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Sample records for crack arrest tests

  1. A crack arrest test using a toughness gradient steel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, H.; Yagawa, G.; Urabe, Y.; Satoh, M.; Sano, J.

    1995-01-01

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) is a phenomenon that can occur in the reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with internal pressure and is one of the most severe stress conditions that can be applied to the vessel. Preliminary research has shown that no PTS concern is likely to exist on Japanese RPVs during their design service lives. However, public acceptance of vessel integrity requires analyses and experiment in order to establish an analytical method and a database for life extension of Japanese RPVs. The Japanese PTS integrity study was carried out from FY 1983 to FY 1991 as a national project by Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) under contract with Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) in cooperation with LWR utilities and vendors. Here, a crack arrest test was carried out using a toughness gradient steel plate with three layers to study the concept of crack arrest toughness. Four-point bending load with thermal shock was applied to the large flat plate specimen with a surface crack. Five crack initiations and arrests were observed during the test and the propagated crack bifurcated. Finally, cracks were arrested at the boundary of the first and the second layer, except for a small segment of the crack. The first crack initiation took place slightly higher than the lower bound of K Ic data obtained by ITCT specimens. That is, the K IC concept for brittle crack initiation was verified for heavy section steel plates. The first crack arrest took place within the scatter band of K Ia and K Id data for the first layer. That is, the K Ia concept appears applicable for crack arrest of a short crack jump

  2. Crack arrest toughness of structural steels evaluated by compact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Michihiro

    1982-01-01

    Crack arrest tests such as compact, ESSO and DCB tests were made on SA533B Cl. 1, HT80 and KD32 steels to evaluate the crack arrest toughness. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) The crack arrest toughness could be evaluated by K sub(Ia) which was obtained by the static analysis of compact test. (2) K sub(ID) determined by the dynamic analysis of compact test was greater than K sub(Ia), though K sub(ID) became close to K sub(Ia)/K sub(Q) became a unity where K sub(Q) is the stress intensity factor at the crack initiation. (3) No significant difference was observed between K sub(Ia) and K sub(ca) obtained by ESSO and DCB tests, though K sub(ca) obtained by DCB test tended to be smaller than K sub(Ia) at lower temperatures. (4) K sub(Ia) was smaller than K sub(Ic) in the transition temperature range, while it was greater than K sub(Id). In the temperature range where K sub(Ic), which was determined from J sub(Ic), decreased with temperature increase, however, it was smaller than K sub(Ia). (5) The fracture appearance transition temperature and the absorbed energy obtained by 2 mm V-notch Charpy test were appropriate parameters for representing the crack arrest toughness, while the NDT temperature was not. (author)

  3. Use of forces from instrumented Charpy V-notch testing to determine crack-arrest toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.; Hutton, J.T.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is an estimation of the crack-arrest toughness, particularly of irradiated materials, from voltage versus time output of an instrumented setup during a test on a Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimen. This voltage versus time trace (which can be converted to force versus displacement) displays events during fracture of the specimen. Various stages of the fracture process can be identified on the trace, including an arrest point indicating arrest of brittle fracture. The force at arrest, F a , versus test temperature, T, relationship is examined to explore possible relationships to other experimental measures of crack-arrest toughness such as the drop-weight nil-ductility temperature (NDT), or crack-arrest toughness, K a . For a wide range of weld and plate materials, the temperature at which F a = 2.45 kN correlates with NDT with a standard deviation, sigma, of about 11 K. Excluding the so-called low upper-shelf energy (USE) welds from the analysis resulted in F a = 4.12 kN and σ = 6.6 K. The estimates of the correlation of the temperature for F a = 7.4 kN with the temperature at 100-MPa√m level for a mean American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) type K Ia curve through crack-arrest toughness values show that prediction of conservative values of K a are possible

  4. Dynamic photoelastic investigation of crack arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, G.R.; Dally, J.W.; Kobayashi, T.; Fourney, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Crack arrest and crack arrest toughness are of great interest, particularly for studies pertaining to safety of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Investigations are needed in which the instantaneous values of stress intensity factor (K) can be observed during crack propagation and arrest. Such observations are possible if the test specimens are made from plates of a transparent photoelastic sensitive material. Values of K as a function of crack speed are shown for Homalite 100 and various epoxy blends. 9 figures

  5. Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degrees C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. open-quotes Mean close-quote curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K la curve were fit to the data with only the open-quotes reference temperatureclose quotes as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined

  6. European experiences of the proposed ASTM test method for crack arrest toughness of ferritic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutla, T.; Lidbury, D.P.G.; Ziebs, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    1986-01-01

    The proposed ASTM test method for measuring the crack arrest toughness of ferritic materials using wedge-loaded, side-grooved, compact specimens was applied to three steels: A514 bridge steel, A588 bridge steel, and A533B pressure vessel steel. Five sets of results from different laboratories are discussed here. Notches were prepared by spark erosion, although root radii varied from ∝0.1-1.5 mm. Although fast fractures were successfully initiated, arrest did not occur in a significant number of cases. The results showed no obvious dependence of crack arrest toughness, K a , (determined by a static analysis) on crack initiation toughness, K 0 . It was found that K a decreases markedly with increasing crack jump distance. A limited amount of further work on smaller specimens of the A533B steel showed that lower K a values tended to be recorded. It is concluded that a number of points relating to the proposed test method and notch preparation are worthy of further consideration. It is pointed out that the proposed validity criteria may screen out lower bound data. Nevertheless, for present practical purposes, K a values may be regarded as useful in providing an estimate of arrest toughness - although not necessarily a conservative estimate. (orig./HP)

  7. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity insurance by crack arrestability evaluation using load from CVN tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-01-01

    The present work is undertaken in the framework of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance and aims at revisiting the crack arrest approach to structural integrity insurance. This approach, performed under normal plant operation conditions, can also offer an attractive alternative to the crack initiation philosophy promoted for accidental analysis. To this end, an accidental conservative, cost effective and robust methodology is forwarded and demonstrated: it makes use of the crack arrest information contained in the instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test and/or in the shear fracture appearance of broken samples. Particular attention is paid to the appraisal of uncertainties and the related safety margin. The resulting capability is placed in perspective with the state-of-the-art crack initiation methodology based on the slow bend testing of recracked specimens, presently under standardization world-wide. The investigation leads to highlight three conceptual weaknesses of current enfgineering and regulatory practices. Improved crack arrestability evaluation emerges as an optimal approach to insure safe PWR operation up to design end-of-life and beyond

  8. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity insurance by crack arrestability evaluation using load from CVN tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-10-15

    The present work is undertaken in the framework of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance and aims at revisiting the crack arrest approach to structural integrity insurance. This approach, performed under normal plant operation conditions, can also offer an attractive alternative to the crack initiation philosophy promoted for accidental analysis. To this end, an accidental conservative, cost effective and robust methodology is forwarded and demonstrated: it makes use of the crack arrest information contained in the instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test and/or in the shear fracture appearance of broken samples. Particular attention is paid to the appraisal of uncertainties and the related safety margin. The resulting capability is placed in perspective with the state-of-the-art crack initiation methodology based on the slow bend testing of recracked specimens, presently under standardization world-wide. The investigation leads to highlight three conceptual weaknesses of current enfgineering and regulatory practices. Improved crack arrestability evaluation emerges as an optimal approach to insure safe PWR operation up to design end-of-life and beyond.

  9. Results of crack-arrest tests on irradiated a 508 class 3 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Milella, P.P.; Pini, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Ten crack-arrest toughness values for irradiated specimens of A 508 class 3 forging steel have been obtained. The tests were performed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Method for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K la of Ferritic Steels, E 1221-88. None of these values are strictly valid in all five ASTM E 1221-88 validity criteria. However, they are useful when compared to unirradiated crack-arrest specimen toughness values since they show the small (averaging approximately 10 degrees C) shifts in the mean and lower-bound crack-arrest toughness curves. This confirms that a low copper content in ASTM A 508 class 3 forging material can be expected to result in small shifts of the transition toughness curve. The shifts due to neutron irradiation of the lower bound and mean toughness curves are approximately the same as the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J temperature shift. The nine crack-arrest specimens were irradiated at temperatures varying from 243 to 280 degrees C, and to a fluence varying from 1.7 to 2.7 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (> 1 MeV). The test results were normalized to reference values that correspond to those of CVN specimens irradiated at 284 degrees C to a fluence of 3.2 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (> 1 MeV) in the same capsule as the crack-arrest specimens. This adjustment resulted in a shift to lower temperatures of all the data, and in particular moved two data points that appeared to lie close to or lower than the American Society of Mechanical Engineers K la curve to positions that seemed more reasonable with respect to the remaining data. A special fixture was designed, fabricated, and successfully used in the testing. For reasons explained in the text, special blocks to receive the Oak Ridge National Laboratory clip gage were designed, and greater-than-standard crack-mouth opening displacements measured were accounted for. 24 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs

  10. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K Ia curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs

  11. Summary of HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests and analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney-Walker, J.; Fields, R.J.; DeWit, R.; Low, S.R. III

    1988-01-01

    Eleven wide-plate crack-arrest tests have been completed to date, seven utilizing specimens fabricated from A533B class 1 material (WP-1 series), and four fabricated from a low upper-shelf base material (WP-2 series). With the exception of one test in the WP-1 series and two tests in the WP-2 series which utilized 152-mm-thick specimens, each test utilized a single-edge notched (SEN) plate specimen 1 by 1 by 0.1 m that was subjected to a linear thermal gradient along the plane of crack propagation. Test results exhibit an increase in crack-arrest toughness with temperature, with the rate of increase becoming greater as the temperature increases. When the wide-place test results are combined with other large-specimen results (Japanese ESSO, thermal-shock experiments and pressurized-thermal-shock experiments) the data show a consistent trend in which the K Ia data extends above the limit provided in ASME Section XI. (author)

  12. Viscoplastic-dynamic analyses of small-scale fracture tests to obtain crack arrest toughness values for PTS conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanninen, M.F.; Hudak, S.J. Jr; Dexter, R.J.; Couque, H.; O'Donoghue, P.E.; Polch, E.Z.

    1988-01-01

    Reliable predictions of crack arrest at the high upper shelf toughness conditions involved in postulated pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events require procedures beyond those utilized in conventional fracture mechanics treatments. To develop such a procedure, viscoplastic-dynamic fracture mechanics finite element analyses, viscoplastic material characterization testing, and small-scale crack propagation and arrest experimentation are being combines in this research. The approach couples SwRI's viscoplastic-dynamic fracture mechanics finite element code VISCRK with experiments using duplex 4340/A533B steel compact specimens. The experiments are simulated by VISCRK computations employing the Bodner-Partom viscoplastic constitutive relation and the nonlinear fracture mechanics parameter T. The goal is to develop temperature-dependent crack arrest toughness values for A533B steel. While only room temperature K Ia values have been obtained so far, these have been found to agree closely with those obtained from wide plate tests. (author)

  13. Comparison of crack arrest methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The ASTM Cooperative Test Program Data were used to compare the static (K/sub Ia/) and dynamic (K/sud ID/, K/sub IDm/) approaches to crack arrest. K/sub Ia/ is not dependent on K/sub Q/. This is consistent with the requirements of the static approach, but not the dynamic one which requires that K/sub Ia/ decrease with K/sub Q/ if K/sub ID/ (= K/sub IDm/) is a constant. K/sub ID/ increases systematically with K/sub Q/ at a rate that is consistent with calculations based on the use of a constant value for K/sub Ia/ which is equal to its measured mean value. Only in the limiting case of very short crack jumps (associated with very low average crack speeds) can K/sub ID/ be identified as a minimum value at which K/sub ID/ = K/sub IDm/. In this case K/sub IDm/ approx. K/sub Ia/ approx. K/sub Im/. The latter is the idealized minimum value of K that will support the continued propagation of a running crack

  14. Crack arrest concepts for failure prevention and life extension. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    These proceedings contain the thirteen papers presented at a seminar on crack arrest concepts for failure prevention and life extension. They provide a picture of the current position of crack arrest testing, models and applications, discussion of the relevance of recent research to industrial problems, and an assessment of whether the application of crack arrest models provides additional safety. Separate abstracts have been prepared for seven papers of relevance to the nuclear industry and, in particular, reactor pressure vessels. (UK)

  15. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect o...

  16. Crack-arrest behavior in SEN wide plates of low-upper-shelf base metal tested under nonisothermal conditions: WP-2 series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Keeney-Walker, J.; Bass, B.R.; Robinson, G.C. Jr.; Iskander, S.K.; Alexander, D.J.; Fields, R.J.; deWit, R.; Low, S.R.; Schwartz, C.W.

    1990-08-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting analytical and experimental studies aimed at understanding the circumstances that would initiate the growth of an existing crack in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the conditions leading to arrest of a propagating crack. Objectives of these studies are to determine (1) if the material will exhibit crack-arrest behavior when the driving force on a crack exceeds the ASME limit, (2) the relationship between K Ia and temperature, and (3) the interaction of fracture modes (arrest, stable crack growth, unstable crack growth, and tensile instability) when arrest occurs at high temperatures. In meeting these objectives, crack-arrest data are being developed over an expanded temperature range through tests involving large thermally shocked cylinders, pressurized thermally shocked vessels, and wide-plate specimens. The wide-plate specimens provide the opportunity for a significant number of data points to be obtained at relatively affordable costs. These tests are designed to provide fracture-toughness measurements approaching or above the onset of the Charpy upper-shelf regime in a rising toughness region and with an increasing driving force. This document discusses test methodology and results. 23 refs., 92 figs., 25 tabs

  17. Experimental investigation of interfacial crack arrest in sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading using a novel crack arresting device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J.H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A recently proposed face-sheet–core interface crack arresting device is implemented in sandwich beams and tested using the Sandwich Tear Test configuration. Fatigue loading conditions are applied to propagate the crack and determine the effect of the crack stopper on the fatigue growth rate and a...

  18. Determination of crack arrest toughness in A508 CL.3 forging steel from ASTM E1221-88 procedure. Comparison with the values obtained from thermal loading tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frund, J.M.; Difant, M.; Bethmont, M.

    1994-01-01

    A crack arrest study is under way at Electricite de France as part of the analysis of the risk of fast fracture of PWR vessels in emergency conditions. The first objective of this study is to evaluate the toughness which characterizes crack arrest through tests on reduced-size specimens. Some of the tests on a forging steel (A508 Cl.3) were conducted in conformity with two experimental methods. One method recommended by the ASTM calls for the use of an imposed-displacement mechanical loading on specimens kept under homogeneous temperature. Since the stress intensity factor K applied to the outside loading decreases along the crack growth, we can observe the arrest of the crack. In order to obtain brittle crack initiations in cleavage in the whole studied range of temperature and crack propagation of a sufficient length, the application of a weld point at the top of the notch is done. The other experimental method is based on a thermal loading. It requires the use of a disk or a cylinder with a longitudinal initial crack of the external surface. We dip this specimen in liquid nitrogen and we heat its internal surface with inducing current. There is a temperature gradient in the thickness of the specimen which produces a stress field which tends to open the crack. When the value of K is reached the crack initiation takes place. Several phenomena act to oppose the crack growth, they even go as far as stopping it. First the value of K, after increasing, gets steady then decreases, then, the rate of energy dissipated by plasticity at the top of the crack increases because the crack meets warmer and warmer areas on its way. The arrest toughness values which were obtained were then analyzed and compared to one another and with values proposed by RCC-m code. (authors). 12 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Dynamic propagation and cleavage crack arrest in bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaj, M.

    2006-06-01

    In complement of the studies of harmfulness of defects, generally realized in term of initiation, the concept of crack arrest could be used as complementary analyses to the studies of safety. The stop occurs when the stress intensity factor becomes lower than crack arrest toughness (KIa) calculated in elasto-statics (KI ≤ KIa). The aim of this thesis is to understand and predict the stop of a crack propagating at high speed in a 18MND5 steel used in the pressure water reactor (PWR). The test chosen to study crack arrest is the disc thermal shock test. The observations under the scanning electron microscope of the fracture surface showed that the crack arrest always occurs in cleavage mode and that the critical microstructural entity with respect to the propagation and crack arrest corresponds to at least the size of the prior austenitic grain. The numerical analyses in elasto-statics confirm the conservatism of the codified curve of the RCC-M with respect to the values of KIa. The dynamic numerical analyses show that the deceleration of the crack measured at the end of the propagation is related to the global dynamic of the structure (vibrations). The transferability to components of crack arrest toughness obtained from tests analysed in static is thus not assured. The disc thermal shock tests were also modelled by considering a criterion of propagation and arrest of the type 'RKR' characterized by a critical stress sc which depends on the temperature. The results obtained account well for the crack jump measured in experiments as well as the shape of the crack arrest front. (author)

  20. Interfacial crack arrest in sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading using a novel crack arresting device – Numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J.H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A novel crack arresting device is implemented in foam-cored composite sandwich beams and tested using the Sandwich Tear Test (STT) configuration. A finite element model of the setup is developed, and the predictions are correlated with observations and results from a recently conducted experiment...... concept, as well as a design tool that can be used for the implementation of crack arresting devises in engineering applications of sandwich components and structures....

  1. Crack arrest toughness measurements with A533B steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, Seppo.

    1979-11-01

    This work covers crack arrest toughness measurements on A533B steel done at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. These measurements are one part of a multinational effort, involving 30 laboratories. The aim of the cooperative test program is to examine two test procedures for measuring the crack arrest toughness, to give information about their reproducibility, and to identify the factors affecting the interpretation. The principles given for the testing were easy to apply in general and the results were satisfactory. Some factors in the test runs and in the specimen's behaviour are indicated which can cause error in the results or make implementation of the test more difficult. By comparing the results from our laboratory with average values from the test program a good agreement can be seen. Crack arrest toughness values derived from the compared procedures with a static analysis agree closely, but values calculated using a dynamic analysis differ considerably. (author)

  2. An engineering interpretation of pop-in arrest and tearing arrest in terms of static crack arrest, Ksub(Ia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    When fracture toughness specimens are tested under displacement controlled conditions, they are often observed to exhibit unstable cleavage fracture followed by arrest of the cleavage mode wherein a significant load remains on the specimen (pop-in arrest). This behavior carries over into the ductile tearing regime wherein tearing may occur rapidly identified by load reduction and then proceeds at a discernible less rate (tearing arrest). Both these behaviors represent an initiation condition followed by an arrest condition. In this paper it is demonstrated that from either of the arrest conditions an arrest value may be determined which, for available experimental data, is shown to be an engineering estimate for the static crack arrest toughness, Ksub(Ia). A data analysis procedure is outlined and Ksub(Ic) and Ksub(Ia) estimates from sixty-eight 1/2, 1 and 2 in. thick compact specimens from two steels (A533 Grade B Class 1 and AISI 1018) tested between -40 deg F and 200 deg F are summarized. The crack arrest estimates are seen to compare favorably with Ksub(Ia) results obtained by other investigators using 2 in. thick specimens. Also it is demonstrated that when failure is by fully ductile tearing, the crack arrest toughness is at least equal to the estimate for Ksub(Ic) for the specimen. (author)

  3. Fracture mechanical modeling of brittle crack propagation and arrest of steel. 3. Application to duplex-type test; Kozai no zeisei kiretsu denpa teisi no rikigaku model. 3. Konseigata shiken eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, S.; Tsuchida, Y. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Machida, S.; Yoshinari, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A proposal was made previously on a model of brittle crack propagation and arrest that considers the effect of crack opening suppression by using unbroken ligaments generated on steel plate surface and the effect that cracks precede in the central part of the plate thickness, based on a local limit stress theory for brittleness fracture. This paper discusses applicability of this model to a mixed type test, and elucidates causes for difference in the arrest tenacity of both types in a double tensile test of the standard size. The brittle crack propagation and arrest model based on the local limit stress theory was found applicable to a simulation of the mixed type test. Experimental crack propagation speed history and behavior of the arrest were reproduced nearly completely by using this model. When load stress is increased, the arrests in the mixed type test may be classified into arrests of both inside the steel plate and near the surface, cracks in the former position or arrest in the latter position, and rush of cracks into both positions. Furthermore, at higher stresses, the propagation speed drops once after cracks rushed into the test plate, but turns to a rise, leading to propagation and piercing. 8 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Fracture mechanical modeling of brittle crack propagation and arrest of steel. 3. Application to duplex-type test; Kozai no zeisei kiretsu denpa teisi no rikigaku model. 3. Konseigata shiken eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, S; Tsuchida, Y [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Machida, S; Yoshinari, H [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-12-31

    A proposal was made previously on a model of brittle crack propagation and arrest that considers the effect of crack opening suppression by using unbroken ligaments generated on steel plate surface and the effect that cracks precede in the central part of the plate thickness, based on a local limit stress theory for brittleness fracture. This paper discusses applicability of this model to a mixed type test, and elucidates causes for difference in the arrest tenacity of both types in a double tensile test of the standard size. The brittle crack propagation and arrest model based on the local limit stress theory was found applicable to a simulation of the mixed type test. Experimental crack propagation speed history and behavior of the arrest were reproduced nearly completely by using this model. When load stress is increased, the arrests in the mixed type test may be classified into arrests of both inside the steel plate and near the surface, cracks in the former position or arrest in the latter position, and rush of cracks into both positions. Furthermore, at higher stresses, the propagation speed drops once after cracks rushed into the test plate, but turns to a rise, leading to propagation and piercing. 8 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Crack propagation and arrest simulation of X90 gas pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fengping; Huo, Chunyong; Luo, Jinheng; Li, He; Li, Yang

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether X90 steel pipe has enough crack arrest toughness or not, a damage model was suggested as crack arrest criterion with material parameters of plastic uniform percentage elongation and damage strain energy per volume. Fracture characteristic length which characterizes fracture zone size was suggested to be the largest mesh size on expected cracking path. Plastic uniform percentage elongation, damage strain energy per volume and fracture characteristic length of X90 were obtained by five kinds of tensile tests. Based on this criterion, a length of 24 m, Φ1219 × 16.3 mm pipe segment model with 12 MPa internal gas pressure was built and computed with fluid-structure coupling method in ABAQUS. Ideal gas state equation was used to describe lean gas behavior. Euler grid was used to mesh gas zone inside the pipe while Lagrangian shell element was used to mesh pipe. Crack propagation speed and gas decompression speed were got after computation. The result shows that, when plastic uniform percentage elongation is equal to 0.054 and damage strain energy per volume is equal to 0.64 J/mm"3, crack propagation speed is less than gas decompression speed, which means the simulated X90 gas pipe with 12 MPa internal pressure can arrest cracking itself. - Highlights: • A damage model was suggested as crack arrest criterion. • Plastic uniform elongation and damage strain energy density are material parameters. • Fracture characteristic length is suggested to be largest mesh size in cracking path. • Crack propagating simulation with coupling of pipe and gas was realized in ABAQUS. • A Chinese X90 steel pipe with 12 MPa internal pressure can arrest cracking itself.

  6. HSST crack-arrest studies overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Whitman, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is given of the efforts underway in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program to better understand and model crack-arrest behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels. The efforts are both experimental and analytical. The experimental work provides K/sub Ia/ data from laboratory-sized specimens, from thick-wall cylinders which exhibit essentially-full restraint and from nonisothermal wide-plate specimens. These data serve to define toughness-temperature trends and to provide validation data under prototypical reactor conditions. The analytical efforts interpret and correlate the data, plus provide LEFM, elastodynamic and viscoplastic methods for analyzing crack run-arrest behavior in reactor vessels. The analysis methods are incorporated into finite element computer programs which are under development at three separate laboratories. 22 refs., 10 figs

  7. Comparison of analysis and experimental data for a unique crack arrest specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, D.J.; Fabi, R.J.; Schonenberg, R.Y.; Norris, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    A new fracture test specimen has been developed to study crack extension and arrest in nuclear reactor vessel steels subject to stress-intensity factor and toughness gradients similar to those in postulated pressurized thermal shock situations. A summary of the results of all the tests performed is presented to illustrate the range of crack arrest and crack reinitiation conditions observed. One test of this specimen with the corresponding stress analysis is described in detail. During this test the crack initiated, extended, arrested, reinitiated, extended again, and reached a final arrest. Comparison of detailed dynamic elastic-plastic finite-element analyses and dynamic strain and displacement measurements of the crack extension, arrest, and reinitiation events, combined with topographic analysis of the future surfaces, has led to a new understanding of the crack extension and arrest process. The results of the tests demonstrate crack arrest in rising stress-intensity field at near-upper-shelf temperature conditions and show that the toughness required for arrest is lower than would be predicted by the analysis procedures usually employed for pressurized thermal shock evaluations

  8. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Master curve based correlation between static initiation toughness KIC and crack arrest toughness KIa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.; Rintamaa, R.

    1999-01-01

    Historically the ASME reference curve concept assumes a constant relation between static fracture toughness initiation toughness and crack arrest toughness. In reality, this is not the case. Experimental results show that the difference between K IC and K Ia is material specific. For some materials there is a big difference while for others they nearly coincide. So far, however, no systematic study regarding a possible correlation between the two parameters has been performed. The recent Master curve method, developed for brittle fracture initiation estimation, has enabled a consistent analysis of fracture initiation toughness data. The Master curve method has been modified to be able to describe also crack arrest toughness. Here, this modified 'crack arrest master curve' is further validated and used to develop a simple, but yet (for safety assessment purpose) adequately accurate correlation between the two fracture toughness parameters. The correlation enables the estimation of crack arrest toughness from small Charpy-sized static fracture toughness tests. The correlation is valid for low Nickel steels ≤ (1.2% Ni). If a more accurate description of the crack arrest toughness is required, it can either be measured experimentally or estimated from instrumented Charpy-V crack arrest load information. (orig.)

  10. Critical experiments, measurements, and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.

    1977-01-01

    Substantial progress was made in three important areas: crack propagation and arrest theory, two-dimensional dynamic crack propagation analyses, and a laboratory test method for the material property data base. The major findings were as follows: Measurements of run-arrest events lent support to the dynamic, energy conservation theory of crack arrest. A two-dimensional, dynamic, finite-difference analysis, including inertia forces and thermal gradients, was developed. The analysis was successfully applied to run-arrest events in DCB (double-cantilever-beam) and SEN (single-edge notched) test pieces. A simplified procedure for measuring K/sub D/ and K/sub Im/ values with ordinary and duplex DCB specimens was demonstrated. The procedure employs a dynamic analysis of the crack length at arrest and requires no special instrumentation. The new method was applied to ''duplex'' specimens to measure the large K/sub D/ values displayed by A533B steel above the nil-ductility temperature. K/sub D/ crack velocity curves and K/sub Im/ values of two heats of A533B steel and the corresponding values for the plane strain fracture toughness associated with static initiation (K/sub Ic/), dynamic initiation (K/sub Id/), and the static stress intensity at crack arrest (K/sub Ia/) were measured. Possible relations among these toughness indices are identified. During the past year the principal investigators of the participating groups reached agreement on a crack arrest theory appropriate for the pressure vessel problem. 7 figures

  11. Full thickness crack arrest investigations on compact specimens and a heavy wide-plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Gillot, R.; Elenz, T.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of specimen size and testing procedure on the crack arrest toughness K Ia at various temperatures, investigations were carried out on a wide-plate and compact specimens using a highly brittle material. Test interpretation included static as well as dynamic methods. The comparison of the measured K Ia -values shows good agreement although there is a distinct difference in specimen size. In general, the (static) ASTM test method yields a lower and thus conservative estimate of the crack arrest toughness K Ia . 14 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Evaluation of the presence of constraint in crack run/arrest events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, C.W.; Bass, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    Crack arrest studies currently being conducted by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program are designed to improve our understanding of the conditions contributing to the arrest of a propagating fracture in a pressure vessel. These studies are generating data spanning a wide temperature range for a variety of experimental configurations. Dynamic crack arrest parameters are back-figured from these experiments through 'generation mode' dynamic viscoplastic finite element calculations driven by the measured crack tip history input. A major approximation in these analyses, which is dictated by the practical limitations of current supercomputer hardware, is the assumption of two-dimensional plane stress conditions. Although this approximation is reasonable over most of the problem domain for many test specimen geometries, it deteriorates at locations near the crack tip due to triaxial constraint effects. This paper describes plans for a fine-grained three-dimensional computational study to investigate the importance of these near-tip triaxial constraint effects on crack tip yielding and to develop appropriate algorithms for incorporating these effects into conventional two-dimensional plane stress approximations. (author)

  13. The relevance of crack arrest phenomena for pressure vessel structural integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connors, D.C.; Dowling, A.R.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    1996-01-01

    The potential role of a crack arrest argument for the structural integrity assessments of steel pressure vessels and the relationship between crack initiation and crack arrest philosophies are described. A typical structural integrity assessment using crack initiation fracture mechanics is illustrated by means of a case study based on assessment of the steel pressure vessels for Magnox power stations. Evidence of the occurrence of crack arrest in structures is presented and reviewed, and the applications to pressure vessels which are subjected to similar conditions are considered. An outline is given of the material characterisation that would be required to undertake a crack arrest integrity assessment. It is concluded that crack arrest arguments could be significant in the structural integrity assessment of PWR reactor pressure vessels under thermal shock conditions, whereas for Magnox steel pressure vessels it would be limited in its potential to supporting existing arguments. (author)

  14. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Said; Julan, Emricka; Tran, Xuan-Van; Robert, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  15. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  16. Crack arrest: some comments on microscopic and macroscopic aspects in relation to the assurance of structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidbury, D.P.G.; Druce, S.G.; Tomkins, B. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    Fracture prevention in high integrity structures in general, and steel nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) in particular, is based upon the avoidance of crack initiation, with due regard to real or postulated defects, material toughness and anticipated normal and off-normal loading conditions. However, avoidance of crack initiation can never be guaranteed in any absolute sense. Thus, in cases where there is the possibility of an initiated crack propagating by brittle, cleavage fracture, the crack arrest concept may be usefully applied to provide some additional assurance of structural integrity. Within this context, the mechanical processes operative during the initiation and arrest of cleavage cracks are briefly compared and contrasted. The empirical evidence for indexing and onset-of-upper-shelf temperature for initiation (OUST) and the crack arrest temperature (CAT) relative to the Pellini drop-weight nil-ductility transition temperature (NDTT) is examined, and estimates of the parameter (OUST-CAT) are made for a range of steels. In the light of this, correlations between small-scale tests and more structurally relevant, large-scale tests are examined in relation to both initiation- and arrest-based failure avoidance methodologies. (author).

  17. Effects of irradiation on crack-arrest toughness of two high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). A preliminary evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves, (for the range of test temperatures covered), compared to those of the ASME K Ia -curve did not seem to have been altered by irradiation. 10 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Criterion of cleavage crack propagation and arrest in a nuclear PWR vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet, Amaury

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this PhD thesis is to understand physical mechanisms of cleavage crack propagation and arrest in the 16MND5 PWR vessel steel and to propose a robust predicting model based on a brittle fracture experimental campaign of finely instrumented laboratory specimens associated with numerical computations. First, experiments were carried out on thin CT25 specimens at five temperatures (-150 C, -125 C, -100 C, -7 C, -50 C). Two kinds of crack path, straight or branching path, have been observed. To characterize crack propagation and to measure crack speed, a high-speed framing camera system was used, combined with the development of an experimental protocol which allowed to observe CT surface without icing inside the thermal chamber and on the specimen. The framing camera (520 000 fps) has allowed to have a very accurate estimation of crack speed on the complete ligament of CT (∼ 25 mm). Besides, to analyse experiments and to study the impact of viscosity on the mechanical response around the crack tip, the elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the ferritic steel has been studied up to a strain rate of 104 s -1 for the tested temperatures.The extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) was used in CAST3M FE software to model crack propagation. Numerical computations combine a local non linear dynamic approach with a RKR type fracture stress criterion to a characteristic distance. The work carried out has confirmed the form of the criterion proposed by Prabel at -125 C, and has identified the dependencies of the criterion on temperature and strain rate. From numerical analyzes in 2D and 3D, a multi-temperature fracture stress criterion, increasing function of the strain rate, was proposed. Predictive modeling were used to confirm the identified criterion on two specimen geometries (CT and compressive ring) in mode I at different temperatures. SEM observations and 3D analyzes made with optical microscope showed that the fracture mechanism was the cleavage associated

  19. Crack arrest within teeth at the dentinoenamel junction caused by elastic modulus mismatch

    OpenAIRE

    Bechtle, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Enamel and dentin compose the crowns of human teeth. They are joined at the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) which is a very strong and well-bonded interface unlikely to fail within healthy teeth despite the formation of multiple cracks within enamel during a lifetime of exposure to masticatory forces. These cracks commonly are arrested when reaching the DEJ. The phenomenon of crack arrest at the DEJ is described in many publications but there is little consensus on the underlying cause and mecha...

  20. Crack Arrest Toughness of Two High Strength Steels (AISI 4140 and AISI 4340)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripling, E. J.; Mulherin, J. H.; Crosley, P. B.

    1982-04-01

    The crack initiation toughness ( K c ) and crack arrest toughness ( K a ) of AISI 4140 and AISI 4340 steel were measured over a range of yield strengths from 965 to 1240 MPa, and a range of test temperatures from -53 to +74°C. Emphasis was placed on K a testing since these values are thought to represent the minimum toughness of the steel as a function of loading rate. At the same yield strengths and test temperatures, K a for the AISI 4340 was about twice as high as it was for the AISI 4140. In addition, the K a values showed a more pronounced transition temperature than the K c values, when the data were plotted as a function of test temperature. The transition appeared to be associated with a change in fracture mechanism from cleavage to dimpled rupture as the test temperature was increased. The occurrence of a “pop-in” behavior at supertransition temperatures has not been found in lower strength steels, and its evaluation in these high strength steels was possible only because they are not especially tough at their supertransition temperatures. There is an upper toughness limit at which pop-in will not occur, and this was found for the AISI 4340 steel when it was tempered to its lowest yield strength (965 MPa). All the crack arrest data were identified as plane strain values, while only about one-half of the initiation values could be classified this way.

  1. Prediction of cleavage crack propagation and arrest in a nuclear pressure vessel steel (16MND5) under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this PhD study is to predict the propagation and arrest of cleavage cracks in a French PWR vessel steel (16MND5). This is accomplished through use of a local criterion based on the critical stress calculated ahead of crack tip. Previous work has shown that fracture mechanism was cleavage associated with the ductile shear zone between the different planes of cracking. Thus, the critical stress at crack tip depends on stain rate. This thesis consists of numerical optimization, identification and validation of a local criterion based on experiments which have complex thermomechanical loads. The criterion accounts for various crack paths, deepening the knowledge about micro mechanisms during crack propagation in order to justify the established criterion. Criterion identification was carried out by using numerical simulations of tension tests performed on CT (Compact Tension) specimens at four different temperatures (-150 C, -125 C, -100 C and -75 C). The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) was used in CAST3M FE software to model dynamic crack propagation and arrest. The analysis results in 2D and 3D showed that the critical stress at crack tip increased with the inelastic strain rate. Therefore, a criterion based on the critical stress was established. An analytical model was developed to justify the identified criterion. The critical stress given by the local criterion was considered as the sum of the critical cleavage stress and the stress generated by the deformation of ligaments behind the crack tip. In order to quantify this phenomenon, measurements of ligaments' characteristics have been performed on fracture surfaces and on cross-sections of the specimens. The stress profile of the crack lips generated by ligaments was calculated by modeling of multi-cracks on specimen's cross-section. The contribution of stress generated by ligaments to the critical stress at crack tip was obtained with this method, and then the analytical model of

  2. Finite-Element Analysis of Crack Arrest Properties of Fiber Reinforced Composites Application in Semi-Elliptical Cracked Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyuan; Song, Shulei; Deng, Hongbo; Zhong, Kai

    2018-04-01

    In nowadays, repair method using fiber reinforced composites as the mainstream pipe repair technology, it can provide security for X100 high-grade steel energy long-distance pipelines in engineering. In this paper, analysis of cracked X100 high-grade steel pipe was conducted, simulation analysis was made on structure of pipes and crack arresters (CAs) to obtain the J-integral value in virtue of ANSYS Workbench finite element software and evaluation on crack arrest effects was done through measured elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter J-integral and the crack arrest coefficient K, in a bid to summarize effect laws of composite CAs and size of pipes and cracks for repairing CAs. The results indicate that the K value is correlated with laying angle λ, laying length L2/D1, laying thickness T1/T2of CAs, crack depth c/T1 and crack length a/c, and calculate recommended parameters for repairing fiber reinforced composite CAs in terms of two different crack forms.

  3. Crack arrest within teeth at the dentinoenamel junction caused by elastic modulus mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtle, Sabine; Fett, Theo; Rizzi, Gabriele; Habelitz, Stefan; Klocke, Arndt; Schneider, Gerold A

    2010-05-01

    Enamel and dentin compose the crowns of human teeth. They are joined at the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) which is a very strong and well-bonded interface unlikely to fail within healthy teeth despite the formation of multiple cracks within enamel during a lifetime of exposure to masticatory forces. These cracks commonly are arrested when reaching the DEJ. The phenomenon of crack arrest at the DEJ is described in many publications but there is little consensus on the underlying cause and mechanism. Explanations range from the DEJ having a larger toughness than both enamel and dentin up to the assumption that not the DEJ itself causes crack arrest but the so-called mantle dentin, a thin material layer close to the DEJ that is somewhat softer than the bulk dentin. In this study we conducted 3-point bending experiments with bending bars consisting of the DEJ and surrounding enamel and dentin to investigate crack propagation and arrest within the DEJ region. Calculated stress intensities around crack tips were found to be highly influenced by the elastic modulus mismatch between enamel and dentin and hence, the phenomenon of crack arrest at the DEJ could be explained accordingly via this elastic modulus mismatch. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  5. A dynamic analysis of crack propagation and arrest of pressurized thermal shock experiments (PTSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickstad, B.; Nilsson, F.

    1984-01-01

    The PTS-experiments performed at ORNL are dynamically analysed by aid ot a two-dimensional FEM-code with capability of simulating rapid crack growth.It is found that both a quasistatic and a dynamic treatment agree well with the experimentally obtained crack arrest lengths. (author)

  6. Conservatism of ASME KIR-reference curve with respect to crack arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.; Rintamaa, R.; Nagel, G.

    1999-01-01

    The conservatism of the RT NDT temperature indexing parameter and the ASME K IR -reference curve with respect to crack arrest toughness, has been evaluated. Based on an analysis of the original ASME K Ia data, it was established that inherently, the ASME K IR -reference curve corresponds to an overall 5% lower bound curve with respect to crack arrest. It was shown that the scatter of crack arrest toughness is essentially material independent and has a standard deviation of 18% and the temperature dependence of K Ia has the same form as predicted by the master curve for crack initiation toughness. The 'built in' offset between the mean 100 MPa√(m) crack arrest temperature, TK Ia , and RT NDT is 38 C (TK Ia =RT NDT +38 C) and the experimental relation between TK Ia and NDT is, TK Ia =NDT+28 C. The K IR -reference curve using NDT as reference temperature will be conservative with respect to the general 5% lower bound K Ia(5%) -curve, with a 75% confidence. The use of RT NDT , instead of NDT, will generally increase the degree of conservatism, both for non-irradiated as well as irradiated materials, close to a 95% confidence level. This trend is pronounced for materials with Charpy-V upper shelf energies below 100 J. It is shown that the K IR -curve effectively constitutes a deterministic lower bound curve for crack arrest. The findings are valid both for nuclear pressure vessel plates, forgings and welds. (orig.)

  7. An energy analysis of crack-initiation and arrest in epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kim, A.; Bosnyak, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study fracture processes such as crack initiation and arrest in epoxy. A compact tension specimen with displacement-controlled loading is employed to observe multiple crack initiations and arrests. The energy release rate at crack initiation is significantly higher than that at crack arrest, as has been observed elsewhere. In this study, the difference between these energy release rates is found to depend on specimen size (scale effect), and is quantitatively related to the fracture surface morphology. The scale effect, similar to that in strength theory, is conventionally attributed to the statistics of defects which control the fracture process. Triangular shaped ripples, deltoids, are formed on the fracture surface of the epoxy during the slow sub-critical crack growth, prior to the smooth mirrorlike surface characteristic of fast cracks. The deltoids are complimentary on the two crack faces which excludes any inelastic deformation from consideration. The deltoids are analogous to the ripples created on a river surface downstream from a small obstacle. However, in spite of the expectation based on this analogy and the observed scale effect, there are no 'defects' at the apex of the deltoids detectable down to the 0.1 micron level. This suggests that the formation of deltoids during the slow process of subcritical crack growth is an intrinsic feature of the fracture process itself, triggered by inhomogeneity of material on a submicron scale. This inhomogeneity may be related to a fluctuation in the cross-link density of the epoxy.

  8. In situ observations of crack arrest and bridging by nanoscale twins in copper thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong-Woong; Li Xiaoyan; Gao Huajian; Kumar, Sharvan

    2012-01-01

    In situ tensile experiments in a transmission electron microscope revealed that micro-cracks in ultrafine grained, free-standing, thin copper foils containing nanoscale twins initiated in matrix domains separated by the twins and then arrested at twin boundaries as twin boundary sliding proceeded. The adjacent microcracks eventually coalesced through shear failure of the bridging twins. To investigate the atomic mechanism of this rarely seen nanoscale crack bridging behavior, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to show that during crack propagation twin boundaries are impinged upon by numerous dislocations from the plastically deforming matrix. These dislocations react at the interface and evolve into substantially impenetrable dislocation walls that strongly confine crack nucleation and resist crack propagation, leading to the experimentally observed crack bridging behavior. The present results raise an approach to significantly toughening polycrystalline thin films by incorporating nanoscale twin structures into individual grains that serve as crack bridging ligaments.

  9. Critical experiments, measurements and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels. Task 62. Second annual progress report, 1 July 1975 to 30 June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.; Gehlen, P.C.; Hoagland, R.G.; Marschall, C.W.; Kanninen, M.F.; Popelar, C.; Rosenfield, A.R.

    1976-10-01

    Developments of the theory, the analyses and the materials characterization for assessments of crack arrest in heavy walled nuclear pressure vessels are described. A two-dimensional, dynamic, finite difference analysis of crack propagation and arrest, including inertia forces and thermal stresses is derived. The analysis is used to treat run-arrest events in DCB- and SEN-specimens. Calculations based on the one-dimensional analysis are compared with detailed measurements of run-arrest in two polymeric materials. The agreements between calculations and experiments support the dynamic, energy conservation theory of crack arrest. Implications of a K/sub ID/-crack velocity curve with a negative slope are examined. The quantity K/sub Im/, the minimum propagating crack toughness, is identified as the crack arrest material property for engineering applications. Considerations entering the design of a crack arrest property measuring procedure, including specimen shape, size, thickness and the crack jump are discussed. The influence of side grooves on the propensity for crack branching is examined. Compliance measurements for rectangular DCB-specimens are presented and analyzed. Energy losses arising from damping remote from the crack tip in an A533B steel DCB specimen are described, and classed as negligible. Interactions between test pieces and the loading system are examined. A simplified procedure for measuring K/sub D/-, K/sub m/-, and K/sub a/-values, based on the dynamic analysis of the crack length at arrest is demonstrated. Measurements of K/sub D/ at temperatures in the range (NDT-66)C to (NDT +34)C and for crack velocities in the range 200 ms -1 to 1000 ms -1 are presented. The connection between propagating crack toughness values and the rapidly loaded stationary crack toughness K/sub Id/ is examined

  10. Conservatism of ASME KIR-reference curve with respect to crack arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.; Rintamaa, R.; Nagel, G.

    2001-01-01

    The conservatism of the RT NDT temperature indexing parameter and the ASME K IR -reference curve with respect to crack arrest toughness, has been evaluated. Based on an analysis of the original ASME K Ia data, it was established that inherently, the ASME K IR -reference curve corresponds to an overall 5% lower bound curve with respect to crack arrest. It was shown that the scatter of crack arrest toughness is essentially material independent and has a standard deviation (S.D.) of 18% and the temperature dependence of K Ia has the same form as predicted by the master curve for crack initiation toughness. The 'built in' offset between the mean 100 MPa√m crack arrest temperature, TK Ia , and RT NDT is 38 deg. C (TK Ia =RT NDT +38 deg. C) and the experimental relation between TK Ia and NDT is, TK Ia =NDT+28 deg. C. The K IR -reference curve using NDT as reference temperature will be conservative with respect to the general 5% lower bound K Ia(5%) -curve, with a 75% confidence. The use of RT NDT , instead of NDT, will generally increase the degree of conservatism, both for non-irradiated as well as irradiated materials, close to a 95% confidence level. This trend is pronounced for materials with Charpy-V upper shelf energies below 100 J. It is shown that the K IR -curve effectively constitutes a deterministic lower bound curve for crack arrest The findings are valid both for nuclear pressure vessel plates, forgings and welds

  11. Observations on Hydride Structures at the Tip of Arrested Cracks Grown under Conditions of Delayed Hydride Cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Kjell; Oskarsson, Magnus; Bergqvist, Hans

    2003-04-01

    One sample of Zr2.5%Nb and one sample of cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 which have been tested for hydrogen induced crack growth have been examined in the crack tip region with the aim of determining the mechanism behind the growth of cracks. The proposed mechanisms are brittle failure of a crack tip hydride and hydrogen enhanced localized shear. The examinations were done by TEM and SEM. However attempts to produce a TEM specimen with a thinned region at the tip of the crack were unsuccessful in both samples. One feature observed in the Zr2.5%Nb material may however be an indication of intense shear deformation at the tip of the crack. On the other hand all observations on the Zircaloy-4 sample indicate precipitation of hydrides ahead of the crack tip and the presence of hydrides on the crack flanks

  12. Elastodynamic fracture analyses of large crack-arrest experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Walker, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results obtained to date show that the essence of the run-arrest events, including dynamic behavior, is being modeled. Refined meshes and optimum solution algorithms are important parameters in elastodynamic analysis programs to give sufficient resolution to the geometric and time-dependent aspects of fracture analyses. Further refinements in quantitative representation of material parameters and the inclusion of rate dependence through viscoplastic modeling is expected to give an even more accurate basis for assessing the fracture behavior of reactor pressure vessels under PTS and other off-normal loading conditions

  13. Critical experiments, measurements and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels. First annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.; Gehlen, P.C.; Hoagland, R.G.; Kanninen, M.F.; Popelar, C.; Rosenfield, A.R.; deCampos, V.S.

    1975-08-01

    The one-dimensional, Timoshenko beam-on-a-generalized elastic foundation treatment has been extended to contoured-DCB specimens and to the conditions attending tensile loading in an ordinary testing machine. Preliminary calculations show that the crack propagation and arrest events in contoured DCB specimens are very similar to those calculated for regular DCB-specimens for comparable initiation conditions. In both cases the calculated K/sub Ia/-values are between 44 and 100 percent of K/sub ID,min/ and show a systematic variation with the initiation K/sub Q/-level. In contrast with stiff wedge loading, which favors a continuous event, the calculations for rectangular and contoured DCB specimens in series with an idealized testing machine load train display one or more halts and restarts before the final arrest. A series of experiments designed to distinguish between the K/sub D/ and K/sub a/ approaches to predicting crack arrest are described. Studies of the effect of side grooves in rectangular DCB specimens confirm that grooves with depths representing up to 60 percent of the cross section have no significant effect on either K/sub ID/ or K/sub Ia/ measurements. (auth)

  14. The use of COD and plastic instability in crack propagation and arrest in shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Ratwani, M.

    1974-01-01

    The initiation, growth, and possible arrest of fracture in cylindrical shells containing initial defects are dealt with. For those defects which may be approximated by a part-through semi-elliptic surface crack which is sufficiently shallow so that part of the net ligament in the plane of the crack is still elastic, the existing flat plate solution is modified to take into account the shell curvature effect as well as the effect of the thickness and the small scale plastic deformations. The problem of large defects is then considered under the assumptions that the defect may be approximated by a relatively deep meridional part-through surface crack and the net ligament through the shell wall is fully yielded. The results given are based on an 8th order bending theory of shallow shells using a conventional plastic strip model to account for the plastic deformations around the crack border.

  15. The reinitiation of fracture at the tip of an arrested crack in a reactor pressure vessel: The effect of ligaments on the reinitiation K value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1986-01-01

    During a hypothetical thermal shock event involving a water-cooled nuclear reactor steel pressure vessel, it is possible for a crack to propagate deep into the reactor vessel thickness by a series of run-arrest-reinitiation events. Furthermore, within the transition temperature regime, crack propagation and arrest are associated with a combination of cleavage and ductile rupture processes, the latter being manifested by ligaments that are normal to the crack plane and parallel to the direction of crack propagation. Earlier work by the author has modelled the effect of ligaments on the reinitiation of fracture at the tip of an arrested crack. Proceeding from the basis that the ligaments fail by a ductile rupture process, reinitiation K values were calculated. These values were appreciably higher than the experimental reinitiation K values for cracks in model vessels subject to thermal shock; it was therefore argued that the ligaments, which are present at arrest, are unlikely to fail entirely by ductile rupture prior to the reinitiation of fracture at an arrested crack tip. Instead it was suggested that the ligaments fail by cleavage, and consequently do not markedly affect the reinitiation K value, which therefore correlates with Ksub(IC). This paper's theoretical analysis extends the earlier work by relaxing a key assumption in the earlier work that, when calculating the reinitiation K value on the basis that the ligaments fail by ductile rupture, they should disappear completely prior to reinitiation. The new results, however, show that the predicted reinitiation K values are still so much greater than the model test reinitiation K values, that it is unlikely that the ligaments fail solely by ductile rupture prior to reinitiation. The view that the ligaments can fail by cleavage is therefore reinforced. (orig.)

  16. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program: Recent developments in crack initiation and arrest research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Technology for the analysis of crack initiation and arrest is central to the reactor pressure vessel fracture-margin-assessment process. Regulatory procedures for nuclear plants utilize this technology to assure the retention of adequate fracture-prevention margins throughout the plant operating license period. As nuclear plants age and regulatory procedures dictate that fracture-margin assessments be performed, interest in the fracture-mechanics technology incorporated into those procedures has heightened. This has led to proposals from a number of sources for development and refinement of the underlying crack-initiation and arrest-analysis technology. This paper presents an overview of ongoing Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program research aimed at refining the fracture toughness data used in the analysis of fracture margins under pressurized-thermal-shock loading conditions. 33 refs., 13 figs

  17. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program: Recent developments in crack initiation and arrest research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Technology for the analysis of crack initiation and arrest is central to the reactor pressure vessel fracture-margin-assessment process. Regulatory procedures for nuclear plants utilize this technology to assure the retention of adequate fracture-prevention margins throughout the plant operating license period. As nuclear plants age and regulatory procedures dictate that fracture-margin assessments be performed, interest in the fracture-mechanics technology incorporated into those procedures has heightened. This has led to proposals from a number of sources for development and refinement of the underlying crack-initiation and arrest-analysis technology. An important element of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is devoted to the investigation and evaluation of these proposals. This paper presents the technological bases and fracture-margin assessment objectives for some of the recently proposed crack-initiation and arrest-technology developments. The HSST Program approach to the evaluation of the proposals is described and the results and conclusions obtained to date are presented

  18. Development of a viscoplastic dynamic fracture mechanics treatment for crack arrest predictions in a PTS event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanninen, M.F.; Hudak, S.J. Jr.; Reed, K.W.; Dexter, R.J.; Polch, E.Z.; Cardinal, J.W.; Achenbach, J.D.; Popelar, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a fundamentally correct methodology for the prediction of crack arrest at the high upper shelf conditions occurring in a postulated pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event. The effort is aimed at the development of a versatile finite-element method for the solution of time-dependent boundary value problems that admit inertia effects, a prescribed spatial temperature distribution, and viscoplastic constitutive and fracture behavior. Supporting this development are (1) material characterization and fracture experimentation, (2) detailed mathematical analyses of the near-tip region, (3) elastodynamic fracture analysis, and (4) elastic-plastic tearing instability analyses. As a first step, dynamic-viscoplastic analyses are currently being made of the wide plate tests being performed by the National Bureau of Standards in a companion HSST program. Some preliminary conclusions drawn from this work and from the supporting research activities are offered in this paper. The outstanding critical issues that subsequent research must focus on are also described

  19. Prediction of crack propagation and arrest in X100 natural gas transmission pipelines with a strain rate dependent damage model (SRDD). Part 2: Large scale pipe models with gas depressurisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomidis, F.; Shterenlikht, A.; Truman, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper described a specimen for the measurement of high strain rate flow and fracture properties of pipe material and for tuning a strain rate dependent damage model (SRDD). In part 2 the tuned SRDD model is used for the simulation of axial crack propagation and arrest in X100 natural gas pipelines. Linear pressure drop model was adopted behind the crack tip, and an exponential gas depressurisation model was used ahead of the crack tip. The model correctly predicted the crack initiation (burst) pressure, the crack speed and the crack arrest length. Strain rates between 1000 s −1 and 3000 s −1 immediately ahead of the crack tip are predicted, giving a strong indication that a strain rate material model is required for the structural integrity assessment of the natural gas pipelines. The models predict the stress triaxiality of about 0.65 for at least 1 m ahead of the crack tip, gradually dropping to 0.5 at distances of about 5–7 m ahead of the crack tip. Finally, the models predicted a linear drop in crack tip opening angle (CTOA) from about 11−12° at the onset of crack propagation down to 7−8° at crack arrest. Only the lower of these values agree with those reported in the literature for quasi-static measurements. This discrepancy might indicate substantial strain rate dependence in CTOA. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations of 3 burst tests of X100 pipes are detailed. • Strain rate dependent damage model, tuned on small scale X100 samples, was used. • The models correctly predict burst pressure, crack speed and crack arrest length. • The model predicts a crack length dependent critical CTOA. • The strain rate dependent damage model is verified as mesh independent

  20. Brutal crack propagation in dynamic fracture: industrial application to the length of the crack arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumouchel, P.E.

    2008-03-01

    This research thesis aims at understanding and analysing some mechanisms involved in the dynamic failure under various loadings which are notably present in industrial environment, and more particularly in some parts of EDF's plants where networks of micro-cracks may steadily grow: heterogeneous zones, defects under coating. The author presents a simplified model based on the de-bonding of a film to understand the mechanisms of a sudden failure under a quasi-static loading. He develops a similar model to explore the influence of a defect on crack propagation under a quasi-static loading, and then under a sudden loading. This model is then generalized to the case of several defects, and more particularly very small defects. Finally, the author gives a numerical interpretation of a sudden propagation under quasi-static loading

  1. Investigation Analysis of Crack Growth Arresting with Fasteners in Hybrid Laminated Skin-Stiffener Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevan Kumar, N.; Ramesh Babu, P.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years carbon fibre-reinforced polymers (CFRP) emerged its increasing demand in aerospace engineering. Due to their high specific strength to weight ratio, these composites offer more characteristics and considerable advantages compared to metals. Metals, unlike composites, offer plasticity effects to evade high stress concentrations during postbuckling. Under compressive load, composite structures show a wide range of damage mechanisms where a set of damage modes combined together might lead to the eventual structural collapse. Crack is one of the most critical damages in fiber composites, which are being employed in primary aircraft structures. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the arrest mechanism of the delamination or crack growth with installation of multiple fasteners when the delamination is embedded in between the skin and stiffener interface.

  2. Critical experiments, measurements and analyses to establish a crack arrest methodology for nuclear pressure vessel steels. Sixth quarterly progress report, January--March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.T.; Gehlen, P.C.; Hoagland, R.G.; Kanninen, M.F.; Popelar, C.; Rosenfield, A.R.

    1976-07-01

    Governing equations for a complete two-dimensional analysis of fast fracture and crack arrest (including inertia and thermal gradients) are derived. Strain energy and compliance values calculated for an SEN specimen agree with experiment. In the case of a nonstationary crack, the strain energy release rate is computed from the nodal displacements in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip. This value of G is sensitive to the spacings between nodes in the x and y direction. Results of two-dimensional analyses of propagation and arrest in the SEN test piece are also described; they are in general accord with one propagation event measured in an SEN A533B steel test piece. Compliance measurements were carried out on the rectangular DCB specimen to test the accuracy of the compliance values calculated with the one-dimensional beam-on-elastic-foundation model. These compliance values and the derivatives of compliance with crack length are used to relate the loads or displacements at fracture onset and at arrest to K/sub Q/, K/sub D/, and K/sub a/. Efforts were also made to test the assumption that energy losses arising from damping remote from the crack tip can be neglected. Measurements of damped oscillations in an A533B DCB specimen with a stationary crack indicate that total damping rates are relatively low, and that oscillations of the load pins in the pinhole account for the bulk of the damping. Finally, a new procedure for measuring K/sub D/ and K/sub m/ values is described; it is based on a dynamic analysis of the crack length at arrest and dynamically stiff wedge loading (the tie-down device) and eliminates the need for crack velocity measurements. It can also be applied to both small and large crack jumps and to ordinary and duplex-DCB specimens. Results for A533B steel agree with K/sub D/-values obtained from velocity measurements. The new procedure is also used to analyze results for a series of ship steels

  3. Dynamic analysis of crack growth and arrest in a pressure vessel subjected to thermal and pressure loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickstad, B.

    1984-01-01

    Predictions of crack arrest behaviour are performed for a cracked reactor pressure vessel under both thermal and pressure loading. The object is to compare static and dynamic calculations. The dynamic calculations are made using an explicit finite element technique where crack growth is simulated by gradual nodal release. Three different load cases and the effect of different velocity dependence on the crack propagation toughness are studied. It is found that for the analysed cases the static analysis is slightly conservative, thus justifying its use for these problems. (orig.)

  4. Experimental assessment of welded joints brittle fracture on the crack arrest criterion for WWER-1000 RPV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumin, A.A.; Timofeev, B.T.

    2000-01-01

    The crack arrest fracture toughness in a vessel steel used in WWER-1000 reactor, namely in steel 15Kh2NMFA and its submerged arc welded joints, produced with Sv-08KhGNMTA, Sv-12 Kh2NMFA welding wires and NF-18 M, FZ-16 A welding fluxes, is under study. Experimental studies are carried out using three heats with the chemical composition meeting the specifications. Weld specimens 100-200 mm thick are subjected to tempering according various regimes to induce the embrittlement and simulate mechanical properties (yield strength and ductile-brittle transition temperature) corresponding to those at the end of service life under neutron radiation effect. Base metal and weld properties are compared. The wide scatter is noted for experimental data on fracture toughness temperature dependences. A possibility to use the dependence of K Ia = f (T-T k ) for determining the crack arrest fracture toughness is discussed taking in account that K Ia is a stress intensity factor calculated within the frame of static fracture mechanics [ru

  5. Analysis of Mode I and Mode II Crack Growth Arrest Mechanism with Z-Fibre Pins in Composite Laminated Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevan Kumar, N.; Ramesh Babu, P.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the numerical study of the mode I and mode II interlaminar crack growth arrest in hybrid laminated curved composite stiffened joint with Z-fibre reinforcement. A FE model of hybrid laminated skin-stiffener joint reinforced with Z-pins is developed to investigate the effect of Z- fibre pins on mode I and mode II crack growth where the delamination is embedded inbetween the skin and stiffener interface. A finite element model was developed using S4R element of a 4-node doubly curved thick shell elements to model the composite laminates and non linear interface elements to simulate the reinforcements. The numerical analyses revealed that Z-fibre pinning were effective in suppressing the delamination growth when propagated due to applied loads. Therefore, the Z-fibre technique effectively improves the crack growth resistance and hence arrests or delays crack growth extension.

  6. Thermal shock experiment analysis, the use of crack arrest toughness measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.; Chavaillard, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    The main purpose of thermal shock experiment is to assess the procedure codified in the ASME XI appendix 1 or RCC-M-B appendix ZG, and allow comparisons with numerical simulations. The analysis of the integrity of the PWR vessel belt line under accidental transients is based on reference curves. The test-piece is a cylinder of SA 508 cl.3 steel. Arrest toughness measured agrees with reference curve

  7. Fluorescent penetration crack testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, A.

    1979-01-01

    The same cleaning, penetration, washing, development and evaluation agents are used in this method as for known methods. In order to accelerate or shorten the testing, the drying process is performed only to optical dryness of the material surface by blowing on it with pressurized air, the development by simple pressing into or dusting of the material with the developer and the temperature of the washing water is selected within room temperature range. (RW) [de

  8. Standard test method for creep-fatigue crack growth testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep-fatigue crack growth properties of nominally homogeneous materials by use of pre-cracked compact type, C(T), test specimens subjected to uniaxial cyclic forces. It concerns fatigue cycling with sufficiently long loading/unloading rates or hold-times, or both, to cause creep deformation at the crack tip and the creep deformation be responsible for enhanced crack growth per loading cycle. It is intended as a guide for creep-fatigue testing performed in support of such activities as materials research and development, mechanical design, process and quality control, product performance, and failure analysis. Therefore, this method requires testing of at least two specimens that yield overlapping crack growth rate data. The cyclic conditions responsible for creep-fatigue deformation and enhanced crack growth vary with material and with temperature for a given material. The effects of environment such as time-dependent oxidation in enhancing the crack growth ra...

  9. Surface crack testing - state of technique and trends in development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Seminar contains 12 lectures on the following subjects: State of technique in magnetic powder testing (K. Goebbels); Recognisability of faults and probability of faults in surface crack testing (W. Morgner); Requirements for picture processing systems for proving and assessing crack indications (M. Stadthaus); Possibilities and limits of automatic crack recognition in magnetic powder testing (V. Deutsch); Development of equipment for eddy current testing (M. Junger); Signal processing - a way of improving the recognisability of faults in eddy current testing (R. Becker); Methods of testing steel products for surface faults and their practical limits of fault recognisability (D. Thiery); Surface crack testing in pipe manufacture (R. Pawelletz); Surface crack testing in powerstation construction (L. v. Bernus); Trends in automation in surface crack testing (G. Maier); Eddy current testing in engine construction (E. Dickhaut); Eddy current testing in aircraft repair (F. Schur). (orig.) [de

  10. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  11. Ductile crack initiation in the Charpy V-notch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Norris, D.M. Jr.; Prado, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    Initiation and growth of a crack in the Charpy V-notch test was investigated by performing both static and impact controlled deflection tests. Test specimens were deformed to various deflections, heat-tinted to mark crack extension and broken apart at low temperature to allow extension measurements. Measurement of the crack extension provided an estimate of crack initiation as defined by different criteria. Crack initiation starts well before maximum load, and is dependent on the definition of ''initiation''. Using a definition of first micro-initiation away from the ductile blunting, computer model predictions agreed favorably with the experimental results

  12. Delayed hydrogen cracking test design for pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Roberto; Loberse, Antonio N.; Yawny, Alejandro A.; Riquelme, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    CANDU nuclear power stations pressure tubes of alloy Zr-2,5 % Nb present a cracking phenomenon known as delayed hydrogen cracking (DHC). This is a brittle fracture of zirconium hydrides that are developed by hydrogen due to aqueous corrosion on the metal surface. This hydrogen diffuses to the crack tip where brittle zirconium hydrides develops and promotes the crack propagation. A direct current potential decay (DCPD) technique has been developed to measure crack propagation rates on compact test (CT) samples machined from a non irradiated pressure tube. Those test samples were hydrogen charged by cathodic polarization in an acid solution and then pre cracked in a fatigue machine. This technique proved to be useful to measure crack propagation rates with at least 1% accuracy for DHC in pressure tubes. (author)

  13. Comparisons of irradiation-induced shifts in fracture toughness, crack arrest toughness, and Charpy impact energy in high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program is examining relative shifts and changes in shape of fracture and crack-arrest toughness versus temperature behavior for two high-copper welds. Fracture toughness 100-MPa√m temperature shifts are greater than Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Mean curve fits to the fracture toughness data provide mixed results regarding curve shape changes, but curves constructed as lower boundaries indicate lower slopes. Preliminary crack-arrest toughness results indicate that shifts of lower-bound curves are approximately the same as CVN 41-J shifts with no shape changes

  14. An appraisal of crack arrest results and their relevance to the onset of upper shelf temperature issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1996-01-01

    The paper appraises experimental results which support the view that a crack can propagate by cleavage mechanism in a ferritic steel as used in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, at temperatures that are markedly in excess of the onset of upper shelf temperature as estimated using an initiation based criterion. At temperatures in the vicinity of the onset shelf as estimated by such a criterion, cleavage crack propagation can occur at K values that are markedly less than the static fracture toughness values appropriate to the same temperature regime. It is demonstrated how these conclusions are reflected in the ASME Code Section III Appendix G procedure for defining the pressure-temperature limits associated with the normal operation of a PWR reactor pressure vessel in the USA. This procedure defines the onset of upper shelf temperature in relation to the crack arrest toughness curve and not the initiation toughness curve, the difference between the onset of upper shelf temperatures using the two definitions being about 80 o F. (author)

  15. Process and device for magnetic crack testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, D.; Meili, E.; Fuchs, E.

    1983-01-01

    There is a problem of sufficient crack depth discrimination to suppress fault signals or pictures due to unevenness not caused by cracks. To solve this, when magnetising in the preferred direction of adhesion, the effect depending on the direction of the crack, before magnetic powder detection, magnetic powder is blown on, showing the fault and for the comparison of the adhesion effect crack direction characteristics it is blown on parallel to the preferred direction, or if one wants to stress the directional characteristic, it is blown on transversely to the preferred direction. In both cases one blows with the same force, without removing the magnetic powder remnants relevant to faults in the intended crack areas. This strong blowing removes the magnetic powder remnants relevant to interference and not relevant to faults. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Test methods for evaluating hot cracking: Review and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of hot cracking is described and discussed, and criteria for tests to assess hot cracking are elucidated. The historical development of hot cracking tests is traced from the 1930s to present, with categorization of tests into several types. It is noted that the number of tests developed continues to increase dramatically. The number of literature citations also increases with time, with few popular tests receiving a major share of interest. Predominant countries of origin of both tests and citations shift with time, and a few journals account for most of the published information. Reviews of hot cracking are reviewed, and it is predicted that modeling and other developing analytical techniques will contribute greatly to an increase in our understanding of hot cracking. 30 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  17. Influence of bending test configuration on cracking behavior of FRC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finazzi, Silvia; Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    the flexural load-deformation response of FRC. This research focuses particularly on the influence of the appearance and depth of the notch on the cracking behavior of FRC. For this purpose, several specimens, both un-notched and notched with different depths of the notch (25 mm and 45 mm), were tested....... The results obtained in the various tests are compared to determine to what extent the notch can affect cracking behavior and the resulting evaluation of the material according to the method described in the standard. Formation of cracking and the crack development has been documented by means of a digital...

  18. An evaluation of analysis methodologies for predicting cleavage arrest of a deep crack in an RPV subjected to PTS loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney-Walker, J.; Bass, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Several calculational procedures are compared for predicting cleavage arrest of a deep crack in the wall of a prototypical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) types of loading conditions. Three procedures examined in this study utilized the following models: (1) a static finite-element model (full bending); (2) a radially constrained static model; and (3) a thermoelastic dynamic finite-element model. A PTS transient loading condition was selected that produced a deep arrest of an axially-oriented initially shallow crack according to calculational results obtained from the static (full-bending) model. Results from the two static models were compared with those generated from the detailed thermoelastic dynamic finite-element analysis. The dynamic analyses modeled cleavage-crack propagation using node-release technique and an application-mode methodology based on dynamic fracture toughness curves generated from measured data. Comparisons presented here indicate that the degree to which dynamic solutions can be approximated by static models is highly dependent on several factors, including the material dynamic fracture curves and the propensity for cleavage reinitiation of the arrested crack under PTS loading conditions. Additional work is required to develop and validate a satisfactory dynamic fracture toughness model applicable to postcleavage arrest conditions in an RPV

  19. Development and field test of psychophysical tests for DWI arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    Administration and scoring procedures were standardized for a sobriety test battery consisting of the walk-and-turn test, the one leg stand test, and horizontal gaze nystagmus. The effectiveness of the standardized battery was then evaluated in the l...

  20. Miniature specimen technology for postirradiation fatigue crack growth testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mervyn, D.A.; Ermi, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    Current magnetic fusion reactor design concepts require that the fatigue behavior of candidate first wall materials be characterized. Fatigue crack growth may, in fact, be the design limiting factor in these cyclic reactor concepts given the inevitable presence of crack-like flaws in fabricated sheet structures. Miniature specimen technology has been developed to provide the large data base necessary to characterize irradiation effects on the fatigue crack growth behavior. An electrical potential method of measuring crack growth rates is employed on miniature center-cracked-tension specimens (1.27 cm x 2.54 cm x 0.061 cm). Results of a baseline study on 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel, which was tested in an in-cell prototypic fatigue machine, are presented. The miniature fatigue machine is designed for low cost, on-line, real time testing of irradiated fusion candidate alloys. It will enable large scale characterization and development of candidate first wall alloys

  1. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spending time in a rehab facility or getting cognitive-behavioral therapy or other treatments. Right now, there are no medicines to treat a crack addiction. If you smoke crack, talking with a counselor ...

  2. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  3. Fatigue test results of flat plate specimens with surface cracks and evaluation of crack growth in structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Yokoyama, Norio; Ohba, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Takaichi; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1982-12-01

    Part-through surface cracks are most frequently observed in the inspection of structural components, and it is one of the important subjects in the assessment of safety to evaluate appropriately the growth of such cracks during the service life of structural components. Due to the complexity of the stress at the front free surface, the crack growth at the surface shows a different behavior from the other part. Besides, an effect of interaction is caused in the growth of multiple surface cracks. These effects should be included in the growth analysis of surface part-through cracks. Authors have carried out a series of fatigue tests on some kinds of pipes with multiple cracks in the inner surface, and subsequently the fatigue test of flat plate specimens, made of Type 304L stainless steel, with a single or double surface cracks was carried out to study the basic characteristics in the growth of multiple surface cracks. Based on the results of the flat plate test. the correction factors for the front free surface (Cs) and interaction (Ci) of surface cracks were derived quantitatively by the following empirical expressions; Cs = 0.824. Ci = (0.227(a/b) 2 (sec(PI X/2) - 1) + 1)sup(1/m). Using these two correction factors, a procedure to predict the growth of surface cracks was developed by applying the crack growth formula to both the thickness and surface directions. Besides, the crack growth predictions based on the procedure of ASME Code Sex. XI, and the above procedure without the correction of the free surface and interactions on the crack growth behaviors were compared with the test results of flat plate specimens. The crack growth behavior predicted by the procedure described in this report showed the best agreement with the test results in respects of the crack growth life and the change in the crack shape. The criteria of the ASME Code did not agree with the test results. (author)

  4. The role of ductile ligaments and warm prestress on the re-initiation of fracture from a crack arrested during thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1982-01-01

    The protection offered by warm prestress can be important for preserving a nuclear pressure vessel's integrity during a postulated emergency condition involving a loss of coolant, when the emergency core cooling water subjects the pressure vessel to a thermal shock. There are two aspects to the problem: (a) the initial extension of a defect into the vessel wall, and (b) the subsequent re-initiation of fracture at an arrested crack tip. This note considers the effect of warm prestress on the re-initiation of fracture from an arrested crack, and emphasizes the role of ductile ligaments. It is argued that the warm prestress concept is applicable, thus complementing the limited experimental results provided by the HSST Thermal Shock experimental programme. (orig.)

  5. Effects of irradiation on initiation and crack-arrest toughness of two high-copper welds and on stainless steel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Haggag, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the study on the high-copper welds is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the ASME K Ic and K Ia toughness curves. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Compact specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C to fluences from 1.5 to 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). The fracture toughness test results show that the irradiation-induced shifts at 100 MPa/m were greater than the Charpy 41-J shifts by about 11 and 18 degree C. Mean curve fits indicate mixed results regarding curve shape changes, but curves constructed as lower boundaries to the data do indicate curves of lower slopes. A preliminary evaluation of the crack-arrest results shows that the neutron-irradiation induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered), compared to those of the ASME K Ia curve did not appear to have been altered by the irradiation. Three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding was irradiated at 288 degree C to fluences of 2 and 5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). Charpy 41-J temperature shifts of 13 and 28 degree C were observed, respectively. For the lower fluence only, 12.7-mm thick compact specimens showed decreases in both J Ic and the tearing modulus. Comparison of the fracture toughness results with typical plate and a low upper-shelf weld reveals that the irradiated stainless steel cladding possesses low ductile initiation fracture toughness comparable to the low upper-shelf weld. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Sizing of cracks by ultrasonic testing - Diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, K.; Sattari-Far, I.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    The work has been concentrated on manual ultrasonic testing of plates in carbon and austenitic steel with thicknesses of 10-40 mm. Evaluation of data was performed by studying the amplitude, accuracy (crack depth) and visibility. The experience from the project showed that identification of the weak signals from the crack tips requires well-trained personnel. Besides that, the following can be recommended: Estimate if the crack has compressive stresses. Especially shallow cracks are exposed for compressive stresses. Chose a refraction angle ≥ 60 degrees if the crack is deep. Try both low (approx equivalent to 2MHz) and high (approx equivalent to 4-5MHz) frequency. Lower frequencies often increase amplitude response. Avoid the combination of refraction angle greater than 60 degrees and low frequency. Inspect with half as well as full skip. Sometimes a stronger signal is received for full skip, because the amplitude of the diffracted signal is higher from the cracked side. Use complementary measurements with mode conversion techniques. Focused probes can improve the results, especially for complicated geometries. Do not use reference reflectors of EDM-notch type for verification of signal amplitude. No correlation between amplitude from an EDM-notch tip and a crack tip exists. Reference reflectors of EDM-notch type can be used to verify the resolution of the system. A shallow EDM-notch can show if the probe can separate the tip and corner. It is our experience that general solutions does not exist, and each case needs an individual solution

  7. Detection of ductile crack initiation by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.; Boehmert, J.; Viehrig, H.W.

    1998-08-01

    A Charpy impact test equipment is described permitting simultaneous measurement of impact force, crack tip opening, acoustic emissions and magnetic emissions. The core of the equipment is an inverted pendulum ram impact testing machine and the tests have been performed with laterally notched, pre-fatigue ISO-V specimens made of steels of various strength and toughness properties. The tests are intended to ascertain whether the acoustic emission method is suitable for detecting steady crack initiation in highly ductile steels. (orig./CB) [de

  8. Humidity Testing of PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.; Herzberger, Jaemi

    2014-01-01

    Cracks in ceramic capacitors are one of the major causes of failures during operation of electronic systems. Humidity testing has been successfully used for many years to verify the absence of cracks and assure quality of military grade capacitors. Traditionally, only precious metal electrode (PME) capacitors were used in high reliability applications and the existing requirements for humidity testing were developed for this type of parts. With the advance of base metal electrode (BME) capacitors, there is a need for assessment of the applicability of the existing techniques for the new technology capacitors. In this work, variety of different PME and BME capacitors with introduced cracks were tested in humid environments at different voltages and temperatures. Analysis of the test results indicates differences in the behavior and failure mechanisms for BME and PME capacitors and the need for different testing conditions.

  9. Cascaded image analysis for dynamic crack detection in material testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, U.; Maas, H.-G.

    Concrete probes in civil engineering material testing often show fissures or hairline-cracks. These cracks develop dynamically. Starting at a width of a few microns, they usually cannot be detected visually or in an image of a camera imaging the whole probe. Conventional image analysis techniques will detect fissures only if they show a width in the order of one pixel. To be able to detect and measure fissures with a width of a fraction of a pixel at an early stage of their development, a cascaded image analysis approach has been developed, implemented and tested. The basic idea of the approach is to detect discontinuities in dense surface deformation vector fields. These deformation vector fields between consecutive stereo image pairs, which are generated by cross correlation or least squares matching, show a precision in the order of 1/50 pixel. Hairline-cracks can be detected and measured by applying edge detection techniques such as a Sobel operator to the results of the image matching process. Cracks will show up as linear discontinuities in the deformation vector field and can be vectorized by edge chaining. In practical tests of the method, cracks with a width of 1/20 pixel could be detected, and their width could be determined at a precision of 1/50 pixel.

  10. A look at magnetic crack testing at an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, V.; Cost, H.; Schug, W.

    1984-01-01

    On an international level, there are several different magnetization processes in use for magnetic particle crack testing. Anglo-Saxon countries implement two separate working cycles with a DC current or field respectively. France has introduced combined sequential magnetization using a DC field. For German speaking countries, a combination of out-of-phase AC fields represents the state of the art. Comparisons present the advantages and disadvantages involved. Consequences arising from the equipment used are indicated by way of an example of a new generation of crack testing equipment. (orig.) [de

  11. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing of cracks in claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, Anders; Zagbai, Theo

    2006-05-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The present project has been concerned with the modelling of defects in claddings. A cladding is a layer of material that is put on for corrosion protection, in the nuclear power industry this layer is often an austenitic steel that is welded onto the surface. The cladding is usually anisotropic and to some degree it is most likely also inhomogeneous, particularly in that the direction of the anisotropy is varying. This degree of inhomogeneity is unknown but probably not very pronounced so for modelling purposes it may be a valid assumption to take the cladding to be homogeneous. However, another important complicating factor with claddings is that the interface between the cladding and the base material is often corrugated. This corrugation can have large effects on the transmission of ultrasound through the interface and can thus greatly affect the detectability of defects in the cladding. In the present project the only type of defect that is considered is a planar crack that is situated inside the cladding. The investigations are, furthermore, limited to two dimensions, and the crack is then only a straight line. The crack can be arbitrarily oriented and situated, but it must not intersect the interface to the base material. The crack can be surface-breaking, and this is often the case of most practical interest, but it should then be

  12. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing of cracks in claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Anders; Zagbai, Theo [Calmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Mechanics

    2006-05-15

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The present project has been concerned with the modelling of defects in claddings. A cladding is a layer of material that is put on for corrosion protection, in the nuclear power industry this layer is often an austenitic steel that is welded onto the surface. The cladding is usually anisotropic and to some degree it is most likely also inhomogeneous, particularly in that the direction of the anisotropy is varying. This degree of inhomogeneity is unknown but probably not very pronounced so for modelling purposes it may be a valid assumption to take the cladding to be homogeneous. However, another important complicating factor with claddings is that the interface between the cladding and the base material is often corrugated. This corrugation can have large effects on the transmission of ultrasound through the interface and can thus greatly affect the detectability of defects in the cladding. In the present project the only type of defect that is considered is a planar crack that is situated inside the cladding. The investigations are, furthermore, limited to two dimensions, and the crack is then only a straight line. The crack can be arbitrarily oriented and situated, but it must not intersect the interface to the base material. The crack can be surface-breaking, and this is often the case of most practical interest, but it should then be

  13. Automated corrosion fatigue crack growth testing in pressurized water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschini, L.J.; Liaw, P.K.; Rudd, G.E.; Logsdon, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a novel approach to construct a test facility for developing corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties in aggressive environments. The environment studied is that of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 288 0 C (550 0 F) and 13.8 MPa (200 psig). To expedite data generation, each chamber was designed to accommodate two test specimens. A common water recirculation and pressurization system was employed to service two test chambers. Thus, four fatigue crack propagation rate tests could be conducted simultaneously in the pressurized water environment. The data analysis was automated to minimize the typically high labor costs associated with corrosion fatigue crack propagation testing. Verification FCGR tests conducted on an ASTM A469 rotor steel in a room temperature air environment as well as actual PWR environment FCGR tests performed on an ASTM A533 Grade B Class 2 pressure vessel steel demonstrated that the dual specimen test facility is an excellent system for developing the FCGR properties of materials in adverse environments

  14. Standard test method for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fatigue crack growth rates from near-threshold to Kmax controlled instability. Results are expressed in terms of the crack-tip stress-intensity factor range (ΔK), defined by the theory of linear elasticity. 1.2 Several different test procedures are provided, the optimum test procedure being primarily dependent on the magnitude of the fatigue crack growth rate to be measured. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength so long as specimens are of sufficient thickness to preclude buckling and of sufficient planar size to remain predominantly elastic during testing. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size is variable to be adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness may be varied independent of planar size. 1.5 The details of the various specimens and test configurations are shown in Annex A1-Annex A3. Specimen configurations other than t...

  15. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing in anisotropic materials - Rectangular crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, A.

    2001-12-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry when searching for defects, in particular cracks. To develop and qualify testing procedures extensive experimental work on test blocks is usually required. This can take a lot of time and therefore be quite costly. A good mathematical model of the testing situation is therefore of great value as it can reduce the experimental work to a great extent. A good model can be very useful for parametric studies and as a pedagogical tool. A further use of a model is as a tool in the qualification of personnel. In anisotropic materials, e.g. austenitic welds, the propagation of ultrasound becomes much more complicated as compared to isotropic materials. Therefore, modelling is even more useful for anisotropic materials, and it in particular has a greater pedagogical value. The present project has been concerned with a further development of the anisotropic capabilities of the computer program UTDefect, which has so far only contained a strip-like crack as the single defect type for anisotropic materials. To be more specific, the scattering by a rectangular crack in an anisotropic component has been studied and the result is adapted to include transmitting and receiving ultrasonic probes. The component under study is assumed to be anisotropic with arbitrary anisotropy. On the other hand, it is assumed to be homogeneous, and this in particular excludes most welds, where it is seldom an adequate approximation to assume homogeneity. The anisotropy may be arbitrarily oriented and the same is true of the rectangular crack. The crack may also be located near a backside of the component. To solve the scattering problem for the crack an integral equation method is used. The probe model has been developed in an earlier project and to compute the signal response in the receiving probe an electromechanical reciprocity argument is employed. As a rectangle is a truly 3D scatterer the sizes of the

  16. SAES St 909 pilot scale methane cracking tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J. E.; Sessions, H. T.

    2008-01-01

    Pilot scale (0.5 kg) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted for potential tritium process applications. Up to 1400 hours tests were done at 700 deg.C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 0.03 sLPM feed of methane plus impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. Carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered, but equating nitrogen to an equivalent amount of methane was nitrogen feed composition dependent. A decreased hydrogen feed increased methane getter rates while a 30 deg.C drop in one furnace zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate. (authors)

  17. Crack propagation tests on the fundamental structure under cyclic thermal transients. Results of nondestructive inspection for cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Horikiri, M.

    2001-06-01

    This report shows the results of crack inspection in crack propagation tests that were carried out at the Air-cooling Thermal Transient Test Facility (ATTF). Test specimens were made of 304 type austenitic stainless steel, and they were the same cylindrical shape, 1,500 mm in height, 130 mm in outer diameter and 30 mm in thickness. And they had initial slits machined on inner surfaces. Firstly the specimens were heated up to 650degC in a furnace, then cooled by pressurized air blowing through the specimen for 90 seconds. These cyclic changes of temperature gradients in the wall of specimens were loaded. Specimens were tested for several years. The specimen No. CPTT-102 with machined two circumferential slits and two semi-elliptical slits was tested up to 10,000 cycles. And the specimen No. CPTT-103 with machined six semi-elliptical slits of different length respectively was tested up to 5,000 cycles. Cracks of specimens were inspected nondestructively for a giving cycle in these tests. Applied inspection methods were ultra-sonic testing, potential-drop method and inner surface observation. Ultra-sonic testing was carried out by applying the pulse-echo method. Potential-drop testing was carried out by measurement of localized constant direct current beyond cracks. Photographs of the inner surface of specimens were taken using a bore-scope. The results of ultra-sonic testing have been close to destructive test results. The depth of crack by the potential-drop method was almost corresponding to destructive test results, too. Photographs of the inner surface were synthesized by the computer, and connection between main crack and hair crack was observed. (author)

  18. An acceleration test for stress corrosion cracking using humped specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Fukumura, Takuya; Totsuka, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    By using the humped specimen, which is processed by the humped die, in the slow strain rate technique (SSRT) test, fracture facet due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can be observed in relatively short duration. Although the cold work and concentrated stress and strain caused by the characteristic shape of the specimen accelerate the SCC, to date these acceleration effects have not been examined quantitatively. In the present study, the acceleration effects of the humped specimen were examined through experiments and finite element analyses (FEA). The experiments investigated the SCC of alloy 600 in the primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor. SSRT tests were conducted using two kinds of humped specimen: one was annealed after hump processing in order to eliminate the cold work, and the other was hump processed after the annealing treatment. The work ratio caused by the hump processing and stress/strain conditions during SSRT test were evaluated by FEA. It was found that maximum work ratio of 30% is introduced by the hump processing and that the distribution of the work ratio is not uniform. Furthermore, the work ratio is influenced by the friction between the specimen and dies as well as by the shape of dies. It was revealed that not only the cold work but also the concentrated stress and strain during SSRT test accelerate the crack initiation and growth of the SCC. (author)

  19. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niel, A.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.

    2010-06-01

    Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  20. Preloading To Accelerate Slow-Crack-Growth Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, John P.; Choi, Sung R.; Pawlik, Ralph J.

    2004-01-01

    An accelerated-testing methodology has been developed for measuring the slow-crack-growth (SCG) behavior of brittle materials. Like the prior methodology, the accelerated-testing methodology involves dynamic fatigue ( constant stress-rate) testing, in which a load or a displacement is applied to a specimen at a constant rate. SCG parameters or life prediction parameters needed for designing components made of the same material as that of the specimen are calculated from the relationship between (1) the strength of the material as measured in the test and (2) the applied stress rate used in the test. Despite its simplicity and convenience, dynamic fatigue testing as practiced heretofore has one major drawback: it is extremely time-consuming, especially at low stress rates. The present accelerated methodology reduces the time needed to test a specimen at a given rate of applied load, stress, or displacement. Instead of starting the test from zero applied load or displacement as in the prior methodology, one preloads the specimen and increases the applied load at the specified rate (see Figure 1). One might expect the preload to alter the results of the test and indeed it does, but fortunately, it is possible to account for the effect of the preload in interpreting the results. The accounting is done by calculating the normalized strength (defined as the strength in the presence of preload the strength in the absence of preload) as a function of (1) the preloading factor (defined as the preload stress the strength in the absence of preload) and (2) a SCG parameter, denoted n, that is used in a power-law crack-speed formulation. Figure 2 presents numerical results from this theoretical calculation.

  1. Behavior of underclad cracks in reactor pressure vessels - evaluation of mechanical analyses with tests on cladded mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Rousselier, G.; Bethmont, M.

    1993-01-01

    Innocuity of underclad flaws in the reactor pressure vessels must be demonstrated in the French safety analyses, particularly in the case of a severe transient at the end of the pressure vessel lifetime, because of the radiation embrittlement of the vessel material. Safety analyses are usually performed with elastic and elasto-plastic analyses taking into account the effect of the stainless steel cladding. EDF has started a program including experiments on large size cladded specimens and their interpretations. The purpose of this program is to evaluate the different methods of fracture analysis used in safety studies. Several specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C1 3 with stainless steel cladding, containing small artificial defects, are loaded in four-point bending. Experiments are performed at very low temperature to simulate radiation embrittlement and to obtain crack instability by cleavage fracture. Three tests have been performed on mock-ups containing a small underclad crack (with depth about 5 mn) and a fourth test has been performed on one mock-up with a larger crack (depth about 13 mn). In each case, crack instability occurred by cleavage fracture in the base metal, without crack arrest, at a temperature of about - 170 deg C. Each test is interpreted using linear elastic analysis and elastic-plastic analysis by two-dimensional finite element computations. The fracture are conservatively predicted: the stress intensity factors deduced from the computations (K cp or K j ) are always greater than the base metal toughness. The comparison between the elastic analyses (including two plasticity corrections) and the elastic-plastic analyses shows that the elastic analyses are often conservative. The beneficial effect of the cladding in the analyses is also shown : the analyses are too conservative if the cladding effects is not taken into account. (authors). 9 figs., 6 tabs., 10 refs

  2. Development of crack growth and crack initiation test units for stress corrosion cracking examinations in high-temperature water environments under neutron irradiation (1) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumo, Hironobu; Ishida, Takuya; Kawamata, Kazuo; Inoue, Shuichi; Ide, Hiroshi; Saito, Takashi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Ise, Hideo; Miwa, Yukio; Ugachi, Hirokazu; Nakano, Junichi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate integrity of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) on in-core structural materials used in light water reactors (LWRs), useful knowledge regarding IASCC has been obtained mainly by post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). In the core of commercial LWRs, however, the actual IASCC occurs under the effects of irradiation on both materials and high-temperature water environment. Therefore, it is necessary to confirm the suitability of the knowledge by PIE with comparison to IASCC behaviors during in-core SCC tests. Fundamental techniques for in-core crack growth and crack initiation tests have been developed already at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). For the in-core crack growth test technique, to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation on stainless steels irradiated to low neutron fluences, it is indispensable to develop new loading technique which is applicable to compact tension (CT) specimens with thickness of 0.5 inch (0.5T), from the viewpoint of validity based on the fracture mechanics. Based on the present technical investigation for the in-core loading technique, it is expected that a target load of 7.6 kN approximately can apply to a 0.5T-CT specimen by adopting a loading unit of a lever type instead of the previous uni-axial tension type. For the in-core crack initiation test technique, moreover, construction of a loading unit adopting linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) has been investigated and technical issues have examined. (author)

  3. Ultrasonic testing of fatigue cracks under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, T.J.; Cameron, A.G.B.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable detection of the fatigue cracks was possible under all conditions studied. Applied load affected the ultrasonic response in a variety of ways but never more than by 20dB and generally considerably less. Material variations affected the response under applied load by up to 20dB. Oxide in the crack and crack morphology affected the response by up to 9dB (12dB under load). Crack size variations and presence of water had little effect. Sizing accuracy was generally within 2mm although there was a tendency to undersize. The time of flight sizing technique gave the best accuracy if a tensile load was applied

  4. EFAM GTP-CREEP 02 - the GKSS test procedure for determining the creep crack extension of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, K.H.

    2002-01-01

    This document describes a fracture mechanics method in procedural form for determining the creep crack extension of materials. It is based on the unified fracture mechanics test method EFAM GTP 02, the ASTM standard E 1457-98, activities of VAMAS TWA 19, and GKSS experience in creep crack extension testing. It introduces novel features such as the rate of the δ 5 crack tip opening displacement, the crack tip opening angle, and the middle cracked tension specimen. (orig.) [de

  5. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschaux-beaume F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  6. Test Method Variability in Slow Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, J. A.; Tandon, R.

    2010-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured by using constant stress rate testing in 2 and 95 percent RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and crack velocities for dry environments are 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitive to small changes in RH at low RH. Biaxial and uniaxial stress states produced similar parameters. Confidence intervals on crack growth parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors solutions were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation. Use of scratch-like and indentation flaws produced similar crack growth parameters when residual stresses were considered.

  7. Standard test method for measurement of creep crack growth times in metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep crack growth (CCG) in metals at elevated temperatures using pre-cracked specimens subjected to static or quasi-static loading conditions. The time (CCI), t0.2 to an initial crack extension δai = 0.2 mm from the onset of first applied force and creep crack growth rate, ˙a or da/dt is expressed in terms of the magnitude of creep crack growth relating parameters, C* or K. With C* defined as the steady state determination of the crack tip stresses derived in principal from C*(t) and Ct (1-14). The crack growth derived in this manner is identified as a material property which can be used in modeling and life assessment methods (15-25). 1.1.1 The choice of the crack growth correlating parameter C*, C*(t), Ct, or K depends on the material creep properties, geometry and size of the specimen. Two types of material behavior are generally observed during creep crack growth tests; creep-ductile (1-14) and creep-brittle (26-37). In creep ductile materials, where cr...

  8. Characterization of cracking in Strain-Hardening Cementitious Composites using the compact tension test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A. O.

    The characterization of the tensile behavior of strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) is of significant importance to the material design. In a previous work the tensile stress-crack opening response of different types of SHCC was characterized using notched specimens tested in direct...... tension, where a single crack was obtained and mechanically characterized by performing Single Crack Tension Test (SCTT). In this study the tensile behavior of SHCC materials is characterized under eccentric tensile load using the Compact Tension Test (CTT). The long edge notch placed in the rectangular...... plate specimens and the eccentrically applied tensile load create the local conditions necessary to the initiation of a single crack at the tip of the notch. Further propagation and opening of the crack in Mode I allow the assessment of the tensile load-displacement relationship. The experimental...

  9. A method for crack profiles identification in eddy current testing by the multi-directional scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Fumio; Ikeda, Takuya; Nguyen, Doung

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a method for identification of crack shape in conducting materials. Multi-directional scanning strategies using Eddy Current Testing is performed for sizing complex natural crackings. Two dimensional measurements by means of multi-directional scan are used in a output least square identifications. (author)

  10. G-control fatigue testing for cyclic crack propagation in composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manca, Marcello; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a computer controlled testing methodology called “The G-control Method” which allows cyclic crack growth testing using real-time control of the cyclic energy release rate. The advantages of using this approach are described and compared with traditional fatigue testing methods...... that the G-control method allows fatigue testing at a constant range of energy release rates leading to a constant crack propagation rate....

  11. A probabilistic approach to crack instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1989-01-01

    A probabilistic model of brittle fracture is examined with reference to two-dimensional problems. The model is illustrated by using experimental data obtained for 25 macroscopically identical specimens made of short-fiber-reinforced composites. It is shown that the model proposed here provides a predictive formalism for the probability distributions of critical crack depth, critical loads, and crack arrest depths. It also provides similarity criteria for small-scale testing.

  12. Eddy current testing for blade edge micro cracks of aircraft engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-min; Xu, Min-dong; Gao, Xuan-yi; Jin, Xin; Qin, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Based on the problems of low detection efficiency in the micro cracks detection of aircraft engine blades, a differential excitation eddy current testing system was designed and developed. The function and the working principle of the system were described, the problems which contained the manufacture method of simulated cracks, signal generating, signal processing and the signal display method were described. The detection test was carried out by taking a certain model aircraft engine blade with simulated cracks as a tested specimen. The test data was processed by digital low-pass filter in the computer and the crack signals of time domain display and Lissajous figure display were acquired. By comparing the test results, it is verified that Lissajous figure display shows better performance compared to time domain display when the crack angle is small. The test results show that the eddy current testing system designed in this paper is feasible to detect the micro cracks on the aeroengine blade and can effectively improve the detection efficiency of micro cracks in the practical detection work.

  13. Numerical modeling of thermal fatigue cracks from the viewpoint of eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Virkkunen, Iikka; Kemppainen, Mika

    2012-01-01

    This study discusses a suitable numerical modeling of a thermal fatigue crack from the viewpoint of eddy current testing. Five artificial thermal fatigue cracks, introduced into type 304L austenitic stainless steel plates with a thickness of 25 mm, are prepared; and eddy current inspections are carried out to gather signals using an absolute type pancake probe and a differential type plus point probe. Finite element simulations are then carried out to evaluate a proper numerical model of the thermal fatigue cracks. In the finite element simulations, the thermal fatigue cracks are modeled as a semi-elliptic planar region on the basis of the results of the destructive tests. The width and internal conductivity are evaluated by the simulations. The results of the simulations reveal that the thermal fatigue cracks are regarded as almost nonconductive when the internal conductivity is assumed to be uniform inside. (author)

  14. Evaluation of micro fatigue crack growth under equi-biaxial stress by membranous pressure fatigue test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Satoshi; Abe, Shigeki; Nakamura, Takao; Kamaya, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    For preventing nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents, NPPs are required to ensure system safety in long term safe operation under aging degradation. Now, fatigue accumulation is one of major ageing phenomena and are evaluated to ensure safety by design fatigue curve that are based on the results of uniaxial fatigue tests. On the other hand, thermal stress that occurs in piping of actual components is not uniaxial but equi-biaxial. For accurate evaluation, it is required to conform real circumstance. In this study, membranous pressure fatigue test was conducted to simulated equi-biaxial stress. Crack initiation and crack growth were examined by replica investigation. Calculation result of equivalent stress intensity factor shows crack growth under equi-biaxial stress is faster than under uniaxial stress. It is concluded that equi-biaxial fatigue behavior should be considered in the evaluation of fatigue crack initiation and crack growth. (author)

  15. Crack growth of throughwall flaw in Alloy 600 tube during leak testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Majumdar, Saurin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A series of leak testing was conducted at a constant pressure and room temperature. • The time-dependent increase in the leak rate was observed. • The fractography revealed slip offsets and crystallographic facets. • Time-dependent plasticity at the crack tip caused the slip offsets. • Fatigue by jet/structure interaction caused the crystallographic facets. - Abstract: We examined the issue of whether crack growth in a full thickness material can occur in a leaking crack. A series of leak tests was conducted at a room temperature and constant pressure (17.3 MPa) with Alloy 600 tube specimens containing a tight rectangular throughwall axial fatigue crack. To exclude a potential pulsation effect by a high pressure pump, the test water was pressurized by using high pressure nitrogen gas. Fractography showed that crack growth in the full thickness material can occur in the leaking crack by two mechanisms: time-dependent plasticity at the crack tip and fatigue induced by jet/structure interaction. The threshold leak rate at which the jet/structure interaction was triggered was between 1.3 and 3.3 L/min for the specific heat of the Alloy 600 tube tested

  16. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  17. A simple test procedure for evaluating low temperature crack resistance of asphalt concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The current means of evaluating the low temperature cracking resistance of HMA relies on extensive test : methods that require assumptions about material behaviors and the use of complicated loading equipment. The purpose : of this study was to devel...

  18. 'GRC1.5': Uptower Gearbox Testing to Investigate Bearing Axial Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan; Vaes, David; McNiff, Brian

    2016-02-16

    This presentation focuses on the investigation of bearing axial cracking using the GRC1.5 uptower gearbox. Topics covered include the testing options considered, the project goal, and current and near-term activities.

  19. Fabrication of irradiation capsule for IASCC irradiation tests (2). Irradiation capsule for crack propagation test (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Kawamata, Kazuo; Taguchi, Taketoshi; Kanazawa, Yoshiharu; Onuma, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Shuichi; Izumo, Hironobu; Ishida, Takuya; Saito, Takashi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ugachi, Hirokazu; Tsukada, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    It is known that irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) occurs when austenitic stainless steel components used for light water reactor (LWR) are irradiated for a long period. In order to evaluate the high aging of the nuclear power plant, the study of IASCC becomes the important problem. The specimens irradiated in the reactor were evaluated by post irradiation examination in the past study. For the appropriate evaluation of IASCC, it is necessary to test it under the simulated LWR conditions; temperature, water chemistry and irradiation conditions. In order to perform in-pile SCC test, saturated temperature capsule (SATCAP) was developed. There are crack growth test, crack propagation test and so on for in-pile SCC test. In this report, SATCAP for crack propagation test is reported. (author)

  20. Fabrication of irradiation capsule for IASCC irradiation tests (1). Irradiation capsule for crack growth test (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Kawamata, Kazuo; Taguchi, Taketoshi; Kanazawa, Yoshiharu; Onuma, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Shuichi; Izumo, Hironobu; Ishida, Takuya; Saito, Takashi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ugachi, Hirokazu; Tsukada, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    It is known that Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) occurs when austenitic stainless steel components used for light water reactor (LWR) are irradiated for a long period. In order to evaluate the high aging of the nuclear power plant, the study of IASCC becomes the important problem. The specimens irradiated in the reactor were evaluated by post irradiation examination in the past study. For the appropriate evaluation of IASCC, it is necessary to test it under the simulated LWR conditions; temperature, water chemistry and irradiation conditions. In order to perform in-pile SCC test, saturated temperature capsule (SATCAP) was developed. There are crack growth test, crack propagation test and so on for in-pile SCC test. In this report, SATCAP for crack growth test is reported. (author)

  1. Standard test method for determination of resistance to stable crack extension under low-constraint conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This standard covers the determination of the resistance to stable crack extension in metallic materials in terms of the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOAc), ψc and/or the crack-opening displacement (COD), δ5 resistance curve (1). This method applies specifically to fatigue pre-cracked specimens that exhibit low constraint (crack-length-to-thickness and un-cracked ligament-to-thickness ratios greater than or equal to 4) and that are tested under slowly increasing remote applied displacement. The recommended specimens are the compact-tension, C(T), and middle-crack-tension, M(T), specimens. The fracture resistance determined in accordance with this standard is measured as ψc (critical CTOA value) and/or δ5 (critical COD resistance curve) as a function of crack extension. Both fracture resistance parameters are characterized using either a single-specimen or multiple-specimen procedures. These fracture quantities are determined under the opening mode (Mode I) of loading. Influences of environment a...

  2. Probabilistic modeling of crack networks in thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, N.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal superficial crack networks have been detected in mixing zone of cooling system in nuclear power plants. Numerous experimental works have already been led to characterize initiation and propagation of these cracks. The random aspect of initiation led to propose a probabilistic model for the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal fatigue. In a first part, uniaxial mechanical test were performed on smooth and slightly notched specimens in order to characterize the initiation of multiple cracks, their arrest due to obscuration and the coalescence phenomenon by recovery of amplification stress zones. In a second time, the probabilistic model was established under two assumptions: the continuous cracks initiation on surface, described by a Poisson point process law with threshold, and the shielding phenomenon which prohibits the initiation or the propagation of a crack if this one is in the relaxation stress zone of another existing crack. The crack propagation is assumed to follow a Paris' law based on the computation of stress intensity factors at the top and the bottom of crack. The evolution of multiaxial cracks on the surface can be followed thanks to three quantities: the shielding probability, comparable to a damage variable of the structure, the initiated crack density, representing the total number of cracks per unit surface which can be compared to experimental observations, and the propagating crack density, representing the number per unit surface of active cracks in the network. The crack sizes distribution is also computed by the model allowing an easier comparison with experimental results. (author)

  3. Analysis and experimental validation of through-thickness cracked large-scale biaxial fracture tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, C.S.; Goldthorpe, M.R.; Andrews, R.M.; Garwood, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1984 TWI has been involved in an extensive series of tests investigating the effects of biaxial loading on the fracture behaviour of A533B steel. Testing conditions have ranged from the lower to upper shelf regions of the transition curve and covered a range of biaxiality ratios. In an attempt to elucidate the trends underlying the experimental results, finite element-based mechanistic models were used to analyse the effects of biaxial loading. For ductile fracture, a modified Gunson model was used and important effects on tearing behaviour were found for through thickness cracked wide plates, as observed in upper shelf tests. For cleavage fracture, both simple T-stress methods and the Anderson-Dodds and Beremin models were used. Whilst the effect of biaxiality on surface cracked plates was small, a marked effect of biaxial loading was found for the through-thickness crack. To further validate the numerical predictions for cleavage fracture, TWI have performed an additional series of lower shelf through thickness cracked biaxial wide plate fracture tests. These tests were performed using various biaxiality loading conditions varying from simple uniaxial loading, through equibiaxial loading, to a biaxiality ratio equivalent to a circumferential crack in a pressure vessel. These tests confirmed the predictions that there is a significant effect of biaxial loading on cleavage fracture of through thickness cracked plate. (orig.)

  4. A method for crack sizing using Bayesian inference arising in eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Fumio; Kikuchi, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a sizing methodology of crack using Bayesian inference arising in eddy current testing. There is often uncertainty about data through quantitative measurements of nondestructive testing and this can yield misleading inference of crack sizing at on-site monitoring. In this paper, we propose optimal strategies of measurements in eddy current testing using Bayesian prior-to-posteriori analysis. First our likelihood functional is given by Gaussian distribution with the measurement model based on the hybrid use of finite and boundary element methods. Secondly, given a priori distributions of crack sizing, we propose a method for estimating the region of interest for sizing cracks. Finally an optimal sensing method is demonstrated using our idea. (author)

  5. Towards a European draft code of practice in creep crack growth testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikbin, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    Crack growth and initiation models as well as defect assessment codes need reliable and verifiable material properties data for use in their predictive methodologies. These data consist of uniaxial, multiaxial and crack initiation and growth data under static and cyclic loading at the relevant temperatures. International collaboration for developing standards in this field started in 1987 under the auspices of the VAMAS (Versailles Agreement for MAterials and Standards). Two technical Working Areas TWA11 and TWA19 committees ending 1998 have made substantial progress in unifying and standardising the methods for obtaining the relevant data. This collaboration has resulted in the development of ASTM E1457 creep crack growth testing standard. The European collaborative programme CRETE (see Acknowledgements), which began in 1999, is following up this valuable research in order to develop a European Code of Practice for elevated temperature crack growth which is planned to have a wider field of application. A Round Robin experimental, analytical and verification programme in CRETE will include testing a type 316 LN stainless steel at 550 degC and a Carbon-Manganese steel at 400 degC consisting of seven different geometries. The paper reviews the methods of analysis used for laboratory creep crack growth data and their relevance to long term crack initiation and growth in components. In addition, since design and life assessment and material properties under creep are an integral part of this project a short review of the models available for predicting creep and fatigue crack growth is presented. (author)

  6. Development of European creep crack growth testing code of practice for industrial specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, B.; Nikbin, K.; Petrovski, B.

    2004-01-01

    The integrity and residual life assessment of high temperature components require defects, detected or assumed to exist, through minimum allowable limits of detectable flaws using nondestructive testing methods. It relies on information obtained from the material's mechanical, uniaxial creep, creep crack initiation and growth properties. The information derived from experiments needs to be validated and harmonised following a Code of Practice that data variability between different institutions can be reduced to a minimum. The present paper reports on a Code of Practice (CoP) being prepared within the framework of the partially European Commission funded project CRETE. The novel aspect of the presented CoP is the inclusion of component relevant industrial specimen geometries. It covers testing and analysis of Creep Crack growth (CCG) in metallic materials at elevated temperature using six different cracked geometries that have been validated in. It aims to give advice on testing, measurements and analysis of creep crack growth data for a range of creep brittle to creep ductile materials using component service relevant specimen geometries and sizes. The CoP may be used for material selection criteria and inspection requirements for damage tolerant applications. In quantitative terms, these types of tests can be used to assess the individual and combined effects of metallurgical, fabrication, operating temperature, and loading conditions on creep crack growth life. Further issues will be addressed including material properties, damage and crack growth related constraint effect, stress relaxation and stress-strain fields, residual stresses, partitioning displacement, analysis of elastic creep, elastic compliance measurements

  7. Micro alloyed steel weldability and sensibility testing on the lamellar cracks appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stojadinović

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work are given the testing results of mechanical properties welded joints and microstructure of micro alloyed steel as well as its sensitivity to lamellar cracks appearance. The obtained results show that steel has good resistance to lamellar cracks appearance and with an appropriate wire choice for welding, a good combination of mechanical properties could be obtained at room (ambience temperatures as well as at low temperatures.

  8. Bursting tests on pressure vessels with cracks differing in configuration and location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlberg, R.

    1978-01-01

    For assessing the safety of nuclear pressure vessels exhibiting cracks, bursting test were carried out on a series of medium-size pressure vessels with and without welded nozzles and exhibiting cracks differing in configuration and location. The linear-elastic approach proved to be sufficiently accurate for straight strain conditions up to the onset of general yielding. Other analytical methods were successfully used to cover the plastic region. (orig.) [de

  9. Standard practice for fracture testing with surface-crack tension specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the design, preparation, and testing of surface-crack tension (SCT) specimens. It relates specifically to testing under continuously increasing force and excludes cyclic and sustained loadings. The quantity determined is the residual strength of a specimen having a semielliptical or circular-segment fatigue crack in one surface. This value depends on the crack dimensions and the specimen thickness as well as the characteristics of the material. 1.2 Metallic materials that can be tested are not limited by strength, thickness, or toughness. However, tests of thick specimens of tough materials may require a tension test machine of extremely high capacity. The applicability of this practice to nonmetallic materials has not been determined. 1.3 This practice is limited to specimens having a uniform rectangular cross section in the test section. The test section width and length must be large with respect to the crack length. Crack depth and length should be chosen to suit the ultimate pu...

  10. A test procedure for determining the influence of stress ratio on fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J. H.; Wei, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    A test procedure is outlined by which the rate of fatigue crack growth over a range of stress ratios and stress intensities can be determined expeditiously using a small number of specimens. This procedure was developed to avoid or circumvent the effects of load interactions on fatigue crack growth, and was used to develop data on a mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy plate. Experimental data suggest that the rates of fatigue crack growth among the various stress ratios may be correlated in terms of an effective stress intensity range at given values of K max. This procedure is not to be used, however, for determining the corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of alloys when nonsteady-state effects are significant.

  11. An accurately controllable imitative stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose a method to simulate stress corrosion cracking. ► The method offers nondestructive signals similar to those of actual cracking. ► Visual and eddy current examinations validate the method. - Abstract: This study proposes a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an artificial flaw that is identical to stress corrosion cracking especially from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea of the approach is to embed a partially-bonded region inside a material by bonding together surfaces that have grooves. The region is regarded as an area of uniform non-zero conductivity from an electromagnetic nondestructive point of view, and thus simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking. Since the grooves are introduced using electro-discharge machining, one can control the profile of the imitative stress corrosion cracking accurately. After numerical simulation to evaluate the spatial resolution of conventional eddy current testing, six specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel were fabricated on the basis of the results of the simulations. Visual and eddy current examinations were carried out to demonstrate that the artificial flaws well simulated the characteristics of actual stress corrosion cracking. Subsequent destructive test confirmed that the bonding did not change the depth profiles of the artificial flaw.

  12. Artificial-Crack-Behavior Test Evaluation of the Water-Leakage Repair Materials Used for the Repair of Water-Leakage Cracks in Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Yeon Kim; Sang-Keun Oh; Byoungil Kim

    2016-01-01

    There are no existing standard test methods at home and abroad that can verify the performance of water leakage repair materials, and it is thus very difficult to perform quality control checks in the field of water leakage repair. This study determined that the key factors that have the greatest impact on the water leakage repair materials are the micro-behaviors of cracks, and proposed an artificial-crack-behavior test method for the performance verification of the repair materials. The per...

  13. Crack growth testing of cold worked stainless steel in a simulated PWR primary water environment to assess susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Stairmand, J.W.; Fairbrother, H.J.; Stock, A.

    2007-01-01

    Although austenitic stainless steels do not show a high degree of susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in PWR primary environments, there is limited evidence from laboratory testing that crack propagation may occur under some conditions for materials in a cold-worked condition. A test program is therefore underway to examine the factors influencing SCC propagation in good quality PWR primary coolant. Type 304 stainless steel was subjected to cold working by either rolling (at ambient or elevated temperature) or fatigue cycling, to produce a range of yield strengths. Compact tension specimens were fabricated from these materials and tested in simulated high temperature (250-300 o C) PWR primary coolant. It was observed that the degree of crack propagation was influenced by the degree of cold work, the crack growth orientation relative to the rolling direction and the method of working. (author)

  14. An approach to reconstruction of a natural crack using signals of eddy current testing. 1. Reconstruction of an idealized natural crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhenmao

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, an approach to the reconstruction of an idealized natural crack of non-vanishing conductivity is proposed with use of signals of eddy current testing. Two numerical models are introduced at first for modeling a Stress Corrosion Crack (SCC) in order it possibly to be represented by a set of crack parameters. A method for rapid prediction of the eddy current testing signals arisen from these idealized cracks is given then by extending a knowledge based fast forward solver developed by authors to the case of a non-vanishing conductivity. On the other hand, the inverse algorithm of conjugate gradient method is improved to reconstruct the crack parameters and is implemented with the pick-up signals and gradients calculated by using the rapid forward solver. Several examples are presented finally for validating the proposed strategy. The results verified that both of the models can give reasonable reconstruction results in case of a low noise level. The model concerning the touch of crack surfaces with a conducting band region surrounded by the crack edge, however, is proved more efficient that the model using a conductivity distribution from the point of view of both reconstruction speed and accuracy. (author)

  15. Further Development of Crack Growth Detection Techniques for US Test and Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohse, Gordon; Carpenter, David M.; Ostrovsky, Yakov; Joseph Palmer, A.; Teysseyre, Sebastien P.; Davis, Kurt L.; Rempe, Joy L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key issues facing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in extending lifetimes beyond 60 years is characterizing the combined effect of irradiation and water chemistry on material degradation and failure. Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC), in which a crack propagates in a susceptible material under stress in an aggressive environment, is a mechanism of particular concern. Full understanding of IASCC depends on real time crack growth data acquired under relevant irradiation conditions. Techniques to measure crack growth in actively loaded samples under irradiation have been developed outside the US - at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor, for example. Several types of IASCC tests have also been deployed at the MITR, including passively loaded crack growth measurements and actively loaded slow strain rate tests. However, there is not currently a facility available in the US to measure crack growth on actively loaded, pre-cracked specimens in LWR irradiation environments. A joint program between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) is currently underway to develop and demonstrate such a capability for US test and research reactors. Based on the Halden design, the samples will be loaded using miniature high pressure bellows and a compact loading mechanism, with crack length measured in real time using the switched Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. The basic design and initial mechanical testing of the load system and implementation of the DCPD method have been previously reported. This paper presents the results of initial autoclave testing at INL and the adaptation of the design for use in the high pressure, high temperature water loop at the MITR 6 MW research reactor, where an initial demonstration is planned in mid-2015. Materials considerations for the high pressure bellows are addressed. Design modifications to the loading mechanism required by the

  16. Testing machine for fatigue crack kinetic investigation in specimens under bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasyuk, V.V.; Ratych, L.V.; Dmytrakh, I.N.

    1978-01-01

    A kinematic diagram of testing mashine for the investigation of fatigue crack kinetics in prismatic specimens, subjected to pure bending is described. Suggested is a technique of choosing an optimum ratio of the parameters of ''the testing machine-specimen'' system, which provide the stabilization of the stress intensity coefficient for a certain region of crack development under hard loading. On the example of the 40KhS and 15Kh2MFA steel specimens the pliability of the machine constructed according to the described diagram and designed for the 30ONxm maximum bending moment. The results obtained can be used in designing of the testing machines for studying pure bending under hard loading and in choosing the sizes of specimens with rectangular cross sections for investigations into the kinetics of the fatigue crack

  17. An overview of the HSST Full-Thickness Shallow-Crack Clad Beam Testing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Theiss, T.J.; McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    A testing program is described that will utilize full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow flaws in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow flaws in the beam specimen include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. Fracture toughness tests focusing on shallow flaws in plate and weld material will also provide data for evaluating the relative influence of absolute and normalized crack depth on constraint conditions. Pretest finite-element analyses are described that provide near-tip stress and strain fields for characterization of constraint in the shallow-crack specimens in terms of the Q-stress. Analysis results predict a constraint loss in the shallow-crack clad beam specimen similar to that determined for a previously tested shallow-crack single-edge notch homogeneous bend specimen with the same normalized crack depth

  18. Investigation of Bearing Axial Cracking: Benchtop and Full-Scale Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gould, Benjamin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Greco, Aaron [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-16

    The most common failure mode in wind turbine gearboxes is axial cracking in intermediate and high-speed-stage bearings, also commonly called white-etching cracks (WECs). Although these types of cracks have been reported for over a decade, the conditions leading to WECs, the process by which this failure culminates, and the reasons for their apparent prevalence in wind turbine gearboxes are all highly debated. This paper summarizes the state of a multipronged research effort to examine the causes of WECs in wind turbine gearbox bearings. Recent efforts have recreated WECs on a benchtop test rig in highly loaded sliding conditions, wherein it was found that the formation of a dark etching microstructure precedes the formation of a crack, and a crack precedes the formation of white-etching microstructure. A cumulative frictional sliding energy criterion has been postulated to predict the presence of WECs. Bearing loads have also been measured and predicted in steady state and transient drivetrain operations in dynamometer testing. In addition, both loads and sliding at full scale will be measured in planned uptower drivetrain testing. If the cumulative frictional sliding energy is the dominant mechanism that causes WECs, understanding the amount of frictional sliding energy that wind turbine bearings are subjected to in typical operations is the next step in the investigation. If highly loaded sliding conditions are found uptower, similar to the examined benchtop levels, appropriate mitigation solutions can be examined, ranging from new bearing coatings and improved lubricants to changes in gearbox designs and turbine operations.

  19. Numerical ductile tearing simulation of circumferential cracked pipe tests under dynamic loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Suk; Kim, Ji Soo; Ryu, Ho Wan; Kim, Yun Jae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Weon [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper presents a numerical method to simulate ductile tearing in cracked components under high strain rates using finite element damage analysis. The strain rate dependence on tensile properties and multiaxial fracture strain is characterized by the model developed by Johnson and Cook. The damage model is then defined based on the ductility exhaustion concept using the strain rate dependent multiaxial fracture strain concept. The proposed model is applied to simulate previously published three cracked pipe bending test results under two different test speed conditions. Simulated results show overall good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Potential drop crack growth monitoring in high temperature biaxial fatigue tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, B.P.; Krempl, E.

    1993-01-01

    The present work describes a procedure for monitoring crack growth in high temperature, biaxial, low cycle fatigue tests. The reversing DC potential drop equipment monitors smooth, tubular type 304 stainless steel specimens during fatigue testing. Electrical interference from an induction heater is filtered out by an analog filter and by using a long integration time. A Fourier smoothing algorithm and two spline interpolations process the large data set. The experimentally determined electrical potential drop is compared with the theoretical electrostatic potential that is found by solving Laplace's equation for an elliptical crack in a semi-infinite conducting medium. Since agreement between theory and experiment is good, the method can be used to measure crack growth to failure from the threshold of detectability

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  2. [After your heart arrest, would you like to test a medicinal elixir?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, P-N; Hugli, O; Liaudet, L; Yersin, B

    2005-02-09

    So far, cardiac arrest is still associated with high mortality or severe neurological disability in survivors. At the tissue level, cardiac arrest results into an acute condition of generalized hypoxia. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion and of the inflammatory response that develops after cardiac arrest could help to design novel therapeutic strategies in the future. It seems unlikely that a single drug, acting as a , might be able to improve survival or neurological prognosis. Lessons learned from pathophysiological mechanisms rather indicate that combined therapies, involving thrombolysis, neuroprotective agents, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory molecules, together with temperature cooling, might represent helpful strategies to improve patient's outcome after cardiac arrest.

  3. Analysis of crack initiation and growth in the high level vibration test at Tadotsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassir, M.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1991-01-01

    A High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) Program was carried out recently on the seismic table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the study being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is to use the HLVT data to assess the accuracy and usefulness of existing methods for predicting crack initiation and growth under complex, large amplitude loading. The work to be performed as part of this effort involves: (1) analysis of the stress/strain distribution in the vicinity of the crack, including the potential for residual stresses due to the weld repair; (2) analysis of the number of load cycles required for crack initiation, including estimates of the impact of the weld repair on the crack initiation behavior; (3) analysis of crack advance as a function of applied loading (classic fatigue versus cyclic tearing) taking into account the variable amplitude loading and the possible influence of the repair; and (4) material property testing to supplement the work performed as part of the HLVT, providing the materials data necessary to perform the analysis efforts. A summary of research progress for FY 1990 is presented. 2 refs

  4. Passive wireless antenna sensor for strain and crack sensing—electromagnetic modeling, simulation, and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Xiaohua; Cho, Chunhee; Wang, Yang; Cooper, James; Tentzeris, Manos M; Leon, Roberto T

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates a passive wireless antenna sensor designed for strain and crack sensing. When the antenna experiences deformation, the antenna shape changes, causing a shift in the electromagnetic resonance frequency of the antenna. A radio frequency identification (RFID) chip is adopted for antenna signal modulation, so that a wireless reader can easily distinguish the backscattered sensor signal from unwanted environmental reflections. The RFID chip captures its operating power from an interrogation electromagnetic wave emitted by the reader, which allows the antenna sensor to be passive (battery-free). This paper first reports the latest simulation results on radiation patterns, surface current density, and electromagnetic field distribution. The simulation results are followed with experimental results on the strain and crack sensing performance of the antenna sensor. Tensile tests show that the wireless antenna sensor can detect small strain changes lower than 20 με, and can perform well at large strains higher than 10 000 με. With a high-gain reader antenna, the wireless interrogation distance can be increased up to 2.1 m. Furthermore, an array of antenna sensors is capable of measuring the strain distribution in close proximity. During emulated crack and fatigue crack tests, the antenna sensor is able to detect the growth of a small crack. (paper)

  5. Development of European creep crack growth testing code of practice for industrial specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, B.; Nikbin, K. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Petrovski, B. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde (IFW)

    2004-07-01

    The integrity and residual life assessment of high temperature components require defects, detected or assumed to exist, through minimum allowable limits of detectable flaws using nondestructive testing methods. It relies on information obtained from the material's mechanical, uniaxial creep, creep crack initiation and growth properties. The information derived from experiments needs to be validated and harmonised following a Code of Practice that data variability between different institutions can be reduced to a minimum. The present paper reports on a Code of Practice (CoP) being prepared within the framework of the partially European Commission funded project CRETE. The novel aspect of the presented CoP is the inclusion of component relevant industrial specimen geometries. It covers testing and analysis of Creep Crack growth (CCG) in metallic materials at elevated temperature using six different cracked geometries that have been validated in. It aims to give advice on testing, measurements and analysis of creep crack growth data for a range of creep brittle to creep ductile materials using component service relevant specimen geometries and sizes. The CoP may be used for material selection criteria and inspection requirements for damage tolerant applications. In quantitative terms, these types of tests can be used to assess the individual and combined effects of metallurgical, fabrication, operating temperature, and loading conditions on creep crack growth life. Further issues will be addressed including material properties, damage and crack growth related constraint effect, stress relaxation and stress-strain fields, residual stresses, partitioning displacement, analysis of elasticcreep, elastic compliance measurements.

  6. Fatigue crack behaviour: comparing three-point bend test and wedge splitting test data on vibrated concrete using Paris' law

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seitl, Stanislav; Thienpont, T.; De Corte, W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 39 (2017), s. 110-117 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Fatigue crack behaviour * Tree-point bending test * Wedge splitting test * Self-compacting concrete Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  7. Multiple cracks initiation and propagation behavior of stainless steel in high temperature water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Chiba, Goro; Nakajima, Nobuo; Totsuka, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    Environmentally assisted crack initiation behavior is greatly affected by applied stress and environmental factors, such as water temperature, contained impurities and so on. On the other hand, crack initiation behavior also influences crack propagation. A typical example of this influence can be observed as the interference effects of multiple cracks, such as the coalescence of approaching crack tips or the arrest phenomena in the relaxation zone of an adjacent crack. To understand these effects of crack initiation on crack propagation behavior is very important to predict the lifetime of components, in which quite a few cracks tend to occur. This study aimed at revealing the crack initiation behavior and the influence of this behavior on propagation. At first, to evaluate the effect of applied stress on crack initiation behavior, sensitized stainless steel was subjected to a four-point bending test in a high temperature water environment at the constant potentials of ECP +50 mV and ECP +150 mV. Secondly, a crack initiation and growth simulation model was developed, in which the interference effect of multiple cracks is evaluated by the finite element method, based on the experimental results. Using this model, the relationship between crack initiation and propagation was studied. From the model, it was revealed that the increasing number of the cracks accelerates crack propagation and reduces life. (author)

  8. Initiation and propagation of multiple cracks of stainless steel in high temperature water environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Chiba, Goro; Nakajima, Nobuo; Totsuka, Nobuo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Environmentally assisted crack initiation behavior is greatly affected by applied stress and environmental factors, such as water temperature, contained impurities and so on. Crack initiation behavior also influences crack propagation. A typical example of this influence can be observed as the interference effects of multiple cracks, such as the coalescence of approaching crack tips or the arrest phenomena in the relaxation zone of an adjacent crack. To understand these effects of crack initiation on crack propagation behavior is very important to predict the lifetime of components, in which relatively large number of cracks tend to occur. This study aimed at revealing the crack initiation behavior and the influence of this behavior on propagation. At first, to evaluate the effect of applied stress on crack initiation behavior, sensitized stainless steel was subjected to a four-point bending test in high temperature water environment at the constant potentials of +50 mV SHE and +150 mV SHE Secondly, a crack initiation and growth simulation model was developed, in which the interference effect of multiple cracks is evaluated by the finite element method, based on the experimental results. Using this model, the relationship between crack initiation and propagation was investigated, and it was revealed that the increasing number of the cracks accelerates crack propagation and reduces life. (author)

  9. Determination of the bonding strength in solid oxide fuel cells' interfaces by Schwickerath crack initiation test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Sevecek, O.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2017-01-01

    An adaptation of the Schwickerath crack initiation test (ISO 9693) was used to determine the bonding strength between an anode support and three different cathodes with a solid oxide fuel cell interconnect. Interfacial elemental characterization of the interfaces was carried out by SEM/EDS analys...

  10. Cracking and load-deformation behavior of fiber reinforced concrete: Influence of testing method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Minelli, Fausto; Fischer, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    cementitious composites with strain hardening and strain softening behavior. Digital Image Correlation was utilized in the experimental program to detect and quantify the formation of cracks. Results show that the different test methodologies valuate specific aspects of material performance. The outcome...

  11. ASK Procedure for Instrumented Pre-cracked Charpy-Type Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, T.; Njo, D.H.; Prantl, G.

    1981-01-01

    The essential technical content of the ASK procedure originated from development work in Switzerland since 1963, and practical experiences gained since 1972. The remainder of the content and the format of the procedure are based on the ASTM E 24.03.03. (Tentative Draft Copy) 'Proposed Method for Pre-cracked Charpy Impact and Slow-Bend Testing of Metallic Materials' by C. E. Harbower, 1973. Two different velocities, 5 m/s and 0.1 m/s were used with a Schnadt-type machine of rigid construction. The stiffness of the machine proved to be very suitable for instrumented testing. The instrumented Schnadt-Type machine was equipped with strain gauges both on the top of the pendulum and on the chisel. A static force calibration was followed by energy calibration, comparing potential energy losses with the area under the force-deflection curve. Deflection was measured using a high frequency eddy current method on the pendulum, and for slow testing by means of an inductive gauge on the chisel. Charpy-Type specimens of 1.0 mm max notch depth and 0.12 mm max notch radius were pre-cracked using a resonant fatigue testing machine, or an eccentric drive machine. Crack propagation rate da/dN was measured using 'Russenberger' measuring gauges. In addition a new technique for the detection of dynamic crack initiation, developed at the Institute of Research and Technology (TVFA) in Vienna is discussed and some results presented

  12. Methodic aspects of autoclave tests of compact samples on cyclic crack resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhmurskij, V.I.; Gnyp, I.P.; Popov, A.A.; Tarasyuk, G.P.; Dutsyak, I.Z.; Timonin, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory autoclave LAKIM-25 was created for investigation of cyclic and static crack resistance of vessel materials of power plants under the conditions close to operation ones. It enables to investigate the cyclic crack resistance of standard samples of up to 25 mm thickness in water at 623 K and 18 MPa. The friction force changes during tests from 6.1 up to 6.4 kN, therefore it is necessary to correct regularly the force of sample loading, recording the s-n diagram on a drum of UMEh-10TM plant. The periodic record of loading diagram coincides with respect to time with the necessity of controlling the change of sample pliability during crack propagation

  13. Ultrasonic signal processing and B-SCAN imaging for nondestructive testing. Application to under - cladding - cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, G.

    1988-02-01

    Crack propagation under the stainless steel cladding of nuclear reactor vessels is monitored by ultrasonic testing. This work study signal processing to improve detection and sizing of defects. Two possibilities are examined: processing of each individual signal and simultaneous processing of all the signals giving a B-SCAN image. The bibliographic study of time-frequency methods shows that they are not suitable for pulses. Then decomposition in instantaneous frequency and envelope is used. Effect of interference of 2 close echoes on instantaneous frequency is studies. The deconvolution of B-SCAN images is obtained by the transducer field. A point-by-point deconvolution method, less noise sensitive, is developed. B-SCAN images are processed in 2 phases: interface signal processing and deconvolution. These calculations improve image accuracy and dynamics. Water-stell interface and ferritic-austenitic interface are separated. Echoes of crack top are visualized and crack-hole differentiation is improved [fr

  14. Creep crack growth verification testing in alloy 800H tubular components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.P.; Hurst, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    A method for determining the creep crack growth, CCG, and stress rupture behaviour of Alloy 800H tubular components containing longitudinal notches at 800deg C is described. The presence of the notch is found to systematically weaken the tube, the degree of weaking dependent upon the notch length and depth. The creep crack growth rates, determined from a specially adapted potential drop technique are compared with those obtained from conventional compact tension type specimens. Using the stress intensity factor, K 1 , and the C * parameter as the basis of comparison it is found that the latter gives excellent correlation between the specimen and component behaviour. Finally attention is drawn to the potential dangers of predicting the component creep crack growth behaviour from the data obtained using conventional specimens for a structure sensitive material such as Alloy 800H and conversely to the advantages of the component type CCG tests developed in the present work. (orig.)

  15. Artificial-Crack-Behavior Test Evaluation of the Water-Leakage Repair Materials Used for the Repair of Water-Leakage Cracks in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yeon Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There are no existing standard test methods at home and abroad that can verify the performance of water leakage repair materials, and it is thus very difficult to perform quality control checks in the field of water leakage repair. This study determined that the key factors that have the greatest impact on the water leakage repair materials are the micro-behaviors of cracks, and proposed an artificial-crack-behavior test method for the performance verification of the repair materials. The performance of the 15 kinds of repair materials that are currently being used in the field of water leakage repair was evaluated by applying the proposed test method. The main aim of such a test method is to determine if there is water leakage by injecting water leakage repair materials into a crack behavior test specimen with an artificial 5-mm crack width, applying a 2.5 mm vertical behavior load at 100 cycles, and applying 0.3 N/mm2 constant water pressure. The test results showed that of the 15 kinds of repair materials, only two effectively sealed the crack and thus stopped the water leakage. The findings of this study confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed artificial-crack-behavior test method and suggest that it can be used as a performance verification method for checking the responsiveness of the repair materials being used in the field of water leakage repair to the repetitive water leakage behaviors that occur in concrete structures. The study findings further suggest that the use of the proposed test method makes it possible to quantify the water leakage repair quality control in the field.

  16. Aquatic ecotoxicity and biodegradability of cracked gas oils. Summary of relevant test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Parkerton, T.; Leon Paumen, M.; Dmytrasz, B.; Del Castillo, F.

    2013-09-15

    This report describes the experimental procedures and the results obtained in acute and chronic ecotoxicity tests as well as a biodegradation study on cracked gas oil samples. In a CONCAWE study, three samples were tested for toxicity to the crustacean zooplankter, Daphnia magna and the algae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (alternatively known as Selenastrum capricornutum) using water accommodated fractions. In addition, another sample was tested in a separate API study for toxicity to the fish, Oncorhynchus mykiss, the crustacean zooplankter, Daphnia magna (acute and chronic) and the algae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata using water accommodated fractions. The API sample was also tested for ready biodegradability in a manometric respirometry test. All these results assist in determining the environmental hazard posed by cracked gas oils.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  18. Results of a bench mark test on the crack opening and leak rate calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.

    1995-01-01

    Results of a bench mark test on the standard problem calculation of crack opening and leak rate in piping components are presented. The bench mark test is based on two experiments performed in phase III of the German HDR safety program. The pipe sections considered in these experiments were a straight pipe with an 80 mm diameter containing a circumferential wall penetrating crack and a pipe branch DN 100/DN 25 with a crack in the weldment between the nozzle and the main pipe. Both test pieces were made of austenitic steel and were loaded by internal pressure and bending moment. For the evaluation of the crack opening either analytical methods or estimation schemes or the finite element method were used, while leak rates were calculated by means of two-phase flow methods. The compilation of the results shows very large scatter bands in general, with deviations between calculated and measured values of up to some one hundred percent. Reasons for this behaviour are uncertainties in the measured data and their evaluation as well as the different methods of calculation and their uncertainties. (author)

  19. Analysis of crack initiation and growth in the high level vibration test at Tadotsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassir, M.K.; Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Shteyngart, S.

    1993-08-01

    The High Level Vibration Test data are used to assess the accuracy and usefulness of current engineering methodologies for predicting crack initiation and growth in a cast stainless steel pipe elbow under complex, large amplitude loading. The data were obtained by testing at room temperature a large scale modified model of one loop of a PWR primary coolant system at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory in Japan. Fatigue crack initiation time is reasonably predicted by applying a modified local strain approach (Coffin-Mason-Goodman equation) in conjunction with Miner's rule of cumulative damage. Three fracture mechanics methodologies are applied to investigate the crack growth behavior observed in the hot leg of the model. These are: the ΔK methodology (Paris law), ΔJ concepts and a recently developed limit load stress-range criterion. The report includes a discussion on the pros and cons of the analysis involved in each of the methods, the role played by the key parameters influencing the formulation and a comparison of the results with the actual crack growth behavior observed in the vibration test program. Some conclusions and recommendations for improvement of the methodologies are also provided

  20. Standard test method for crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness measurement

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of critical crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) values at one or more of several crack extension events, and may be used to measure cleavage crack initiation toughness for materials that exhibit a change from ductile to brittle behavior with decreasing temperature, such as ferritic steels. This test method applies specifically to notched specimens sharpened by fatigue cracking. The recommended specimens are three-point bend [SE(B)], compact [C(T)], or arc-shaped bend [A(B)] specimens. The loading rate is slow and influences of environment (other than temperature) are not covered. The specimens are tested under crosshead or clip gage displacement controlled loading. 1.1.1 The recommended specimen thickness, B, for the SE(B) and C(T) specimens is that of the material in thicknesses intended for an application. For the A(B) specimen, the recommended depth, W, is the wall thickness of the tube or pipe from which the specimen is obtained. Superficial surface machini...

  1. Magnetic powder crack tests as a means of quality assurance in forged parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, V.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic powder process has been used for years for crack detection in forged parts, which are used as safety parts in car construction. The representation of the present state of technology appears useful, as terms and units have been redefined in DIN draft standards and guidelines, and because alternating field magnetisation has increasingly displaced earlier techniques. The correct choice of equipment, test materials and UV lamps, and the configuration of the working positions are discussed. As the complete automation of this test method is not possible at present, the organisation of the viewing process is of great importance. The comparison with other processes of non-destructive material testing proves the irreplaceability of the magnetic power crack testing at present. (orig.) [de

  2. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  3. Investigation of hydrogen assisted cracking in acicular ferrite using site-specific micro-fracture tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costin, Walter L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Lavigne, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.lavigne@adelaide.edu.au [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Kotousov, Andrei; Ghomashchi, Reza [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Linton, Valerie [Energy Pipelines Cooperative Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-10

    Hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) is a common type of failure mechanism that can affect a wide range of metals and alloys. Experimental studies of HAC are cumbersome due to various intrinsic and extrinsic parameters and factors (associated with stress, hydrogen and the materials microstructure) contributing to the hydrogen crack kinetics. The microstructure of many materials consists of diverse constituents with characteristic features and mechanical properties which only occur in very small material volumes. The only way to differentiate the effect of these individual constituents on the hydrogen crack kinetics is to miniaturise the testing procedures. In this paper we present a new experimental approach to investigate hydrogen assisted crack growth in a microstructural constituent, i.e. acicular ferrite. For this purpose, sharply notched micro-cantilevers were fabricated with a Focus Ion Beam within this selected microscopic region. Acicular ferrite can be found in many ferrous alloys including ferritic weld metal and has specific features that control its intrinsic susceptibility to HAC. These features were characterised via Electron Backscatter Diffraction and the specimens were subsequently loaded under uncharged and hydrogen charged conditions with a nano-indenter. The outcomes of the testing, demonstrated that the threshold stress intensity factor, K{sub th}, to initiate crack propagation in acicular ferrite ranges between 1.56 MPa m{sup 1/2} and 4.36 MPa m{sup 1/2}. This range is significantly below the values of K{sub th} reported for various ferrous alloys in standard macro-tests. This finding indicates that the mechanisms and resistance to HAC at micro-scale could be very different than at the macro-scale as not all fracture toughening mechanisms may be activated at this scale level.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented

  5. Tests at constant extension velocity CERT for the evaluation of environmental assisted cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    The test at constant velocity extension (CERT) is firmly established as a technique for the study of environmentally cracking (stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement) and is widely used, mainly in mechanistic studies. In CERT test, an increasing charge is applied to a sample and the extension velocity is hold up constant to allow that corrosion interplay in the process. The type of crack and ductility measurements with the conditions for testing are compared with a cracked sample in an inert media. Required equipment: 1) A charge mechanism capable to control the elongation of test samples in a rank of 1 x 10 -5 to 1 x 10 -7 inch/inch sec and capable to hold up constant such elongation. 2) A suitable standard (Astm standard A-370). 3) A chamber or cell for the media in which the chemical composition of the solution, the gas composition, the pressure, temperature and electrochemical potential can be controlled in order to simulate with anticipation the service conditions. The cell must allow the mechanical access of the test sample to the charge train of the machine. (Author)

  6. Development of testing system for the thermo-mechanical fatigue crack analysis of nuclear power plant pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Maan Won; Lee, Bong Sang

    2003-12-01

    Fatigue crack growth analysis plays an important role in the structural integrity assessment or the service life calculation of the nuclear power plant pipes. To obtain the material properties as a basic data to achieve an accurate crack growth analysis, a lot of tests and numerical crack growth simulations have been done for decades. The BS 7910 or the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, generally used to evaluate crack growth behavior, were made under the based on simple stress states or at the evaluated isothermal temperature. It is well known that the ASME code could sometimes give so conservative results in some cases of which the cracked components are experiencing with cyclic thermal shock. In this report, we suggested a method for the life assessment of a crack embedded in nuclear power plant pipes under the thermal-mechanical fatigue loads. We here use the numerical method to get the temperature history for thermal- mechanical fatigue crack growth test. And then we can calculate the remaining life time of the pipe by using the fracture mechanics and the test results together. For this purpose, we constructed a thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth testing system. We also gave a lot of review about recent researches in the experimental field of thermal-mechanical fatigue analysis

  7. Crack initiation and propagation on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Domínguez Almaraz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Crack initiation and propagation have been investigated on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing. Three controlled actions were implemented in order to carry out fatigue tests at very high frequency on this material of low thermal conductivity, they are: a The applying load was low to limit heat dissipation at the specimen neck section, b The dimensions of testing specimen were small (but fitting the resonance condition, in order to restraint the temperature gradient at the specimen narrow section, c Temperature at the specimen neck section was restrained by immersion in water or oil during ultrasonic fatigue testing. Experimental results are discussed on the basis of thermo-mechanical behaviour: the tail phenomenon at the initial stage of fatigue, initial shear yielding deformation, crazed development on the later stage, plastic strain on the fracture surface and the transition from low to high crack growth rate. In addition, a numerical analysis is developed to evaluate the J integral of energy dissipation and the stress intensity factor K, with the crack length

  8. Ductile growth of crack like flawing during hydrotest; Propagacao dutil de defeitos planares durante teste hidrostatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Jose C; Donato, Guilherme V [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Silva, Marcinei S. da; Bastian, Fernando L [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE); Lima, Romulo S. de [PETROBRAS/AB-RE, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    In this paper effects of hydrostatic testing on ductile propagation of crack like flaw defects were evaluated in API X-60 steel. The model used was based on the J-tearing theory, supported by elastic - plastic fracture mechanics. The J-initiation resistance values (JIc) were determined by fracture mechanic tests using potential drop technique and compact test specimen. The JIc values were also determined from flow stress and Charpy V-notch at plateau, which are both usually available in mill-test data. Despite of being based on small database it seems it could be extended and it will be useful for future analysis. (author)

  9. Biaxial fatigue tests and crack paths for AISI 304L stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Chaves

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AISI 304L stainless steel specimens have been tested in fatigue. The tests were axial, torsional and in-phase biaxial, all of them under load control and R=-1. The S-N curves were built following the ASTM E739 standard and the method of maximum likelihood proposed by Bettinelli. The fatigue limits of the biaxial tests were represented in axes σ-τ. The elliptical quadrant, appropriate for ductile materials, and the elliptical arc, appropriate for fragile materials, were included in the graph. The experimental values were better fitted with an elliptical quadrant, despite the ratio between the pure torsion and tension fatigue limits, τFL/σFL, is 0.91, close to 1, which is a typical value for fragile materials. The crack direction along the surface has been analyzed by using a microscope, with especial attention to the crack initiation zones. The crack direction during the Stage I has been compared with theoretical models.

  10. Study on hydrogen assisted cracking susceptibility of HSLA steel by implant test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopa Chakraborty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DMR-249A is an indigenously developed high strength low alloy steel for Indian ship building industry for making ship-hull and is extensively used in the construction of war ships and submarines. Welding electrodes conforming to SFA 5.5 AWS E8018 C1 has been indigenously developed for welding of this steel using shielded metal arc welding process. In the present study, susceptibility to hydrogen assisted cracking of DMR-249A steel welds made using this electrode has been assessed using implant test. Implant tests were conducted using this electrode at two different levels of diffusible hydrogen, measured using gas chromatography technique. It is observed that both the steel and the welding consumable are not susceptible to hydrogen assisted cracking even with a high diffusible hydrogen level of 9 mL/100g of weld metal. In implant tests, specimen did not fracture even after loading to stress levels higher than the yield strength of the base metal. The good resistance of this steel and the welding consumable, even with high levels of diffusible hydrogen, is attributed to absence of a susceptible microstructure in both the weld metal and heat affected zone. Hence, this study shows that, in the absence of a susceptible microstructure, hydrogen assisted cracking is unlikely to occur even if hydrogen level is high. It also confirms that in welding of DMR-249A with indigenously developed E8018 C1 electrode, hydrogen assisted cracking is not a concern and no preheating is required to avoid it during welding.

  11. Experimental investigation of flawed pipes with respect to fracture behavior and development of crack opening area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoppler, W [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1993-12-31

    The critical length of a longitudinal through-wall flaw, defined as that causing rupture, was first determined hydro-statically on large experimental vessels under internal pressure; the leak before rupture diagram for the base material of the vessel is established by experiment and calculation; it gives a limit between the two modes of failure, leakage or rupture (catastrophic failure), depending on slit length and loading conditions. Tests under pneumatic pressure were then carried out to investigate crack arrest, with notched discs made of a brittle material welded in the cylindrical part of the vessel, and cracks triggered by means of a small charged ignited over the notch. In the case of discs of a diameter smaller than the critical slit length, crack arrest occurred when the crack entered the tough material, while a disc corresponding to the critical crack length of the vessel led to rupture. 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Residual Strength Pressure Tests and Nonlinear Analyses of Stringer- and Frame-Stiffened Aluminum Fuselage Panels with Longitudinal Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard D.; Rouse, Marshall; Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The results of residual strength pressure tests and nonlinear analyses of stringer- and frame-stiffened aluminum fuselage panels with longitudinal cracks are presented. Two types of damage are considered: a longitudinal crack located midway between stringers, and a longitudinal crack adjacent to a stringer and along a row of fasteners in a lap joint that has multiple-site damage (MSD). In both cases, the longitudinal crack is centered on a severed frame. The panels are subjected to internal pressure plus axial tension loads. The axial tension loads are equivalent to a bulkhead pressure load. Nonlinear elastic-plastic residual strength analyses of the fuselage panels are conducted using a finite element program and the crack-tip-opening-angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. Predicted crack growth and residual strength results from nonlinear analyses of the stiffened fuselage panels are compared with experimental measurements and observations. Both the test and analysis results indicate that the presence of MSD affects crack growth stability and reduces the residual strength of stiffened fuselage shells with long cracks.

  13. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  14. Accelerated Testing Methodology for the Determination of Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1997-01-01

    Constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing has been used for several decades to characterize slow crack growth behavior of glass and ceramics at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The advantage of constant stress-rate testing over other methods lies in its simplicity: Strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying a constant crosshead speed or constant loading rate. The slow crack growth parameters (n and A) required for design can be estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. With the proper use of preloading in constant stress-rate testing, an appreciable saving of test time can be achieved. If a preload corresponding to 50 % of the strength is applied to the specimen prior to testing, 50 % of the test time can be saved as long as the strength remains unchanged regardless of the applied preload. In fact, it has been a common, empirical practice in strength testing of ceramics or optical fibers to apply some preloading (less then 40%). The purpose of this work is to study the effect of preloading on the strength to lay a theoretical foundation on such an empirical practice. For this purpose, analytical and numerical solutions of strength as a function of preloading were developed. To verify the solution, constant stress-rate testing using glass and alumina at room temperature and alumina silicon nitride, and silicon carbide at elevated temperatures was conducted in a range of preloadings from O to 90 %.

  15. C-130: Results of center wing residual strength and crack propagation test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.; Snider, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings which had experienced from approximately 4,000 to 13,000 hours of flight service and its associated fatigue damage were tested to destruction, seven in upbending and seven in downbending. Six wings were tested directly for static residual strength in the fatigue-damaged condition as received from field service. The other eight wings were tested in crack propagation cyclic testing at a prescribed stress level for a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Then the stress level was reduced and testing was continued up to a maximum of 20,000 total cycles. Cyclic testing was performed with constant-amplitude stresses at a stress ratio of +0.1. Maximum cyclic skin stresses were approximately 18,000 psi. At the conclusion of cyclic testing, a static test to destruction was conducted to determine the residual strength of each fatigue-damaged specimen.

  16. Hydrogen Induced Crack and Phase Transformation in Hydrogen Pressured Tensile Test of 316L Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Un Bong; Nam, Sung Hoon [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Byung Hak; Shim, Jong Hun [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Uk [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Keyyong [Korea Research Institute of Ship and Ocean Engineering, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this investigation is to prove the mechanism of hydrogen induced crack (HIC) of 316L stainless steels in hydrogen pressured tensile test. Microstructures like twin, planar slip, and abnormal phase transformation around the HIC were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Deformation twin accompanied by planar slip could be related to the main cause of HIC in the hydrogen pressured tensile condition, because intragranular HICs were mainly observed along the boundaries of twins and planar slip lines. An abnormal forbidden diffraction was also accompanied by HIC in the hydrogen attacked area. Examination of the HIC mechanism in austenitic stainless steel can be applied to the fitness of use for alloys with the possibility of various susceptible cracks in a hydrogen and stress atmosphere.

  17. Accelerated Testing Methodology Developed for Determining the Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    Constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") testing has been used for several decades to characterize the slow crack growth behavior of glass and structural ceramics at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The advantage of such testing over other methods lies in its simplicity: strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying a constant displacement or loading rate. The slow crack growth parameters required for component design can be estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. With the proper use of preloading in constant stress-rate testing, test time can be reduced appreciably. If a preload corresponding to 50 percent of the strength is applied to the specimen prior to testing, 50 percent of the test time can be saved as long as the applied preload does not change the strength. In fact, it has been a common, empirical practice in the strength testing of ceramics or optical fibers to apply some preloading (<40 percent). The purpose of this work at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to study the effect of preloading on measured strength in order to add a theoretical foundation to the empirical practice.

  18. Feasibility of Penetrant Testing on Surface Axial-Radial Cracks of GH4169 Super Alloy Turbine Disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIAO Haiyan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The post emulsifiable and water-washable fluorescent penetrant testing were carried out with ZL-27A and ZL67 respectively. Ultrasonic cleaning by detergent were used for 30 minutes before penetrant. The parts were immersed and drained for 60 minutes. The macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cracks were researched using the split mirror and scanning electron microscope. The results show that the outgrowth of high temperature oxidation plugs up the forging cracks. Thus the penetrant testing is not effective in detecting this type of cracks.

  19. Thermal fatigue crack growth tests and analyses of thick wall cylinder made of Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, Takashi, E-mail: wakai.takashi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho Oarai, Ibaraki 3111393 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [IX Knowledge Inc., 3-22-23 MSC Center Bldg, Kaigan Minato-ku, Tokyo 1080022 Japan (Japan); Ando, Masanori; Kobayashi, Sumio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho Oarai, Ibaraki 3111393 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A thermal fatigue crack growth test was performed using Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel cylinder. • Axial/circumferential notches were machined on the inner surface of the cylinder. • Simplified analytical results were compared to the test data. • Crack length could not be predicted by the analyses because of crack conjunctions. • If there are no surface cracks, the calculations might agree with the observations. - Abstract: In Japan, the basic designing works for a demonstration plant of Japan Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) are now conducted. JSFR is an advanced loop type reactor concept. To enhance the safety and the economic competitiveness, JSFR employs modified 9% chromium–1% molybdenum (Mod.9Cr–1Mo) steel as a material for coolant pipes and components, because the steel has both excellent high temperature strength and thermal properties. The steel has been standardized as a nuclear material in Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) code in 2012. In JSFR pipes, demonstration of Leak Before Break (LBB) aspect is strongly expected because the safety assessment may be performed on the premise of leak rate where the LBB aspect is assured. Although the authors have already performed a series of thermal fatigue crack growth tests of austenitic stainless steel cylinders (Wakai et al., 2005), crack growth behavior in the structures made of Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel has not been investigated yet. Especially for the welded joints of Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel, “Type-IV” cracking may occur at heat affected zone (HAZ). Therefore, this study performed a series of thermal fatigue crack growth tests of thick wall cylinders made of Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel including welds, to obtain the crack growth data under cyclic thermal transients. The test results were compared to the analytical results obtained from JAEA's simplified methods (Wakai et al., 2005).

  20. Manufacturing method for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced test specimen for stainless steel pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futagawa, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a manufacturing step for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced for stainless steel pipelines, pipe are abutted against with each other and welded, and a heat affected portion is applied with a sensitizing heat treatment. Further, a crevice jig is attached near the heat affected portion at the inner surface of the pipe and kept in a chlorine ion added water under high temperature and high pressure at a predetermined period of time. If tap water is used instead of purified water for C.P.T. test in a step of forming sample of IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking), since the chlorine ion concentration in the tap water is relatively high, TGSCC (intragranular stress corrosion crackings caused in all of the samples. A heat input and an interlayer temperature are determined for the material of stainless pipe having a carbon content of more than 0.05% so that the welding residual stress on the inner surface is applied as tension. The condition for the heat treatment is determined as, for example, 500degC x 24hr, and the samples are kept under water at high temperature and high pressure applied with chlorine ions for 500 to 200hours. As a result, since samples of TGSCC can be formed by utilizing the manufacturing step for IGSCC, there is no requirement for providing devices for applying environmental factors separately. (N.H.)

  1. Assessment of NDE methods for detecting cracks and damage in environmental barrier coated CMC tested under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Gorican, Daniel; Rauser, Richard W.

    2015-03-01

    For validating physics based analytical models predicting spallation life of environmental barrier coating (EBC) on fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, the fracture strength of EBC and kinetics of crack growth in EBC layers need to be experimentally determined under engine operating conditions. In this study, a multi layered barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS) based EBC-coated, melt infiltrated silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC) specimen was tensile tested at room temperature. Multiple tests were performed on a single specimen with increasing predetermined stress levels until final failure. During loading, the damage occurring in the EBC was monitored by digital image correlation (DIC). After unloading from the predetermined stress levels, the specimen was examined by optical microscopy and computed tomography (CT). Results indicate both optical microscopy and CT could not resolve the primary or secondary cracks developed during tensile loading until failure. On the other hand, DIC did show formation of a primary crack at ~ 50% of the ultimate tensile strength and this crack grew with increasing stress and eventually led to final failure of the specimen. Although some secondary cracks were seen in the DIC strain plots prior to final failure, the existence of these cracks were not confirmed by other methods. By using a higher resolution camera, it is possible to improve the capability of DIC in resolving secondary cracks and damage in coated specimen tested at room temperature, but use of DIC at high temperature requires significant development. Based on the current data, it appears that both optical microscopy and CT do not offer any hope for detecting crack initiation or determining crack growth in EBC coated CMC tested at room or high temperatures after the specimen has been unloaded. Other methods such as, thermography and optical/SEM of the polished cross section of EBC coated CMC specimens stressed to

  2. Comparison of Crack Growth Test Results at Elevated Temperature and Design Code Material Properties for Grade 91 Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Kim, Woo-Gon; Kim, Nak-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Reserach Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The material properties of crack growth models at an elevated temperature were derived from the results of numerous crack growth tests for Mod.9Cr-1Mo (ASME Grade 91) steel specimens under fatigue loading and creep loading at an elevated temperature. These crack growth models were needed for defect assessment under creep-fatigue loading. The mathematical crack growth rate models for fatigue crack growth (FCG) and creep crack growth (CCG) were determined based on the test results, and the models were compared with those of the French design code RCCMRx to investigate the conservatism of the code. The French design code RCC-MRx provides an FCG model and a CCG model for Grade 91 steel in Section III Tome 6. It was shown that the FCG model of RCC-MRx is conservative, while the CCG model is non-conservative compared with the present test data. Thus, it was shown that further validation of the property was required. Mechanical strength tests and creep tests were also conducted, and the test results were compared with those of RCC-MRx.

  3. Experimental Field Tests and Finite Element Analyses for Rock Cracking Using the Expansion of Vermiculite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-hyung Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the previous research, laboratory tests were performed in order to measure the expansion of vermiculite upon heating and to convert it into expansion pressure. Based on these test results, this study mainly focuses on experimental field tests conducted to verify that expansion pressure obtained by heating vermiculite materials is enough to break massive and hard granite rock with an intention to excavate the tunnel. Hexahedral granite specimens with a circular hole perforated in the center were constructed for the experimental tests. The circular holes were filled with vermiculite plus thermal conduction and then heated using the cartridge heater. As a result, all of hexahedral granite specimens had cracks in the surface after 700-second thermal heating and were finally spilt into two pieces completely. The specimen of larger size only requires more heating time and expansion pressure. The material properties of granite rocks, which were obtained from the experimental tests, were utilized to produce finite element models used for numerical analyses. The analysis results show good agreement with the experimental results in terms of initial cracking, propagation direction, and expansion pressure.

  4. Effects of crack front curvature on J–R curve testing using clamped SE(T) specimens of homogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yifan; Zhou, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analyses (FEA) of clamped single-edge tension (SE(T)) specimens are performed to investigate the impact of the crack front curvature on the elastic compliance, compliance rotation correction factor and average J-integral evaluated over the crack front. Specimens with six average crack lengths (i.e. a_a_v_e/W = 0.2–0.7) and three thickness-to-width ratios (i.e. B/W = 0.5, 1 and 2) are analyzed. The curved crack front is assumed to be bowed symmetrically and characterized by a power-law expression with a wide range of curvatures. Several crack front straightness requirements for SE(B) and C(T) specimens specified in BS7448, ISO and ASTM E1820 standards are reviewed. Based on results of the numerical investigation, new crack front straightness criteria for the SE(T) specimen are proposed in the context of the nine-point measurement by using as a criterion that the errors in the estimated compliance and average J values should be no more than five percent. The proposed criteria depend on both a_a_v_e/W and B/W, and are more advantageous than those specified in the BS, ISO and ASTM standards in terms of controlling the differences in J and compliance between the specimens with curved and straight crack fronts. - Highlights: • Investigate the impacts of crack front curvature on the compliance, rotation correction factor and J for SE(T) specimens. • Validate the applicabilities of crack front straightness criteria specified in the seven test standards on SE(T) specimens. • Recommend new crack front straightness criteria for the SE(T) specimen.

  5. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  6. Multiscale characterization of White Etching Cracks (WEC) in a 100Cr6 bearing from a thrust bearing test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Guzmán, F. Gutiérrez; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    A common cause for premature bearing failures in wind turbine gearboxes are the so-called White Etching Cracks (WEC). These undirected, three-dimensional cracks are bordered by regions of altered microstructure and ultimately lead to a cracking or spalling of the raceway. An accelerated WEC test...... significant grain refinement. Atom probe tomography showed the microstructure in the undamaged zone has a plate-like martensitic structure with carbides, while no carbides were detected in the WEA where the microstructure consisted of equiaxed 10 nm grains. A three dimensional characterisation of WEC network...

  7. A method of multi-crack shape identification from eddy current testing signals of steam generator tubes including support plates as noise sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Endo, Hisashi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Uchimoto, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with identifying multiple cracks from eddy current testing (ECT) signals obtained in a steam generator tube with a support plate and deposits. Assume two-dimensionally scanned ECT signals to be a picture image, then the signal processing by a multi-frequency technique eliminates noise caused by the support plate and deposits. A template matching with help of genetic algorithms detects number and positions of cracks from the image after the signal processing. Inverse analysis estimates the crack profile based on the predicted position of cracks. The number and positions of the cracks are sufficiently well predicted. Crack shape reconstructions are achieved with a satisfactory degree of accuracy. (author)

  8. Developing Field Test Procedures for Chloride Stress Corrosion Cracking in the Arabian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Farhat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas production and petrochemical plants in the Arabian Gulf are exposed to severe environmental conditions of high temperature and humidity. This makes these plants susceptible to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (CSCC. The laboratory testing fails to provide the exact field environmental conditions. A cost efficient field test setup for CSCC was designed and developed for the Arabian Gulf. The setup included designing self-sustained loading devices, samples, and sample racks. The samples were exposed to a stress equivalent to 80% and 100% of their yield strength. This paper describes the developed test procedures to establish testing with high level of accuracy and repeatability. It also discusses the design aspects and the challenges that were met.

  9. Fabrication of imitative cracks by 3D printing for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Yusa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that 3D printing technology offers a simple, easy, and cost-effective method to fabricate artificial flaws simulating real cracks from the viewpoint of eddy current testing. The method does not attempt to produce a flaw whose morphology mirrors that of a real crack but instead produces a relatively simple artificial flaw. The parameters of this flaw that have dominant effects on eddy current signals can be quantitatively controlled. Three artificial flaws in type 316L austenitic stainless steel plates were fabricated using a powderbed-based laser metal additive manufacturing machine. The three artificial flaws were designed to have the same length, depth, and opening but different branching and electrical contacts between flaw surfaces. The flaws were measured by eddy current testing using an absolute type pancake probe. The signals due to the three flaws clearly differed from each other although the flaws had the same length and depth. These results were supported by subsequent destructive tests and finite element analyses.

  10. Stable crack growth during over stressing or proof testing of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njo, D.H.

    1985-07-01

    In an earlier study several years ago an attempt has been made by a study group in Switzerland formed by representatives of utilities, manufacturers, inspection agency and the licensing authority to evaluate systematically the advantages and disadvantages of a proof test for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) taking into account the different aspects involved. In this study, the present day practice in the requirements regarding proof testing in several countries with nuclear power plants were assessed. Using the method of fracture mechanics, taking into account the proof test conditions and material behaviour at hand, qualified quantitative statements were then sought for. One of the important findings of the study was that a sufficiently accurate determination of stable crack growth (SCG) during proof testing is a necessary precondition for a qualified quantitative statement. At that time this requirement could not be met. The aim of the present exercise of collecting available information on SCG was twofold: to get an overview of the present day requirements on pre-service and in-service proof testing of reactor pressure vessels in different countries with NPPs; to collect data on stable crack growth due to over stressing during proof tests to be used in the quantitative assessment, using fracture mechanics methods, and the potential benefit, if any, of proof tests. In the framework of the present study, the originally stipulated aims could not be achieved. It turned out to be a very complex and difficult problem, where various important aspects are little known and could not be assessed without further comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigations

  11. Daily Arrests

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset provides the public with arrest information from the Montgomery County Central Processing Unit (CPU) systems. The data presented is derived from every...

  12. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... magnesium. These minerals help your heart's electrical system work. Abnormally high or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your ...

  13. Interpretation of the deep cracking phenomenon of tungsten monoblock targets observed in high-heat-flux fatigue tests at 20 MW/m"2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A theoretical interpretation is presented for deep crack of W monoblocks at 20 MW/m"2. • A consecutive process of crack initiation and growth was modeled in two stages. • The lifetime to crack initiation and the driving force of fracture are assessed. • Numerical predictions in this study agree well with the experimental findings. - Abstract: The HHF qualification tests conducted on the ITER divertor target prototypes showed that the tungsten monoblock armor suffered from deep cracking due to fatigue, when the applied high-heat-flux load approaches 20 MW/m"2. In spite of the critical implication of the deep cracking of armor on the structural integrity of a whole target component, no rigorous interpretation has been given to date. In this paper, a theoretical interpretation of the observed deep cracking feature is presented. A two-stage modeling approach is employed where deep cracking is thought to be a consecutive process of crack initiation and crack growth, which is assumed to be caused by plastic fatigue and brittle facture, respectively. The fatigue lifetime to crack initiation on the armor surface and the crack tip load of brittle fracture are assessed as a function of crack length and heat flux loads. The potential mechanisms of deep cracking are discussed for a typical slow transient high-heat-flux load cycle. It is shown that the quantitative predictions delivered in this study agree well with the observed findings offering insight into the nature of tungsten armor failure.

  14. Critical study of test methods in stress corrosion cracking. Application to stainless steels in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, Lotfi

    1985-01-01

    The transposition of results obtained in laboratory to the prediction of in-service material resistance is a crucial problem in the case of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The search for a SCC test which allows a reliable and realistic classification of stainless steels in chloride environments requires a choice of adequate electrolytes and of mechanical solicitation mode. In this research, the author first justifies the choice of an environment which could be representative of actual service conditions in the case of 5 grades of austenitic steels and 1 grade of austeno-ferric steel. Using a computerized data acquisition and processing system, the author compares the information obtained with two types of test: under constant load and under slow strain rate [fr

  15. Signal process and profile reconstruction of stress corrosion crack by eddy current test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Siquan; Chen Tiequn; Liu Guixiong

    2008-01-01

    The reconstruction of crack profiles is very important in the NDE (nondestructive evaluation) of critical structures, such as pressure vessel and tubes in heat exchangers. First a wavelet transform signal processing technique is used to reduce noise and other non-defect signals from the signals of crack, and then based on an artificial neural network method, the crack profiles are reconstructed. Although the results reveal that this method is with many advantages such as a short CPU time and precision for reconstruction,it does have some drawbacks, for example, the database generation and network training is a much time consuming work. Moreover, this approach does not expressly reconstruct the distribution of conductivity inside a crack, so the reliability of a reconstructed crack shape is unknown. But in practical application, if we do not consider the multiple cracks, this method can be used to reconstruct the natural crack. (authors)

  16. Testing Adaptive Hypotheses of Convergence with Functional Landscapes: A Case Study of Bone-Cracking Hypercarnivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Zhijie Jack

    2013-01-01

    Morphological convergence is a well documented phenomenon in mammals, and adaptive explanations are commonly employed to infer similar functions for convergent characteristics. I present a study that adopts aspects of theoretical morphology and engineering optimization to test hypotheses about adaptive convergent evolution. Bone-cracking ecomorphologies in Carnivora were used as a case study. Previous research has shown that skull deepening and widening are major evolutionary patterns in convergent bone-cracking canids and hyaenids. A simple two-dimensional design space, with skull width-to-length and depth-to-length ratios as variables, was used to examine optimized shapes for two functional properties: mechanical advantage (MA) and strain energy (SE). Functionality of theoretical skull shapes was studied using finite element analysis (FEA) and visualized as functional landscapes. The distribution of actual skull shapes in the landscape showed a convergent trend of plesiomorphically low-MA and moderate-SE skulls evolving towards higher-MA and moderate-SE skulls; this is corroborated by FEA of 13 actual specimens. Nevertheless, regions exist in the landscape where high-MA and lower-SE shapes are not represented by existing species; their vacancy is observed even at higher taxonomic levels. Results highlight the interaction of biomechanical and non-biomechanical factors in constraining general skull dimensions to localized functional optima through evolution. PMID:23734244

  17. Testing adaptive hypotheses of convergence with functional landscapes: a case study of bone-cracking hypercarnivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Jack Tseng

    Full Text Available Morphological convergence is a well documented phenomenon in mammals, and adaptive explanations are commonly employed to infer similar functions for convergent characteristics. I present a study that adopts aspects of theoretical morphology and engineering optimization to test hypotheses about adaptive convergent evolution. Bone-cracking ecomorphologies in Carnivora were used as a case study. Previous research has shown that skull deepening and widening are major evolutionary patterns in convergent bone-cracking canids and hyaenids. A simple two-dimensional design space, with skull width-to-length and depth-to-length ratios as variables, was used to examine optimized shapes for two functional properties: mechanical advantage (MA and strain energy (SE. Functionality of theoretical skull shapes was studied using finite element analysis (FEA and visualized as functional landscapes. The distribution of actual skull shapes in the landscape showed a convergent trend of plesiomorphically low-MA and moderate-SE skulls evolving towards higher-MA and moderate-SE skulls; this is corroborated by FEA of 13 actual specimens. Nevertheless, regions exist in the landscape where high-MA and lower-SE shapes are not represented by existing species; their vacancy is observed even at higher taxonomic levels. Results highlight the interaction of biomechanical and non-biomechanical factors in constraining general skull dimensions to localized functional optima through evolution.

  18. The fatigue-crack propagation behavior of ASTM A533-B steel tested in vacuo at LWR operating temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fatigue-crack propagation (FCP) behavior of ASTM A533-B-1 steel was characterized in vacuo at 288 0 C. Tests were conducted at two stress ratios: R = 0.05 and R = 0.7. Results of these tests were compared with results from previous studies for the same type of steel tested in an air environment, and FCP rates in vacuo were generally lower than those in air. Stress ratio effects in vacuo were not as great as those in air, and both stress ratio effects and environmental effects are discussed from the standpoint of crack closure concepts

  19. The hydrogen influenced cold cracking tendency of two high strength low alloy steels - evaluated by the implant-test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, V.; Schoenherr, W.

    1978-01-01

    A possible way of evaluating the hydrogen influenced cold cracking tendency of constructional steels is the implant test. Using this testing method, it is possible to adjust extensively independently of one other the three influencing parameters - hydrogen content of the welding deposit and the heat-affected zone, hardness structure and stresses - and to examine their effect on the crack behaviour. Due to the same microstructure formation in the heat affected zone of the implant samples and in the non-heat affected regions from the consequent position of the heat affected zone of component seams, welding conditions can be determined with suitable changing of the sample whose application to the real component practically excludes the danger of cold cracking. The broken surfaces in cold cracking are partly ductile and poor in deformation. The deformation-poor fracturing can possibly take an intercrystalline or transcrystalline course according to the chemical composition of the steel. The investigation confirm the theories and test results of other authors: The formation of deformation-poor, typical fracture sections for cold cracking was only obtained when there was a clear delay between putting on the test load and fracture of the sample. (orig./RW) [de

  20. Reinforcement against crack propagation of PWR absorbers by development of boron-carbon-hafnium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provot, B.; Herter, P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the mechanical behaviour of materials used as neutron absorbers in nuclear reactors, we have developed CERCER or CERMET composites with boron and hafnium. Thus a new composite B 4 C/HfB 2 has been especially studied. We have identified three kinds of degradation under irradiation (thermal gradient, swelling due to fission products and accidental corrosion) that induce imposed deformations cracking phenomena. Mechanical behaviour and crack propagation resistance have been studied by ball-on-three-balls and double torsion tests. A special device was developed to enable crack propagation and associated stress intensity factor measurements. Effects of structure and of a second phase are underline. First results show that these materials present crack initiation and propagation resistance much higher than pure boron carbide or hafnium diboride. We observe R-Curves effects, crack bridging or branching, crack arrests, and toughness increases that we can relate respectively to the composite structures. (author)

  1. Investigations of mode I crack propagation in fibre-reinforced plastics with real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, A.; Nordstrom, R.; Flueeler, P.

    1992-01-01

    The described investigation of crack formation and crack propagation in mode I (tensile stress) in fibre-reinforced plastic samples, especially uni-directional carbon fibre reinforced polyether-ether ketone (PEEK) has several aims. On the one hand, the phenomena of crack formation and crack propagation in these materials are to be studied, and on the other hand, the draft standards for these tests are to be checked. It was found that the combination of real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis is excellently suited for the basic examination of crack formation and crack propagation in DCB samples. With the aid of picture processing and analysis of the video representation, consistent crack lengths and resulting G IC values can be determined. (orig./RHM) [de

  2. Comparison of different test methods to assess thermal stresses of metal oxide surge arresters under pollution conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargigia, A.; de Nigris, M.; Pigini, A.; Sironi, A.

    1992-01-01

    The report deals with the research conducted by ENEL, the Italian Electricity Board, to assess the performance of zinc oxide surge arresters under pollution condition, with special reference to the consequent thermal stress on internal active parts which can affect the energy handling capabality of the arrester and may lead, in particular conditions, even to thermal runaway

  3. Repair and Strengthening by Use of Superficial Fixed Laminates of Cracked Masonry Walls Sheared Horizontally-Laboratory Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubica, Jan; Kwiecien, Arkadiusz; Zajac, Boguslaw

    2008-01-01

    There are many methods of crack repairing in masonry structures. One of them is repair and strengthening by using of superficial fixed laminates, especially in case of masonry walls with plastering on their both sides. The initial laboratory tests of three different types of strengthening of diagonal cracked masonry wallettes are presented. Tests concerned three clay brick masonry walls subjected to horizontal shearing with two levels of precompression and strengthened by flexible polymer injection, superficial glass fixed by polymer fibre laminate plates and using of CRFP strips stiff fixed to the wall surface by polymer and stiff resin epoxy fixing are presented and discussed

  4. Modification of ASTM Standard E1681 on Environmental Cracking to Include Bolt-Load Specimen Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Underwood, Jean D. M

    1997-01-01

    Benet Laboratories experience with environmental cracking of cannon components has been combined with the technical expertise of various participants at ASTM technical meetings and symposia to develop...

  5. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication of imitative stress corrosion cracking using diffusion bonding for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study reports a method to fabricate imitative stress corrosion cracking suitable for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluation methods. The method is to embed a partially-bonded region, which simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking, inside a material by bonding together surfaces having artificial grooves. Since the sizes of the grooves are smaller than the spatial resolution of nondestructive testing method applied, the material property realized can be regarded as uniform as the actual stress corrosion cracking. The grooves are introduced using mechanical machining, which enables one to control the characteristics of the simulated flaw. Four specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel are fabricated. The method is demonstrated by visual and eddy current examinations. (author)

  7. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  8. Test of 6-in.-thick pressure vessels. Series 4: intermediate test vessels V-5 and V-9 with inside nozzle corner cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Holz, P.P.; Smith, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Failure testing is described for two 99-cm-diam (39-in.), 15.2-cm-thick (6-in.) steel pressure vessels, each containing one flawed nozzle. Vessel V-5 was tested at 88 0 C (190 0 F) and failed by leaking without fracturing after extensive stable crack growth. Vessel V-9 was tested at 25 0 C (75 0 F) and failed by fracturing. Material properties measured before the tests were used for pretest and posttest fracture analyses. Test results supported by analysis indicate that inside nozzle corner cracks are not subject to plane strain under pressure loading. The preparation of inside nozzle corner cracks is described in detail. Extensive experimental data are tabulated and plotted

  9. Study of toughening mechanisms through the observations of crack propagation in nanostructured and layered metallic sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.Y.; Li, D.F.; Zhang, J.B.; Liu, F.; Liu, X.R.; Lu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A nanostructured and layered steel exhibits high strength and large ductility. → The excellent combination originates from a multiple interlaminar cracking. → The initiation and propagation of cracks are controlled by three aspects. → The cracks are deflected by interface and arrested by compressive residual stress. → Finally, the cracks are blunted by the graded grain size distribution. - Abstract: A layered and nanostructured (LN) 304 SS sheet was produced by combination of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) with warm co-rolling. The microstructure of LN sheet is characterized by a periodic distribution of nanocrystalline layers and micron-grained layers with a graded transition of grain size. Tensile test results show that exceptional properties of high yield strength and large elongation to fracture are achieved. A multiple interlaminar cracking was observed by scanning electron microscopy, which is induced by repeated crack initiation and propagation. The toughening mechanisms of the LN sheet are proposed to be controlling the crack propagation path by several strategies. The main cracks initiating at interface defects are arrested by large compressive residual stress, deflected by weak interface bonding and blunted by the graded grain size distribution.

  10. Eddy current testing. Evaluation of cracks propagation in austenitic steel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeon, M.

    1983-12-01

    A low frequency eddy current method has been developed to evaluate the ligament between crack front and cladding surface and measure crack length. It uses a large surface probe to obtain a low sensitivity on surface variations and a good penetration of eddy current

  11. Evaluation of the inner wall axial cracks of steam generator tubes by eddy current test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Doek Hyun; Han, Jung Ho

    2001-01-01

    For the enhancement of ECT reliability on the primary water stress corrosion cracks of nuclear steam generator tubes, it is important to comprehend the signal characteristics on crack morphology and to select an appropriate probe type. In this paper, the sizing accuracy and the detectability for the inner wall axial cracks of tubes were quantitatively evaluated using the electric discharge machined notches and the corrosion cracks which were developed on the operating steam generator tubes. The difference of eddy current signal characteristics between pancake and axial coil were also investigated. The results obtained from this study provide a useful information for more precise evaluation on the inner wall axial cracks of steam generator tubes.

  12. Tests with Inconel 600 to obtain quantitative stress-corrosion cracking data for evaluating service performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1982-09-01

    Inconel 600 tubes in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators form a pressure boundary between radioactive primary water and secondary water which is converted to steam and used for generating electricity. Under operating conditions the performance of alloy 600 has been good, but with some occasional small leaks resulting from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), related to the presence of unusually high residual or operating stresses. The suspected high stresses can result from either the deformation of tubes during manufacture, or distortion during abnormal conditions such as denting. The present experimental program addresses two specific conditions, i.e., (1) where deformation occurs but is no longer active, such as when denting is stopped and (2) where plastic deformation of the metal continues, as would occur during denting. Laboratory media consist of pure water as well as solutions to simulate environments that would apply in service; tubing from actual production is used in carrying out these tests. The environments include both normal and off chemistries for primary and secondary water. The results reported here were obtained in several different tests. The main ones are (1) split tube reverse U-bends, (2) constant extension rate tests (CERT), and (3) constant load. The temperature range covered is 290 to 365 0 C

  13. Standard practice for slow strain rate testing to evaluate the susceptibility of metallic materials to environmentally assisted cracking

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for the design, preparation, and use of axially loaded, tension test specimens and fatigue pre-cracked (fracture mechanics) specimens for use in slow strain rate (SSR) tests to investigate the resistance of metallic materials to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). While some investigators utilize SSR test techniques in combination with cyclic or fatigue loading, no attempt has been made to incorporate such techniques into this practice. 1.2 Slow strain rate testing is applicable to the evaluation of a wide variety of metallic materials in test environments which simulate aqueous, nonaqueous, and gaseous service environments over a wide range of temperatures and pressures that may cause EAC of susceptible materials. 1.3 The primary use of this practice is to furnish accepted procedures for the accelerated testing of the resistance of metallic materials to EAC under various environmental conditions. In many cases, the initiation of EAC is accelerated through the applic...

  14. Formulation of a new model of dynamic cracking in PLEXUS. First applications to a laboratory test specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, P.

    1986-07-01

    The problem of dynamic rupture is important for nuclear power plant safety analysis, more particularly in case of cold shock in a PWR vessel. Preliminary studies showed that PLEXUS is a numerical frame well adapted to the analysis of the problem. The aim of this report is to present a new model implemented in PLEXUS, for a better simulation of splitting. A first trial taking into account the variation of the dynamic toughness versus crack propagation rate has been done (samples of steel AISI 4340). The model has been applied to the dynamic cracking of a test specimen. The influence of wave reflections at the structure limits has been clearly pointed out [fr

  15. An analysis for crack layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehanobish, K.; Botsis, J.; Moet, A.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uncontrolled crack propagation and crack arrest is considered with respect to crack layer (CL) translational stability. CL propagation is determined by the difference between the energy release rate and the amount of energy required for material transformation, and necessary and sufficient conditions for CL instability are derived. CL propagation in polystyrene is studied for two cases. For the case of remotely applied fixed load fatigue, the sufficient condition of instability is shown to be met before the necessary condition, and the necessary condition controls the stability. For the fixed displacement case, neither of the instability conditions are met, and CL propagation remains stable, resulting in crack arrest.

  16. Fatigue crack growth monitoring: fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.; Mudge, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    If a fatigue crack is found in a component in service, two options exist if plant integrity is to be maintained: first, the plant can be removed from service and repairs effected or replacements fitted; second, the growth of the crack can be monitored non-destructively until it is either considered to be too large to tolerate, in which case it must be repaired, or until a convenient down time when repair can be effected. The second option has obvious benefits for plant operators, but in such a situation it is essential that errors of the non-destructive estimate of defect size, which will undoubtedly exist, and uncertainties in the fatigue crack growth laws in operation must both be allowed for if a safe extension of service life is to be obtained; i.e. without failure by leakage or fast fracture arising from the fatigue crack. This paper analyses the accuracy required of non-destructive crack measurement techniques to permit the safe monitoring of crack growth by periodic inspection. It then demonstrates that it is possible to achieve adequate crack monitoring using conventional ultrasonic techniques. (author)

  17. NDE Evidence for the Damage Arrestment Performance of PRSEUS Composite Cube During High-Pressure Load Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    As an approach to light-weight, cost-effective and manufacturable structures required to enable the hybrid wing body aircraft, The Boeing Company, Inc. and NASA have developed the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. A PRSEUS pressure cube was developed as a risk reduction test article to examine a new integral cap joint concept as part of a building block approach for technology development of the PRSEUS concept. The overall specimen strength exceeded the 18.4 psi load requirement as testing resulted in the cube reaching a final pressure load of around 48 psi prior to catastrophic failure. The cube pressure test verified that the joints and structure were capable of sustaining the required loads, and represented the first testing of joined PRSEUS structure. This paper will address the damage arrestment performance of the stitched PRSEUS structure. Following catastrophic failure of the cube, ultrasonic pulse-echo inspection found that the localized damage, surrounding a barely-visible impact damage site, did not change noticeably between just after impact and catastrophic failure of the cube, and did not play a role in the catastrophic failure event. Ultrasonic inspection of the remaining intact cube panels presented three basic types of indications: delaminations between laminae parallel to the face sheets, lying between face sheet and tear strap layers, or between tear strap and flange layers; delaminations above the noodles of stringers, frames or integral caps, lying within face sheet or tear strap layers; and delaminations between the laminae in the inner fillets of the integral caps, where pulloff stresses were expected to be highest. Delaminations of all three types were predominantly contained by the first row of stitches encountered. For the small fraction of delaminations extending beyond the first row of stitches, all were contained by the second stitch row.

  18. A simple test procedure for evaluating low temperature crack resistance of asphalt concrete : executive summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Low temperature cracking is one of the major : distress modes in asphalt pavement and is : disastrous to pavement performance and service : life. A poor riding surface leads to an increase in : maintenance and eventual early replacement of : the pave...

  19. Predicting crack instability behavior of burst tests from small specimens for irradiated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P.H.

    1997-01-01

    A scaling approach, based on the deformation J-integral at maximum load obtained from small specimens, is proposed for predicting the crack instability behavior of burst tests on irradiated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes. An assessment of this approach is carried out by comparison with other toughness criteria such as the modified J-integral and the plastic work dissipation rate approach. The largest discrepancy between the different parameters occurs for materials of intermediate toughness which exhibit the most stable crack growth and tunnelling up to maximum load. A study of one material of intermediate toughness suggests crack-front tunnelling has a significant influence on the results obtained from the 17-mm-wide specimens. It is shown that for a tube of intermediate toughness the different approaches can significantly underpredict the extent of stable crack growth before instability in a burst test even after correcting for tunnelling. The usefulness of a scaling approach in reducing the discrepancy between the small- and large-scale specimen results for this material is demonstrated

  20. Periodic oxide cracking on Fe2.25Cr1Mo produced by high-temperature fatigue tests with a compression hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, R.L.; Weertman, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Long, straight cracks perpendicular to the stress axis are seen on the oxidized surface of specimens of Fe2.25Cr1Mo cycled with a compressive hold at high temperatures. The cracks in the oxide are periodically spaced. They resemble cracks observed in a brittle film on a ductile substrate after a tension test of the substrate. They also resemble the parallel multiple fractures that occur in a brittle matrix of a composite with ductile fibers undergoing tension. The authors apply both the model of a brittle film on a ductile substrate and of the brittle matrix composite to explain the observed intercrack spacing. Cracks in the oxide film lead to localized oxidation of the metal in the region around their intersection with the oxide-metal interface. These cracks are seen to penetrate the metal. Stress concentrations from deep grooves that form during compression hold fatigue, together with crack initiation from the oxide, lead to a shortened cycle life

  1. Effect of copper, tin, phosphorous and arsenic on the surface cracking of a 18-8 stainless steel during hot compression tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botella, J.; Fernandez, M.T.; Fernandez de Castillo, I.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of certain different concentrations of Cu, Sn, P and As on the surface cracking of 18-8 austenitic stainless steel hot compressed specimens has been studied, at 1,123 and 1,273 K, in an oxidizing atmosphere (air). A procedure for determining surface cracking has been established, and the cracking factor obtained in this ways is correlated with the chemical composition of the materials at both temperatures. The cracking factors obtained at 1,273 K have been compared with the reduction of area drops obtained by hot tension tests at the same temperature. (Author) 5 refs

  2. The evaluation of dynamic cracking resistance of chosen casting alloys in the aspect of the impact bending test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Sadowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase of quality and durability of produced casting alloys can be evaluated on the base of material tests performed on a high level. One of such modern test methods are tests of the dynamic damage process of materials and the evaluation on the base of obtained courses F(f, F(t of parameters of dynamic cracking resistance KId, JId, performed with the usage of instrumented Charpy pendulums. In the paper there was presented the evaluation of dynamic cracking resistance parameters of casting alloys such as: AK12 aluminum alloy, L20G cast steel and spheroid cast iron. The methodology of the evaluation of that parameters was described and their change as well, for the AK12 alloy with the cold work different level, L20G cast steel cooled from different temperatures in the range +20oC -60oC, and for the spheroid cast iron in different stages of treatment i.e. raw state, after normalization, spheroid annealing and graphitizing annealing.Obtained parameters of dynamic cracking resistance KId, JId of tested casting alloys enabled to define the critical value of the ad defect that can be tolerated by tested castings in different work conditions with impact loadings.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels in Fuel Grade Ethanol and Blends - Study to Evaluate Alternate Standard Tests and Phenomenological Understanding of SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-30

    Main aim of this project was to evaluate alternate standard test methods for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and compare them with the results from slow strain rate test (SSRT) results under equivalent environmental conditions. Other important aim of...

  4. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  5. Sub-Pixel Accuracy Crack Width Determination on Concrete Beams in Load Tests by Triangle Mesh Geometry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebold, F.; Maas, H.-G.

    2018-05-01

    This paper deals with the determination of crack widths of concrete beams during load tests from monocular image sequences. The procedure starts in a reference image of the probe with suitable surface texture under zero load, where a large number of points is defined by an interest operator. Then a triangulated irregular network is established to connect the points. Image sequences are recorded during load tests with the load increasing continuously or stepwise, or at intermittently changing load. The vertices of the triangles are tracked through the consecutive images of the sequence with sub-pixel accuracy by least squares matching. All triangles are then analyzed for changes by principal strain calculation. For each triangle showing significant strain, a crack width is computed by a thorough geometric analysis of the relative movement of the vertices.

  6. Dependency of Delayed Hydride Crack Velocity on the Direction of an Approach to Test Temperatures in Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Kang Soo; Im, Kyung Soo; Ahn, Sang Bok; Cheong, Yong Moo

    2005-01-01

    Recently, Kim proposed a new DHC model where a driving force for the DHC is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration as a result of a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen in zirconium alloys upon a heating and a cooling. This model was demonstrated to be valid through a model experiment where the prior plastic deformation facilitated nucleation of the reoriented hydrides, thus reducing the supersaturated hydrogen concentration at the plastic zone ahead of the crack tip and causing hydrogen to move to the crack tip from the bulk region. Thus, an approach to the test temperature by a cooling is required to create a supersaturation of hydrogen, which is a driving force for the DHC of zirconium alloys. However, despite the absence of the supersaturation of hydrogen due to an approach to the test temperature by a heating, DHC is observed to occur in zirconium alloys at the test temperatures below 180 .deg. C. As to this DHC phenomenon, Kim proposed that stress-induced transformation from γ-hydrides to δ-hydrides is likely to be a cause of this, based on Root's observation that the γ-hydride is a stable phase at temperatures lower than 180 .deg. C. In other words, the hydrides formed at the crack tip would be δ-hydrides due to the stressinduced transformation while the bulk region still maintains the initial hydride phase or γ-hydrides. It should be noted that Ambler has also assumed the crack tip hydrides to be δ-hydrides. When the δ-hydrides or ZrH1.66 are precipitated at the crack tip due to the transformation of the γ-hydrides or ZrH, the crack tip will have a decreased concentration of dissolved hydrogen in zirconium, considering the atomic ratio of hydrogen and zirconium in the γ- and δ-hydrides. In contrast, due to no stress-induced transformation of hydrides, the bulk region maintains the initial concentration of dissolved hydrogen. Hence, there develops a difference in the hydrogen concentration or .C between the bulk and the

  7. Dependency of Delayed Hydride Crack Velocity on the Direction of an Approach to Test Temperatures in Zirconium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Kang Soo; Im, Kyung Soo; Ahn, Sang Bok; Cheong, Yong Moo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Recently, Kim proposed a new DHC model where a driving force for the DHC is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration as a result of a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen in zirconium alloys upon a heating and a cooling. This model was demonstrated to be valid through a model experiment where the prior plastic deformation facilitated nucleation of the reoriented hydrides, thus reducing the supersaturated hydrogen concentration at the plastic zone ahead of the crack tip and causing hydrogen to move to the crack tip from the bulk region. Thus, an approach to the test temperature by a cooling is required to create a supersaturation of hydrogen, which is a driving force for the DHC of zirconium alloys. However, despite the absence of the supersaturation of hydrogen due to an approach to the test temperature by a heating, DHC is observed to occur in zirconium alloys at the test temperatures below 180 .deg. C. As to this DHC phenomenon, Kim proposed that stress-induced transformation from {gamma}-hydrides to {delta}-hydrides is likely to be a cause of this, based on Root's observation that the {gamma}-hydride is a stable phase at temperatures lower than 180 .deg. C. In other words, the hydrides formed at the crack tip would be {delta}-hydrides due to the stressinduced transformation while the bulk region still maintains the initial hydride phase or {gamma}-hydrides. It should be noted that Ambler has also assumed the crack tip hydrides to be {delta}-hydrides. When the {delta}-hydrides or ZrH1.66 are precipitated at the crack tip due to the transformation of the {gamma}-hydrides or ZrH, the crack tip will have a decreased concentration of dissolved hydrogen in zirconium, considering the atomic ratio of hydrogen and zirconium in the {gamma}- and {delta}-hydrides. In contrast, due to no stress-induced transformation of hydrides, the bulk region maintains the initial concentration of dissolved hydrogen. Hence, there develops a difference in the

  8. Quantification of Applied Stresses of C-Ring Specimens for Stress Corrosion Cracking Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Sun Jae; Rhee, Chang Kyu; Kuk, Il Hiun; Choi, Jong Ho

    1997-01-01

    For comparing their resistances for stress-corrosion cracking(SCC) in the K600-MA, K690-MA, and K600-TT tubes, C-ring specimens were fabricated with the various thermal-treatments to control the distributions of the precipitates like Cr-carbides. The bending stresses were analyzed to determine the amounts to make the stress quantitatively to all the C-ring samples, and then the stresses were calculated with the relation to the outer diameter(O.D) deflection(δ) of the C-rings. To measure accurately the bending strains of the C-ring specimens, the strain gauges were used and the compression test was also carried out. In the elastic region, the stresses in both the transverse and the circumferential directions were different with the locations of the strain gauges as attached at α= 30 .deg., 45 .deg., and 90 .deg. to the principal stress direction, but those in the longitudinal direction were independent of their attached locations. Calculated stresses from the strains obtained using the strain gauges were well agreed with the theoretical. In the plastic region over δ=1.0mm, the stresses for the TT tubes showed lower values of about 400MPa than those for the MA tubes. However, the stresses among the TT tubes showed almost the similar values in this region. Therefore, the states of the stresses applied to the C-ring specimens would be different with the material conditions, i.e, the chemical compositions, the thermal treatments such as MA and TT

  9. Temperatures, strains and crack behavior during local thermal shock tests on the RPV-cylinder of the HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubrech, G.E.; Goerner, F.; Siebler, T.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarises and critically discusses the results obtained from thermal shocks locally applied to the inner surface of the RPV-cylinder. This evaluation is based on on-line measurements (temperatures and strains at the RPV-wall during the thermal shock loading, non-destructive-testing), on materials investigations, and on theoretical investigations (finite element calculations, fracture mechanics analyses). The comparison between the corresponding measured and calculated results serves as a basis for subsequent assessments. It was the object of these tests to achieve the following primary aims: - Investigation of the loading conditions produced by local thermal shocks during realistic cooling processes. - A better understanding of the physical processes involved in crack initiation and propagation resulting from thermocyclic loading. - Assessment of non-destructive-testing methods with respect to detection and analysis of cracks as a basis for fracture mechanical evaluations. - Assessment of the reliability of the applied structural analysis methods. - Production of naturally formed deep cracks on the inner surface of the RPV-cylinder by means of excessive cooling processes. (orig./HP)

  10. Using Peer-Referral Chains with Incentives to Promote HIV Testing and Identify Undiagnosed HIV Infections Among Crack Users in San Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasman, Laura R; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Lechuga, Julia; Tarima, Sergey; Bodnar, Gloria; de Mendoza, Lorena Rivas

    2016-06-01

    In El Salvador, crack users are at high risk for HIV but they are not targeted by efforts to promote early HIV diagnosis. We evaluated the promise of peer-referral chains with incentives to increase HIV testing and identify undiagnosed HIV infections among networks of crack users in San Salvador. For 14 months, we offered HIV testing in communities with a high prevalence of crack use. For the following 14 months, we promoted chains in which crack users from these communities referred their peers to HIV testing and received a small monetary incentive. We recorded the monthly numbers of HIV testers, and their crack use, sexual risk behaviors and test results. After launching the referral chains, the monthly numbers of HIV testers increased significantly (Z = 6.90, p < .001) and decayed more slowly (Z = 5.93, p < .001), and the total number of crack-using testers increased nearly fourfold. Testers in the peer-referral period reported fewer HIV risk behaviors, but a similar percentage (~5 %) tested HIV positive in both periods. More women than men received an HIV-positive diagnosis throughout the study (χ(2)(1, N = 799) = 4.23, p = .040). Peer-referral chains with incentives can potentially increase HIV testing among networks of crack users while retaining a focus on high-risk individuals.

  11. Technical report on the fatigue crack Growth Benchmark based on CEA pipe bending tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    In order to improve the estimation methods of surface crack propagation through the thickness of components, CEA has proposed a benchmark to members of the IAGE WG, sub-group on Integrity of metal components and structures. The subject is a simple configuration of a pipe containing an axisymmetric notch and submitted to a cyclic bending load. An experimental data-set form CEA was used to validate three issues in the topic of Leak Before Break. - Crack initiation, - Crack propagation through the thickness, - Crack penetration. All material and geometrical data which are necessary for the simulation were given in the proposal, including experimental results. Due to the peculiar complexity of the problem, it was decided to focus the work on methodologies comparison so as to allow participants to tune up parameters and adjust their models and tools. This report presents all estimations performed by the participants and collected by CEA. They are compared to the experimental results. An analysis of the used procedures is also proposed. This, associated with the study of the accuracy of different methodologies, leads to comments and recommendations on the analysis of fatigue crack growth. The participation in the first step was important: nine participants have proposed analyses, sometimes parametric analysis to estimate crack growth. Results sorted out three estimation methods groups that give results in accordance with experimental ones (these three groups are based on a strain range evaluation and the fatigue curve of the material): - The use of an elastic stress at the notch tip and a fatigue notch concentration factor to determine the strain range. - The use of a KI (or elastic F.E. calculation) and a Neuber rule for the estimation of the strain range at a characteristic distance from the crack tip. - The direct calculation of the strain range at the characteristic distance by an elastic plastic F.E. calculation. Only 4 participants have proposed an estimate of the

  12. Early detection of fatigue cracks by means of nondestructive testing, NDT; Tidig detektering av utmattningssprickor genom ofoerstoerande provning, OFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broddegaard, Mattias [Siemens Industrial Turbines, Finspaang (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Components in gas turbines, steam turbines and boilers are subjected to both high and low cycle fatigue. The lifetime of components is established by calculations based on conservative assumptions and safety factors, which means that most components will have a real life far exceeding the calculated. Conventional nondestructive testing is aimed at detecting macroscopic defects, such as cracks, inclusions and other discontinuities in the material. By having the possibility of detecting damage at a microscopic level, the risk of fractures in components subjected to fatigue can be reduced and the interval between testing occasions can be extended. The project goal has been to establish knowledge about possibilities and limitations for early detection of low and high cycle fatigue damage, by a literature survey and by practical experiments on low cycle fatigue specimens in 12% Cr-steel, for the following nondestructive testing methods: MWM (Meandering Winding Magnetometer) eddy current testing; and Nonlinear ultrasonics, both classical (second harmonic) and non-classical (crack closure). The project started with a literature survey. This resulted in a proposal for specimen design and selection of testing techniques and project partners. Manufacturing of specimens in 12% Cr-steel, designation X22CrMoV12-1, and low cycle fatigue testing at 300 deg C testing temperature was carried out at Siemens Industrial Turbines in Finspaang. Specimens with 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% consumed life, based on the number of cycles to presence of macroscopic cracks, were produced. MWM eddy current testing was carried out by Jentek Sensors Inc. in the USA. Measurements with nonlinear ultrasonics were carried out by Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich and at Blekinge Univ. The specimens were finally examined in SEM and light optical microscope in Finspaang. In the literature, results showing that early detection of fatigue damage by nondestructive testing is possible, can be found. By

  13. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  14. Standard test method for determining a threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the environment-assisted cracking threshold stress intensity factor parameters, KIEAC and KEAC, for metallic materials from constant-force testing of fatigue precracked beam or compact fracture specimens and from constant-displacement testing of fatigue precracked bolt-load compact fracture specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to environment-assisted cracking in aqueous or other aggressive environments. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength as long as specimens are of sufficient thickness and planar size to meet the size requirements of this test method. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size may be variable and adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness is a variable independent of planar size. 1.5 Specimen configurations other than those contained in this test method may be used, provided that well-established stress ...

  15. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  16. Investigation of fatigue crack growth in SA508-2 in a 2880C PWR environment by a constant δK test method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.; DeMiglio, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth experiments using a constant δK test technique were conducted on three 50.8 mm thick compact fracture specimens of SA508-2 in a 288 0 C simulated PWR water environment. Alternating stress intensity factor (δK) values were investigated in the range 16.5 to 44 MPa√m at sinusoidal loading frequencies ranging from 10 to .017 Hz (1 cpm) and R ratios 0.03 to 0.72. For a given δK and frequency, δK was held constant to within 1%. A steady-state rate of crack growth per cycle of stress (da/dN) was determined for each test condition. Over a typical crack extension of 1.3 mm, the crack growth rate in many cases was a constant. As many as 14 separate experiments were conducted on a single specimen. There was no influence of prior loading history or crack length on the crack growth rate. It was found that the crack growth rate was controlled by the δK, frequency, and R ratio of the test. Large changes in the crack growth rate did not occur as the frequency of loading was decreased from >1 Hz to .017 Hz (1 cpm). As compared to high frequency results (>1 Hz) the crack growth rate increased slightly at 1 cpm for δK > 22 MPa√m and decreased slightly for δK < 22 MPa√m. At 1 cpm the R ratio was observed to influence the crack growth rate; however, the magnitude of this effect was not well-defined

  17. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune

    In this paper the problem of describing the asymptotic fields around a slowly growing crack in a linearly viscoelastic material is considered. It is shown that for plane mixed mode problems the asymptotic fields must be described by 6 parameters: 2 stress intensity factors and 4 deformation...... intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  18. Determination of the bonding strength in solid oxide fuel cells’interfaces by Schwickerath crack initiation test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Ševeček, O.; Frandsen, L. H.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Molin, S.; Charlas, B.; Hjelm, J.; Cannio, M.; Hendriksen, P. V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 11 (2017), s. 3565-3578 ISSN 0955-2219 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Schwickerath crack-initiation test * Three-point bending test * SOFC interfaces * Metal-ceramic bond strength Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016 https://apps.webofknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=WOS&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=3&SID=S1ftxS2ACYn8QwRNK3P&page=1&doc=1

  19. Analytical Tem Comparisons of Stress-Corrosion-Crack Microstructures in Alloy 600 under Steam-Generator Service and Laboratory Test Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.E.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Scott, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) has been used to characterize stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in Alloy 600 steam-generator (SG) tubing from tests with caustic and acid-sulfate solutions. The aim of this work was to identify the microstructural and microchemical signatures of intergranular attack and cracking produced under well-controlled test conditions in order to determine the local environments promoting degradation in service. Cross-sectioned cracks and crack tips were examined in samples of mill-annealed alloy 600 tested in concentrated caustic and acid-sulfate solutions at 320 C. Characteristic microstructures observed in the caustic (10% NaOH) test sample included deeply penetrative attack along crack-intersected grain boundaries, with Cr-rich spinel and NiO structure oxides ranging from random nanocrystalline to oriented epitaxial films filling cracks up to the tips. Sodium was readily detectable in the oxides (up to 5 wt.% in the spinel corrosion product) along with S and Cu enrichment at crack-wall metal/oxide interfaces and local attack of the metal matrix around IG carbide particles. In the sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 + FeSO 4 ) test sample, the grain boundaries were also deeply attacked/cracked. Epitaxial NiO-structure oxide formed on the crack walls and S, sometimes with Cu, was concentrated between the oriented oxide layers rather than along the metal/oxide interfaces. Carbides were attacked and partially converted to fine-grained oxide containing up to several percent S. Observations of crack tips in the acid sulfate sample also revealed nm-wide cracks preceding the oxide along grain boundaries. The SCC structures produced in the laboratory tests differed in most details from the secondary-side SCC structures observed in pulled SG tubes. Important differences included the oxide morphologies, the presence of easily detectable Na and absence of sulfides in the test samples, different types of attack on IG carbide particles

  20. Minimum critical crack depths in pressure vessels guidelines for nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, M.R.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1983-09-01

    Estimates of the minimum critical depths which can be expected in high quality vessels designed to certain British and American Code rules are given. A simple means of allowing for fatigue crack growth in service is included. The data which are presented can be used to decide what sensitivity and what reporting levels should be employed during an ultrasonic inspection of a pressure vessel. It is emphasised that the minimum crack depths are those which would be relevant to a vessel in which the material is stressed to its maximum permitted value during operation. Stresses may, in practice, be significantly less than this. Less restrictive inspection standards may be established, if it were considered worthwhile to carry out a detailed stress analysis of the particular vessel under examination. (author)

  1. Evolution of dislocation structure and fatigue crack behavior in Fe-Si alloys during cyclic bending test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushioda, Kohsaku; Takebayashi, Shigeto; Goto, Shoji; Komatsu, Yoshinari; Hoshino, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of dislocation structures was investigated by means of TEM in Fe-Si alloys with 0, 0.5 and 1.0 mass% Si during a cyclic bending test in conjunction with fatigue crack behavior. The addition of Si increased the fatigue strength. In steel without Si the cell structure develops, whereas in steel with 1%Si the vein structure evolves, which is considered to lead to the increased fatigue strength. The cell structure in 0%Si steel is postulated to be caused by the easy cross slip of dislocations, whereas the vein structure in the steels with Si is inferred to be caused by the difficulty in cross slip presumably due to the decrease in stacking fault energy. Furthermore, the steel containing Si shows a dislocation free zone (DFZ) along grain boundaries. A transgranular fracture takes place in 0%Si steel, while in 1%Si steel many intergranular cracks were observed just beneath the top surface, which was thought to be caused by the fact that a) strains are dispersed within grains owing to the vein structure and b) micro cracks are initiated and propagated along a DFZ.

  2. Ultrasonic testing results of fatigue cracks in PWR mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondard, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Ispra Joint Research Center has entered, since many years a study on fatigue crack propagation in PWR reactor vessels. The objective of this study is to establish a relation between the size and the location of defects and the lifetime of the vessel. For verifying the theoretical models validity a mockup has been built. This document gives the results of CEA for 6 in service inspection during 5 years [fr

  3. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  4. Preliminary test results from the HSST shallow-crack fracture toughness program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Robinson, G.C.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program under sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is investigating the influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel. The ultimate goal of the investigation is the generation of a limited data base of elastic-plastic fracture toughness values appropriate for shallow flaws in a reactor pressure vessel and the application of this data to reactor vessel life assessments. It has been shown that shallow-flaws play a dominant role in the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of reactor pressure vessels during a pressurized-thermal-shock event. In addition, recent research has shown that the crack initiation toughness measured using specimens with shallow flaws is greater that the toughness determined with conventional, deeply notched specimens at temperatures within the transition region for non-nuclear steels. The influence of crack depth on the elastic-plastic fracture toughness for prototypic reactor material is being investigated. Preliminary results indicate a significant increase in the toughness associated with shallow-flaws which has the potential to significantly impact the conditional probability of vessel failure. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Testing round robin on cyclic crack growth of low and medium sulfur A533-B steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, H.; Komai, K.; Nakajima, H.; Higuchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    After the facts of environmentally assisted crack growth of low alloy steel was first observed when cyclically loaded in high temperature water. The subject has been extensively studied in connection with the evaluation of the integrity of LWR pressure boundary materials. In 1977, International Cooperative Group on Cyclic Crack Growth Rate Testing Evaluation (the ICCGR group) was organized for more systematic and effective solution of the problem. Successful results have been reported on the programs of the ICCGR activity, particularly in the promotion of a couple of programs of testing round robin and the associated research. JAERI also organized a domestic group of 15 organizations as the Corrosion Fatigue Subcommittee(JCF) of the LWR Safety Research Committee to carry out the similar test program. The group has been evaluating the behavior of steels representing the range of quality for the existing Japanese LWR plants. This paper describes the present status of the Japanese domestic testing round robin and related research especially focused on the test methodology

  6. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials. In support of this research, efforts are currently underway to arrange shipment of “free” high fluence austenitic alloys available through Électricité de France (EDF) for post irradiation testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and IASCC testing at the University of Michigan. These high fluence materials range in damage values from 45 to 125 displacements per atom (dpa). The samples identified for transport to the United States, which include nine, no-cost, 304, 308 and 316 tensile bars, were relocated from the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia, and received at the Halden Reactor in Halden, Norway, on August 23, 2016. ORNL has been notified that a significant amount of work is required to prepare the samples for further shipment to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The

  7. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  8. Ultrasonic sectional imaging for crack identification. Part 1. Confirmation test of essential factors for ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasahara, Toshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Since the first reports of inter-granular stress corrosion crack (IGSCC) in boiling water reactor (BWR) pipe in the 1970s, nuclear power industry has focused considerable attention on service induced crack detection and sizing using ultrasonic examination. In recent years, phased array systems, those reconstruct high quality flaw images at real time are getting to apply for crack detection and sizing. But because the price of phased array systems are expensive for inspection vendors, field application of phased array systems are limited and reliable ultrasonic imaging systems with reasonable price are expected. This paper will discuss cost effective ultrasonic equipment with sectional image (B-scan) presentation as the simplified imaging system for assisting ultrasonic examination personnel. To develop the simplified B-scan imaging system, the frequency characteristics of IGSCC echoes and neighboring geometry echoes such as base-metal to weld interface and inner surface of a pipe are studied. The experimental study confirmed the reflectors have different frequency characteristics and 2MHz is suitable to visualize IGSCC and 5MHz and higher frequency are suitable to reconstruct geometry images. The other study is the amplifier selection for the imaging system. To reconstruct images of IGSCC and geometry echoes, the ultrasonic imaging instrument with linear amplifier has to adjust gain setting to the target. On the other hand, the ultrasonic imaging instrument with logarithmic amplifier can collect and display wider dynamic range on a screen and this wider dynamic range are effective to visualize IGSCC and geometry echoes on a B-scan presentation at a time. (author)

  9. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author) [fr

  10. Circulatory Arrest, Brain Arrest and Death Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam David Shemie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances, particularly in the capacity to support, replace or transplant failing organs, continue to challenge and refine our understanding of human death. Given the ability to reanimate organs before and after death, both inside and outside of the body, through reinstitution of oxygenated circulation, concepts related to death of organs (e.g. cardiac death are no longer valid. This paper advances the rationale for a single conceptual determination of death related to permanent brain arrest, resulting from primary brain injury or secondary to circulatory arrest. The clinical characteristics of brain arrest are the permanent loss of capacity for consciousness and loss of all brainstem functions. In the setting of circulatory arrest, death occurs after the arrest of circulation to the brain rather than death of the heart. Correspondingly, any intervention that resumes oxygenated circulation to the brain after circulatory arrest would invalidate the determination of death.

  11. Crack growth threshold under hold time conditions in DA Inconel 718 – A transition in the crack growth mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fessler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aeroengine manufacturers have to demonstrate that critical components such as turbine disks, made of DA Inconel 718, meet the certification requirements in term of fatigue crack growth. In order to be more representative of the in service loading conditions, crack growth under hold time conditions is studied. Modelling crack growth under these conditions is challenging due to the combined effect of fatigue, creep and environment. Under these conditions, established models are often conservative but the degree of conservatism can be reduced by introducing the crack growth threshold in models. Here, the emphasis is laid on the characterization of crack growth rates in the low ΔK regime under hold time conditions and in particular, on the involved crack growth mechanism. Crack growth tests were carried out at high temperature (550 °C to 650 °C under hold time conditions (up to 1200 s in the low ΔK regime using a K-decreasing procedure. Scanning electron microscopy was used to identify the fracture mode involved in the low ΔK regime. EBSD analyses and BSE imaging were also carried out along the crack path for a more accurate identification of the fracture mode. A transition from intergranular to transgranular fracture was evidenced in the low ΔK regime and slip bands have also been observed at the tip of an arrested crack at low ΔK. Transgranular fracture and slip bands are usually observed under pure fatigue loading conditions. At low ΔK, hold time cycles are believed to act as equivalent pure fatigue cycles. This change in the crack growth mechanism under hold time conditions at low ΔK is discussed regarding results related to intergranular crack tip oxidation and its effect on the crack growth behaviour of Inconel 718 alloy. A concept based on an “effective oxygen partial pressure” at the crack tip is proposed to explain the transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture in the low ΔK regime.

  12. Modelling of liquid sodium induced crack propagation in T91 martensitic steel: Competition with ductile fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemery, Samuel [Institut PPRIME, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ISAE ENSMA, UPR 3346, Téléport 2, 1 Avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Berdin, Clotilde, E-mail: clotilde.berdin@u-psud.fr [Univ Paris-Sud, SP2M-ICMMO, CNRS UMR 8182, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Auger, Thierry; Bourhi, Mariem [Ecole Centrale-Supelec, MSSMat CNRS UMR 8579, F-92295 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (France)

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of T91 steel is numerically modeled by the finite element method to analyse experimental results in an axisymmetric notched geometry. The behavior of the material is identified from tensile tests then a crack with a constant crack velocity is introduced using the node release technique in order to simulate the brittle crack induced by LME. A good agreement between the simulated and the experimental macroscopic behavior is found: this suggests that the assumption of a constant crack velocity is correct. Mechanical fields during the embrittlement process are then extracted from the results of the finite element model. An analysis of the crack initiation and propagation stages: the ductile fracture probably breaks off the LME induced brittle fracture. - Highlights: • T91 martensitic steel is embrittled by liquid sodium depending on the loading rate at 573 K. • The mechanical behavior is modeled by a von Mises elastic-plastic law. • The LME induced crack propagates at a constant velocity. • The mechanical state at the crack tip does not explain a brittle crack arrest. • The occurrence of the ductile fracture breaks off the brittle fracture.

  13. Prediction of long time creep rupture properties of welded joints using the results of short duration creep crack incubation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, E.

    2013-07-01

    This dissertation submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich examines the applicability of the LICON methodology for the prediction of long-time creep rupture strength of a dissimilar metal weld. The LICON methodology is an approach for predicting the lifetime of materials under creep loading conditions. It predicts long-time uniaxial creep strength using the results from several short duration creep crack incubation tests in conjunction with the outcome of a mechanical analysis on the test-piece. This study has re-examined the previous application of the LICON methodology for 9%Cr and 1CrMoV steels. It has shown that application of the original Lion method (based on reference stress solutions) for certain materials is not appropriate. This study therefore proposes a new development for the Lion approach which uses finite-element analysis to account for the generated multiaxial stress states within welded uniaxial test-pieces.

  14. Prediction of long time creep rupture properties of welded joints using the results of short duration creep crack incubation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, E.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich examines the applicability of the LICON methodology for the prediction of long-time creep rupture strength of a dissimilar metal weld. The LICON methodology is an approach for predicting the lifetime of materials under creep loading conditions. It predicts long-time uniaxial creep strength using the results from several short duration creep crack incubation tests in conjunction with the outcome of a mechanical analysis on the test-piece. This study has re-examined the previous application of the LICON methodology for 9%Cr and 1CrMoV steels. It has shown that application of the original Lion method (based on reference stress solutions) for certain materials is not appropriate. This study therefore proposes a new development for the Lion approach which uses finite-element analysis to account for the generated multiaxial stress states within welded uniaxial test-pieces

  15. Dynamic Toughness Testing of Pre-Cracked Charpy V-Notch Specimens. Convention ELECTRABEL - SCK-CEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E

    1999-04-01

    This document describes the experimental and analytical procedures which have been adopted at the laboratories of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN for performing dynamic toughness tests on pre-cracked Charpy-V specimens. Such procedures were chosen on the basis of the existing literature on the subject, with several updates in the data analysis stages which reflect more recent developments in fracture toughness testing. Qualification tests have been carried out on PCCv specimens of JRQ steel, in order to assess the reliability of the results obtained; straightforward comparisons with reference data have been performed, as well as more advanced analyses using the Master Curve approach. Aspects related to machine compliance and dynamic tup calibration have also been addressed.

  16. Crack propagation during fatigue in cast duplex stainless steels: influence of the microstructure, of the aging and of the test temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calonne, V.

    2001-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels are used as cast components in nuclear power plants. At the service temperature of about 320 C, the ferrite phase is thermally aged and embrittled. This induces a significant decrease in fracture properties of these materials. The aim of this work consists in studying Fatigue Crack Growth Rates (FCGR) and Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms (FCGM) as a function of thermal ageing and test temperature (20 C/320 C). Two cast duplex stainless steels (30% ferrite) are tested. In order to better understand the influence of the crystallographic orientation of the phases on the FCGM, the solidification structure of the material is studied by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) and by Unidirectional Solidification Quenching. Fatigue crack growth tests are also performed in equiaxed and basaltic structures. Microstructure, fatigue crack growth mechanical properties and mechanisms are thus studied in relation to each other. In the studied range of delta K, the crack propagates without any preferential path by successive ruptures of phase laths. The macroscopic crack propagation plane, as determined by EBSD, depends on the crystallographic orientation of the ferrite grain. So, according to the solidification structure, secondary cracks can appear, which in turn influences the FCGR. Fatigue crack closure, which has to be determined to estimate the intrinsic FCGR, decreases with increasing ageing. This can be explained by a decrease in the kinematic cyclic hardening. The Paris exponent as determined from intrinsic FCGR increases with ageing. Intrinsic FCGR can then be separated in two ranges: one with lower FCGR in aged materials than in un-aged and one with the reversed tendency. (author)

  17. Research on Crack-Filling Heat Treatment and Hydrogen Permeation Test of Self-healing Tritium Permeation Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dawei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Ouyang, Taoyuan; Zhou, Tong; Fang, Xuanwei; Suo, Jinping

    2018-03-01

    A TiC + mixture (TiC/Al2O3 (1:1 wt.%)) +Al2O3 self-healing triple layer coating (TLC) was designed and manufactured by our group, and the crack-filling heat treatment process had been roughly explored in the past. In this work, the accelerating test with a thick TiC + mixture (TiC/Al2O3 (1:1 wt.%)) double-layer coating (DLC) was carried out. The DLC coating warped when the heat treatment temperature was lower than 550 °C, which was rare in similar researches, and it crushed into fan-shaped pieces when the treatment temperature was higher than 650 °C. The two different spalling failures were explained by weight gain, porosity and stress analyses. The heating rate had a significant effect. The bonding strength and hydrogen permeation of the TLC samples were also tested. Remaining at 650 °C for 40 h was proved to be an optimal crack-filling heat treatment process, considering the hydrogen resistance.

  18. 20,000-hour stress-corrosion cracking tests on ASTM A36 and A387-9 steels in simulated Hanford groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Modified WOL specimens were employed to evaluate the susceptibility of two candidate container materials, A36 and A387-9 steels, to SCC in simulated groundwater at 250 0 C. The test duration was 20,000 hours. Post-test measurements of specimen compliance were not possible because significant build-up of corrosion products and/or mineral deposits on the fracture faces prevented a linear relationship between load and displacement. Considerable load was ''lost'' due to time-independent plasticity, time-dependent deformation and crack-face wedging, but the amounts lost were comparable to similar short-term tests conducted earlier. A number of direct and indirect observations suggested that no crack extension occurred during the environmental exposure. One indirect observation, the initial pre-test compliance measurements, suggested a possibility of crack extension occurred, but it is believed that these measurements were in error because of the experimental test set-up used in the program

  19. The real performance of radioactive lightning arrester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of the performance of radioactive lightning arrester comparing to the performance of conventional one are presented. Measurements of currents between lightning arrester and an energyzed plate with wind simulation were done for radioactive and conventional lightning arresters, separately. The attraction range of radioactive and conventional lightning arresters using atmospheric pulses produced by a generator of 3MV were verified, separately and simultaneously. The influence of ionization produced by radioactive lightning arrester on critical disruptive tension of a spark plate, testing two lightning arresters for differents nominal attraction distances with applications of atmospheric pulses (positive and negative polarity) and tensions of 60 Hz was verified. The radiation emitted by a radioactive lightning had used in a building was retired and handled without special carefullness by a personnel without worthy of credence to evaluate the hazard in handling radioactive lightning arrester was measured. Critical disruptive tensions of radioactive and conventional lightning arrester using a suspensed electrode and external pulse generator of 6MV was measured. The effect of attraction of a radioactive and conventional lightning arresters disposed symmetrically regarding the same suspensed electrode was verified simultaneously. Seven cases on faults of radioactive lightning arrester in external areas are present. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Use of the gapped bead-on-plate test to investigate hydrogen induced cracking of flux cored arc welds of a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang; Dunne, Druce; Davidson, Len

    2014-01-01

    Gapped bead-on-plate (G-BOP) testing of flux cored arc welds was conducted to assess the susceptibility to hydrogen induced cold cracking (HICC) of weld metal deposited on a high strength quenched and tempered steel. For preheat temperatures higher than 40°C, no weld metal cracking was observed using a shielding gas consisting of argon with 20% carbon dioxide. In contrast, the no-crack condition was not achieved for a shielding gas consisting of argon-5% carbon dioxide for preheat temperatures lower than 100°C. This extraordinary difference in weld metal HICC resistance indicates that, in general, the shielding gas mixture can exert a major influence on weld metal transverse cold cracking behaviour

  1. Standard test method for determining whether gas-leak-detector fluid solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking of brass alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers an accelerated test method for evaluating the tendency of gas leak detection fluids (LDFs) to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass components in compressed gas service. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Crack closure, a literature study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, M.

    1993-08-01

    In this report crack closure is treated. The state of the art is reviewed. Different empirical formulas for determining the crack closure are compared with each other, and their benefits are discussed. Experimental techniques for determining the crack closure stress are discussed, and some results from fatigue tests are also reported. Experimental data from the literature are reported.

  3. Characterization and Performance Test of Palm Oil Based Bio-Fuel Produced Via Ni/Zeolite-Catalyzed Cracking Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Kadarwati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic cracking process of palm oil into bio-fuel using Ni/zeolite catalysts (2-10% wt. Ni at various reaction temperatures (400-500oC in a flow-fixed bed reactor system has been carried out. Palm oil was pre-treated to produce methyl ester of palm oil as feedstock in the catalytic cracking reactions. The Ni/zeolite catalysts were prepared by wetness impregnation method using Ni(NO32.6H2O as the precursor. The products were collected and analysed using GC, GC-MS, and calorimeter. The effects of process temperatures and Ni content in Ni/zeolite have been studied. The results showed that Ni-2/zeolite could give a yield of 99.0% at 500oC but only produced gasoline fraction of 18.35%. The physical properties of bio-fuel produced in this condition in terms of density, viscosity, flash point, and specific gravity were less than but similar to commercial fuel. The results of performance test in a 4-strike engine showed that the mixture of commercial gasoline (petrol and bio-fuel with a ratio of 9:1 gave similar performance to fossil-based gasoline with much lower CO and O2 emissions and more efficient combustion

  4. Crack closure and growth behavior of short fatigue cracks under random loading (part I : details of crack closure behavior)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Young; Song, Ji Ho

    2000-01-01

    Crack closure and growth behavior of physically short fatigue cracks under random loading are investigated by performing narrow-and wide-band random loading tests for various stress ratios. Artificially prepared two-dimensional, short through-thickness cracks are used. The closure behavior of short cracks under random loading is discussed, comparing with that of short cracks under constant-amplitude loading and also that of long cracks under random loading. Irrespective of random loading spectrum or block length, the crack opening load of short cracks is much lower under random loading than under constant-amplitude loading corresponding to the largest load cycle in a random load history, contrary to the behavior of long cracks that the crack opening load under random loading is nearly the same as or slightly higher than constant-amplitude results. This result indicates that the largest load cycle in a random load history has an effect to enhance crack opening of short cracks

  5. Effect of a Sulphate Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H. P

    2002-03-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. Within WP 3 of this project, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) investigates the effect of water chemistry transients on the EAC crack growth behaviour under periodical partial unloading (PPU) conditions. The present report is a summary of the first PSI test of WP 3 with a Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} transient. In the first part of the report, the theoretical background on crack growth mechanisms, crack chemistry, mass transport and water chemistry transients as well as a brief literature survey on other water chemistry transient investigations is given. Furthermore, the experimental equipment and test procedure is presented, followed by a summary of the results of PSI test 1 of WP 3. Finally the results are discussed in detail and compared to literature data. In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack was generated by PPU in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 {sup o}C, DO = 8 ppm, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} < 0.6 ppb). Then a sulphate transient was applied. The duration ({approx} 300 h) and the amount of sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 368 ppb) of the applied sulphate transient conservatively covered all sulphate transients, which might occur in BWR/normal water chemistry (NWC) practice. After the transient, outlet conductivity was lowered from ca. 1 {mu}S/cm to less than 0.15 {mu}S/cm within 2.6 h by a 'two-loop technique'. No accelerating effect of the sulphate transient on the EAC crack growth of both tested fracture mechanics specimens under highly oxidising BWR/NWC conditions was observed, making it impossible to deterrnine incubation or delay times. The EAC crack growth rates (CGR) before, during and after the

  6. Proceedings of a C.S.N.I. specialist meeting on instrumented pre-cracked Charpy testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wullaert, R A [Fracture Control Corp., 340 South Kellogg Avenue, Suite G, Goleta, California 93017 (United States)

    1981-11-15

    This report presents the status of the testing and data analysis procedures for the instrumented pre-cracked Charpy test with emphasis on the application of the test technique to the nuclear industry. The report (Proceedings) consist of invited technical papers by specialists in the field and a synopsis of the comments, conclusions, and recommendations reached in a workshop session. The CSNl-sponsored and EPRI-hosted meeting confirmed both the popularity of the test technique in the nuclear industry and the problems associated with the test technique due to the lack of a national or international consensus standard. Major emphasis in the meeting was devoted to evaluating the existing industry testing procedure (EPRI procedure) and proposed national standards (ASTM, ASK). The EPRI procedures were considered adequate by specialists concerned with engineering applications, but too restrictive by specialists concerned with research applications. As a result of the conference, a compilation of state-of-the-art papers is now available to code and standard committees. Specific comments concerning test and data analysis procedures, applications in the nuclear industry, and future research areas are also contained in the proceedings

  7. Study of oxide film formed in a pre cracked CT specimen of AISI 304L during a rising displacement test in 288 C water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz S, A.; Castano M, V.

    2007-01-01

    A study of oxide film formed inside pre cracked CT specimens during a rising displacement test in high temperature water (288 C) was performed in this study, The environmental conditions used during the experiments were similar to these found in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR): Normal Water Condition (NWC - 200 ppb O 2 ) and Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC - 125 ppb H2). The oxide films formed were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In both cases the oxide film consisted of two layers identified as magnetite. In the case of HWC the results agree with previous reports that mention magnetite as a stable phase in reducing conditions. However the stable phase in oxidant conditions is hematite and this work shows the presence of magnetite crystals in the narrow crack of CT specimens in spite of the oxidant environmental condition. This situation confirms that inside the pre-cracked CT specimens the environmental conditions were different from the oxidant bulk, and probably a poor oxygen access and stagnant conditions within the narrow crack promoted a localized reducing environment that permitted the magnetite formation. Is evident that the crack growth studies should consider the conditions inside crack because they are significantly different. (Author)

  8. Performance demonstration testing at the EPRI NDE center for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pherigo, G.

    1986-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has become a significant concern for the commercial electric utility industry during the past four years. As the IGSCC problem manifested itself, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) responded by issuing Inspection and Enforcement (I and E) Bulletin 82-03 which required that ultrasonic inspection procedures be demonstrated on service- removed samples. The ability to reliably detect and discriminate IGSCC was recognized by the industry as a very difficult task, at best. Concurrent with the NRC bulletin, state-of-the-art yet practical techniques for the detection and discrimination of IGSCC had to be developed, demonstrated, and transferred to the field in a relatively short time. With the release of I and E Bulletin 83-02, procedures as well as personnel had to be qualified on service-removed samples. This paper reports how the EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center developed the necessary technology and a formal training and qualification program to meet these needs on behalf of the industry

  9. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z. [Midwest Superconductivity Inc., Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  10. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z.

    1994-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology

  11. Influence of hydride microstructure on through-thickness crack growth in zircaloy-4 sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynaud, P.A.; Meholic, M.J.; Koss, D.A.; Motta, A.T.; Chan, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The fracture toughness of cold-worked and stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet subject to through-thickness crack growth within a 'sunburst' hydride microstructure was determined at 25 o C. The results were obtained utilizing a novel testing procedure in which a narrow linear strip of hydride blister was fractured at small loads under bending to create a well-defined sharp pre-crack that arrested at the blister-substrate interface. The hydriding procedure also forms 'sunburst' hydrides emanating from the blister that were aligned both in the plane of the crack and in the crack growth direction. Subsequent tensile loading caused crack growth initiation into the field of 'sunburst' hydrides. Specimen failure occurred under near-linear elastic behavior, and the fracture toughness for crack growth initiation into sunburst hydrides was in the range K Q ∼10-15 MPa√m. These results, when combined with those of a previous study, indicate that the through-thickness crack growth initiation toughness at 25 o C is very sensitive to the hydride microstructure. (author)

  12. Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of a Wind Turbine Blade in Flapwise Direction and Examining the Effect of Crack Propagation on the Blade Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Al-Khudairi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the sensitivity of the structural integrity of wind turbine blades to debonding of the shear web from the spar cap was investigated. In this regard, modal analysis, static and fatigue testing were performed on a 45.7 m blade for three states of the blade: (i as received blade (ii when a crack of 200 mm was introduced between the web and the spar cap and (iii when the crack was extended to 1000 mm. Calibration pull-tests for all three states of the blade were performed to obtain the strain-bending moment relationship of the blade according to the estimated target bending moment (BM which the blade is expected to experience in its service life. The resultant data was used to apply appropriate load in the fatigue tests. The blade natural frequencies in flapwise and edgewise directions over a range of frequency domain were found by modal testing for all three states of the blade. The blade first natural frequency for each state was used for the flapwise fatigue tests. These were performed in accordance with technical specification IEC TS 61400-23. The fatigue results showed that, for a 200 mm crack between the web and spar cap at 9 m from the blade root, the crack did not propagate at 50% of the target BM up to 62,110 cycles. However, when the load was increased to 70% of target BM, some damages were detected on the pressure side of the blade. When the 200 mm crack was extended to 1000 mm, the crack began to propagate when the applied load exceeded 100% of target BM and the blade experienced delaminations, adhesive joint failure, compression failure and sandwich core failure.

  13. Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of a Wind Turbine Blade in Flapwise Direction and Examining the Effect of Crack Propagation on the Blade Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khudairi, Othman; Hadavinia, Homayoun; Little, Christian; Gillmore, Gavin; Greaves, Peter; Dyer, Kirsten

    2017-10-03

    In this paper, the sensitivity of the structural integrity of wind turbine blades to debonding of the shear web from the spar cap was investigated. In this regard, modal analysis, static and fatigue testing were performed on a 45.7 m blade for three states of the blade: (i) as received blade (ii) when a crack of 200 mm was introduced between the web and the spar cap and (iii) when the crack was extended to 1000 mm. Calibration pull-tests for all three states of the blade were performed to obtain the strain-bending moment relationship of the blade according to the estimated target bending moment (BM) which the blade is expected to experience in its service life. The resultant data was used to apply appropriate load in the fatigue tests. The blade natural frequencies in flapwise and edgewise directions over a range of frequency domain were found by modal testing for all three states of the blade. The blade first natural frequency for each state was used for the flapwise fatigue tests. These were performed in accordance with technical specification IEC TS 61400-23. The fatigue results showed that, for a 200 mm crack between the web and spar cap at 9 m from the blade root, the crack did not propagate at 50% of the target BM up to 62,110 cycles. However, when the load was increased to 70% of target BM, some damages were detected on the pressure side of the blade. When the 200 mm crack was extended to 1000 mm, the crack began to propagate when the applied load exceeded 100% of target BM and the blade experienced delaminations, adhesive joint failure, compression failure and sandwich core failure.

  14. Adaptive numerical modeling of dynamic crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adouani, H.; Tie, B.; Berdin, C.; Aubry, D.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an adaptive numerical strategy that aims at developing reliable and efficient numerical tools to model dynamic crack propagation and crack arrest. We use the cohesive zone theory as behavior of interface-type elements to model crack. Since the crack path is generally unknown beforehand, adaptive meshing is proposed to model the dynamic crack propagation. The dynamic study requires the development of specific solvers for time integration. As both geometry and finite element mesh of the studied structure evolve in time during transient analysis, the stability behavior of dynamic solver becomes a major concern. For this purpose, we use the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, well-known to provide a natural framework to manage meshes that evolve in time. As an important result, we prove that the space-time discontinuous Galerkin solver is unconditionally stable, when the dynamic crack propagation is modeled by the cohesive zone theory, which is highly non-linear. (authors)

  15. Standard test method for determining susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of 2XXX and 7XXX Aluminum alloy products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for characterizing the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength aluminum alloy wrought products for the guidance of those who perform stress-corrosion tests, for those who prepare stress-corrosion specifications, and for materials engineers. 1.2 This test method covers method of sampling, type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure for determining the susceptibility to SCC of 2XXX (with 1.8 to 7.0 % copper) and 7XXX (with 0.4 to 2.8 % copper) aluminum alloy products, particularly when stressed in the short-transverse direction relative to the grain structure. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The inch-pound units in parentheses are provided for information. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and de...

  16. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  17. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  18. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested by...

  19. Measurement and accompanying numerical simulation of fast crack propagation in modified DCB specimens made of Araldit B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckl, H.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical simulations of fracture-mechanical experiments with the aim of determining the stress intensity factor and its relation to the fracture velocity from the measured data of the crack length are problematic with the conventional DCB specimen loaded through wedge and bolt namely because of the not clearly definable limiting conditions. Experiments were therefore carried out with modified DCB specimens made of ARALDIT B, with the loading wedge pressed directly into the crack mouth. In the case of suitable specimen dimensions, K I already in the initial phase of crack propagation before arrival of the first reflected waves covers a great part of the relevant range. Numerical simulations agree well with the shadow-optical measurements in this phase. A specimen variant with T-shaped extension at the counterbearing is suitable especially for crack arrest investigations, since high fracture velocities and brief crack jump lengths can be combined in tests with this specimen. The constant member in the series development of the stress distribution at the crack tip according to Williams determines the directional stability of the crack. The theories established by Cotterell, Schindler, Streit and Finnie are discussed by means of the kinking cracks observed during some experiments. (orig.) [de

  20. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Ponzoni, Lucio M.E.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (t inc ), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  1. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS FOLLOWING A CRACK AND CREVICE TYPE APPLICATION IN THE U.S. EPA INDOOR AIR QUALITY TEST HOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in the U.S. EPA Indoor Air Quality Test House to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of chlorpyrifos following a professional crack and crevice application in the kitchen. Following the application, measurements were made in the kitchen, den a...

  2. Process and device for the ultrasonic testing of slotted screws screwed into a head of a nuclear reactor fuel element for cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpenberg, R.

    1986-01-01

    To achieve correct echo signals, a test head is set separately on each area limited by a slot of the top of the slotted screw and the screw head is ultrasonically sounded in the direction of the suspected cracks. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Determination of the onset of ductile crack extension in 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel by multi-specimen J integral testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.G.

    1982-02-01

    Results obtained at AERE Harwell as part of the first phase of the European Group on Fracture round robin activity into ductile crack initiation detection are presented and discussed. Data are analysed using the current ASTM Jsub(IC) testing procedure and by an alternative procedure. Difficulties in the definition of 'initiation' are highlighted and deficiencies of the ASTM procedure exposed. The ASTM Jsub(IC) value for 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel was determined as 0.21 MN/m. The alternative procedure provides a more accurate evaluation of the 'initiation' value of J, that is, at the point of crack advance in excess of that due to crack tip blunting. Using this procedure the 'initiation' value, Jsub(i), was measured as 0.14 MN/m. (author)

  4. Implant test and acoustic emission technique used to investigate hydrogen assisted cracking in the melted zone of a welded HSLA-80 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fals, H. C.; Trevisan, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Weld metal hydrogen assisted cracking was studied using two flux cored wire (AWS E 70T-5 and AWS E 120 T5-K4) and a mixture gas of CO 2 +5% H 2 to induce values of diffusible hydrogen in high strength low alloy steel (HSLA-80) weldments. An acoustical Emission Measurement System (AEMS) RMS voltmeter was coupled to the implant test (NF 89-100) apparatus to determine energy, amplitude and event numbers of signal. All cracks were initiated in the partially melted zone and propagated into the coarse-grained region of the heat affected zone when E 70 T5 consumable was used, and the quasi-cleavage fracture mode was predominant. When E 120 T5 K4 consumable was used the cracks propagated vertically across the fusion zone, and a mixed fracture mode was the most important. A significant relationship between acoustic emission parameters and fracture modes was found. (Author) 12 refs

  5. The Dugdale solution for two unequal straight cracks weakening

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A crack arrest model is proposed for an infinite elastic perfectly-plastic plate weakened by two unequal, quasi-static, collinear straight cracks. The Dugdale model solution is obtained for the above problem when the developed plastic zones are subjected to normal cohesive quadratically varying yield point stress. Employing ...

  6. NRI experimental facility for the testing of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Zamboch, M.

    1998-01-01

    IASCC influencing reactor internals of both BWR and PWR reactors is a complex phenomenon covering influences of material structure, neutron fluence, neutron flux, chemistry of environment, gamma radiation and mechanical stress. To evaluate such degradation, tests should be performed under conditions similar to those in real structure. Nuclear Research Institute has built several experimental facilities in order to be able to test IASCC degradation of materials. Basically, reactor water loops, both PWR and BWR, could be used to model environmental conditions including gamma and neutron irradiation. Pre-irradiation can be done in irradiation channels under well controlled temperature conditions. During the experiment, in-pile conditions can be compared with those out of pile. It enables to clarify pure influence of irradiation. For testing of irradiated specimens, hot cell facility has been developed for slow strain rate tests. The paper will show all above mentioned facilities as well as some of the results observed with them. (author)

  7. Yield and Pitfalls of Ajmaline Testing in the Evaluation of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest and Sudden Unexplained Death: Single-Center Experience With 482 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Rafik; Nannenberg, Eline A; Lieve, Krystien V; Škorić-Milosavljević, Doris; Lahrouchi, Najim; Lekanne Deprez, Ronald H; Vendrik, Jeroen; Reckman, Yolan J; Postema, Pieter G; Amin, Ahmad S; Bezzina, Connie R; Wilde, Arthur A M; Tan, Hanno L

    2017-12-11

    This study evaluated the yield of ajmaline testing and assessed the occurrence of confounding responses in a large cohort of families with unexplained cardiac arrest (UCA) or sudden unexplained death (SUD). Ajmaline testing to diagnose Brugada syndrome (BrS) is routinely used in the evaluation of SUD and UCA, but its yield, limitations, and appropriate dosing have not been studied in a large cohort. We assessed ajmaline test response and genetic testing results in 637 individuals from 482 families who underwent ajmaline testing for SUD or UCA. Overall, 89 individuals (14%) from 88 families (18%) had a positive ajmaline test result. SCN5A mutations were identified in 9 of 86 ajmaline-positive cases (10%). SCN5A mutation carriers had positive test results at significantly lower ajmaline doses than noncarriers (0.75 [range: 0.64 to 0.98] mg/kg vs. 1.03 [range: 0.95 to 1.14] mg/kg, respectively; p genetic diagnosis accounting for UCA/SUD (5 cases) or noncosegregation of positive ajmaline response and arrhythmia (2 cases). The rate of confounding responses was significantly higher in positive ajmaline responses obtained at >1 mg/kg than in those obtained at ≤1 mg/kg (7 of 48 vs. 0 of 41 individuals; Fisher's exact test: p = 0.014). In line with previous, smaller studies, a positive ajmaline response was observed in a large proportion of UCA/SUD families. Importantly, our data emphasize the potential for confounding possibly false-positive ajmaline responses in this population, particularly at high doses, which could possibly lead to a misdiagnosis. Clinicians should consider all alternative causes in UCA/SUD and avoid ajmaline doses >1 mg/kg. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interlamellar cracking of thermal barrier coatings with TGOs by non-standard four-point bending tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P.F. [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Li, X.D. [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Aircraft Strength Research Institute of China, Xi' an, 710065 (China); Shang, F.L., E-mail: shangfl@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Li, C.J. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2011-09-25

    Highlights: {yields} A non-standard modified four-point bending specimen is adopted for delamination test. {yields} Typical failure mode of the TBC system with TGO layer is demonstrated. {yields} Fracture toughness of 8YSZ on a cold-sprayed MCrAlY coating is evaluated theoretically. - Abstract: This work concerns the failure mode and fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) deposited on a cold-sprayed MCrAlY bond coat (BC) after thermal oxidation. Upon high-temperature exposure, a thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was formed along the interface between the BC layer and YSZ ceramic coating layer through oxidation of the bond coat. By utilizing a non-standard modified four-point bending specimen, in conjunction with fractured surface examinations by scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscope, the failure mode of this thermal barrier coating (TBC) system has been checked experimentally. It is shown that delamination cracks firstly initiate at the YSZ/BC interface edge, and then propagate along a wavy path near the interface, not only through the TBC but also within the TGO and along the interlamellar interfaces. Through a theoretical analysis of the bending specimen, the fracture toughness of this TBC system, in terms of strain energy release rate, has been determined from the load-displacement curves which were recorded during the tests.

  9. Flaw preparations for HSST program vessel fracture mechanics testing: mechanical-cyclic pumping and electron-beam weld-hydrogen-charge cracking schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, P.P.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the document is to present schemes for flaw preparations in heavy section steel. The ability of investigators to grow representative sharp cracks of known size, location, and orientation is basic to representative field testing to determine data for potential flaw propagation, fracture behavior, and margin against fracture for high-pressure-, high-temperature-service steel vessels subjected to increasing pressurization and/or thermal shock. Gaging for analytical stress and strain procedures and ultrasonic and acoustic emission instrumentation can then be applied to monitor the vessel during testing and to study crack growth. This report presents flaw preparations for HSST fracture mechanics testing. Cracks were grown by two techniques: (1) a mechanical method wherein a premachined notch was sharpened by pressurization and (2) a method combining electron-beam welds and hydrogen charging to crack the chill zone of a rapidly placed autogenous weld. The mechanical method produces a naturally occurring growth shape controlled primarily by the shape of the machined notch; the welding-electrochemical method produces flaws of uniform depth from the surface of a wall or machined notch. Theories, details, discussions, and procedures are covered for both of the flaw-growing schemes

  10. Stress-corrosion cracking properties of candidate fuel cladding alloys for the Canadian SCWR: a summary of literature data and recent test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, W.; Zeng, Y., E-mail: Wenyue@NRcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Luo, J. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Novotny, R. [JRC-European Commission, Patten (Netherlands); Li, J.; Amirkhiz, B.S., E-mail: Jian.li@nrcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Matchim, M.; Collier, J.; Yang, L., E-mail: lin.yang@nrcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Cracking of fuel claddings is a serious concern when selecting candidate alloys for the development of a next-generation reactor. Whether the cracking is due to an environment-metal interaction such as stress-corrosion, or a pure metallurgical process such as localized plastic deformation along grain boundaries, the final impact is the same: cracking of the cladding can lead to fuel failure. In the course of a review of potential candidate alloys in preparation for further assessment under conditions relevant to the Canadian SCWR concept, relevant cracking studies reported for five short-listed alloys (namely 310S, 347H, 800H, 625 and 214) in the open literature were examined, and the key findings are provided in this paper. Discussions are also made of the recent SCC data from capsule tests and slow-strain rate tests (SSRT) in supercritical water. The data suggest that there is a threshold strain level below which SCC is not developed during SSRT tests. The practical implication of this finding is also discussed. (author)

  11. Ductile fracture evaluation of ductile cast iron and forged steel by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Pt. 1. Tensile test by large scaled test pieces with surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ajima, Tatsuro; Inohara, Yasuto

    1999-01-01

    The ductile fracture tests of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under a tensile stress condition were conducted using large-scaled flat test specimens with a surface crack and were evaluated by the J-integral values, in order to propose an evaluation method of initiation of ductile fracture of a cask body with crack by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Following results were obtained. 1) 1 -strain relations of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under the tensile stress condition were obtained, which is necessary for the development of J-integral design curves for evaluating the initiation of ductile fracture of the cask body. 2) In case of Ductile Cast Iron, the experimental J-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman at room temperature, in both elastic and plastic regions. But, at 70degC in plastic region, the experimental i-integral values showed middle values between those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory and by the non- linear-elastic- theory (based on the fully plastic solution by Yagawa et al.). 3) In case of Forged Steel at both -25degC and room temperature, the experimental i-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, in the elastic region. In the plastic region, however, the experimental i-integral values fell apart from the curve predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, and also approached to those by the non-linear-elastic-theory with increasing strain.(author)

  12. Effect of crack blunting in liquid metal environments on K-IEAC determined by the rising load test

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, U.K. (Received 13 March 1996) KIEAC is the threshold stress intensity below which environmentally assisted crack growth does not occur. This parameter... corrosion conditions has been well documented \\[12\\]. Wheeler et al. \\[13\\] have reported similar results in the case of crack growth in the aluminium-molten mercury system. By changing the loading conditions from fixed...

  13. Damage and fatigue crack growth of Eurofer steel first wall mock-up under cyclic heat flux loads. Part 1: Electron beam irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.H., E-mail: you@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Höschen, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK2, Euratom Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Clear evidence of microscopic damage and crack formation at the notch root in the early stage of the fatigue loading (50–100 load cycles). • Propagation of fatigue crack at the notch root in the course of subsequent cyclic heat-flux loading followed by saturation after roughly 600 load cycles. • No sign of damage on the notch-free surface up to 800 load cycles. • No obvious effect of the pulse time duration on the crack extension. • Slight change in the grain microstructure due to the formation of sub-grain boundaries by plastic deformation. - Abstract: Recently, the idea of bare steel first wall (FW) is drawing attention, where the surface of the steel is to be directly exposed to high heat flux loads. Hence, the thermo-mechanical impacts on the bare steel FW will be different from those of the tungsten-coated one. There are several previous works on the thermal fatigue tests of bare steel FW made of austenitic steel with regard to the ITER application. In the case of reduced-activation steel Eurofer97, a candidate structural material for the DEMO FW, there is no report on high heat flux tests yet. The aim of the present study is to investigate the thermal fatigue behavior of the Eurofer-based bare steel FW under cyclic heat flux loads relevant to DEMO operation. To this end, we conducted a series of electron beam irradiation tests with heat flux load of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} on water-cooled mock-ups with an engraved thin notch on the surface. It was found that the notch root region exhibited a marked development of damage and fatigue cracks whereas the notch-free surface manifested no sign of crack formation up to 800 load cycles. Results of extensive microscopic investigation are reported.

  14. SMILE: experimental results of the WP4 PTS large scale test performed on a component in terms of cracked cylinder involving warm pre-stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerkhof, K.; Bezdikian, G.; Moinereau, D.; Dahl, A; Wadier, Y.; Gilles, P.; Keim, E.; Chapuliot, S.; Taylor, N.; Lidbury, D.; Sharples, J.; Budden, P.; Siegele, D.; Nagel, G.; Bass, R.; Emond, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is an essential component, which is liable to limit the lifetime duration of PWR plants. The assessment of defects in RPV subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients made at an European level generally does not necessarily consider the beneficial effect of the load history (Warm Pre-stress, WPS). The SMILE project - Structural Margin Improvements in aged embrittled RPV with Load history Effects-aims to give sufficient elements to demonstrate, to model and to validate the beneficial WPS effect. It also aims to harmonize the different approaches in the national codes and standards regarding the inclusion of the WPS effect in a RPV structural integrity assessment. The project includes significant experimental work on WPS type experiments with C(T) specimens and a PTS type transient experiment on a large component. This paper deals with the results of the PTS type transient experiment on a component-like specimen subjected to WPS- loading, the so called Validation Test, carried out within the framework of work package WP4. The test specimen consists of a cylindrical thick walled specimen with a thickness of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 160 mm, provided with an internal fully circumferential crack with a depth of about 15 mm. The specified load path type is Load-Cool-Unload-Fracture (LCUF). No crack initiation occurred during cooling (thermal shock loading) although the loading path crossed the fracture toughness curve in the transition region. The benefit of the WPS-effect by final re-loading up to fracture in the lower shelf region, was shown clearly. The corresponding fracture load during reloading in the lower shelf region was significantly higher than the crack initiation values of the original material in the lower shelf region. The post test fractographic evaluation showed that the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage fracture also with some secondary cracks emanating from major crack. (authors)

  15. Initiation and arrest - two approaches to pressure vessel safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Filip, R.; Stepanek, S.

    1976-01-01

    The safety analysis is described of the reactor pressure vessel related to brittle fracture based on the fracture mechanics theory using two different approximations, i.e., the Crack Arrest Temperature (CAT) or Nil Ductility Temperature (NDT), and fracture toughness. The variation of CAT with stress was determined for different steel specimens of 120 to 200 mm in thickness. A diagram is shown of CAT variation with stress allowing the determination of crack arrest temperature for all types of commonly used steels independently of the NDT initial value. The diagram also shows that the difference between fracture transition elastic (FTE) and NDT depends on the type of material and determines the value of the ΔTsub(sigma) factor typical of the safety coefficient. The so-called fracture toughness reference value Ksub(IR) is recommended for the computation of pressure vessel criticality. Also shown is a defect analysis diagram which may be used for the calculation of pressure vessel safety prior to and during operation and which may also be used in making the decision on what crack sizes are critical, what cracks may be arrested and what cracks are likely to expand. The diagram is also important for the fact that it is material-independent and may be employed for the estimates of pre-operational and operational inspections and for pressure vessel life prediction. It is generally applicable to materials of greater thickness in the region where the validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics is guaranteed. (J.P.)

  16. Natural zeolite bitumen cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznicki, S.M.; McCaffrey, W.C.; Bian, J.; Wangen, E.; Koenig, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate how low cost heavy oil upgrading in the field could reduce the need for diluents while lowering the cost for pipelining. Low cost field upgrading could also contribute to lowering contaminant levels. The performance of visbreaking processes could be improved by using disposable cracking agents. In turn, the economics of field upgrading of in-situ derived bitumen would be improved. However, in order to be viable, such agents would have to be far less expensive than current commercial cracking catalysts. A platy natural zeolite was selected for modification and testing due to its unique chemical and morphological properties. A catalyst-bearing oil sand was then heat-treated for 1 hour at 400 degrees C in a sealed microreactor. Under these mild cracking conditions, the catalyst-bearing oil sand produced extractable products of much lower viscosity. The products also contained considerably more gas oil and middle distillates than raw oil sand processed under the same conditions as thermal cracking alone. According to model cracking studies using hexadecane, these modified mineral zeolites may be more active cracking agents than undiluted premium commercial FCC catalyst. These materials hold promise for partial upgrading schemes to reduce solvent requirements in the field. tabs., figs.

  17. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  18. Use of the Master Curve methodology for real three dimensional cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, Kim

    2007-01-01

    At VTT, development work has been in progress for 15 years to develop and validate testing and analysis methods applicable for fracture resistance determination from small material samples. The VTT approach is a holistic approach by which to determine static, dynamic and crack arrest fracture toughness properties either directly or by correlations from small material samples. The development work has evolved a testing standard for fracture toughness testing in the transition region. The standard, known as the Master Curve standard is in a way 'first of a kind', since it includes guidelines on how to properly treat the test data for use in structural integrity assessment. No standard, so far, has done this. The standard is based on the VTT approach, but presently, the VTT approach goes beyond the standard. Key components in the standard are statistical expressions for describing the data scatter, and for predicting a specimens size (crack front length) effect and an expression (Master Curve) for the fracture toughness temperature dependence. The standard and the approach, it is based upon, can be considered to represent the state of the art of small specimen fracture toughness characterization. Normally, the Master Curve parameters are determined using test specimens with 'straight' crack fronts and comparatively uniform stress state along the crack front. This enables the use of a single K I value and single constraint value to describe the whole specimen. For a real crack in a structure, this is usually not the case. Normally, both K I and constraint vary along the crack front and in the case of a thermal shock, even the temperature will vary along the crack front. A proper means of applying the Master Curve methodology for such cases is presented here

  19. Use of the master curve methodology for real three dimensional cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.; Rintamaa, R.

    2005-01-01

    At VTT, development work has been in progress for 15 years to develop and validate testing and analysis methods applicable for fracture resistance determination from small material samples. The VTT approach is a holistic approach by which to determine static, dynamic and crack arrest fracture toughness properties either directly or by correlations from small material samples. The development work has evolved a testing standard for fracture toughness testing in the transition region. The standard, known as the Master Curve standard is in a way 'first of a kind', since it includes guidelines on how to properly treat the test data for use in structural integrity assessment. No standard, so far, has done this. The standard is based on the VTT approach, but presently, the VTT approach goes beyond the standard. Key components in the standard are statistical expressions for describing the data scatter, and for predicting a specimen's size (crack front length) effect and an expression (Master Curve) for the fracture toughness temperature dependence. The standard and the approach it is based upon can be considered to represent the state of the art of small specimen fracture toughness characterization. Normally, the Master Curve parameters are determined using test specimens with 'straight' crack fronts and comparatively uniform stress state along the crack front. This enables the use of a single KI value and single constraint value to describe the whole specimen. For a real crack in a structure, this is usually not the case. Normally, both KI and constraint varies along the crack front and in the case of a thermal shock, even the temperature will vary along the crack front. A proper means of applying the Master Curve methodology for such cases is presented here. (authors)

  20. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    the same strength as a plain Dugdale model. The critical energy release rates Gamma_CR, however, become different. Expressions (with easy computer algorithms) are presented in the paper which relate critical energy release rates and crack geometry to arbitrary cohesive stress distributions.For future...... lifetime analysis of viscoelastic materials strain energy release rates, crack geometries, and cohesive stress distributions are considered as related to sub-critical loads sigma stress-deformation tests......The Dugdale crack model is widely used in materials science to predict strength of defective (cracked) materials. A stable Dugdale crack in an elasto-plastic material is prevented from spreading by uniformly distributed cohesive stresses acting in narrow areas at the crack tips. These stresses...

  1. Cracking in Flexural Reinforced Concrete Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    The system of cracks developing in reinforced concrete is in many aspects essential when modelling structures in both serviceability- and ultimate limit state. This paper discusses the behavior concerning crack development in flexural members observed from tests and associates it with two different...... existing models. From the investigations an approach is proposed on how to predict the crack pattern in flexural members involving two different crack systems; primary flexural cracks and local secondary cracks. The results of the approach is in overall good agreement with the observed tests and captures...... the pronounced size effect associated with flexural cracking in which the crack spacing and crack widths are approximately proportional to the depth of the member....

  2. Crack retardation by load reduction during fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Nam, Ki Woo; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Do, Jae Yoon

    2003-01-01

    Fracture life and crack retardation behavior were examined experimentally using CT specimens of aluminum alloy 5083. Crack retardation life and fracture life were a wide difference between 0.8 and 0.6 in proportion to ratio of load reduction. The wheeler model retardation parameter was used successfully to predict crack growth behavior. By using a crack propagation rule, prediction of fracture life can be evaluated quantitatively. A statistical approach based on Weibull distribution was applied to the test data to evaluate the dispersion in the retardation life and fracture life by the change of load reduction

  3. Determination of the availability of appropriate aged flight rocket motors. [captive tests to determine case bond separation and grain bore cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    A program to identify surplus solid rocket propellant engines which would be available for a program of functional integrity testing was conducted. The engines are classified as: (1) upper stage and apogee engines, (2) sounding rocket and launch vehicle engines, and (3) jato, sled, and tactical engines. Nearly all the engines were available because their age exceeds the warranted shelf life. The preference for testing included tests at nominal flight conditions, at design limits, and to establish margin limits. The principal failure modes of interest were case bond separation and grain bore cracking. Data concerning the identification and characteristics of each engine are tabulated. Methods for conducting the tests are described.

  4. Determination of a cohesive law for delamination modelling - Accounting for variation in crack opening and stress state across the test specimen width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joki, R. K.; Grytten, F.; Hayman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    by differentiating the fracture resistance with respect to opening displacement at the initial location of the crack tip, measured at the specimen edge. 2) Extend the bridging law to a cohesive law by accounting for crack tip fracture energy. 3) Fine-tune the cohesive law through an iterative modelling approach so......The cohesive law for Mode I delamination in glass fibre Non-Crimped Fabric reinforced vinylester is determined for use in finite element models. The cohesive law is derived from a delamination test based on DCB specimens loaded with pure bending moments taking into account the presence of large...... that the changing state of stress and deformation across the width of the test specimen is taken into account. The changing state of stress and deformation across the specimen width is shown to be significant for small openings (small fracture process zone size). This will also be important for the initial part...

  5. Pittsburgh Police Arrest Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Arrest data contains information on people taken into custody by City of Pittsburgh police officers. More serious crimes such as felony offenses are more likely to...

  6. Crack closure and healing studies in WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] salt using compressional wave velocity and attenuation measurements: Test methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, N.S.

    1990-11-01

    Compressional wave ultrasonic data were used to qualitatively assess the extent of crack closure during hydrostatic compression of damaged specimens of WIPP salt. Cracks were introduced during constant strain-rate triaxial tests at low confining pressure (0.5 MPa) as specimens were taken to either 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 percent axial strain. For three specimens taken to 1.0 percent axial strain, the pressure was increased to 5, 10 or 15 MPa. For the remaining specimens, pressure was raised to 15 MPa. Waveforms for compressional waves traveling both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum principal stress were measured in the undamaged state, during constant strain-rate tests, and then monitored as functions of time while the specimens were held at pressure. Both wave velocities and amplitudes increased over time at pressure, indicating that cracks closed and perhaps healed. The recovery of ultrasonic wave characteristics depended upon both pressure and damage level. The higher the pressure, the greater the velocity recovery; however, amplitude recovery showed no clear correlation with pressure. For both amplitudes and velocities, recoveries were greatest in the specimens with the least damage. 13 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  7. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-07-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  8. Hydrogen cracking and stress corrosion of pipeline steels. Contribution of the cracking mechanisms study to the understanding of the in-service damage and to the definition of a ranking test; Fissuration assistee par l'hydrogene et corrosion sous contrainte des aciers de pipelines. Apports de l'etude des mecanismes de fissuration a la comprehension de l'endommagement de service et a la definition d'un test de classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Friant, D.

    2000-12-19

    This work is based on the study of the cracking of a French oil transmission pipeline protected by a cathodic protection system. The objective is to identify field parameters, which contribute to the cracks propagation, and to assess changes in the operating conditions, which could lead to a mitigation of the phenomenon. We have focused on the study of the micro-mechanisms by means of slow strain rate tests. Then, cyclic loading tests were carried out to investigate cracks propagation mechanisms. Smooth and pre-notched specimens were tested at free and cathodic potential. Hydrogen is responsible for crack advance through changes in the local steels properties. Such effects take place when two phenomenons occur: favourable conditions for hydrogen entry and, a localisation of hydrogen and its effects. In particular, we have shown the essential role of a dynamic loading in promoting hydrogen entry into the steel (especially at the very crack tip). At cathodic potential, hydrogen-related effects are exacerbated by the presence of MnS inclusions which leads to the initiation of internal cracks (HIC) and to a SOHIC-like crack morphology. At free potential, the lesser amount of available hydrogen give localisation-related effects a greater importance. Cracking is then related to a hydrogen-induced SCC mechanism. Three parameters are involved in the field cracking: operating pressure variations, period of over-protection and a sensitive steels microstructure (MnS). Cathodic protection appears to be the most efficient field parameter to mitigate the phenomenon: it requires a better control of the polarisation level. Finally, a ranking test is outlined from the study of the cracking mechanisms. (author)

  9. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T.

    1998-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  10. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  11. Stress corrosion crack initiation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment during creep, relaxation, and constant strain rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezequel, T.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Bono, M.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Chabretou, V.; Mozzani, N.; Rautenberg, M.

    2018-02-01

    During accidental power transient conditions with Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), the synergistic effect of the stress and strain imposed on the cladding by thermal expansion of the fuel, and corrosion by iodine released as a fission product, may lead to cladding failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this study, internal pressure tests were conducted on unirradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment. The goal was to investigate the influence of loading type (constant pressure tests, constant circumferential strain rate tests, or constant circumferential strain tests) and test temperature (320, 350, or 380 °C) on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC). The experimental results obtained with different loading types were consistent with each other. The apparent threshold hoop stress for I-SCC was found to be independent of the test temperature. SEM micrographs of the tested samples showed many pits distributed over the inner surface, which tended to coalesce into large pits in which a microcrack could initiate. A model for the time-to-failure of a cladding tube was developed using finite element simulations of the viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material and a modified Kachanov's damage growth model. The times-to-failure predicted by this model are consistent with the experimental data.

  12. Effect of a Chloride Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P.

    2002-11-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5 t h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the second test of working package (WP) 3 with a NaCl transient, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack with a crack growth rate (CGR) in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC line' of the GE-model was generated by periodical partial unloading (PPU) in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 o C, DO = 8 ppm). Then a chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - was applied for ∼40 h. After this transient, the load level was reduced and the loading conditions were changed to pure cyclic loading. Thereupon a second transient with a chloride concentration of 49 ppb was applied. In both RPV steels, the first chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - resulted in an acceleration of the EAC crack growth by more than one order of magnitude and in fast, stationary SCC crack growth during the constant load phase of the PPU cycles at K I values 1/2 . 3 h after adding chloride to the high-purity water, the EAC CGR started to increase in the high-sulphur RPV steel during the constant load phase of a PPU cycle and after 20 h a stationary EAC CGR value in the range of the 'high-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model was reached. After 5 h in high-purity water, the crack growth began to slow down after a partial unloading cycle and 15 h later it reached again a stationary CGR value in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model. The second chloride transient did not result in an acceleration of the crack growth in both investigated specimens. This was explained by crack closure effects, which occurred in both specimens after the reduction of the load. The CGR

  13. Crack detection '86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The participants of the conference heard 36 papers of which 13 were incorporated in INIS. The incorporated papers deal with the quality control of the equipment of nuclear power plants, with technical specifications and possibilities of diverse crack detection devices, as well as with personnel training for nondestructive materials testing. (E.S.)

  14. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  15. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Feng

    Full Text Available Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three

  16. Distinct mechanisms act in concert to mediate cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toettcher, Jared E; Loewer, Alexander; Ostheimer, Gerard J; Yaffe, Michael B; Tidor, Bruce; Lahav, Galit

    2009-01-20

    In response to DNA damage, cells arrest at specific stages in the cell cycle. This arrest must fulfill at least 3 requirements: it must be activated promptly; it must be sustained as long as damage is present to prevent loss of genomic information; and after the arrest, cells must re-enter into the appropriate cell cycle phase to ensure proper ploidy. Multiple molecular mechanisms capable of arresting the cell cycle have been identified in mammalian cells; however, it is unknown whether each mechanism meets all 3 requirements or whether they act together to confer specific functions to the arrest. To address this question, we integrated mathematical models describing the cell cycle and the DNA damage signaling networks and tested the contributions of each mechanism to cell cycle arrest and re-entry. Predictions from this model were then tested with quantitative experiments to identify the combined action of arrest mechanisms in irradiated cells. We find that different arrest mechanisms serve indispensable roles in the proper cellular response to DNA damage over time: p53-independent cyclin inactivation confers immediate arrest, whereas p53-dependent cyclin downregulation allows this arrest to be sustained. Additionally, p21-mediated inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity is indispensable for preventing improper cell cycle re-entry and endoreduplication. This work shows that in a complex signaling network, seemingly redundant mechanisms, acting in a concerted fashion, can achieve a specific cellular outcome.

  17. Fatigue crack growth behaviors in hot-rolled low carbon steels: A comparison between ferrite–pearlite and ferrite–bainite microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Mingfei; Yu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The roles of microstructure types in fatigue crack growth behaviors in ferrite–pearlite steel and ferrite–bainite steel were investigated. The ferrite–bainite dual-phase microstructure was obtained by intermediate heat treatment, conducted on ferrite–pearlite hot-rolled low carbon steel. This paper presents the results from investigation using constant stress-controlled fatigue tests with in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate tests, and fatigue fractography analysis. Microscopy images arrested by in-situ SEM showed that the fatigue crack propagation in F–P steel could become unstable more ealier compared with that in F–B steel. The fatigue cracks in ferrite–pearlite were more tortuous and could propagate more freely than that in ferrite–bainite microstructures. However, frequent crack branching were observed in ferrite–bainite steel and it indicated that the second hard bainite phase effectively retarded the crack propagation. The variation of FCG rate (da/dN) with stress intensity factor range (ΔK) for F–P and F–B steels was discussed within the Paris region. It was shown that FCG rate of F–P steel was higher than that of F–B steel. Moreover, the fatigue fracture surface analysis proved that grain boundaries could also play a role in the resistance of crack propagation.

  18. Single borehole test sensitivity towards crack and rock parameter. Lesson Hortberg; Einbohrlochtracertestsensitivitaet gegenueber Riss und Gesteinsparametern. Lektion Horstberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghergut, Iulia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Angewandte Geologie

    2012-10-16

    The novel experiments of the GeoZentrum Hanover (Hanover, Federal Republic of Germany) on geothermal energy at the well bore Horstberg in the south heath also motivated the accompanying tracertest-mindset to move away from the tracer job stereotypes. For some possible designs at the tracertest at this drilling (forced-gradient divergent push by water fracking of Detfurth perforation, single-screen push-pull at Solling perforation, single-screen push-pull at Detfurth perforation, and so forth) the analysis shows how and why the controlling parameter do not comply with the mental basic pattern of the expectations at the tracertests ('tracertest by crack {yields} characterization of the crack', 'tracer residence time {yields} prognosis of the thermal lifetime').

  19. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  20. Single borehole test sensitivity towards crack and rock parameter. Lesson Hortberg; Einbohrlochtracertestsensitivitaet gegenueber Riss und Gesteinsparametern. Lektion Horstberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghergut, Iulia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Angewandte Geologie

    2012-10-16

    The novel experiments of the GeoZentrum Hanover (Hanover, Federal Republic of Germany) on geothermal energy at the well bore Horstberg in the south heath also motivated the accompanying tracertest-mindset to move away from the tracer job stereotypes. For some possible designs at the tracertest at this drilling (forced-gradient divergent push by water fracking of Detfurth perforation, single-screen push-pull at Solling perforation, single-screen push-pull at Detfurth perforation, and so forth) the analysis shows how and why the controlling parameter do not comply with the mental basic pattern of the expectations at the tracertests ('tracertest by crack {yields} characterization of the crack', 'tracer residence time {yields} prognosis of the thermal lifetime').

  1. Influence of MSD crack pattern on the residual strength of flat stiffened sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, K.-F.

    A parameter study of the residual strength for a multiple site damaged (MSD) stiffened sheet is presented. The analysis is based on an elastic-plastic fracture analysis using the yield-strip model for interaction between a lead crack and the smaller MSD cracks. Two crack growth criteria, one with a pronounced crack growth resistance and one with no crack growth resistance and five different MSD crack patterns, are analysed for different sizes of the lead crack and the smaller MSD cracks. The analysis indicates that the residual strength reduction depends on all these parameters and that MSD may totally erode the crack arrest capability of a tear strap. Another important outcome is that for certain combinations also very small MSD cracks may induce a significant residual strength reduction.

  2. Password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Χριστοφάκης, Μιχαήλ Κ.

    2014-01-01

    Information security is the next big thing in computers society because of the rapidly growing security incidents and the outcomes of those. Hacking and cracking existed even from the start of the eighties decade when there was the first step of the interconnection through the internet between humans. From then and ever after there was a big explosion of such incidents mostly because of the worldwide web which was introduced in the early nineties. Following the huge steps forward of computers...

  3. Analysis of 3D crack propagation by microfocus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Bo; Chen Fuxing; Deng Cuizhen; Zeng Yabin

    2014-01-01

    The three-point bending test of notched specimens of 2A50 forging aluminum was performed by high frequency fatigue tester, and the surface cracks of different stages were analyzed and contrasted by SEM. The crack was reconstructed by microfocus computed tomography, and its size, position and distribution were visually displayed through 3D visualization. The crack propagation behaviors were researched through gray value and position of crack front of 2D CT images in two adjacent stages, and the results show that crack propagation is irregular. The projection image of crack was obtained if crack of two stages projected onto the reference plane respectively, a significant increase of new crack propagation was observed compared with the previous projection of crack, and the distribution curve of crack front of two stages was displayed. The 3D increment distribution of the crack front propagation was obtained through the 3D crack analysis of two stages. (authors)

  4. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  5. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  6. Runway Arrested Landing Site (RALS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Runway Arrested Landing Site includes an underground complex located on a Mod 2, Mod 3, and Mod 3+ arresting gear and are located under the runway and accurately...

  7. An evaluation of detection ability of ultrasonic testing with a large aperture transducer for axial cracks in cast stainless steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Yoshito; Ishida, Hitoshi; Kurozumi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is difficult to apply to cast stainless steel which is the material of the main coolant pipes in pressurized water reactors, because of the large attenuation and scattering of ultrasonic waves caused by its macro structure. In this study, ultrasonic testing for progression of axial fatigue cracks of a welded area in the test piece of cast stainless steel pipe was performed using double big-size ultrasonic probes which were formerly developed in INSS. It was found that detection of defects that were over 6% of the target depth for the specimen thickness of 69mm is possible, and detection of defects with over 10% of the target depth is possible for all test conditions. (author)

  8. Cracking hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forwood, G F; Lane, M; Taplay, J G

    1921-10-07

    In cracking and hydrogenating hydrocarbon oils by passing their vapors together with steam over heated carbon derived from shale, wood, peat or other vegetable or animal matter, the gases from the condenser are freed from sulfuretted hydrogen, and preferably also from carbon dioxide, and passed together with oil vapors and steam through the retort. Carbon dioxide may be removed by passage through slaked lime, and sulfuretted hydrogen by means of hydrated oxide of iron. Vapors from high-boiling oils and those from low-boiling oils are passed alternately through the retort, so that carbon deposited from the high-boiling oils is used up during treatment of low-boiling oils.

  9. Crack propagation of brittle rock under high geostress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Chu, Weijiang; Chen, Pingzhi

    2018-03-01

    Based on fracture mechanics and numerical methods, the characteristics and failure criterions of wall rock cracks including initiation, propagation, and coalescence are analyzed systematically under different conditions. In order to consider the interaction among cracks, adopt the sliding model of multi-cracks to simulate the splitting failure of rock in axial compress. The reinforcement of bolts and shotcrete supporting to rock mass can control the cracks propagation well. Adopt both theory analysis and simulation method to study the mechanism of controlling the propagation. The best fixed angle of bolts is calculated. Then use ansys to simulate the crack arrest function of bolt to crack. Analyze the influence of different factors on stress intensity factor. The method offer more scientific and rational criterion to evaluate the splitting failure of underground engineering under high geostress.

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the behaviour of cracks in primary coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbuch, R.; Bartholome, G.; Felski, N.; Kastner, W.

    1981-01-01

    During the investigations of the government-sponsored R+D programs (RS 104 and RS 320) experimental and theoretical work has been performed to describe the leak before break behaviour and the extent of instable crack growth. The test pipes are 300 mm ID pipes made of 20MnMoNi55. Three of them had been welded to a pressure reservoir to simulate the situation of a real system of piping and components as related to hydrodynamics. The instrumentation of the specimen was designed to describe - temperature and pressure during failure - effect of reservoir on depressurisation - motion of the pipe - leakage area as function of time - crack arrest length. At two experiments the pressure dropped to saturation but in others for a short period the pressure was remarkably lower. (orig./GL)

  11. Application of Interfacial Propagation and Kinking Crack Concept to ECC/Concrete Overlay Repair System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw ChiaHwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the application of ultraductile engineered cementitious composite (ECC as overlay in the repair of deteriorated concrete structures is performed in this paper. Also, interfacial crack kinking and trapping mechanism experimentally observed in ECC/concrete overlay repair system are described by comparison of toughness and energy release rate. The mechanism involves cycles of extension, kinking, and arrest of interfacial crack into the overlay. Experimental testing of overlay repair system reveals significant improvements in load carrying capacity and ductility over conventional concrete overlay. The commonly observed overlay system failure mode of delamination or spalling is eliminated when ECC is applied. These failure modes are suppressed when ECC is used as an ideal and durable candidate overlay repair material.

  12. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FDandE SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are observed

  13. Monitoring crack growth using thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djedjiga, Ait Aouita; Abdeldjalil, Ouahabi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a novel strategy for real-time monitoring crack growth of materials. The process is based on the use of thermal data extracted along the horizontal axis of symmetry of single edge notch tension (SENT) specimens, during fatigue tests. These data are exploited using an implemented program to detect in situ the growth of fatigue crack, with the critical size and propagation speed of the crack. This technique has the advantage to be applicable to a wide range of materials regardless of their electrical conductivity and their surface texture. (authors)

  14. Assessment of cracking in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, Anders; Norrgaard, K.; Lagerstroem, J.; Embring, G.; Tice, D.R.

    2001-08-01

    During the refueling in 2000, indications were observed by non-destructive testing at four locations in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzle to safe end weld in Ringhals 4. All indications were confined to the outlet nozzle (hotleg) oriented at 25 deg, a nozzle with documented repair welding. Six boat samples were removed from the four locations, and the samples were subsequently subjected to a metallographic examination. The objectives were to establish the fracture morphology, and if possible the root cause for cracking. The examination revealed that cracks were present at all four boat sample locations and that they all were confined to the weld metal, alloy 182. Cracking extended in the axial direction of the safe-end. There was no evidence of any cracks extending into the RPV-steel, or the stainless steel safe-end. All cracking was interdendritic and significantly branched. Among others, these observations strongly suggested crack propagation mainly was caused by interdendritic stress corrosion cracking. In addition, crack type defects and isolated areas on the fracture surfaces suggested the presence of hot cracking, which would have been formed during fabrication. The reason for crack initiation could not be established based on the boat samples examined. However, increased stress levels due to repair welding, cold work from grinding, and defects produced during fabrication, e. g. hot cracks, may alone or in combination have contributed to crack initiation

  15. Behavior of sulfur species in steam generator conditions of PWRs - towards an update of the secondary side corrosion cracking model based on laboratory tests in sulfate environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, C.; Legras, L.; Catalette, H.; Lefevre, G.; Fedoroff, M.; Pavageau, E.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Secondary side corrosion cracking affects Mill Annealed Alloy 600 steam generator (SG) tubes of PWRs in flow restricted areas where pollutants, such as sulfate, can concentrate and form various aggressive local environments. The 'sulfate model', based on laboratory tests in sulfate environments, was developed to predict the degradation of SG tubes. Such prediction is aimed to be done after having evaluated the chemistry in the flow restricted areas where the degradation occurs. For such purpose, a better knowledge of the behavior of sulfur species in SG conditions is needed. After a brief description of the sulfate model, this paper focuses on the latest experimental results that have been obtained : sorption of sulfur species over magnetite in SG temperature conditions, thermodynamical calculations as well as transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observations of magnetite after sorption and C-Ring specimens tested in sulfate environments. Then, all these results are discussed in order to contribute to a better understanding of the secondary side corrosion cracking of SG tubes. (author)

  16. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  17. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to New Source Performance Standard (NSPS... From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for Carbon Monoxide...

  18. An experimental assessment of hysteresis in near-threshold fatigue crack propagation regime of a low alloy ferritic steel under closure-free testing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1991-01-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behavior of a high strength steel was investigated in laboratory air under closure-free testing conditions at R = 0.7 (= R eff ), and at two different K-gradients. Depending on the criterion assumed, the threshold value differed; the criterion of non-propagation gave a lower threshold value than that assumed by the propagation criterion. Nevertheless, the subsequent propagation following a load increase was discontinuous in both the cases, and da/dN vs ΔK curves obtained on the same specimen during the K-decreasing and the K-increasing test were not necessarily identical in the threshold regime. This behavior, hysteresis, is analyzed mainly from the experimental viewpoint, and it is shown that hysteresis is not an artifact. (orig.) With 13 figs., 3 appendices [de

  19. The fatigue life and fatigue crack through thickness behavior of a surface cracked plate, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ki-Woo; Fujibayashi, Shinpei; Ando, Kotoji; Ogura, Nobukazu.

    1987-01-01

    Most structures have a region where stresses concentrate, and the probability of fatigue crack initiation may be higher than in other parts. Therefore, to improve the reliability of an LBB design, it is necessary to evaluate the growth and through thickness behavior of fatigue cracks in the stress concentration part. In this paper, a fatigue crack growth test at a stress concentration region has been made on 3 % NiCrMo and HT 80 steel. Stress concentration is caused by a fillet on the plate. The main results obtained are as follows : (1) Before cracking through the plate thickness, stress concentration has a remarkable effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior and it flatens the shape of a surface crack. The crack growth behavior can be explained quantatively by using the Newman-Raju equation and the stress resolving method proposed by ASME B and P Code SecXI. (2) The da/dN-ΔK relation obtained in a stress concentration specimen shows good agreement with that obtained in a surface cracked smooth specimen. (3) It is shown that stress concentration caused by a fillet has little effect on the crack growth rate after cracking through the plate thickness. (4) By using the K value based on eq. (1), (2), particular crack growth behavior and the change in crack shape after cracking through thickness can be explained quantatively. (author)

  20. Mechanisms of hydrogen induced delayed cracking in hydride forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.; Nuttall, K.; Puls, M.P.; Simpson, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms which have been formulated to describe delayed hydrogen cracking in hydride-forming metals are reviewed and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the commercial alloy Zr--2.5% Nb (Cb) which is extensively used in nuclear reactor core components. A quantitative model for hydrogen cracking in this material is presented and compared with available experimental data. The kinetics of crack propagation are controlled by the growth of hydrides at the stressed crack tip by the diffusive ingress of hydrogen into this region. The driving force for the diffusion flux is provided by the local stress gradient which interacts with both hydrogen atoms in solution and hydrogen atoms being dissolved and reprecipitated at the crack tip. The model is developed using concepts of elastoplastic fracture mechanics. Stage I crack growth is controlled by hydrides growing in the elastic stress gradient, while Stage II is controlled by hydride growth in the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent experimental observations are presented which indicate that the process occurs in an intermittent fashion; hydride clusters accumulate at the crack tip followed by unstable crack advance and subsequent crack arrest in repeated cycles

  1. Mechanisms of hydrogen induced delayed cracking in hydride forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.; Nuttall, K.; Puls, M.P.; Simpson, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms which have been formulated to describe delayed hydrogen cracking in hydride-forming metals are reviewed and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the commercial alloy Zr-2.5 pct Nb which is extensively used in nuclear reactor core components. A quantitative model for hydrogen cracking in this material is presented and compared with available experimental data. The kinetics of crack propagation are controlled by the growth of hydrides at the stressed crack tip by the diffusive ingress of hydrogen into this region. The driving force for the diffusion flux is provided by the local stress gradient which interacts with both hydrogen atoms in solution and hydrogen atoms being dissolved and reprecipitated at the crack tip. The model is developed using concepts of elastoplastic fracture mechanics. Stage I crack growth is controlled by hydrides growing in the elastic stress gradient, while Stage II is controlled by hydride growth in the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent experimental observations are presented which indicate that the process occurs in an intermittent fashion; hydride clusters accumulate at the crack tip followed by unstable crack advance and subsequent crack arrest in repeated cycles. 55 refs., 6 figs

  2. Gender and Relational-Distance Effects in Arrests for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, William; DeMaris, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study tests two hypotheses regarding factors affecting arrest of the perpetrator in domestic violence incidents. Black's relational-distance thesis is that the probability of arrest increases with increasing relational distance between perpetrator and victim. Klinger's leniency principle suggests that the probability of arrest is lower for…

  3. The Relationship Between Family-of-Origin Violence, Hostility, and Intimate Partner Violence in Men Arrested for Domestic Violence: Testing a Mediational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmquist, JoAnna; Shorey, Ryan C; Labrecque, Lindsay; Ninnemann, Andrew; Zapor, Heather; Febres, Jeniimarie; Wolford-Clevenger, Caitlin; Plasencia, Maribel; Temple, Jeff R; Stuart, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Although research has shown links between family-of-origin violence (FOV), intimate partner violence (IPV), and hostility, research has not examined whether hostility mediates the relationship between FOV and IPV. The current study examined whether hostility mediates FOV and IPV perpetration in 302 men arrested for domestic violence. Results demonstrated that hostility fully mediated the relationship between father-to-participant FOV and physical and psychological IPV, and the relationship between mother-to-participant FOV and physical IPV. Results indicated that hostility fully mediated the relationship between experiencing and witnessing FOV and physical IPV (composite FOV), and partially mediated the relationship between composite FOV and psychological aggression. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, W.; Turnbull, A.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.03 and is structured as follows: General aspects of SCC testing; Non-precracked specimens; Precracked specimens - the fracture mechanics approach to SCC; Crack growth measurement; Limitations of the LEFM approach to SCC; The use of SCC data; Guide to selection of mechanical scc test method

  5. Transient subcritical crack-growth behavior in transformation-toughened ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O.; Carter, W.C.; Veirs, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Transient subcritical crack-growth behavior following abrupt changes in the applied load are studied in transformation-toughened ceramics. A mechanics analysis is developed to model the transient nature of transformation shielding of the crack tip, K s , with subcritical crack extension following the applied load change. conditions for continued crack growth, crack growth followed by arrest, and no crack growth after the load change, are considered and related to the magnitude and sign of the applied load change and to materials properties such as the critical transformation stress. The analysis is found to provide similar trends in K s compared to values calculated from experimentally measured transformation zones in a transformation-toughened Mg-PSZ. In addition, accurate prediction of the post load-change transient crack-growth behavior is obtained using experimentally derived steady-state subcritical crack-growth relationships for cyclic fatigue in the same material

  6. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, V.; Rabinovitch, A.; Bahat, D.

    2006-01-01

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality

  7. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, V. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: vfrid@bgu.ac.il; Rabinovitch, A. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Bahat, D. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2006-07-31

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality.

  8. Dynamic experiments on cracked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, M.; Brunet, G.; Buland, P.

    1991-01-01

    In order to apply the leak before break concept to piping systems, the behavior of cracked pipes under dynamic, and especially seismic loading must be studied. In a first phase, an experimental program on cracked stainless steel pipes under quasi-static monotonic loading has been conducted. In this paper, the dynamic tests on the same pipe geometry are described. These tests have been performed on a shaking table with a mono frequency input signal. The main parameter of the tests is the frequency of excitation versus the frequency of the system

  9. Noncontact fatigue crack evaluation using thermoelastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Min; An, Yun Kyu; Sohn, Hoon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    This paper proposes a noncontact thermography technique for fatigue crack evaluation under a cyclic tensile loading. The proposed technique identifies and localizes an invisible fatigue crack without scanning, thus making it possible to instantaneously evaluate an incipient fatigue crack. Based on a thermoelastic theory, a new fatigue crack evaluation algorithm is proposed for the fatigue crack tip localization. The performance of the proposed algorithm is experimentally validated. To achieve this, the cyclic tensile loading is applied to a dog bone shape aluminum specimen using a universal testing machine, and the corresponding thermal responses induced by thermoelastic effects are captured by an infrared camera. The test results confirm that the fatigue crack is well identified and localized by comparing with its microscopic images.

  10. Dynamic fracture toughness testing of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debel, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Two candidate test methods aimed at producing materials properties of interest in connection with crack arrest assessments are currently under evaluation. These methods and the significance of the results are described. The quasi-static as well as the dynamic fracture toughness of a plain C-Mn steel in the as-quenched and tempered condition have been examined at temperatures between -115 0 C and the ambient temperature. Wedge-loaded duplex DCB-specimens were used in dynamic tests. The crack extension velocity was measured using a surface deposited grid and a registration circuit based on TTL-electronics. The toughness transition-temperature at quasi-static loading rate is found to be low; but during dynamic crack-extension a substantial shift of the transition-region to higher temperatures is produced, and fast fracture was obtained even at ambient temperature. Even though the dynamic fracture toughness Ksub(ID) increases with temperature, it decreases with increasing crack-extension velocity at a given temperature and the rate of decrease with respect to crack-extension velocity seems to be independent of temperature. Ksub(ID) appears to be insensitive to heat treatments. Test results indicate insufficient load-train stiffness, and problems due to crack branching were encountered. (author)

  11. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to make advancements in understanding solidification crack formation in aluminum welds, by investigating in particular the aluminum 6060/4043 system. Alloy 6060 is typical of a family of Al-Mg-Si extrusion alloys, which are considered weldable only when using an appropriate filler alloy such as 4043 (Al-5Si). The effect of 4043 filler dilution (i.e. weld metal silicon content) on cracking sensitivity and solidification path of Alloy 6060 welds are investigated. Afterwards, cracking models are developed to propose mechanisms for solidification crack initiation and growth. Cracking Sensitivity. Building upon the concept that silicon improves weldability and that weldability can be defined by a critical strain rate, strain rate-composition combinations required for solidification crack formation in the Al- 6060/4043 system were determined using the newly developed Controlled Tensile Weldability (CTW) test utilizing local strain extensometer measurements. Results, presented in a critical strain rate - dilution map, show a crack - no crack boundary which reveals that higher local strain rates require higher 4043 filler dilution to avoid solidification cracking when arc welding Alloy 6060. Using the established crack - no crack boundary as a line of reference, additional parameters were examined and their influence on cracking characterized. These parameter influences have included studies of weld travel speed, weld pool contaminants (Fe, O, and H), and grain refiner additions (TiAl{sub 3} + Boron). Each parameter has been independently varied and its effect on cracking susceptibility quantified in terms of strain rate - composition combinations. Solidification Path. Solidification path of the Al-6060/4043 system was characterized using thermal analysis and phase identification. Increasing 4043 filler dilution from 0 to 16% in Alloy 6060 arc welds resulted in little effect on thermal arrests and microstructure, no effect on

  12. Seismic behaviour of un-cracked and cracked thin pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blay, N.; Brunet, G.; Gantenbein, F.; Aguilar, J.

    1995-01-01

    In order to evaluate the seismic behaviour of un-cracked and cracked thin pipes, subjected to high acceleration levels, seismic tests and calculations have been performed on straight thin pipes made of 316L stainless steel, loaded in pure bending by a permanent static and dynamic loading. The seismic tests were carried out on the AZALEE shaking table of the CEA laboratory TAMARIS. The influence of the elasto-plastic model with isotropic or kinematic hardening are studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Application of acoustic emission to hydride cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagat, S.; Ambler, J.F.R.; Coleman, C.E.

    1986-07-01

    Acoustic emission has been used for over a decade to study delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys. At first acoustic emission was used primarily to detect the onset of DHC. This was possible because DHC was accompanied by very little plastic deformation of the material and furthermore the amplitudes of the acoustic pulses produced during cracking of the brittle hydride phase were much larger than those from dislocation motion and twinning. Acoustic emission was also used for measuring crack growth when it was found that for a suitable amplitude threshold, the total number of acoustic emission counts was linearly related to the cracked area. Once the proportionality constant was established, the acoustic counts could be converted to the crack length. Now the proportionality between the count rate and the crack growth rate is used to provide feedback between the crack length and the applied load, using computer technology. In such a system, the stress at the crack tip can be maintained constant during the test by adjusting the applied load as the crack progresses, or it can be changed in a predetermined manner, for example, to measure the threshold stress for cracking

  14. Gentilly-2 NPP - Concrete aging effects on long term pre-stress losses and propagation of concrete cracking due to pressure testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocevski, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the study intended to evaluate the post-tension long term losses and propagation of cracks in the envelope of Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant reactor building. The numerical simulation of concrete, that takes into account elastic as well as inelastic strains due to loading, shrinkage strains due to drying or cooling and inelastic strains from alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) related swelling, is explained. The simultaneous contribution of AAR, shrinkage and creep, are simulated using an enhanced elastic-plastic constitutive relation. The nonlinear relations are validated by comparing the numerically calculated strains with strain measurements from the extensometers placed in the concrete during the construction of the envelope. The post-tension losses/gains are evaluated for the vertical as well as horizontal cables. Also included is the result of pull-out test conducted on sample beam cast at the time of the reactor building construction with the same concrete mix, post-tension cable and force. Structural behaviour of the beam is simulated over the same period of time as the reactor building envelope. The test results are used also to calibrate the numerical model. The paper also includes discussion of the results obtained from the simulation of a standard internal high pressure test (145 kPa). The behavior of the reactor building envelope, prior to applied pressure, during the test and for the period of several months after the testing was simulated using an advanced numerical model and the results (strains) were compared with measured values. It was found that this method may be used as an approximate procedure for evaluation of post-tension losses/gains and assessment of propagation of cracking visible on the outside surfaces of the confinement building. In addition, a discussion of the negative effect of high post-tension on the air tightness of the confinement building of Gentilly-2. The comparison is made between the post

  15. Gentilly-2 NPP - Concrete aging effects on long term pre-stress losses and propagation of concrete cracking due to pressure testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocevski, V. [Hydro-Quebe (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the study intended to evaluate the post-tension long term losses and propagation of cracks in the envelope of Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant reactor building. The numerical simulation of concrete, that takes into account elastic as well as inelastic strains due to loading, shrinkage strains due to drying or cooling and inelastic strains from alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) related swelling, is explained. The simultaneous contribution of AAR, shrinkage and creep, are simulated using an enhanced elastic-plastic constitutive relation. The nonlinear relations are validated by comparing the numerically calculated strains with strain measurements from the extensometers placed in the concrete during the construction of the envelope. The post-tension losses/gains are evaluated for the vertical as well as horizontal cables. Also included is the result of pull-out test conducted on sample beam cast at the time of the reactor building construction with the same concrete mix, post-tension cable and force. Structural behaviour of the beam is simulated over the same period of time as the reactor building envelope. The test results are used also to calibrate the numerical model. The paper also includes discussion of the results obtained from the simulation of a standard internal high pressure test (145 kPa). The behavior of the reactor building envelope, prior to applied pressure, during the test and for the period of several months after the testing was simulated using an advanced numerical model and the results (strains) were compared with measured values. It was found that this method may be used as an approximate procedure for evaluation of post-tension losses/gains and assessment of propagation of cracking visible on the outside surfaces of the confinement building. In addition, a discussion of the negative effect of high post-tension on the air tightness of the confinement building of Gentilly-2. The comparison is made between the post

  16. Standard test method for plane-strain (Chevron-Notch) fracture toughness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plane-strain (chevron-notch) fracture toughnesses, KIv or KIvM, of metallic materials. Fracture toughness by this method is relative to a slowly advancing steady state crack initiated at a chevron-shaped notch, and propagating in a chevron-shaped ligament (Fig. 1). Some metallic materials, when tested by this method, exhibit a sporadic crack growth in which the crack front remains nearly stationary until a critical load is reached. The crack then becomes unstable and suddenly advances at high speed to the next arrest point. For these materials, this test method covers the determination of the plane-strain fracture toughness, KIvj or KIvM, relative to the crack at the points of instability. Note 1—One difference between this test method and Test Method E 399 (which measures KIc) is that Test Method E 399 centers attention on the start of crack extension from a fatigue precrack. This test method makes use of either a steady state slowly propagating crack, or a...

  17. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  18. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  19. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Handouts Cardiac arrest (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cardiac Arrest updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Cardiac arrest Related Health Topics Arrhythmia CPR Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators National Institutes ...

  20. Crack characterization for in-service inspection planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waale, J.; Ekstroem, P.

    1995-12-01

    During in-service inspection by non destructive testing the reliability is highly dependent on how the equipment is adjusted to the specific object and to the anticipated crack feature.The crack feature and morphology vary widely between different cracking mechanisms and between material types in which the cracks appear. The major objective of this study was to characterize a number of morphology parameters for common crack mechanism and structure material combinations. Critical morphology parameters are crack orientation, shape, width, surface roughness and branching. The crack parameters were evaluated from failure analyses reported from the nuclear and non-nuclear industry. In addition, a literature review was carried out on crack parameter reports and on failure analysis reports, which were further evaluated. The evaluated crack parameters were plotted and statistically processed in data groups with respect to crack mechanism and material type. The fatigue crack mechanism were classified as mechanical, thermal or corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion crack mechanism as intergranular, transgranular or inter dendritic stress corrosion cracking. Furthermore, some common weld defects were characterized for comparison. The materials were divided into three broad groups, ferritic low alloy steels, stainless steels and nickel base alloys. The results indicate significant differences between crack parameters when comparing data from different crack mechanism/material type combinations. Typical parameter values and scatter were derived for several combinations where the data was sufficient for statistical significance. 10 refs, 105 figs, 14 tabs

  1. Crack characterization for in-service inspection planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waale, J [SAQ Inspection Ltd, Stockholm (Sweden); Ekstroem, P [ABB Atom AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    During in-service inspection by non destructive testing the reliability is highly dependent on how the equipment is adjusted to the specific object and to the anticipated crack feature.The crack feature and morphology vary widely between different cracking mechanisms and between material types in which the cracks appear. The major objective of this study was to characterize a number of morphology parameters for common crack mechanism and structure material combinations. Critical morphology parameters are crack orientation, shape, width, surface roughness and branching. The crack parameters were evaluated from failure analyses reported from the nuclear and non-nuclear industry. In addition, a literature review was carried out on crack parameter reports and on failure analysis reports, which were further evaluated. The evaluated crack parameters were plotted and statistically processed in data groups with respect to crack mechanism and material type. The fatigue crack mechanism were classified as mechanical, thermal or corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion crack mechanism as intergranular, transgranular or inter dendritic stress corrosion cracking. Furthermore, some common weld defects were characterized for comparison. The materials were divided into three broad groups, ferritic low alloy steels, stainless steels and nickel base alloys. The results indicate significant differences between crack parameters when comparing data from different crack mechanism/material type combinations. Typical parameter values and scatter were derived for several combinations where the data was sufficient for statistical significance. 10 refs, 105 figs, 14 tabs.

  2. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  3. In-reactor fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Mervyn, D.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1979-08-01

    An in-reactor fatigue experiment is being designed to determine the effect of dynamic irradiation on the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behavior of candidate fusion first wall materials. This investigation has been prompted by studies which show gross differences in crack growth characteristics of creep rupture specimens testing by postirradiation versus dynamic in-reactor methods. The experiment utilizes miniature center-cracked-tension specimens developed specifically for in-reactor studies. In the test, a chain of eight specimens, precracked to various initial crack lengths, is stressed during irradiation to determine crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity. Load levels were chosen which result in small crack growth rates encompassing a regime of the crack growth curve not previously investigated during irradiation studies of FCP. The test will be conducted on 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel at a temperature of 425 0 C, in a sodium environment, and at a frequency of 1 cycle/min. Irradiation will occur in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, resulting in a He/dpa ratio similar to that expected at the first wall in a fusion reactor. Detailed design of the experiment is presented, along with crack growth data obtained from prototypic testing of the experimental apparatus. These results are compared to data obtained under similar conditions generated by conventional test methods

  4. "House Arrest" or "Developmental Arrest"? A Study of Youth Under House Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamiel, Elad; Walsh, Sophie D

    2018-06-01

    Studies have examined the potential benefits and risks of alternative forms of detention, such as house arrest, for adults but, despite its growing use, little research has examined the implications of house arrest for juveniles. The current research examined the experience of 14 adolescents under house arrest. Six main themes were identified in the narratives of the participants: the experience of detention, daily schedule and utilization of time, emotions and self-reflection, relationships with peers, relation to parents and supervisor(s), and contact with professionals. Findings emphasized the potential developmental dangers of house arrest at the critical stage of adolescence. Yet, analysis also showed that the period of house arrest has the potential to be a period of positive changes, and can be used for successful rehabilitation.

  5. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  6. Unsaturated Seepage Analysis of Cracked Soil including Development Process of Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks in soil provide preferential pathways for water flow and their morphological parameters significantly affect the hydraulic conductivity of the soil. To study the hydraulic properties of cracks, the dynamic development of cracks in the expansive soil during drying and wetting has been measured in the laboratory. The test results enable the development of the relationships between the cracks morphological parameters and the water content. In this study, the fractal model has been used to predict the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the cracked soil, including the developmental process of the cracks. The cracked expansive soil has been considered as a crack-pore medium. A dual media flow model has been developed to simulate the seepage characteristics of the cracked expansive soil. The variations in pore water pressure at different part of the model are quite different due to the impact of the cracks. This study proves that seepage characteristics can be better predicted if the impact of cracks is taken into account.

  7. Crack Formation in Grouted Annular Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the present analysis is to identify the reason for extensive crack formation which occurred during an annulus grouting performance test, to evaluate possible consequences of the cracking, and to recommend measures to be taken in order to avoid similar problems in the future....

  8. Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel in Dow NS-1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type-304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1978-09-01

    Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and A106-B carbon and low alloy steels in a solution to be used to remove residual metallic copper from the Dresden 1 primary system surfaces following the chemical cleaning. No evidence of deleterious corrosion was observed in either set of tests

  9. Analysis of a bending test on a full-scale PWR hot leg elbow containing a surface crack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delliou, P. le [Electricite de France, EDF, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Dept. MTC; Julisch, P.; Hippelein, K. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt; Bezdikian, G. [Electricite de France, EDF, 92 - Paris la Defense (France). Direction Production Transport

    1998-11-01

    EDF, in co-operation with Framatome, has conducted a large research programme on the mechanical behaviour of thermally aged cast duplex stainless steel elbows, which are part of the main primary circuit of French PWR. One important task of this programme consisted of testing a full-scale PWR hot leg elbow. The elbow contained a semi-elliptical circumferential notch machined on the outer surface of the intrados as well as casting defects located on the flanks. To simulate the end-of-life condition of the component regarding material toughness, it had undergone a 2400 hours ageing heat treatment at 400 C. The test preparation and execution, as well as the material characterization programme, were committed to MPA. The test was conducted under constant internal pressure and in-plane bending (opening mode) at 200 C. For safety reasons, it took place on an open air-site: the Meppen military test ground. At the maximum applied moment (6000 kN.m), the notch did not initiate. This paper presents the experimental results and the fracture mechanics analysis of the test, based on finite element calculations. (orig.)

  10. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, T., E-mail: kubo@nfd.co.jp [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [M.O.X. Co., Ltd., 1828-520 Hirasu-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 311-0853 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data.

  11. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  12. Crack turning in integrally stiffened aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    resistance orthotropy---a second-order linear elastic method with a characteristic length parameter to incorporate T-stress/process-zone effects, and an elastic-plastic method that uses the Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD) to determine the failure response. Together with a novel method for obtaining enhanced accuracy T-stress calculations, these methods are incorporated into an adaptive-mesh, finite-element fracture simulation code. A total of 43 fracture tests using symmetrically and asymmetrically loaded double cantilever beam specimens were run to develop crack turning parameters and compare predicted and observed crack paths.

  13. Fatigue crack nucleation of type 316LN stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2000-01-01

    Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) life decreases drastically with increasing temperature but increases with the addition of nitrogen at room and high temperatures. The effect of nitrogen on LCF life may be related to crack nucleation at high temperatures in austenitic stainless steel because the fraction of crack nucleation in LCF life is about 40%. The influence of nitrogen on the crack nucleation of LCF in type 316LN stainless steel is investigated by observations of crack population and crack depth after testing at 40% of fatigue life. Nitrogen increases the number of cycles to nucleate microcracks of 100 μm but decreases the crack population

  14. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  15. Acoustic emission for interlaminar toughness testing of CFRP: Evaluation of the crack growth due to burst analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lissek, F.; Haegerb, A.; Knoblauch, V.; Hloch, Sergej; Pude, F.; Kaufeld, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 1 (2018), s. 55-62 ISSN 1359-8368 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : DCB * interlaminar toughness testing * acoustic emission * CFRP * burst analysis Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 4.727, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1359836817313720

  16. Acoustic emission for interlaminar toughness testing of CFRP: Evaluation of the crack growth due to burst analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lissek, F.; Haegerb, A.; Knoblauch, V.; Hloch, Sergej; Pude, F.; Kaufeld, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 1 (2018), s. 55-62 ISSN 1359-8368 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : DCB * interlaminar toughness testing * acoustic emission * CFRP * burst analysis Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 4.727, year: 2016 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S1359836817313720

  17. Test chip for detecting thin film cracking induced by fast temperature cycling and electromigration in multilevel interconnect systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Van Hieu; Nguyen, H.; Salm, Cora; Vroemen, J.; Voets, J.; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Bisschop, J.; Mouthaan, A.J.; Kuper, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    Temperature cycling in power ICs is a reliability hazard, even more so when electromigration is playing a role as well. The frequency of the temperature cycling is in the audio domain, which makes it impossible to test in environmental chambers. In the paper, the design and application of a novel

  18. Test chip for Detecting Thin Film Cracking Induced by Fast Temperature Cycling and Electromigration in Multilevel Interconnect Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Van Hieu; Salm, Cora; Vroemen, J.; Voets, J.; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Krabbenborg, B.; Bisschop, J.; Mouthaan, A.J.; Kuper, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    Temperature cycling in power ICs is a reliability hazard, even more so when electromigration is playing a role as well. The frequency of the temperature cycling is in the audio domain, which makes it impossible to test in environmental chambers. In the paper, the design and application of a novel

  19. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, Δt greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, Δx, decreased linearly with Δt. With Δt less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, Δx = Δx* which approached a limiting value of 1 μm. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  20. Crystallographic fatigue crack growth in a polycrystal: simulations based on FEM and discrete dislocation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, G.; Sauzay, M.; Bertolino, G.; Doquet, V.

    2003-01-01

    An attempt to model the variability of short cracks development in high-cycle fatigue is made by coupling finite element calculations of the stresses ahead of a microcrack in a polycrystal with simulations of crack growth along slip planes based on discrete dislocations dynamics. The model predicts a large scatter in growth rates related to the roughness of the crack path. It also describes the influence of the mean grain size and the fact that overloads may suppress the endurance limit by allowing arrested cracks to cross the grain boundaries. (authors)

  1. Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zr-2.5Nb Tubes with the Direction of An Approach to Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Im, Kyung Soo; Kim, Kang Soo; Ahn, Sang Bok; Cheong, Yong Moo

    2006-01-01

    One of the unique features of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of zirconium alloys is that the DHC velocity (DHCV) of zirconium alloys strongly depends on the path to the test temperature. Ambler reported that the DHCV of Zr-2.5Nb tubes at temperatures above 180 .deg. C depended upon the direction of an approach to the test temperatures, and reported on a presence of the DHC arrest temperature or TDAT above which the DHCV decreased upon an approach to the test temperature by a heating. Ambler proposed a hydrogen transfer from the bulk to the crack tip assuming that the hydrides formed at the crack tip and in the bulk region are fully constrained and partially constrained at the crack tip, respectively. In other words, the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen would be governed by elastic strain energy induced by the precipitating hydrides, leading to a higher TSS in the bulk region than that at the crack tip. In a sense, his assumption that the hydrogen concentration is higher in the bulk region than that at the crack tip due to a higher TSS in the bulk region is, in a way, similar to Kim's DHC model. Even though Ambler assumed a different strain energy of the matrix hydrides with the direction of an approach to the test temperature, the peak temperature, hydrogen concentration and the hydride phase, a feasible rationale for this assumption is yet to be given. In this study, a path dependence of DHC velocity of Zr-2.5Nb tubes will be investigated using Kim's DHC model where a driving force for DHC is the supersaturated hydrogen concentration between the crack tip and the bulk region. To this ends, the furnace cooled and water-quenched Zr-2.5Nb specimens were subjected to DHC tests at different test temperatures that were approached by a heating or by a cooling. Kim's DHC model predicts that the water-quenched Zr- 2.5Nb will have DHC crack growth even at temperatures above 180 .deg. C where the furnace-cooled Zr-2.5Nb will not. This experiment will provide

  2. Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zr-2.5Nb Tubes with the Direction of An Approach to Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Im, Kyung Soo; Kim, Kang Soo; Ahn, Sang Bok; Cheong, Yong Moo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    One of the unique features of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of zirconium alloys is that the DHC velocity (DHCV) of zirconium alloys strongly depends on the path to the test temperature. Ambler reported that the DHCV of Zr-2.5Nb tubes at temperatures above 180 .deg. C depended upon the direction of an approach to the test temperatures, and reported on a presence of the DHC arrest temperature or TDAT above which the DHCV decreased upon an approach to the test temperature by a heating. Ambler proposed a hydrogen transfer from the bulk to the crack tip assuming that the hydrides formed at the crack tip and in the bulk region are fully constrained and partially constrained at the crack tip, respectively. In other words, the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen would be governed by elastic strain energy induced by the precipitating hydrides, leading to a higher TSS in the bulk region than that at the crack tip. In a sense, his assumption that the hydrogen concentration is higher in the bulk region than that at the crack tip due to a higher TSS in the bulk region is, in a way, similar to Kim's DHC model. Even though Ambler assumed a different strain energy of the matrix hydrides with the direction of an approach to the test temperature, the peak temperature, hydrogen concentration and the hydride phase, a feasible rationale for this assumption is yet to be given. In this study, a path dependence of DHC velocity of Zr-2.5Nb tubes will be investigated using Kim's DHC model where a driving force for DHC is the supersaturated hydrogen concentration between the crack tip and the bulk region. To this ends, the furnace cooled and water-quenched Zr-2.5Nb specimens were subjected to DHC tests at different test temperatures that were approached by a heating or by a cooling. Kim's DHC model predicts that the water-quenched Zr- 2.5Nb will have DHC crack growth even at temperatures above 180 .deg. C where the furnace-cooled Zr-2.5Nb will not. This experiment

  3. Two-parameter fracture mechanical analysis of a near-crack-tip stress field in wedge splitting test specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seitl, Stanislav; Veselý, V.; Řoutil, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 89, 21-22 (2011), s. 1852-1858 ISSN 0045-7949. [International Conference on Civil, Structural and Enviromental Engineering Computing /12./. Funchal, Madeira, 01.09.2009-04.09.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Wedge splitting test * Stress intensity factor * T-stress * Numerical simulation * Direct method Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.874, year: 2011

  4. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  5. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  6. High chromium nickel base alloys hot cracking susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirand, G.; Primault, C.; Robin, V.

    2014-01-01

    High Chromium nickel based alloys (FM52) have a higher ductility dip cracking sensitivity. New filler material with higher niobium and molybdenum content are developed to decrease the hot crack formation. The behavior of these materials is studied by coupling microstructural analyses and hot cracking test, PVR test. The metallurgical analyses illustrate an Nb and Mo enrichment of the inter-dendritic spaces of the new materials. A niobium high content (FM52MSS) induces the formation of primary carbide at the end of solidification. The PVR test reveal a solidification crack sensitivity of the new materials, and a lowest ductility dip cracking sensitivity for the filler material 52MSS. (authors)

  7. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  8. Principles and Application of Magnetic Rubber Testing for Crack Detection in High-Strength Steel Components: I. Active-Field Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    containing a dispersion of ferromagnetic particles to the surface of a magnetised steel component. Following curing of the rubber, any surface-breaking...concentration of black particles along the crack is clearly visible against the lighter pigments of the silicone rubber base. magnetic leakage flux due...other side of the black crack indication appear white because they contain a very low density of magnetic particles so that the underlying white pigment

  9. A study on fatigue crack growth behavior subjected to a single tensile overload: Part II. Transfer of stress concentration and its role in overload-induced transient crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P.K.; An, K.; Hubbard, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effects of overload-induced enlarged compressive residual stresses and crack tip blunting with secondary cracks are suggested to be responsible for the observed changes in the crack opening load and resultant post-overload transient crack growth behavior [Lee SY, Liaw PK, Choo H, Rogge RB, Acta Mater 2010;59:485-94]. In this article, in situ neutron diffraction experiments were performed to quantify the influence of the combined effects by investigating the internal-stress evolution at various locations away from the crack tip. In the overload-retardation period, stress concentration occurs in the crack blunting region (an overload point) until a maximum crack arrest load is reached. The stress concentration is then transferred from the blunting region to the propagating crack tip (following the overload), requiring a higher applied load, as the closed crack is gradually opened. The transfer phenomena of the stress concentration associated with a crack opening process account for the nonlinearity of strain response in the vicinity of the crack tip. The delaying action of stress concentration at the crack tip is understood in conjunction with the concept of a critical stress (i.e. the stress required to open the closed crack behind the crack tip). A linear relationship between Δε eff and ΔK eff provides experimental support for the hypothesis that ΔK eff can be considered as the fatigue crack tip driving force.

  10. Statistical investigation of the crack initiation lives of piping structural welded joint in low cycle fatigue test of 240 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongxiang; Gao Qing; Cai Lixun

    1999-01-01

    A statistical investigation into the fitting of four possible fatigue assumed distributions (three parameter Weibull, two parameter Weibull, lognormal and extreme maximum value distributions) for the crack initiation lives of piping structural welded joint in low cycle fatigue test of 240 degree C is performed by linear regression and least squares methods. The results reveal that the three parameters Weibull distribution may give misleading results in fatigue reliability analysis because the shape parameter is often less than 1. This means that the failure rate decreases with fatigue cycling which is contrary to the general understanding of the behaviour of welded joint. Reliability analyses may also affected by the slightly nonconservative evaluations in tail regions of this distribution. The other three distributions are slightly poor in the total fit effects, but they can be safety assumed in reliability analyses due to the non-conservative evaluations in tail regions mostly and the consistency with the fatigue physics of the structural behaviour of welded joint in the range of engineering practice. In addition, the extreme maximum value distribution is in good consists with the general physical understanding of the structural behaviour of welded joint

  11. Study of crack propagation mechanisms during Charpy impact toughness tests on both equiaxed and lamellar microstructures of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buirette, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.buirette@ensiacet.fr [Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse (France); Huez, Julitte, E-mail: julitte.huez@ensiacet.fr [Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse (France); Gey, Nathalie, E-mail: Nathalie.gey@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR CNRS 7239, Université de Lorraine, Île du Saulcy, 57045 METZ Cedex 1 (France); DAMAS, Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structures, Université de Lorraine (France); Vassel, Alain, E-mail: alain.vassel@titane.asso.fr [Association Française du Titane, 16 quai Ernest Renaud, BP 70515, 44105 Nantes Cedex 4 (France); Andrieu, Eric, E-mail: eric.andrieu@ensiacet.fr [Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse (France)

    2014-11-17

    The impact toughness of two highly textured rolled plates of Ti–6Al–4V alloy with an α equiaxed and an α lamellar microstructures has been investigated. The results show a strong anisotropy of the fracture energy for both materials and underline that a coincidence of the prismatic planes with the shear bands at the notch tip is favorable for higher fracture energies. Moreover, it is pointed out, as it was already done by previous studies, that the α lamellar microstructure presents higher fracture energy than the α equiaxed one. Thanks to electron back scattering diffraction, and tensile tests, local microstructure heterogeneities, called macrozones, have been observed and characterized. Their size depends on microstructure element and is larger for α lamellar microstructure than for the α equiaxed. High strain is localized on the macrozones favorably oriented for prismatic slip with respect to the direction of impact and leads to a particular dimple free zone on the fracture surface. The contribution of these macrozones in the fracture behavior, and more precisely on the crack propagation rate was evaluated; thus the effects of the macroscopic texture and of the microstructure element on the impact toughness are discussed separately.

  12. Tunneling cracks in full scale wind turbine blade joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn; Sørensen, Bent F.; Kildegaard, C.

    2017-01-01

    A novel approach is presented and used in a generic tunneling crack tool for the prediction of crack growth rates for tunneling cracks propagating across a bond-line in a wind turbine blade under high cyclic loadings. In order to test and demonstrate the applicability of the tool, model predictions...

  13. Tests at constant extension velocity CERT for the evaluation of environmental assisted cracking; Pruebas a velocidad de extension constante CERT, para evaluar el agrietamiento asistido por el ambiente (EAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis J, C R [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The test at constant velocity extension (CERT) is firmly established as a technique for the study of environmentally cracking (stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement) and is widely used, mainly in mechanistic studies. In CERT test, an increasing charge is applied to a sample and the extension velocity is hold up constant to allow that corrosion interplay in the process. The type of crack and ductility measurements with the conditions for testing are compared with a cracked sample in an inert media. Required equipment: (1) A charge mechanism capable to control the elongation of test samples in a rank of 1 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -7} inch/inch sec and capable to hold up constant such elongation. (2) A suitable standard (Astm standard A-370). (3) A chamber or cell for the media in which the chemical composition of the solution, the gas composition, the pressure, temperature and electrochemical potential can be controlled in order to simulate with anticipation the service conditions. The cell must allow the mechanical access of the test sample to the charge train of the machine. (Author).

  14. Evaluations of environmental effect on micro crack initiation and propagation by surface observations of fatigue specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Ryosuke; Abe, Shigeki; Nakamura, Takao; Kamaya, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue life of nuclear facilities tends to be decreased by the influence of reactor coolant, which is called environmental effect. The effect accelerates crack growth rate but the influence for crack initiation is not clarified. This study intends to discuss the environmental effect in crack initiation. The crack length and the number of cracks are measured from the investigation of fatigue test specimens in reactor coolant and air. The behavior of crack initiation is revealed from the measurement of number of cracks, crack sizes and fatigue life. From this study, environmental effect of reactor coolant is considered to influence crack initiation and increase the number of micro crack. It is also estimated that the coalescence of cracks influences the acceleration of crack growth. (author)

  15. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  16. A practical method for computation of ductile crack growth by means of finite elements and parametric 3D-modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumjohann, F.; Kroening, J.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper originates from a contribution to the safety assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Investigations evaluating the safety against brittle fracture (exclosure of crack initiation and arrest assessments) are completed by calculations concerning ductile crack extension. Crack geometries including the expected crack extension are generated parametrically by a computer code and are used for further calculations with finite element programs. J-integrals of ductile growing cracks located between two comparative contours are determined by interpolation. The comparative contours are loaded by instationary temperature and pressure fields and are evaluated in advance. Taking the stability condition into consideration, the ductile crack extension is determined by pursuing the equilibrium between loading and crack resistance. The automatic modelling and a mathematical program processing the finite element results evaluate the crack growth of the finite element results very effectively. (orig.)

  17. Crack embryo formation before crack initiation and growth in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Koji; Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Crack growth measurements were performed in high temperature water and in air to examine the role of creep on IGSCC growth using cold rolled non-sensitized Type316(UNS S31600), TT690 alloy, MA600 alloy, and Carbon steel (STPT42). In addition, crack initiation tests were performed also in high temperature water and in air using specially designed CT specimen. The obtained major results are as follows: (1) TT690 did crack in intergranularly in hydrogenated high temperature water if material is cold worked in heavily. (2) Cold worked carbon steel also cracked in intergranularly in dearated high temperature water. (3) Intergranular crack growth was recognized on cold worked 316, TT690, MA600, and carbon steel even in air which might be crack embryo of IGSCC. (4) Simple Arrhenius type temperature dependence was observed on IGSCC in high temperature water and creep crack growth in air. This suggested that intergranular crack growth rate was determined by some thermal activated reaction. (5) Vacancy condensation was recognized at just ahead of the crack tips of IGSCC and creep crack of cold worked steel. This showed that IGSCC and creep crack growth was controlled by same mechanism. (6) Clear evidence of vacancies condensation was recognized at just beneath the surface before crack initiation. This proved that crack did initiate as the result of diffusion of vacancies in the solid. And the incubation time seems to be controlled by the required time for the condensation of vacancies to the stress concentrated zone. (7) Diffusion of subsituational atoms was also driven by stress gradient. This is the important knowledge to evaluate the SCC initiation after long term operation in LWR's. Based on the observed results, IGSCC initiation and growth mechanism were proposed considering the diffusion process of cold worked induced vacancies. (author)

  18. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  19. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water

  20. Crack detecting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michiko; Aida, Shigekazu

    1998-01-01

    A penetration liquid or a slow drying penetration liquid prepared by mixing a penetration liquid and a slow drying liquid is filled to the inside of an artificial crack formed to a member to be detected such as of boiler power generation facilities and nuclear power facilities. A developing liquid is applied to the periphery of the artificial crack on the surface of a member to be detected. As the slow-drying liquid, an oil having a viscosity of 56 is preferably used. Loads are applied repeatedly to the member to be detected, and when a crack is caused to the artificial crack, the permeation liquid penetrates into the crack. The penetration liquid penetrated into the crack is developed by the developing liquid previously coated to the periphery of the artificial crack of the surface of the member to be detected. When a crack is caused, since the crack is developed clearly even if it is a small opening, the crack can be recognized visually reliably. (I.N.)

  1. Fatigue crack threshold relevant to stress ratio, crack wake and loading histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Masakazu; Iwasaki, Akira; Kasahara, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation behavior was investigated in a low alloy steel which experienced several kind of loading histories. Both the effects of stress ratio, test temperature on the fatigue crack threshold, and the change in the threshold depending on the thermo-mechanical loading histories, were experimentally investigated. It was shown that the thermo-mechanical loading history left its effect along the prior fatigue crack wake resulting in the change of fatigue crack threshold. Some discussions are made on how this type of loading history effect should be treated from engineering point of view. (author)

  2. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.; Kuzay, T.; Rybicki, E.F.; Stonesifer, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Piping in light-water-reactor power systems has been affected by several types of environmental degradation. This paper presents results from studies of (1) stress corrosion crack growth in fracture mechanics specimens of modified Type 347 SS and Type 304/308L SS weld overlay material, (2) heat-to-heat variations in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Types 316NG and 347 SS, (3) SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS in water with cupric ion or organic acid impurities, (4) electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements under gamma irradiation, (5) SCC of ferritic steels, (6) strain-controlled fatigue of Type 316NG SS in air at ambient temperature, and (7) through-wall residual stress measurements and finite-element calculation of residual stresses in weldments treated by a mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). Fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate tests on Type 316NG SS have shown that transgranular cracking can occur even in high purity environments, whereas no crack growth was observed in Type 347 SS even in impurity environments. In tests on weld overlay specimens, no cracks penetrated into the overlay even in impurity environments. Instead, the cracks branched when they approached the overlay, and then grew parallel to interface. In SCC tests on sensitized Type 304 SS, cupric ions at concentrations greater than ∼1 ppm were found to be deleterious, whereas organic acids at this concentration were not detrimental. Tests on several ferritic steels indicate a strong correlation between the sulfur content of the steels and susceptibility to SCC. External gamma radiation fields produced a large positive shift in the ECP of Type 304 SS at low dissolved-oxygen concentrations (<5 ppb), whereas in the absence of an external gamma field there was no difference in the ECP values of irradiated and nonirradiated material. Fatigue data for Type 316NG SS are consistent with the ASME code mean curve at high strains, but fall below the curve at low strains. Calculations of the

  3. Thermal fatigue cracking in T-fittings of feed water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, J.

    1983-03-01

    The existence of thermal fatigue cracks can be determined by ultrasonic methods. The depth of the cracks will be of importance for evaluation of the seriousness of the situation. Currently, no method is available for determining depth of cracks without cutting and grinding. Methods for gaining information of crack depth have been discussed with leading European materials testing institutes. More elaborate ultrasonic methods have been tested with negative results. On testing signals from crack corners flood possible signals from the crack tips. At present no reliable technique based on ultrasonics exist (in Europe, that will give information of crack depth.(P.Aa.)

  4. Microstructural features of environmentally assisted cracking in pipeline steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.W.; Lambert, S.B.; Zhang, X.; Plumtree, A.; Sutherby, R.

    2003-01-01

    A number of small-scale pipeline specimens containing edge or surface cracks were tested in simulated groundwater (NS4 solution) in an anaerobic environment under cyclic loading conditions. Micrographs of the crack surface showed corrosion fatigue at high frequencies and low R-ratios. Following large amounts of growth (∼200 μm) for those specimens tested at low frequencies, evidence of transgranular quasi-cleavage was detected. Green rust was found to be present at the crack tips and along their flanks. Iron sulfide, resulting from anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron carbonate were also present in the NS4 solution during testing. These corrosion products retarded crack growth in the depth direction of surface cracks. Under variable amplitude loadings conditions, the accompanying increased surface crack growth rate can be accounted for by rupture of the green rust film at the crack tip. (author)

  5. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  6. Crack path in aeronautical titanium alloy under ultrasonic torsion loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses features of fatigue crack initiation and growth in aeronautical VT3-1 titanium alloy under pure torsion loading in gigacycle regime. Two materials: extruded and forged VT3-1 titanium alloys were studied. Torsion fatigue tests were performed up to fatigue life of 109 cycles. The results of the torsion tests were compared with previously obtained results under fully reversed axial loading on the same alloys. It has been shown that independently on production process as surface as well subsurface crack initiation may appear under ultrasonic torsion loading despite the maximum stress amplitude located at the specimen surface. In the case of surface crack initiation, a scenario of crack initiation and growth is similar to HCF regime except an additional possibility for internal crack branching. In the case of subsurface crack, the initiation site is located below the specimen surface (about 200 μm and is not clearly related to any material flaw. Internal crack initiation is produced by shear stress in maximum shear plane and early crack growth is in Mode II. Crack branching is limited in the case of internal crack initiation compared to surface one. A typical ‘fish-eye’ crack can be observed at the torsion fracture surface, but mechanism of crack initiation seems not to be the same than under axial fatigue loading.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation taking account of surface crack effect for stress corrosion cracking in a stainless steel SUS 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohgo, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials occurs by initiation and coalescence of micro cracks, subcritical crack propagation and multiple large crack formation or final failure under the combination of materials, stress and corrosive environment. In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation for the process of SCC has been proposed based on the stochastic properties of micro crack initiation and fracture mechanics concept for crack coalescence and propagation. The emphasis in the model is put on the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks. Numerical simulations are carried out based on CBB (creviced bent beam) test results of a sensitized stainless steel SUS 304 and the influence of micro crack initiation rate and coalescence condition on the simulation results is discussed. The numerical examples indicate the applicability of the present model to a prediction of the SCC behavior in real structures. (author)

  8. Cardiac arrest due to lymphocytic colitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groth Kristian A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia caused by lymphocytic colitis. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented four months prior to a cardiac arrest with watery diarrhea and was diagnosed with lymphocytic colitis. Our patient experienced a witnessed cardiac arrest at his general practitioner's surgery. Two physicians and the emergency medical services resuscitated our patient for one hour and four minutes before arriving at our university hospital. Our patient was defibrillated 16 times due to the recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. An arterial blood sample revealed a potassium level of 2.0 mmol/L (reference range: 3.5 to 4.6 mmol/L and pH 6.86 (reference range: pH 7.37 to 7.45. As the potassium level was corrected, the propensity for ventricular tachyarrhythmias ceased. Our patient recovered from his cardiac arrest without any neurological deficit. Further tests and examinations revealed no other reason for the cardiac arrest. Conclusion Diarrhea can cause life-threatening situations due to the excretion of potassium, ultimately causing cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia. Physicians treating patients with severe diarrhea should consider monitoring their electrolyte levels.

  9. Thermal shock cracking of GSO single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kazunari; Tamura, Takaharu; Kurashige, Kazuhisa; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Susa, Kenzo

    1998-01-01

    The quantitative estimation of the failure stress of a gadolinium orthosilicate (Gd 2 SiO 5 , hereafter abbreviated as GSO) single crystal due to thermal shock was investigated. A cylindrical test specimen was heated in a silicone oil bath, then subjected to thermal shock by pouring room temperature silicone oil. Cracking occurred during cooling. The heat conduction analysis was performed to obtain temperature distribution in a GSO single crystal at cracking, using the surface temperatures measured in the thermal shock cracking test. Then the thermal stress was calculated using temperature profile of the test specimen obtained from the heat conduction analysis. It is found from the results of the thermal stress analysis and the observation of the cracking in test specimens that the thermal shock cracking occurs in a cleavage plane due to the stress normal to the plane. Three-point bending tests were also performed to examine the relationship between the critical stress for thermal shock cracking and the three-point bending strength obtained from small-sized test specimens. (author)

  10. Cracks in functionally graded materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, H.-A.; Balke, H.; Fett, T.; Hofinger, I.; Kirchhoff, G.; Munz, D.; Neubrand, A.; Semenov, A.S.; Weiss, H.-J.; Yang, Y.Y.

    2003-01-01

    The weight function method is described to analyze the crack growth behavior in functionally graded materials and in particular materials with a rising crack growth resistance curve. Further, failure of graded thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under cyclic surface heating by laser irradiation is modeled on the basis of fracture mechanics. The damage of both graded and non-graded TBCs is found to develop in several distinct stages: vertical cracking→delamination→blistering→spalling. This sequence can be understood as an effect of progressive shrinkage due to sintering and high-temperature creep during thermal cycling, which increases the energy-release rate for vertical cracks which subsequently turn into delamination cracks. The results of finite element modeling, taking into account the TBC damage mechanisms, are compatible with experimental data. An increase of interface fracture toughness due to grading and a decrease due to ageing have been measured in a four-point bending test modified by a stiffening layer. Correlation with the damage observed in cyclic heating is discussed. It is explained in which way grading is able to reduce the damage

  11. Terahertz non-destructive imaging of cracks and cracking in structures of cement-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujie Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cracks and crack propagation in cement-based materials are key factors leading to failure of structures, affecting safety in construction engineering. This work investigated the application of terahertz (THz non-destructive imaging to inspections on structures of cement-based materials, so as to explore the potential of THz imaging in crack detection. Two kinds of disk specimens made of plain cement mortar and UHMWPE fiber concrete were prepared respectively. A mechanical expansion load device was deployed to generate cracks and control the whole process of cracking. Experimental tests were carried out on cracked specimens by using a commercial THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS during loading. The results show that crack opening and propagation could be examined by THz clearly and the material factors influence the ability of crack resistance significantly. It was found that the THz imaging of crack initiation and propagation agrees with the practical phenomenon and supplies more information about damage of samples. It is demonstrated that the damage behavior of structures of cement-based materials can be successfully detected by THz imaging.

  12. Terahertz non-destructive imaging of cracks and cracking in structures of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shujie; Li, Tongchun; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xiaoming; Qi, Huijun; Mu, Zhiyong

    2017-11-01

    Cracks and crack propagation in cement-based materials are key factors leading to failure of structures, affecting safety in construction engineering. This work investigated the application of terahertz (THz) non-destructive imaging to inspections on structures of cement-based materials, so as to explore the potential of THz imaging in crack detection. Two kinds of disk specimens made of plain cement mortar and UHMWPE fiber concrete were prepared respectively. A mechanical expansion load device was deployed to generate cracks and control the whole process of cracking. Experimental tests were carried out on cracked specimens by using a commercial THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) during loading. The results show that crack opening and propagation could be examined by THz clearly and the material factors influence the ability of crack resistance significantly. It was found that the THz imaging of crack initiation and propagation agrees with the practical phenomenon and supplies more information about damage of samples. It is demonstrated that the damage behavior of structures of cement-based materials can be successfully detected by THz imaging.

  13. A review of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gill, T.P.S.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments is discussed with respect to its origin and metallurgical contributory factors. Of the three types of hot cracking, namely solidification cracking, liquation and ductility dip cracking, solidification cracking occurs in the interdendritic regions in weld metal while liquation and ductility dip cracking occur intergranularly in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Segregation of impurity and minor elements such as sulphur, phosphorous, silicon, niobium, boron etc to form low melting eutectic phases has been found to be the major cause of hot cracking. Control of HAZ cracking requires minimisation of impurity elements in the base metal. In stabilized stainless steels containing niobium, higher amounts of delta-ferrite have been found necessary to prevent cracking than in unstabilized compositions. Titanium compounds have been found to cause liquation cracking in maraging steels and titanium containing stainless steels and superalloys. In nitrogen added stainless steels, cracking resistance decreases when the solidification mode changes to primary austenitic due to nitrogen addition. A review of the test methods to evaluate hot cracking behaviour showed that several external restraint and semi-self-restraint tests are available. The finger Test, WRC Fissure Bend Test, the PVR test and the Varestraint Test are described along with typical test results. Hot ductility testing to reveal HAZ cracking tendency during welding is described, which is of particular importance to stabilized stainless steels. Based on the literature, recommendations are made for welding stabilized and nitrogen added steels, indicating areas of further work. (author). 81 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab

  14. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  15. Characterization of mixed mode crack opening in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas Sejersbøl; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Olesen, John Forbes

    2012-01-01

    components of the mixed mode displacement are measured using a custom made orthogonal gauge, and the measurements are used directly as the closed loop control signals. A double notch, concrete specimen is used for the crack investigation. The tests are divided into two steps, a pure Mode I opening step......In real concrete structures cracks often open in mixed mode after their initiation. To capture the direct material behavior of a mixed mode crack opening a stiff biaxial testing machine, capable of imposing both normal and shear loads on a given crack area, has been applied. The opening and sliding......, where a macro crack is initiated in the specimen followed by the mixed mode opening step. The high stiffness of the set-up together with the closed control loop ensures a stable crack initiation followed by a controllable mixed mode opening. The deep notches result in a plane crack, only influenced...

  16. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav [Department of Materials Engineering, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, tr. 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava - Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  17. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  18. Miniaturized fatigue crack growth specimen technology and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigh, R.J.; Bauer, R.E.; Ermi, A.M.; Chin, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    The miniature fatigue crack propagation technology has been extended to in-cell fabrication of irradiated specimens. Baseline testing of selected titanium alloys has been performed at 25 0 C in air. At relatively small values for the stress intensity factor, ΔK, the crack growth rates for all titanium alloys investigated are within a factor of three. The crack growth rates for these titanium alloys are a factor of three greater than the crack growth rates of either 316SS (20% CW) or HT-9. Each of the titanium alloys has observable crack propagation for stress intensity factors as small as 4.2 MPa√m

  19. Stress corrosion crack growth in unirradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.

    1978-10-01

    Experimental techniques suitable for the determination of stress corrosion crack growth rates in irradiated Zircaloy tube have been developed. The techniques have been tested on unirradiated. Zircaloy and it was found that the results were in good agreement with the results of other investigations. Some of the results were obtained at very low stress intensities and the crack growth rates observed, gave no indication of the existance of a K sub(ISCC) for iodine induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy. This is of importance both for fuel rod behavior after a power ramp and for long term storage of spent Zircaloy-clad fuel. (author)

  20. Fatigue cracking on a steam generator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccanfuso, M.; Lothios, J.; Thebault, Y.; Bruyere, B.; Duisabeau, L.; Herms, E.

    2015-01-01

    A circumferential fatigue crack was observed on a steam generator tube of the unit 2 of the Fessenheim plant. The results of destructive testing and the examination of the fracture surface show that the circumferential crack is linked to a large number of cycles with a very low stress intensity factor. Other aggravating factors like inter-granular corrosion have played a role in the initiating phase of fatigue cracking. The damage has been exacerbated by the lack of support of the tube at the level of the anti-vibration bars. (A.C.)

  1. Eddy current standards - Cracks versus notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemaier, D. J.; Collingwood, M. R.; Nguyen, K. H.

    1992-10-01

    Eddy current tests aimed at evaluating cracks and electron-discharge machined (EDM) notches in 7075-T6 aluminum specimens are described. A comparison of the shape and amplitude of recordings made from both transverse and longitudinal scans of small EDM notches and fatigue cracks showd almost identical results. The signal amplitude and phase angle increased with an increase of EDM notch and crak size. It is concluded that equivalent eddy current results obtained from similar-size surface cracks and notches in aluminum can be used to establish a desired sensitivity level for inspection.

  2. Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Tandon, R.

    2008-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured using constant stress rate testing in 2% and 95% RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and velocities for dry environments are approx. 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitivity to small changes in RH at low RH. Confidence intervals on parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. High temperature cracking of steels: effect of geometry on creep crack growth laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabiri, M.R.

    2003-12-01

    This study was performed at Centre des Materiaux de l'Ecole des Mines de Paris. It deals with identification and transferability of high temperature creep cracking laws of steels. A global approach, based on C * and J non-linear fracture mechanics parameters has been used to characterize creep crack initiation and propagation. The studied materials are: the ferritic steels 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V (hot and cold parts working at 540 and 250 C) used in the thermal power stations and the austenitic stainless steel 316 L(N) used in the nuclear power stations. During this thesis a data base was setting up, it regroups several tests of fatigue, creep, creep-fatigue, and relaxation. Its particularity is to contain several creep tests (27 tests), achieved at various temperatures (550 to 650 C) and using three different geometries. The relevance of the C * parameter to describe the creep crack propagation was analysed by a means of systematic study of elasto-viscoplastic stress singularities under several conditions (different stress triaxiality). It has been shown that, besides the C * parameter, a second non singular term, denoted here as Q * , is necessary to describe the local variables in the vicinity of the crack tip. Values of this constraint parameter are always negative. Consequently, application of typical creep crack growth laws linking the creep crack growth rate to the C * parameter (da/dt - C * ), will be conservative for industrial applications. Furthermore, we showed that for ferritic steels, crack incubation period is important, therefore a correlation of Ti - C * type has been kept to predict crack initiation time Ti. For the austenitic stainless steel, the relevant stage is the one of the crack propagation, so that a master curve (da/dt - C * ), using a new data analysis method, was established. Finally, the propagation of cracks has been simulated numerically using the node release technique, allowing to validate analytical expressions utilised for the experimental

  4. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  5. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HRS Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... people of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  7. Extended analysis of WWER-1000 Charpy test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodenicharov, St.; Kamenova, Tz.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the embrittlement rate of WWER-1000 RPV weld metal with high Ni content and to determine influence of neutron irradiation on partial energies of ductile crack initiation, stable and unstable crack propagation and post crack arrest. (author)

  8. Studies of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    During the present work crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including ·Application of known information to predict solidification phases from the alloy...... composition. ·Weld metal solidification rate measurements for prediction of phases. ·Various crack tests to assess the crack susceptibility of alloys. ·A combination of the above for selection of suitable, weldable alloys. The possibility of using such specific methods for alloys and applications has been...... to the crack behaviour, but do not show an expected correlation between the crack resistance and the solidification rate. The employment of pulsed seams is therefore assessed not to be usable in the present selection methods. From evaluation of several crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has been chosen...

  9. Reactor vessel nozzle cracks: a photoelastic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method consisting of a marriage between the ''frozen stress'' photoelastic approach and the local stress field equations of linear elastic fracture mechanics for estimating stress intensity factor distributions in three dimensional, finite cracked body problems is reviewed and extensions of the method are indicated. The method is then applied to the nuclear reactor vessel nozzle corner crack problem for both Intermediate Test Vessel and Boiling Water Reactor geometries. Results are compared with those of other investigators. 35 refs

  10. Fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy-fractographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, I.; Muhammad, W.; Ejaz, N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-fold approach was adopted to understand the fatigue crack growth process in an Aluminum alloy; fatigue crack growth test of samples and analysis of fractured surfaces. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared from an Aluminum alloy cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The stress applied was from 20,30 and 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material. The fatigue crack growth data was recorded. After fatigue testing, the samples were subjected to detailed scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. The resulting fracture surfaces were subjected to qualitative and quantitative fractographic examinations. Quantitative fracture analysis included an estimation of crack growth rate (CGR) in different regions. The effect of the microstructural features on fatigue crack growth was examined. It was observed that in stage II (crack growth region), the failure mode changes from intergranular to transgranular as the stress level increases. In the region of intergranular failure the localized brittle failure was observed and fatigue striations are difficult to reveal. However, in the region of transgranular failure the crack path is independent of the microstructural features. In this region, localized ductile failure mode was observed and well defined fatigue striations were present in the wake of fatigue crack. The effect of interaction of growing fatigue crack with microstructural features was not substantial. The final fracture (stage III) was ductile in all the cases.

  11. Eddy current crack detection capability assessment approach using crack specimens with differing electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2018-03-01

    Like other NDE methods, eddy current surface crack detectability is determined using probability of detection (POD) demonstration. The POD demonstration involves eddy current testing of surface crack specimens with known crack sizes. Reliably detectable flaw size, denoted by, a90/95 is determined by statistical analysis of POD test data. The surface crack specimens shall be made from a similar material with electrical conductivity close to the part conductivity. A calibration standard with electro-discharged machined (EDM) notches is typically used in eddy current testing for surface crack detection. The calibration standard conductivity shall be within +/- 15% of the part conductivity. This condition is also applicable to the POD demonstration crack set. Here, a case is considered, where conductivity of the crack specimens available for POD testing differs by more than 15% from that of the part to be inspected. Therefore, a direct POD demonstration of reliably detectable flaw size is not applicable. Additional testing is necessary to use the demonstrated POD test data. An approach to estimate the reliably detectable flaw size in eddy current testing for part made from material A using POD crack specimens made from material B with different conductivity is provided. The approach uses additional test data obtained on EDM notch specimens made from materials A and B. EDM notch test data from the two materials is used to create a transfer function between the demonstrated a90/95 size on crack specimens made of material B and the estimated a90/95 size for part made of material A. Two methods are given. For method A, a90/95 crack size for material B is given and POD data is available. Objective of method A is to determine a90/95 crack size for material A using the same relative decision threshold that was used for material B. For method B, target crack size a90/95 for material A is known. Objective is to determine decision threshold for inspecting material A.

  12. Study on the high temperature crack resistance of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of a multiple use of tungsten specimens in crack resistance tests in the temperature range of 600-2000 deg C is studied. It is established experimentally that the minimum length of growth of a main crack is 1x10 -4 m for the most effective repeated use of specimens. A flow diagram of mechanical tests is suggested for investigating high temperature tungsten crack resistance and estimating the degree of weakening the grain-boundary bond

  13. Plasticity around an Axial Surface Crack in a Cylindrical Shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    of the yield zone. The model is used to analyse published test data on surface cracked pressurised pipes. The analysis consists in COD evaluation and estimate of failure as a consequence of plastic instability. A method is proposed which deals with the problem by simultaneous analysis of a number of cracks......This paper presents a plasticity model for deep axial surface cracks in pressurised pipes. The model is used in an investigation of the relative merits of fracture criteria based on COD and plastic instability. Recent investigations have shown that the inconsistency of the singular bending stress...... on the bending stresses is considerable. In the case of surface cracks moments are induced due to the eccentricity of the crack and transverse shear effects should therefore be included. A plasticity model for a rectangular axial surface crack is developed. Like a previous surface crack model by Erdogen...

  14. Cracked gas generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abthoff, J; Schuster, H D; Gabler, R

    1976-11-17

    A small cracked-gas generator in a vehicle driven, in particular, by an air combustion engine has been proposed for the economic production of the gases necessary for low toxicity combustion from diesel fuel. This proceeds via catalytic crack-gasification and exploitation of residual heat from exhaust gases. This patent application foresees the insertion of one of the catalysts supporting the cracked-gas reaction in a container through which the reacting mixture for cracked-gas production flows in longitudinal direction. Further, air ducts are embedded in the catalyst through which exhaust gases and fresh air flow in counter direction to the cracked gas flow in the catalyst. The air vents are connected through heat conduction to the catalyst. A cracked gas constituting H/sub 2//CO/CO/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O can be produced from the air-fuel mixture using appropriate catalysts. By the addition of 5 to 25% of cracked gas to the volume of air drawn in by the combustion engine, a more favourable combustion can be achieved compared to that obtained under normal combustion conditions.

  15. Crack-tip chemistry modeling of stage I stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1991-10-01

    Stage I stress corrosion cracking usually exhibits a very strong K dependence with Paris law exponents of up to 30. 2 Model calculations indicate that the crack velocity in this regime is controlled by transport through a salt film and that the K dependence results from crack opening controlled salt film dissolution. An ionic transport model that accounts for both electromigration through the resistive salt film and Fickian diffusion through the aqueous solution was used for these predictions. Predicted crack growth rates are in excellent agreement with measured values for Ni with P segregated to the grain boundaries and tested in IN H 2 SO 4 at +900 mV. This salt film dissolution may be applicable to stage I cracking of other materials

  16. Multi-parameter crack tip stress state description for evaluation of nonlinear zone width in silicate composite specimens in component splitting/bending test geometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, V.; Frantík, P.; Sopek, J.; Malíková, L.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2015), s. 200-214 ISSN 8756-758X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/11/0833 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : near-crack tip fields * Williams series * higher-order terms * stress field * failure criterion * nonlinear zone * quasi-brittle fracture * splitting-bending geometry Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2015

  17. Crack Cocaine-Induced Cardiac Conduction Abnormalities Are Reversed by Sodium Bicarbonate Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a dramatic case of a 19-year-old man with crack cocaine overdose with important clinical complications as cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and epileptics status. During this intoxication, electrocardiographic abnormalities similar to those found in tricyclic antidepressant poisoning were observed, and they were reversed by intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion.

  18. Fracture resistance of welded panel specimen with perpendicular crack in tensile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gochev, Todor; Adziev, Todor

    1998-01-01

    Defects caused by natural crack in welded joints of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels are very often. Perpendicular crack in welded joints and its heat treatment after the welding has also an influence on the fracture resistance. The fracture resistance of welded joints by crack in tense panel specimens was investigated by crack mouse opening displesment (CMOD), the parameter of fracture mechanic. Crack propagation was analysed by using a metallographic analysis of fractured specimens after the test. (Author)

  19. A unified model of hydride cracking based on elasto-plastic energy release rate over a finite crack extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Sauve, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    A fracture criterion based on energy balance is proposed for elasto-plastic cracking at hydrides in zirconium, assuming a finite length of crack advance. The proposed elasto-plastic energy release rate is applied to the crack initiation at hydrides in smooth and notched surfaces, as well as the subsequent delayed hydride cracking (DHC) considering limited crack-tip plasticity. For a smooth or notched surface of an elastic body, the fracture parameter is related to the stress intensity factor for the initiated crack. For DHC, a unique curve relates the non-dimensionalized elasto-plastic energy release rate with the length of crack extension relative to the plastic zone size. This fracture criterion explains experimental observations concerning DHC in a qualitative manner. Quantitative comparison with experiments is made for fracture toughness and DHC tests on specimens containing certain hydride structures; very good agreement is obtained. ((orig.))

  20. Effects of rust in the crack face on crack detection based on Sonic-IR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harai, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Takamatsu, T.; Sakagami, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sonic-IR, which is based on the thermographic detection of the temperature rise due to frictional heating at the defect faces under ultrasonic excitation, has an advantage in the detection of closed and small defects. However, this method has a lot of nuclear factors relating to heat generation. In this study, effects of rust in the crack faces on the crack detection based on the sonic-IR method is experimentally investigated by using crack specimens. The heat generation by ultrasonic excitation was observed regularly during rust accelerated test using original device. The distribution of temperature change around the crack was changed with the progress of rust. This change in heat generation, it believed to be due to change in the contact state of the crack surface due to rust. As a result, it was found that heat generation by ultrasonic excitation is affected by rust in the crack faces. And it was also found that crack detection can be conducted by sonic-IR even if rust was generated in the crack faces. (author)

  1. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  2. Predominantly elastic crack growth under combined creep-fatigue cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    A rationalization of the various observed effects of combined creep-fatigue cycling upon predominantly elastic fatigue-crack propagation in austenitic steel is presented. Existing and new evidence is used to show two main groups of behaviour: (i) material and cycling conditions which lead to modest increases (6-8 times) in the rate of crack growth are associated with relaxation-induced changes in the material deformation characteristics, and (ii) material and cycling conditions severe enough to generate internal fracture damage lead to significant (up to a factor of 30) increases in crack growth rate when compared with fast-cycling crack propagation rates at the same temperature. A working hypothesis is presented to show that the boundary between the two groups occurs when the scale of the nucleated creep damage is of the same magnitude as the crack tip opening displacement. This leads to the possibility of unstable crack advance. Creep crack growth rates are shown to provide an upper bound to creep-fatigue crack growth rates when crack advance is unstable. If the deformation properties only are affected by the creep-fatigue cycling then creep crack growth rates provide a lower bound. The role of intergranular oxygen corrosion in very low frequency crack growth tests is also briefly discussed. (author)

  3. On short cracks that depart from elastoplastic notch tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Miquelin Machado

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of short cracks that depart from elastoplastic notch tips is modeled to estimate the stresses required to initiate and to propagate cracks in notched structural components, and to evaluate the size of tolerable crack-like defects under general loading conditions. This analysis can model both fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking problems; can evaluate notch sensitivity in both cases; and can as well be used to establish design or acceptance criteria for tolerable non-propagating crack-like defects in such cases. The growth of short cracks is assumed driven by the applied stresses and by the stress gradient ahead the notch tip, and supported by the material resistances to crack initiation and to long crack propagation by fatigue or EAC. In the elastoplastic case, the stress gradient ahead of the notch tip is quantified by a J-field to consider the short crack behavior. The tolerable short crack predictions made by this model are evaluated by suitable fatigue and EAC tests of notched specimens specially designed to start nonpropagating cracks from the notch tips, both under elastic and elastoplastic conditions.

  4. Internal shear cracking in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an uncoupled ductile damage criterion for modelling the opening and propagation of internal shear cracks in bulk metal forming. The criterion is built upon the original work on the motion of a hole subjected to shear with superimposed tensile stress triaxiality and its overall...... performance is evaluated by means of side-pressing formability tests in Aluminium AA2007-T6 subjected to different levels of pre-strain. Results show that the new proposed criterionis able to combine simplicity with efficiency for predicting the onset of fracture and the crack propagation path for the entire...... cracking to internal cracks formed undert hree-dimensional states of stress that are typical of bulk metal forming....

  5. Crack identification by artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwu, C.B.; Liang, Y.C. [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Aeronaut. and Astronaut.

    1998-04-01

    In this paper, a most popular artificial neural network called the back propagation neural network (BPN) is employed to achieve an ideal on-line identification of the crack embedded in a composite plate. Different from the usual dynamic estimate, the parameters used for the present crack identification are the strains of static deformation. It is known that the crack effects are localized which may not be clearly reflected from the boundary information especially when the data is from static deformation only. To remedy this, we use data from multiple-loading modes in which the loading modes may include the opening, shearing and tearing modes. The results show that our method for crack identification is always stable and accurate no matter how far-away of the test data from its training set. (orig.) 8 refs.

  6. Microwave based method of monitoring crack formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, Sergej; Aman, Alexander; Majcherek, Soeren; Hirsch, Soeren; Schmidt, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    The formation of cracks in glass particles was monitored by application of linearly polarized microwaves. The breakage behavior of glass spheres coated with a thin gold layer of about 50 nm, i.e. a thickness that is lower than the microwave penetration depth, was tested. In this way the investigation of fracture behavior of electronic circuits was simulated. A shielding current was induced in the gold layer by the application of microwaves. During the crack formation the distribution of this current changed abruptly and a scattered microwave signal appeared at the frequency of the incident microwaves. The time behavior of the scattered signal reflects the microscopic processes occurring during the fracture of the specimen. The duration of the increasing signal corresponds to the crack formation time in the tested specimen. This time was estimated as particle size divided by crack development speed in glass. An intense emission of electrons occurs during the formation of cracks. Due to this, coherent Thomson scattering of microwaves by emitted electrons becomes significant with a delay of a few microseconds after the initial phase of crack formation. In this time the intensity of the microwave signal increases. (paper)

  7. Serum tau and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nielsen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test serum tau as a predictor of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. METHODS: We measured the neuronal protein tau in serum at 24, 48, and 72 hours after cardiac arrest in 689 patients in the prospective international Target Temperature Management trial. The main outcome...... was poor neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Categories 3-5 at 6 months. RESULTS: Increased tau was associated with poor outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest (median = 38.5, interquartile range [IQR] = 5.7-245ng/l in poor vs median = 1.5, IQR = 0.7-2.4ng/l in good outcome, for tau....... The accuracy in predicting outcome by serum tau was equally high for patients randomized to 33 °C and 36 °C targeted temperature after cardiac arrest. INTERPRETATION: Serum tau is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological outcome in patients with cardiac arrest. It may be significantly better...

  8. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  9. Cracking the Gender Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennison, Betina Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    extensive work to raise the proportion of women. This has helped slightly, but women remain underrepresented at the corporate top. Why is this so? What can be done to solve it? This article presents five different types of answers relating to five discursive codes: nature, talent, business, exclusion...... in leadership management, we must become more aware and take advantage of this complexity. We must crack the codes in order to crack the curve....

  10. Arrester Resistive Current Measuring System Based on Heterogeneous Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun Hua; Li, Zai Lin; Yuan, Feng; Hou Pan, Feng; Guo, Zhan Nan; Han, Yue

    2018-03-01

    Metal Oxide Arrester (MOA) suffers from aging and poor insulation due to long-term impulse voltage and environmental impact, and the value and variation tendency of resistive current can reflect the health conditions of MOA. The common wired MOA detection need to use long cables, which is complicated to operate, and that wireless measurement methods are facing the problems of poor data synchronization and instability. Therefore a novel synchronous measurement system of arrester current resistive based on heterogeneous network is proposed, which simplifies the calculation process and improves synchronization, accuracy and stability and of the measuring system. This system combines LoRa wireless network, high speed wireless personal area network and the process layer communication, and realizes the detection of arrester working condition. Field test data shows that the system has the characteristics of high accuracy, strong anti-interference ability and good synchronization, which plays an important role in ensuring the stable operation of the power grid.

  11. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  12. CAT scanning of hydrogen-induced cracks in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Tapping, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Computer assisted tomography (CAT) was applied to detect small cracks caused by hydrogen ingress into carbon steel samples. The incipient cracks in the samples resulted from a quality control procedure used to test the susceptibility of carbon steel to hydrogen blistering/cracking. The method used until now to assess the extent of the cracking resulting from this test has been mechanical sectioning, polishing and microscopic examination of the sections. The CAT results are compared with the reference method and the feasibility of using CAT in the proposed application is demonstrated. (orig.)

  13. Thermal fatigue crack growth analysis in a nozzle corner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauel, J.G.; Hodulak, L.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of the crack growth under local thermal shock fatigue are performed. Estimates of crack growth are based on stress distributions obtained by a finite element analysis for thermal transients in the structure without crack. Stress intensity factors are calculated using interpolation formulae derived from known basic solutions for part-through cracks under constant and linearly varying load. The crack propagation at selected parts of the crack front is calculated stepwise by integration of the Paris law with material constants C and n interpolated from test results on compact specimens at constant temperatures. Experimental results for the model vessel test MB1 at an internal pressure of 14 N/mm 2 and a temperature of 320 0 C exposed to a repeated local spraying with cold water are presented and compared to predictions

  14. Crack growth rates in vessel head penetration materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    1994-01-01

    The cracks detected in reactor vessel head penetrations in certain European plants have been attributed to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The penetrations in question are made from Inconel 600. The susceptibility of this alloy to PWSCC has been widely studied in relation to use of this material for steam generator tubes. When the first reactor vessel head penetration cracks were detected, most of the available data on crack propagation rates were from test specimens made from steam generator tubes and tested under conditions that questioned the validity of these data for assessment of the evolution of cracks in penetrations. For this reason, the scope of the Spanish Research Project on the Inspection and Repair of PWR reactor vessel head penetrations included the acquisition of data on crack propagation rates in Inconel 600, representative of the materials used for vessel head penetrations. (authors). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  15. Ultrasonic sizing of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    Surface and buried fatigue cracks in steel plates have been sized using immersion probes as transmitters-receivers, angled to produce shear waves in the steel. Sizes have been estimated by identifying the ultrasonic waves diffracted from the crack tip and by measuring the time taken for a signal to travel to and from the crack tip. The effects of compression normal to a fatigue crack and of crack front curvature are discussed. Another diffraction technique, developed by UKAEA, Harwell, is reviewed

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in water at high temperature: contribution to a phenomenological approach to the understanding of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, Pascale

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking of an alloy 600 in water at high temperature. More precisely, it aimed at determining, by using quantitative data characterizing cracking phenomenology, which mechanism(s) is (are) able to explain crack initiation and crack growth. These data concern quantitative characterization of crack initiation, of crack growth and of the influence of two cracking parameters (strain rate, medium hydrogen content). They have been obtained by quantifying cracking through the application of a morphological model. More precisely, these data are: evolution of crack density during a tensile test at slow rate, value of initial crack width with respect to grain boundary length, and relationship between crack density and medium hydrogen content. It appears that hydrogen absorption seems to be involved in the crack initiation mechanism. Crack growth mechanisms and crack growth rates are also discussed [fr

  17. A consistent partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Jesper L.; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2007-01-01

    Present extended finite element method (XFEM) elements for cohesive crack growth may often not be able to model equal stresses on both sides of the discontinuity when acting as a crack-tip element. The authors have developed a new partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth with extra...... enrichments to the cracked elements. The extra enrichments are element side local and were developed by superposition of the standard nodal shape functions for the element and standard nodal shape functions for a sub-triangle of the cracked element. With the extra enrichments, the crack-tip element becomes...... capable of modelling variations in the discontinuous displacement field on both sides of the crack and hence also capable of modelling the case where equal stresses are present on each side of the crack. The enrichment was implemented for the 3-node constant strain triangle (CST) and a standard algorithm...

  18. A crack growth evaluation method for interacting multiple cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    When stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue occurs, multiple cracks are frequently initiated in the same area. According to section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, multiple cracks are considered as a single combined crack in crack growth analysis, if the specified conditions are satisfied. In crack growth processes, however, no prescription for the interference between multiple cracks is given in this code. The JSME Post-Construction Code, issued in May 2000, prescribes the conditions of crack coalescence in the crack growth process. This study aimed to extend this prescription to more general cases. A simulation model was applied, to simulate the crack growth process, taking into account the interference between two cracks. This model made it possible to analyze multiple crack growth behaviors for many cases (e.g. different relative position and length) that could not be studied by experiment only. Based on these analyses, a new crack growth analysis method was suggested for taking into account the interference between multiple cracks. (author)

  19. Fatigue crack behaviour in mine excavator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Y.; Grondin, G.Y.; Elwi, A.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-05-15

    Fatigue cracking in excavation equipment represents a significant operating cost for oil sands operators. It is caused by high impact loads, the high frequency of load cycles, and large component sizes found in oil sands processing facilities. Monitoring and repair strategies for fatigue cracks are typically based on vendor specifications and the experience of maintenance personnel. This paper provided details of an optimized crack management program applied to a BE 395B shovel boom. The proposed crack management tool uses a chart to predict the remaining life of a corner crack in the shovel boom. Predictions are based on limited field measurements of operating loads as well as on data obtained from fatigue testing of boom material, and a finite element analysis of the shovel boom. Field and laboratory data are used along with fracture mechanics and finite element modelling to predict crack life. It was concluded that the tool will allow inspectors and planners to schedule repairs based on safe service life. The tool is applicable for any components subjected to fatigue loading. 3 refs., 21 tabs., 64 figs.

  20. Crack propagation on spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Roche, R.

    1975-01-01

    The risk presented by a crack on a pressure vessel built with a ductile steel cannot be well evaluated by simple application of the rules of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, which only apply to brittle materials. Tests were carried out on spherical vessels of three different scales built with the same steel. Cracks of different length were machined through the vessel wall. From the results obtained, crack initiation stress (beginning of stable propagation) and instable propagation stress may be plotted against the lengths of these cracks. For small and medium size, subject to ductile fracture, the resulting curves are identical, and may be used for ductile fracture prediction. Brittle rupture was observed on larger vessels and crack propagation occurred at lower stress level. Preceedings curves are not usable for fracture analysis. Ultimate pressure can be computed with a good accuracy by using equivalent energy toughness, Ksub(1cd), characteristic of the metal plates. Satisfactory measurements have been obtained on thin samples. The risks of brittle fracture may then judged by comparing Ksub(1cd) with the calculated K 1 value, in which corrections for vessel shape are taken into account. It is thus possible to establish the bursting pressure of cracked spherical vessels, with the help of two rules, one for brittle fracture, the other for ductile instability. A practical method is proposed on the basis of the work reported here

  1. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  2. Same-Sex and Race-Based Disparities in Statutory Rape Arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Mark; Chenoweth, Stephanie; Letourneau, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    This study tests a liberation hypothesis for statutory rape incidents, specifically that there may be same-sex and race/ethnicity arrest disparities among statutory rape incidents and that these will be greater among statutory rape than among forcible sex crime incidents. 26,726 reported incidents of statutory rape as defined under state statutes and 96,474 forcible sex crime incidents were extracted from National Incident-Based Reporting System data sets. Arrest outcomes were tested using multilevel modeling. Same-sex statutory rape pairings were rare but had much higher arrest odds. A victim-offender romantic relationship amplified arrest odds for same-sex pairings, but damped arrest odds for male-on-female pairings. Same-sex disparities were larger among statutory than among forcible incidents. Female-on-male incidents had uniformly lower arrest odds. Race/ethnicity effects were smaller than gender effects and more complexly patterned. The findings support the liberation hypothesis for same-sex statutory rape arrest disparities, particularly among same-sex romantic pairings. Support for race/ethnicity-based arrest disparities was limited and mixed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Development of an Improved Crack Propagation Model for Corrosion-Induced Cover Cracking in RC Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilyati, S.; Nizam, Z. M.; Zurisman, M. A. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2017-06-01

    During the last two decades, reinforced concrete (RC) has been extensively used in most of the world as one of the common construction material due to its advantages and durability. However, RC structures exposed to marine environments are subjected to chloride attack. Chlorides from seawater penetrate into RC structures are not only causing severe corrosion problems but also affect the durability and serviceability of such structures. This paper investigates the influence of transverse reinforcement and spacing of reinforcing bars on concrete cover cracking of two-way RC slab specimens using accelerated corrosion tests. The experimental program involved the testing of four RC slab specimens and was generally designed to observe the crack width and the time of crack to propagate. An improved model for predicting the timing of crack propagation based on the experimental data was then developed.

  4. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic thermal transient stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  5. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic transient thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  6. Self-repair of cracks in brittle material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most effective uses for self repair is in material systems that crack because the cracks can allow the repair chemical to flow into the crack damage sites in all three dimensions. In order for the repair chemical to stay in the damage site and flow along to all the crack and repair there must be enough chemical to fill the entire crack. The repair chemical must be designed appropriately for the particular crack size and total volume of cracks. In each of the three examples of self repair in crackable brittle systems, the viscosity and chemical makeup and volume of the repair chemicals used is different for each system. Further the chemical delivery system has to be designed for each application also. Test results from self repair of three brittle systems are discussed. In "Self Repair of Concrete Bridges and Infrastructure" two chemicals were used due to different placements in bridges to repair different types of cracks- surface shrinkage and shear cracks, In "Airplane Wings and Fuselage, in Graphite" the composite has very different properties than the concrete bridges. In the graphite for airplane components the chemical also had to survive the high processing temperatures. In this composite the cracks were so definite and deep and thin that the repair chemical could flow easily and repair in all layers of the composite. In "Ceramic/Composite Demonstrating Self Repair" the self repair system not only repaired the broken ceramic but also rebounded the composite to the ceramic layer

  7. Unloading Effect on Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2010-01-01

    It is well-known that a tensile overload retards not only the crack growth rate (CGR) in zirconium alloys during the delayed hydride cracking (DHC) tests but also the fatigue crack growth rate in metals, the cause of which is unclear to date. A considerable decrease in the fatigue crack growth rate due to overload is suggested to occur due either to the crack closure or to compressive stresses or strains arising from unloading of the overload. However, the role of the crack closure or the compressive stress in the crack growth rate remains yet to be understood because of incomplete understanding of crack growth kinetics. The aim of this study is to resolve the effect of unloading on the CGR of zirconium alloys, which comes in last among the unresolved issues as listed above. To this end, the CGRs of the Zr-2.5Nb tubes were determined at a constant temperature under the cyclic load with the load ratio, R changing from 0.13 to 0.66 where the extent of unloading became higher at the lower R. More direct evidence for the effect of unloading after an overload is provided using Simpson's experiment investigating the effect on the CGR of a Zr-2.5Nb tube of the stress states of the prefatigue crack tip by unloading or annealing after the formation of a pre-fatigue crack

  8. A Small Crack Length Evaluation Technique by Electronic Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sang; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The results of crack evaluation by conventional UT(Ultrasonic Test)is highly depend on the inspector's experience or knowledge of ultrasound. Phased array UT system and its application methods for small crack length evaluation will be a good alternative method which overcome present UT weakness. This study was aimed at checking the accuracy of crack length evaluation method by electronic scanning and discuss about characteristics of electronic scanning for crack length evaluation. Especially ultrasonic phased array with electronic scan technique was used in carrying out both sizing and detect ability of crack as its length changes. The response of ultrasonic phased array was analyzed to obtain the special method of determining crack length without moving the transducer and detectability of crack minimal length and depth from the material. A method of crack length determining by electronic scanning for the small crack is very real method which has it's accuracy and verify the effectiveness of method compared to a conventional crack length determination

  9. Biaxial fatigue crack propagation behavior of perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Shi, Shouwen; Wang, Lei; Chen, Xu; Chen, Gang

    2018-04-01

    Perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes have long been used as the typical electrolyte for polymer-electrolyte fuel cells, which not only transport proton and water but also serve as barriers to prevent reactants mixing. However, too often the structural integrity of perfluorosulfonic-acid membranes is impaired by membrane thinning or cracks/pinholes formation induced by mechanical and chemical degradations. Despite the increasing number of studies that report crack formation, such as crack size and shape, the underlying mechanism and driving forces have not been well explored. In this paper, the fatigue crack propagation behaviors of Nafion membranes subjected to biaxial loading conditions have been investigated. In particular, the fatigue crack growth rates of flat cracks in responses to different loading conditions are compared, and the impact of transverse stress on fatigue crack growth rate is clarified. In addition, the crack paths for slant cracks under both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions are discussed, which are similar in geometry to those found after accelerated stress testing of fuel cells. The directions of initial crack propagation are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental observations, which are in good agreement. The findings reported here lays the foundation for understanding of mechanical failure of membranes.

  10. Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Christopher John; Whitaker, Mark Thomas; Williams, Steve John

    2017-01-04

    Non-isothermal conditions during flight cycles have long led to the requirement for thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) evaluation of aerospace materials. However, the increased temperatures within the gas turbine engine have meant that the requirements for TMF testing now extend to disc alloys along with blade materials. As such, fatigue crack growth rates are required to be evaluated under non-isothermal conditions along with the development of a detailed understanding of related failure mechanisms. In the current work, a TMF crack growth testing method has been developed utilising induction heating and direct current potential drop techniques for polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys, such as RR1000. Results have shown that in-phase (IP) testing produces accelerated crack growth rates compared with out-of-phase (OOP) due to increased temperature at peak stress and therefore increased time dependent crack growth. The ordering of the crack growth rates is supported by detailed fractographic analysis which shows intergranular crack growth in IP test specimens, and transgranular crack growth in 90° OOP and 180° OOP tests. Isothermal tests have also been carried out for comparison of crack growth rates at the point of peak stress in the TMF cycles.

  11. Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of RR1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Pretty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-isothermal conditions during flight cycles have long led to the requirement for thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF evaluation of aerospace materials. However, the increased temperatures within the gas turbine engine have meant that the requirements for TMF testing now extend to disc alloys along with blade materials. As such, fatigue crack growth rates are required to be evaluated under non-isothermal conditions along with the development of a detailed understanding of related failure mechanisms. In the current work, a TMF crack growth testing method has been developed utilising induction heating and direct current potential drop techniques for polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys, such as RR1000. Results have shown that in-phase (IP testing produces accelerated crack growth rates compared with out-of-phase (OOP due to increased temperature at peak stress and therefore increased time dependent crack growth. The ordering of the crack growth rates is supported by detailed fractographic analysis which shows intergranular crack growth in IP test specimens, and transgranular crack growth in 90° OOP and 180° OOP tests. Isothermal tests have also been carried out for comparison of crack growth rates at the point of peak stress in the TMF cycles.

  12. Nonlinear crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshun, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic features of the deformation and failure of actual materials in the vicinity of a crack tip are due to their physical nonlinearity in the stress-concentration zone, which is a result of plasticity, microfailure, or a nonlinear dependence of the interatomic forces on the distance. Therefore, adequate models of the failure mechanics must be nonlinear, in principle, although linear failure mechanics is applicable if the zone of nonlinear deformation is small in comparison with the crack length. Models of crack mechanics are based on analytical solutions of the problem of the stress-strain state in the vicinity of the crack. On account of the complexity of the problem, nonlinear models are bason on approximate schematic solutions. In the Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale nonlinear model, one of the best known, the actual two-dimensional plastic zone (the nonlinearity zone) is replaced by a narrow one-dimensional zone, which is then modeled by extending the crack with a specified normal load equal to the yield point. The condition of finite stress is applied here, and hence the length of the plastic zone is determined. As a result of this approximation, the displacement in the plastic zone at the abscissa is nonzero

  13. Environmental effects of high temperature sodium of fatigue crack characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ozawa, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    In order to study fatigue crack growth characteristics in the components used in liquid sodium, fatigue tests were carried out at 550degC. This is near the system temperature used for sodium coolant in fast breeder reactors (FBRs). The factors influencing fatigue lifetime in sodium compared with that in air were investigated by observation of surface cracks in 316FR steel. Furthermore, the effects of sodium environment on fatigue were investigated based on examining the results of thermal striping tests, etc., obtained up to now. The results of the fatigue tests show that many micro cracks in the shearing direction were produced by the mid-lifetime, and micro cracks connected quickly after that. This is because an oxidation film was not formed, since sodium is of a reductive nature, and strain of the material surface tends to distribute equally. During crack progression there is no oxide formed on broken surfaces. Therefore re-combination between broken surfaces takes place, and crack progression rate falls. Furthermore, in non-propagating crack, the wedge effect by oxide between broken surfaces at the time of compression is small. Therefore, the crack closure angle is small, compression strain generated in the crack tip becomes large, and the crack cannot stop easily. As mentioned above, the main sodium influence on the fatigue characteristics are because of its reductive nature. In summary, in sodium environment, it is hard to form a crack and to get it to grow. Once started, however, it is hard to stop the crack in sodium compared with in the case of the air. (author)

  14. Production of steam cracking feedstocks by mild cracking of plastic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angyal, Andras; Miskolczi, Norbert; Bartha, Laszlo; Tungler, Antal; Nagy, Lajos; Vida, Laszlo; Nagy, Gabor

    2010-11-15

    In this work the utility of new possible petrochemical feedstocks obtained by plastic waste cracking has been studied. The cracking process of polyethylene (PE), polyethylene-polypropylene (PEPP) and polyethylene-polystyrene (PEPS) has been carried out in a pilot scale tubular reactor. In this process mild reaction parameters has been applied, with the temperature of 530 C and the residence time of 15 min. The produced hydrocarbon fractions as light- and middle distillates were tested by using a laboratory steam cracking unit. It was concluded that the products of the mild cracking of plastic wastes could be applied as petrochemical feedstocks. Based on the analytical data it was determined that these liquid products contained in significant concentration (25-50 wt.%) of olefin hydrocarbons. Moreover the cracking of polystyrene containing raw material resulted in liquid products with significant amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons too. The steam cracking experiments proved that the products obtained by PE and PEPP cracking resulted in similar or better ethylene and propylene yields than the reference samples, however the aromatic content of PEPS products reduced the ethylene and propylene yields. (author)

  15. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  16. Potential drop crack measurement systems for CANDU components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahney, R [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    A project to develop an automated crack measurement system for CANDU pressure tube burst testing is currently underway. The system will utilize either Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) or Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) techniques for crack measurement. The preliminary stage of the project involves testing and comparison of both ACPD and DCPD methods on a Zr - 2.5% Nb alloy plate with saw cuts (used to simulate cracks). Preliminary results show that both ACPD and DCPD techniques are capable of detecting cracks; further testing is in progress to determine the ability of each of the two systems to make accurate crack depth measurements. This paper will describe the two potential drop techniques and will present test results from the experimental program. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Crack propagation during fatigue in cast duplex stainless steels: influence of the microstructure, of the aging and of the test temperature; Propagation de fissure par fatigue dans les aciers austeno-ferritiques moules: influence de la microstructure, du vieillissement et de la temperature d'essai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, V

    2001-07-15

    Duplex stainless steels are used as cast components in nuclear power plants. At the service temperature of about 320 C, the ferrite phase is thermally aged and embrittled. This induces a significant decrease in fracture properties of these materials. The aim of this work consists in studying Fatigue Crack Growth Rates (FCGR) and Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms (FCGM) as a function of thermal ageing and test temperature (20 C/320 C). Two cast duplex stainless steels (30% ferrite) are tested. In order to better understand the influence of the crystallographic orientation of the phases on the FCGM, the solidification structure of the material is studied by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) and by Unidirectional Solidification Quenching. Fatigue crack growth tests are also performed in equiaxed and basaltic structures. Microstructure, fatigue crack growth mechanical properties and mechanisms are thus studied in relation to each other. In the studied range of delta K, the crack propagates without any preferential path by successive ruptures of phase laths. The macroscopic crack propagation plane, as determined by EBSD, depends on the crystallographic orientation of the ferrite grain. So, according to the solidification structure, secondary cracks can appear, which in turn influences the FCGR. Fatigue crack closure, which has to be determined to estimate the intrinsic FCGR, decreases with increasing ageing. This can be explained by a decrease in the kinematic cyclic hardening. The Paris exponent as determined from intrinsic FCGR increases with ageing. Intrinsic FCGR can then be separated in two ranges: one with lower FCGR in aged materials than in un-aged and one with the reversed tendency. (author)

  18. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Nielsen, Laila

    1997-01-01

    (capillary water uptake) is used, involving an in-situ method and a laboratory method. Three different concrete qualities as well as steel fibres (ZP) and polypropylene fibres (PP) are used. Results of the durability tests on cracked FRC-beams are compared to results for uncracked FRC-beams and beams without......Durability studies are carried out by subjecting FRC-beams to combined mechanical and environmental load. Mechanical load is obtained by exposing beams to il-point bending until a predefined crack width is reached, using a newly developed test setup. As environmental load, exposure to water...

  19. Effect of Loading Transients on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Tests 3 and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P

    2003-04-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5{sup t}h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the third and fourth test of working package (WP) 3 with loading transients, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Two different low-alloy steels (20 MnMoNi 5 5, 0.015 wt.% S and 22 NiMoCr 3 7, 0.007 wt. %S) were investigated in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 240 {sup o}C, DO = 400 ppb) in a daisy chain at two different load ratios (R = 0.8 and 0.2). In the first part of the experiments, asymmetrical saw tooth loading with different rise times {delta}t{sub R} of the load and different loading frequencies were applied. Then the loading conditions were changed to an asymmetrical trapezoid waveform loading (periodical partial unloading, PPU) and the hold time {delta}t{sub H} at maximum load was varied. In the final phase of WP 3 PSI tests 3 and 4 the SCC behaviour was investigated under constant load. With decreasing loading frequency the corrosion fatigue (CF) crack advance per cycle {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} of material A increased. Sustained EAC crack growth could be maintained down to low frequencies of 10{sup -5} Hz. The time-based crack growth rate (CGR) da/dt{sub EAC} decreased with decreasing frequency. In material B no effect of the loading frequency could be resolved. Up to a hold time of 1 h at maximum constant load the CGR da/dt{sub EAC} seemed to be independent of the hold time. Above hold times of 1 h the CGR decreased and dropped down to CGR values in the range or below the BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines. This behaviour was observed in both investigated materials. The cycle-based CGR {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} remained approximately constant with increasing hold time. The

  20. Fatigue-crack propagation in gamma-based titanium aluminide alloys at large and small crack sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzic, J.J.; Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-01-01

    Most evaluations of the fracture and fatigue-crack propagation properties of γ+α 2 titanium aluminide alloys to date have been performed using standard large-crack samples, e.g., compact-tension specimens containing crack sizes which are on the order of tens of millimeters, i.e., large compared to microstructural dimensions. However, these alloys have been targeted for applications, such as blades in gas-turbine engines, where relevant crack sizes are much smaller ( 5 mm) and (c ≅ 25--300 microm) cracks in a γ-TiAl based alloy, of composition Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr-0.2B (at.%), specifically for duplex (average grain size approximately17 microm) and refined lamellar (average colony size ≅150 microm) microstructures. It is found that, whereas the lamellar microstructure displays far superior fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth resistance in the presence of large cracks, in small-crack testing the duplex microstructure exhibits a better combination of properties. The reasons for such contrasting behavior are examined in terms of the intrinsic and extrinsic (i.e., crack bridging) contributions to cyclic crack advance

  1. Subsurface crack initiation and propagation mechanisms in gigacycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhiyong; Wagner, Daniele; Bathias, Claude; Paris, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    In the very high cycle regime (N f > 10 7 cycles) cracks can nucleate on inclusions, 'supergrains' and pores, which leads to fish-eye propagation around the defect. The initiation from an inclusion or other defect is almost equal to the total crack growth lifetime, perhaps much more than 99% of this lifetime in many cases. Integration of the Paris law allows one to predict the number of cycles to crack initiation. A cyclic plastic zone around the crack exists, and recording the surface temperature of the sample during the test may allow one to follow crack propagation and determine the number of cycles to crack initiation. A thermo-mechanical model has been developed. In this study several fish-eyes from various materials have been observed by scanning electron microscopy, and the fractographic results analyzed as they related to the mechanical and thermo-mechanical models.

  2. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  3. Statistical crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is possible to simulate the ground blast from a single explosive shot with a simple computer algorithm and appropriate constants, the most commonly used modelling methods do not account for major changes in geology or shot energy because mechanical features such as tectonic stresses, fault structure, microcracking, brittle-ductile transition, and water content are not represented in significant detail. An alternative approach for modelling called Statistical Crack Mechanics is presented in this paper. This method, developed in the seventies as a part of the oil shale program, accounts for crack opening, shear, growth, and coalescence. Numerous photographs and micrographs show that shocked materials tend to involve arrays of planar cracks. The approach described here provides a way to account for microstructure and give a representation of the physical behavior of a material at the microscopic level that can account for phenomena such as permeability, fragmentation, shear banding, and hot-spot formation in explosives

  4. Numerical approach of memory effect on crack closure phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billardon, R.; Brunet, M.; Lemaitre, J.

    1981-01-01

    In the case of variable amplitude loading, it is necessary to introduce in the fatigue crack propagation law a parameter accounting for the threshold value of strain energy release rate. In order to relate this threshold to crack closure or crack opening, a finite element procedure has been developed based upon anisotropic elastoplastic constitutive equations (Marquis). This finite element procedure is used for the cyclic elastoplastic analysis of fatigue bending crack tests carried on 2024 aluminium alloy, 2 millimeters thick. The influence of the hardening rule used is studied for the case of one single overload on constant amplitude (0, +) loading. (orig./HP)

  5. Cracking susceptibility of stainless steel subjected to plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, H.

    1995-01-01

    The similarities and differences in the cracking susceptibility between welding and resolidification after plasma disruption were examined experimentally using a number of primary candidate alloy samples with different chemical compositions. The product of the number density and the average depth of the cracks was measured after simulated disruption, employing a hydrogen ion beam as the heat source, and was compared with the Varestraint test result. An adequate correlation was observed between them, which indicates that the cracking susceptibility during plasma disruption can be well estimated from the welding cracking susceptibility. (orig.)

  6. Ductile cast irons: microstructure influence on fatigue crack propagation resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cavallini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure influence on fatigue crack propagation resistance in five different ductile cast irons (DCI was investigated. Four ferrite/pearlite volume fractions were considered, performing fatigue crack propagation tests according to ASTM E647 standard (R equals to 0.1, 0.5 and 0.75, respectively. Results were compared with an austempered DCI. Damaging micromechanisms were investigated according to the following procedures: - “traditional” Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM fracture surfaces analysis; - SEM fracture surface analysis with 3D quantitative analysis; - SEM longitudinal crack profile analysis - Light Optical Microscope (LOM transversal crack profile analysis;

  7. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  8. Flexural Cracking Behavior Of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abdalkader

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Steel fibers are added to concrete due to its ability to improve the tensile strength and control propagation of cracks in reinforced concrete members. Steel fiber reinforced concrete is made of cement fine water and coarse aggregate in addition to steel fibers. In this experimental work flexural cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams contains different percentage of hooked-end steel fibers with length of 50 mm and equivalent diameter of 0.5 mm was studied. The beams were tested under third-point loading test at 28 days. First cracking load maximum crack width cracks number and load-deflection relations were investigated to evaluate the flexural cracking behavior of concrete beams with 34 MPa target mean strength. Workability wet density compressive and splitting tensile strength were also investigated. The results showed that the flexural crack width is significantly reduced with the addition of steel fibers. Fiber contents of 1.0 resulted in 81 reduction in maximum crack width compared to control concrete without fiber. The results also showed that the first cracking load and maximum load are increased with the addition of steel fibers.

  9. Cracking the Cipher Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Singh, Simon

    2002-01-01

    In the back of 'The Code Book', a history of cryptography, Simon Singh included a series of 10 encoded messages, each from a different period of history. The first person to crack all 10 messages would win a prize of £10,000. Now that the prize has been won, Simon can reveal the story behind the Cipher Challenge. Along the way he will show how mathematics can be used to crack codes, the role it played in World War Two and how it helps to guarantee security in the Information Age.

  10. Fatigue crack growth studies on a tee junction using ultrasonic non-destructive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Thavasimuthu, M.; Ramesh, A.S.; Jayakumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Fatigue cracks need to be detected and sized to maintain structural integrity. The significance of cracks detected in service must also be assessed. This paper describes the on-line ultrasonic testing carried out on a Tee joint subjected to fatigue loading. The initiation and growth of the cracks were monitored for every 5,000 cycles up to 40,000 cycles. The study demonstrated the use of ultrasonic testing for fatigue crack growth detection and sizing. (author)

  11. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  12. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  13. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  14. Microstructural modelling of creep crack growth from a blunted crack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; Giessen, E. van der

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crack tip blunting on the initial stages of creep crack growth is investigated by means of a planar microstructural model in which grains are represented discretely. The actual linking-up process of discrete microcracks with the macroscopic crack is simulated, with full account of the

  15. Creep crack growth in phosphorus alloyed oxygen free copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Rui; Seitisleam, Facredin (Swerea KIMAB (Sweden)); Sandstroem, Rolf; Jin, Lai-Zhe (Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    Using standard compact tension (CT) specimens taken from a pierce and draw cylinder, creep crack growth (CCG) has been studied in phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) parent metal at 22, 75, 175, and 215 deg C. Pre- and post-test metallography are performed. At higher temperatures the rupture time of CCG is shorter by a factor up of 65 than that of uniaxial at same stress/reference stress. At 175 and 215 deg C, crack does grow by creep about 10 mm before final instantaneous failure. In contrast, there is hardly any visible crack growth at 22 and 75 deg C. The tests were interrupted after 5000 to 13000 hours. For ruptured tests at 175 and 215 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains are observed adjacent to crack. Extensive and intergranular creep cavities and microcracks are found several mm around crack. For interrupted tests at 22 and 75 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains, creep cavities, as well as microcracks are observed close to crack tip. Surface cracks from both sides have initiated and grown about 45 deg to the load direction towards inside. For the interrupted tests, hardness adjacent to crack tip has more than doubled because of work hardening, or heavy deformation. This is consistent with large crack tip opening. The true strain at the crack tip is estimated to 10 and 4 for the tests at 22 and 75 deg C, respectively. The stress state behind the crack tip has been modelled with FEM. Stress relaxation after loading has also been taken into account. A model for the creep damage based on the creep strain rate has been formulated that can describe the uniaxial creep rupture data without fitting parameters. Based on the formulation for the creep damage, a model for the crack propagation has been set up. When the creep damage has reached the value unity in front of the crack tip, the crack is assumed to propagate. Taking multiaxial effects into account the observed life times of the CT specimens can be well described. The multiaxial

  16. Creep crack growth in phosphorus alloyed oxygen free copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Rui; Seitisleam, Facredin; Sandstroem, Rolf; Jin, Lai-Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Using standard compact tension (CT) specimens taken from a pierce and draw cylinder, creep crack growth (CCG) has been studied in phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) parent metal at 22, 75, 175, and 215 deg C. Pre- and post-test metallography are performed. At higher temperatures the rupture time of CCG is shorter by a factor up of 65 than that of uniaxial at same stress/reference stress. At 175 and 215 deg C, crack does grow by creep about 10 mm before final instantaneous failure. In contrast, there is hardly any visible crack growth at 22 and 75 deg C. The tests were interrupted after 5000 to 13000 hours. For ruptured tests at 175 and 215 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains are observed adjacent to crack. Extensive and intergranular creep cavities and microcracks are found several mm around crack. For interrupted tests at 22 and 75 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains, creep cavities, as well as microcracks are observed close to crack tip. Surface cracks from both sides have initiated and grown about 45 deg to the load direction towards inside. For the interrupted tests, hardness adjacent to crack tip has more than doubled because of work hardening, or heavy deformation. This is consistent with large crack tip opening. The true strain at the crack tip is estimated to 10 and 4 for the tests at 22 and 75 deg C, respectively. The stress state behind the crack tip has been modelled with FEM. Stress relaxation after loading has also been taken into account. A model for the creep damage based on the creep strain rate has been formulated that can describe the uniaxial creep rupture data without fitting parameters. Based on the formulation for the creep damage, a model for the crack propagation has been set up. When the creep damage has reached the value unity in front of the crack tip, the crack is assumed to propagate. Taking multiaxial effects into account the observed life times of the CT specimens can be well described. The multiaxial

  17. Linear Cracking in Bridge Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Concrete cracking in bridge decks remains an important issue relative to deck durability. Cracks can allow increased penetration of chlorides, which can result in premature corrosion of the reinforcing steel and subsequent spalling of the concrete de...

  18. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  19. Radiological analyses of France Telecom surge arresters. Study performed for the CGT FAPT Cantal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    This document reports the radiological characterization of various versions of surge arresters used in the past to protect telephone lines against over-voltages. These equipment, which use various radioactive materials, were assessed by gamma radiation flow measurements, alpha-beta-gamma count rate measurements, dose rate measurements, gamma spectrometry analyses, tritium emanation test, radon 222 emanation test, smearing. Recommendations are formulated to manage radioactive surge arresters which are still being operated

  20. The epidemiology of physical attack and rape among crack-using women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, R S; Wang, J; Carlson, R G; Siegal, H A

    2001-02-01

    This prospective study examines the epidemiology of physical attack and rape among a sample of 171 not-in-treatment, crack-cocaine using women. Since initiating crack use, 62% of the women reported suffering a physical attack. The annual rate of victimization by physical attack was 45%. Overall, more than half of the victims sought medical care subsequent to an attack. The prevalence of rape since crack use was initiated was 32%, and the annual rate was 11%. Among those women having been raped since they initiated crack use, 83% reported they were high on crack when the crime occurred as were an estimated 57% of the perpetrators. Logistic regression analyses showed that duration of crack use, arrest for prostitution, and some college education were predictors of having experienced a physical attack. Duration of crack use and a history of prostitution were predictors of suffering a rape. Drug abuse treatment programs must be sensitive to high levels of violence victimization experienced by crack-cocaine using women. Screening women for victimization, and treating the problems that emanate from it, may help make drug abuse treatment more effective.