseline. The tone burst frequency can be changed to obtain approximately uniform heating (low frequency) or heating of a thin region at the observation surface. Although front surface temperature changes due to 10% deep far-side pits in a 6 mm thick plate can be measured, it is not yet clear whether a 20% deep crack within this pit can be discriminated against the background. Both simulations and measurements will be presented. The objective of this work is to determine whether the TBET method is suitable for the detection and characterization of far side pitting, cracking and cracks within those pits.

  10. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, .M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  11. Preliminary study of depth of interaction measurement for a PET detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Yan-Fei; LIU Shuang-Quan; WANG Pei-Lin; WEI Shu-Jun; WEI Long; ZHANG Zhi-Ming; LI Dao-Wu; SHUAI Lei; SHAN Bao-Ci; HUANG Xian-Chao; LIU Jun-Hui; CHEN Yan; WANG Ying-Jie

    2011-01-01

    In this work we studied the feasibility of detecting the depth of interaction (DOI) with two layers of crystal arrays of LYSO and BGO scintillators coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT)R8900-C12.A front-end electronics was designed,with which we got different pulse shapes for different crystals to obtain depth information.With the double integration method,we got the DOI histogram of a divided integration ratio of two crystals as the standard to determine the layer-of-interaction.The DOI accuracy,measured by scanning a 22Na slit source along the side of the module,was 98% for the LYSO layer and 95% for the BGO layer.The energy resolution at 511keV was 13.1% for LYSO and 17.1% for BGO.We obtained good crystal separation in 2D position histograms of both layers.These results could be useful in the manufacture of PET scanners with high spatial resolutions.

  12. SU-E-T-443: Developmental Technique for Proton Pencil Beam Measurements: Depth Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjomandy, B; Lee, T; Schultz, T; Hsi, W; Park, S [McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measurements of depth dose distribution (DDD) of pencil beam in proton therapy can be challenging and time consuming. We have developed a technique that uses two Bragg peak chambers to expedite these measurements with a high accuracy. Methods and Material: We used a PTW water tank and two PTW 10.5 cm3 Bragg peak chambers; one as a field chamber and the other as a reference chamber to measure DDDs for 100–250 MeV proton pencil beams. The reference chamber was positioned outside of the water tank upstream with respect to field chamber. We used Geant4 Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) to model the ProTom proton beam to generate DDDs. The MCS generated DDDs were used to account for halo effects of proton pencil beam that are not measureable with Bragg peak chambers. We also used PTW PEAKFINDER to measure DDDs for comparison purpose. Results: We compared measured and MCS DDDs with Continuous Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA) ranges to verify the range of proton beams that were supplied by the manufacturer. The agreements between all DDD with respect to CSDA were within ±0.5 mm. The WET for Bragg peak chamber for energies between 100–250 MeV was 12.7 ± 0.5 mm. The correction for halo effect was negligible below 150 MeV and was in order of ∼5-10% for 150–250 MeV. Conclusion: Use of Bragg Peak chamber as a reference chamber can facilitate DDD measurements in proton pencil beam with a high accuracy. Some corrections will be required to account for halo effect in case of high energy proton beams due to physical size of chamber.

  13. Measurements of UV aerosol optical depth in the French Southern Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lenoble

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Routine measurements of global and diffuse UV irradiances at Briançon station (1310 m a.s.l. are used to retrieve the direct solar irradiance and the aerosol optical depth (AOD, for cloudless days. Data of three years (2003, 2004, 2005 are analyzed; the results confirm those of a preliminary analysis for 2001, 2002.

    The atmosphere is very clear in winter, with AODs between 0.05 and 0.1. The turbidity increases slowly in spring, starting end of February, with AODs around 0.2–0.3 in mid summer, some values reaching 0.4. A similar behaviour is observed for all years, with somewhat higher values in late summer for the year 2003.

  14. Assessment of error in aerosol optical depth measured by AERONET due to aerosol forward scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyuk, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Eck, Thomas F.; Slutsker, Ilya; Schafer, Joel S.; Giles, David M.; Sorokin, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the accuracy of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by CIMEL Sun photometers. The effect is quantified in terms of AOD and solar zenith angle using radiative transfer modeling. The analysis is based on aerosol size distributions derived from multi-year climatologies of AERONET aerosol retrievals. The study shows that the modeled error is lower than AOD calibration uncertainty (0.01) for the vast majority of AERONET level 2 observations, ∼99.53%. Only ∼0.47% of the AERONET database corresponding mostly to dust aerosol with high AOD and low solar elevations has larger biases. We also show that observations with extreme reductions in direct solar irradiance do not contribute to level 2 AOD due to low Sun photometer digital counts below a quality control cutoff threshold.

  15. Thickness dependent CARS measurement of polymeric thin films without depth-profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae Sik; Jeoung, Sae Chae; Chon, Byung-Hyuk

    2008-02-18

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is demonstrated to be a promising optical method for the characterization of polymer films with film thickness varying between 180 nm to 4300 nm. In case of PMMA films with a thickness of few hundreds of nanometers, the observed CARS signal was mainly associated with the interference effect of large nonresonant CARS field from glass substrate and the weak resonant field of PMMA. The dependence of resonant CARS intensity of PMMA film on film thickness is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction on a CARS field. The current work offers potential possibilities of noninvasive thickness measurement of polymeric thin film of thickness less than 180 nm by multiplex CARS microscopy without depth-profiling.

  16. Depth measurement using monocular stereo vision system: aspect of spatial discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Chengjin; Zhao, Xunjie; Chen, Jiabo

    2010-11-01

    The monocular stereo vision system, consisting of single camera with controllable focal length, can be used in 3D reconstruction. Applying the system for 3D reconstruction, must consider effects caused by digital camera. There are two possible methods to make the monocular stereo vision system. First one the distance between the target object and the camera image plane is constant and lens moves. The second method assumes that the lens position is constant and the image plane moves in respect to the target. In this paper mathematical modeling of two approaches is presented. We focus on iso-disparity surfaces to define the discretization effect on the reconstructed space. These models are implemented and simulated on Matlab. The analysis is used to define application constrains and limitations of these methods. The results can be also used to enhance the accuracy of depth measurement.

  17. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  18. Measuring Compositions in Organic Depth Profiling: Results from a VAMAS Interlaboratory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shard, A. G.; Havelund, Rasmus; Spencer, Steve J.; Gilmore, I. S.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Angerer, Tina B.; Aoyagi, Satoka; Barnes, Jean P.; Benayad, Anass; Bernasik, Andrzej; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D.; Deeks, Christopher; Fletcher, John S.; Graham, Daniel J.; Heuser, Christian; Lee, Tae G.; Marie, Camille; Marzec, Mateusz M.; Mishra, Gautam; Rading, Derk; Renault, Oliver; Scurr, David J.; Shon, Hyun K.; Spampinato, Valentina; Tian, Hua; Wang, Fuyi; Winograd, Nicholas; Wu, Kui; Wucher, Andreas; Zhou, Yufan; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-07-23

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) interlaboratory study on the measurement of composition in organic depth profiling. Layered samples with known binary compositions of Irganox 1010 and either Irganox 1098 or Fmoc-pentafluoro-L-phenylalanine in each layer were manufactured in a single batch and distributed to more than 20 participating laboratories. The samples were analyzed using argon cluster ion sputtering and either X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) or Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to generate depth profiles. Participants were asked to estimate the volume fractions in two of the layers and were provided with the compositions of all other layers. Participants using XPS provided volume fractions within 0.03 of the nominal values. Participants using ToF-SIMS either made no attempt, or used various methods that gave results ranging in error from 0.02 to over 0.10 in volume fraction, the latter representing a 50% relative error for a nominal volume fraction of 0.2. Error was predominantly caused by inadequacy in the ability to compensate for primary ion intensity variations and the matrix effect in SIMS. Matrix effects in these materials appear to be more pronounced as the number of atoms in both the primary analytical ion and the secondary ion increase. Using the participants’ data we show that organic SIMS matrix effects can be measured and are remarkably consistent between instruments. We provide recommendations for identifying and compensating for matrix effects. Finally we demonstrate, using a simple normalization method, that virtually all ToF-SIMS participants could have obtained estimates of volume fraction that were at least as accurate and consistent as XPS.

  19. Measuring Compositions in Organic Depth Profiling: Results from a VAMAS Interlaboratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shard, Alexander G; Havelund, Rasmus; Spencer, Steve J; Gilmore, Ian S; Alexander, Morgan R; Angerer, Tina B; Aoyagi, Satoka; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Benayad, Anass; Bernasik, Andrzej; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D P; Deeks, Christopher; Fletcher, John S; Graham, Daniel J; Heuser, Christian; Lee, Tae Geol; Marie, Camille; Marzec, Mateusz M; Mishra, Gautam; Rading, Derk; Renault, Olivier; Scurr, David J; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Spampinato, Valentina; Tian, Hua; Wang, Fuyi; Winograd, Nicholas; Wu, Kui; Wucher, Andreas; Zhou, Yufan; Zhu, Zihua; Cristaudo, Vanina; Poleunis, Claude

    2015-08-20

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) interlaboratory study on the measurement of composition in organic depth profiling. Layered samples with known binary compositions of Irganox 1010 and either Irganox 1098 or Fmoc-pentafluoro-l-phenylalanine in each layer were manufactured in a single batch and distributed to more than 20 participating laboratories. The samples were analyzed using argon cluster ion sputtering and either X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to generate depth profiles. Participants were asked to estimate the volume fractions in two of the layers and were provided with the compositions of all other layers. Participants using XPS provided volume fractions within 0.03 of the nominal values. Participants using ToF-SIMS either made no attempt, or used various methods that gave results ranging in error from 0.02 to over 0.10 in volume fraction, the latter representing a 50% relative error for a nominal volume fraction of 0.2. Error was predominantly caused by inadequacy in the ability to compensate for primary ion intensity variations and the matrix effect in SIMS. Matrix effects in these materials appear to be more pronounced as the number of atoms in both the primary analytical ion and the secondary ion increase. Using the participants' data we show that organic SIMS matrix effects can be measured and are remarkably consistent between instruments. We provide recommendations for identifying and compensating for matrix effects. Finally, we demonstrate, using a simple normalization method, that virtually all ToF-SIMS participants could have obtained estimates of volume fraction that were at least as accurate and consistent as XPS.

  20. Practical aspects of using Hertzian ring crack initiation to measure surface flaw densities in glasses: influence of humidity, friction and searched areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rajan; Paliwal, Bhasker; Gibson, Cory

    2013-07-01

    Ring crack initiation loads on glass, using spherical Tungsten carbide (WC) and glass (G) indenters, are measured and analysed. Our measurements demonstrate that environmental humidity plays a key role in determining the load to fracture; experiments conducted without controlling this variable cannot be used to obtain material properties. The role of friction is explicitly considered for dissimilar (WC-G) elastic contacts. For this material pair, the stresses at fracture are well described by a boundary lubrication value of friction coefficient. The fracture loads are used in a fracture-mechanics formulation to calculate crack sizes on glass surfaces. The 'searched-area' concept for dissimilar contacts is described, and used to provide crack density values for these surfaces.

  1. 枣树裂果防治技术研究综述%Research Summary on Preventive Measures for Jujube Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁晓娟

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, jujube fruit cracking problem is very serious.From breeding crack resistance jujube cultivars, jujube cultivation measures, jujube fruit cracking research reagents and jujube shelter cultivation four aspects were intro-duced in recent years of Chinese jujube and crack preventive measures induding spraying nutriene solution, exogenous hor-mone, liguid protective film, so as to provide a theoretical basis for the prevention and control of jujube fruit cracking.%近年来,红枣裂果问题十分严重。笔者从选育枣树抗裂品种方面介绍了枣树的防裂措施,从灌溉、施肥、套袋、整形修剪4方面介绍了枣树综合栽培防裂措施,从喷施营养液、外源激素、液体保护膜3方面介绍了枣果实防裂试剂的研究,最后介绍了枣树避雨栽培防裂技术,旨在为防治枣树裂果提供理论依据。

  2. Central corneal thickness and anterior chamber depth measurement by Sirius® Scheimpflug tomography and ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available J Jorge,1 JL Rosado,2 JA Díaz-Rey,1 JM González-Méijome11Clinical and Experimental Optometry Research Laboratory, Center of Physics (Optometry, School of Sciences, University of Minho, Braga, 2Opticlinic, Lisboa, PortugalBackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of the new Sirius® Scheimpflug anterior segment examination device for measurement of central corneal thickness (CCT and anterior chamber depth (ACD with that of CCT measurements obtained by ultrasound pachymetry and ACD measurements obtained by ultrasound biometry, respectively.Methods: CCT and ACD was measured in 50 right eyes from 50 healthy subjects using a Sirius Scheimpflug camera, SP100 ultrasound pachymetry, and US800 ultrasound biometry.Results: CCT measured with the Sirius was 546 ± 39 µm and 541 ± 35 µm with SP100 ultrasound pachymetry (P = 0.003. The difference was statistically significant (mean difference 4.68 ± 10.5 µm; limits of agreement −15.8 to 25.20 µm. ACD measured with the Sirius was 2.96 ± 0.3 mm compared with 3.36 ± 0.29 mm using US800 ultrasound biometry (P < 0.001. The difference was statistically significant (mean difference −0.40 ± 0.16 mm; limits of agreement −0.72 to 0.07 mm. When the ACD values obtained using ultrasound biometry were corrected according to the values for CCT measured by ultrasound, the agreement increased significantly between both technologies for ACD measurements (mean difference 0.15 ± 0.16 mm; limits of agreement −0.16 to 0.45 mm.Conclusion: CCT and ACD measured by Sirius and ultrasound methods showing good agreement between repeated measurements obtained in the same subjects (repeatability with either instrument. However, CCT and ACD values, even after correcting ultrasound ACD by subtracting the CCT value obtained with either technology should not be used interchangeably.Keywords: Scheimpflug corneal tomography, ultrasound biometry, ultrasound pachymetry, limits of agreement

  3. Combining snow depth and innovative skier flow measurements in order to improve snow grooming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, Carlo Maria; Albrecht, Stéphane; Hargoaa, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, ski resort managers have massively improved their snow management practices, in order to adapt their strategies to the inter-annual variability in snow conditions and to the effects of climate change. New real-time informations, such as snow depth measurements carried out on the ski slopes by grooming machines during their daily operations, have become available, allowing high saving, efficiency and optimization gains (reducing for instance the groomer fuel consumption and operation time and the need for machine-made snow production). In order to take a step forward in improving the grooming techniques, it would be necessary to keep into account also the snow erosion by skiers, which depends mostly on the snow surface properties and on the skier attendance. Today, however, most ski resort managers have only a vague idea of the evolution of the skier flows on each slope during the winter season. In this context, we have developed a new sensor (named Skiflux) able to measure the skier attendance using an infrared beam crossing the slopes. Ten Skiflux sensors have been deployed during the 2016/17 winter season at Val Thorens ski area (French Alps), covering a whole sector of the resort. A dedicated software showing the number of skier passages in real time as been developed as well. Combining this new Skiflux dataset with the snow depth measurements from grooming machines (Snowsat System) and the snow and meteorological conditions measured in-situ (Liberty System from Technoalpin), we were able to create a "real-time skiability index" accounting for the quality of the surface snow and its evolution during the day. Moreover, this new framework allowed us to improve the preparation of ski slopes, suggesting new strategies for adapting the grooming working schedule to the snow quality and the skier attendance. In the near future, this work will benefit from the advances made within the H2020 PROSNOW project ("Provision of a prediction system allowing

  4. [Band depth analysis and partial least square regression based winter wheat biomass estimation using hyperspectral measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ji-Hua; Yang, Gui-Jun; Song, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Xin-Gang; Feng, Hai-Kuan

    2013-05-01

    The major limitation of using existing vegetation indices for crop biomass estimation is that it approaches a saturation level asymptotically for a certain range of biomass. In order to resolve this problem, band depth analysis and partial least square regression (PLSR) were combined to establish winter wheat biomass estimation model in the present study. The models based on the combination of band depth analysis and PLSR were compared with the models based on common vegetation indexes from the point of view of estimation accuracy, subsequently. Band depth analysis was conducted in the visible spectral domain (550-750 nm). Band depth, band depth ratio (BDR), normalized band depth index, and band depth normalized to area were utilized to represent band depth information. Among the calibrated estimation models, the models based on the combination of band depth analysis and PLSR reached higher accuracy than those based on the vegetation indices. Among them, the combination of BDR and PLSR got the highest accuracy (R2 = 0.792, RMSE = 0.164 kg x m(-2)). The results indicated that the combination of band depth analysis and PLSR could well overcome the saturation problem and improve the biomass estimation accuracy when winter wheat biomass is large.

  5. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  6. Standardization of choroidal thickness measurements using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nattapon; Boonarpha; Yalin; Zheng; Alexandros; N.Stangos; Huiqi; Lu; Ankur; Raj; Gabriela; Czanner; Simon; P.Harding; Jayashree; Nair-Sahni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe and evaluate a standardized protocol for measuring the choroidal thickness(Ch T) using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography(EDI OCT).METHODS: Single 9 mm EDI OCT line scans across the fovea were used for this study. The protocol used in this study classified the EDI OCT images into four groups based on the appearance of the choroidal-scleral interface and suprachoroidal space. Two evaluation iterations of experiments were performed: first, the protocol was validated in a pilot study of 12 healthy eyes. Afterwards, the applicability of the protocol was tested in 82 eyes of patients with diabetes. Inter-observer and intra-observer agreements on image classifications were performed using Cohen’s kappa coefficient(κ). Intraclass correlation coefficient(ICC) and Bland-Altman’s methodology were used for the measurement of the Ch T.RESULTS: There was a moderate(κ=0.42) and perfect(κ =1) inter- and intra-observer agreements on image classifications from healthy eyes images and substantial(κ =0.66) and almost perfect(κ =0.86) agreements from diabetic eyes images. The proposed protocol showed excellent inter- and intra-observer agreements for the Ch T measurements on both, healthy eyes and diabetic eyes(ICC >0.90 in all image categories). The Bland-Altman plot showed a relatively large Ch T measurement agreement in the scans that contained less visible choroidal outer boundary. CONCLUSION: A protocol to standardize Ch T measurements in EDI OCT images has been developed;the results obtained using this protocol show that the technique is accurate and reliable for routine clinical practice and research.

  7. Standardization of choroidal thickness measurements using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattapon Boonarpha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To describe and evaluate a standardized protocol for measuring the choroidal thickness (ChT using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI OCT.METHODS:Single 9 mm EDI OCT line scans across the fovea were used for this study. The protocol used in this study classified the EDI OCT images into four groups based on the appearance of the choroidal-scleral interface and suprachoroidal space. Two evaluation iterations of experiments were performed:first, the protocol was validated in a pilot study of 12 healthy eyes. Afterwards, the applicability of the protocol was tested in 82 eyes of patients with diabetes. Inter-observer and intra-observer agreements on image classifications were performed using Cohen’s kappa coefficient (k. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman’s methodology were used for the measurement of the ChT.RESULTS:There was a moderate (k=0.42 and perfect (k=1 inter- and intra-observer agreements on image classifications from healthy eyes images and substantial (k=0.66 and almost perfect (k=0.86 agreements from diabetic eyes images. The proposed protocol showed excellent inter- and intra-observer agreements for the ChT measurements on both, healthy eyes and diabetic eyes (ICC>0.90 in all image categories. The Bland-Altman plot showed a relatively large ChT measurement agreement in the scans that contained less visible choroidal outer boundary.CONCLUSIONS:A protocol to standardize ChT measurements in EDI OCT images has been developed; the results obtained using this protocol show that the technique is accurate and reliable for routine clinical practice and research.

  8. A Comparison of Multiscale Permutation Entropy Measures in On-Line Depth of Anesthesia Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoli; Li, Duan; Li, Yongwang; Ursino, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Multiscale permutation entropy (MSPE) is becoming an interesting tool to explore neurophysiological mechanisms in recent years. In this study, six MSPE measures were proposed for on-line depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitoring to quantify the anesthetic effect on the real-time EEG recordings. The performance of these measures in describing the transient characters of simulated neural populations and clinical anesthesia EEG were evaluated and compared. Methods Six MSPE algorithms—derived from Shannon permutation entropy (SPE), Renyi permutation entropy (RPE) and Tsallis permutation entropy (TPE) combined with the decomposition procedures of coarse-graining (CG) method and moving average (MA) analysis—were studied. A thalamo-cortical neural mass model (TCNMM) was used to generate noise-free EEG under anesthesia to quantitatively assess the robustness of each MSPE measure against noise. Then, the clinical anesthesia EEG recordings from 20 patients were analyzed with these measures. To validate their effectiveness, the ability of six measures were compared in terms of tracking the dynamical changes in EEG data and the performance in state discrimination. The Pearson correlation coefficient (R) was used to assess the relationship among MSPE measures. Results CG-based MSPEs failed in on-line DoA monitoring at multiscale analysis. In on-line EEG analysis, the MA-based MSPE measures at 5 decomposed scales could track the transient changes of EEG recordings and statistically distinguish the awake state, unconsciousness and recovery of consciousness (RoC) state significantly. Compared to single-scale SPE and RPE, MSPEs had better anti-noise ability and MA-RPE at scale 5 performed best in this aspect. MA-TPE outperformed other measures with faster tracking speed of the loss of unconsciousness. Conclusions MA-based multiscale permutation entropies have the potential for on-line anesthesia EEG analysis with its simple computation and sensitivity to drug effect

  9. Depth-Encoded Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy for Simultaneous Multi-Site Nanoscale Optical Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendargo, Hansford C; Bower, Bradley A; Reinstein, Alex S; Shepherd, Neal; Tao, Yuankai K; Izatt, Joseph A

    2011-09-01

    Spectral domain phase microscopy (SDPM) is an extension of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) that exploits the extraordinary phase stability of spectrometer-based systems with common-path geometry to resolve sub-wavelength displacements within a sample volume. This technique has been implemented for high resolution axial displacement and velocity measurements in biological samples, but since axial displacement information is acquired serially along the lateral dimension, it has been unable to measure fast temporal dynamics in extended samples. Depth-Encoded SDPM (DESDPM) uses multiple sample arms with unevenly spaced common path reference reflectors to multiplex independent SDPM signals from separate lateral positions on a sample simultaneously using a single interferometer, thereby reducing the time required to detect unique optical events to the integration period of the detector. Here, we introduce DESDPM and demonstrate the ability to acquire useful phase data concurrently at two laterally separated locations in a phantom sample as well as a biological preparation of spontaneously beating chick cardiomyocytes. DESDPM may be a useful tool for imaging fast cellular phenomena such as nervous conduction velocity or contractile motion.

  10. Dependence of the Martian radiation environment on atmospheric depth: Modeling and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingnan; Slaba, Tony C.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Badavi, Francis F.; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Brinza, David E.; Ehresmann, Bent; Hassler, Donald M.; Matthiä, Daniel; Rafkin, Scot

    2017-02-01

    The energetic particle environment on the Martian surface is influenced by solar and heliospheric modulation and changes in the local atmospheric pressure (or column depth). The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity on the surface of Mars has been measuring this effect for over four Earth years (about two Martian years). The anticorrelation between the recorded surface Galactic Cosmic Ray-induced dose rates and pressure changes has been investigated by Rafkin et al. (2014) and the long-term solar modulation has also been empirically analyzed and modeled by Guo et al. (2015). This paper employs the newly updated HZETRN2015 code to model the Martian atmospheric shielding effect on the accumulated dose rates and the change of this effect under different solar modulation and atmospheric conditions. The modeled results are compared with the most up-to-date (from 14 August 2012 to 29 June 2016) observations of the RAD instrument on the surface of Mars. Both model and measurements agree reasonably well and show the atmospheric shielding effect under weak solar modulation conditions and the decline of this effect as solar modulation becomes stronger. This result is important for better risk estimations of future human explorations to Mars under different heliospheric and Martian atmospheric conditions.

  11. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask The Expert Ask a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the ... Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers Knuckle Cracking Q & A September 10, ...

  12. X-ray measurements of the depth dependence of stress in gold films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S.; Munkholm, A.; Leung, O. S.; Nix, W. D.

    2000-01-12

    X-rays are used to determine the stress as a function of depth for five evaporated gold films of 0.8--2.5 microns thickness. The depth dependence is achieved by varying the incident angle of the x-rays, which effects the penetration depth of the x-rays into the film. The films, which have a different thermal expansion coefficient than the silicon substrate, are strained as a result of thermal cycling after deposition. The authors find essentially no variation with stress as a function of depth for these films.

  13. Depth-Penetrating Measurements Developed for Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Thermographic Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The insulating properties of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide highly beneficial thermal protection to turbine engine components by reducing the temperature sustained by those components. Therefore, measuring the temperature beneath the TBC is critical for determining whether the TBC is performing its insulating function. Currently, noncontact temperature measurements are performed by infrared pyrometry, which unfortunately measures the TBC surface temperature rather than the temperature of the underlying component. To remedy this problem, the NASA Glenn Research Center, under the Information Rich Test Instrumentation Project, developed a technique to measure the temperature beneath the TBC by incorporating a thin phosphor layer beneath the TBC. By performing fluorescence decay-time measurements on light emission from this phosphor layer, Glenn successfully measured temperatures from the phosphor layer up to 1100 C. This is the first successful demonstration of temperature measurements that penetrate beneath the TBC. Thermographic phosphors have a history of providing noncontact surface temperature measurements. Conventionally, a thermographic phosphor is applied to the material surface and temperature measurements are performed by exciting the phosphor with ultraviolet light and then measuring the temperature-dependent decay time of the phosphor emission at a longer wavelength. The innovative feature of the new approach is to take advantage of the relative transparency of the TBC (composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia) in order to excite and measure the phosphor emission beneath the TBC. The primary obstacle to achieving depth-penetrating temperature measurements is that the TBCs are completely opaque to the ultraviolet light usually employed to excite the phosphor. The strategy that Glenn pursued was to select a thermographic phosphor that could be excited and emit at wavelengths that could be transmitted through the TBC. The phosphor that was selected was

  14. On multiple crack detection in beam structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Shapour; Kargozarfard, Mohammad [Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    This study presents an inverse procedure to identify multiple cracks in beams using an evolutionary algorithm. By considering the crack detection procedure as an optimization problem, an objective function can be constructed based on the change of the eigenfrequencies and some strain energy parameters. Each crack is modeled by a rotational spring. The changes in natural frequencies due to the presence of the cracks are related to a damage index vector. Then, the bees algorithm, a swarm-based evolutionary optimization technique, is used to optimize the objective function and find the damage index vector, whose positive components show the number and position of the cracks. A second objective function is also optimized to find the crack depths. Several experimental studies on cracked cantilever beams are conducted to ensure the integrity of the proposed method. The results show that the number of cracks as well as their sizes and locations can be predicted well through this method.

  15. Signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop measurement for crack detection of conductive substrate with tunable coating materials through finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep Rao, Simha; Liu, Ming; Peng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Huijuan

    2016-12-01

    We adopt a finite element numerical modeling approach to investigate the electromagnetic coupling effect of two parallel electric conductors with tunable electric conductivity σ and magnetic permeability μ. For two parallel conductors C and S (μ C   ṡ  σ C   ≤  μ S   ṡ  σ S), we find that the shape of current density profile of conductor S is dependent on the product of μ C   ṡ  σ C, while the magnitude is determined by the AC current frequency f. On the other hand, the frequency f affects not only the shape but also the magnitude of the current density profile of conductor C. We further adopt a coplanar model to investigate the signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement for both surface crack and inner crack detection. We find that with modified coating materials (lower electric conductivity and higher magnetic permeability, compared with the substrate material properties), the crack detection signal sensitivity can be greatly enhanced for both the cracks within the coating and at the coating/substrate interface, where cracks are most commonly encountered in real situations.

  16. Shaft Crack Identification Based on Vibration and AE Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiu Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shaft crack is one of the main serious malfunctions that often occur in rotating machinery. However, it is difficult to locate the crack and determine the depth of the crack. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE signal and vibration response are used to diagnose the crack. The wavelet transform is applied to AE signal to decompose into a series of time-domain signals, each of which covers a specific octave frequency band. Then an improved union method based on threshold and cross-correlation method is applied to detect the location of the shaft crack. The finite element method is used to build the model of the cracked rotor, and the crack depth is identified by comparing the vibration response of experiment and simulation. The experimental results show that the AE signal is effective and convenient to locate the shaft crack, and the vibration signal is feasible to determine the depth of shaft crack.

  17. Penetration Depth Measurements Using a Tunnel Diode Oscillator in Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Charles C.

    2004-03-01

    The tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) has been used as a tool in condensed matter physics for over 30 years. We will discuss the application of the TDO to measure rf penetration depth in small metallic and superconducting samples in the range of 10 -1500 MHz. Our technique involves placing a sample in or on the inductor of a self-resonant tank circuit powered by a tunnel diode, and measuring the impedance of the sample by recording the frequency and amplitude shift as a function of magnetic field or temperature. This technique is very sensitive to the properties of the electrons in a sample, does not require contacts on a sample, can be used for arbitrarily small samples, is very compatible with pulsed magnetic fields, and works well in pressure cells. We will begin by giving a brief history of the TDO in condensed matter physics. We will describe the electronic theory of the TDO showing the important parameters necessary to keep the circuit stable and oscillating in different venues such as very low temperatures and pulsed magnetic fields. We will also describe some of the trade offs between stability and sensitivity in these extreme environments. We will then discuss how to interpret the data produced by the TDO, concentrating on the description of rf penetration in metallic and type II superconducting samples. Finally, as examples of the power of this TDO method, we will show Fermi surface measurements, type II superconducting phase diagrams, including details of the vortex system, and very recent results showing evidence of an inhomogeneous superconducting state. Support for this project has come from the NHMFL and the NSF

  18. Satellite and Ship-based Lidar Measurements of Optical Depth during EOPACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, M.; Wash, C.; Durkee, P.H.; Veefkind, J.P.; Leeuw, G. de; Smith, M.H.; Hill, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the coastal MABL for the entire battlespace is critical for modern Navy operations. To support modern weapon and sensor systems, quantitative assessment of a number of MABL properties are needed. They include: optical depth, boundary layer depth, sea surface temperature, and surface lay

  19. Measuring soil frost depth in forest ecosystems with ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Butnor; John L. Campbell; James B. Shanley; Stanley. Zarnoch

    2014-01-01

    Soil frost depth in forest ecosystems can be variable and depends largely on early winter air temperatures and the amount and timing of snowfall. A thorough evaluation of ecological responses to seasonally frozen ground is hampered by our inability to adequately characterize the frequency, depth, duration and intensity of soil frost events. We evaluated the use of...

  20. Measurement of snow depth distribution in the upper basin in the Japanese Alps using an airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Sasaki, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    In the Japanese Alps region, large amounts of precipitation in the form of snow constitute a more important water resource than rain. During the winter, precipitation that is deposited as snowfall accumulates in the river basins, and it forms natural dams known as "white dams." A quantitative understanding of snow depth distribution in these mountainous areas is important not only for evaluating water resource volume, but also for understanding the effects of snow in terms of its impact on landforms and its effect on the distribution of vegetation. However, it is not easy to perform a quantitative evaluation of snow depth distribution in mountainous areas. Several methods have been proposed for clarifying snow depth distribution. The most widely used of these is a method of inserting a sounding rod into the snow to measure its depth at each geographic position. Another method is to dig a trench in the snow and then perform an observational measurement of the side of the trench. These methods enable accurate measurement of the snow depth; however, when the snow is several meters deep, the methods may be limited by the measuring capacity of the equipment, or by the time restrictions of the survey. For these reasons, wide area measurement of the spatial distribution of snow is very difficult, and it is not suitable for investigating snow depth distribution in river basins. In recent years, a measurement technology has been developed that uses laser scanners mounted on aircraft. This method enables researchers to obtain ground surface coordinate data with high precision over a wide area from the air. Using such a scanner to measure the ground surface during snow coverage and during no snow coverage, and then finding the differences between the surface elevations, has made it possible to ascertain snow depth with high precision. Airborne laser measurement enables high-precision measurements over a wide area and in a short amount of time, and measurements can be made

  1. Muon "Depth-Intensity" Relation Measured by LVD Underground Experiment and Cosmic-Ray Muon Spectrum at Sea Level

    CERN Document Server

    Aglietta, M

    1998-01-01

    We present the analysis of the muon events with all muon multiplicities collected during 21804 hours of operation of the first LVD tower. The measured angular distribution of muon intensity has been converted to the `depth -- vertical intensity' relation in the depth range from 3 to 12 km w.e.. The analysis of this relation allowed to derive the power index, $\\gamma$, of the primary all-nucleon spectrum: $\\gamma=2.78 \\pm 0.05$. The `depth -- vertical intensity' relation has been converted to standard rock and the comparison with the data of other experiments has been done. We present also the derived vertical muon spectrum at sea level.

  2. On-line depth measurement for laser-drilled holes based on the intensity of plasma emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chao-Ching; Chiu, Chih-Mu; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Kuo, Chia-Lung

    2014-09-01

    The direct time-resolved depth measurement of blind holes is extremely difficult due to the short time interval and the limited space inside the hole. This work presents a method that involves on-line plasma emission acquisition and analysis to obtain correlations between the machining processes and the optical signal output. Given that the depths of laser-machined holes can be estimated on-line using a coaxial photodiode, this was employed in our inspection system. Our experiments were conducted in air under normal atmospheric conditions without gas assist. The intensity of radiation emitted from the vaporized material was found to correlate with the depth of the hole. The results indicate that the estimated depths of the laser-drilled holes were inversely proportional to the maximum plasma light emission measured for a given laser pulse number.

  3. Depth statistics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In 1975 John Tukey proposed a multivariate median which is the 'deepest' point in a given data cloud in R^d. Later, in measuring the depth of an arbitrary point z with respect to the data, David Donoho and Miriam Gasko considered hyperplanes through z and determined its 'depth' by the smallest portion of data that are separated by such a hyperplane. Since then, these ideas has proved extremely fruitful. A rich statistical methodology has developed that is based on data depth and, more general...

  4. An ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of burn wounds in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Hanna, Pamela D.

    1991-01-01

    Whenever ultrasound encounters discontinuity in its medium of propagation, some energy is reflected from the interface. Such reflections or echoes occur when incident energy encounters the front skin, viable/necrotic, and dermis/fat skin tissue interfaces. It was shown that the most probable cause of the viable/necrotic interface is the uncoiling of collagen in the necrotic tissue, which can cause a reflection at the viable/necrotic interface of approximately 10 percent of the wave amplitude, and is approximately the same as that from the other two interfaces noted. The instrument, still in the prototype stage, was designed to detect the various reflections from within the skin layer. It is shown that, by studying the timing between the various echoes, one can use ultrasound as an aid in diagnosing the depth of burned skin tissue in humans. The instrument is a 60-MHz A-scan unit, modified to more easily identify the echoes occurring within the short time interval during which the reflections are received from the skin layers. A high frequency unit was selected so that various transducers could be utilized to optimize the system. Signal conditioning circuits were modified and added to provide an adequate display of the principle reflections expected. The unit was successful in studying burned tissue in pigs and was recently used to study burn wounds in humans. Measurement techniques and preliminary results are presented.

  5. Comparison of PMCAMx aerosol optical depth predictions over Europe with AERONET and MODIS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Antigoni; Charalampidis, Panagiotis; Fountoukis, Christos; Pilinis, Christodoulos; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-11-01

    The ability of chemical transport model (CTM) PMCAMx to reproduce aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over Europe during the photochemically active period of May 2008 (EUCAARI campaign) is evaluated. Periods with high dust or sea-salt levels are excluded, so the analysis focuses on the ability of the model to simulate the mostly secondary aerosol and its interactions with water. PMCAMx reproduces the monthly mean MODIS and AERONET AOD values over the Iberian Peninsula, the British Isles, central Europe, and Russia with a fractional bias of less than 15 % and a fractional error of less than 30 %. However, the model overestimates the AOD over northern Europe, most probably due to an overestimation of organic aerosol and sulfates. At the other end, PMCAMx underestimates the monthly mean MODIS AOD over the Balkans, the Mediterranean, and the South Atlantic. These errors appear to be related to an underestimation of sulfates. Sensitivity tests indicate that the evaluation results of the monthly mean AODs are quite sensitive to the relative humidity (RH) fields used by PMCAMx, but are not sensitive to the simulated size distribution and the black carbon mixing state. The screening of the satellite retrievals for periods with high dust (or coarse particles in general) concentrations as well as the combination of the MODIS and AERONET datasets lead to more robust conclusions about the ability of the model to simulate the secondary aerosol components that dominate the AOD during this period.

  6. Measurement of choroid thickness in pregnant women using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Sertan; Basaran, Ahmet; Sakarya, Yasar; Ozcimen, Muammer; Kucukaydin, Zehra; Sakarya, Rabia; Basaran, Mustafa; Erdogan, Erkan; Alpfidan, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    To investigate choroidal thickness in healthy pregnant women during different trimesters using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). This prospective study included 90 healthy pregnant women in their first, second, or third trimester (groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively) and 30 non-pregnant healthy women (group 4). The age range for all groups was 18-40 years. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans were obtained to estimate the average choroidal thickness. Using EDI-OCT, we measured choroidal thickness manually from the outer border of the retinal pigment epithelium to the inner scleral border at the subfovea, 3 mm temporal, and 3 mm nasal to the fovea. Differences among groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. We found a statistically significant difference between groups 2 and group 4 for subfoveal, temporal, and nasal mean choroidal thickness (p=0.007, pchoroidal thickness for group 2 was 395 ± 80 μm, 338 ± 74 μm, and 233 ± 61 μm at the regions subfoveal, temporal, and nasal to the fovea, respectively. In comparison, the mean choroidal thickness for group 4 was 335 ± 86 μm, 274 ± 54 μm, and 200 ± 53 μm at the regions subfoveal, temporal, and nasal to the fovea, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found for choroidal thickness among groups 1-4 (p=0.214, p=0.177, p=0.094, respectively) and between groups 3-4 (p=0.105, p=0.261, p=0.695, respectively) for all measured points. Our results suggest that choroidal thickening can occur at the regions subfoveal, temporal, and nasal to the fovea in the second trimester.

  7. Influence of Anion Types on the Electrodeposition Healing Effect of Concrete Cracks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Hongqiang; JIANG Linhua; XU Ning; XIONG Chuansheng

    2012-01-01

    With the zinc salt and magnesium salt solutions,the influence of anion types on the electrodeposition healing effect of concrete cracks was investigated,four parameters such as rate of weight gain,surface coating,crack closure,and crack filling depth were measured,and the mineral composition and appearance of electrodeposits in the cracks were analyzed.The experimental results demonstrate that the electrodeposition healing effect is the best by adopting ZnSO4 and MgSO4 solutions.The mineral composition of electrodeposits in the cracks does not change with the anion types.The most particles of ZnO crystal appear as fusiform by using zinc salt solutions.If we selected MgSO4 solution,the Mg(OH)2 crystal was porous honeycomb.The electrodeposits present as flake structure while the other magnesium salt solutions were adopted.

  8. Spectral aerosol optical depths over Bay of Bengal and Chennai: I—measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, S.; Jayaraman, A.

    A cruise experiment to study the aerosol optical characteristics was conducted in February-March 2001 over the Bay of Bengal, a data void region. An analysis of aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured onboard Sagar Kanya shows that the AODs are higher when compared to those measured over the west coast of India and the Arabian Sea. The mean AODs at 0.5 μm over the Bay of Bengal are in the range of 0.2-0.7, and are found to show a variation of about 40-50% in the wavelength region of 0.4- 0.85 μm. The mean wavelength exponent α over the Bay of Bengal is found to be 1.80, higher than the Arabian Sea value of 1.46, indicating a relatively higher concentration of submicron size particles. The mean Ångström coefficient β, which represents the columnar aerosol loading, over the Bay of Bengal is found to be 0.10. Measurements of AODs, made before and after the cruise in Chennai, an urban station located on the eastern coast of India, show higher values compared to the Bay of Bengal data. The mean α for Chennai is found to be 1.53, which is lower than the Bay of Bengal value while the mean β is higher at 0.18. While a higher α value indicates the dominance of smaller size particles over Bay of Bengal, a higher β and a higher AOD at all wavelengths indicate the dominance of both bigger and smaller particles over Chennai. A comparison of AODs obtained over a coastal station Trivandrum, located on the southwest coast of India, during March 2001 showed that in the smaller wavelength range the Chennai AODs are higher while above 0.6 μm the AODs are comparable. The day-to-day variations of AODs measured at Chennai are less significant when compared to Bay of Bengal and are below 10%. As Chennai is an urban, industrial and a well-populated city, and is a constant source of aerosol particles, there are lesser day-to-day variations in the AOD, while over the Bay of Bengal the air masses come from different source regions carrying aerosols of different chemical and

  9. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  10. Measurement and modeling of depth cue combination: in defense of weak fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, M S; Maloney, L T; Johnston, E B; Young, M

    1995-02-01

    Various visual cues provide information about depth and shape in a scene. When several of these cues are simultaneously available in a single location in the scene, the visual system attempts to combine them. In this paper, we discuss three key issues relevant to the experimental analysis of depth cue combination in human vision: cue promotion, dynamic weighting of cues, and robustness of cue combination. We review recent psychophysical studies of human depth cue combination in light of these issues. We organize the discussion and review as the development of a model of the depth cue combination process termed modified weak fusion (MWF). We relate the MWF framework to Bayesian theories of cue combination. We argue that the MWF model is consistent with previous experimental results and is a parsimonious summary of these results. While the MWF model is motivated by normative considerations, it is primarily intended to guide experimental analysis of depth cue combination in human vision. We describe experimental methods, analogous to perturbation analysis, that permit us to analyze depth cue combination in novel ways. In particular these methods allow us to investigate the key issues we have raised. We summarize recent experimental tests of the MWF framework that use these methods.

  11. Experimental measurement of diffusive extinction depth and soil moisture gradients in dune sand of Western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, I.; Jadoon, K. Z.; Mai, P. M.; Al-Mashharawi, S.; Missimer, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration and water is commonly stored within them because of the low hydraulic conductivity soils within the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the "extinction depth", where it is protected from evaporation during the long dry periods. The stored moisture below the extinction depth can be utilized to support desert agriculture and the subsurface areas below this depth can serve as potential sites for storage of surface runoff or treated waste water by artificial recharge. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. A barrel with a diameter 150 cm and a height of 150 cm was installed underground in the field and was filled with dune sand. The sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation) for thirty days. The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded by using transducers and sensors installed at different depths to monitor the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The moisture content gradient showed a gradual decline during measurement. The effect of the diurnal variation of temperature was observed by the sensors installed in the upper 75 cm and was negligible at greater depths. The water level decline stabilized after twenty days and the extinction depth was established at 85 cm. In the field, a similar extinction depth was observed in the region where sand dunes overlay an impervious basement.

  12. A novel technique for measuring stress-corrosion crack-growth rates in single-crystal experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichter, B.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)]|[Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Flanagan, W.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Crack-growth occurs discontinuously in oriented copper-gold single-crystals during slow-strain rate experiments performed under anodic polarization in aqueous NaCl solutions. Crack advance between major crack arrests is accompanied by load-drops and current-transients which can be quantitatively related to the length of the advance as well as yielding the average instantaneous rate of advance. Two independent but self-consistent methods are used: (1) mechanical analysis of the load-drops, taking into account the elastic displacement of the load-train and of the specimen, due to both the load and the crack advance, and (2) analysis of the current-transients in which it is argued that the current is proportional to the rate of new surface production. Results show that the crack velocity is on the order of 50--400{mu}/s, depending on the environment and potential, too slow to be explained by a running brittle crack, and too fast to be explained by Faradaic dissolution.

  13. Penetration Depth Measurement of Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Light for Milk Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly common application of the near-infrared (NIR hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR reflectance images were collected for eight different milk powder products that included five brands of non-fat milk powder and three brands of whole milk powder. For each milk powder, five different powder depths ranging from 1 mm–5 mm were prepared on the top of a base layer of melamine, to test spectral-based detection of the melamine through the milk. A relationship was established between the NIR reflectance spectra (937.5–1653.7 nm and the penetration depth was investigated by means of the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA technique to classify pixels as being milk-only or a mixture of milk and melamine. With increasing milk depth, classification model accuracy was gradually decreased. The results from the 1-mm, 2-mm and 3-mm models showed that the average classification accuracy of the validation set for milk-melamine samples was reduced from 99.86% down to 94.93% as the milk depth increased from 1 mm–3 mm. As the milk depth increased to 4 mm and 5 mm, model performance deteriorated further to accuracies as low as 81.83% and 58.26%, respectively. The results suggest that a 2-mm sample depth is recommended for the screening/evaluation of milk powders using an online NIR hyperspectral imaging system similar to that used in this study.

  14. Penetration Depth Measurement of Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Light for Milk Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Mo, Changyeun; Esquerre, Carlos; Delwiche, Stephen; Zhu, Qibing

    2016-03-25

    The increasingly common application of the near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR reflectance images were collected for eight different milk powder products that included five brands of non-fat milk powder and three brands of whole milk powder. For each milk powder, five different powder depths ranging from 1 mm-5 mm were prepared on the top of a base layer of melamine, to test spectral-based detection of the melamine through the milk. A relationship was established between the NIR reflectance spectra (937.5-1653.7 nm) and the penetration depth was investigated by means of the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) technique to classify pixels as being milk-only or a mixture of milk and melamine. With increasing milk depth, classification model accuracy was gradually decreased. The results from the 1-mm, 2-mm and 3-mm models showed that the average classification accuracy of the validation set for milk-melamine samples was reduced from 99.86% down to 94.93% as the milk depth increased from 1 mm-3 mm. As the milk depth increased to 4 mm and 5 mm, model performance deteriorated further to accuracies as low as 81.83% and 58.26%, respectively. The results suggest that a 2-mm sample depth is recommended for the screening/evaluation of milk powders using an online NIR hyperspectral imaging system similar to that used in this study.

  15. A Decade of Change: Measuring the Extent, Depth and Severity of Food Insecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Kelly Stamper

    2016-09-01

    Rates of food insecurity in the US have been rising since 2000 spiking with the onset of the Great Recession in 2008, and have remained essentially unchanged since then despite improvements in the economy. The present study employed a series of indices adapted from the poverty literature to examine the depth and severity of food insecurity across the decade by race and ethnicity among low-income households with and without children. The most rapid increases in the depth and severity of food insecurity were found among low-income households without children. Non-Hispanic White households with and without children had lower prevalence rates but steeper increases in the depth and severity of food insecurity throughout the decade. Non-Hispanic Black households with and without children were at the most disadvantaged among low-income populations.

  16. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  17. Toward Respiratory Assessment Using Depth Measurements from a Time-of-Flight Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Charles; Soleimani, Vahid; Hannuna, Sion; Camplani, Massimo; Damen, Dima; Viner, Jason; Mirmehdi, Majid; Dodd, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There is increasing interest in technologies that may enable remote monitoring of respiratory disease. Traditional methods for assessing respiratory function such as spirometry can be expensive and require specialist training to perform and interpret. Remote, non-contact tracking of chest wall movement has been explored in the past using structured light, accelerometers and impedance pneumography, but these have often been costly and clinical utility remains to be defined. We present data from a 3-Dimensional time-of-flight camera (found in gaming consoles) used to estimate chest volume during routine spirometry maneuvres. Methods: Patients were recruited from a general respiratory physiology laboratory. Spirometry was performed according to international standards using an unmodified spirometer. A Microsoft Kinect V2 time-of-flight depth sensor was used to reconstruct 3-dimensional models of the subject's thorax to estimate volume-time and flow-time curves following the introduction of a scaling factor to transform measurements to volume estimates. The Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement of model estimation with simultaneous recordings from the spirometer. Patient characteristics were used to assess predictors of error using regression analysis and to further explore the scaling factors. Results: The chest volume change estimated by the Kinect camera during spirometry tracked respiratory rate accurately and estimated forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity to within ± 150 ml difference. Linear regression including age, gender, height, weight, and pack years of smoking explained 37.0% of the variance in the scaling factor for volume estimation. This technique had a positive predictive value of 0.833 to detect obstructive spirometry. Conclusion: These data illustrate the potential of 3D time-of-flight cameras to remotely monitor respiratory rate. This is not a replacement for conventional spirometry and needs further refinement

  18. Toward Respiratory Assessment Using Depth Measurements from a Time-of-Flight Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Charles; Soleimani, Vahid; Hannuna, Sion; Camplani, Massimo; Damen, Dima; Viner, Jason; Mirmehdi, Majid; Dodd, James W

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There is increasing interest in technologies that may enable remote monitoring of respiratory disease. Traditional methods for assessing respiratory function such as spirometry can be expensive and require specialist training to perform and interpret. Remote, non-contact tracking of chest wall movement has been explored in the past using structured light, accelerometers and impedance pneumography, but these have often been costly and clinical utility remains to be defined. We present data from a 3-Dimensional time-of-flight camera (found in gaming consoles) used to estimate chest volume during routine spirometry maneuvres. Methods: Patients were recruited from a general respiratory physiology laboratory. Spirometry was performed according to international standards using an unmodified spirometer. A Microsoft Kinect V2 time-of-flight depth sensor was used to reconstruct 3-dimensional models of the subject's thorax to estimate volume-time and flow-time curves following the introduction of a scaling factor to transform measurements to volume estimates. The Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement of model estimation with simultaneous recordings from the spirometer. Patient characteristics were used to assess predictors of error using regression analysis and to further explore the scaling factors. Results: The chest volume change estimated by the Kinect camera during spirometry tracked respiratory rate accurately and estimated forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity to within ± 150 ml difference. Linear regression including age, gender, height, weight, and pack years of smoking explained 37.0% of the variance in the scaling factor for volume estimation. This technique had a positive predictive value of 0.833 to detect obstructive spirometry. Conclusion: These data illustrate the potential of 3D time-of-flight cameras to remotely monitor respiratory rate. This is not a replacement for conventional spirometry and needs further refinement

  19. Linking snow depth to avalanche release area size: measurements from the Vallée de la Sionne field site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitinger, Jochen; Sovilla, Betty

    2016-08-01

    One of the major challenges in avalanche hazard assessment is the correct estimation of avalanche release area size, which is of crucial importance to evaluate the potential danger that avalanches pose to roads, railways or infrastructure. Terrain analysis plays an important role in assessing the potential size of avalanche releases areas and is commonly based on digital terrain models (DTMs) of a snow-free summer terrain. However, a snow-covered winter terrain can significantly differ from its underlying, snow-free terrain. This may lead to different, and/or potentially larger release areas. To investigate this hypothesis, the relation between avalanche release area size, snow depth and surface roughness was investigated using avalanche observations of artificially triggered slab avalanches over a period of 15 years in a high-alpine field site. High-resolution, continuous snow depth measurements at times of avalanche release showed a decrease of mean surface roughness with increasing release area size, both for the bed surface and the snow surface before avalanche release. Further, surface roughness patterns in snow-covered winter terrain appeared to be well suited to demarcate release areas, suggesting an increase of potential release area size with greater snow depth. In this context, snow depth around terrain features that serve as potential delineation borders, such as ridges or trenches, appeared to be particularly relevant for release area size. Furthermore, snow depth measured at a nearby weather station was, to a considerable extent, related to potential release area size, as it was often representative of snow depth around those critical features where snow can accumulate over a long period before becoming susceptible to avalanche release. Snow depth - due to its link to surface roughness - could therefore serve as a highly useful variable with regard to potential release area definition for varying snow cover scenarios, as, for example, the avalanche

  20. Interpretation of the depths of maximum of extensive air showers measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Baughman, B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K.H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S.H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R.M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Kotera, K.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulz, J.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    2013-01-01

    To interpret the mean depth of cosmic ray air shower maximum and its dispersion, we parametrize those two observables as functions of the first two moments of the ln A distribution. We examine the goodness of this simple method through simulations of test mass distributions. The application of the p

  1. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  2. Thick monolithic scintillation crystals for TOF-PET with depth-of-interaction measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinke, Ruud; van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Beekman, Freek J.; Lohner, Herbert; Schaart, Dennis R.; Dendooven, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors based on monolithic scintillation crystals show excellent intrinsic spatial resolution and allow depth-of-interaction (DOI) reconstruction using a single photosensor array. The inclusion of time-of-flight (TOF) information in the image reconstruction

  3. Intermediate-Depth Currents Estimated From Float Measurements in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, G. L.; Wienders, N.; Romano, A.

    2005-05-01

    Data from 17 PALACE floats set in the Gulf of Mexico sampling the intermediate-depth (~ 900 db) flow from April 1998 to February 2002 indicate a mean cyclonic circulation along the northern, western and southwestern edges of the Gulf of Mexico. This flow intensified into a ~ 0.10 m/s current in the western and southern Bay of Campeche and was deflected around a topographic feature, called here the Campeche Bay Bump, in the southern Bay of Campeche. Associated with this intensified flow was a small cyclonic gyre in the southwestern Bay of Campeche. Floats launched in the eastern Gulf of Mexico tended to stay there and those launched in the western Gulf of Mexico tended to stay in the western Gulf of Mexico suggesting restricted connection at depth between the eastern and western Gulf of Mexico. The current estimates made neglecting non-900 db depth drifts before first-surface fix and drifts after last-surface fix were 10% larger than those which took into account these drifts. Most of this (8%) was due to neglect of the surface drift before first and after last fix. Except for stronger flow below the Loop Current and Loop Current warm-core rings, no other pattern was seen between the intermediate depth flow and the surface flow.

  4. The Snowtweets Project: communicating snow depth measurements from specialists and non-specialists via mobile communication technologies and social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. M.; Cabrera, A. R.; Kelly, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    With the global decline of in situ snow measurements for hydrometeorological applications, there is an evolving need to find alternative ways to collect localized measurements of snow. The Snowtweets Project is an experiment aimed at providing a way for people interested in making snow measurements to quickly broadcast their measurements to the internet. The goal of the project is to encourage specialists and non-specialists alike to share simple snow depth measurements through widely available social networking sites. We are currently using the rapidly growing microblogging site Twitter (www.twitter.com) as a broadcasting vehicle to collect the snow depth measurements. Using 140 characters or less, users "tweet" their snow depth from their location through the Twitter website. This can be done from a computer or smartphone with internet access or through SMS messaging. The project has developed a Snowtweets web application that interrogates Twitter by parsing the 140 character string to obtain a geographic position and snow depth. GeoRSS and KML feeds are available to visualize the tweets in GoogleEarth or they can be viewed in our own visualiser, Snowbird. The emphasis is on achieving wide coverage to increase the number of microblogs. Furthermore, after some quality control filters, the project is able to combine the broadcast snow depths with traditional and objective satellite remote sensing-based observations or hydrologic model estimates. Our site, snowcore.uwaterloo.ca, was launched in July 2009 and is ready for the 2009-2010 northern hemisphere winter. We invite comments from experienced community participation projects to help improve our product.

  5. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10(18) eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Barbosa, A. F.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X-max, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10(18) eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are se

  6. Measurement of depth distributions of (3)H and (14)C induced in concrete shielding of an electron accelerator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira; Harada, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Katsuya; Kikuchi, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    The estimation of radioactivity induced in concrete shielding is important for the decommissioning of accelerator facilities. Concentrations of (3)H and (14)C in the concrete shielding of an electron linear accelerator were measured, and the depth distributions of (3)H and (14)C and gamma-ray emitters were discussed in relation to their formation reactions.

  7. A Calculation Model for Corrosion Cracking in RC Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Gang; Wei Jun; Zhang Keqiang; Zhou Xiwu

    2007-01-01

    A novel calculation model is proposed aiming at the problem of concrete cover cracking induced by reinforcement corrosion. In this article, the relationship between the corrosion depth of the bar and the thickness of the rust layer is established. By deducing the radial displacement expression of concrete, the formula for corrosion depth and corrosion pressure before cracking is proposed. The crack depth of cover in accordance with the maximum corrosion pressure is deduced; furthermore, the corrosion depth and corrosion pressure at the cracking time are obtained. Finally, the theoretical model is validated by several experiments, and the calculated values agree well with the experiment results.

  8. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  9. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruml, T., E-mail: kruml@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, CZ 61662 Brno (Czech Republic); Hutar, P.; Nahlik, L.; Seitl, S.; Polak, J. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, CZ 61662 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 {mu}m was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude (R{sub {epsilon}} = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  10. Measurement of atmospheric production depths of muons with the pierre auger observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Gámez D.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The time structure of muons at ground retains valuable information about the longitudinal development of the hadronic component in extensive air showers. Using the signals collected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory it is possible to reconstruct the Muon Production Depth (MPD distribution. In this work we explore the main features of these reconstructions for zenith angles around 60° and different energies of the primary particle. From the MPDs we define a new observable, Xμmax as the depth, along the shower axis, where the maximum number of muons is produced. The potentiality of Xμmax to infer the mass composition of cosmic rays is studied.

  11. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60° and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions, we define Xmaxμ as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of Xmaxμ as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

  12. Depth discrimination in acousto-optic cerebral blood flow measurement simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalach, A.; Schiffer, Z.; Ratner, E.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial, as inadequate perfusion, even for relatively short periods of time, may lead to brain damage or even death. Thus, significant research efforts are directed at developing reliable monitoring tools that will enable continuous, bed side, simple and cost-effective monitoring of CBF. All existing non invasive bed side monitoring methods, which are mostly NIRS based, such as Laser Doppler or DCS, tend to underestimate CBF in adults, due to the indefinite effect of extra-cerebral tissues on the obtained signal. If those are to find place in day to day clinical practice, the contribution of extra-cerebral tissues must be eliminated and data from the depth (brain) should be extracted and discriminated. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133Xe SPECT and laser Doppler. We have assembled a comprehensive computerized simulation, modeling this acousto-optic technique in a highly scattering media. Using the combination of light and ultrasound, we show how depth information may be extracted, thus distinguishing between flow patterns taking place at different depths. Our algorithm, based on the analysis of light modulated by ultrasound, is presented and examined in a computerized simulation. Distinct depth discrimination ability is presented, suggesting that using such method one can effectively nullify the extra-cerebral tissues influence on the obtained signals, and specifically extract cerebral flow data.

  13. Dealloying evidence on corroded brass by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy mapping and depth profiling measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, R.; Casal, A.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2017-04-01

    The dealloying phenomenon, also called demetalification, is a; consequence of a corrosion problem found in binary alloys where an enrichment of one of the two main elements of the alloy is produced at the expense of the leaching of the other element. In the present work, the ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection and characterization of dealloying films formed on metal has been tested. For this purpose, specific areas of brass specimens have been subjected to a chemical attack of the surface in order to produce a selective leaching of zinc or dezincification. For the lateral and in-depth characterization of the dealloyed areas by LIBS, depth profiles, 2D and 3D maps have been generated from the treated samples and from a reference non-treated sample. The differences in the maps and depth profiles between the corroded and non-corroded regions have allowed to reveal the localization and extension of the dealloying process along the brass sample surface and to estimate the thickness of the dezincification layers, demonstrating the capability of LIBS technique for the characterization of dealloying phenomena.

  14. Laser Doppler flowmetry for bone blood flow measurements: helium-neon laser light attenuation and depth of perfusion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nötzli, H P; Swiontkowski, M F; Thaxter, S T; Carpenter, G K; Wyatt, R

    1989-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been successfully used in clinical and experimental settings to evaluate bone perfusion but unanswered questions regarding its capabilities and limitations still remain. This study was undertaken to determine absorption of He-Ne laser light (632.8 nm) and maximum depth for flow assessment (threshold thickness) under optimal conditions in bone. Light transmittance in bovine bone samples of femora and tibia was measured after each step of grinding and depth of penetration calculated. The threshold thickness was obtained by placing the same samples in a flow chamber where a solution of 2% latex circulated beneath; flow was detected by a laser Doppler probe resting on top of the sample. The results showed a significantly higher depth of penetration for trabecular than for cortical bone. A regression analysis showed a high correlation between the inorganic fraction of the bone and the depth of penetration. The maximum depth at which the laser Doppler probe can evaluate flow in bone conditions was found to be 2.9 +/- 0.2 mm in cortical bone, 3.5 +/- 0.3 mm in bone covered by 1 mm cartilage and 3.5 +/- 0.2 mm in trabecular bone. The study showed the limitations of LDF in bone and their correlations to various bone properties.

  15. New development of hydraulic fracturing technique for in-situ stress measurement at great depth of mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In-situ stress measurement using the hydraulic fracturing technique was made at Wanfu Coal Mine in Shandong Province,China.To solve problems caused by great measuring depth and extra thick overburden soil layers in the mine,a series of improved techniques were developed for the traditional hydraulic fracturing technique and equipment to increase their pressure-enduring ability and to ensure safe and flexible removal of the sealing packers with other experimental apparatus.Successful in-situ stress measurement at 37 points within 7 boreholes,which were mostly over 1000 m deep,was completed.Through the measurement,detailed in

  16. Measurement of the penetration depth and coherence length of MgB2 in all directions using transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loudon, J. C.; Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    the crystallographic a axis. A new method was developed to simulate these images that accounted for vortices with a nonzero core in a thin, anisotropic superconductor and a simplex algorithm was used to make a quantitative comparison between the images and simulations to measure the penetration depths and coherence...... gives Lambda(ab) = 107 +/- 8 nm, Lambda(c) = 120 +/- 15 nm, xi(ab) = 39 +/- 11 nm, and xi(c) = 35 +/- 10 nm, which agree well with measurements made using other techniques. The experiment required two days to conduct and does not require large-scale facilities. It was performed on a very small sample......We demonstrate that images of flux vortices in a superconductor taken with a transmission electron microscope can be used to measure the penetration depth and coherence length in all directions at the same temperature and magnetic field. This is particularly useful for MgB2, where these quantities...

  17. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2017-07-01

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation of three mill-annealed (MA) alloy 600 heats in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water has been investigated using constant load tests equipped with in-situ direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurement capabilities. SCC initiation times were greatly reduced by a small amount of cold work. Shallow intergranular (IG) attack and/or cracks were found on most high-energy grain boundaries intersecting the surface with only a small fraction evolving into larger cracks and IGSCC growth. Crack depth profiles were measured and related to DCPD-detected initiation response. Processes controlling the SCC initiation in MA alloy 600 are discussed. IN PRESS, CORRECTED PROOF, 05/02/2017 - mfl

  18. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method.

  19. Monitoring reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced cracking using non-destructive x-ray attenuation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    To test the applicability of the x-ray attenuation method to monitor the movement of corrosion products as well as the formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials reinforced mortar samples were prepared and tested under accelerated corrosion conditions. It is evident from...

  20. Multiaxial mixed-mode cracking - small crack initiation and propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, M. de; Reis, L.; Li Bin [Lisbon Univ. (Portugal). ICEMS - Inst. of Material and Surface Science and Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Both the fatigue crack path and fatigue life of CK45 steel and 42CrMo4 steel under various multiaxial loading paths are studied in this paper. The replica method was applied to monitor the crack initiation and small crack growth, the fractographic analyses were carried out on the fracture surface and the crack initiation angle was measured. The effects of non-proportional loading on both the crack path and fatigue life were studied, and the flattening of asperities on the crack surface due to compressive normal stress was also observed. An improved model is proposed based on correcting the strain range parameter of the ASME code approach, taking into account the additional hardening caused by the non-proportional loading path, which can improve the predictions of the fatigue lives for various non-proportional loading paths and provide an easy way to overcome the drawbacks of the current ASME code approach for non-proportional fatigue. Based on these corrected strain range parameters, a strain intensity factor range is used to correlate with the experimental results of small crack growth rates. It is concluded that the orientation of the early crack growth can be predicted well by the critical damage plane, but the fatigue life can not be predicted accurately using only the parameters on the critical plane, since the damage on all the planes contributes to fatigue damage as stated by the integral approaches. (orig.)

  1. Mixed sand and gravel beaches: accurate measurement of active layer depth and sediment transport volumes using PIT tagged tracer pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A.; Moses, C.; Sear, D. A.; Cope, S.

    2016-12-01

    As sediments containing significant gravel portions are increasingly used for beach replenishment projects globally, the total number of beaches classified as `mixed sand and gravel' (MSG) increases. Calculations for required replenishment sediment volumes usually assume a uniform layer of sediment transport across and along the beach, but research into active layer (AL) depth has shown variations both across shore and according to sediment size distribution. This study addresses the need for more accurate calculations of sediment transport volumes on MSG beaches by using more precise measurements of AL depth and width, and virtual velocity of tracer pebbles. Variations in AL depth were measured along three main profile lines (from MHWS to MLWN) at Eastoke, Hayling Island (Hampshire, UK). Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged pebbles were deployed in columns, and their new locations repeatedly surveyed with RFID technology. These data were combined with daily dGPS beach profiles and sediment sampling for detailed analysis of the influence of beach morphodynamics on sediment transport volumes. Data were collected over two consecutive winter seasons: 2014-15 (relatively calm, average wave height sandy lower foreshore reduced the AL to 10% of wave height in this area. The disparity in AL depth across the beach profile indicates that traditional models are not accurately representing bulk sediment transport on MSG beaches. It is anticipated that by improving model inputs, beach managers will be better able to predict necessary volumes and sediment grain size proportions of replenishment material for effective management of MSG beaches.

  2. 加气混凝土墙面抹灰防开裂分析与措施%Aerated concrete wall plastering cracks resistance analysis and measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛志成

    2011-01-01

    Taking actual engineering as the research background,it briefly introduces aerated concrete masonry,analyzes aerated concrete wall plastering cracking causes,and puts forward aerated concrete cracks processing measures,with a view to guarantee the smoothness and integrity of aerated concrete internal and external wall.%以某实际工程为研究背景,对加气混凝土砌块作了简单介绍,分析了加气混凝土墙面抹灰层开裂原因,并提出了加气混凝土开裂处理措施,以期保证加气混凝土内、外墙面上抹灰的平整度、整体性。

  3. Relationship between vessel diameter and depth measurements within the limbus using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Emmanuel; Hutchings, Natalie; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Simpson, Trefford

    2017-06-16

    To establish a relationship between the diameter and depth position of vessels in the superior and inferior corneo-scleral limbus using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). Volumetric OCT images of the superior and inferior limbus were acquired from 14 healthy subjects with a research-grade UHR-OCT system. Differences in vessel diameter and depth between superior and inferior limbus were analyzed using repeated measured ANOVA in SPSS and R. The mean (± SD) superior and inferior diameters were 29±18μm and 24±18μm respectively, and the mean (± SD) superior and inferior depths were 177±109μm and 207±132μm respectively. The superior limbal vessels were larger than the inferior ones (RM-ANOVA, p=0.004), and the inferior limbal vessels were deeper than the superior vessels (RM-ANOVA, p=0.041). There was a positive linear association between limbal vessel depth and size within the superior and inferior limbus with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.803 and 0.754, respectively. This study demonstrated that the UHR-OCT was capable of imaging morphometric characteristics such as the size and depth of vessels in the limbus. The results of this study suggest a difference in the size and depth of vessels across different positions of the limbus, which may be indicative of adaptations to chronic hypoxia caused by the covering of the superior limbus by the upper eyelid. UHR-OCT may be a useful tool to evaluate the effect of contact lenses on the microvascular properties within the limbus. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved Sensing Pulses for Increased Human Head Depth Measurement Sensitivity With Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an improved electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) stimulus paradigm, based on dual-energy pulses using the stochastic Gabor function (SGF) that may more sensitively assess deep brain tissue impedance than current single-pulse paradigms. The SGF is a uniformly distributed noise, modulated by a Gaussian envelope, with a wide-frequency spectrum representation regardless of the stimuli energy, and is least compact in the sample frequency phase plane. Numerical results obtained using a realistic human head model confirm that two sequential SGF pulses at different energies can improve EIS depth sensitivity when used in a dual-energy subtraction scheme. Specifically, although the two SGF pulses exhibit different tissue current distributions, they maintain the broadband sensing pulse characteristics needed to generate all the frequencies of interest. Moreover, finite-difference time domain simulations show that this dual-energy excitation scheme is capable of reducing the amplitude of weighted current densities surface directly underneath the electrodes by approximately 3 million times versus single stimulation pulses, while maintaining an acceptable tissue conductivity distribution at depth. This increased sensitivity for the detection of small, deep impedance changes might be of value in potential future EIS applications, such as the portable, point-of-care detection of deep brain hemorrhage or infarction. PMID:24043365

  5. Very high resolution measurement of the penetration depth of superconductors by a novel single-coil inductance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauzzi, A.; Le Cochec, J.; Lamura, G.; Jönsson, B. J.; Gasparov, V. A.; Ladan, F. R.; Plaçais, B.; Probst, P. A.; Pavuna, D.; Bok, J.

    2000-05-01

    We describe a novel single-coil mutual inductance technique for measuring the magnetic penetration depth λ of superconductors at 2-4 MHz as a function of temperature in the 4-100 K range. We combine a single-coil configuration with a high-stability marginal oscillator; this enables us to measure the absolute value of λ on both bulk samples and thin films with very high resolution (δλ=10 pm) and a precision of 30 nm. As example of application, we report measurements on NbTi bulk samples and Nb films. This contactless technique is suited for probing the superconducting properties of samples over large surfaces.

  6. FRACTAL KINEMATICS OF CRACK PROPAGATION IN GEOMATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢和平

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results indicate that propagation paths of cracks in geomaterials are often irregular, producing rough fracture surfaces which are fractal. A formula is derived for the fractal kinematics of crack propagation in geomaterials. The formula correlates the dynamic and static fracture toughnesses with crack velocity, crack length and a microstructural parameter, and allows the fractal dimension to be obtained. From the equations for estimating crack velocity and fractal dimension it can be shown that the measured crack velocity, Vo , should be much smaller than the fractal crack velocity, V. It can also be shown that the fractal dimension of the crack propagation path can be calculated directly from Vo and from the fracture toughness.

  7. Analysis of Crack Arrest Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-15

    vload(m) vp tn(m) Vertical Source Load (kN) on wedge HY80 Finite Element 0.0122 0.0099 3.81x10 -4 144 Steel Calculations Experiment 0.0122 --- 3.74x10-4...curve, are bona fide measures of the fracture arrest capability of tough ductile steels . The second is that the J-values represent the crack driving...fibrous mode of crack extension. (b) A new test method for studying fast fracture and arrest in tough steels . (c) Measurements of fast fracture and crack

  8. A method for determining the analytical form of a radionuclide depth distribution using multiple gamma spectrometry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Steven Clifford, E-mail: sdewey001@gmail.com [United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Environmental Health Division, Health Physics Branch, Radiation Analysis Laboratories, 2350 Gillingham Drive, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235 (United States); Whetstone, Zachary David, E-mail: zacwhets@umich.edu [Radiological Health Engineering Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, 1906 Cooley Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Kearfott, Kimberlee Jane, E-mail: kearfott@umich.edu [Radiological Health Engineering Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, 1906 Cooley Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    When characterizing environmental radioactivity, whether in the soil or within concrete building structures undergoing remediation or decommissioning, it is highly desirable to know the radionuclide depth distribution. This is typically modeled using continuous analytical expressions, whose forms are believed to best represent the true source distributions. In situ gamma ray spectroscopic measurements are combined with these models to fully describe the source. Currently, the choice of analytical expressions is based upon prior experimental core sampling results at similar locations, any known site history, or radionuclide transport models. This paper presents a method, employing multiple in situ measurements at a single site, for determining the analytical form that best represents the true depth distribution present. The measurements can be made using a variety of geometries, each of which has a different sensitivity variation with source spatial distribution. Using non-linear least squares numerical optimization methods, the results can be fit to a collection of analytical models and the parameters of each model determined. The analytical expression that results in the fit with the lowest residual is selected as the most accurate representation. A cursory examination is made of the effects of measurement errors on the method. - Highlights: > A new method for determining radionuclide distribution as a function of depth is presented. > Multiple measurements are used, with enough measurements to determine the unknowns in analytical functions that might describe the distribution. > The measurements must be as independent as possible, which is achieved through special collimation of the detector. > Although the effects of measurements errors may be significant on the results, an improvement over other methods is anticipated.

  9. Phase unwrapping for large depth-of-field 3D laser holographic interferometry measurement of laterally discontinuous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenhua; Shih, Albert J.; Ni, Jun

    2006-11-01

    A phase unwrapping method is developed to mathematically increase the depth-of-field for the 3D optical measurement of objects with laterally discontinuous surfaces, which contain disconnected high aspect ratio regions. This method is applied for laser holographic interferometry precision measurements. The phase wrap identification at boundary pixels, masking and recovery, dynamic segmentation and phase adjustment are developed to overcome the divergence problem in phase unwrapping of laterally discontinuous surfaces. An automotive automatic transmission valve body is applied as an example to demonstrate the developed method. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can efficiently unwrap the phase to increase the depth-of-field for laterally discontinuous surfaces. Effects of segment size and width of overlapped regions on the computational efficiency are investigated.

  10. Modeling of crack propagation in weak snowpack layers using the discrete element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gaume

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1 failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2 crack propagation within the weak layer and (3 tensile fracture through the slab which leads to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e. to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. On the other hand, our understanding of dynamic crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity is still very limited. For instance, it is not uncommon to perform field measurements with widespread crack propagation on one day, while a few days later, with very little changes to the snowpack, crack propagation does not occur anymore. Thus far, there is no clear theoretical framework to interpret such observations, and it is not clear how and which snowpack properties affect dynamic crack propagation. To shed more light on this issue, we performed numerical propagation saw test (PST experiments applying the discrete element (DE method and compared the numerical results with field measurements based on particle tracking. The goal is to investigate the influence of weak layer failure and the mechanical properties of the slab on crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity. Crack propagation speeds and distances before fracture arrest were derived from the DE simulations for different snowpack configurations and mechanical properties. Then, the relation between mechanical parameters of the snowpack was taken into account so as to compare numerical and experimental results, which were in good agreement, suggesting that the simulations can reproduce crack propagation in PSTs. Finally, an in-depth analysis of the

  11. Radar Plant and Measurement Technique for Determination of the Orientation and the Depth of Buried Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    A plant for generation of information indicative of the depth and the orientation of an object positioned below the surface of the ground is adapted to use electromagnetic radiation emitted from and received by an antenna system associated with the plant. The plant has a transmitter and a receiver...... for generation of the electromagnetic radiation in cooperation with the antenna system mentioned and for reception of the electromagnetic radiation reflected by the object in cooperation with the antenna system, respectively. The antenna system includes a plurality of individual antenna elements such as dipole...... the antenna system and thus polarizing the electromagnetic field around or in relation to the geometric center of the antenna system....

  12. A Crack Identification Method for Bridge Type Structures under Vehicular Load Using Wavelet Transform and Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Gökdağ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a crack identification method is proposed for bridge type structures carrying moving vehicle. The bridge is modeled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and open cracks exist on several points of the beam. Half-car model is adopted for the vehicle. Coupled equations of the beam-vehicle system are solved using Newmark-Beta method, and the dynamic responses of the beam are obtained. Using these and the reference displacements, an objective function is derived. Crack locations and depths are determined by solving the optimization problem. To this end, a robust evolutionary algorithm, that is, the particle swarm optimization (PSO, is employed. To enhance the performance of the method, the measured displacements are denoised using multiresolution property of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT. It is observed that by the proposed method it is possible to determine small cracks with depth ratio 0.1 in spite of 5% noise interference.

  13. Spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry for phase-sensitive measurement of Faraday rotation at multiple depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Jou; Black, Adam J; Akkin, Taner

    2013-10-10

    We describe a method for differential phase measurement of Faraday rotation from multiple depth locations simultaneously. A polarization-maintaining fiber-based spectral-domain interferometer that utilizes a low-coherent light source and a single camera is developed. Light decorrelated by the orthogonal channels of the fiber is launched on a sample as two oppositely polarized circular states. These states reflect from sample surfaces and interfere with the corresponding states of the reference arm. A custom spectrometer, which is designed to simplify camera alignment, separates the orthogonal channels and records the interference-related oscillations on both spectra. Inverse Fourier transform of the spectral oscillations in k-space yields complex depth profiles, whose amplitudes and phase difference are related to reflectivity and Faraday rotation within the sample, respectively. Information along a full depth profile is produced at the camera speed without performing an axial scan for a multisurface sample. System sensitivity for the Faraday rotation measurement is 0.86 min of arc. Verdet constants of clear liquids and turbid media are measured at 687 nm.

  14. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  15. Quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow in a juvenile porcine model by depth-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Diop, Mamadou; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lawrence, Keith St.

    2010-05-01

    Nearly half a million children and young adults are affected by traumatic brain injury each year in the United States. Although adequate cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential to recovery, complications that disrupt blood flow to the brain and exacerbate neurological injury often go undetected because no adequate bedside measure of CBF exists. In this study we validate a depth-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that provides quantitative CBF measurement despite significant signal contamination from skull and scalp tissue. The respiration rates of eight anesthetized pigs (weight: 16.2+/-0.5 kg, age: 1 to 2 months old) are modulated to achieve a range of CBF levels. Concomitant CBF measurements are performed with NIRS and CT perfusion. A significant correlation between CBF measurements from the two techniques is demonstrated (r2=0.714, slope=0.92, p<0.001), and the bias between the two techniques is -2.83 mL.min-1.100 g-1 (CI0.95: -19.63 mL.min-1.100 g-1-13.9 mL.min-1.100 g-1). This study demonstrates that accurate measurements of CBF can be achieved with depth-resolved NIRS despite significant signal contamination from scalp and skull. The ability to measure CBF at the bedside provides a means of detecting, and thereby preventing, secondary ischemia during neurointensive care.

  16. Depth-encoded dual beam phase-resolved Doppler OCT for Doppler-angle-independent flow velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Cheng, Wei; Cao, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Xinjian; Mo, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    Phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography (PR-D-OCT) is a functional OCT imaging technique that can provide high-speed and high-resolution depth-resolved measurement on flow in biological materials. However, a common problem with conventional PR-D-OCT is that this technique often measures the flow motion projected onto the OCT beam path. In other words, it needs the projection angle to extract the absolute velocity from PR-D-OCT measurement. In this paper, we proposed a novel dual-beam PR-D-OCT method to measure absolute flow velocity without separate measurement on the projection angle. Two parallel light beams are created in sample arm and focused into the sample at two different incident angles. The images produced by these two beams are encoded to different depths in single B-scan. Then the Doppler signals picked up by the two beams together with the incident angle difference can be used to calculate the absolute velocity. We validated our approach in vitro on an artificial flow phantom with our home-built 1060 nm swept source OCT. Experimental results demonstrated that our method can provide an accurate measurement of absolute flow velocity with independency on the projection angle.

  17. A Feasibility Study for Measuring Accurate Chest Compression Depth and Rate on Soft Surfaces Using Two Accelerometers and Spectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Ruiz de Gauna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR feedback devices are being increasingly used. However, current accelerometer-based devices overestimate chest displacement when CPR is performed on soft surfaces, which may lead to insufficient compression depth. Aim. To assess the performance of a new algorithm for measuring compression depth and rate based on two accelerometers in a simulated resuscitation scenario. Materials and Methods. Compressions were provided to a manikin on two mattresses, foam and sprung, with and without a backboard. One accelerometer was placed on the chest and the second at the manikin’s back. Chest displacement and mattress displacement were calculated from the spectral analysis of the corresponding acceleration every 2 seconds and subtracted to compute the actual sternal-spinal displacement. Compression rate was obtained from the chest acceleration. Results. Median unsigned error in depth was 2.1 mm (4.4%. Error was 2.4 mm in the foam and 1.7 mm in the sprung mattress (p<0.001. Error was 3.1/2.0 mm and 1.8/1.6 mm with/without backboard for foam and sprung, respectively (p<0.001. Median error in rate was 0.9 cpm (1.0%, with no significant differences between test conditions. Conclusion. The system provided accurate feedback on chest compression depth and rate on soft surfaces. Our solution compensated mattress displacement, avoiding overestimation of compression depth when CPR is performed on soft surfaces.

  18. Generation of higher harmonics in longitudinal vibration of beams with breathing cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broda, D.; Pieczonka, L.; Hiwarkar, V.; Staszewski, W. J.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    Classical nonlinear vibration methods used for structural damage detection are often based on higher- and sub-harmonic generation. However, nonlinearities arising from sources other than damage - e.g. boundary conditions or a measurement chain - are a primary concern in these methods. This paper focuses on localisation of damage-related nonlinearities based on higher harmonic generation. Numerical and experimental investigations in longitudinal vibration of beams with breathing cracks are presented. Numerical modelling is performed using a two-dimensional finite element approach. Different crack depths, locations and boundary conditions are investigated. The results demonstrate that nonlinearities in cracked beams are particularly strong in the vicinity of damage, allowing not only for damage localisation but also for separation of crack induced nonlinearity from other sources of nonlinearities.

  19. Investigations about Starting Cracks in DC-Casting of 6063-Type Billets Part II: Modelling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. K.; Schneider, W.

    Influence on starting crack tendency of varying a number of casting parameters has been studied by experiments, Part I (1), and by model calculations, Part II. Both studies point to starting block shape as a most important single factor in controlling starting cracks. By using the thermal model ALSIM-2 in analysing initial experimental results, the variable heat transfer towards the starting block was determined. This made possible a satisfactory model analysis of the starting phase and likewise the formulation of a useful cracking concept. Thus by using calculated and measured liquid pool depth curve in the starting phase of casting as a basis, an effective starting block shape was found. This new shape practically eliminates the starting crack problems in extrusion billets of the AA6063 type alloys.

  20. Measuring Sandy Bottom Dynamics by Exploiting Depth from Stereo Video Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musumeci, Rosaria E.; Farinella, Giovanni M.; Foti, Enrico;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an imaging system for measuring sandy bottom dynamics is proposed. The system exploits stereo sequences and projected laser beams to build the 3D shape of the sandy bottom during time. The reconstruction is used by experts of the field to perform accurate measurements and analysis i...

  1. Accuracy and reliability of facial soft tissue depth measurements using cone beam computer tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    2010-01-01

    It is important to have accurate and reliable measurements of soft tissue thickness for specific landmarks of the face and scalp when producing a facial reconstruction. In the past several methods have been created to measure facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) in cadavers and in the living. The con

  2. Effect of cycloplegia on axial length and anterior chamber depth measurements in children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheung, Sin Wan; Chan, Rufina; Cheng, Roy CS; Cho, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    ...) measurements made with the IOLMaster and an ultrasonic biometer in children. Methods:  Pre- and post-cycloplegic axial length and ACD were measured with the IOLMaster followed by the Sonomed A-5500 in 31 children aged from seven to 15...

  3. Validation of ultrasound as a noninvasive tool to measure subcutaneous fat depth in leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Heather S.; Benson, Scott R.; James, Michael C.; Martin, Kelly J.; Stacy, Brian A.; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Rist, Paul M.; Work, Thierry M.; Balazs, George H.; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) undergo substantial cyclical changes in body condition between foraging and nesting. Ultrasonography has been used to measure subcutaneous fat as an indicator of body condition in many species but has not been applied in sea turtles. To validate this technique in leatherback turtles, ultrasound images were obtained from 36 live-captured and dead-stranded immature and adult turtles from foraging and nesting areas in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Ultrasound measurements were compared with direct measurements from surgical biopsy or necropsy. Tissue architecture was confirmed histologically in a subset of turtles. The dorsal shoulder region provided the best site for differentiation of tissues. Maximum fat depth values with the front flipper in a neutral (45–90°) position demonstrated good correlation with direct measurements. Ultrasound-derived fat measurements may be used in the future for quantitative assessment of body condition as an index of health in this critically endangered species.

  4. VALIDATION OF ULTRASOUND AS A NONINVASIVE TOOL TO MEASURE SUBCUTANEOUS FAT DEPTH IN LEATHERBACK SEA TURTLES (DERMOCHELYS CORIACEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Heather S; Benson, Scott R; James, Michael C; Martin, Kelly J; Stacy, Brian A; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Rist, Paul M; Work, Thierry M; Balazs, George H; Seminoff, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-01

    Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) undergo substantial cyclical changes in body condition between foraging and nesting. Ultrasonography has been used to measure subcutaneous fat as an indicator of body condition in many species but has not been applied in sea turtles. To validate this technique in leatherback turtles, ultrasound images were obtained from 36 live-captured and dead-stranded immature and adult turtles from foraging and nesting areas in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Ultrasound measurements were compared with direct measurements from surgical biopsy or necropsy. Tissue architecture was confirmed histologically in a subset of turtles. The dorsal shoulder region provided the best site for differentiation of tissues. Maximum fat depth values with the front flipper in a neutral (45-90°) position demonstrated good correlation with direct measurements. Ultrasound-derived fat measurements may be used in the future for quantitative assessment of body condition as an index of health in this critically endangered species.

  5. A characterization of Arctic aerosols on the basis of aerosol optical depth and black carbon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Stone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aerosols, transported from distant source regions, influence the Arctic surface radiation budget. When deposited on snow and ice, carbonaceous particles can reduce the surface albedo, which accelerates melting, leading to a temperature-albedo feedback that amplifies Arctic warming. Black carbon (BC, in particular, has been implicated as a major warming agent at high latitudes. BC and co-emitted aerosols in the atmosphere, however, attenuate sunlight and radiatively cool the surface. Warming by soot deposition and cooling by atmospheric aerosols are referred to as “darkening” and “dimming” effects, respectively. In this study, climatologies of spectral aerosol optical depth AOD (2001–2011 and Equivalent BC (EBC (1989–2011 from three Arctic observatories and from a number of aircraft campaigns are used to characterize Arctic aerosols. Since the 1980s, concentrations of BC in the Arctic have decreased by more than 50% at ground stations where in situ observations are made. AOD has increased slightly during the past decade, with variations attributed to changing emission inventories and source strengths of natural aerosols, including biomass smoke and volcanic aerosol, further influenced by deposition rates and airflow patterns.

  6. Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography: A New Way Measuring Choroidal Thickness in Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The body changes markedly during pregnancy; each system behaves differently from a nonpregnant state. As the eyes are the only windows to see directly what is going on in the internal environment, more and more researches have been done to explain the association between ocular changes and the physiological and pathological changes during pregnancy. The choroid is one of the critical parts of the eye, providing nutrition. And abnormal choroid may result in ocular dysfunction and visual problems. As the optical coherence tomography develops, a rapid, direct, noninvasive, and nontoxic way is available to obtain the choroid situation of pregnant women, which may explain the mechanism of pregnancy-related eye diseases. This review would summarize relevant original articles published from January 1, 2008 to December 1, 2016 to assess the changes of choroidal thickness (CT with enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT during pregnancy. And the relationship between choroidal thickness changes and pregnancy remains uncertain. To our knowledge, this is the first review of EDI-OCT in assessing the choroidal thickness of the pregnant women.

  7. Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography: A New Way Measuring Choroidal Thickness in Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The body changes markedly during pregnancy; each system behaves differently from a nonpregnant state. As the eyes are the only windows to see directly what is going on in the internal environment, more and more researches have been done to explain the association between ocular changes and the physiological and pathological changes during pregnancy. The choroid is one of the critical parts of the eye, providing nutrition. And abnormal choroid may result in ocular dysfunction and visual problems. As the optical coherence tomography develops, a rapid, direct, noninvasive, and nontoxic way is available to obtain the choroid situation of pregnant women, which may explain the mechanism of pregnancy-related eye diseases. This review would summarize relevant original articles published from January 1, 2008 to December 1, 2016 to assess the changes of choroidal thickness (CT) with enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) during pregnancy. And the relationship between choroidal thickness changes and pregnancy remains uncertain. To our knowledge, this is the first review of EDI-OCT in assessing the choroidal thickness of the pregnant women. PMID:28630765

  8. Evaluation of spectral entropy to measure anaesthetic depth and antinociception in sevoflurane-anaesthetised Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgaz, Juan; Granados, María del Mar; Domínguez, Juan Manuel; Navarrete, Rocío; Fernández, Andrés; Galán, Alba; Muñoz, Pilar; Gómez-Villamandos, Rafael J

    2011-06-01

    The use of spectral entropy to determine anaesthetic depth and antinociception was evaluated in sevoflurane-anaesthetised Beagle dogs. Dogs were anaesthetised at each of five multiples of their individual minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC; 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5 and 1.75 MAC), and response entropy (RE), state entropy (SE), RE-SE difference, burst suppression rate (BSR) and cardiorespiratory parameters were recorded before and after a painful stimulus. RE, SE and RE-SE difference did not change significantly after the stimuli. The correlation between MAC-entropy parameters was weak, but these values increased when 1.75 MAC results were excluded from the analysis. BSR was different to zero at 1.5 and 1.75 MAC. It was concluded that RE and RE-SE differences were not adequate indicators of antinociception and SE and RE were unable to detect deep planes of anaesthesia in dogs, although they both distinguished the awake and unconscious states. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography: A New Way Measuring Choroidal Thickness in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Huiyun; Yu, Qiubo; Tong, Qihu; Lu, Qinkang

    2017-01-01

    The body changes markedly during pregnancy; each system behaves differently from a nonpregnant state. As the eyes are the only windows to see directly what is going on in the internal environment, more and more researches have been done to explain the association between ocular changes and the physiological and pathological changes during pregnancy. The choroid is one of the critical parts of the eye, providing nutrition. And abnormal choroid may result in ocular dysfunction and visual problems. As the optical coherence tomography develops, a rapid, direct, noninvasive, and nontoxic way is available to obtain the choroid situation of pregnant women, which may explain the mechanism of pregnancy-related eye diseases. This review would summarize relevant original articles published from January 1, 2008 to December 1, 2016 to assess the changes of choroidal thickness (CT) with enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) during pregnancy. And the relationship between choroidal thickness changes and pregnancy remains uncertain. To our knowledge, this is the first review of EDI-OCT in assessing the choroidal thickness of the pregnant women.

  10. Plasticity around an Axial Surface Crack in a Cylindrical Shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a plasticity model for deep axial surface cracks in pressurised pipes. The model is used in an investigation of the relative merits of fracture criteria based on COD and plastic instability. Recent investigations have shown that the inconsistency of the singular bending stress...... with increasing depth. The method avoids iterations and enables, for any load and crack length, calculation of the smallest crack depth which would cause instability....

  11. Measurement of muon production depth in cosmic ray induced extensive air showers by time structure of muons at observation level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegarzadeh, Gohar; Khoshabadi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, muon production depth (MPD) of extensive air showers (EASs) are measured from time structure of muons at the observation level. A new method for calculating MPD is presented. Based on its relation to the maximum depth of development of electrons and muons (Xmax and Xmaxμ), this parameter has been used as a mass discriminator factor. Using CORSIKA simulation, different simulations for proton and iron primaries in the energy range of 1014-1015 eV are presented. It is found that MPD distribution is strongly related to Xmax and Xmaxμ. These are mass sensitive parameters and their potential as mass discriminator parameters between light and heavy primaries for ALBORZ prototype array and some arbitrary arrays are investigated.

  12. Creep crack growth analysis using C{sub t}-parameter for internal circumferential and external axial surface cracks in a pressurized cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tun, Nwe Ni; Yang, Hee Seung; Yu, Jong Min; Yoon, Kee Bong [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Creep crack growth at elevated temperatures is a critical consideration in estimating the remaining life of high temperature structural components and in deciding their inspection interval. In this study, creep crack growth analyses for external radial-axial and internal radial-circumferential surface cracks in a pressurized cylinder were conducted by an analytical method. The effect of crack depth and crack length on the variations in Ct and remaining life predictions were investigated for surface cracks with various initial aspect ratios. It was observed that the remaining life of an internal radial-circumferential surface crack was approximately 53 times longer than that of an external radial-axial surface crack for the same crack size and loading conditions with 316 stainless steel material. It was also observed that the variations in remaining life, crack propagations, and the Ct values were considerably sensitive to the crack location and crack depth. Convergence of crack aspect ratio was not observed when the crack depth ratio was increased. Since the method is independent of material properties and location of the crack geometries, it can be extended to various material properties and various locations of the surface crack geometries.

  13. Soil moisture, dielectric permittivity and emissivity of soil: effective depth of emission measured by the L-band radiometer ELBARA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Slominska, Ewa; Slominski, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Due to the large variation of soil moisture in space and in time, obtaining soil water balance with an aid of data acquired from the surface is still a challenge. Microwave remote sensing is widely used to determine the water content in soil. It is based on the fact that the dielectric constant of the soil is strongly dependent on its water content. This method provides the data in both local and global scales. Very important issue that is still not solved, is the soil depth at which radiometer "sees" the incoming radiation and how this "depth of view" depends on water content and physical properties of soil. The microwave emission comes from its entire profile, but much of this energy is absorbed by the upper layers of soil. As a result, the contribution of each layer to radiation visible for radiometer decreases with depth. The thickness of the surface layer, which significantly contributes to the energy measured by the radiometer is defined as the "penetration depth". In order to improve the physical base of the methodology of soil moisture measurements using microwave remote sensing and to determine the effective emission depth seen by the radiometer, a new algorithm was developed. This algorithm determines the reflectance coefficient from Fresnel equations, and, what is new, the complex dielectric constant of the soil, calculated from the Usowicz's statistical-physical model (S-PM) of dielectric permittivity and conductivity of soil. The model is expressed in terms of electrical resistance and capacity. The unit volume of soil in the model consists of solid, water and air, and is treated as a system made up of spheres, filling volume by overlapping layers. It was assumed that connections between layers and spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of "resistors" and "capacitors". The emissivity of the soil surface is calculated from the ratio between the brightness temperature measured by the ELBARA radiometer (GAMMA Remote

  14. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  15. Investigation of Cracked Lithium Hydride Reactor Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bird, e.l.; mustaleski, t.m.

    1999-06-01

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds, most of which were circumferentially located in the bottom portion of the vessels. Sections were cut from the vessels containing these cracks and examined by use of the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. Most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the base material and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depths of those examined sections ranged from {approximately}300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 1/8 in. The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue, whereby crack propagation may have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which indicates a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  16. Making high-accuracy null depth measurements for the LBTI exozodi survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Defrère, Denis; Nowak, Matthias; Hinz, Philip; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Absil, Olivier; Bailey, Vanessa; Bryden, Geoffrey; Danchi, William; Kennedy, Grant M.; Marion, Lindsay; Roberge, Aki; Serabyn, Eugene; Skemer, Andy J.; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Wyatt, Mark

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of exozodiacal light emission is both important for the understanding of planetary systems evolution and for the preparation of future space missions aiming to characterize low mass planets in the habitable zone of nearby main sequence stars. The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) exozodi survey aims at providing a ten-fold improvement over current state of the art, measuring dust emission levels down to a typical accuracy of 12 zodis per star, for a representative ensemble of 30+ high priority targets. Such measurements promise to yield a final accuracy of about 2 zodis on the median exozodi level of the targets sample. Reaching a 1 σ measurement uncertainty of 12 zodis per star corresponds to measuring interferometric cancellation ("null") levels, i.e visibilities at the few 100 ppm uncertainty level. We discuss here the challenges posed by making such high accuracy mid-infrared visibility measurements from the ground and present the methodology we developed for achieving current best levels of 500 ppm or so. We also discuss current limitations and plans for enhanced exozodi observations over the next few years at LBTI.

  17. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air-showers from LOPES radio measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Łuczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2014-01-01

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, which measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) which leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum Xmax of 13% and 50 g/cm^2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20-25% for the primary energy and 95 g/cm^2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  18. Rock Cracking Indices for Improved Tunnel Support Design: A Case Study for Columnar Jointed Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia-Ting; Hao, Xian-Jie; Jiang, Quan; Li, Shao-jun; Hudson, John A.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements indicate that the development of cracking is a key feature relating to the strength and collapse of a columnar jointed rock mass. In this context, a new support design method utilising rock cracking indices for columnar jointed rock mass under high stress is proposed to restrain the development of cracking in the surrounding rock mass. The method involves limiting the cracking evolution of the surrounding rock mass by designing the appropriate parameters and time of installation of the support system. Two indices are suggested: the allowable depth of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); and the allowable damage extent of the rock mass in the EDZ. The method involves limiting the evolution of cracking in the surrounding rock mass by designing the parameters and time of installation of the support system. The support system should have a suitable stiffness and installation time so as to restrain the evolution of the depth and damage extent of the EDZ within the surrounding rock. Therefore, the depth and damage extent of the EDZ, as well as the axial stress in the anchor bolts, are calculated at different distances between the support location and the tunnel working face to find the appropriate stiffness and installation time of the support system. The method has been successfully adopted to determine the thickness of shotcrete, the arrangement and installation time of rockbolts, and other parameters, for five large diversion tunnels at the Baihetan hydropower station, China, which were excavated in columnar jointed rock masses.

  19. Crack spacing threshold of double cracks propagation for large-module rack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵铁柱; 石端伟; 姚哲皓; 毛宏勇; 程术潇; 彭惠

    2015-01-01

    Large-module rack of the Three Gorges shiplift is manufactured by casting and machining, which is unable to avoid slag inclusions and surface cracks. To ensure its safety in the future service, studying on crack propagation rule and the residual life estimation method of large-module rack is of great significance. The possible crack distribution forms of the rack in the Three Gorges shiplift were studied. By applying moving load on the model in FRANC3D and ANSYS, quantitative analyses of interference effects on double cracks in both collinear and offset conditions were conducted. The variation rule of the stress intensity factor (SIF) influence factor,RK, of double collinear cracks changing with crack spacing ratio,RS, was researched. The horizontal and vertical crack spacing threshold of double cracks within the design life of the shiplift were obtained, which are 24 and 4 times as large as half of initial crack length,c0, respectively. The crack growth rates along the length and depth directions in the process of coalescence on double collinear cracks were also studied.

  20. Inferring the depth of the atmospheric circulation on Jupiter and Saturn through the gravity measurements by Juno and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Y.; Galanti, E.

    2014-04-01

    In approximately two years the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close flybys of Jupiter and Saturn respectively, obtaining for the first time a high precision gravity spectrum for these planets. We discuss how this data can be used to estimate the depth of the observed jet streams on these planets. This can be done in several ways: 1. measurements of the high order even harmonics which beyond J10 are dominated by the dynamics; 2. measurements of odd gravity harmonics which have no contribution from a static planet, and therefore are a pure signature of dynamics; 3. upper limits on the depth can be obtained by comparing low order even harmonics from dynamical models to the difference between the measured low order even harmonics and the largest possible values of a static planet; 4. direct latitudinally varying measurements of the gravity field exerted on the spacecraft. We discuss how these methods may be applied and show that given the expected sensitivities of Juno and Cassini the odd harmonics J3 and J5 will have the best sensitivity to deep dynamics, allowing detection of winds reaching only ~ 100 km deep, if those exist on Jupiter and Saturn (Kaspi, 2013). For this analysis we use a hierarchy of dynamical models ranging from deep compressible GCMs to simplified thermal wind models in order to relate the three-dimensional flow to perturbations of the density field, and therefore to the gravity field.

  1. Nocturnal aerosol optical depth measurements with a small-aperture automated photometer using the moon as a light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, T.A.; Sorokin, M.; Stone, T.; Eck, T.F.; Hoff, R.; Welton, E.; Holben, B.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  2. The "RED Versa NIR" Plane to Retrieve Broken-Cloud Optical Depth from Ground-Based Measurements"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Evans, K.; Wiscombe, W.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for retrieving cloud optical depth from ground-based measurements of zenith radiance in the RED and near infrared (MR) spectral regions is introduced. Because zenith radiance does not have a one-to-one relationship with optical depth, it is absolutely impossible to use a monochromatic retrieval. On the other side, algebraic combinations of spectral radiances such as NDCI while largely removing nouniquiness and the radiative effects of cloud inhomogeneity, can result in poor retrievals due to its insensitivity to cloud fraction. Instead, both RED and NIR radiances as points on the 'RED vs. NIR' plane are proposed to be used for retrieval. The proposed retrieval method is applied to Cimel measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) site in Oklahoma. Cimel, a multi-channel sunphotometer, is a part of AERONET - a ground-based network for monitoring aerosol optical properties. The results of retrieval are compared with the ones from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) located next to Cimel at the ARM site. In addition, the performance of the retrieval method is assessed using a fractal model of cloud inhomogeneity and broken cloudiness. The preliminary results look very promising both theoretically and from measurements.

  3. Noncontact methods for measuring water-surface elevations and velocities in rivers: Implications for depth and discharge extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Kinzel, Paul J.; McDonald, Richard R.; Schmeeckle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed optical and videographic methods for measuring water-surface properties in a noninvasive manner hold great promise for extracting river hydraulic and bathymetric information. This paper describes such a technique, concentrating on the method of infrared videog- raphy for measuring surface velocities and both acoustic (laboratory-based) and laser-scanning (field-based) techniques for measuring water-surface elevations. In ideal laboratory situations with simple flows, appropriate spatial and temporal averaging results in accurate water-surface elevations and water-surface velocities. In test cases, this accuracy is sufficient to allow direct inversion of the governing equations of motion to produce estimates of depth and discharge. Unlike other optical techniques for determining local depth that rely on transmissivity of the water column (bathymetric lidar, multi/hyperspectral correlation), this method uses only water-surface information, so even deep and/or turbid flows can be investigated. However, significant errors arise in areas of nonhydrostatic spatial accelerations, such as those associated with flow over bedforms or other relatively steep obstacles. Using laboratory measurements for test cases, the cause of these errors is examined and both a simple semi-empirical method and computational results are presented that can potentially reduce bathymetric inversion errors.

  4. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  5. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  6. Agreement and relationship between ultrasonic and partial coherence interferometry measurements of axial length and anterior chamber depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissa AR

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amany R Wissa, Sherein S Wahba, Maged M RoshdyAin Shams University and National Eye Hospital, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To find the relationship between axial length (AL and anterior chamber depth (ACD measurements, using partial coherence interferometry (PCI and A-scan ultrasonography (US.Setting: National Eye Hospital, Cairo, Egypt.Method: Retrieving and comparing biometric data from the files of 163 consecutive patients seeking cataract extraction by PCI (IOLMaster and US (Sonomed.Results: AL measured using US range from 20.93 to 33.17 mm (mean ± SD = 24.45 ± 2.73 mm. AL measured by PCI range from 20.90 to 33.27 mm (24.05 ± 2.76 mm. The range of ACD measured by US was 2.09 to 4.48 mm (3.32 ± 0.46 mm. The range of ACD measured by PCI was 2.15 to 4.29 mm (3.31 ± 0.45 mm. There is very high agreement between both methods; the intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.999 for AL, and 0.966 for ACD measurements. A linear regression model of two formulae fits the AL values (one for eyes longer than 29 mm, and the other for the shorter eyes, with no significant departure from linearity (P > 0.1. One formula fits the ACD values with significant departure from linearity (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Both US and PCI methods for measurements of AL and ACD are highly correlated. Therefore, the value of AL measured by one method can be predicted, with high accuracy, from the other method.Keywords: axial length, anterior chamber depth, A-scan US, partial coherence interferometry

  7. Fatigue Crack Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    evaluating ciack initiation time and crack propagation, prgram I was used for performing the major fatigue test with the aircraft structure. In...advantage to begin with the end of the fracture, this is especially so in the case of the quantitative evaluation of striations. The overload fracture...Select the Measuring Line for Quantitative Evaluation Actually, the fatigue fracture should be inspected completely from the point of origin to the

  8. Practical measures for improving the ecological state of lake Marken using in depth system knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genseberger, M.; Noordhuis, R.; Thiange, C.X.O.; Boderie, P.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    For Lake Marken in the Netherlands, high suspended sediment concentrations result in reduced ecological values and prevent goals and standards from being met (Water Framework Directive, Natura 2000). A practical measure to improve the ecology that is currently studied is the construction of sheltere

  9. The Impact of Submarine Depth, Speed Sonar Systems on Arctic Sea-ice Draft Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-21

    speed sonar systems on Arctic sea - ice draft measurements April 21, 2015 Reporting period: Oct 5, 2010- Sept 30, 2014 Prepared for: Office...TERM GOALS Arctic sea ice thickness is critical to geophysical research into climate change, shipping, biological productivity and other things...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Arctic sea ice thickness is critical to geophysical research into climate change, shipping, biological

  10. Object's optical geometry measurements based on Extended Depth of Field (EDoF) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydłowski, Michał; Powałka, Bartosz; Chady, Tomasz; Waszczuk, Paweł

    2017-02-01

    The authors propose a method of using EDoF in macro inspections using bi-telecentric lenses and a specially designed experimental machine setup, allowing accurate focal distance changing. Also a software method is presented allowing EDoF image reconstruction using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT). Exploited method results are additionally compared with measurements performed with Keyence's LJ-V Series in-line Profilometer for reference matters.

  11. Oceanic residual depth measurements, the plate cooling model, and global dynamic topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark J.; Winterbourne, Jeff; Czarnota, Karol; White, Nicky

    2017-03-01

    Convective circulation of the mantle causes deflections of the Earth's surface that vary as a function of space and time. Accurate measurements of this dynamic topography are complicated by the need to isolate and remove other sources of elevation, arising from flexure and lithospheric isostasy. The complex architecture of continental lithosphere means that measurement of present-day dynamic topography is more straightforward in the oceanic realm. Here we present an updated methodology for calculating oceanic residual bathymetry, which is a proxy for dynamic topography. Corrections are applied that account for the effects of sedimentary loading and compaction, for anomalous crustal thickness variations, for subsidence of oceanic lithosphere as a function of age and for non-hydrostatic geoid height variations. Errors are formally propagated to estimate measurement uncertainties. We apply this methodology to a global database of 1936 seismic surveys located on oceanic crust and generate 2297 spot measurements of residual topography, including 1161 with crustal corrections. The resultant anomalies have amplitudes of ±1 km and wavelengths of ˜1000 km. Spectral analysis of our database using cross-validation demonstrates that spherical harmonics up to and including degree 30 (i.e., wavelengths down to 1300 km) are required to accurately represent these observations. Truncation of the expansion at a lower maximum degree erroneously increases the amplitude of inferred long-wavelength dynamic topography. There is a strong correlation between our observations and free-air gravity anomalies, magmatism, ridge seismicity, vertical motions of adjacent rifted margins, and global tomographic models. We infer that shorter wavelength components of the observed pattern of dynamic topography may be attributable to the presence of thermal anomalies within the shallow asthenospheric mantle.

  12. Penetration depth measurement of a 6 MeV electron beam in water by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Hammer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI visualization of a 6 MeV electron beam in ferrous-doped water; a 25 mm penetration depth was measured. Time domain nuclear magnetic resonance was used to investigate the effect of generated free radicals on the free induction decay (FID in nondoped water; no apparent effects to the FID were observed. We show that MRI visualization of charged particle beams used in medical applications will require exogenous agents to provide contrast enhancement.

  13. Agreement and relationship between ultrasonic and partial coherence interferometry measurements of axial length and anterior chamber depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissa, Amany R; Wahba, Sherein S; Roshdy, Maged M

    2012-01-01

    To find the relationship between axial length (AL) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) measurements, using partial coherence interferometry (PCI) and A-scan ultrasonography (US). National Eye Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Retrieving and comparing biometric data from the files of 163 consecutive patients seeking cataract extraction by PCI (IOLMaster) and US (Sonomed). AL measured using US range from 20.93 to 33.17 mm (mean ± SD = 24.45 ± 2.73 mm). AL measured by PCI range from 20.90 to 33.27 mm (24.05 ± 2.76 mm). The range of ACD measured by US was 2.09 to 4.48 mm (3.32 ± 0.46 mm). The range of ACD measured by PCI was 2.15 to 4.29 mm (3.31 ± 0.45 mm). There is very high agreement between both methods; the intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.999 for AL, and 0.966 for ACD measurements. A linear regression model of two formulae fits the AL values (one for eyes longer than 29 mm, and the other for the shorter eyes), with no significant departure from linearity (P > 0.1). One formula fits the ACD values with significant departure from linearity (P < 0.05). Both US and PCI methods for measurements of AL and ACD are highly correlated. Therefore, the value of AL measured by one method can be predicted, with high accuracy, from the other method.

  14. Performance measurements of a depth-encoding PET detector module based on position-sensitive avalanche photodiode read-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokhale, P A; Silverman, R W; Shah, K S; Grazioso, R; Farrell, R; Glodo, J; McClish, M A; Entine, G; Tran, V H; Cherry, S R

    2004-09-21

    We are developing a high-resolution, high-efficiency positron emission tomography (PET) detector module with depth of interaction (DOI) capability based on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator array coupled at both ends to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). In this paper we present the DOI resolution, energy resolution and timing resolution results for complete detector modules. The detector module consists of a 7 x 7 matrix of LSO scintillator crystals (1 x 1 x 20 mm3 in dimension) coupled to 8 x 8 mm2 PSAPDs at both ends. Flood histograms were acquired and used to generate crystal look-up tables. The DOI resolution was measured for individual crystals within the array by using the ratio of the signal amplitudes from the two PSAPDs on an event-by-event basis. A measure of the total scintillation light produced was obtained by summing the signal amplitudes from the two PSAPDs. This summed signal was used to measure the energy resolution. The DOI resolution was measured to be 3-4 mm FWHM irrespective of the position of the crystal within the array, or the interaction location along the length of the crystal. The total light signal and energy resolution was almost independent of the depth of interaction. The measured energy resolution averaged 14% FWHM. The coincidence timing resolution measured using a pair of identical detector modules was 4.5 ns FWHM. These results are consistent with the design goals and the performance required of a compact, high-resolution and high-efficiency PET detector module for small animal and breast imaging applications.

  15. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Ros, A. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  16. Crack-closing of cement mortar beams using NiTi cold-drawn SMA short fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Chung, Young-Soo; Kim, Hee Sun; Jung, Chungsung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, crack-closing tests of mortar beams reinforced by shape memory alloy (SMA) short fibers were performed. For this purpose, NiTi SMA fibers with a diameter of 0.965 mm and a length of 30 mm were made from SMA wires of 1.0 mm diameter by cold drawing. Four types of SMA fibers were prepared, namely, straight and dog-bone-shaped fiber and the two types of fibers with paper wrapping in the middle of the fibers. The paper provides an unbonded length of 15 mm. For bending tests, six types of mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B×H×L) were prepared. The SMA fibers were placed at the bottom center of the beams along with an artificial crack of 10 mm depth and 1 mm thickness. This study investigated the influence of SMA fibers on the flexural strength of the beams from the measured force- deflection curves. After cracking, the beams were heated at the bottom by fire to activate the SMA fibers. Then, the beams recovered the deflection, and the cracks were closed. This study evaluated crack-closing capacity using the degree of crack recovery and deflection-recovery factor. The first factor is estimated from the crack-width before and after crack-closing, and the second one is obtained from the downward deflection due to loading and the upward deflection due to the closing force of the SMA fibers.

  17. Adapting social neuroscience measures for schizophrenia clinical trials, Part 2: trolling the depths of psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Robert S; Penn, David L; Lee, Junghee; Horan, William P; Reise, Steven P; Ochsner, Kevin N; Marder, Stephen R; Green, Michael F

    2013-11-01

    The psychometric properties of 4 paradigms adapted from the social neuroscience literature were evaluated to determine their suitability for use in clinical trials of schizophrenia. This 2-site study (University of California, Los Angeles and University of North Carolina) included 173 clinically stable schizophrenia outpatients and 88 healthy controls. The social cognition battery was administered twice to the schizophrenia group (baseline, 4-week retest) and once to the control group. The 4 paradigms included 2 that assess perception of nonverbal social and action cues (basic biological motion and emotion in biological motion) and 2 that involve higher level inferences about self and others' mental states (self-referential memory and empathic accuracy). Each paradigm was evaluated on (1) patient vs healthy control group differences, (2) test-retest reliability, (3) utility as a repeated measure, and (4) tolerability. Of the 4 paradigms, empathic accuracy demonstrated the strongest characteristics, including large between-group differences, adequate test-retest reliability (.72), negligible practice effects, and good tolerability ratings. The other paradigms showed weaker psychometric characteristics in their current forms. These findings highlight challenges in adapting social neuroscience paradigms for use in clinical trials.

  18. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements Using a Ground-based Lunar Photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Tim; Omar, Ali; Haggard, Charles; Pippin, Margaret; Tasaddaq, Aasam; Stone, Tom; Rodriguez, Jon; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; hide

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was proposed to combine AERONET network photometer capabilities with a high precision lunar model used for satellite calibration to retrieve columnar nighttime AODs. The USGS lunar model can continuously provide pre-atmosphere high precision lunar irradiance determinations for multiple wavelengths at ground sensor locations. When combined with measured irradiances from a ground-based AERONET photometer, atmospheric column transmissions can determined yielding nighttime column aerosol AOD and Angstrom coefficients. Additional demonstrations have utilized this approach to further develop calibration methods and to obtain data in polar regions where extended periods of darkness occur. This new capability enables more complete studies of the diurnal behavior of aerosols, and feedback for models and satellite retrievals for the nighttime behavior of aerosols. It is anticipated that the nighttime capability of these sensors will be useful for comparisons with satellite lidars such as CALIOP and CATS in additional to ground-based lidars in MPLNET at night, when the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than daytime and more precise AOD comparisons can be made.

  19. PRECISE MEASUREMENT OF THE REIONIZATION OPTICAL DEPTH FROM THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC HEATING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: anastasia.fialkov@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    As a result of our limited data on reionization, the total optical depth for electron scattering, τ, limits precision measurements of cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It was recently shown that the predicted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen contains enough information to reconstruct τ with sub-percent accuracy, assuming that the neutral gas was much hotter than the CMB throughout the entire epoch of reionization (EoR). Here we relax this assumption and use the global 21 cm signal alone to extract τ for realistic X-ray heating scenarios. We test our model-independent approach using mock data for a wide range of ionization and heating histories and show that an accurate measurement of the reionization optical depth at a sub-percent level is possible in most of the considered scenarios even when heating is not saturated during the EoR, assuming that the foregrounds are mitigated. However, we find that in cases where heating sources had hard X-ray spectra and their luminosity was close to or lower than what is predicted based on low-redshift observations, the global 21 cm signal alone is not a good tracer of the reionization history.

  20. Thermografic measurement of crack initiation and propagation at thin sheet joints; Rissentstehung thermometrisch ermitteln. Zerstoerungsfreie Bestimmung der Rissinitiierung in mechanisch gefuegten und widerstandpunktgeschweissten Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathke, W.; Stahlfeld, G. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe V.5 - Sicherheit in der Fuegetechnik

    2000-07-01

    This contribution demonstrates how a thermometric procedure might be applied to determine crack initiation during fatigue testing of joints at steel sheets. The procedure is based on the measurement of the temperature increase which is produced by the heat at the respective joint caused by deformation energy. Such investigations are aimed at detection of crack initiation before it becomes visible at the specimen surface. Thermografic measurements at different mechanical joints and resistance welded spots are compared and various applications are suggested. (orig.) [German] In diesem Beitrag wird gezeigt, wie sich ein thermometrisches Verfahren einsetzen laesst, um die Rissentstehung waehrend der Dauerschwingpruefung von Stahlblechen zu erfassen. Vergleichend werden Messungen an Proben, die durch Stanznieten, Clinchen und Widerstandspunktschweissen gefuegt wurden, gegenuebergestellt. Hierzu wird die am Fuegepunkt waehrend der Pruefung in Waerme umgewandelte Formaenderungsenergie kontinuierlich in Form der Temperaturerhoehung gemessen. Ziel dieser Untersuchungen ist es, solche Temperaturerhoehungen zur Erkennung der Rissentstehung zu verwenden, bevor der Riss die Blechoberflaeche erreicht hat und visuell erkennbar wird. Zudem werden verschiedene Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten vorgeschlagen. (orig.)

  1. Strain Measurements within Fibreboard. Part III: Analyzing the Process Zone at the Crack Tip of Medium Density Fiberboards (MDF) Double Cantilever I-Beam Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Jörn; Müller, Ulrich; Konnerth, Johannes; Sinn, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the third part of a study dealing with the mechanical and fracture mechanical characterization of Medium Density Fiberboards (MDF). In the first part, an analysis of internal bond strength testing was performed and in the second part MDF was analyzed by means of the wedge splitting experiment; this part deals with the double cantilever I beam test, which is designed for measuring the fracture energy as well as stress intensity factor in Mode I. For a comparison of isotropic and orthotropic material behavior, finite element modeling was performed. In addition to the calculation of fracture energy the stress intensity factor was analyzed by means of finite elements simulation and calculation. In order to analyze strain deformations and the process zone, electronic speckle pattern interferometry measurements were performed. The results revealed an elongated process zone and lower results for KIC if compared to the wedge splitting experiment. The Gf numbers are higher compared to the wedge splitting results and can be explained by the thicker process zone formed during the crack propagation. The process zone width on its part is influenced by the stiff reinforcements and yields a similar crack surface as with the internal bond test.

  2. 机场道面混凝土夏季施工裂缝防治措施%Crack Prevention Measures for Airport Concrete Pavement in Summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱仁兴; 许军; 许永坤; 杨大志; 叶勇

    2011-01-01

    针对某机场现浇混凝土道面板在夏季施工过程中出现的裂缝现象,综合考虑环境条件与工程特点,从材料品质、施工和环境条件等方面分析了裂缝产生的原因,并提出了相应的防治措施,在实践中取得了显著效果,可供干旱、多风地区道面混凝土夏季施工参考。%Against the cracks in cast-in-situ slab of airport concrete pavement during construction in summer,considering the environmental conditions and engineering characteristics,the causes of cracks in the aspects of material,construction and environment are analyzed,and the corresponding control measures are put forward in this paper.These measures have achieved good results in practice,which can serve as a reference for concrete pavement construction in summer in drought and windy areas.

  3. Strain Measurements within Fibreboard. Part III: Analyzing the Process Zone at the Crack Tip of Medium Density Fiberboards (MDF Double Cantilever I-Beam Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Sinn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the third part of a study dealing with the mechanical and fracture mechanical characterization of Medium Density Fiberboards (MDF. In the first part, an analysis of internal bond strength testing was performed and in the second part MDF was analyzed by means of the wedge splitting experiment; this part deals with the double cantilever I beam test, which is designed for measuring the fracture energy as well as stress intensity factor in Mode I. For a comparison of isotropic and orthotropic material behavior, finite element modeling was performed. In addition to the calculation of fracture energy the stress intensity factor was analyzed by means of finite elements simulation and calculation. In order to analyze strain deformations and the process zone, electronic speckle pattern interferometry measurements were performed. The results revealed an elongated process zone and lower results for KIC if compared to the wedge splitting experiment. The Gf numbers are higher compared to the wedge splitting results and can be explained by the thicker process zone formed during the crack propagation. The process zone width on its part is influenced by the stiff reinforcements and yields a similar crack surface as with the internal bond test.

  4. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U.; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

    2010-02-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  5. Measurement of the depth of maximum of extensive air showers above 10{18} eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anticić, T; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arisaka, K; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; Benzvi, S; Berat, C; Bergmann, T; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohácová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; de Mello Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Díaz Castro, M L; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fröhlich, U; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; García Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gómez Berisso, M; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kadija, K; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D-H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Lopez Agüera, A; Louedec, K; Lozano Bahilo, J; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Marquez Falcon, H R; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martínez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meurer, C; Micanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Parra, A; Parrisius, J; Parsons, R D; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Rodriguez Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Smiałkowski, A; Smída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Susa, T; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tapia, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Todero Peixoto, C J; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés Galicia, J F; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van den Berg, A M; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberic, D; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Winnick, M G; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2010-03-05

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10;{18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{-21}{+35}) g/cm{2}/decade below 10{18.24+/-0.05} eV, and (24+/-3) g/cm{2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  6. Application of oxygen A-band equivalent width to disambiguate downwelling radiances for cloud optical depth measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niple, Edward R.; Scott, Herman E.; Conant, John A.; Jones, Stephen H.; Iannarilli, Frank J.; Pereira, Wellesley E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the three-waveband spectrally agile technique (TWST) for measuring cloud optical depth (COD). TWST is a portable field-proven sensor and retrieval method offering a unique combination of fast (1 Hz) cloud-resolving (0.5° field of view) real-time-reported COD measurements. It entails ground-based measurement of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) zenith spectral radiances much like the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) cloud-mode sensors. What is novel in our approach is that we employ absorption in the oxygen A-band as a means of resolving the COD ambiguity inherent in using up-looking spectral radiances. We describe the TWST sensor and algorithm, and assess their merits by comparison to AERONET cloud-mode measurements collected during the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Spectral radiance agreement was better than 1 %, while a linear fit of COD yielded a slope of 0.905 (TWST reporting higher COD) and offset of -2.1.

  7. Nanometer-resolution depth-resolved measurement of florescence-yield soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy for FeCo thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamaki, M.; Amemiya, K.

    2017-08-01

    We develop a fluorescence-yield depth-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, which is based on the principle that the probing depth is changed by the emission angle of the fluorescence soft x rays. Compared with the electron-yield depth-resolved XAS technique, which has been established in this decade, we can observe wider range in-depth XAS distribution up to several tens of nm. Applying this technique to a 30 ML (˜4.3 nm) FeCo thin film, we observe Fe L-edge XAS spectra at the probing depth of 0.3-6 nm and find that the film has 22 ML (˜3.1 nm) surface oxide layer while its inner layer shows metallic state. We thus successfully obtain nanometer-resolution depth-resolved XAS spectra and further expect that operando measurement under the electric and/or magnetic fields is possible.

  8. An Outline of Studies of Reasons and Preventive Measures for Jujube Fruit Cracking at Home and Abroad%枣裂果原因与预防措施的国内外研究概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王改莲

    2011-01-01

    Jujube is the hot tree species for developing economic forest in Northern China.However,jujube fruit cracking causes enormous economy loss in the jujube farming because fruit cracking would lower the fruit commercial value.The mechanism of fruit cracking was described from the 3 aspects of species,symptom and period and the 8 kinds of factors causing fruit cracking were concluded through analyzing the appearance reasons for fruit cracking at home and abroad.According to these factors,some concrete measures were summarized to prevent jujube fruit cracking,such us the selecting of variety against cracking,keeping the golden mean tree potential,spraying calcium compound,adopting rain shelter greenhouse of new type etc.These can provide some theoretic basis for preventing jujube fruit cracking.%枣是北方经济林发展的主要树种,但由于裂果频繁发生,严重影响了果实的商品价值,给生产者带来了巨大的经济损失。笔者从裂果的种类、症状、时期3个方面对裂果发生的机理进行了阐述,并详细介绍了国内外枣裂果的原因,归纳了8种导致裂果发生的因子。同时总结了防治枣裂果的具体措施,如:选育抗裂品种、保持中庸树势、喷洒钙化物、适当采用新型避雨棚等,为预防枣裂果提供了一定的理论依据。

  9. Lack of Association between Glaucoma and Macular Choroidal Thickness Measured with Enhanced Depth-Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Hochberg, Jessica T.; Banitt, Michael R.; Feuer, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare choroidal thickness measurements among normal eyes, eyes with normal tension glaucoma (NTG), and those with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and to correlate choroidal thickness with demographic and clinical ocular parameters. Methods. Choroidal thickness was measured with enhanced depth-imaging (EDI) optical coherence tomography (OCT) in one eye of 38 normal, 20 NTG, and 56 POAG subjects and compared among groups. The mean age was 69.3 ± 13.6 years (60.1 ± 13.4 years for normal subjects and 73.8 ± 11.3 years for glaucoma subjects; P choroid every 0.5 mm up to 3 mm away from the fovea. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the association between choroidal thickness and demographic and ocular parameters. Results. There were no differences in foveal, temporal, or nasal choroidal thickness between normal, NTG, and POAG subjects (all P > 0.05) after adjusting for age, axial length, and intraocular pressure. Similarly, glaucoma severity groups did not differ from each other in all choroidal thickness measurements (all P > 0.05). Age (β = −1.78; P choroidal thickness in the entire group, followed by axial length (β = −11.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions. Choroidal thickness does not differ among normal, NTG, and POAG subjects, suggesting a lack of relationship between choroidal thickness and glaucoma based on EDI OCT measurements. PMID:21357398

  10. Research on the Construction Crack Measurement Based on Digital Image Processing Technology%基于数字图像处理技术的建筑裂缝测量研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖锋; 刘星; 张亚利; 张璇

    2012-01-01

    提出一种建筑裂缝测量方法,即利用普通数码相机采集裂缝数字图像,经过图像预处理、图像分割、像素标定、宽度测量,完成建筑裂缝测量。本文利用Matlab实现该种建筑裂缝测量方法,并通过在理想状态下进行的模拟试验结果,证明该测量方法能达到实际建筑裂缝监测工程中的精度要求。%This thesis puts forward a kind of building crack measuring method, which completes construction cracks measurement by using common digital camera acquisition crack digital image, after the image preprocessing, image segmentation, pixel calibration, and width measurement. This thesis researches on the realization of the measurement methods of construction cracks, and proves that this method could reach the monitoring accuracy of the actual construction cracks after the ideal condition simulation experiment.

  11. A simplified method to measure choroidal thickness using adaptive compensation in enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Gupta

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate a simplified method to measure choroidal thickness (CT using commercially available enhanced depth imaging (EDI spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. METHODS: We measured CT in 31 subjects without ocular diseases using Spectralis EDI SD-OCT. The choroid-scleral interface of the acquired images was first enhanced using a post-processing compensation algorithm. The enhanced images were then analysed using Photoshop. Two graders independently graded the images to assess inter-grader reliability. One grader re-graded the images after 2 weeks to determine intra-grader reliability. Statistical analysis was performed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman plot analyses. RESULTS: Using adaptive compensation both the intra-grader reliability (ICC: 0.95 to 0.97 and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.93 to 0.97 were perfect for all five locations of CT. However, with the conventional technique of manual CT measurements using built-in callipers provided with the Heidelberg explorer software, the intra- (ICC: 0.87 to 0.94 and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.90 to 0.93 for all the measured locations is lower. Using adaptive compensation, the mean differences (95% limits of agreement for intra- and inter-grader sub-foveal CT measurements were -1.3 (-3.33 to 30.8 µm and -1.2 (-36.6 to 34.2 µm, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of CT obtained from EDI SD-OCT using our simplified method was highly reliable and efficient. Our method is an easy and practical approach to improve the quality of choroidal images and the precision of CT measurement.

  12. Measurement and study of the distributing law of in-situ stresses in rock mass at great depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To solve the technical cruxes of the conventional system in deep rock mass, an automatic testing system for hydraulic fracturing that includes a single tube for hydraulic loop, a pressure-relief valve, central-tubeless packers, and a multichannel real-time data acquisition system was used for in-situ stresses measurement at great depths (over 1000 m) in a coalfield in Juye of Northern China.The values and orientations of horizontal principal stresses were determined by the new system. The virgin stress field and its distributing law were decided by the linear regression from the logged 37 points in seven boreholes. Besides, the typical boreholes arranged in both the adjacent zone and far away zone of the faults were analyzed, respectively. The results show that a stress concentration phenomenon and a deflection in the orientation of the maximal horizontal stress exist in the adjacent zone of the faults, which further provides theoretical basis for design and optimization of mining.

  13. Measurements of the Depth of Maximum of Air-Shower Profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory and their Composition Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, V.

    We describe how the analysis of air showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory leads to an accurate determination of the depth of maximum (Xmax). First, the analysis of the air-shower which leads to the reconstruction of Xmax is discussed. The properties of the detector and its measurement biases are treated and carefully taken into consideration. The Xmax results are interpreted in terms of composition, where the interpretation depends mainly on the hadronic interaction models. A global fit of the Xmax distribution yields an estimate of the abundance of four primaries species. The analysis represents the most statistically significant composition information ever obtained for energies above 1017.8 eV. The scenario that emerges shows no support for a strong flux of iron nuclei and a strong energy dependence of the proton fraction.

  14. Subsidence crack closure: rate, magnitude and sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Graff, J.V.; Romesburg, H.C.

    1981-06-01

    Tension cracks are a major surface disturbance resulting from subsidence and differential settlement above underground coal mines. Recent engineering studies of subsidence indicate that cracks may close where tensile stresses causing the cracks are reduced or relaxed. This stress reduction occurs as mining in the area is completed. Crack closure was confirmed by a study in the Wasatch Plateau coal field of central Utah. Cracks occurred in both exposed bedrock and regolith in an area with maximum subsidence of 3 m. Mean closure rate was 0.3 cm per week with individual crack closure rates between 0.2 cm and 1.0 cm per week. The mean crack closure magnitude was 80% with closure magnitudes varying between 31% and 100%. Actual magnitude values ranged from 0.6 cm to 6.5 cm with a mean value of 3.8 cm. Statistical analysis compared width change status among cracks over time. It was found that: 1) a 41% probability existed that a crack would exhibit decreasing width per weekly measurement, 2) closure state sequences seem random over time, and 3) real differences in closure state sequence existed among different cracks. (6 refs.) (In English)

  15. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherf, Christian; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Joerg; Kara, Eugen; Roedel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Center of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Peter, Christiane [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Center of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Inst. for Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Advanced Technical Coll. Giessen-Friedberg (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Inst. for Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Advanced Technical Coll. Giessen-Friedberg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Background: Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. Material and Methods: The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm{sup 3} thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. Results: The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Conclusion: Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector. (orig.)

  16. Probing into the aging dynamics of biomass burning aerosol by using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Beekmann, Matthias; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Formenti, Paola; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol released into the atmosphere from open biomass burning (BB) is known to undergo considerable chemical and physical transformations (aging). However, there is substantial controversy about the nature and observable effects of these transformations. A shortage of consistent observational evidence on BB aerosol aging processes under different environmental conditions and at various temporal scales hinders development of their adequate representations in chemistry transport models (CTMs). In this study, we obtain insights into the BB aerosol dynamics by using available satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and carbon monoxide (CO). The basic concept of our method is to consider AOD as a function of the BB aerosol photochemical age (that is, the time period characterizing the exposure of BB aerosol emissions to atmospheric oxidation reactions) predicted by means of model tracers. We evaluate the AOD enhancement ratio (ER) defined as the ratio of optical depth of actual BB aerosol with respect to that of a modeled aerosol tracer that is assumed to originate from the same fires as the real BB aerosol but that is not affected by any aging processes. To limit possible effects of model transport errors, the AOD measurements are normalized to CO column amounts that are also retrieved from satellite measurements. The method is applied to the analysis of the meso- and synoptic-scale evolution of aerosol in smoke plumes from major wildfires that occurred in Siberia in summer 2012. AOD and CO retrievals from MODIS and IASI measurements, respectively, are used in combination with simulations performed with the CHIMERE CTM. The analysis indicates that aging processes strongly affected the evolution of BB aerosol in the situation considered, especially in dense plumes (with spatial average PM2. 5 concentration exceeding 100 µg m-3). For such plumes, the ER is found to increase almost 2-fold on the scale of ˜ 10 h of daytime aerosol evolution

  17. Angular dependence of the response of the nanoDot OSLD system for measurements at depth in clinical megavoltage beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Joerg, E-mail: Joerg.Lehmann@sydney.edu.au [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Physics Road A28, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3000 (Australia); Dunn, Leon; Lye, Jessica E.; Kenny, John W.; Alves, Andrew D. C.; Cole, Andrew [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085 (Australia); Asena, Andre [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4001 (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3000 (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, St Andrews Place, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Williams, Ivan M. [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3000 (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to assess the angular dependence of a commercial optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) dosimetry system in MV x-ray beams at depths beyondd{sub max} and to find ways to mitigate this dependence for measurements in phantoms. Methods: Two special holders were designed which allow a dosimeter to be rotated around the center of its sensitive volume. The dosimeter's sensitive volume is a disk, 5 mm in diameter and 0.2 mm thick. The first holder rotates the disk in the traditional way. It positions the disk perpendicular to the beam (gantry pointing to the floor) in the initial position (0°). When the holder is rotated the angle of the disk towards the beam increases until the disk is parallel with the beam (“edge on,” 90°). This is referred to as Setup 1. The second holder offers a new, alternative measurement position. It positions the disk parallel to the beam for all angles while rotating around its center (Setup 2). Measurements with five to ten dosimeters per point were carried out for 6 MV at 3 and 10 cm depth. Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 were performed to simulate the response of the active detector material for several angles. Detector and housing were simulated in detail based on microCT data and communications with the manufacturer. Various material compositions and an all-water geometry were considered. Results: For the traditional Setup 1 the response of the OSLD dropped on average by 1.4% ± 0.7% (measurement) and 2.1% ± 0.3% (Monte Carlo simulation) for the 90° orientation compared to 0°. Monte Carlo simulations also showed a strong dependence of the effect on the composition of the sensitive layer. Assuming the layer to completely consist of the active material (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) results in a 7% drop in response for 90° compared to 0°. Assuming the layer to be completely water, results in a flat response within the simulation uncertainty of about 1%. For the new Setup 2

  18. Digital confocal microscopy using a virtual 4f-system based on numerical beam propagation for depth measurement without mechanical scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yuta; Okamoto, Atsushi; Toda, Masataka; Kuno, Yasuyuki; Nozawa, Jin; Ogawa, Kazuhisa; Tomita, Akihisa

    2016-08-01

    We propose a digital confocal microscope using a virtual 4f-system based on numerical beam propagation for depth measurement without mechanical scanning. In our technique, the information in the sample target along the depth direction is obtained by defocusing the virtual 4f-system, which consists of two virtual lenses arranged in a computer simulation. The principle of our technique is completely different from that of the mechanical scanning method used in the conventional confocal microscope based on digital holography. By using the virtual 4f-system, the measurement and exposure time can be markedly reduced because multilayered tomographic images are generated using a single measurement. In this study, we tested the virtual depth imaging technique by measuring cover glasses arranged along the depth direction.

  19. Small fatigue cracks; Proceedings of the Second International Conference/Workshop, Santa Barbara, CA, Jan. 5-10, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Lankford, J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume include crack initiation and stage I growth, microstructure effects, crack closure, environment effects, the role of notches, analytical modeling, fracture mechanics characterization, experimental techniques, and engineering applications. Papers are presented on fatigue crack initiation along slip bands, the effect of microplastic surface deformation on the growth of small cracks, short fatigue crack behavior in relation to three-dimensional aspects and the crack closure effect, the influence of crack depth on crack electrochemistry and fatigue crack growth, and nondamaging notches in fatigue. Consideration is also given to models of small fatigue cracks, short crack theory, assessment of the growth of small flaws from residual strength data, the relevance of short crack behavior to the integrity of major rotating aero engine components, and the relevance of short fatigue crack growth data to the durability and damage tolerance analyses of aircraft.

  20. Fabrication and testing of a newly designed slit system for depth-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, John; Bouet, Nathalie; Ghose, Sanjit; Dooryhee, Eric; Conley, Ray

    2016-11-01

    A new system of slits called `spiderweb slits' have been developed for depth-resolved powder or polycrystalline X-ray diffraction measurements. The slits act on diffracted X-rays to select a particular gauge volume of sample, while absorbing diffracted X-rays from outside of this volume. Although the slit geometry is to some extent similar to that of previously developed conical slits or spiral slits, this new design has advantages over the previous ones in use for complex heterogeneous materials and in situ and operando diffraction measurements. For example, the slits can measure a majority of any diffraction cone for any polycrystalline material, over a continuous range of diffraction angles, and work for X-ray energies of tens to hundreds of kiloelectronvolts. The design is generated and optimized using ray-tracing simulations, and fabricated through laser micromachining. The first prototype was successfully tested at the X17A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and shows similar performance to simulations, demonstrating gauge volume selection for standard powders, for all diffraction peaks over angles of 2-10°. A similar, but improved, design will be implemented at the X-ray Powder Diffraction beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II.

  1. A New Method of Retarding Fatigue Crack Growth on Pressure Vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianzhong YIN; Yanyan WANG; Xinwei DING

    2001-01-01

    An artificial wedge to retard fatigue crack growth in tension has been investigated. The results show that an artificial wedge can reduce the growth rate of fatigue crack on Surface fatigue crack and, the fatigue crack growth behavior is essentially similar in-depth and width directions. Based on a theoretical analysis, a model for the effective crack growth parameter △Keff is presented. It is shown that the relationships between the calculated △Keff value and crack speed are almost the same as those of cracked specimens without a wedge. Therefore this model can be applied to estimate retardation behavior.

  2. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...

  3. Engineering Solution for the Uniform Strength of Partially Cracked Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elin A.; Hansen, Will; Brincker, Rune

    2005-01-01

    Significant computational resources are required to predict the remaining strength from numerical fracture analysis of a jointed plain concrete pavement that contains a partial depth crack. It is, therefore, advantageous when the failure strength can be adequately predicted with an engineering...... solution. Current engineering or closed-form solutions are based on the elastic effective crack approach with the fracture parameters toughness and critical crack tip opening of concrete. The solutions do not directly consider the effect of the distance to the boundary conditions (restrained slab length......) and the cracking process caused by stress softening across the crack. A proposed engineering solution methodology includes these latter variables. The application of the solution is demonstrated on a slab containing a partial depth midslab crack and subjected to in-plane tension. The solution captures the effects...

  4. Monitoring Growth of Closed Fatigue Crack Using Subharmonic Phased Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Y.; Endo, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Shintaku, Y.; Yamanaka, K.

    2010-02-01

    To ensure the safety and reliability of atomic power plants and airplanes, the technique of monitoring closed fatigue cracks is requisite. Here we monitored the distribution of the crack depths and closure behavior in the length direction after 48000 and 87000 fatigue cycles using subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE). The crack depths in the subharmonic images were larger than those in the fundamental images. Specifically, the difference was larger at near the side surface than at the center. The percentage of the closed part varied with the crack growth in the specimen. In addition, we fabricated shoe for SPACE to facilitate mechanical scanning. Thus, it was demonstrated that SPACE is useful in monitoring closed fatigue crack growth.

  5. The Extent of the Crack on Artificial Simulation Models with CBCT and Periapical Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Xu, Yiran; Shen, Zhengyan; Li, Minghua; Wu, Ligeng

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of the crack of a cracked tooth on an artificial simulation model with Periapical Radiography (PR) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in vitro, providing the basis for early diagnosis and an appropriate treatment plan. Methods Forty-four teeth with different extents of artificial cracks, created by exposure to liquid nitrogen after hot water at 100°C, were collected. They were subjected to PR and CBCT. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) examination, regarded as a relatively more accurate measurement than others, was used to measure and record the crack depth. Three observers, an endodontic graduate student, an experienced endodontist, and an experienced radiologist, examined the PR and CBCT results independently, and the presence or absence of cracks with PR and CBCT were respectively recorded. The external consistency ICC with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was used to analyze the consistency among the graduate student, endodontist, and radiologist; ROC curves were used for the analysis of diagnostic performance of both radiographic modalities for tooth cracks with crack depth. Results For the interpretation of the PR results, there were statistically significant differences among the three different observers (P < 0.001), and the interpretation of the CBCT results (P < 0.001). In the group of results read by the graduate student, the sensitivity of diagnosis with CBCT and PR was 77.27% and 22.73%, respectively (P < 0.001). In the group of results read by the endodontist, the sensitivity of diagnosis with CBCT and PR was 81.81% and 8.19%, respectively (P < 0.001). In the group of results read by the radiologist, the sensitivity of diagnosis with CBCT and PR was 88.64% and 11.36%, respectively (P < 0.001). As for CBCT diagnosis, the critical value for the graduate, endodontist, and radiologist was 3.20 mm, 2.06 mm, and 1.24 mm, respectively. For the PR diagnosis, the critical value for the

  6. Strain Measurements within Fibre Boards. Part II: Strain Concentrations at the Crack Tip of MDF Specimens Tested by the Wedge Splitting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Rathke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of an article series where the mechanical and fracture mechanical properties of medium density fiberboard (MDF were studied. While the first part of the series focused on internal bond strength and density profiles, this article discusses the fracture mechanical properties of the core layer. Fracture properties were studied with a wedge splitting setup. The critical stress intensity factors as well as the specific fracture energies were determined. Critical stress intensity factors were calculated from maximum splitting force and two-dimensional isotropic finite elements simulations of the specimen geometry. Size and shape of micro crack zone were measured with electronic laser speckle interferometry. The process zone length was approx. 5 mm. The specific fracture energy was determined to be 45.2 ± 14.4 J/m2 and the critical stress intensity factor was 0.11 ± 0.02 MPa.

  7. Strain Measurements within Fibre Boards. Part II: Strain Concentrations at the Crack Tip of MDF Specimens Tested by the Wedge Splitting Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Gerhard; Müller, Ulrich; Konnerth, Johannes; Rathke, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    This is the second part of an article series where the mechanical and fracture mechanical properties of medium density fiberboard (MDF) were studied. While the first part of the series focused on internal bond strength and density profiles, this article discusses the fracture mechanical properties of the core layer. Fracture properties were studied with a wedge splitting setup. The critical stress intensity factors as well as the specific fracture energies were determined. Critical stress intensity factors were calculated from maximum splitting force and two-dimensional isotropic finite elements simulations of the specimen geometry. Size and shape of micro crack zone were measured with electronic laser speckle interferometry. The process zone length was approx. 5 mm. The specific fracture energy was determined to be 45.2 ± 14.4 J/m2 and the critical stress intensity factor was 0.11 ± 0.02 MPa.

  8. Measurement of LET (linear energy transfer) spectra using CR-39 at different depths of water irradiated by 171 MeV protons: A comparison with Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, G.S. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tripathy, S.P., E-mail: sam.tripathy@gmail.com [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Molokanov, A.G.; Aleynikov, V.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Sharma, S.D. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Radiological Physics & Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bandyopadhyay, T. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-05-11

    In this work, we have used CR-39 detectors to estimate the LET (linear energy transfer) spectrum of secondary particles due to 171 MeV proton beam at different depths of water including the Bragg peak region. The measured LET spectra were compared with those obtained from FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The absorbed dose (D{sub LET}), dose equivalent (H{sub LET}) were estimated using the LET spectra. The values of D{sub LET} and H{sub LET} per incident proton fluence were found to increase with the increase in depth of water and were maximum at Bragg peak. - Highlights: • Measurement of LET spectrometry using CR-39 detectors at different depths of water. • Comparison of measured spectra with FLUKA Monte carlo simulation. • Absorbed dose and dose equivalent was found to increase with depth of water.

  9. A fiber-reinforced composite structure for the repair of thermally cracked bituminous pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzen, Jeffrey Alan

    1998-10-01

    The apparatus under development in this project is a structural component or beam fabricated from a fiber reinforced plastic composite (FRPC). The FRPC beam is a structural repair component intended to bridge a deteriorated thermal crack in full depth bituminous pavements or partial depth bituminous pavements over portland cement concrete. The bridging action provided by the FRPC beam is intended to minimize roughness through the repaired area for up to five years, eliminate reappearance of the deteriorated crack, and provide a controlled expansion crack that can be treated with standard sealing techniques. This apparatus is designed for maintenance use as a field expedient, semi-permanent repair using tools that are commonly available at the Area Maintenance level. Three FRPC beams were constructed for field trial in a thermally cracked, full depth bituminous pavement on US-36 east of Hiawatha, Kansas. Each of the beams were instrumented with bonded metal foil strain gages and field installation by KDOT Maintenance forces was done in August and September of 1997. The FRPC beams have been evaluated since installation and this evaluation will continue for up to five years. Evaluation of the beams has been accomplished through static load tests using the strain gage instrumentation and Falling Weight Deflectometer measurements. The FRPC beams have performed satisfactorily as of the date of writing.

  10. Deriving depth-dependent light escape efficiency and optical Swank factor from measured pulse height spectra of scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howansky, Adrian; Peng, Boyu; Lubinsky, Anthony R; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Pulse height spectroscopy has been used by investigators to deduce the imaging properties of scintillators. Pulse height spectra (PHS) are used to compute the Swank factor, which describes the variation in scintillator light output per x-ray interaction. The spread in PHS measured below the K-edge is related to the optical component of the Swank factor, i.e., variations in light escape efficiency from different depths of x-ray interaction in the scintillator, denoted ε¯(z). Optimizing scintillators for medical imaging applications requires understanding of these optical properties, as they determine tradeoffs between parameters such as x-ray absorption, light yield, and spatial resolution. This work develops a model for PHS acquisition such that the effect of measurement uncertainty can be removed. This method allows ε¯(z) to be quantified on an absolute scale and permits more accurate estimation of the optical Swank factor of scintillators. The pulse height spectroscopy acquisition chain was modeled as a linear system of stochastic gain stages. Analytical expressions were derived for signal and noise propagation through the PHS chain, accounting for deterministic and stochastic aspects of x-ray absorption, scintillation, and light detection with a photomultiplier tube. The derived expressions were used to calculate PHS of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators using parameters that were measured, calculated, or known from literature. PHS were measured at 25 and 32 keV of CsI samples designed with an optically reflective or absorptive backing, with or without a fiber-optic faceplate (FOP), and with thicknesses ranging from 150-1000 μm. Measured PHS were compared with calculated PHS, then light escape model parameters were varied until measured and modeled results reached agreement. Resulting estimates of ε¯(z) were used to calculate each scintillator's optical Swank factor. For scintillators of the same optical design, only minor differences in

  11. ANALYSIS ON ACOUSTICAL SCATTERING BY A CRACKED ELASTIC STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongWeffang; WuYongdong; WuGuorong; LiangYide

    2003-01-01

    The acoustical scattering by a cracked elastic structure is studied. The mixed method of boundary element and fractal finite element is adopted to solve the cracked structure-acoustic coupling problem. The fractal two-level finite element method is employed for the cracked structure, which can reduce the degree of freedoms (DOFs) greatly, and the boundary element method is used for the exterior acoustic field which can automatically satisfy Sommerfeld's radiation condition. Numerical examples show that the resonance frequency is lower with the crack's depth increase, and that the effect on the acoustical field by the crack is particularly pronounced in the vicinity of the crack tip. This mixed method of boundary element and finite element is effective in solving the scattering problem by a cracked structure.

  12. Unsaturated Seepage Analysis of Cracked Soil including Development Process of Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks in soil provide preferential pathways for water flow and their morphological parameters significantly affect the hydraulic conductivity of the soil. To study the hydraulic properties of cracks, the dynamic development of cracks in the expansive soil during drying and wetting has been measured in the laboratory. The test results enable the development of the relationships between the cracks morphological parameters and the water content. In this study, the fractal model has been used to predict the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the cracked soil, including the developmental process of the cracks. The cracked expansive soil has been considered as a crack-pore medium. A dual media flow model has been developed to simulate the seepage characteristics of the cracked expansive soil. The variations in pore water pressure at different part of the model are quite different due to the impact of the cracks. This study proves that seepage characteristics can be better predicted if the impact of cracks is taken into account.

  13. On the treatment of thermal cracks in lining concrete of water conveyance system of Three Gorges Project permanent ship locks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cong-feng; LIU De-fu; WANG Dong-dong; DUAN Ya-hui

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation was performed for repairing the different types of cracks appearing on the surface or inside the concrete lining at vadous depths. The mate-rial properties used in grouting and two methods for crack repair were discussed in details,and consequently reliable repair measures were proposed and implemented. It is a better choice to adopt the hole-drilling method for the relatively regular crack. The grouting pres-sure should not be too high and it is generally between 0.4~0.6 MPa. For the second time grouting, the pressure maybe increased to 0.8 MPa. Other method is the pasting nozzles method which is more suitable for irregular cracks such as cracks with intensive density and crossing cracks. Its grouting pressure is generally between 0.6~1.0 MPa. The in-situ tests in Three Gorges Project demonstrate favorably the feasibility and applicability of the proposed methods for crack repair within the lining concrete.

  14. Measurement of the Muon Atmospheric Production Depth with the Water Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Bueno, Laura [Univ. of Granada (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) are particles of uncertain origin and composition, with energies above 1 EeV (1018 eV or 0.16 J). The measured flux of UHECR is a steeply decreasing function of energy. The largest and most sensitive apparatus built to date to record and study cosmic ray Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is the Pierre Auger Observatory. The Pierre Auger Observatory has produced the largest and finest amount of data ever collected for UHECR. A broad physics program is being carried out covering all relevant topics of the field. Among them, one of the most interesting is the problem related to the estimation of the mass composition of cosmic rays in this energy range. Currently the best measurements of mass are those obtained by studying the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic part of the EAS with the Fluorescence Detector. However, the collected statistics is small, specially at energies above several tens of EeV. Although less precise, the volume of data gathered with the Surface Detector is nearly a factor ten larger than the fluorescence data. So new ways to study composition with data collected at the ground are under investigation. The subject of this thesis follows one of those new lines of research. Using preferentially the time information associated with the muons that reach the ground, we try to build observables related to the composition of the primaries that initiated the EAS. A simple phenomenological model relates the arrival times with the depths in the atmosphere where muons are produced. The experimental confirmation that the distributions of muon production depths (MPD) correlate with the mass of the primary particle has opened the way to a variety of studies, of which this thesis is a continuation, with the aim of enlarging and improving its range of applicability. We revisit the phenomenological model which is at the root of the analysis and discuss a new way to improve some aspects of the model. We carry

  15. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth Spectra and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Land, Ship, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Durkee, Philip A.; Smith, Peter J.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Wiegner, Matthias; Covert, Dave S.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vitale, Vito; Tomasi, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and colurnmn water vapor (CWV) measurements acquired with NASA Ames Research Center's 6-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated aboard the R/V Professor Vodyanitskiy during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are discussed. Data are compared with various in situ and remote measurements for selected cases. The focus is on 10 July, when the Pelican airplane flew within 70 km of the ship near the time of a NOAA-14/AVHRR satellite overpass and AOD measurements with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) above the marine boundary layer (MBL) permitted calculation of AOD within the MBL from the AATS-6 measurements. A detailed column closure test is performed for MBL AOD on 10 July by comparing the AATS-6 MBL AODs with corresponding values calculated by combining shipboard particle size distribution measurements with models of hygroscopic growth and radiosonde humidity profiles (plus assumptions on the vertical profile of the dry particle size distribution and composition). Large differences (30-80% in the mid-visible) between measured and reconstructed AODs are obtained, in large part because of the high sensitivity of the closure methodology to hygroscopic growth models, which vary considerably and have not been validated over the necessary range of particle size/composition distributions. The wavelength dependence of AATS-6 AODs is compared with the corresponding dependence of aerosol extinction calculated from shipboard measurements of aerosol size distribution and of total scattering mearured by a shipboard integrating nephelometer for several days. Results are highly variable, illustrating further the great difficulty of deriving column values from point measurements. AATS-6 CWV values are shown to agree well with corresponding values derived from radiosonde measurements during 8 soundings on 7 days and also with values calculated from measurements taken on 10 July with

  16. Creating Vocabulary Item Types That Measure Students' Depth of Semantic Knowledge. Research Report. ETS RR-14-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Paul; Lawless, René R.; Li, Chen; Sabatini, John; Bejar, Isaac I.; O'Reilly, Tenaha

    2014-01-01

    We expect that word knowledge accumulates gradually. This article draws on earlier approaches to assessing depth, but focuses on one dimension: richness of semantic knowledge. We present results from a study in which three distinct item types were developed at three levels of depth: knowledge of common usage patterns, knowledge of broad topical…

  17. Automatic quantification of crack patterns by image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Tang, Chao-Sheng; Shi, Bin; Suo, Wen-Bin

    2013-08-01

    Image processing technologies are proposed to quantify crack patterns. On the basis of the technologies, a software "Crack Image Analysis System" (CIAS) has been developed. An image of soil crack network is used as an example to illustrate the image processing technologies and the operations of the CIAS. The quantification of the crack image involves the following three steps: image segmentation, crack identification and measurement. First, the image is converted to a binary image using a cluster analysis method; noise in the binary image is removed; and crack spaces are fused. Then, the medial axis of the crack network is extracted from the binary image, with which nodes and crack segments can be identified. Finally, various geometric parameters of the crack network can be calculated automatically, such as node number, crack number, clod area, clod perimeter, crack area, width, length, and direction. The thresholds used in the operations are specified by cluster analysis and other innovative methods. As a result, the objects (nodes, cracks and clods) in the crack network can be quantified automatically. The software may be used to study the generation and development of soil crack patterns and rock fractures.

  18. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    (displacement) respectively of material considered. The practical applicability of the two models is limited such that predicted strength sigma_CR must be less than sigma_L/3, which corresponds to an assumption that fictitious cracks are much smaller than real crack lengths considered. The reason......A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  19. Measuring the thickness of protective coatings on historic metal objects using nanosecond and femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouli, P.; Melessanaki, K.; Giakoumaki, A.; Argyropoulos, V.; Anglos, D.

    2005-08-01

    Depth profile analysis by means of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated with respect to its potential to measure the thickness of different types of thin organic films used as protective coatings on historical and archaeological metal objects. For the materials examined, acrylic varnish and microcrystalline wax, the output from a nanosecond ArF excimer laser at 193 nm was found appropriate for performing a reliable profiling of the coating films leading to accurate determination of the coating thickness on the basis of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate the coating and on the ablation etch rate of the corresponding coating material under the same irradiation conditions. Nanosecond pulses at 248 nm proved inadequate to profile the coatings because of their weak absorption at the laser wavelength. In contrast, femtosecond irradiation at 248 nm yielded well-resolved profiles as a result of efficient ablation achieved through the increased non-linear absorption induced by the high power density of the ultrashort pulses.

  20. Comparative measurements of total ozone amount and aerosol optical depth during a campaign at El Arenosillo, Huelva, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de La Casinière

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A one week field campaign took place in September 2002 at El Arenosillo, Spain. The objective was to compare total ozone column (TOC and aerosol optical depth (AOD from near ultraviolet to near infrared, measured by several Spanish and French instruments. Three spectroradiometers, Brewer, SPUV02, and LICOR, and a CIMEL photometer, have been used simultaneously and the results are presented for four clear days. TOC values are given by the Brewer instrument, and by SPUV02, using two different methods. The ground instruments compare satisfactorily (within 5 DU and the values are consistent with TOMS data (within 10 DU.

    AOD from the various instruments are compared at seven different wavelengths between 320 nm and 1020 nm: the agreement is very good at 350, 380, and 870 nm; at the four other wavelengths the difference is smaller than 0.03, which can be explained by a relative difference of 4% only between the calibrations of the various instruments. Larger AOD diurnal variations were observed at short wavelengths than in the visible and near infrared; this is most likely due to changes in aerosol size along the day, during the campaign.

  1. In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE s Roof Savings Calculator and Measured Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    New, Joshua Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, Yu [White Box Technologies, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Sanyal, Jibonananda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, William A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Childs, Kenneth W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kriner, Scott [Green Metal Consulting, Inc., Macungie, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) was developed through collaborations among Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), White Box Technologies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Environmental Protection Agency in the context of a California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research project to make cool-color roofing materials a market reality. The RSC website and a simulation engine validated against demonstration homes were developed to replace the liberal DOE Cool Roof Calculator and the conservative EPA Energy Star Roofing Calculator, which reported different roof savings estimates. A preliminary analysis arrived at a tentative explanation for why RSC results differed from previous LBNL studies and provided guidance for future analysis in the comparison of four simulation programs (doe2attic, DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, and MicroPas), including heat exchange between the attic surfaces (principally the roof and ceiling) and the resulting heat flows through the ceiling to the building below. The results were consolidated in an ORNL technical report, ORNL/TM-2013/501. This report is an in-depth inter-comparison of four programs with detailed measured data from an experimental facility operated by ORNL in South Carolina in which different segments of the attic had different roof and attic systems.

  2. Aerosol Optical Depth measurements at 340 nm with a Brewer spectrophotometer and comparison with Cimel sunphotometer observations at Uccle, Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Bock

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Langley Plot Method (LPM is adapted for the retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values at 340 nm from Brewer#178 sun scan measurements between 335 and 345 nm (convoluted with the band pass function of the Cimel sunphotometer filter at 340 nm performed in Uccle, Belgium. The use of sun scans instead of direct sun measurements simplifies the comparison of the AOD values with quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer values. Also, the irradiance at 340 nm is larger than the one at 320.1 nm due to lower ozone absorption, thus improving the signal to noise ratio. For the selection of the cloudless days (from now on referred to as calibration quality clear days, a new set of criteria is proposed. With the adapted method, individual clear sky AOD values, for which the selection criteria are also presented in this article, are calculated for a period from September 2006 until the end of August 2010. These values are then compared to quasi-simultaneous Cimel sunphotometer measurements, showing a very good agreement (the correlation coefficient, the slope and the intercept of the regression line are respectively 0.974, 0.968 and 0.011, which proves that good quality observations can be obtained from Brewer sun scan measurements at 340 nm. The analysis of the monthly and seasonal Brewer AODs at Uccle is consistent with studies at other sites reporting on the seasonal variation of AODs in Europe. The highest values can be observed in summer and spring, whereas more than 50% of the winter AODs are lower than 0.3. On a monthly scale, the lowest AOD are observed in December and the highest values occur in June and April. No clear weekly cycle is observed for Uccle. The current cloud-screening algorithm is still an issue, which means that some AOD values can still be influenced by scattered clouds. This effect can be seen when comparing the calculated monthly mean values of the Brewer with the AERONET measurements.

  3. Assessment of copper resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in nitrite solutions by means of joint analysis of acoustic emission measurements, deformation diagrams, qualitative and quantitative fractography, and non-linear fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanzhin, V.G.; Nikulin, S.A. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    A study of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper in 0.1M NaNO{sub 2} aqueous solution is presented. The fracture kinetics was monitored by measuring the acoustic emission (AE) signals. Macro- and micro-fractography analysis, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was employed to investigate the fracture mechanisms. Estimates of stress intensity factor, KI, and J-integral were derived in order to assess the resistance of copper to stress corrosion cracking. Two kinds of SCC tests under continuous circulation of the corrosive solution were employed in the present study: 1. Constant extension rate (2x10{sup -6}/s) tests on pre-cracked, middle tension (MT) panel specimens. 2. Tests on pre-cracked, compact tension (CT) specimens at a fixed (by a fixing bolt) opening of the crack walls ({delta} = 0.3 mm, K{sub i} = 27 MPax{radical}m). The time base for these tests was about two months. After the completion of the SCC test, the CT specimen was additionally tested, under a constant-rate (0.02 mm/s) off-center extension. In the both kinds of tests, the SCC fracture kinetics is found to exhibit two typical stages: Stage 1: SCC initiation stage (after a certain incubation period, T{sub i}, measured to be T{sub i} {approx_equal} 3-4 hours for MT specimens under constant extension, the corresponding stress was {sigma} {approx_equal} 40-70 MPa, and T{sub i} {approx_equal} 200 hours for CT specimens under a fixed crack wall opening). Stage 2: Active fracture process (SCC macro-fracture) distinguished by strong AE pulses (which are registered after time T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 8 hours for MT specimens and T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 800 hours for CT specimens). Fractography analysis has shown that the zone of SCC fracture in MT specimens extends to approximately 1,500 {mu}m. A 400-700 {mu}m deep zone of brittle transgranular fracture, which included small areas showing characteristic SCC 'striations', was observed adjacent to the fatigue pre-crack area. At higher

  4. 现浇混凝土楼板裂缝产生的原因及防治措施%Cast-in-situ concrete floor board cracking causes and preventing measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建庆; 李树国

    2014-01-01

    The thesis introduces several cast-in-situ concrete floor board cracking styles,analyzes cracking causes from various aspects,and dis-cusses the concrete floor board cracks preventing and processing measures by combining with construction norms,operation procedures and con-struction experience,with a view to strengthen the floor utilization functions.%介绍了现浇混凝土楼板裂缝的几种形式,从各个角度对裂缝产生的原因进行了分析,结合施工规范、操作规程和施工经验,对混凝土楼板裂缝的预防及处理措施进行了论述,以增强楼板的使用功能。

  5. Settlement crack analysis and reinforcement measures of one kindergarten in Tangshan city%唐山市某幼儿园沉降裂缝分析及补强措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚娈英; 温欣

    2009-01-01

    阐述了沉降缝的破坏特征,分析了唐山市某幼儿园出现沉降缝的原因,提出了该工程采取的补强措施,对工程设计人员进行具体的工程设计,提高裂缝预防意识有一定的意义.%The author describes the destroy characteristics of the settlement crack, analyzes the causes of the settlement crack of one kinder-garten in Tangshan city, provides the reinforcement measures adopted in this project, which has certain significance for the project designer get concrete project design and improve crack prevention consciousness.

  6. Fracture analysis of cracked metallic plate repaired with adhesive bonding composite patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Weiguo; Mu Zhitao

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth test of cracked metallic plate repaired with adhesive bonding composite patch was conducted to study the fracture behavior of crack patching. The failure mode was that crack grows along with adhesive debonding. The crack length and debonding area were measured at different numbers of cycles. The nonlinear three-dimensional(3D)finite element(FE)model considering adhesive debonding and crack growth simultaneously was developed. The experimental and analytical results were in good agreement with each other.

  7. Monitoring crack development in fiber concrete beam by using electrical resistivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwattanachang, N.; Giao, P. H.

    2011-10-01

    Accurate detection of damaged concrete zones plays an important role in selecting the proper remedial technique. This study presents results from an application of the electrical imaging method to monitor the development of cracks in fiber concrete beams. The study showed that resistivity measurements on the concrete specimens were able to detect the increase of concrete resistivity with the curing time that reached about 65 Ωm after 28 days of curing. A similar development trend of concrete compressive strength was also found. Two types of cracks were investigated, i.e., artificial cracks made of plastic sheets inserted in concrete and cracks developed during a four-step loading test. A mini-electric imaging survey with Wenner array was conducted on the tension face of the beams. To deal with the effect of the beam size new procedures to correct resistivity measurements before inversion were proposed and successfully applied in this study. The results indicated that both crack direction and depth could be accurately determined in the inverted resistivity sections.

  8. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade

  9. Validation of snow depth reconstruction from lapse-rate webcam images against terrestrial laser scanner measurements in centrel Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelto, Jesús; Jonas, Tobias; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Snow distribution in mountain areas plays a key role in many processes as runoff dynamics, ecological cycles or erosion rates. Nevertheless, the acquisition of high resolution snow depth data (SD) in space-time is a complex task that needs the application of remote sensing techniques as Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS). Such kind of techniques requires intense field work for obtaining high quality snowpack evolution during a specific time period. Combining TLS data with other remote sensing techniques (satellite images, photogrammetry…) and in-situ measurements could represent an improvement of the available information of a variable with rapid topographic changes. The aim of this study is to reconstruct daily SD distribution from lapse-rate images from a webcam and data from two to three TLS acquisitions during the snow melting periods of 2012, 2013 and 2014. This information is obtained at Izas Experimental catchment in Central Spanish Pyrenees; a catchment of 33ha, with an elevation ranging from 2050 to 2350m a.s.l. The lapse-rate images provide the Snow Covered Area (SCA) evolution at the study site, while TLS allows obtaining high resolution information of SD distribution. With ground control points, lapse-rate images are georrectified and their information is rasterized into a 1-meter resolution Digital Elevation Model. Subsequently, for each snow season, the Melt-Out Date (MOD) of each pixel is obtained. The reconstruction increases the estimated SD lose for each time step (day) in a distributed manner; starting the reconstruction for each grid cell at the MOD (note the reverse time evolution). To do so, the reconstruction has been previously adjusted in time and space as follows. Firstly, the degree day factor (SD lose/positive average temperatures) is calculated from the information measured at an automatic weather station (AWS) located in the catchment. Afterwards, comparing the SD lose at the AWS during a specific time period (i.e. between two TLS

  10. Measurements of fluorine depth-profiles on TiAl turbine blades using ion beam analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neve, S. [Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKF), Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Masset, P.J. [Karl-Winnacker-Institute, DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany); TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Center for Innovation Competence VIRTUHCON, Freiberg (Germany); Zschau, H.E.; Schuetze, M. [Karl-Winnacker-Institute, DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Intermetallic TiAl alloys are foreseen to substitute Ni-based alloys in several high-temperature applications such as turbine blades for aeronautics. Because of their low density the mass of these components could be reduced by half. However, a mixed oxide scale of TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} which provides no oxidation protection is growing at temperatures above 700 C. By means of the halogen-effect the high-temperature oxidation resistance of TiAl alloys can be improved by orders of magnitude. Therefore fluorine was introduced into turbine blades using two different chemical fluorination methods. The application of a fluorine treatment promotes the growth of a pure and dense alumina scale which prevents the alloy from increased oxidation. In previous work it has been shown that an appropriate fluorine content after oxidation and its location beneath the surface are indicators of a successful fluorine effect. In the present work, the fluorine content was measured before and after oxidation of TNB alloy as a function of depth by using proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) in a specially designed vacuum chamber at the 2.5 MV van-de-Graaff accelerator at the IKF. Additionally, composition and thickness of the oxide scale was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The ion beam techniques are non-destructive and thus offer a method for quality assurance of the halogen treatment. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Effect of CTE on Fatigue Cracking of Stainless Steel Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, E. L.; Mustaleski, T. M.

    2002-01-31

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds. Most cracks were parallel to the weld in the bottom portion of the vessel. Sections were cut out of the vessel containing these cracks and examined using the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the heat affected zone and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depth of those sections examined ranged from about 300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 0.32-cm (0.125-inch). The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the CTE differences between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue whereby crack propagation might have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which is indicative of a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  12. XFEM for Thermal Crack of Massive Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal cracking of massive concrete structures occurs as a result of stresses caused by hydration in real environment conditions. The extended finite element method that combines thermal fields and creep is used in this study to analyze the thermal cracking of massive concrete structures. The temperature field is accurately simulated through an equivalent equation of heat conduction that considers the effect of a cooling pipe system. The time-dependent creep behavior of massive concrete is determined by the viscoelastic constitutive model with Prony series. Based on the degree of hydration, we consider the main properties related to cracking evolving with time. Numerical simulations of a real massive concrete structure are conducted. Results show that the developed method is efficient for numerical calculations of thermal cracks on massive concrete. Further analyses indicate that a cooling system and appropriate heat preservation measures can efficiently prevent the occurrence of thermal cracks.

  13. Evaluation of creep-fatigue crack growth for large-scale FBR reactor vessel and NDE assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hun; Yoo, Bong

    2001-03-01

    Creep fatigue crack growth contributes to the failure of FRB reactor vessels in high temperature condition. In the design stage of reactor vessel, crack growth evaluation is very important to ensure the structural safety and setup the in-service inspection strategy. In this study, creep-fatigue crack growth evaluation has been performed for the semi-elliptical surface cracks subjected to thermal loading. The thermal stress analysis of a large-scale FBR reactor vessel has been carried out for the load conditions. The distributions of axial, radial, hoop, and Von Mises stresses were obtained for the loading conditions. At the maximum point of the axial and hoop stress, the longitudinal and circumferential surface cracks (i.e. PTS crack, NDE short crack and shallow long crack) were postulated. Using the maximum and minimum values of stresses, the creep-fatigue crack growth of the proposed cracks was simulated. The crack growth rate of circumferential cracks becomes greater than that of longitudinal cracks. The total crack growth of the largest PTS crack is very small after 427 cycles. The structural integrity of a large-scale reactor can be maintained for the plant life. The crack depth growth of the shallow long crack is faster than that of the NDE short crack. In the ISI of the large-scale FBR reactor vessel, the ultrasonic inspection is beneficial to detect the shallow circumferential cracks.

  14. Improving Interferometric Null Depth Measurements using Statistical Distributions: Theory and First Results with the Palomar Fiber Nuller

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Hanot; Stefan, Martin; Kurt, Liewer; Frank, Loya; Dimitri, Mawet; Pierre, Riaud; Olivier, Absil; Eugene, Serabyn; 10.1088/0004-637X/729/2/110

    2011-01-01

    A new "self-calibrated" statistical analysis method has been developed for the reduction of nulling interferometry data. The idea is to use the statistical distributions of the fluctuating null depth and beam intensities to retrieve the astrophysical null depth (or equivalently the object's visibility) in the presence of fast atmospheric fluctuations. The approach yields an accuracy much better (about an order of magnitude) than is presently possible with standard data reduction methods, because the astrophysical null depth accuracy is no longer limited by the magnitude of the instrumental phase and intensity errors but by uncertainties on their probability distributions. This approach was tested on the sky with the two-aperture fiber nulling instrument mounted on the Palomar Hale telescope. Using our new data analysis approach alone-and no observations of calibrators-we find that error bars on the astrophysical null depth as low as a few 10-4 can be obtained in the near-infrared, which means that null depths...

  15. Evaluation of Surface Cracks Using Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution characteristics of surface cracks with various widths are discussed based on finite element (FEM) results. The crack depth was 0.20 mm, the width range was from 0.02 to 1.00 mm. The results showed that crack width and lift-off (the distance between surface and sensor) will influence signals. Discussed in this paper is the influence of various lift-off parameters on the peak to peak values of the normal component in magnetic flux leakage testing. The effects can be applied to evaluate surface breaking cracks of different widths and depths.An idea is presented to smooth narrow, sharp crack tips using alternating current (AC) field magnetization.

  16. Characterization of crack growth under combined loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A.; Smith, F. W.; Holston, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Room-temperature static and cyclic tests were made on 21 aluminum plates in the shape of a 91.4x91.4-cm Maltese cross with 45 deg flaws to develop crack growth and fracture toughness data under mixed-mode conditions. During cyclic testing, it was impossible to maintain a high proportion of shear-mode deformation on the crack tips. Cracks either branched or turned. Under static loading, cracks remained straight if shear stress intensity exceeded normal stress intensity. Mixed-mode crack growth rate data compared reasonably well with published single-mode data, and measured crack displacements agreed with the straight and branched crack analyses. Values of critical strain energy release rate at fracture for pure shear were approximately 50% higher than for pure normal opening, and there was a large reduction in normal stress intensity at fracture in the presence of high shear stress intensity. Net section stresses were well into the inelastic range when fracture occurred under high shear on the cracks.

  17. Crack propagation directions in unfilled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, G; Sadeghipour, K; Jayaraman, S; Silage, D; Paul, D; Boberick, K

    1998-11-01

    Posterior composite restorative materials undergo accelerated wear in the occlusal contact area, primarily through a fatigue mechanism. To facilitate the timely development of new and improved materials, a predictive wear model is desirable. The objective of this study was to develop a finite element model enabling investigators to predict crack propagation directions in resins used as the matrix material in composites, and to verify these predictions by observing cracks formed during the pin-on-disc wear of a 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA resin and an EBPADMA resin. Laser confocal scanning microscopy was used to measure crack locations. Finite element studies were done by means of ABAQUS software, modeling a cylinder sliding on a material with pre-existing surface-breaking cracks. Variables included modulus, cylinder/material friction coefficient, crack face friction, and yield behavior. Experimental results were surprising, since most crack directions were opposite previously published observations. The majority of surface cracks, though initially orthogonal to the surface, changed direction to run 20 to 30 degrees from the horizontal in the direction of indenter movement. Finite element modeling established the importance of subsurface shear stresses, since calculations provided evidence that cracks propagate in the direction of maximum K(II)(theta), in the same direction as the motion of the indenter, and at an angle of approximately 20 degrees. These findings provide the foundation for a predictive model of sliding wear in unfilled glassy resins.

  18. Dynamic behaviour of a rotating cracked beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashar, Ahmed; Ghandchi-Tehrani, Maryam; Ferguson, Neil

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to investigate and analyse the vibrational behaviour of cracked rotating cantilever beams, which can for example represent helicopter or wind turbine blades. The analytical Hamiltonian method is used in modelling the rotating beam and two numerical methods, the Rayleigh-Ritz and FEM, are used to study the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the intact rotating beams. Subsequently, a crack is introduced into the FE model and simulations are performed to identify the modal characteristics for an open cracked rotating beam. The effect of various parameters such as non-dimensional rotating speed, hub ratio and slenderness ratio are investigated for both the intact and the cracked rotating beam, and in both directions of chordwise and flapwise motion. The veering phenomena in the natural frequencies as a function of the rotational speed and the buckling speed are considered with respect to the slenderness ratio. In addition, the mode shapes obtained for the flapwise vibration are compared using the modal assurance criterion (MAC). Finally, a new three dimensional design chart is produced, showing the effect of crack location and depth on the natural frequencies of the rotating beam. This chart will be subsequently important in identifying crack defects in rotating blades.

  19. Signal and depth enhancement for in vivo flow cytometer measurement of ear skin by optical clearing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yimin; Wang, Jing; Fan, Zhichao; Wei, Dan; Shi, Rui; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan; Wei, Xunbin

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) has shown a great potential for detecting circulating tumor cells quantitatively in the bloodstream. However, the detection depth suffers from the strong light scattering of tissue. In this study, an innovative ear skin optical clearing agent (ESOCA) is employed to improve the signal quality of the IVFC. Our results show that compared with commonly used glycerol, topical application of ESOCA can enhance the transmittance of rat ear significantly in vivo. The labeled red blood cells can be detected by the IVFC with higher signal quality and greater detection depth. This study is very helpful for potential tumor metastasis studies by the IVFC in deep tissues.

  20. Dynamic Strain and Crack Monitoring Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new automated vehicle health monitoring sensor system capable of measuring loads and detecting crack, corrosion, and...

  1. Multileaf collimator tongue-and-groove effect on depth and off-axis doses: A comparison of treatment planning data with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Jung [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Siyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Park, Yang-Kyun [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, Jung-in [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Min [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon, E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how accurately treatment planning systems (TPSs) account for the tongue-and-groove (TG) effect, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and radiochromic film (RCF) measurements were performed for comparison with TPS results. Two commercial TPSs computed the TG effect for Varian Millennium 120 multileaf collimator (MLC). The TG effect on off-axis dose profile at 3 depths of solid water was estimated as the maximum depth and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the dose dip at an interleaf position. When compared with the off-axis dose of open field, the maximum depth of the dose dip for MC and RCF ranged from 10.1% to 20.6%; the maximum depth of the dose dip gradually decreased by up to 8.7% with increasing depths of 1.5 to 10 cm and also by up to 4.1% with increasing off-axis distances of 0 to 13 cm. However, TPS results showed at most a 2.7% decrease for the same depth range and a negligible variation for the same off-axis distances. The FWHM of the dose dip was approximately 0.19 cm for MC and 0.17 cm for RCF, but 0.30 cm for Eclipse TPS and 0.45 cm for Pinnacle TPS. Accordingly, the integrated value of TG dose dip for TPS was larger than that for MC and RCF and almost invariant along the depths and off-axis distances. We concluded that the TG dependence on depth and off-axis doses shown in the MC and RCF results could not be appropriately modeled by the TPS versions in this study.

  2. DETECTION OF CRACKS IN PAVED ROAD SURFACE USING LASER SCAN IMAGE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we developed a methodology for detecting cracks in the surface of paved road using 3D digital surface model of road created by measuring with three-dimensional laser scanner which works on the basis of the light-section method automatically. For the detection of cracks from the imagery data of the model, the background subtraction method (Rolling Ball Background Subtraction Algorithm was applied to the data for filtering out the background noise originating from the undulation and gradual slope and also for filtering the ruts that were caused by wearing, aging and excessive use of road and other reasons. We confirmed the influence from the difference in height (depth caused by forgoing reasons included in a data can be reduced significantly at this stage. Various parameters of ball radius were applied for checking how the result of data obtained with this process vary according to the change of parameter and it becomes clear that there are not important differences by the change of parameters if they are in a certain range radius. And then, image segmentation was performed by multi-resolution segmentation based on the object-based image analysis technique. The parameters for the image segmentation, scale, pixel value (height/depth and the compactness of objects were used. For the classification of cracks in the database, the height, length and other geometric property are used and we confirmed the method is useful for the detection of cracks in a paved road surface.

  3. Detection of Cracks in Paved Road Surface Using Laser Scan Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Zhu, L.; Kurosu, H.

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, we developed a methodology for detecting cracks in the surface of paved road using 3D digital surface model of road created by measuring with three-dimensional laser scanner which works on the basis of the light-section method automatically. For the detection of cracks from the imagery data of the model, the background subtraction method (Rolling Ball Background Subtraction Algorithm) was applied to the data for filtering out the background noise originating from the undulation and gradual slope and also for filtering the ruts that were caused by wearing, aging and excessive use of road and other reasons. We confirmed the influence from the difference in height (depth) caused by forgoing reasons included in a data can be reduced significantly at this stage. Various parameters of ball radius were applied for checking how the result of data obtained with this process vary according to the change of parameter and it becomes clear that there are not important differences by the change of parameters if they are in a certain range radius. And then, image segmentation was performed by multi-resolution segmentation based on the object-based image analysis technique. The parameters for the image segmentation, scale, pixel value (height/depth) and the compactness of objects were used. For the classification of cracks in the database, the height, length and other geometric property are used and we confirmed the method is useful for the detection of cracks in a paved road surface.

  4. Burst pressure predictions of pipelines with longitudinal cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotta, Fernando; Riggieri, Claudio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Naval e Oceanica

    2003-07-01

    This study extends a micro mechanics approach based upon the computational cell methodology to model ductile crack extension of longitudinal crack-like defects in a high strength pipeline steel. Laboratory testing of an API 5L X60 steel at room temperature using standard, deep crack C(T) specimens provides the data needed to measure the crack growth resistance curve for the material. In the computational cell model, ductile crack extension occurs through void growth and coalescence (by cell extinction) within a thin layer of material ahead of crack tip. A simple scheme to calibrate material-specific parameters for the cells is also described. A central focus of the paper is the application of the cell methodology to predict experimentally measured burst pressures for pre-cracked pipe specimens with different crack sizes. The experimental program includes longitudinally pre cracked 20'' (508 mm) O.D. pipe specimens with 15.8 mm thickness and varying crack geometries. Plane-strain computations are conducted on detailed finite element models for the pipe specimens to describe crack extension with increased pressure. The numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the cell approach to describe crack growth response and to predict the burst pressure for the tested pipes. (author)

  5. Raw data based image processing algorithm for fast detection of surface breaking cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sruthi Krishna K., P.; Puthiyaveetil, Nithin; Kidangan, Renil; Unnikrishnakurup, Sreedhar; Zeigler, Mathias; Myrach, Philipp; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Biju, P.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to illustrate the contribution of signal processing techniques in the field of Non-Destructive Evaluation. A component's life evaluation is inevitably related to the presence of flaws in it. The detection and characterization of cracks prior to damage is a technologically and economically significant task and is of very importance when it comes to safety-relevant measures. The Laser Thermography is the most effective and advanced thermography method for Non-Destructive Evaluation. High capability for the detection of surface cracks and for the characterization of the geometry of artificial surface flaws in metallic samples of laser thermography is particularly encouraging. This is one of the non-contacting, fast and real time detection method. The presence of a vertical surface breaking crack will disturb the thermal footprint. The data processing method plays vital role in fast detection of the surface and sub-surface cracks. Currently in laser thermographic inspection lacks a compromising data processing algorithm which is necessary for the fast crack detection and also the analysis of data is done as part of post processing. In this work we introduced a raw data based image processing algorithm which results precise, better and fast crack detection. The algorithm we developed gives better results in both experimental and modeling data. By applying this algorithm we carried out a detailed investigation variation of thermal contrast with crack parameters like depth and width. The algorithm we developed is applied for various surface temperature data from the 2D scanning model and also validated credibility of algorithm with experimental data.

  6. Mean wind patterns and snow depths in an alpine-subalpine ecosystem as measured by damage to coniferous trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. L. Wooldridge; R. C. Musselman; R. A. Sommerfeld; D. G. Fox; B. H. Connell

    1996-01-01

    1. Deformations of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir trees were surveyed for the purpose of determining climatic wind speeds and directions and snow depths in the Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site (GLEES) in the Snowy Range of southeastern Wyoming, USA. Tree deformations were recorded at 50- and 100-m grid intervals over areas of c. 30 ha and 300 ha,...

  7. Effects of Crack on Vibration Characteristics of Mistuned Rotated Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotated blades are key mechanical components in turbine and high cycle fatigues often induce blade cracks. Meanwhile, mistuning is inevitable in rotated blades, which often makes it much difficult to detect cracks. In order to solve this problem, it is important and necessary to study effects of crack on vibration characteristics of mistuned rotated blades (MRBs. Firstly, a lumped-parameter model is established based on coupled multiple blades, where mistuned stiffness with normal distribution is introduced. Next, a breathing crack model is adopted and eigenvalue analysis is used in coupled lumped-parameter model. Then, numerical analysis is done and effects of depths and positions of a crack on natural frequency, vibration amplitude, and vibration localization parameters are studied. The results show that a crack causes natural frequency decease and vibration amplitude increase of cracked blade. Bifurcations will occur due to a breathing crack. Furthermore, based on natural frequencies and vibration amplitudes, variational factors are defined to detect a crack in MRBs, which are validated by numerical simulations. Thus, the proposed method provides theoretical guidance for crack detection in MRBs.

  8. Depth relief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, A.M.L.; Koenderink, J.J.; Doorn, A.J. van

    1995-01-01

    A study is reported of the depth relief in a simple three-dimensional scene consisting of a white, rough sphere on a planar support, illuminated in a natural manner. Viewing conditions included monocular and binocular as well as 'synoptical' viewing. In the synoptical condition the eyes are

  9. Can the Analytical Hierarchy Process Model Be Effectively Applied in the Prioritization of Information Assurance Defense In-Depth Measures? --A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Rodney T.

    2017-01-01

    Organizational computing devices are increasingly becoming targets of cyber-attacks, and organizations have become dependent on the safety and security of their computer networks and their organizational computing devices. Business and government often use defense in-depth information assurance measures such as firewalls, intrusion detection…

  10. Crack detection in offshore platform structure based on structural intensity approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaojie; Liu, Guijie; Gao, Zhiming; Chen, Pengfei; Mu, Weilei

    2017-02-01

    Structural intensity approach is introduced to study the crack detection for offshore platform in the paper. The Line Spring Model (LSM) of surface crack is proposed based on plate crack structure, and thus the relationship between the additional angle, displacement and crack relative depth is achieved. Besides, the concept of appended structure-borne sound intensity is introduced. The expression of appended structural intensity for crack damage is derived. By observing the input energy, distribution, transmission and vibration performance of structure intensity, evidence is provided for detection of crack location. Vibration analysis is conducted on the whole platform under multi environment load. Using the structural intensity approach, the crack is detected on the key point easily. Moreover, the K-shape welded pipe point is detected using structural intensity approach, and the crack can be detected accurately. Therefore, development structural intensity approach would be extremely useful to spread out technologies that can be applied for offshore platform crack detection accurately.

  11. Crack initiation and crack growth behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavenda, D.J.; Luebbers, P.R.; Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-01-01

    Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. These curves were based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves, but recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels. Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of test specimens may be a factor of {approx}70 shorter than in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environment on crack imitation and crack growth of carbon and low-alloy steels are presented. Crack lengths as a function of fatigue cycles were determined in air by a surface replication technique, and in water by block loading that leaves marks on the fracture surface. Decreases in fatigue life of low-alloy steels in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water are primarily caused by the effects of environment during early stages of fatigue damage, i.e., growth of short cracks <100 {micro}m in depth. For crack sizes of >100 {micro}m, crack growth rates in high-DO water are higher than in air by one order of magnitude. The effects of LWR environments on growth of short cracks are discussed.

  12. Optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds over oceans from CALIPSO infrared radiometer and lidar measurements, and an evaluation of the lidar multiple scattering factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garnier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed evaluation of cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm and comparisons to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP flying on-board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations satellite. The blackbody radiance taken in the IIR Version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are then compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent 2-way transmittance through the cloud. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40% as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. This behavior is explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT to be applied to correct the measured transmittance, which is taken equal to 0.6 in the CALIOP Version 3 algorithm, and which is found here to vary with temperature (and hence cloud particle size from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP depolarization ratios and particle habits derived from IIR measurements.

  13. Measurement of crack closure effects of Al 8090-T6 and 42CrMo4. Messungen der Rissschliesseffekte an Al 8090-T6 und 42CrMo4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marci, G.; Braendle, M.; Bachmann, V. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Werkstoff-Forschung)

    1990-09-01

    Two different materials, a quenched and tempered steel with German designation 42CrMo4 and an Al-Li 8090-T6, were used to investigate the influence of crack closure on the lower part of the loading cycle. The usually measured closure parameter K{sub op} was determined, too. But, the primary target of the present investigation was the lowest K{sub min}-value experienced by the crack front in the tension-tension fatigue regime. This lowest K{sub min} was denoted as K{sub min}{sup *}. In addition, the modification of {Delta}K to a lower value {Delta}K{sub red} due to crack closure during the lower part of a fatigue cycle has been determined. It was found that for 42CrMo4 the influence of crack closure on K{sub min} or {Delta}K is negligible, while for the Al-Li 8090-T6 closure can substantially alter K{sub min} and {Delta}K. The two materials investigated can - in respect to their closure effects - be considered as the two boundary conditions enclosing the range of structural materials. (orig.).

  14. 金属材料疲劳小裂纹扩展速率试验方法编制说明%Explanation of the Standard Test Method for Measurement of Small Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Metallic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁传富; 刘建中; 胡本润; 吴学仁; 李树柏

    2001-01-01

    概述了疲劳小裂纹试验方法航标的编制背景。论述了航标中几个主要技术问题,如,小裂纹试样和小裂纹监测方法的选择,三维应力强度因子K的确定,小裂纹数据有效性的判据及物理小裂纹门槛值。并且与ASTM E647-95a方法中附录X3进行了比较。%Compiling background of an aero-standard test method for measurement of small fatigue crack growth rates was outlined.Several main technical problems for the method were demonstrated,such as choice of specimens and methods of monitoring small-crack, determi-nation of three-dimensional (3D) stress intensity factor,small-crack non-interacting criteria as well as physical small-crack threshold.Comparision was also made between this method and Appendix X3 on ASTM test method E647-95a.

  15. Subcritical crack growth in two titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of subcritical crack growth during static loading of precracked titanium alloys in salt water using samples too thin for plane strain loading to predominate was examined as a method for determining the critical stress intensity for crack propagation in salt water. Significant internal crack growth followed by arrest was found at quite low stress intensities, but crack growth rates were relatively low. Assuming these techniques provided a reliable measurement of the critical stress intensity, the value for annealed Ti-4Al-1.5Mo-0.5V alloy was apparently about 35 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, while that for annealed Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V was below 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power. Crack growth was also observed in tests conducted in both alloys in an air environment. At 65 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, the extent of crack growth was greater in air than in salt water. Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V showed arrested crack growth in air at a stress intensity of 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power.

  16. Comparison between measured tissue phantom ratio values and calculated from percent depth doses with and without peak scatter correction factor in a 6 MV beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Narayanasamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of calculated tissue phantom ratio (TPR data with measured TPR values of a 6MV photon beam. TPR was calculated from the measured percent depth dose (PDD values using 2 methods – with and without correcting for the differences in peak scatter fraction (PSF. Mean error less than 1% was observed between the measured and calculated TPR values with the PSF correction, for all clinically relevant field sizes and depths. When not accounting for the PSF correction, mean difference between the measured and calculated TPR values was larger than 1% for square field sizes ranging from 3 cm to 10 cm.

  17. Crack growth rate in core shroud horizontal welds using two models for a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis Juárez, C.R., E-mail: carlos.arganis@inin.gob.mx; Hernández Callejas, R.; Medina Almazán, A.L.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Two models were used to predict SCC growth rate in a core shroud of a BWR. • A weld residual stress distribution with 30% stress relaxation by neutron was used. • Agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions. • Slip–oxidation model is better at low fluences and empirical model at high fluences. - Abstract: An empirical crack growth rate correlation model and a predictive model based on the slip–oxidation mechanism for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) were used to calculate the crack growth rate in a BWR core shroud. In this study, the crack growth rate was calculated by accounting for the environmental factors related to aqueous environment, neutron irradiation to high fluence and the complex residual stress conditions resulting from welding. In estimating the SCC behavior the crack growth measurements data from a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant are referred to, and the stress intensity factor vs crack depth throughout thickness is calculated using a generic weld residual stress distribution for a core shroud, with a 30% stress relaxation induced by neutron irradiation. Quantitative agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions of the slip–oxidation mechanism model for relatively low fluences (5 × 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}), and the empirical model predicted better the SCC growth rate than the slip–oxidation model for high fluences (>1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}). The relevance of the models predictions for SCC growth rate behavior depends on knowing the model parameters.

  18. Characterization of mixed mode crack opening in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas Sejersbøl; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Olesen, John Forbes

    2012-01-01

    In real concrete structures cracks often open in mixed mode after their initiation. To capture the direct material behavior of a mixed mode crack opening a stiff biaxial testing machine, capable of imposing both normal and shear loads on a given crack area, has been applied. The opening and sliding...... components of the mixed mode displacement are measured using a custom made orthogonal gauge, and the measurements are used directly as the closed loop control signals. A double notch, concrete specimen is used for the crack investigation. The tests are divided into two steps, a pure Mode I opening step......, where a macro crack is initiated in the specimen followed by the mixed mode opening step. The high stiffness of the set-up together with the closed control loop ensures a stable crack initiation followed by a controllable mixed mode opening. The deep notches result in a plane crack, only influenced...

  19. Development of a Distributed Crack Sensor Using Coaxial Cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiao, Tong; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Hai

    2016-07-29

    Cracks, the important factor of structure failure, reflect structural damage directly. Thus, it is significant to realize distributed, real-time crack monitoring. To overcome the shortages of traditional crack detectors, such as the inconvenience of installation, vulnerability, and low measurement range, etc., an improved topology-based cable sensor with a shallow helical groove on the outside surface of a coaxial cable is proposed in this paper. The sensing mechanism, fabrication method, and performances are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Crack monitoring experiments of the reinforced beams are also presented in this paper, illustrating the utility of this sensor in practical applications. These studies show that the sensor can identify a minimum crack width of 0.02 mm and can measure multiple cracks with a spatial resolution of 3 mm. In addition, it is also proved that the sensor performs well to detect the initiation and development of cracks until structure failure.

  20. Detection of subcritical crack propagation for concrete dams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO TengFei; YU Hong

    2009-01-01

    Subcritical propagation of cracks is a warning sign of fracture.If such propagation is detected at an early stage,timely maintenance measures can be taken to prevent the failure of structures.To detect the subcritical propagation of a crack,the crack needs to be monitored continuously in a long term,which is not realistic under certain conditions.However,cracks in concrete dams can be monitored continuously by dam monitoring to offer possible detection for subcritical propagation.In this paper,with measured crack openings from dam monitoring,a state equation for characterizing crack development is established based on the grey system theory.The relation between the stability of the equation and the subcritical crack propagation is investigated,then a criterion is proposed for detecting subcritical propagation.An example demonstrates the validity of the criterion and its potential for practical application.

  1. The investigation of ultrasound technology to measure breast muscle depth as a correlated trait to breast meat yield in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, L A; Wood, B J; Miller, S P

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound measurements of muscle depth were analyzed to determine if these traits could be used to increase the rate of genetic gain in breast meat yield (BMY). Two measurements of breast depth, one taken horizontally across both breast lobes and one parallel to the keel, were captured using ultrasound. Heritabilities of muscle depth traits ranged from 0.35 to 0.70. These values were greater than heritabilities of conformation scores, which ranged from 0.25 to 0.47 within sex and line. The ultrasound traits also showed strong genetic correlations to BMY, ranging from 0.43 to 0.75, indicating that selection, using ultrasound depth as a correlated information source, could result in improved BMY. Including each ultrasound trait in a linear regression model predicting BMY increased the proportion of variation explained by the models by 0.08 to 0.17, relative to using conformation score as the only in vivo estimate. Based on results from a simulated turkey breeding program with selection pressure only on BMY, the ultrasound measures could increase the accuracy of a selection index for BMY by 0.02 to 0.16. As a result, ultrasound technology has the potential to improve the rate of genetic gain in BMY in a breeding program.

  2. Slow crack growth in spinel in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes, S.; Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel was tested in a water environment at room temperature to establish its slow crack-growth behavior. Ring specimens with artificial flaws on the outside surface were loaded hydraulically on the inside surface. The time to failure was measured. Various precracking techniques were evaluated and multiple precracks were used to minimize the scatter in the static fatigue tests. Statistical analysis techniques were developed to determine the strength and crack velocities for a single flaw. Slow crack-growth rupture was observed at stress intensities as low as 70 percent of K sub c. A strengthening effect was observed in specimens that had survived long-time static fatigue tests.

  3. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  4. A depth-dependent profile of the lipid conformation and lateral packing order of the stratum corneum in vivo measured using Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2016-03-21

    The intercellular lipid structure of the stratum corneum (SC) plays a key role in skin barrier function. A depth profile of the intercellular lipid conformation and the lipid lateral packing order were measured in vivo in the human SC using confocal Raman microscopy. The depth profiles of the 2880 cm(-1)/2850 cm(-1) peak ratio intensity, which represent the C-H stretching and lateral packing order of lipids, and the 1080 cm(-1)/(1130 cm(-1) + 1060 cm(-1)) peak ratio, which represents the C-C skeleton vibration and trans-gauche conformation order of lipids, were investigated. The influence of keratin on the lipid peaks at 2850 cm(-1) and 2880 cm(-1) was excluded by the developed mathematical algorithm. The results show that the trans-conformation and lateral packing order of the intercellular lipids reach their maximum value in the SC at 20-40% of its depth and then decrease towards the stratum granulosum. These results show that at a depth of 20-40% (normally corresponding to a depth of 4-8 μm) the SC exhibits the most ordered lipids and therefore the highest skin barrier function. The lateral packing of lipids is more disordered on the surface and in the deeper parts of the SC, which may be associated with a reduced skin barrier function.

  5. Research on System Error Compensation in Depth Measurement of Kinect%Kinect深度测量的系统误差补偿研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪; 郑梓均; 孙春龙

    2015-01-01

    A statistics-based method was proposed in this paper in order to compensate the system error of Kinect sensor in depth measurement.In this method,a high-precision laser scanner was used to obtain a series of depth reference value in varying depths.According to the system error model,the Kinect depth data was mapped into the reference value with a second order polyno-mial.It was proved that the Kinect depth data after compensation is more accurate than before.%Kinect在测量深度时往往存在系统误差,为此提出了一种基于数学统计的Kinect系统误差补偿方法。该方法设计了一个使用高精度激光扫描仪获取深度参考值的装置,然后根据Kinect的系统误差模型,将深度参考值与Kinect的深度测量值相互匹配,进行二次曲线拟合。结果表明,经过补偿之后的Kinect深度数据相比原始数据精度显著提高了。

  6. Crack growth monitoring at CFRP bond lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahammer, M.; Adebahr, W.; Sachse, R.; Gröninger, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    With the growing need for lightweight technologies in aerospace and automotive industries, fibre-reinforced plastics, especially carbon-fibre (CFRP), are used with a continuously increasing annual growth rate. A promising joining technique for composites is adhesive bonding. While rivet holes destroy the fibres and cause stress concentration, adhesive bond lines distribute the load evenly. Today bonding is only used in secondary structures due to a lack of knowledge with regard to long-term predictability. In all industries, numerical simulation plays a critical part in the development process of new materials and structures, while it plays a vital role when it comes to CFRP adhesive bondings conducing the predictability of life time and damage tolerance. The critical issue with adhesive bondings is crack growth. In a dynamic tensile stress testing machine we dynamically load bonded CFRP coupon specimen and measure the growth rate of an artificially started crack in order to feed the models with the results. We also investigate the effect of mechanical crack stopping features. For observation of the bond line, we apply two non-contact NDT techniques: Air-coupled ultrasound in slanted transmission mode and active lockin-thermography evaluated at load frequencies. Both methods give promising results for detecting the current crack front location. While the ultrasonic technique provides a slightly higher accuracy, thermography has the advantage of true online monitoring, because the measurements are made while the cyclic load is being applied. The NDT methods are compared to visual inspection of the crack front at the specimen flanks and show high congruence. Furthermore, the effect of crack stopping features within the specimen on the crack growth is investigated. The results show, that not all crack fronts are perfectly horizontal, but all of them eventually come to a halt in the crack stopping feature vicinity.

  7. Measurements of anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter using two Scheimpflug imaging devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Domínguez-Vicent

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the ocular anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter, as measured with two different Scheimpflug imaging devices. Methods: This transversal study included 80 right eyes from 80 subjects aged from 20 to 40 years. Their spherical equivalents ranged from -4.25 to +1.00 diopters (D. Each eye's anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter, were measured for far vision using both the Galilei G4 (double Scheimpflug camera and the Pentacam HR (single Scheimpflug camera systems. Results: Mean anterior chamber depths were calculated as 3.12 ± 0.23 mm and 3.19 ± 0.24 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. The mean white-to-white distance measured was 11.84 ± 0.31 mm and 11.90 ± 0.43 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. Mean pupil diameters were measured as 3.22 ± 0.58 mm and 3.22 ± 0.52 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. Finally, the mean anterior chamber angle was 34.30 ± 2.86 degrees when it was measured with the Galilei G4, and 39.26 ± 2.85 degrees when measured with the Pentacam HR. A comparative analysis revealed that the Galilei G4 yielded a significantly lower (P0.05 for both devices were obtained for the white-to-white distance measurements. Conclusion: The Galilei G4 and Pentacam HR Scheimpflug systems cannot be used interchangeably because they produce significant measurement differences.

  8. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Mirage IIIO Wing Main Spar Specimens and the Effects of Spectrum Truncation on Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Science Division, Library Trans-Australia Airlines, Library Qantas Airways Limited SEC of Vic., Herman Research Laboratory, Library Ansett Airlines of...linear relationship was found between the log. life and log. crack depth for individual specimens. At the smallest crack depth usedfor analysis (0.3 mm...any attempt made to extrapolate the curves back to zero crack depth. A further analysis of the basic data for specimens tested under Spectrum I was

  9. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  10. Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at...

  11. Photoelastic studies of crack propagation and crack arrest. [Homalite 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, G.R.; Dally, J.W.; Kobayashi, T.; Fourney, W.L.; Etheridge, J.M.

    1977-09-01

    This report describes the third year effort on research programs dealing with the characterization of dynamic aspects of fracture. The results included in this report are (1) verification of the BCL one-dimensional computer code; (2) determination of a-dot--K relationship from modified compact-tension specimen of Homalite 100; (3) verification of the MRL procedure for K/sub Ia/ measurement with machine-loaded C-DCB specimen of Homalite 100; (4) influence of adhesive toughness, adhesive thickness, and toughness of the arrest section on crack behavior in duplex specimens of both the M-CT and R-DCB types; (5) crack propagation in a thermally stressed ring specimen; and (6) development of a two-dimensional finite-difference code to predict fracture behavior in specimens of rectangular geometry under various a-dot vs K relationships. 118 figures, 53 tables.

  12. Experimental and theoretical strain distributions for stationary and growing cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerberich, W. W.; Davidson, D. L.; Kaczorowski, M.

    E XPERIMENTAL strain distributions are determined very near the crack tip in Fe-3wt.%Si single crystals. Both in situ stereoimaging and electron channeling techniques give reasonably reproducible distributions. By growing fatigue cracks on a {100} cleavage plane, the singularity strengths have been determined for both growing and stationary cracks under relatively plane stress and plane strain conditions. This has allowed a comparison to existing theoretical models. It is shown that the HRR singularity (Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren, 1968) for stationary cracks is very good to within I μm of the crack tip and a hardening model for the growing crack (gao and hwang, Advances in Fracture Research, edited by D. Francois. 5th Int. Conf. on Fracture, Cannes, France, 2, 669, 1981) is surprisingly good. Other issues such as fracture criteria are discussed since strains greater than unity were measured at the crack tip in this relatively brittle material.

  13. Imaging Cracks by Laser Excited Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, J.; Kervalishvili, G. N.; Maierhofer, Ch.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2010-02-01

    During the last years active thermography is increasingly used in a number of NDT problems in production and maintenance. In this work we focus on the detection of vertical cracks starting at the surface, which is an important indication of structural failure. By using local thermal excitation it is possible to image anisotropies in the lateral diffusivity by recording the temporal temperature data with an infrared camera. The regional transient behaviour of temperature distribution then can provide quantitative information of the crack parameter. In doing so, we present an advanced technique for the determination of the crack depth. The experimental set-up is based on an Nd:YAG laser. The beam is focused on the test sample by using an optical scanner to create the required lateral heat flow. The time resolved temperature distribution is recorded with an infrared camera (InSb FPA, 3 to 5 μm) providing a frame rate of up to 500 Hz. In addition we report on numerical simulation to investigate the concept of local heat excitation for a quantitative estimation of crack parameters. The modeling also includes the influence of surface to surface radiation inside the crack. We obtained a good consistency between experimental and theoretical data.

  14. Failure analysis of corrosion cracking and simulated testing for a fluid catalytic cracking unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Chen; Xiaogang Li; Chaofang Dong; Ming Li; Jinwen Yang

    2005-01-01

    The failure of a fluid catalysis and cracking unit (FCCU) in a Chinese refinery was investigated by using nondestructive detection methods, fracture surface examination, hardness measurement, chemical composition and corrosion products analysis. The results showed that the failure was caused by the dew point nitrate stress corrosion cracking. For a long operation period, the wall temperature of the regenerator in the FCCU was below the fume dew point. As a result, an acid fume NOx-SOx-H2O medium presented on the surface, resulting in stress corrosion cracking of the component with high residual stress. In order to confirm the relative conclusion, simulated testing was conducted in laboratory, and the results showed similar cracking characteristics. Finally, some suggestions have been made to prevent the stress corrosion cracking of an FCCU from re-occurring in the future.

  15. Hydrocarbon cracking selectivities with a dual zeolite fluid cracking catalyst containing REY and ZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, K.; Young, G.W. (W.R. Grace and Company, Columbia, MD (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Synthetic Y faujasite zeolites have been used commercially as cracking catalysts for the past two decades, and more recently dual zeolite fluid cracking catalysts, containing faujasite and ZSM-5 were discovered to increase the octane number of the gasoline during catalytic cracking of gas oil. This concept, where ZSM-5 constitutes only a small fraction (about 1 wt %) of the cracking catalyst, has been tested commercially in Europe and in the United States. Cracking of paraffinic and olefinic hydrocarbons by ZSM-5 catalysts has been studied by several investigators over a range of temperatures (350 to 540{degree}C) and using nearly pure ZSM-5 as the catalyst. The mechanism of octane number enhancement with the dual zeolite catalyst was investigated by examining the effect on product selectivity of addition of 1 wt % ZSM-5 to a cracking catalyst composition during catalytic cracking of a commercial gas oil at 500{degree}C. Changes in composition of the product gasoline (paraffins, olefins, naphthenes and aromatics) caused by ZSM-5 were measured. Since commercial cracking catalysts undergo continuous high temperature regeneration in the presence of steam, the effect of hydrothermal treatment of ZSM-5 was also investigated.

  16. Aerosol optical depth over a remote semi-arid region of South Africa from spectral measurements of the daytime solar extinction and the nighttime stellar extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, P.; Winkler, H.; Fourie, P.; Piketh, S.; Makgopa, B.; Helas, G.; Andreae, M. O.

    Spectral daytime aerosol optical depths have been measured at Sutherland, South Africa (32°22'S, 20°48'E), from January 1998 to November 1999. Sutherland is located in the semi-arid Karoo desert, approximately 400-km northeast from Cape Town. The site, remote from major sources of aerosols, hosts the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), where nighttime stellar extinction is being measured. The comparison of daytime and nighttime measurements for the years 1998-1999 makes it possible to validate the astronomical dataset of aerosol optical depth ( τa) dating back to 1991. The 1998 and 1999 annually averaged daytime τa at 500 nm are 0.04±0.04 and 0.06±0.06, respectively. Half-day averages vary between 0.03 and 0.44, with peak values in August-September. This pronounced seasonality is linked to the biomass-burning season in the Southern Hemisphere. Smoke haze layers transported to Sutherland originated primarily on the African landmass at latitudes between 10° and 20°S and passed over Namibia and Angola. On one occasion, aerosols from fires in Brazil transported across the Atlantic Ocean were likely detected. The haze layers reaching Sutherland are therefore at least 2-3 days old. The spectral dependence of the aerosol optical depth for the smoke layers supports the bimodality of the volume size distribution for biomass burning aerosols. The accumulation mode has a volume modal diameter of 0.32 μm, consistent with the hypothesis of aged haze. The stellar measurements (1991-2001) show that, due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, the atmospheric extinction depth at 550 nm in the years 1991-1993 increased by 33% with respect to the average value (0.14±0.03) for the period 1994-2001. Outside the Pinatubo event, extinction is largest in the period 1997-1999.

  17. Quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior and the crack morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Chen

    Full Text Available In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the "energy conversion factor" is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris.

  18. Effect of Initial Debond Crack Location on the Face/core Debond Fracture Toughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of initial crack location on the face/core debond fracture toughness under different mixed mode loading conditions. The mixed mode loading at the crack tip is defined in terms of the mode-mixity. In order to achieve the desired initial debond crack location, a pre...... as initial debond crack location. Lower fracture toughness values were measured for specimens with the initial crack location in the face laminate....

  19. Modeling the Time-to Corrosion Cracking of the Cover Concrete in Chloride Contaminated Reinforced Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Youping

    1996-01-01

    Significant factors on steel corrosion in chloride contaminated reinforced concrete and time-to-corrosion cracking were investigated in this study. Sixty specimens were designed with seven admixed chloride contents, three concrete cover depths, two reinforcing steel bar diameters, two exposure conditions, and a typical concrete with water to cement ratio of 0.45. Corrosion current density (corrosion rate), corrosion potential, ohmic resistance of concrete and temperature were measured monthly...

  20. 钢筋混凝土楼板裂缝的控制及其预防措施%On control over reinforced concrete crack and its prevention measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方文新

    2015-01-01

    从材料选择、施工方法、温度应力三方面出发,对混凝土施工楼板裂缝的形成原因进行了分析,探讨了钢筋混凝土楼板裂缝的防治措施及处理方法,从而提高混凝土楼板施工的质量,保证建筑物的稳定性和耐久性。%From the material selection,construction methods,and temperature stress,the paper analyzes the reasons for the cracks of concrete floors,and explores the prevention measures and treatment methods for the cracks on the reinforced concrete floors,so as to promote the quality of the concrete floor construction and ensure the stability and durability of buildings.

  1. Cause Analysis and Control Measures of the Concrete Cracks of Floor Heating Hill Layer%地暖地坪填充层混凝土裂缝成因分析及控制措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏玲; 罗红亮

    2014-01-01

    本文通过工程实例对地暖地坪填充层混凝土裂缝成因进行了详细分析,从设计、材料、施工等方面提出了相应的预防措施。对施工中减少填充层混凝土裂缝,保证地暖地面的外观及使用功能有一定指导实践意义。%This paper through engineering examples analyzes the ground floor fil ing layer concrete crack causes in detail, puts forward corresponding prevention measures from design, material, construction and other aspects. To reduce the fil ing layer of concrete cracks in construction, which has a certain pr-actice guiding significance to ensure the appearance and fun-ction of ground floor heating.

  2. 外墙外保温体系产生裂缝的原因及防控措施%Reason of Exterior Insulation System Crack ;and Control Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晋萍

    2015-01-01

    外墙外保温体系在节能建筑应用中出现的裂缝,是当前亟待解决的技术问题。从结构设计、材料生产、建筑施工等方面,分析了产生裂缝的原因,阐述了技术和管理方面的控制措施。%Exterior insulation system crack appearing in the energy-saving building application is a technical problem to be solved. From aspects of structural design,materials production,construction and so on, the author analyzes the causes of cracks and expounds the technology and management control measures.

  3. Transport and Corrosion Behavior of Cracked Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin

    to enter the concrete. This is, among others, important in the corrosion of reinforcing steel. When cracks protrude to the depth of reinforcing steel, liquids containing aggressive ions (i.e. chlorides associated with salts and sea water) may rapidly access and initiate corrosion of the reinforcing...... structures. These models currently lack some of the scientific validity to fully represent actual field structures, i.e. structures containing cracks. Further understanding, therefore is needed on the effect cracks have on transport and corrosion in reinforced concrete. The fundamental mechanisms...... of transport and corrosion in cracked, reinforced concrete are not yet fully understood. The scope of this study therefore is to develop a link between concrete cracks and the relevant transport mechanism(s) under particular environmental conditions. It is envisioned that a finite element model...

  4. Study on the Role of Thermal Cracking in FCC Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei; Wei Xiaoli

    2004-01-01

    A bench-scale fixed fluidized bed reactor was used to study the distribution and quality of products derived from thermal cracking of VGO. Test results had shown that the space velocity has minor effect on thermal cracking reaction. The depth of thermal cracking reaction was mainly affected by the reaction temperature.At different reaction temperatures the form of free radicals thus initiated varied, resulting in different product distribution. At low temperature C10= and C11= olefins dominated in thermally cracked gasoline products,whereas at higher temperature C6=-C9= olefins dominated in thermally cracked gasoline products, among which C6 and C7 olefins were mainly composed of 2M 1 Cs= and 2E1C5=. Difference in olefin structure can lead to different reaction pathways of catalytic cycle.

  5. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  6. Using Noise and Fluctuations for In Situ  Measurements of Nitrogen Diffusion Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Samoila

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In manufacturing processes involving diffusion (of C, N, S, etc., the evolution of the layer depth is of the utmost importance: the success of the entire process depends on this parameter. Currently, nitriding is typically either calibrated using a “post process” method or controlled via indirect measurements (H2, O2, H2O + CO2. In the absence of “in situ” monitoring, any variation in the process parameters (gas concentration, temperature, steel composition, distance between sensors and furnace chamber can cause expensive process inefficiency or failure. Indirect measurements can prevent process failure, but uncertainties and complications may arise in the relationship between the measured parameters and the actual diffusion process. In this paper, a method based on noise and fluctuation measurements is proposed that offers direct control of the layer depth evolution because the parameters of interest are measured in direct contact with the nitrided steel (represented by the active electrode. The paper addresses two related sets of experiments. The first set of experiments consisted of laboratory tests on nitrided samples using Barkhausen noise and yieded a linear relationship between the frequency exponent in the Hooge equation and the nitriding time. For the second set, a specific sensor based on conductivity noise (at the nitriding temperature was built for shop‐floor experiments. Although two different types of noise were measured in these two sets of experiments, the use of the frequency exponent to monitor the process evolution remained valid.

  7. Validity of Core Temperature Measurements at 3 Rectal Depths During Rest, Exercise, Cold-Water Immersion, and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Hughes, Lexie E; Long, Blaine C; Adams, William M; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-04-01

      No evidence-based recommendation exists regarding how far clinicians should insert a rectal thermistor to obtain the most valid estimate of core temperature. Knowing the validity of temperatures at different rectal depths has implications for exertional heat-stroke (EHS) management.   To determine whether rectal temperature (Trec) taken at 4 cm, 10 cm, or 15 cm from the anal sphincter provides the most valid estimate of core temperature (as determined by esophageal temperature [Teso]) during similar stressors an athlete with EHS may experience.   Cross-sectional study.   Laboratory.   Seventeen individuals (14 men, 3 women: age = 23 ± 2 years, mass = 79.7 ± 12.4 kg, height = 177.8 ± 9.8 cm, body fat = 9.4% ± 4.1%, body surface area = 1.97 ± 0.19 m(2)).   Rectal temperatures taken at 4 cm, 10 cm, and 15 cm from the anal sphincter were compared with Teso during a 10-minute rest period; exercise until the participant's Teso reached 39.5°C; cold-water immersion (∼10°C) until all temperatures were ≤38°C; and a 30-minute postimmersion recovery period. The Teso and Trec were compared every minute during rest and recovery. Because exercise and cooling times varied, we compared temperatures at 10% intervals of total exercise and cooling durations for these periods.   The Teso and Trec were used to calculate bias (ie, the difference in temperatures between sites).   Rectal depth affected bias (F2,24 = 6.8, P = .008). Bias at 4 cm (0.85°C ± 0.78°C) was higher than at 15 cm (0.65°C ± 0.68°C, P .05). Bias varied over time (F2,34 = 79.5, P < .001). Bias during rest (0.42°C ± 0.27°C), exercise (0.23°C ± 0.53°C), and recovery (0.65°C ± 0.35°C) was less than during cooling (1.72°C ± 0.65°C, P < .05). Bias during exercise was less than during postimmersion recovery (0.65°C ± 0.35°C, P < .05).   When EHS is suspected, clinicians should insert the flexible rectal thermistor to 15 cm (6 in) because it is the most valid depth. The low

  8. SU-C-213-04: Application of Depth Sensing and 3D-Printing Technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Patient Measurement and Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, B; Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Jenkins, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an innovative method of using depth sensing cameras and 3D printing techniques for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatment planning and compensator fabrication. Methods: A tablet with motion tracking cameras and integrated depth sensing was used to scan a RANDOTM phantom arranged in a TBI treatment booth to detect and store the 3D surface in a point cloud (PC) format. The accuracy of the detected surface was evaluated by comparison to extracted measurements from CT scan images. The thickness, source to surface distance and off-axis distance of the phantom at different body section was measured for TBI treatment planning. A 2D map containing a detailed compensator design was calculated to achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the phantom. The compensator was fabricated using a 3D printer, silicone molding and tungsten powder. In vivo dosimetry measurements were performed using optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs). Results: The whole scan of the anthropomorphic phantom took approximately 30 seconds. The mean error for thickness measurements at each section of phantom compare to CT was 0.44 ± 0.268 cm. These errors resulted in approximately 2% dose error calculation and 0.4 mm tungsten thickness deviation for the compensator design. The accuracy of 3D compensator printing was within 0.2 mm. In vivo measurements for an end-to-end test showed the overall dose difference was within 3%. Conclusion: Motion cameras and depth sensing techniques proved to be an accurate and efficient tool for TBI patient measurement and treatment planning. 3D printing technique improved the efficiency and accuracy of the compensator production and ensured a more accurate treatment delivery.

  9. Predictions for fatigue crack growth life of cracked pipes and pipe welds using RMS SIF approach and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Punit, E-mail: punit@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Department of Atomic Energy, Maharashtra, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, P.K.; Bhasin, Vivek; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Department of Atomic Energy, Maharashtra, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pukazhendhi, D.M.; Gandhi, P.; Raghava, G. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2011-10-15

    The objective of the present study is to understand the fatigue crack growth behavior in austenitic stainless steel pipes and pipe welds by carrying out analysis/predictions and experiments. The Paris law has been used for the prediction of fatigue crack growth life. To carry out the analysis, Paris constants have been determined for pipe (base) and pipe weld materials by using Compact Tension (CT) specimens machined from the actual pipe/pipe weld. Analyses have been carried out to predict the fatigue crack growth life of the austenitic stainless steel pipes/pipes welds having part through cracks on the outer surface. In the analyses, Stress Intensity Factors (K) have been evaluated through two different schemes. The first scheme considers the 'K' evaluations at two points of the crack front i.e. maximum crack depth and crack tip at the outer surface. The second scheme accounts for the area averaged root mean square stress intensity factor (K{sub RMS}) at deepest and surface points. Crack growth and the crack shape with loading cycles have been evaluated. In order to validate the analytical procedure/results, experiments have been carried out on full scale pipe and pipe welds with part through circumferential crack. Fatigue crack growth life evaluated using both schemes have been compared with experimental results. Use of stress intensity factor (K{sub RMS}) evaluated using second scheme gives better fatigue crack growth life prediction compared to that of first scheme. Fatigue crack growth in pipe weld (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) can be predicted well using Paris constants of base material but prediction is non-conservative for pipe weld (Shielded Metal Arc Welding). Further, predictions using fatigue crack growth rate curve of ASME produces conservative results for pipe and GTAW pipe welds and comparable results for SMAW pipe welds. - Highlights: > Predicting fatigue crack growth of Austenitic Stainless Steel pipes and pipe welds. > Use of RMS-SIF and

  10. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Theoretical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wire, G.L.

    1997-02-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) can cause increases in fatigue crack growth rates of 40 to 100 times the rate in air for low alloy steels. The increased rates can lead to very large predicted crack growth. EAC is activated by a critical level of dissolved sulfides at the crack tip. Sulfide inclusions (MnS) in the steel produce corrosive sulfides in solution following exposure by a growing crack. In stagnant, low oxygen water conditions considered here, diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism acting to change the sulfide concentration within the crack. The average crack tip velocity is below the level required to produce the critical crack tip sulfide ion concentration required for EAC. Crack extension analyses also consider the breakthrough of large, hypothetical embedded defects with the attendant large freshly exposed sulfide inventory. Combrade et al. noted that a large inventory of undissolved metallurgical sulfides on crack flanks could trigger EAC, but did not quantify the effects. Diffusion analysis is extended herein to cover breakthrough of embedded defects with large sulfide inventories. The mass transport via diffusion is limited by the sulfide solubility. As a result, deep cracks in high sulfur steels are predicted to retain undissolved sulfides for extended but finite periods of time t{sub diss} which increase with the crack length and the metallurgical sulfide content in the steel. The analysis shows that the duration of EAC is limited to t{sub diss} providing V{sub eac}, the crack tip velocity associated with EAC is less than V{sub In}, the crack tip velocity below which EAC will not occur in an initially sulfide free crack. This condition on V{sub eac} need only be met for a short time following crack cleanup to turn off EAC. The predicted crack extension due to limited duration of EAC is a small fraction of the initial embedded defect size and would not greatly change calculated crack depths.

  11. Radio-frequency Attenuation Length, Basal-Reflectivity, Depth, and Polarization Measurements from Moore's Bay in the Ross Ice-Shelf

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D; Duffin, T; Hanson, J C; Klein, S R; Kleinfelder, S A; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Walker, J; Zou, L

    2014-01-01

    Radio-glaciological parameters from Moore's Bay, in the Ross Ice Shelf, have been measured. The thickness of the ice shelf in Moore's Bay was measured from reflection times of radio-frequency pulses propagating vertically through the shelf and reflecting from the ocean. The average depth obtained is $576\\pm8$ m. The temperature-averaged attenuation length of the ice column, $\\langle L \\rangle$, is derived from the returned power assuming 100\\% reflection. A linear fit to the data yields $\\langle L(\

  12. Active Seismic Monitoring of Crack Initiation, Propagation, and Coalescence in Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiriasari, Anahita; Bobet, Antonio; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    2017-09-01

    Active seismic monitoring was used to detect and characterize crack initiation, crack propagation and crack coalescence in pre-cracked rock specimens. Uniaxial compression tests were conducted on Indiana limestone specimens with two parallel pre-existing cracks. During the experiments, the mechanically induced cracks around the flaw tips were monitored by measuring surface displacements using digital image correlation (DIC). Transmitted and reflected compressional and shear waves through the specimens were also recorded during the loading to detect any damage or cracking phenomena. The amplitude of transmitted compressional and shear waves decreased with uniaxial compression. However, the rate of decrease of the amplitude of the transmitted waves intensified well before the initiation of tensile cracks. In addition, a distinct minimum in the amplitude of transmitted waves occurred close to coalescence. The normalized amplitude of waves reflecting from the new cracks increased before new tensile and shear cracks initiated around the flaw tips. In addition, the location of new cracks could be identified using the traveling time of the reflected waves. The experimental results indicate that changes in normalized amplitude of transmitted and reflected signals associated with crack initiation and crack coalescence were detected much earlier than with DIC, at a load of about 80-90% of the load at which the cracks appeared on the surface. The tests show conclusively that active wave monitoring is an effective tool to detect damage and new cracks in rock, as well as to estimate the location of the new cracks.

  13. STUDY ON THE SURFACE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR IN 14MnNbq BRIDGE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanping Liu; Chuanyao Chen; Guoqing Li

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack closure correction methods are investigated in this paper.The fatigue crack growth tests of surface cracks in 14MnNbq steel for bridge plate subjected to tensile and bending loadings are systematically conducted.The experimentally measured fatigue crack growth rates of surface cracks are compared with those of through-thickness cracks in detail.It is found that the crack growth rates of surface cracks are lower than those of through-thickness cracks.In order to correct their differences in fatigue crack growth rates,a dimensionless crack closure correction model is proposed.Although this correction model is determined only by the experimental data of surface cracks under tensile loading with a constant ratio R=0.05,it can correlate the surface crack growth rates with reasonable accuracy under tensile and bending loadings with various stress ratios ranging from 0 to 0.5.Furthermore,predictions of fatigue life and crack aspect ratio for surface cracks are discussed,and the predicted results are also compared with those obtained from other prediction approaches.Comparison results show that the proposed crack closure correction model gives better prediction of fatigue life than other models.

  14. The influence of loading on the corrosion of steel in cracked ordinary Portland cement and high performance concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Shahzma Jafferali

    Most studies that have examined chloride-induced corrosion of steel in concrete have focused on sound concrete. However, reinforced concrete is seldom uncracked and very few studies have investigated the influence of cracked concrete on rebar corrosion. Furthermore, the studies that have examined the relationship between cracks and corrosion have focused on unloaded or statically loaded cracks. However, in practice, reinforced concrete structures (e.g. bridges) are often dynamically loaded. Hence, the cracks in such structures open and close which could influence the corrosion of the reinforcing steel. Consequently, the objectives of this project were (i) to examine the effect of different types of loading on the corrosion of reinforcing steel, (ii) the influence of concrete mixture design on the corrosion behaviour and (iii) to provide data that can be used in service-life modelling of cracked reinforced concretes. In this project, cracked reinforced concrete beams made with ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC) and high performance concrete (HPC) were subjected to no load, static loading and dynamic loading. They were immersed in salt solution to just above the crack level at their mid-point for two weeks out of every four (wet cycle) and, for the remaining two weeks, were left in ambient laboratory conditions to dry (dry cycle). The wet cycle led to three conditions of exposure for each beam: (i) the non-submerged region, (ii) the sound, submerged region and (iii) the cracked mid-section, which was also immersed in the solution. Linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse techniques were used to monitor the corrosion in the three regions. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical current noise and concrete electrical resistance measurements were also performed. These measurements illustrated that (i) rebar corroded faster at cracks than in sound concrete, (ii) HPC was more protective towards the rebar than OPCC even at cracks and (iii) there

  15. Crack monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers for concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinlei; Bao, Tengfei; Chen, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Optical fibers have been widely used in structural health monitoring. Traditional silica fibers are easy to break in field applications due to their brittleness. Thus, silica fibers are proposed to be replaced by plastic optical fibers (POFs) in crack monitoring in this study. Moreover, considering the uncertainty of crack propagation direction in composite materials, the influence of the angles between fibers and cracks on the monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers is studied. A POF sensing device was designed and the relationship between light intensity loss and crack width under different fiber/crack angles was first measured through the device. Then, three-point bend tests were conducted on concrete beams. POFs were glued to the bottom surfaces of the beams and light intensity loss with crack width was measured. Experimental results showed that light intensity loss in plastic optical fibers increased with crack width increase. Therefore, application of plastic optical fibers in crack monitoring is feasible. Moreover, the results also showed that the sensitivity of the POF crack sensor decreased with the increase of angles between fibers and cracks.

  16. Assessment of the aerosol optical depths measured by satellite-based passive remote sensors in the Alberta oil sands region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioris, Christopher E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Shephard, Mark W.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Abboud, Ihab

    2017-02-01

    Several satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products are assessed in terms of their data quality in the Alberta oil sands region. The instruments consist of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), and AATSR (Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer). The AOD data products are examined in terms of multiplicative and additive biases determined using local Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) (AEROCAN) stations. Correlation with ground-based data is used to assess whether the satellite-based AODs capture day-to-day, month-to-month, and spatial variability. The ability of the satellite AOD products to capture interannual variability is assessed at Albian mine and Shell Muskeg River, two neighbouring sites in the northern mining region where a statistically significant positive trend (2002-2015) in PM2.5 mass density exists. An increasing trend of similar amplitude (˜ 5 % year-1) is observed in this northern mining region using some of the satellite AOD products.

  17. Fault Feature Analysis of a Cracked Gear Coupled Rotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the misalignment of gear root circle and base circle and accurate transition curve, an improved mesh stiffness model for healthy gear is proposed, and it is validated by comparison with the finite element method. On the basis of the improved method, a mesh stiffness model for a cracked gear pair is built. Then a finite element model of a cracked gear coupled rotor system in a one-stage reduction gear box is established. The effects of crack depth, width, initial position, and crack propagation direction on gear mesh stiffness, fault features in time domain and frequency domain, and statistical indicators are investigated. Moreover, fault features are also validated by experiment. The results show that the improved mesh stiffness model is more accurate than the traditional mesh stiffness model. When the tooth root crack appears, distinct impulses are found in time domain vibration responses, and sidebands appear in frequency domain. Amplitudes of all the statistical indicators ascend gradually with the growth of crack depth and width, decrease with the increasing crack initial position angle, and firstly increase and then decrease with the growth of propagation direction angle.

  18. Depth keying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  19. Discuss the Cracks Causes and Prevention Measures of Reinforced Concrete Floor%浅谈钢筋混凝土楼板裂缝成因及防治措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎晓文

    2013-01-01

    随着近年来我国城镇化进程的不断推进,越来越多的城市及乡镇建起了安全美观的钢筋混凝土住宅。但当他们高高兴兴地搬进新居时,却有可能遇到楼板存在裂缝的情况。为避免及减少由施工原因引起的楼板裂缝,本文将分析现浇钢筋混凝土楼板裂缝的成因,并提出相应的预防措施,以便能够提升钢筋混凝土楼板的施工质量。%With the advancement of urbanization process in China in recent years, a growing number of cities and towns built security and beautiful reinforced concrete residential. But when they happily moved into their new homes, they may enc-ounter the situation of floor cracks. To prevent and reduce the floor cracks caused by the construction, this article analyzes the cause of the cast-in-place reinforced concrete floor cracks and puts forward appropriate preventive measures to enhance the construction quality of reinforced concrete floor.

  20. 论泵送混凝土现浇板裂缝产生机理及预防措施%Study on the mechanism caused the cracks in cast-in-place floor of pump concrete and preventive measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许洪祥

    2009-01-01

    针对泵送混凝土现浇板产生的各种裂缝,从混凝土组成、搅拌、运输、泵送、浇筑、养护、支模等方面出发,通过对各生产环节的观察和试验,对裂缝产生的机理进行了深入、全面地分析,并针对不同问题提出了相应的预防措施,以减少或避免出现混凝土裂缝.%According to various cracks produced in cast-in-place floor of pump concrete, from the composition, mixing, transportation, pumping, pouring, curing and other aspects the mechanism caused the production of those cracks in cast-in-place floor of pump concrete are comprehensively analyzed based upon observation and experiments, at the same time corresponding preventive measures are proposed, in order to reduce and eliminate the production of those cracks in pump concrete.

  1. A comparison of two methods to measure choroidal thickness by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography -Letter to the Editor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Kristian; Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet;

    2016-01-01

    -domain optical coherence tomography (EDI-SD OCT) has made it possible to visualize the choroid, and it is generally accepted that Heidelberg Spectralis OCT provides valid measurements of choroidal thickness (CT) (Li et al. 2014), although no fully automated software is commercially available. In the literature...... different approaches and software programs are described for manual measurement of the CT. Unfortunately many investigators do not report in details which method they use. Two methods for CT-measurement are available in the Heidelberg software, but to our knowledge these methods have not been compared....... Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and validate the Segmentation method and the Ruler method for CT-measurement. We obtained data from 10 healthy subjects, aged 15 to 17 years (mean 16.3) and 10 patients with macular pathology, aged 59 to 79 years (mean 71.8). The diseases included wet age...

  2. Correlation between Initial BIC and the Insertion Torque/Depth Integral Recorded with an Instantaneous Torque-Measuring Implant Motor: An in vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capparé, Paolo; Vinci, Raffaele; Di Stefano, Danilo Alessio; Traini, Tonino; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Gherlone, Enrico Felice; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative intraoperative evaluation of bone quality at implant placement site and postinsertion implant primary stability assessment are two key parameters to perform implant-supported rehabilitation properly. A novel micromotor has been recently introduced allowing to measure bone density at implant placement site and to record implant insertion-related parameters, such as the instantaneous, average and peak insertion torque values, and the insertion torque/depth integral. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo if any correlation existed between initial bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone density and integral values recorded with the instrument. Twenty-five patients seeking for implant-supported rehabilitation of edentulous areas were consecutively treated. Before implant placement, bone density at the insertion site was measured. For each patient, an undersized 3.3 × 8-mm implant was placed, recording the insertion torque/depth integral values. After 15 minutes, the undersized implant was retrieved with a 0.5 mm-thick layer of bone surrounding it. Standard implants were consequently placed. Retrieved implants were analyzed for initial BIC quantification after fixation, dehydration, acrylic resin embedment, sections cutting and grinding, and toluidine-blue and acid fuchsine staining. Correlation between initial BIC values, bone density at the insertion site, and the torque/depth integral values was investigated by linear regression analysis. A significant linear correlation was found to exist between initial BIC and (a) bone density at the insertion site (R = 0.96, explained variance R(2)  = 0.92) and (b) torque/depth integral at placement (R = 0.81, explained variance R(2)  = 0.66). The system provided quantitative, reliable data correlating significantly with immediate postinsertion initial BIC, and could therefore represent a valuable tool both for clinical research and for the oral implantologist in his/her daily clinical

  3. Effects of coating thickness and interfacial roughness on cracking and delamination strength of WC-Co coating measured by ring compression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masahiko; Nazul, Mahmoud; Itti, Takeshi; Akebono, Hiroyuki; Sugeta, Atsushi; Mitani, Eiji

    2014-08-01

    The effects of coating thickness and interfacial roughness on the interfacial fracture toughness of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) coatings were evaluated using a ring compression test. WC-Co powder was sprayed on steel (JIS:SS400) rings by a high-velocity air- fuel method in coatings with various thicknesses and values of interfacial roughness. The ring compression test was carried out, and the cracking and delamination behavior of the coatings was observed using charge-coupled-device cameras. The results showed that cracking perpendicular to the loading direction occurred in the coatings during the ring compression test, and the cracking strength obtained from the ring compression test decreased slightly with increasing coating thickness, but was independent of the interfacial roughness. Upon further increase of the compression load, the coatings delaminated from the substrate. The interfacial fracture toughness calculated from the delamination of the coatings during the ring compression test decreased with increasing coating thickness and increased with increasing interfacial roughness.

  4. Crack identification for rotating machines based on a nonlinear approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalini, A. A., Jr.; Sanches, L.; Bachschmid, N.; Steffen, V., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous contribution, a crack identification methodology based on a nonlinear approach was proposed. The technique uses external applied diagnostic forces at certain frequencies attaining combinational resonances, together with a pseudo-random optimization code, known as Differential Evolution, in order to characterize the signatures of the crack in the spectral responses of the flexible rotor. The conditions under which combinational resonances appear were determined by using the method of multiple scales. In real conditions, the breathing phenomenon arises from the stress and strain distribution on the cross-sectional area of the crack. This mechanism behavior follows the static and dynamic loads acting on the rotor. Therefore, the breathing crack can be simulated according to the Mayes' model, in which the crack transition from fully opened to fully closed is described by a cosine function. However, many contributions try to represent the crack behavior by machining a small notch on the shaft instead of the fatigue process. In this paper, the open and breathing crack models are compared regarding their dynamic behavior and the efficiency of the proposed identification technique. The additional flexibility introduced by the crack is calculated by using the linear fracture mechanics theory (LFM). The open crack model is based on LFM and the breathing crack model corresponds to the Mayes' model, which combines LFM with a given breathing mechanism. For illustration purposes, a rotor composed by a horizontal flexible shaft, two rigid discs, and two self-aligning ball bearings is used to compose a finite element model of the system. Then, numerical simulation is performed to determine the dynamic behavior of the rotor. Finally, the results of the inverse problem conveyed show that the methodology is a reliable tool that is able to estimate satisfactorily the location and depth of the crack.

  5. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  6. Detection and analysis of rock cracks in meteor crater

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Min

    2010-01-01

    In 2000, a geologist Fridtjof Riis discovered a meteor crater in Ritland, Hjelmelan municipality in Rogland. This crater was formed by meteorite impact. The crater has areas with a lot of cracks in the rocks, and geologists think these cracks are very valuable information for them. By making photos with an ordinary camera, they want to get binary pictures where the cracks are shown as white lines on a black background. They can measure and quantify the length and direction of t...

  7. A measurement of cracked teeth on the maxillary first molar cusp inclination by using CEREC3 CAD / CAM.%应用CEREC3 CAD/CAM对上颌隐裂磨牙牙尖斜度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶小波; 王文梅; 俞青; 陈渊华

    2011-01-01

    目的:通过隐裂磨牙牙尖斜度的测量,从牙体解剖结构上探讨磨牙隐裂的病因.方法:选取隐裂组、对照组磨牙模型,应用CEREC3 CAD/CAM测量出各自的牙尖高度、牙尖斜嵴的长度及牙尖之间的距离,利用三角函数计算出牙尖斜度及近中颊舌斜面夹角、远中颊舌斜面夹角.结果:在近中颊尖斜度、近中舌尖斜度、远中颊尖斜度、远中舌尖斜度方面隐裂组比对照组大:在近中颊舌斜面夹角、远中颊舌斜面夹角大小方面隐裂组比对照组小,经成组t检验,有显著差异(P<0.05).结论:牙体解剖学因素与牙隐裂发病关系密切,牙尖斜度的大小是磨牙隐裂重要病因之一,牙尖斜度越大,牙尖斜面夹角越小,隐裂发生的可能性越大.%Objective: To study the anatnmical etiology of the cracked molars by measuring cuspal inclination of the cracked molars. Method: Measuring cuspal height, cuspal oblique ridge length and the distance between the cusp of cracked teeth group and control group by using CEREC3 CAD / CAM and calculating the inclination of the cusp, the mesial buccal-lingnal inclined angle and the distal buccal-lingual inclined angle. Result: Significant differences are found between cracked teeth group and control group in the mesial buccal-lingnal inclined angle and the distal buccal-lingnal inclined angle (P <0.05). Conclusion: It suggests that the factors of dental anatomy are closely related with the incidence of crocked teeth. The bigger the inclination and the smaller cuspal inclined angle, the greater possibility occurs cracked teeth.

  8. Genetic parameters for carcass traits and in vovo measured muscle and fat depth in Danish Texel and Shropshire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxa, Jan; Norberg, Elise; Berg, Peer;

    2007-01-01

    Genetic parameters for carcass traits and ultrasonic scanning measurements were estimated for Danish Texel and Shropshire, the most common sheep breeds in Denmark. Data used in this study were collected from 1990 to 2005 by the Danish Agricultural Advisory Service. A multivariate animal model...

  9. Optical depth distribution of optically thin clouds and surface elevation variability derived from CALIPSO lidar measurements (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoyan; Lin, Bing; Obland, Michael D.; Campbell, Joel

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the major greenhouse gases in the Earth's climate system. The CO2 concentration in the atmosphere has been significantly increased over the last 150 years, due mainly to anthropogenic activities. Comprehensive measurements of global atmospheric CO2 distributions are urgently needed to develop a more complete understanding of CO2 sources and sinks. Because of the importance of the atmospheric CO2 measurements, satellite missions with passive sensors such as GOSAT and OCO-2 have been launched, and those with active sensors like Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) using an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar are being studied. The required accuracy and precision for the column-integrated CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2) is high, within 1.0 ppm or approximately 0.26%, which calls for unbiased CO2 measurements and accurate determinations of the path length. The presence of clouds and aerosols can make the measurement complicated, especially for passive instruments. The heterogeneity generated by the surface elevation changes within the field of view of the sensors and the grid boxes of averaged values of atmospheric CO2 would also cause significant uncertainties in XCO2 estimates if the path length is not accurately known. Thus, it is required to study the cloud and aerosol distributions as well as the surface elevation variability in assessing the performance of the CO2 measurements from both active and passive instruments. The CALIPSO lidar has acquired nearly 10 years of global measurement data. It provides a great opportunity to study the global distribution of clouds and aerosols as well as the statistics of the surface elevation variations. In this study we have analyzed multiple years of the CALIPSO Level 2 data to derive the global occurrence of aerosols and optically thin clouds. The results show that clear sky does not occur as frequently as expected. The global average

  10. Fatigue crack growth rate test using a frequency sweep method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun ZHOU; Xiao-li YU

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation characteristics of a diesel engine crankshaft are studied by measuring the fatigue crack growth rate using a frequency sweep method on a resonant fatigue test rig. Based on the phenomenon that the system frequency will change when the crack becomes large, this method can be directly applied to a complex component or structure. Finite element analyses (FEAs) are performed to calibrate the relation between the frequency change and the crack size, and to obtain the natural frequency of the test rig and the stress intensity factor (SIF) of growing cracks. The crack growth rate i.e. da/dN-AK of each crack size is obtained by combining the testing-time monitored data and FEA results. The results show that the crack growth rate of engine crankshaft, which is a component with complex geometry and special surface treatment, is quite different from that of a pure material. There is an apparent turning point in the Paris's crack partition. The cause of the fatigue crack growth is also dis-cussed.

  11. Measurement of dust optical depth using the solar irradiance sensor (SIS) onboard the ExoMars 2016 EDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, D.; Arruego, I.; Apéstigue, V.; Jiménez, J. J.; Gómez, L.; Yela, M.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.

    2017-04-01

    The solar irradiance sensor (SIS) was included in the DREAMS package onboard the ExoMars 2016 Entry Descent and Landing Demonstrator Module, and has been selected in the METEO meteorological station onboard the ExoMars 2020 Lander. This instrument is designed to measure at different time intervals the scattered flux or the sum of direct flux and scattered flux in UVA (315-400 nm) and NIR (700-1100 nm) bands. For SIS'16, these measurements are performed by a total of 3 sensors per band placed at the faces of a truncated tetrahedron with face inclination angles of 60°. The principal goal of SIS'16 design is to perform measurements of the dust opacity in UVA and NIR wavelengths ranges, crucial parameters in the understanding of the Martian dust cycle. The retrieval procedure is based on the use of radiative transfer simulations to reproduce SIS observations acquired during daytime as a function of dust opacity. Based on different sensitivity analysis, the retrieval procedure also requires to include as free parameters (1) the dust effective radius; (2) the dust effective variance; and (3) the imaginary part of the refractive index of dust particles in UVA band. We found that the imaginary part of the refractive index of dust particles does not have a big impact on NIR signal, and hence we can kept constant this parameter in the retrieval of dust opacity at this channel. In addition to dust opacity measurements, this instrument is also capable to detect and characterize clouds by looking at the time variation of the color index (CI), defined as the ratio between the observations in NIR and UVA channels, during daytime or twilight. By simulating CI signals with a radiative transfer model, the cloud opacity and cloud altitude (only during twilight) can be retrieved. Here the different retrieval procedures that are used to analyze SIS measurements, as well as the results obtained in different sensitivity analysis, are presented and discussed.

  12. Computational models for the determination of depth-dependent mechanical properties of skin with a soft, flexible measurement device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianghong; Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Ma, Yinji; Feng, Xue; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2016-10-01

    Conformal modulus sensors (CMS) incorporate PZT nanoribbons as mechanical actuators and sensors to achieve reversible conformal contact with the human skin for non-invasive, in vivo measurements of skin modulus. An analytic model presented in this paper yields expressions that connect the sensor output voltage to the Young moduli of the epidermis and dermis, the thickness of the epidermis, as well as the material and geometrical parameters of the CMS device itself and its encapsulation layer. Results from the model agree well with in vitro experiments on bilayer structures of poly(dimethylsiloxane). These results provide a means to determine the skin moduli (epidermis and dermis) and the thickness of the epidermis from in vivo measurements of human skin.

  13. Dynamic initiation and propagation of cracks in unidirectional composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Demirkan

    Dynamic crack growth along weak planes is a significant mode of failure in composites and other layered/sandwiched structures and is also the principal mechanism of shallow crustal earthquakes. In order to shed light on this phenomenon dynamic crack initiation and propagation characteristics of a model fiber-reinforced unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate was investigated experimentally. Dynamic fracture experiments were conducted by subjecting the composite plates to in-plane, symmetric and asymmetric, impact loading. The lateral shearing interferometric technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) in conjunction with high-speed photography was used to visualize the failure process in real time. It was found that mode-I cracks propagated subsonically with crack speeds increasing to the neighborhood of the Rayleigh wave speed of the composite. Also in mode-I, the dependence of the dynamic initiation fracture toughness on the loading rate was determined and was found to be constant for low loading rates and to increase rapidly above K˙dI>10 5 . The dynamic crack propagation toughness, KID, was observed to decrease with crack tip speed up to the Rayleigh wave speed of the composite. For asymmetric, mode-II, types of loading the results revealed highly unstable and intersonic shear-dominated crack growth along the fibers. These cracks propagated with unprecedented speeds reaching 7400 m/s which is the dilatational wave speed of the composite along the fibers. For intersonic crack growth, the interferograms, featured a shock wave structure typical of disturbances traveling with speeds higher than one of the characteristic wave speeds in the solid. In addition high speed thermographic measurements are conducted that show concentrated hot spots behind the crack tip indicating non-uniform crack face frictional contact. In addition, shear dominated dynamic crack growth is investigated along composite/Homalite interfaces subjected to impact loading. The crack

  14. Prototype pre-clinical PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurements using single-layer crystal array and single-ended readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Kyeong Yun; Ko, Guen Bae; Lee, Jae Sung

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we developed a proof-of-concept prototype PET system using a pair of depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET detectors based on the proposed DOI-encoding method and digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). Our novel cost-effective DOI measurement method is based on a triangular-shaped reflector that requires only a single-layer pixelated crystal and single-ended signal readout. The DOI detector consisted of an 18  ×  18 array of unpolished LYSO crystal (1.47  ×  1.47  ×  15 mm3) wrapped with triangular-shaped reflectors. The DOI information was encoded by depth-dependent light distribution tailored by the reflector geometry and DOI correction was performed using four-step depth calibration data and maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation. The detector pair and the object were placed on two motorized rotation stages to demonstrate 12-block ring PET geometry with 11.15 cm diameter. Spatial resolution was measured and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to investigate imaging performance. All images were reconstructed with and without the DOI correction to examine the impact of our DOI measurement. The pair of dSiPM-based DOI PET detectors showed good physical performances respectively: 2.82 and 3.09 peak-to-valley ratios, 14.30% and 18.95% energy resolution, and 4.28 and 4.24 mm DOI resolution averaged over all crystals and all depths. A sub-millimeter spatial resolution was achieved at the center of the field of view (FOV). After applying ML-based DOI correction, maximum 36.92% improvement was achieved in the radial spatial resolution and a uniform resolution was observed within 5 cm of transverse PET FOV. We successfully acquired phantom and animal images with improved spatial resolution and contrast by using the DOI measurement. The proposed DOI-encoding method was successfully demonstrated in the system level and exhibited good performance, showing its feasibility for animal PET applications with high spatial

  15. Validating MODIS above-cloud aerosol optical depth retrieved from "color ratio" algorithm using direct measurements made by NASA's airborne AATS and 4STAR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal Rosenheimer, Michal; Spurr, Rob

    2016-10-01

    We present the validation analysis of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) retrieved from the "color ratio" method applied to MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance measurements using the limited direct measurements made by NASA's airborne Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) sensors. A thorough search of the airborne database collection revealed a total of five significant events in which an airborne sun photometer, coincident with the MODIS overpass, observed partially absorbing aerosols emitted from agricultural biomass burning, dust, and wildfires over a low-level cloud deck during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS 2013 campaigns, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne matchups revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square difference < 0.1), with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties associated the MODIS retrievals (about -10 to +50 %). The co-retrieved cloud optical depth was comparable to that of the MODIS operational cloud product for ACE-ASIA and SEAC4RS, however, higher by 30-50 % for the SAFARI-2000 case study. The reason for this discrepancy could be attributed to the distinct aerosol optical properties encountered during respective campaigns. A brief discussion on the sources of uncertainty in the satellite-based ACAOD retrieval and co-location procedure is presented. Field experiments dedicated to making direct measurements of aerosols above cloud are needed for the extensive validation of satellite-based retrievals.

  16. Validating MODIS Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieved from Color Ratio Algorithm Using Direct Measurements Made by NASA's Airborne AATS and 4STAR Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Spurr, Rob

    2016-01-01

    We present the validation analysis of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) retrieved from the color ratio method applied to MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance measurements using the limited direct measurements made by NASAs airborne Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) sensors. A thorough search of the airborne database collection revealed a total of five significant events in which an airborne sun photometer, coincident with the MODIS overpass, observed partially absorbing aerosols emitted from agricultural biomass burning, dust, and wildfires over a low-level cloud deck during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS 2013 campaigns, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne match ups revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square difference less than 0.1), with most match ups falling within the estimated uncertainties associated with the MODIS retrievals (about -10 to +50 ). The co-retrieved cloud optical depth was comparable to that of the MODIS operational cloud product for ACE-ASIA and SEAC4RS, however, higher by 30-50% for the SAFARI-2000 case study. The reason for this discrepancy could be attributed to the distinct aerosol optical properties encountered during respective campaigns. A brief discussion on the sources of uncertainty in the satellite-based ACAOD retrieval and co-location procedure is presented. Field experiments dedicated to making direct measurements of aerosols above cloud are needed for the extensive validation of satellite based retrievals.

  17. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth resolved from geoelectromagnetic pedotransfer function and depth of investigation resolved from geoelectrical measurements: A case study of coastal formation, southern Nigeria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N J George; D N Obiora; A M Ekanem; A E Akpan

    2016-10-01

    The task involved in the interpretation of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) data is how to get unique results in the absence/limited number of borehole information, which is usually limited to information on the spot. Geological and geochemical mapping of electrical properties are usually limited to direct observations on the surface and therefore, conclusions and extrapolations that can be drawn about thesystem electrical characteristics and possible underlying structures may be masked as geology changes with positions. The electrical resistivity study pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been linked with the electromagnetic (EM) resolved PTFs at chosen frequencies of skin/penetration depth corresponding to the VES resolved investigation depth in order to determine the local geological attributes of hydrogeological repository in the coastal formation dominated with fine sand. The illustrative application of effective skin depth depicts that effective skin depth has direct relation with the EM response of the local source over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aidfor estimating the optimum depth and electrical parameters through comparative analysis. Though the VES and EM resolved depths of investigation at appropriate effective and theoretical frequencies have wide gaps, diagnostic relations characterising the subsurface depth of interest have been established. Thedetermining factors of skin effect have been found to include frequency/period, resistivity/conductivity, absorption/attenuation coefficient and energy loss factor. The novel diagnostic relations and their corresponding constants between 1-D resistivity data and EM skin depth are robust PTFs necessary for checking the accuracy associated with the non-unique interpretations that characterise the 1-D resistivitydata, mostly when lithostratigraphic data are not available.

  18. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth resolved from geoelectromagnetic pedotransfer function and depth of investigation resolved from geoelectrical measurements: A case study of coastal formation, southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, N. J.; Obiora, D. N.; Ekanem, A. M.; Akpan, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    The task involved in the interpretation of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) data is how to get unique results in the absence/limited number of borehole information, which is usually limited to information on the spot. Geological and geochemical mapping of electrical properties are usually limited to direct observations on the surface and therefore, conclusions and extrapolations that can be drawn about the system electrical characteristics and possible underlying structures may be masked as geology changes with positions. The electrical resistivity study pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been linked with the electromagnetic (EM) resolved PTFs at chosen frequencies of skin/penetration depth corresponding to the VES resolved investigation depth in order to determine the local geological attributes of hydrogeological repository in the coastal formation dominated with fine sand. The illustrative application of effective skin depth depicts that effective skin depth has direct relation with the EM response of the local source over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aid for estimating the optimum depth and electrical parameters through comparative analysis. Though the VES and EM resolved depths of investigation at appropriate effective and theoretical frequencies have wide gaps, diagnostic relations characterising the subsurface depth of interest have been established. The determining factors of skin effect have been found to include frequency/period, resistivity/conductivity, absorption/attenuation coefficient and energy loss factor. The novel diagnostic relations and their corresponding constants between 1-D resistivity data and EM skin depth are robust PTFs necessary for checking the accuracy associated with the non-unique interpretations that characterise the 1-D resistivity data, mostly when lithostratigraphic data are not available.

  19. Cracks in Fired Perforated Brick Walls Caused by Temperature Change and Some Counter-measures%烧结多孔砖墙体温度裂缝分析和预防措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆杰

    2013-01-01

    烧结多孔砖作为烧结普通砖的替代材料,因其具有性能稳定、耐久性好、容重轻、施工方便、施工效率高及保温节能等特点,并可节约土地资源,得到广泛推选使用。采用烧结多孔砖砌筑的墙体裂缝的产生与烧结普通砖有许多相似。因砌体结构房屋钢筋混凝土屋盖和烧结多孔砖墙体的线膨胀系数和刚度不同,当温度变化时,二者就会产生相对位移和内力,从而引起墙体裂缝。裂缝的产生与温度、水平阻力系数及墙体截面尺寸有关。通过对温度裂缝产生原因进行定性、定量分析,提出从设计构造、规范施工及砌体强度等方面来控制温度裂缝。%Fired perforated brick is used as a substitute for bearing wall instead of fired common bricks.It has good performance in stability,durability,low volume-weight,and thermal insu-lation,and it is convenient,highly efficient and energy-saving for construction.It also saves land resources,which is widely chosen and used.The cracks on fired perforated brick walls have a lot in common with those on fired common brick walls.Because of the differences of lin-ear expansion coefficient and stiffness between reinforced concrete roof and fired perforated brick walls,when the temperature changes,both of them bring the relative displacement and internal force, thus the crack appears on the wall.Temperature, horizontal resistance coefficient and the section size of the wall body are relevant to the crack.Based on quantitative and qualitative analysis of crack caused by temperature change,the paper provides several counter-measures against crack with regard to design conformation, standardizing construction,and the strength of masonry.

  20. 纯钛挤压管坯内孔铜包套破裂成因分析及预防措施%Factors Analysis and Preventive Measures of Pure Titanium Tube Blank Internal Copper Canning Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢翀博; 王成长; 朱梅生; 马建明; 陈贵曾; 晁鸿涛

    2012-01-01

    The cracking of internal copper canning during pure titanium tube blank extruding was studied. The second phase on the cracked copper canning surface was analyzed by metallography, energy spectrum and XRD. The cause of second phase formation and its effect on the copper canning cracking was also analyzed. The results show that the compounds on the copper canning surface which contact to the internal surface of pure titanium extruded tube blank are Cu3Ti. The friction and distortion heat increase significantly when extrusion ratio increases, leading to the failure of oil-base lubricant, the titanium reacts with copper to yield Cu3Ti within 10s due to the elevated temperature(>850℃ ) , leading to the cracking of internal copper canning. Following the test results, the preventive measures to avoiding the internal canning cracking and internal pits were put forward.%针对纯钛挤压管坯内孔铜包套破裂现象,通过金相、能谱及XRD分析对破裂铜包套表面的第二相进行了成分、物相和成因分析.结果表明:铜包套和纯钛锭坯相接触表面的第二相是Cu3 Ti;包套破裂的主要原因是挤压比增大(从14.2提高到22.9)引起摩擦热和变形热增大,原半流体油基润滑剂的润滑效果不良,导致铜包套和纯钛管坯局部温度升高(>850℃),并在短时间内(<10s)发生Ti-Cu反应,导致铜包套撕裂脱落.通过实验确定了预防铜包套破裂的关键措施.

  1. The Relationship Between Crack-Tip Strain and Subcritical Cracking Thresholds for Steels in High-Pressure Hydrogen Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibur, Kevin A.; Somerday, Brian P.; Marchi, Chris San; Foulk, James W.; Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Sofronis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. Thresholds for crack extension under rising displacement, K THi, for crack extension under constant displacement, K_{{THi}}^{*} , and for crack arrest under constant displacement K THa, were identified. These values were not found to be equivalent, i.e. K THi assisted fracture mechanism was determined to be strain controlled for all of the alloys in this study, and the micromechanics of strain controlled fracture are used to explain the observed disparities between the different threshold measurements. K THa and K THi differ because the strain singularity of a stationary crack is stronger than that of a propagating crack; K THa must be larger than K THi to achieve equivalent crack tip strain at the same distance from the crack tip. Hydrogen interacts with deformation mechanisms, enhancing strain localization and consequently altering both the nucleation and growth stages of strain controlled fracture mechanisms. The timing of load application and hydrogen exposure, i.e., sequential for constant displacement tests and concurrent for rising displacement tests, leads to differences in the strain history relative to the environmental exposure history and promotes the disparity between K_{{THi}}^{*} and K THi. K THi is the only conservative measurement of fracture threshold among the methods presented here.

  2. Stress analysis and stress-intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses, and the stress-intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress-intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center-cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress-intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids

  3. Stress analysis and stress intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids.

  4. Radio measurements of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air showers by Tunka-Rex

    CERN Document Server

    Bezyazeekov, P A; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Lubsandorzhiev, N; Mirgazov, R R; Monkhoev, R; Pakhorukov, A; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Schröder, F G

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the energy and the position of the shower maximum of air showers with energies $E \\gtrsim 100\\,$PeV using radio measurements performed with Tunka-Rex. A comparison to air-Cherenkov measurements of the same air showers with the Tunka-133 photomultiplier array confirms that the radio reconstruction works reliably. Splitting our data set into two seasons, we had blinded the Tunka-133 reconstruction for the second season, which we used as later, independent cross-check of the methods developed for the first season. This gives additional confidence in the radio reconstruction. An event-to-event comparison of Tunka-Rex and Tunka-133 shows that both experiments yield consistent values for energy and $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$. The energy precision of Tunka-Rex is comparable to the Tunka-133 precision of $15\\,\\%$, and comes with a $20\\,\\%$ uncertainty on the absolute scale dominated by the amplitude calibration of the antennas. For $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$, this is the first direct experimental correlation of radi...

  5. XO-2b: a hot Jupiter with a variable host star that potentially affects its measured transit depth

    CERN Document Server

    Zellem, Robert T; Pearson, Kyle A; Turner, Jake D; Henry, Gregory W; Williamson, Michael W; Fitzpatrick, M Ryleigh; Teske, Johanna K; Biddle, Lauren I

    2015-01-01

    The transiting hot Jupiter XO-2b is an ideal target for multi-object photometry and spectroscopy as it has a relatively bright ($V$-mag = 11.25) K0V host star (XO-2N) and a large planet-to-star contrast ratio (R$_{p}$/R$_{s}\\approx0.015$). It also has a nearby (31.21") binary stellar companion (XO-2S) of nearly the same brightness ($V$-mag = 11.20) and spectral type (G9V), allowing for the characterization and removal of shared systematic errors (e.g., airmass brightness variations). We have therefore conducted a multiyear (2012--2015) study of XO-2b with the University of Arizona's 61" (1.55~m) Kuiper Telescope and Mont4k CCD in the Bessel U and Harris B photometric passbands to measure its Rayleigh scattering slope to place upper limits on the pressure-dependent radius at, e.g., 10~bar. Such measurements are needed to constrain its derived molecular abundances from primary transit observations. We have also been monitoring XO-2N since the 2013--2014 winter season with Tennessee State University's Celestron-...