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Sample records for coverage dependent adsorption

  1. Coverage-dependent adsorption thermodynamics of oxygen on ZnO(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming; Seebauer, Edmund G., E-mail: eseebaue@illinois.edu

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Adsorption enthalpy and entropy of oxygen on Zn-term ZnO(0001) were measured by photoreflectance. • These parameters are large in magnitude and vary nonmonotonically with coverage. • Many kinds of sites, chemical species and reconstructions contribute to this behavior. • Entropic and enthalpic contributions to the free energy are comparable near room temperature. - Abstract: The equilibrium behavior of oxygen adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces such as ZnO(0001) often affects their behavior in applications such as gas sensing. The present work attempts to bridge this distinct gap to applications from an alternate perspective by employing the optical technique of photoreflectance (PR) to measure the enthalpy ΔH{sub ads} and entropy ΔS{sub ads} of oxygen adsorption as a function of coverage on Zn-terminated ZnO(0001). The large and strongly coverage-dependent parameters, stemming from a multiplicity of sites, chemical species and reconstructions, lead to a nonmonotonic coverage variation in both ΔH{sub ads} and ΔS{sub ads}. The entropic contribution to the free energy is comparable to the enthalpic contribution even near room temperature, so that temperature effects on oxygen adsorption may be uncommonly large.

  2. Memory Effects and Coverage Dependence of Surface Diffusion in a Model Adsorption System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Ying, S. C.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    1999-01-01

    in tracer and collective diffusion. We show that memory effects can be very pronounced deep inside the ordered phases and in regions close to first and second order phase transition boundaries. Particular attention is paid to the details of the time dependence of memory effects. The memory effect in tracer......We study the coverage dependence of surface diffusion coefficients for a strongly interacting adsorption system O/W(110) via Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice-gas model. In particular, we consider the nature and emergence of memory effects as contained in the corresponding correlation factors...... diffusion is found to decay following a power law after an initial transient period. This behavior persists until the hydrodynamic regime is reached, after which the memory effect decays exponentially. The time required to reach the hydrodynamical regime and the related exponential decay is strongly...

  3. Coverage-dependent adsorption and desorption of oxygen on Pd(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnen, Angela den; Jacobse, Leon; Wiegman, Sandra; Juurlink, Ludo B. F., E-mail: l.juurlink@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Berg, Otto T. [Department of Chemistry, California State University Fresno, 2555 E. San Ramon Ave., Fresno, California 93740 (United States)

    2016-06-28

    We have studied the adsorption and desorption of O{sub 2} on Pd(100) by supersonic molecular beam techniques and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Adsorption measurements on the bare surface confirm that O{sub 2} initially dissociates for all kinetic energies between 56 and 380 meV and surface temperatures between 100 and 600 K via a direct mechanism. At and below 150 K, continued adsorption leads to a combined O/O{sub 2} overlayer. Dissociation of molecularly bound O{sub 2} during a subsequent temperature ramp leads to unexpected high atomic oxygen coverages, which are also obtained at high incident energy and high surface temperature. At intermediate temperatures and energies, these high final coverages are not obtained. Our results show that kinetic energy of the gas phase reactant and reaction energy dissipated during O{sub 2} dissociation on the cold surface both enable activated nucleation of high-coverage surface structures. We suggest that excitation of local substrate phonons may play a crucial role in oxygen dissociation at any coverage.

  4. Coverage dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of CO chemisorption on Cu (111): evidence for two adsorption sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugnet, Y.; Tran, M.D.

    1978-06-01

    The ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS) of CO adsorbed on (111) face of Cu are found to be dependent of coverage from exposure of 0.3L up to saturation. At lowest dose two intense molecular orbitals are observed at binding energies of 8.7 and 11.7 eV - phase I -. The intensity of two additional structures at 9.6 and 13.7 eV is fastly enhanced with increasing exposure - phase II -, more weakly bound, yielding at saturation coverage the complex four peak spectra usually reported for CO and Cu. We therefore reassign the levels at 11.7 and 8.7 eV to the 4SIGMA and overlap of molecular orbitals of CO adsorbed on top position and the levels at 13.7 and 9.6 eV to the same for CO adsorbed on bridge position

  5. A three-site Langmuir adsorption model to elucidate the temperature, pressure, and support dependence of the hydrogen coverage on supported Pt particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Y.; Koot, V.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Ramaker, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    The three-site adsorption model, previously developed to describe H adsorption on small Pt particles, was used to gain insight into dependence of hydrogen coverage on temperature, pressure, and support ionicity. The three sites, in order of decreasing PtH bond strength, involve H in an atop, a

  6. Insights into the effect of coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation over Rh(1 0 0) surface: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Riguang; Ling, Lixia; Wang, Baojun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The adsorption energies gradually decrease with the increasing of CO coverage on Rh(1 0 0). • CO reaches the saturated adsorption with the coverage of 12/12 ML on Rh(1 0 0). • Both CO desorption and dissociation co-exist at the coverage less than or equal to 2/12 ML. • Only molecule CO adsorption is favored at the coverage greater than or equal to 3/12 ML. • Only molecule CO adsorption form exists in syngas conversion on Rh catalyst. - Abstract: The adsorption, dissociation and desorption of CO at different coverage over Rh(1 0 0) surface have been systematically investigated using density functional theory method together with the periodic slab model. Our results show that at the coverage less than or equal to 4/12 ML, CO favored the most stable bridge site adsorption, and the adsorption energies of CO have little difference; while at the coverage greater than or equal to 5/12 ML, the lateral repulsive interaction begins to affect the adsorption structures and the corresponding adsorption energies of adsorbed CO molecules, and the interaction will be stronger with the increasing of CO coverage, which leads to CO migration over Rh(1 0 0) surface when CO coverage is greater than or equal to 10/12 ML. The adsorption energies of these CO molecules will decrease successively until the saturated adsorption with the CO coverage of 12/12 ML. Further calculations on CO dissociation indicate that when CO coverage is greater than or equal to 3/12 ML, the dissociation of adsorbed CO molecules will be unfavorable both kinetically and thermodynamically, suggesting that only molecule CO adsorption are favored. Considering the catalytic activity of Rh(1 0 0) surface toward CO dissociation and the higher CO coverage under the continuous supply of CO in syngas conversion, it is to be expected that only molecule CO adsorption exist on Rh catalyst

  7. pH dependent polymeric micelle adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, S C; Gee, M L [The University of Melbourne, VIC (Australia). School of Chemistry

    2003-07-01

    Full text: Poly(2-vinylpyridine)-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP-PEO) shows potential as a possible drug delivery system for anti-tumour drugs since it forms pH dependent polymeric micelles. Hence to better understand the adsorption behaviour of this polymer we have studied the interaction forces between layers of P2VP-PEO adsorbed onto silica as a function of solution pH using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). When P2VP-PEO is initially adsorbed above the pKa of the P2VP block, P2VP-PEO adsorbs from solution as micelles that exist as either partially collapsed- or a hemi-micelles at the silica surface. Below the pKa of P2VP, the P2VP-PEO adsorbs as unimers, forming a compact layer with little looping and tailing into solution. When initial adsorption of P2VP-PEO is in the form of unimers, any driving force to self-assembly of the now charge neutral polymer is kinetically hindered. Hence, after initial adsorption at pH 3.6, a subsequent increase in pH to 6.6 results in a slow surface restructuring towards self-assembly and equilibrium. When the pH is increased from pH 6.6 to 9.7 there is a continuation of the evolution of the system to its equilibrium position during which the adsorbed P2VP-PEO unimers continue to 'unravel' from the surface, extending away from it, towards eventual complete surface self-assembly.

  8. Investigating the coverage dependent behaviour of CO on Gd/Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrikkeholm, Elisabeth Therese; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    diffraction (LEED), showing that a highly ordered crystal structure had appeared. To study the molecular dynamics on this surface a detailed study of the CO adsorption on the surface was conducted using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO. The TPD spectra show a desorption peak shifted down...... in temperature compared to those of pure Pt(111). The shape of the desorption peak and the desorption temperature were shown to be strongly dependent on the CO coverage of the surface. A systematic investigation of CO desorption temperature as a function of coverage was consequently performed. A simple...... simulation of the TPD spectra was carried out, based on adsorption energies from density functional theory (DFT). This simulation reproduces the shift and the narrowing of the desorption spectrum from the experiments and the DFT calculations suggest that the sharp TPD feature arises from cooperative...

  9. Did the Affordable Care Act's Dependent Coverage Mandate Increase Premiums?

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs Depew; James Bailey

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the Affordable Care Act's dependent coverage mandate on insurance premiums. The expansion of dependent coverage under the ACA allows young adults to remain on their parent's private health insurance plans until the age of 26. We find that the mandate has led to a 2.5-2.8 percent increase in premiums for health insurance plans that cover children, relative to single-coverage plans. We find no evidence that the mandate caused an increase in the amount of the employe...

  10. Coverage Dependent Assembly of Anthraquinone on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Brad; Deloach, Andrew; Einstein, Theodore; Dougherty, Daniel

    A study of adsorbate-adsorbate and surface state mediated interactions of anthraquinone (AnQ) on Au(111) is presented. We utilize scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to characterize the coverage dependence of AnQ structure formation. Ordered structures are observed up to a single monolayer (ML) and are found to be strongly dependent on molecular surface density. While the complete ML forms a well-ordered close-packed layer, for a narrow range of sub-ML coverages irregular close-packed islands are observed to coexist with a disordered pore network linking neighboring islands. This network displays a characteristic pore size and at lower coverages, the soliton walls of the herringbone reconstruction are shown to promote formation of distinct pore nanostructures. We will discuss these nanostructure formations in the context of surface mediated and more direct adsorbate interactions.

  11. High coverage hydrogen adsorption on the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaohu, E-mail: yuxiaohu950203@126.com [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China); State Key laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China); Zhang, Xuemei [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China); Wang, Shengguang [State Key laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China); Synfuels China Co., Ltd., Huairou, Beijing 101407 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption on the A and B termination layers of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface at different coverage has been studied by DFT + U method. • The adsorption of hydrogen prefers surface oxygen atoms on both Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface layers. • The more stable A layer has stronger adsorption energy than the less stable B layer. • The saturation coverage has two dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the A layer, and one dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the B layer. - Abstract: Hydrogen adsorption on the A and B termination layers of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface at different coverage has been systematically studied by density functional theory calculations including an on-site Hubbard term (GGA + U). The adsorption of hydrogen prefers surface oxygen atoms on both layers. The more stable A layer has stronger adsorption energy than the less stable B layer. The saturation coverage has two dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the A layer, and one dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the B layer. The adsorption mechanism has been analyzed on the basis of projected density of states (PDOS).

  12. Pulse gas chromatographic study of adsorption of substituted aromatics and heterocyclic molecules on MIL-47 at zero coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerinck, Tim; Couck, Sarah; Vermoortele, Frederik; De Vos, Dirk E; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2012-10-02

    The low coverage adsorptive properties of the MIL-47 metal organic framework toward aromatic and heterocyclic molecules are reported in this paper. The effect of molecular functionality and size on Henry adsorption constants and adsorption enthalpies of alkyl and heteroatom functionalized benzene derivates and heterocyclic molecules was studied using pulse gas chromatography. By means of statistical analysis, experimental data was analyzed and modeled using principal component analysis and partial least-squares regression. Structure-property relationships were established, revealing and confirming several trends. Among the molecular properties governing the adsorption process, vapor pressure, mean polarizability, and dipole moment play a determining role.

  13. Coverage dependent molecular assembly of anthraquinone on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Andrew S.; Conrad, Brad R.; Einstein, T. L.; Dougherty, Daniel B.

    2017-11-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy study of anthraquinone (AQ) on the Au(111) surface shows that the molecules self-assemble into several structures depending on the local surface coverage. At high coverages, a close-packed saturated monolayer is observed, while at low coverages, mobile surface molecules coexist with stable chiral hexamer clusters. At intermediate coverages, a disordered 2D porous network interlinking close-packed islands is observed in contrast to the giant honeycomb networks observed for the same molecule on Cu(111). This difference verifies the predicted extreme sensitivity [J. Wyrick et al., Nano Lett. 11, 2944 (2011)] of the pore network to small changes in the surface electronic structure. Quantitative analysis of the 2D pore network reveals that the areas of the vacancy islands are distributed log-normally. Log-normal distributions are typically associated with the product of random variables (multiplicative noise), and we propose that the distribution of pore sizes for AQ on Au(111) originates from random linear rate constants for molecules to either desorb from the surface or detach from the region of a nucleated pore.

  14. Young Adults’ Selection and Use of Dependent Coverage under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependent coverage expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA required health insurance policies that cover dependents to offer coverage for policyholder’ children up to age 26. It has been well documented that the provision successfully reduced the uninsured rate among the young adults. However, less is known about whether dependent coverage crowded out other insurance types and whether young adults used dependent coverage as a fill-in-the-gap short-term option. Using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation 2008 Panel, the paper assesses dependent coverage uptake and duration before and after the ACA provision among young adults aged 19–26 versus those aged 27–30. Regressions for additional coverage outcomes were also performed to estimate the crowd-out rate. It was found that the ACA provision had a significant positive impact on dependent coverage uptake and duration. The estimated crowd-out rate ranges from 27 to 42%, depending on the definition. Most dependent coverage enrollees used the coverage for 1 or 2 years. Differences in dependent coverage uptake and duration remained among racial groups. Less healthy individuals were also less likely to make use of dependent coverage.

  15. Theoretical insights into the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation over stepped Ni surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuiwei; Zhang, Minhua; Yu, Yingzhe

    2017-07-21

    Vicinal surfaces of Ni are model catalysts of general interest and great importance in computational catalysis. Here we report a comprehensive study conducted with density functional theory on Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n = 2, 3 and 4) surfaces to explore the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation, a probe reaction relevant to many industrial processes. The coordination numbers (CN), the generalized coordination numbers and the d band partial density of states (d-PDOS) of Ni are identified as descriptors to faithfully reflect the difference of the step edge region for Ni[n(111) × (100)]. Based on analysis of the energy diagrams for CO activation and dissociation as well as the structural features of the Ni(311), Ni(211) and Ni(533) surfaces, Ni(211) (n = 3) is proposed as a model of adequate representativeness for Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n≥ 3) surface groups in investigating small molecule activation over such stepped structures. Further, a series of Ni(211) surfaces with the step edge coverage ranging from 1/4 to 1 monolayer (ML) were utilized to assess their effect on CO activation. The results show that CO adsorption is not sensitive to the step edge coverage, which could readily approach 1 ML under a CO-rich atmosphere. In contrast, CO dissociation manifests strong coverage dependence when the coverage exceeds 1/2 ML, indicating that significant adsorbate-adsorbate interactions emerge. These results are conducive to theoretical studies of metal-catalyzed surface processes where the defects play a vital role.

  16. Oxygen adsorption on Pt(110)-(1x2): new high-coverage structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, Stig; Lorensen, Henrik Qvist; Horch, Sebastian

    1999-01-01

    From an interplay between scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, a comprehensive picture is obtained for oxygen adsorption on the Pt(110)-(1 x 2) surface, from single isolated oxygen atoms chemisorbed in FCC sites along the platinum ridges...... adsorption and platinum lattice distortions. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Banerjee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Application of saw dust for the removal of an anionic dye, tartrazine, from aqueous solutions has been investigated. The experiments were carried out in batch mode. Effect of the parameters such as pH, initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye was studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 70 min. Maximum adsorption of dye was achieved at pH 3. Removal percent was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum removal was found to be 97% at 1 mg/L of tartrazine. The removal increases from 71% to 97% when the initial concentration of dye solution decreases from 15 mg/L to 1 mg/L. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich isotherm models. The (Langmuir adsorption capacity of the adsorbent is found to be 4.71 mg/g at 318 K. Kinetic modeling of the process of removal was carried out and the process of removal was found to follow a pseudo second order model and the value of rate constant for adsorption process was calculated as 2.7 × 10−3 g mg−1 min−1 at 318 K. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (ΔG°, enthalpy (ΔH° and entropy (ΔS° were determined and the negative values of ΔG° indicated that the process of removal was spontaneous at all values of temperatures. Further, the values of ΔH° indicated the endothermic nature of the process of removal.

  18. Size dependence of adsorption kinetics of nano-MgO: a theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shuting; Wen, Yanzhen; Cui, Zixiang; Xue, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles present tremendous differences in adsorption kinetics compared with corresponding bulk particles which have great influences on the applications of nanoparticles. A size-dependent adsorption kinetic theory was proposed, the relations between adsorption kinetic parameters, respectively, and particle size of nano-adsorbent were derived theoretically, and the influence mechanism of particle size on the adsorption kinetic parameters was discussed. In experiment, nanoscale magnesium oxide (nano-MgO) with different diameters between 11.5 and 41.4 nm with narrow size distribution and low agglomeration were prepared, and the kinetic parameters of adsorption of benzene on nano-MgO in aqueous solution were obtained. Then the influence regularities of the particle size on the adsorption kinetic parameters were obtained. The experimental results are consistent with the nano-adsorption kinetic theory. With particle size decreasing, the adsorption rate constant increases; the adsorption activation energy and the adsorption pre-exponential factor decrease. Furthermore, the logarithm of adsorption rate constant, the adsorption activation energy, and the logarithm of adsorption pre-exponential factor are linearly related to the reciprocal of particle diameter, respectively. The mechanism of particle size influence on the kinetic parameters is that the activation energy is influenced by the molar surface enthalpy of nano-adsorbent, the pre-exponential factor by the molar surface entropy, and the rate constant by both the molar surface enthalpy and the molar surface entropy

  19. Tip-Enhanced Raman Voltammetry: Coverage Dependence and Quantitative Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Michael; Kang, Gyeongwon; Goubert, Guillaume; Chulhai, Dhabih V; Schatz, George C; Jensen, Lasse; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2017-01-11

    Electrochemical atomic force microscopy tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-AFM-TERS) was employed for the first time to observe nanoscale spatial variations in the formal potential, E 0' , of a surface-bound redox couple. TERS cyclic voltammograms (TERS CVs) of single Nile Blue (NB) molecules were acquired at different locations spaced 5-10 nm apart on an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. Analysis of TERS CVs at different coverages was used to verify the observation of single-molecule electrochemistry. The resulting TERS CVs were fit to the Laviron model for surface-bound electroactive species to quantitatively extract the formal potential E 0' at each spatial location. Histograms of single-molecule E 0' at each coverage indicate that the electrochemical behavior of the cationic oxidized species is less sensitive to local environment than the neutral reduced species. This information is not accessible using purely electrochemical methods or ensemble spectroelectrochemical measurements. We anticipate that quantitative modeling and measurement of site-specific electrochemistry with EC-AFM-TERS will have a profound impact on our understanding of the role of nanoscale electrode heterogeneity in applications such as electrocatalysis, biological electron transfer, and energy production and storage.

  20. Dependence of adsorption rate for uranium on porous property of hydrophilic amidoxime type adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Takagi, Norio; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko; Takai, Nobuharu; Seno, Manabu; Itagaki, Takaharu; Ouchi, Hidenaga.

    1984-01-01

    Dependence of macro- and microporous properties of the amidoxime chelating resins was investigated on the rate of adsorption for uranium from sea water. These resins, which were cross-linked with hydrophilic monomers at the degree of cross-linking of 40 wt%, were macroreticular type porous ones. The rate of adsorption increased as the macropore volume increased. In addition, it depended on the length of the cross-linking agent: the resin cross-linked with tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate showed the maximum rate of adsorption for uranium. These results suggested that the diffusion of uranyl ions in the resin was responsible for the rate of adsorption for uranium. (author)

  1. Adsorption differences between low coverage enantiomers of alanine on the chiral Cu{421}R surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladys, Michael J; Han, Jeong Woo; Pedersen, Therese S; Tadich, Anton; O'Donnell, Kane M; Thomsen, Lars

    2017-05-31

    Chiral separation using heterogeneous methods has long been sought after. Chiral metal surfaces have the potential to make it possible to model these systems using small amino acids, the building blocks for proteins. A comparison of submonolayer concentrations of alanine enantiomers adsorbed onto Cu{421} R has revealed a large geometrical differences between the two molecules as compared to the saturated coverage. Large differences were observed in HR-XPS and NEXAFS and complemented by theoretical DFT calculations. At approximately one third of a monolayer a comparison of the C1s XPS signal showed a shift in the methyl group of more than 300 meV indicating that the two enantiomers are in different chemical environments. NEXAFS spectroscopy confirmed the XPS variations and showed large differences in the orientation of the adsorbed molecules. Our DFT results show that the l-enantiomer is energetically the most stable in the {311} microfacet configuration. In contrast to the full monolayer coverage, these lower coverages showed enhanced selectivity.

  2. Salinity dependence of 226Ra adsorption on montmorillonite and kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuji Tamamura; Takahiro Takada; Seiya Nagao; Masayoshi Yamamoto; Keisuke Fukushi

    2014-01-01

    The effect of NaCl concentration (10.0-1,000 mM) on 226 Ra adsorption was investigated in the presence of montmorillonite and kaolinite. A positive correlation was observed between the dissolved 226 Ra and NaCl concentrations in the presence of these adsorbents. Distribution coefficients decreased from the order of 10 4 to 10 0 (mL g -1 ) with an increase in NaCl concentration. Although the coefficients were higher for montmorillonite than kaolinite at lower NaCl concentrations, the trend was reversed at higher NaCl concentrations (≥500 mM) owing to the sharper reduction of the coefficient for montmorillonite with the increase in NaCl concentration. The rapid reduction was ascribed to higher negative charge density of montmorillonite, which leads the Ra 2+ adsorption mechanism to approach charge-compensating ion exchange. (author)

  3. The pH-dependent adsorption of tributyltin to charcoals and soot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Liping; Borggaard, Ole K.; Marcussen, Helle; Holm, Peter E.; Bruun Hansen, Hans Christian

    2010-01-01

    Widespread use of tributyltin (TBT) poses a serious environmental problem. Adsorption by black carbon (BC) may strongly affect its behavior. The adsorption of TBT to well characterized soot and two charcoals with specific surface area in the range of 62-111 m 2 g -1 have been investigated with main focus on pH effects. The charcoals but not soot possess acidic functional groups. TBT adsorption reaches maximum at pH 6-7 for charcoals, and at pH > 6 for soot. Soot has between 1.5 and 15 times higher adsorption density (0.09-1.77 μmol m -2 ) than charcoals, but charcoals show up to 17 times higher sorption affinities than soot. TBT adsorption is successfully described by a new pH-dependent dual Langmuir model considering electrostatic and hydrophobic adsorption, and pH effects on TBT speciation and BC surface charge. It is inferred that strong sorption of the TBTOH species to BC may affect TBT toxicity. - Tributyltin adsorption to black carbon increases at increasing pH but charcoal exhibits electrostatic and hydrophobic adsorption, whereas soot only adsorbs hydrophobically.

  4. The pH-dependent adsorption of tributyltin to charcoals and soot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Liping, E-mail: fang@life.ku.d [Department of Basic Sciences and Environment, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Borggaard, Ole K.; Marcussen, Helle; Holm, Peter E.; Bruun Hansen, Hans Christian [Department of Basic Sciences and Environment, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)

    2010-12-15

    Widespread use of tributyltin (TBT) poses a serious environmental problem. Adsorption by black carbon (BC) may strongly affect its behavior. The adsorption of TBT to well characterized soot and two charcoals with specific surface area in the range of 62-111 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} have been investigated with main focus on pH effects. The charcoals but not soot possess acidic functional groups. TBT adsorption reaches maximum at pH 6-7 for charcoals, and at pH > 6 for soot. Soot has between 1.5 and 15 times higher adsorption density (0.09-1.77 {mu}mol m{sup -2}) than charcoals, but charcoals show up to 17 times higher sorption affinities than soot. TBT adsorption is successfully described by a new pH-dependent dual Langmuir model considering electrostatic and hydrophobic adsorption, and pH effects on TBT speciation and BC surface charge. It is inferred that strong sorption of the TBTOH species to BC may affect TBT toxicity. - Tributyltin adsorption to black carbon increases at increasing pH but charcoal exhibits electrostatic and hydrophobic adsorption, whereas soot only adsorbs hydrophobically.

  5. Atomic-scale study of the adsorption of calcium fluoride on Si(100) at low-coverage regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaravalloti, Franco; Dujardin, Gerald; Riedel, Damien; Pinto, Henry P.; Foster, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate, experimentally and theoretically, the initial stage of the formation of Ca/Si and Si/F structures that occurs during the adsorption of CaF 2 molecules onto a bare Si(100) surface heated to 1000 K in a low-coverage regime (0.3 monolayer). A low-temperature (5 K) scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is used to observe the topographies and the electronic properties of the exposed silicon surfaces. Our atomic-scale study reveals that several chemical reactions arise during CaF 2 deposition, such as dissociation of the CaF 2 molecules and etching of the surface silicon dimers. The experimental and calculated STM topographies are compared using the density functional theory, and this comparison enables us to identify two types of reacted structures on the Si(100) surface. The first type of observed complex surface structure consists of large islands formed with a semiperiodic sequence of 3 x 2 unit cells. The second one is made of isolated Ca adatoms adsorbed at specific sites on the Si(100)-2 x 1 surface.

  6. On the effect of coverage-dependent adsorbate-adsorbate interactions for CO methanation on transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausche, Adam C.; Medford, Andrew J.; Khan, Tuhin Suvra

    2013-01-01

    with a high coverage of CO. At these high coverages, reaction intermediates experience interaction effects that typically reduce their adsorption energies. Herein, the effect of these interactions on the activities of transition metals for CO methanation is investigated. For transition metals that have low...... coverages of reactants, the effect is minimal. But for materials with high coverages under reaction conditions, rates can change by several orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, the position of the maximum of the activity volcano does not shift significantly, and the rates at the maximum are only slightly......Heterogeneously catalyzed reactions involving the dissociation of strongly bonded molecules typically need quite reactive catalysts with high coverages of intermediate molecules. Methanation of carbon monoxide is one example, where CO dissociation has been reported to take place on step sites...

  7. Modeling the state dependent impulse control for computer virus propagation under media coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiyin; Pei, Yongzhen; Lv, Yunfei

    2018-02-01

    A state dependent impulsive control model is proposed to model the spread of computer virus incorporating media coverage. By the successor function, the sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of order-1 periodic solution are presented first. Secondly, for two classes of periodic solutions, the geometric property of successor function and the analogue of the Poincaré criterion are employed to obtain the stability results. These results show that the number of the infective computers is under the threshold all the time. Finally, the theoretic and numerical analysis show that media coverage can delay the spread of computer virus.

  8. Pore size dependent molecular adsorption of cationic dye in biomass derived hierarchically porous carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Ji, Tuo; Mu, Liwen; Shi, Yijun; Wang, Huaiyuan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2017-07-01

    Hierarchically porous carbon adsorbents were successfully fabricated from different biomass resources (softwood, hardwood, bamboo and cotton) by a facile two-step process, i.e. carbonization in nitrogen and thermal oxidation in air. Without involving any toxic/corrosive chemicals, large surface area of up to 890 m 2 /g was achieved, which is comparable to commercial activated carbon. The porous carbons with various surface area and pore size were used as adsorbents to investigate the pore size dependent adsorption phenomenon. Based on the density functional theory, effective (E-SSA) and ineffective surface area (InE-SSA) was calculated considering the geometry of used probing adsorbate. It was demonstrated that the adsorption capacity strongly depends on E-SSA instead of total surface area. Moreover, a regression model was developed to quantify the adsorption capacities contributed from E-SSA and InE-SSA, respectively. The applicability of this model has been verified by satisfactory prediction results on porous carbons prepared in this work as well as commercial activated carbon. Revealing the pore size dependent adsorption behavior in these biomass derived porous carbon adsorbents will help to design more effective materials (either from biomass or other carbon resources) targeting to specific adsorption applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Zn2+ and Sr2+ Adsorption at the TiO2 (110)-Electrolyte Interface: Influence of Ionic Strength, Coverage, and Anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Sturchio, N.; Bedzyk, M.; Machesky, M.; Anovitz, L.; Wesolowski, D.

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray standing wave technique was used to probe the sensitivity of Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ ion adsorption to changes in both the adsorbed ion coverage and the background electrolyte species and concentrations at the rutile (α-TiO 2 ) (110)-aqueous interface. Measurements were made with various background electrolytes (NaCl, NaTr, RbCl, NaBr) at concentrations as high as 1 m. The results demonstrate that Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ reside primarily in the condensed layer and that the ion heights above the Ti-O surface plane are insensitive to ionic strength and the choice of background electrolyte (with - , coupled with the insensitivity of Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ cation heights to changes in the background electrolyte, implies that anions do not play a significant role in the adsorption of these divalent metal ions to the rutile (110) surface. Absolute ion coverage measurements for Zn 2+ and Sr 2+ show a maximum Stern-layer coverage of ∼0.5 monolayer, with no significant variation in height as a function of Stern-layer coverage. These observations are discussed in the context of Gouy-Chapman-Stern models of the electrical double layer developed from macroscopic sorption and pH-titration studies of rutile powder suspensions. Direct comparison between these experimental observations and the MUltiSIte Complexation (MUSIC) model predictions of cation surface coverage as a function of ionic strength revealed good agreement between measured and predicted surface coverages with no adjustable parameters

  10. Crystal-Size-Dependent Structural Transitions in Nanoporous Crystals: Adsorption-Induced Transitions in ZIF-8

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2014-09-04

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Understanding the crystal-size dependence of both guest adsorption and structural transitions of nanoporous solids is crucial to the development of these materials. We find that nano-sized metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals have significantly different guest adsorption properties compared to the bulk material. A new methodology is developed to simulate the adsorption and transition behavior of entire MOF nanoparticles. Our simulations predict that the transition pressure significantly increases with decreasing particle size, in agreement with crystal-size-dependent experimental measurements of the N2-ZIF-8 system. We also propose a simple core-shell model to examine this effect on length scales that are inaccessible to simulations and again find good agreement with experiments. This study is the first to examine particle size effects on structural transitions in ZIFs and provides a thermodynamic framework for understanding the underlying mechanism.

  11. "Aging Out" of Dependent Coverage and the Effects on US Labor Market and Health Insurance Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, Heather M

    2015-11-01

    I examined how labor market and health insurance outcomes were affected by the loss of dependent coverage eligibility under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). I used National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data and regression discontinuity models to measure the percentage-point change in labor market and health insurance outcomes at age 26 years. My sample was restricted to unmarried individuals aged 24 to 28 years and to a period of time before the ACA's individual mandate (2011-2013). I ran models separately for men and women to determine if there were differences based on gender. Aging out of this provision increased employment among men, employer-sponsored health insurance offers for women, and reports that health insurance coverage was worse than it was 1 year previously (overall and for young women). Uninsured rates did not increase at age 26 years, but there was an increase in the purchase of non-group health coverage, indicating interest in remaining insured after age 26 years. Many young adults will turn to state and federal health insurance marketplaces for information about health coverage. Because young adults (aged 18-29 years) regularly use social media sites, these sites could be used to advertise insurance to individuals reaching their 26th birthdays.

  12. Do more health insurance options lead to higher wages? Evidence from states extending dependent coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillender, Marcus

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about how health insurance affects labor market decisions for young adults. This is despite the fact that expanding coverage for people in their early 20s is an important component of the Affordable Care Act. This paper studies how having an outside source of health insurance affects wages by using variation in health insurance access that comes from states extending dependent coverage to young adults. Using American Community Survey and Census data, I find evidence that extending health insurance to young adults raises their wages. The increases in wages can be explained by increases in human capital and the increased flexibility in the labor market that comes from people no longer having to rely on their own employers for health insurance. The estimates from this paper suggest the Affordable Care Act will lead to wage increases for young adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of race, income, drug abuse and dependence on health insurance coverage among US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nianyang; Xie, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the impact of drug abuse/dependence on health insurance coverage, especially by race groups and income levels. In this study, we examine the disparities in health insurance predictors and investigate the impact of drug use (alcohol abuse/dependence, nicotine dependence, and illicit drug abuse/dependence) on lack of insurance across different race and income groups. To perform the analysis, we used insurance data (8057 uninsured and 28,590 insured individual adults) from the National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH 2011). To analyze the likelihood of being uninsured we performed weighted binomial logistic regression analyses. The results show that the overall prevalence of lacking insurance was 19.6 %. However, race differences in lack of insurance exist, especially for Hispanics who observe the highest probability of being uninsured (38.5 %). Furthermore, we observe that the lowest income level bracket (annual income <$20,000) is associated with the highest likelihood of being uninsured (37.3 %). As the result of this investigation, we observed the following relationship between drug use and lack of insurance: alcohol abuse/dependence and nicotine dependence tend to increase the risk of lack of insurance for African Americans and whites, respectively; illicit drug use increases such risk for whites; alcohol abuse/dependence increases the likelihood of lack of insurance for the group with incomes $20,000-$49,999, whereas nicotine dependence is associated with higher probability of lack of insurance for most income groups. These findings provide some useful insights for policy makers in making decisions regarding unmet health insurance coverage.

  14. 75 FR 27141 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Providing Dependent Coverage of Children to Age...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Providing Dependent Coverage of Children to Age 26 Under... Information and Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are issuing substantially similar interim final regulations with respect to group health plans and health insurance coverage...

  15. Did the dependent coverage expansion increase risky substance use among young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslau, Joshua; Yu, Hao; Han, Bing; Pacula, Rosalie L; Burns, Rachel M; Stein, Bradley D

    2017-09-01

    The dependent coverage expansion (DCE) enacted through the Affordable Care Act increased health insurance coverage among young adults. Increasing insurance coverage in this age group has the potential for unintended consequences on risky substance use. Repeated cross-sectional surveys were used to compare change in substance use during the period the DCE was implemented in the 19-25year old target age group (Pre-DCE n=15,772, Post-DCE n=22,719) with contemporaneous change in a slightly older age group that was not targeted by the policy (Pre-DCE=19,851, Post-DCE n=28,157). Outcomes include 11 measures of alcohol, illicit drug and cigarette use. Statistical controls were included for demographic and socioeconomic factors and for early initiation of substance use to adjust for historical trends in developmental trajectories. Risky substance use decreased in young adults relative to the older age group over the period that the DCE was implemented. However, statistical adjustment for initiation of substance use prior to age 18, which is prior to exposure to the DCE, accounted for the differences between the age groups. In adjusted models, associations between the DCE and substance use outcomes range from 0.96 to 1.08 with p-values ranging from 0.330 to 0.963. Historical trends in initiation of substance use prior to age 18, not the DCE, account for change in risky substance use among 19-25year olds relative to 26-34year olds. The evidence does not support the suggestion that health insurance coverage would increase risky substance use among young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of Young Adults Enrolled Through the Affordable Care Act-Dependent Coverage Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Zhu, Shiyun; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sociodemographic and health care-related characteristics of young adults covered through the Affordable Care Act (ACA)-dependent coverage expansion. Our sample consisted of 36,802 young adults aged 19-25 years from 2011 to 2014 National Health Interview Survey. Sociodemographic differences among young adults with the four insurance types were described: privately insured under parents, privately insured under self/spouse, publicly insured, and uninsured. Multivariable logistic models were fitted to compare those covered under parent with those covered through other traditional insurance types, in terms of the following outcomes: health status, health behaviors, insurance history and experience, access to care, care utilization, and receipt of preventive service, controlling for sociodemographic factors. Young adults who were covered under their parents' insurance were most likely to be college students and non-Hispanic whites. These young adults also had more stable insurance, better access to care, better care utilization patterns, and reported better health status, compared to their peers. The beneficiaries of the ACA-dependent coverage expansion were more likely to be college students from families with high socioeconomic status. Coverage under parents was associated with improved access to care and health outcomes among young adults. The enrollees through the ACA represent the healthiest subgroup of young adults and those with the best care utilization patterns, suggesting that the added cost relative to premium for insurers from this population will likely be minimal. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reducing Young Adults' Health Care Spending through the ACA Expansion of Dependent Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Novak, Priscilla

    2017-10-01

    To estimate health care expenditure trends among young adults ages 19-25 before and after the 2010 implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision that extended eligibility for dependent private health insurance coverage. Nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2008 to 2012. We conducted repeated cross-sectional analyses and employed a difference-in-differences quantile regression model to estimate health care expenditure trends among young adults ages 19-25 (the treatment group) and ages 27-29 (the control group). Our results show that the treatment group had 14 percent lower overall health care expenditures and 21 percent lower out-of-pocket payments compared with the control group in 2011-2012. The overall reduction in health care expenditures among young adults ages 19-25 in years 2011-2012 was more significant at the higher end of the health care expenditure distribution. Young adults ages 19-25 had significantly higher emergency department costs at the 10th percentile in 2011-2012. Differences in the trends of costs of private health insurance and doctor visits are not statistically significant. Increased health insurance enrollment as a consequence of the ACA provision for dependent coverage has successfully reduced spending and catastrophic expenditures, providing financial protections for young adults. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  18. pH-dependence of pesticide adsorption by wheat-residue-derived black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaning; Chun, Yuan; Sheng, Guangyao; Huang, Minsheng

    2004-08-03

    The potential of black carbon as an adsorbent for pesticides in soils may be strongly influenced by the properties of the adsorbent and pesticides and by the environmental conditions. This study evaluated the effect of pH on the adsorption of diuron, bromoxynil, and ametryne by a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) residue derived black carbon (WC) as compared to a commercial activated carbon (AC). The pH drift method indicated that WC had a point of zero charge of 4.2, much lower than that of 7.8 for AC. The density of oxygen-containing surface functional groups, measured by the Boehm titration, on WC was 5.4 times higher than that on AC, resulting in a pesticide adsorption by WC being 30-50% of that by AC, due to the blockage of WC surface by the waters associated with the functional groups. A small decrease (5.5%/unit pH) in diuron adsorption by WC with increase in pH resulted from increased deprotonation of surface functional groups at higher pH values. A much larger decrease (14-21%/unit pH) in bromoxynil adsorption by WC with increase in pH resulted from the deprotonation of both the adsorbate and surface functional groups of the adsorbent. The deprotonation reduced the adsorptive interaction between bromoxynil and the neutral carbon surface and increased the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged WC surface and bromoxynil anions. Deprotonation of ametryne with increase in pH over the low pH range increased its fraction of molecular form and thus adsorption on WC by 15%/unit pH. Further increase in pH resulted in a 20%/unit pH decrease in ametryne adsorption by WC due primarily to the development of a negative charge on the surface of WC. The pH-dependent adsorption of pesticides by black carbon may significantly influence their environmental fate in soils.

  19. Load-dependent surface diffusion model for analyzing the kinetics of protein adsorption onto mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbán, Gregorio; Ramírez-Montoya, Luis A; García, Héctor; Menéndez, J Ángel; Arenillas, Ana; Montes-Morán, Miguel A

    2018-02-01

    The adsorption of cytochrome c in water onto organic and carbon xerogels with narrow pore size distributions has been studied by carrying out transient and equilibrium batch adsorption experiments. It was found that equilibrium adsorption exhibits a quasi-Langmuirian behavior (a g coefficient in the Redlich-Peterson isotherms of over 0.95) involving the formation of a monolayer of cyt c with a depth of ∼4nm on the surface of all xerogels for a packing density of the protein inside the pores of 0.29gcm -3 . A load-dependent surface diffusion model (LDSDM) has been developed and numerically solved to fit the experimental kinetic adsorption curves. The results of the LDSDM show better fittings than the standard homogeneous surface diffusion model. The value of the external mass transfer coefficient obtained by numerical optimization confirms that the process is controlled by the intraparticle surface diffusion of cyt c. The surface diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing protein load down to zero for the maximum possible load. The decrease is steeper in the case of the xerogels with the smallest average pore diameter (∼15nm), the limit at which the zero-load diffusion coefficient of cyt c also begins to be negatively affected by interactions with the opposite wall of the pore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Theoretical investigation of lithium adsorption, diffusion and coverage on MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = O, S, Se, Te) monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersan, F.; Ozaydin, H. D.; Gökoğlu, G.; Aktürk, E.

    2017-12-01

    It is important to improve the high-efficient anode materials for Li batteries, which require the large capacity, high stability and mobility. In this work, we present the adsorption and diffusion properties of lithium atom on MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = O, S, Se, Te) transition metal dichalcogenide structures using first principles calculations within density functional theory. All the MX2 systems considered are semiconductor in bare state with band gaps between 0.93 eV (MoO2) and 1.79 eV (WS2). They turn into metal upon single Li adsorption. Li atom is adsorbed on MoO2 and WO2 rather stronger than other systems. The energy barrier for diffusion of single Li on MX2 varies between 0.15 eV and 0.28 eV which are lower or comparable to that of graphene or silicene. Two Li atoms are preferably adsorbed on MX2 monolayer symmetrically at opposite sides with high adsorption energy. The increasing number of Li atoms does not remarkably affect the adsorption energy per Li atom. This can be attributed to that Li atoms do not accumulate on certain regions of the surface. The systems under investigation provide insights into exploring electronic properties which are rather adequate for possible applications in Li-ion batteries.

  1. Pressure Dependence of the Radial Breathing Mode of Carbon Nanotubes: The Effect of Fluid Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, M. J.; Quirke, N.

    2007-04-01

    The pressure dependence of shifts in the vibrational modes of individual carbon nanotubes is strongly affected by the nature of the pressure transmitting medium as a result of adsorption at the nanotube surface. The adsorbate is treated as an elastic shell which couples with the radial breathing mode (RBM) of the nanotube via van der Waal interactions. Using analytical methods as well as molecular simulation, we observe a low frequency breathing mode for the adsorbed fluid at ˜50cm-1, as well as diameter dependent upshifts in the RBM frequency with pressure, suggesting metallic nanotubes may wet more than semiconducting ones.

  2. Molecular Insights into the pH-Dependent Adsorption and Removal of Ionizable Antibiotic Oxytetracycline by Adsorbent Cyclodextrin Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Cai, Xiyun; Xiong, Weina; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Haitong; Yang, Xianhai; Li, Chao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pH on adsorption and removal efficiency of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) by environmental adsorbents are an area of debate, because of its dual mediation towards adsorbents and adsorbate. Here, we probe the pH-dependent adsorption of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline (comprising OTCH2 +, OTCH±, OTC−, and OTC2−) onto cyclodextrin polymers (CDPs) with the nature of molecular recognition and pH inertness. OTCH± commonly has high adsorption affinity, OTC− exhibits moderate affinity, and the other two species have negligible affinity. These species are evidenced to selectively interact with structural units (e.g., CD cavity, pore channel, and network) of the polymers and thus immobilized onto the adsorbents to different extents. The differences in adsorption affinity and mechanisms of the species account for the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. The mathematical equations are derived from the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of quantitatively relating adsorption affinity of OTC at varying pH to adsorbent properties. A combination of the MLR analysis for OTC and molecular recognition of adsorption of the species illustrates the nature of the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. Based on this finding, γ-HP-CDP is chosen to adsorb and remove OTC at pH 5.0 and 7.0, showing high removal efficiency and strong resistance to the interference of coexisting components. PMID:24465975

  3. Study of neon adsorption on carbon nanocones using molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, R.; Ghafoori Tabrizi, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation to study Ne adsorption on carbon nanocones. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at several temperatures between 22.67 and 49.82 K. Adsorption coverage, isosteric heat, and binding energy were calculated. Adsorption was observed both inside and outside of an individual carbon nanocone. The results indicate that the saturation coverage and saturation pressure depend on temperature. At saturation conditions, the maximum values of interior and exterior coverages are 0.17 and 0.39 neon per carbon, respectively. The results are compared to Ne adsorption on open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes. It is found that adsorption coverages on carbon nanocones are greater than those on carbon nanotubes. The isosteric heat and binding energy of neon adsorption on nanocones indicate that nanocones and nanotubes have highly desirable characteristics as an adsorbent.

  4. Study of neon adsorption on carbon nanocones using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, R. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafoori Tabrizi, K., E-mail: k-tabrizi@sbu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation to study Ne adsorption on carbon nanocones. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at several temperatures between 22.67 and 49.82 K. Adsorption coverage, isosteric heat, and binding energy were calculated. Adsorption was observed both inside and outside of an individual carbon nanocone. The results indicate that the saturation coverage and saturation pressure depend on temperature. At saturation conditions, the maximum values of interior and exterior coverages are 0.17 and 0.39 neon per carbon, respectively. The results are compared to Ne adsorption on open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes. It is found that adsorption coverages on carbon nanocones are greater than those on carbon nanotubes. The isosteric heat and binding energy of neon adsorption on nanocones indicate that nanocones and nanotubes have highly desirable characteristics as an adsorbent.

  5. The Impact of the Affordable Care Act's Dependent Coverage Mandate on Use of Dental Treatments and Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Dan M; Wehby, George L

    2017-09-01

    Oral health problems are the leading chronic conditions among children and younger adults. Lack of dental coverage is thought to be an important barrier to care but little empirical evidence exists on the causal effect of private dental coverage on use of dental services. We explore the relationship between dental coverage and dental services utilization with an analysis of a natural experiment of increasing private dental coverage stemming from the Affordable Care Act's (ACA)-dependent coverage mandate. To evaluate whether increased private dental insurance due to the spillover effect of the ACA-dependent coverage health insurance mandate affected utilization of dental services among a group of affected young adults. 2006-2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. We used a difference-in-difference regression approach comparing changes in dental care utilization for 25-year olds affected by the policy to unaffected 27-year olds. We evaluate effects on dental treatments and preventive services RESULTS:: Compared to 27-year olds, 25-year olds were 8 percentage points more likely to have private dental coverage in the 3 years following the mandate. We do not find compelling evidence that young adults increased their use of preventive dental services in response to gaining insurance. We do find a nearly 5 percentage point increase in the likelihood of dental treatments among 25-year olds following the mandate, an effect that appears concentrated among women. Increases in private dental coverage due to the ACA's-dependent coverage mandate do not appear to be driving significant changes in overall preventive dental services utilization but there is evidence of an increase in restorative care.

  6. Association of the Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Provision With Prenatal Care Use and Birth Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, Jamie R; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2018-02-13

    The effect of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) dependent coverage provision on pregnancy-related health care and health outcomes is unknown. To determine whether the dependent coverage provision was associated with changes in payment for birth, prenatal care, and birth outcomes. Retrospective cohort study, using a differences-in-differences analysis of individual-level birth certificate data comparing live births among US women aged 24 to 25 years (exposure group) and women aged 27 to 28 years (control group) before (2009) and after (2011-2013) enactment of the dependent coverage provision. Results were stratified by marital status. The dependent coverage provision of the ACA, which allowed young adults to stay on their parent's health insurance until age 26 years. Primary outcomes were payment source for birth, early prenatal care (first visit in first trimester), and adequate prenatal care (a first trimester visit and 80% of expected visits). Secondary outcomes were cesarean delivery, premature birth, low birth weight, and infant neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission. The study population included 1 379 005 births among women aged 24-25 years (exposure group; 299 024 in 2009; 1 079 981 in 2011-2013), and 1 551 192 births among women aged 27-28 years (control group; 325 564 in 2009; 1 225 628 in 2011-2013). From 2011-2013, compared with 2009, private insurance payment for births increased in the exposure group (36.9% to 35.9% [difference, -1.0%]) compared with the control group (52.4% to 51.1% [difference, -1.3%]), adjusted difference-in-differences, 1.9 percentage points (95% CI, 1.6 to 2.1). Medicaid payment decreased in the exposure group (51.6% to 53.6% [difference, 2.0%]) compared with the control group (37.4% to 39.4% [difference, 1.9%]), adjusted difference-in-differences, -1.4 percentage points (95% CI, -1.7 to -1.2). Self-payment for births decreased in the exposure group (5.2% to 4.3% [difference, -0.9%]) compared with the

  7. Helium Adsorption on Carbon Nanotube Bundles with Different Diameters:. Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, R.; Karami, A. R.

    2013-05-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation to study helium adsorption capacity of carbon nanotube bundles with different diameters. Homogeneous carbon nanotube bundles of (8,8), (9,9), (10,10), (11,11), and (12,12) single walled carbon nanotubes have been considered. The results indicate that the exohedral adsorption coverage does not depend on the diameter of carbon nanotubes, while the endohedral adsorption coverage is increased by increasing the diameter.

  8. Competitive Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide and Hyaluronate Modified Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren; Postle, Corinne; Anantharaman, Vinod; Meng, Qing Cheng; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    We measured adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) onto six distinct bare and dextran- and hyaluronate-modified silicon surfaces created using two dextran grafting densities and three hyaluronic acid (HA) sodium salts derived from human umbilical cord, rooster comb and streptococcus zooepidemicus. Film thickness and surface morphology depended on HA molecular weight and concentration. BSA coverage was enhanced on surfaces upon competitive adsorption of BSA:Fg mixtures. Dextranization differentially reduced protein adsorption onto surfaces based on oxidation state. Hyaluronization was demonstrated to provide the greatest resistance to protein coverage, equivalent to that of the most resistant dextranized surface. Resistance to protein adsorption was independent of the type of hyaluronic acid utilized. With changing bulk protein concentration from 20 to 40 µg ml−1 for each species, Fg coverage on silicon increased by 4×, whereas both BSA and Fg adsorption on dextran and HA were far less dependent of protein bulk concentration. PMID:21623481

  9. Nanotoxicity of silver nanoparticles to red blood cells: size dependent adsorption, uptake, and hemolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li Qiang; Fang, Li; Ling, Jian; Ding, Cheng Zhi; Kang, Bin; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-03-16

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly being used as antimicrobial agents and drug carriers in biomedical fields. However, toxicological information on their effects on red blood cells (RBCs) and the mechanisms involved remain sparse. In this article, we examined the size dependent nanotoxicity of AgNPs using three different characteristic sizes of 15 nm (AgNPs15), 50 nm (AgNPs50), and 100 nm (AgNPs100) against fish RBCs. Optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations showed that AgNPs exhibited a size effect on their adsorption and uptake by RBCs. The middle sized AgNPs50, compared with the smaller or bigger ones, showed the highest level of adsorption and uptake by the RBCs, suggesting an optimal size of ∼50 nm for passive uptake by RBCs. The toxic effects determined based on the hemolysis, membrane injury, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant enzyme production were fairly size and dose dependent. In particular, the smallest sized AgNPs15 displayed a greater ability to induce hemolysis and membrane damage than AgNPs50 and AgNPs100. Such cytotoxicity induced by AgNPs should be attributed to the direct interaction of the nanoparticle with the RBCs, resulting in the production of oxidative stress, membrane injury, and subsequently hemolysis. Overall, the results suggest that particle size is a critical factor influencing the interaction between AgNPs and the RBCs.

  10. A coverage and slicing dependencies analysis for seeking software security defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Zhang, Dongyan; Liu, Min; Zhang, Weizhe; Gao, Dongmin

    2014-01-01

    Software security defects have a serious impact on the software quality and reliability. It is a major hidden danger for the operation of a system that a software system has some security flaws. When the scale of the software increases, its vulnerability has becoming much more difficult to find out. Once these vulnerabilities are exploited, it may lead to great loss. In this situation, the concept of Software Assurance is carried out by some experts. And the automated fault localization technique is a part of the research of Software Assurance. Currently, automated fault localization method includes coverage based fault localization (CBFL) and program slicing. Both of the methods have their own location advantages and defects. In this paper, we have put forward a new method, named Reverse Data Dependence Analysis Model, which integrates the two methods by analyzing the program structure. On this basis, we finally proposed a new automated fault localization method. This method not only is automation lossless but also changes the basic location unit into single sentence, which makes the location effect more accurate. Through several experiments, we proved that our method is more effective. Furthermore, we analyzed the effectiveness among these existing methods and different faults.

  11. Adsorption kinetics and dynamics of small organic molecules on a silica wafer: Butane, pentane, nonane, thiophene, and methanol adsorption on SiO2/Si(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, S.; Goering, J.; Burghaus, U.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics (by thermal desorption spectroscopy) and adsorption dynamics (by molecular beam scattering) have been determined for a number of alkanes, methanol, thiophene, and water on a silica wafer-SiO 2 /Si(1 1 1). No indications for bond activation were present, i.e., all probe molecules adsorb molecularly obeying 1st order kinetics. The coverage-dependent heat of adsorption has been determined accordingly. The adsorption dynamics are precursor-mediated with Kisliuk-like shapes of the adsorption probabilities at low impact energies and adsorbate-assisted adsorption at large impact energies

  12. Position-Dependent Dynamics Explain Pore-Averaged Diffusion in Strongly Attractive Adsorptive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekelberg, William P; Siderius, Daniel W; Shen, Vincent K; Truskett, Thomas M; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2017-12-12

    Using molecular simulations, we investigate the relationship between the pore-averaged and position-dependent self-diffusivity of a fluid adsorbed in a strongly attractive pore as a function of loading. Previous work (Krekelberg, W. P.; Siderius, D. W.; Shen, V. K.; Truskett, T. M.; Errington, J. R. Connection between thermodynamics and dynamics of simple fluids in highly attractive pores. Langmuir 2013, 29, 14527-14535, doi: 10.1021/la4037327) established that pore-averaged self-diffusivity in the multilayer adsorption regime, where the fluid exhibits a dense film at the pore surface and a lower density interior pore region, is nearly constant as a function of loading. Here we show that this puzzling behavior can be understood in terms of how loading affects the fraction of particles that reside in the film and interior pore regions as well as their distinct dynamics. Specifically, the insensitivity of pore-averaged diffusivity to loading arises from the approximate cancellation of two factors: an increase in the fraction of particles in the higher diffusivity interior pore region with loading and a corresponding decrease in the particle diffusivity in that region. We also find that the position-dependent self-diffusivities scale with the position-dependent density. We present a model for predicting the pore-average self-diffusivity based on the position-dependent self-diffusivity, which captures the unusual characteristics of pore-averaged self-diffusivity in strongly attractive pores over several orders of magnitude.

  13. Molar volume and adsorption isotherm dependence of capillary forces in nanoasperity contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, David B; Kim, Seong H

    2007-11-20

    The magnitude of the capillary force at any given temperature and adsorbate partial pressure depends primarily on four factors: the surface tension of the adsorbate, its liquid molar volume, its isothermal behavior, and the contact geometry. At large contacting radii, the adsorbate surface tension and the contact geometry are dominating. This is the case of surface force apparatus measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments with micrometer-size spheres. However, as the size of contacting asperities decreases to the nanoscale as in AFM experiments with sharp tips, the molar volume and isotherm of the adsorbate become very important to capillary formation as well as capillary adhesion. This effect is experimentally and theoretically explored with simple alcohol molecules (ethanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol) which have comparable surface tensions but differing liquid molar volumes. Adsorption isotherms for these alcohols on silicon oxide are also reported.

  14. “Aging Out” of Dependent Coverage and the Effects on US Labor Market and Health Insurance Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. I examined how labor market and health insurance outcomes were affected by the loss of dependent coverage eligibility under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Methods. I used National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data and regression discontinuity models to measure the percentage-point change in labor market and health insurance outcomes at age 26 years. My sample was restricted to unmarried individuals aged 24 to 28 years and to a period of time before the ACA’s individual mandate (2011–2013). I ran models separately for men and women to determine if there were differences based on gender. Results. Aging out of this provision increased employment among men, employer-sponsored health insurance offers for women, and reports that health insurance coverage was worse than it was 1 year previously (overall and for young women). Uninsured rates did not increase at age 26 years, but there was an increase in the purchase of non–group health coverage, indicating interest in remaining insured after age 26 years. Conclusions. Many young adults will turn to state and federal health insurance marketplaces for information about health coverage. Because young adults (aged 18–29 years) regularly use social media sites, these sites could be used to advertise insurance to individuals reaching their 26th birthdays. PMID:26447916

  15. Coverage dependent desorption dynamics of deuterium on Si(100) surfaces: interpretation with a diffusion-promoted desorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, T; Niida, T; Tsurumaki, H; Namiki, A

    2005-01-08

    We studied coverage dependence of time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of D2 molecules thermally desorbed from the D/Si(100) surface. The mean translational energies Et of desorbed D2 molecules were found to increase from 0.20+/-0.05 eV to 0.40+/-0.04 eV as the desorption coverage window was decreased from 1.0 ML> or =thetaD> or =0.9 ML to 0.2 ML> or =thetaD> or =0 ML, being consistent with the kinetics switch predicted in the interdimer mechanism. The measured TOF spectra were deconvoluted into 2H, 3H, and 4H components by a curve fitting method along the principle of detailed balance. As a result, it turned out that the desorption kinetics changes from the 4H to the 3H situation at high coverage above thetaD=0.9 ML, while the 2H desorption is dominant for a quite wide coverage region up to thetaD=0.8 ML. A dynamic desorption mechanism by which the desorption is promoted by D-atom diffusion to dangling bonds was proposed. 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Thermodynamics of the adsorption of organic cations on kaolinite : temperature dependence and calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrian Isfahany, T.

    1992-01-01

    The present work is aimed at understanding the interactions involved in the adsorption of cationic surfactants on heterogeneous surfaces. The relevance of the study derives from the environmental aspects of the adsorption of small organic molecules onto soil constituents. This thesis

  17. Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-26

    The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

  18. Improving the Yule-Nielsen modified Neugebauer model by dot surface coverages depending on the ink superposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersch, Roger David; Crete, Frederique

    2005-01-01

    Dot gain is different when dots are printed alone, printed in superposition with one ink or printed in superposition with two inks. In addition, the dot gain may also differ depending on which solid ink the considered halftone layer is superposed. In a previous research project, we developed a model for computing the effective surface coverage of a dot according to its superposition conditions. In the present contribution, we improve the Yule-Nielsen modified Neugebauer model by integrating into it our effective dot surface coverage computation model. Calibration of the reproduction curves mapping nominal to effective surface coverages in every superposition condition is carried out by fitting effective dot surfaces which minimize the sum of square differences between the measured reflection density spectra and reflection density spectra predicted according to the Yule-Nielsen modified Neugebauer model. In order to predict the reflection spectrum of a patch, its known nominal surface coverage values are converted into effective coverage values by weighting the contributions from different reproduction curves according to the weights of the contributing superposition conditions. We analyze the colorimetric prediction improvement brought by our extended dot surface coverage model for clustered-dot offset prints, thermal transfer prints and ink-jet prints. The color differences induced by the differences between measured reflection spectra and reflection spectra predicted according to the new dot surface estimation model are quantified on 729 different cyan, magenta, yellow patches covering the full color gamut. As a reference, these differences are also computed for the classical Yule-Nielsen modified spectral Neugebauer model incorporating a single halftone reproduction curve for each ink. Taking into account dot surface coverages according to different superposition conditions considerably improves the predictions of the Yule-Nielsen modified Neugebauer model. In

  19. Temperature Dependence of Uranium and Vanadium Adsorption on Amidoxime-Based Adsorbents in Natural Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Li-Jung [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Gill, Gary A. [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Rao, Linfeng [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Pan, Horng-Bin [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow ID 83844 USA; Wai, Chien M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow ID 83844 USA; Janke, Christopher J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Strivens, Jonathan E. [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Wood, Jordana R. [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; Schlafer, Nicholas [Marine Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sequim WA 98382 USA; D' Alessandro, Evan K. [Rosensteil School of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, University of Miami, Miami FL 33149 USA

    2018-01-16

    The apparent enthalpy and entropy of the complexation of uranium (VI) and vanadium (V) with amidoxime ligands grafted onto polyethylene fiber was determined using time series measurements of adsorption capacities in natural seawater at three different temperatures. The complexation of uranium was highly endothermic, while the complexation of vanadium showed minimal temperature sensitivity. Amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents exhibit significantly increased uranium adsorption capacities and selectivity in warmer waters.

  20. Conductance of Sidewall-Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes: Universal Dependence on Adsorption Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Lastra, J.M.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Strange, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    We use density functional theory to study the effect of molecular adsorbates on the conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes (CNT). The five molecules considered (NO2, NH2, H, COOH, OH) lead to very similar scattering of the electrons. The adsorption of a single molecule suppresses one of the two...

  1. Dependence of adsorption quality of carbon in NPP air cleaning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujisic, Lj.

    1994-01-01

    A relationship which describes the influence of aging, relative humidity and organic poisons on the adsorption quality of coconut charcoal has been established. The relationship is rearranged for easy calculation of the reliable operation time of the adsorbent media in charcoal filters of any single nuclear air-cleaning system during accidental and incidental situation of NPP (author)

  2. Adsorption of human serum albumin: Dependence on molecular architecture of the oppositely charged surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.; Granick, Steve

    1999-05-01

    We contrast the adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) onto two solid substrates previously primed with the same polyelectrolyte of net opposite charge to form one of two alternative structures: randomly adsorbed polymer and the "brush" configuration. These structures were formed either by the adsorption of quaternized poly-4-vinylpyridine (QPVP) or by end-grafting QPVP chains of the same chemical makeup and the same molecular weight to surfaces onto which QPVP segments did not adsorb. The adsorption of HSA was quantified by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR). The two substrates showed striking differences with regard to HSA adsorption. First, the brush substrate induced lesser perturbations in the secondary structure of the adsorbed HSA, reflecting easier conformational adjustment for longer free segments of polyelectrolyte upon binding with the protein. Second, the penetration of HSA into the brush substrate was kinetically retarded relative to the randomly adsorbed polymer, probably due to both pore size restriction and electrostatic sticking between charged groups of HSA and QPVP molecules. Third, release of HSA from the adsorbed layer, as the ionic strength was increased from a low level up to the high level of 1 M NaCl, was largely inhibited for the brush substrate, but occurred easily and rapidly for the substrate with statistically adsorbed QPVP chains. Finally, even after addition of a strong polymeric adsorption competitor (sodium polystyrene sulfonate), HSA remained trapped within a brush substrate though it desorbed slowly from the preadsorbed QPVP layer. This method to produce irreversible trapping of the protein within a brush substrate without major conformational change may find application in biosensor design.

  3. Time dependent wettability of graphite upon ambient exposure: The role of water adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadei, Carlo A.; Lai, Chia-Yun; Heskes, Daan; Chiesa, Matteo

    2014-08-01

    We report the temporal evolution of the wettability of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) exposed to environmental conditions. Macroscopic wettability is investigated by static and dynamic contact angles (SCA and DCA) obtaining values comparable to the ones presented in the literature. SCA increases from ˜68° to ˜90° during the first hour of exposure after cleaving, whereas DCA is characterized by longer-scale (24 h) time evolution. We interpret these results in light of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which indicates that the evolution of the HOPG wettability is due to adsorption of molecules from the surrounding atmosphere. This hypothesis is further confirmed by nanoscopic observations obtained by atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy, which monitor the evolution of surface properties with a spatial resolution superior to macroscopic experiments. Moreover, we observe that the results of macro- and nanoscale measurements evolve in similar fashion with time and we propose a quantitative correlation between SCA and AFM measurements. Our results suggest that the cause of the transition in the wettability of HOPG is due to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contaminations and water molecules from the environment. This is corroborated by annealing the HOPG is vacuum conditions at 150°, allowing the desorption of molecules on the surface, and thus re-establishing the initial macro and nano surface properties. Our findings can be used in the interpretation of the wettability of more complicated systems derived from HOPG (i.e., graphene).

  4. Time dependent wettability of graphite upon ambient exposure: The role of water adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadei, Carlo A.; Lai, Chia-Yun; Heskes, Daan; Chiesa, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We report the temporal evolution of the wettability of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) exposed to environmental conditions. Macroscopic wettability is investigated by static and dynamic contact angles (SCA and DCA) obtaining values comparable to the ones presented in the literature. SCA increases from ∼68° to ∼90° during the first hour of exposure after cleaving, whereas DCA is characterized by longer-scale (24 h) time evolution. We interpret these results in light of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which indicates that the evolution of the HOPG wettability is due to adsorption of molecules from the surrounding atmosphere. This hypothesis is further confirmed by nanoscopic observations obtained by atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy, which monitor the evolution of surface properties with a spatial resolution superior to macroscopic experiments. Moreover, we observe that the results of macro- and nanoscale measurements evolve in similar fashion with time and we propose a quantitative correlation between SCA and AFM measurements. Our results suggest that the cause of the transition in the wettability of HOPG is due to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contaminations and water molecules from the environment. This is corroborated by annealing the HOPG is vacuum conditions at 150°, allowing the desorption of molecules on the surface, and thus re-establishing the initial macro and nano surface properties. Our findings can be used in the interpretation of the wettability of more complicated systems derived from HOPG (i.e., graphene)

  5. Metal-phthalocyanine ordered layers on Au(110): Metal-dependent adsorption energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimi, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.massimi@uniroma1.it; Angelucci, Marco; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Betti, Maria Grazia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma La “Sapienza,” 00185 Roma (Italy); Montoro, Silvia [IFIS Litoral, CONICET-UNL, Laboratorio de Fisica de Superficies e Interfaces, Güemes 3450, Santa Fe (Argentina); Mariani, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.mariani@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, CNISM, Università di Roma La “Sapienza,” 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-28

    Iron-phthalocyanine and cobalt-phthalocyanine chains, assembled along the Au(110)-(1×2) reconstructed channels, present a strong interaction with the Au metallic states, via the central metal ion. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy from the metal-2p core-levels and valence band high-resolution ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy bring to light signatures of the interaction of the metal-phthalocyanine single-layer with gold. The charge transfer from Au to the molecule causes the emerging of a metal-2p core level component at lower binding energy with respect to that measured in the molecular thin films, while the core-levels associated to the organic macrocycle (C and N 1s) are less influenced by the adsorption, and the macrocycles stabilize the interaction, inducing a strong interface dipole. Temperature Programmed Desorption experiments and photoemission as a function of temperature allow to estimate the adsorption energy for the thin-films, mainly due to the molecule-molecule van der Waals interaction, while the FePc and CoPc single-layers remain adsorbed on the Au surface up to at least 820 K.

  6. Time dependent wettability of graphite upon ambient exposure: The role of water adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadei, Carlo A.; Lai, Chia-Yun; Heskes, Daan; Chiesa, Matteo, E-mail: mchiesa@masdar.ac.ae [Laboratory for Energy and NanoScience (LENS), Institute Center for Future Energy (iFES), Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-08-28

    We report the temporal evolution of the wettability of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) exposed to environmental conditions. Macroscopic wettability is investigated by static and dynamic contact angles (SCA and DCA) obtaining values comparable to the ones presented in the literature. SCA increases from ∼68° to ∼90° during the first hour of exposure after cleaving, whereas DCA is characterized by longer-scale (24 h) time evolution. We interpret these results in light of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which indicates that the evolution of the HOPG wettability is due to adsorption of molecules from the surrounding atmosphere. This hypothesis is further confirmed by nanoscopic observations obtained by atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy, which monitor the evolution of surface properties with a spatial resolution superior to macroscopic experiments. Moreover, we observe that the results of macro- and nanoscale measurements evolve in similar fashion with time and we propose a quantitative correlation between SCA and AFM measurements. Our results suggest that the cause of the transition in the wettability of HOPG is due to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contaminations and water molecules from the environment. This is corroborated by annealing the HOPG is vacuum conditions at 150°, allowing the desorption of molecules on the surface, and thus re-establishing the initial macro and nano surface properties. Our findings can be used in the interpretation of the wettability of more complicated systems derived from HOPG (i.e., graphene)

  7. Curvature dependence of single-walled carbon nanotubes for SO2 adsorption and oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqiu; Yin, Shi; Li, Yueli; Cen, Wanglai; Li, Jianjun; Yin, Huaqiang

    2017-05-01

    Porous carbon-based catalysts showing high catalytic activity for SO2 oxidation to SO3 is often used in flue gas desulfurization. Their catalytic activity has been ascribed in many publications to the microporous structure and the effect of its spatial confinement. First principles method was used to investigate the adsorption and oxidation of SO2 on the inner and outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameters. It is interesting to found that there is a direct correlation: the barrier for the oxidation O_SWCNT + SO2 → SO3 + SWCNT monotonically decreases with the increase of SWCNTs' curvature. The oxygen functional located at the inner wall of SWCNTs with small radius is of higher activity for SO2 oxidation, which is extra enhanced by the spatial confinement effects of SWCNTs. These findings can be useful for the development of carbon-based catalysts and provide clues for the optimization and design of porous carbon catalysts.

  8. Nurse practitioner coverage is associated with a decrease in length of stay in a pediatric chronic ventilator dependent unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Courtney M; Cristea, A Ioana; Hamilton, Jennifer C; Taylor, Nicole M; Nitu, Mara E; Ackerman, Veda L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To hypothesize a dedicated critical care nurse practitioner (NP) is associated with a decreased length of stay (LOS) from a pediatric chronic ventilator dependent unit (PCVDU). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients requiring care in the PCVDU from May 2001 through May 2011 comparing the 5 years prior to the 5 years post implementation of the critical care NP in 2005. LOS and room charges were obtained. RESULTS: The average LOS decreased from a median of 55 d [interquartile range (IQR): 9.8-108.3] to a median of 12 (IQR: 4.0-41.0) with the implementation of a dedicated critical care NP (P < 1.0001). Post implementation of a dedicated NP, a savings of 25738049 in room charges was noted over 5 years. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrates a critical care NP coverage model in a PCVDU is associated with a significantly reduced LOS demonstrating that the NP is an efficient and likely cost-effective addition to a medically comprehensive service. PMID:27170929

  9. Dependencies of the speed of adsorption {sup 60}Co(II) from the time on the bentonite from a deposit Jelsovy potok; Zavislosti rychlosti adsorpcie {sup 60}Co(II) od casu na bentonite z lozska Jelsovy potok

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heglasova, K [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra jadrovej chemie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    Adsorption of cobalt on selected sorbents was studied by radioindicator method in a batch experimental arrangement. Distribution coefficients and adsorption percentage were determined for bentonite - cobalt system as a function of time mixing. For adsorption study there were selected bentonite from the alder creek area. Their main advantages are rapid ion exchange and low permeability. They are also considered as the most promising candidates in multi barrier system in repositories of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Cobalt solution at two concentrations was stirred from 15 min to 24 h. The experiment results showed that the adsorption is a time dependent process. Rapid adsorption of cobalt in the beginning and later very slow adsorption indicates two adsorption mechanisms, which are ion exchange and adsorption followed by a slow penetration of cobalt into the crystal grid of montmorillonite, the main component of bentonite. The time to reach the adsorption equilibrium was 4 hours. (authors)

  10. Doping as a means to probe the potential dependence of dopamine adsorption on carbon-based surfaces: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarva, Anja; Laurila, Tomi; Caro, Miguel A.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study the adsorption characteristics of dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA), and dopaminequinone (DAox) on carbonaceous electrodes. Our goal is to obtain a better understanding of the adsorption behavior of these analytes in order to promote the development of new carbon-based electrode materials for sensitive and selective detection of dopamine in vivo. Here we employ density functional theory-based simulations to reach a level of detail that cannot be achieved experimentally. To get a broader understanding of carbonaceous surfaces with different morphological characteristics, we compare three materials: graphene, diamond, and amorphous carbon (a-C). Effects of solvation on adsorption characteristics are taken into account via a continuum solvent model. Potential changes that take place during electrochemical measurements, such as cyclic voltammetry, can also alter the adsorption behavior. In this study, we have utilized doping as an indirect method to simulate these changes by shifting the work function of the electrode material. We demonstrate that sp2- and sp3-rich materials, as well as a-C, respond markedly different to doping. Also the adsorption behavior of the molecules studied here differs depending on the surface material and the change in the surface potential. In all cases, adsorption is spontaneous, but covalent bonding is not detected in vacuum. The aqueous medium has a large effect on the adsorption behavior of DAox, which reaches its highest adsorption energy on diamond when the potential is shifted to more negative values. In all cases, inclusion of the solvent enhances the charge transfer between the slab and DAox. Largest differences in adsorption energy between DA and AA are obtained on graphene. Gaining better understanding of the behavior of the different forms of carbon when used as electrode materials provides a means to rationalize the observed complex phenomena taking place at the electrodes during electrochemical oxidation

  11. Theoretical study of heavy metal Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) adsorption on the kaolinite(0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jian, E-mail: zhaojian0209@aliyun.com [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, PO Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); State Key Laboratory of Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); He, Man-Chao [State Key Laboratory of Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • We investigated the adsorption of Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) on kaolinite(0 0 1) surface. • The adsorption capabilities of the kaolinite for HM atoms were Ni > Cu > Cd > Hg(II). • The adsorption energy increases with the coverage for Cd, Cu, and Hg(II) atoms. • The adsorption energy decreases with the coverage for Ni(II) atoms. - Abstract: Heavy metal pollution is currently of great concern because it has been recognized as a potential threat to air, water, and soil. Adsorption was one of the most popular methods for the removal of heavy metal. The adsorption of heavy metal Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) atoms on the hydroxylated (0 0 1) surface of kaolinite was investigated using density-functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a supercell approach. The coverage dependence of the adsorption structures and energetics were systematically studied for a wide range of coverage Θ [from 0.11 to 1.0 monolayers (ML)] and adsorption sites. The most stable among all possible adsorption sites for Cd(II) atom was the two-fold bridge site followed by the one-fold top site, and the top site was the most favorite adsorption site for Cu and Ni(II) atoms, while the three-fold hollow site was the most stable adsorption site for Hg(II) atom followed by the two-fold bridge site. The adsorption energy increases with the coverage for Cd, Cu, and Hg(II) atoms, thus indicating the higher stability of surface adsorption and a tendency to the formation of adsorbate islands (clusters) with increasing the coverage. However, the adsorption energy of Ni(II) atoms decreases when increasing the coverage. The adsorption capabilities of the kaolinite clay for the heavy metal atoms were in the order of Ni > Cu > Cd > Hg(II). The other properties of the Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II)/kaolinite(0 0 1) system including the different charge distribution, the lattice relaxation, and the electronic density of states were also studied and discussed in detail.

  12. Theoretical study of heavy metal Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) adsorption on the kaolinite(0 0 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jian; He, Man-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated the adsorption of Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) on kaolinite(0 0 1) surface. • The adsorption capabilities of the kaolinite for HM atoms were Ni > Cu > Cd > Hg(II). • The adsorption energy increases with the coverage for Cd, Cu, and Hg(II) atoms. • The adsorption energy decreases with the coverage for Ni(II) atoms. - Abstract: Heavy metal pollution is currently of great concern because it has been recognized as a potential threat to air, water, and soil. Adsorption was one of the most popular methods for the removal of heavy metal. The adsorption of heavy metal Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) atoms on the hydroxylated (0 0 1) surface of kaolinite was investigated using density-functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a supercell approach. The coverage dependence of the adsorption structures and energetics were systematically studied for a wide range of coverage Θ [from 0.11 to 1.0 monolayers (ML)] and adsorption sites. The most stable among all possible adsorption sites for Cd(II) atom was the two-fold bridge site followed by the one-fold top site, and the top site was the most favorite adsorption site for Cu and Ni(II) atoms, while the three-fold hollow site was the most stable adsorption site for Hg(II) atom followed by the two-fold bridge site. The adsorption energy increases with the coverage for Cd, Cu, and Hg(II) atoms, thus indicating the higher stability of surface adsorption and a tendency to the formation of adsorbate islands (clusters) with increasing the coverage. However, the adsorption energy of Ni(II) atoms decreases when increasing the coverage. The adsorption capabilities of the kaolinite clay for the heavy metal atoms were in the order of Ni > Cu > Cd > Hg(II). The other properties of the Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II)/kaolinite(0 0 1) system including the different charge distribution, the lattice relaxation, and the electronic density of states were also studied and discussed in detail

  13. Intra-aneurysmal flow disruption after implantation of the Medina® Embolization Device depends on aneurysm neck coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Andreas Maximilian; Nawka, Marie Teresa; Ernst, Marielle; Frischmuth, Isabell; Fiehler, Jens; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Flow disruption achieved by braided intrasaccular implants is a novel treatment strategy for cerebrovascular aneurysms. We hypothesized that the degree of intra-aneurysmal flow disruption can be quantified in vitro and is influenced by device position across the aneurysm neck. We tested this hypothesis using the Medina® Embolization Device (MED). Ten different patient-specific elastic vascular models were manufactured. Models were connected to a pulsatile flow circuit, filled with a blood-mimicking fluid and treated by two operators using a single MED. Intra-aneurysmal flow velocity was measured using conventional and high-frequency digital subtraction angiography (HF-DSA) before and after each deployment. Aneurysm neck coverage by the implanted devices was assessed with flat detector computed tomography on a three-point Likert scale. A total of 80 individual MED deployments were performed by the two operators. The mean intra-aneurysmal flow velocity reduction after MED implantation was 33.6% (27.5-39.7%). No significant differences in neck coverage (p = 0.99) or flow disruption (p = 0.84) were observed between operators. The degree of flow disruption significantly correlated with neck coverage (ρ = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21-0.59, p = 0.002) as well as with neck area (ρ = -0,35, 95% CI: -0.54 --0.13, p = 0.024). On multiple regression analysis, both neck coverage and total neck area were independent predictors of flow disruption. The degree of intra-aneurysmal flow disruption after MED implantation can be quantified in vitro and varies considerably between different aneurysms and different device configurations. Optimal device coverage across the aneurysm neck improves flow disruption and may thus contribute to aneurysm occlusion.

  14. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS study of adsorption of long-chain surfactants on mechanically milled iron powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syugaev, A.V., E-mail: syual@mail.ru; Maratkanova, A.N.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Plate-like particles modified with surfactant molecules were obtained under high-energy ball milling. • Adsorption layers were studied with polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectroscopy. • For the first time, arrangement of surfactants molecules on the powdered metal surface has been determined. • Tails of surfactant molecules (C-F/C-H) are shown to be oriented perpendicular to the particle surface. • Arrangement of carboxylate groups on the particle surfaces is discussed. - Abstract: In this work we have demonstrated the possibility of using the polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectra to study the structure of organic layers at the surface of powdered materials with plate-like shaped particles. The polarization dependence of the NEXAFS spectra may be easily obtained by just changing the angle between the X-ray beam direction and the substrate onto which the powder particles are set. For the first time, we have carried out a detailed study of the surfactant layers (n-perfluorononanoic and stearic acid), which are formed at the surface of iron plate-like particles under mechanical milling of iron powder with an addition of corresponding surfactants. The surfactant molecules are predominantly oriented perpendicular to the surface of the mechanically milled particles. Such orientation is similar to the arrangement of the molecules in the layers formed under equilibrium conditions, e.g. deposition from solutions. The changes in the chemical environment occurring in the molecule tails (defluorination or dehydrogenation) under mechanochemical treatment, do not result in a significant change in the molecular orientation and disordering of the adsorbed layer.

  15. Effects of basic nitrogen poisoning on adsorption of hydrogen on a hydrotreatment catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entz, R.W.; Seapan, M.

    1985-01-01

    Activity of a hydrotreatment catalyst depends on the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the catalyst. In this work, the adsorption of hydrogen on a Ni-Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst (shell 324) has been studied using a TGA at 1 atm pressure and 200-400 0 C temperature. Hydrogen adsorption on a calcined catalyst was shown to be of activated type with a sudden increase in hydrogen adsorption around 350 0 C. When the catalyst is extracted with Tetrahydrofuran (THF), the hydrogen adsorption increases gradually as the temperature is increased, approaching a monolayer coverage of the catalyst surface. It is shown that solvent extraction of catalyst changes its hydrogen adsorption characteristics significantly. Indeed, at 400 0 C, an extracted catalyst adsorbs about four times more hydrogen than an unextracted catalyst. Adsorption of basic nitrogen compounds on the catalyst interferes with the hydrogen adsorption. The adsorption of pyridine, piperidine, n-pentylamine, and ammonia were studied at 400 0 C. It is shown that the strength of adsorption of piperidine and n-pentylamine are relatively similar, however their adsorption strength is higher than pyridine. Ammonia is the weakest adsorbing compound studied. These observations are in agreement with other studies

  16. First-principles study of the adsorption of methanol at the α-Al2O3(0001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borck, Oeyvind; Schroeder, Elsebeth

    2006-01-01

    We present density functional theory calculations of methanol molecular adsorption at the (0001) surface of α-Al 2 O 3 , for methanol coverages of 1/4 to 1 monolayer (ML). Adsorption energies, adsorption-induced restructuring of the surface, and induced changes to the electronic structure are calculated. We find that methanol bonds with its O atom to Al atoms at the α-Al 2 O 3 (0001) surface with an adsorption energy of 1.23 eV at coverage 1/4 ML, decreasing with coverage to 1.03 eV at 1 ML coverage. From calculations of the relaxed adsorption geometry and the angular dependence of the total energy, we predict an orientation of the adsorbed methanol molecule that has the molecular COH plane tilted away from the surface normal. The adsorption of methanol significantly restructures α-Al 2 O 3 (0001), especially for the outermost Al layer. Upon adsorption a small charge transfer from the molecule to the substrate takes place

  17. Exploring the critical dependence of adsorption of various dyes on the degradation rate using Ln3+-TiO2 surface under UV/solar light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devi, L. Gomathi; Kumar, S. Girish

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The surface reactive acidic sites enhances on doping with rare earth ions which facilitates efficient adsorption of the dye molecules on the catalyst surface. In addition, the nature of the dopant, its concentration and electronic configuration additionally contributes to the overall efficiency. Highlights: ► The degradation of structurally different anionic dyes under different pH conditions is reported. ► Pre adsorption of pollutant on catalyst surface is vital for efficient photocatalysis. ► Adsorption of dye on the catalyst surface depends on the substituent's attached to it. ► The dopant with half filled electronic configuration served as shallow traps for charge carriers. - Abstract: The degradation of structurally different anionic dyes like Alizarin Red S (ARS) Amaranth (AR), Brilliant Yellow (BY), Congo Red (CR), Fast Red (FR), Methyl Orange (MO), and Methyl Red (MR) were carried out using Ln 3+ (Ln 3+ = La 3+ , Ce 3+ and Gd 3+ ) doped TiO 2 at different pH conditions under UV/solar light. All the anionic dyes underwent rapid degradation at acidic pH, while resisted at alkaline conditions due to the adsorptive tendency of these dyes on the catalyst surface at different pH conditions. Gd 3+ (0.15 mol%)-TiO 2 exhibited better activity compared to other photocatalyst ascribed to half filled electronic configuration of Gd 3+ ions. It is proposed that Ln 3+ serves only as charge carrier traps under UV light, while it also act as visible light sensitizers under solar light. Irrespective of the catalyst and excitation source, the dye degradation followed the order: AR > FR > MO > MR > ARS > BY > CR. The results suggest that pre-adsorption of the pollutant is vital for efficient photocatalysis which is dependent on the nature of the substituent's group attached to the dye molecule.

  18. Adsorption of the compounds encountered in monosaccharide dehydration in zeolite beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Marta; Swift, T Dallas; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-06-04

    A comprehensive study of the adsorption of the compounds involved in the reaction of dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) on the zeolite H-BEA with SiO2/Al2O3 = 18 has been carried out. Furthermore, a method for the estimation of the real adsorption loading from the experimentally measured excess adsorption is developed and applied to calculate the adsorption isotherms both in the case of single-solute and multisolute mixtures. It was found that zeolite H-BEA adsorbs HMF and levulinic acid from water mixtures to greater extent than sugars and formic acid, which prefer to partition in the aqueous phase. HMF and levulinic acid adsorption isotherms could be fitted in a Redlich-Peterson isotherm model, while the adsorption of formic acid is better fitted using the Freundlich model and sugars via the Henry model. Adsorption loadings decreased with increasing temperature (0, 25, and 40 °C), which is characteristic of an exothermic process. From the temperature dependence of the isotherms, the limiting heat of adsorption at zero coverage was determined using van't Hoff equation. Given the importance and the complexity of multicomponent systems, several experiments of adsorption of multisolute solutions have been carried out. In most of the cases, the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) has been proven to satisfactorily predict adsorption from multisolute mixtures using as input the single-solute isotherms.

  19. Adsorption of amylase enzyme on ultrafiltration membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    A method to measure the static adsorption on membrane surfaces has been developed and described. The static adsorption of an amylase-F has been measured on two different ultrafiltration membranes, both with a cut-off value of 10 kDa (a PES membrane and the ETNA10PP membrane, which is a surface......-modified PVDF membrane). The adsorption follows the Langmuir adsorption theory. Thus, the static adsorption consists of monolayer coverage. The static adsorption is expressed both as a permeability drop and an adsorption resistance. From the adsorption isotherms the maximum static permeability drops...... and the maximum static adsorption resistances are determined. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophobic PES membrane is 75 % and the maximum static adsorption resistance is 0.014 m2hbar/L. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophilic surface-modified PVDF membrane (ETNA10PP) is 23...

  20. Contributions of depth filter components to protein adsorption in bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Ohnmar; Singh, Nripen; Traylor, Steven J; Xu, Xuankuo; Ghose, Sanchayita; Li, Zheng J; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2018-04-16

    Depth filtration is widely used in downstream bioprocessing to remove particulate contaminants via depth straining and is therefore applied to harvest clarification and other processing steps. However, depth filtration also removes proteins via adsorption, which can contribute variously to impurity clearance and to reduction in product yield. The adsorption may occur on the different components of the depth filter, that is, filter aid, binder, and cellulose filter. We measured adsorption of several model proteins and therapeutic proteins onto filter aids, cellulose, and commercial depth filters at pH 5-8 and ionic strengths filter component in the adsorption of proteins with different net charges, using confocal microscopy. Our findings show that a complete depth filter's maximum adsorptive capacity for proteins can be estimated by its protein monolayer coverage values, which are of order mg/m 2 , depending on the protein size. Furthermore, the extent of adsorption of different proteins appears to depend on the nature of the resin binder and its extent of coating over the depth filter surface, particularly in masking the cation-exchanger-like capacity of the siliceous filter aids. In addition to guiding improved depth filter selection, the findings can be leveraged in inspiring a more intentional selection of components and design of depth filter construction for particular impurity removal targets. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Iron phthalocyanine on Cu(111): Coverage-dependent assembly and symmetry breaking, temperature-induced homocoupling, and modification of the adsorbate-surface interaction by annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhkova, Olesia; Bischoff, Felix; He, Yuanqin; Wiengarten, Alissa; Chaudhary, Shilpi; Johansson, Niclas; Schulte, Karina; Knudsen, Jan; Barth, Johannes V; Seufert, Knud; Auwärter, Willi; Schnadt, Joachim

    2016-03-07

    We have examined the geometric and electronic structures of iron phthalocyanine assemblies on a Cu(111) surface at different sub- to mono-layer coverages and the changes induced by thermal annealing at temperatures between 250 and 320 °C by scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The symmetry breaking observed in scanning tunneling microscopy images is found to be coverage dependent and to persist upon annealing. Further, we find that annealing to temperatures between 300 and 320 °C leads to both desorption of iron phthalocyanine molecules from the surface and their agglomeration. We see clear evidence of temperature-induced homocoupling reactions of the iron phthalocyanine molecules following dehydrogenation of their isoindole rings, similar to what has been observed for related tetrapyrroles on transition metal surfaces. Finally, spectroscopy indicates a modified substrate-adsorbate interaction upon annealing with a shortened bond distance. This finding could potentially explain a changed reactivity of Cu-supported iron phthalocyanine in comparison to that of the pristine compound.

  2. Percent Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Percent Coverage is a spreadsheet that keeps track of and compares the number of vessels that have departed with and without observers to the numbers of vessels...

  3. In situ SERS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on the pH-dependant adsorption of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on silver electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan, E-mail: dany@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Jia, Shaojie [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Fodjo, Essy Kouadio [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, University Felix Houphouet Boigny, 22 BP 582, Abidjan 22, Cote d’Ivoire (Cote d' Ivoire); Xu, Hu [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Wang, Yuhong, E-mail: yuhong_wang502@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Deng, Wei [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: The orientation of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) has been investigated by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (in situ SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) on silver surface. - Highlights: • The adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on Ag electrode is influenced by the pH. • The pH-dependant adsorption of AQ-2-COOH has been confirmed by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (in situ SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS). • The results can provide insights into electron transfer reactions of AQ-2-COOH in biological systems. - Abstract: In this study, in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) are used to investigate the redox reaction and adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on an Ag electrode at different pH values. The obtained results indicate that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed tilted on the Ag electrode through O-atom of ring carbonyl in a potential range from −0.3 to −0.5 V vs. SCE, but the orientation turns to more tilted orientation with both O-atom of the ring carbonyl and carboxylate group in positive potential region for pH 6.0 and 7.4. However, at pH 10.0, the orientation adopts tilted conformation constantly on the Ag electrode with both O-atom of the anthraquinone ring and carboxylate group in the potential range from −0.3 to −0.5 V vs. SCE or at positive potentials. Moreover, the adsorption behavior of AQ-2-COOH has been further confirmed by AR-XPS on the Ag surface. Proposed reasons for the observed changes in orientation are presented.

  4. Dimers at Ge/Si(001) surfaces: Ge coverage dependent quenching, reactivation of flip-flop motion, and interaction with dimer vacancy lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Mizuno, H.; Yoshida, R.

    2002-01-01

    We studied Ge coverage (θ Ge ) dependent quenching, reactivation of the flip-flop motion, and interaction with dimer vacancy lines (DVLs) of dimers on Ge/Si(001) surfaces using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) combined with a molecular beam epitaxy apparatus. Deposition of ∼0.3 ML (monolayer) Ge quenched the flip-flop motion, making all dimers asymmetric. Further deposition introduced DVLs at θ Ge ≥∼0.5 ML, and symmetric dimer domains appeared again locally at θ≥1.5 ML. High-resolution STM images indicated that asymmetric dimer rows always invert their phase in alternation with buckled dimer's up-end at the DVLs. Low-temperature STM images indicated that the symmetric dimer domains were due to flip-flopping of asymmetric dimers activated by large θ Ge at room temperature. The symmetric dimer domains extended along the dimer rows over the DVLs due to the phase correlation

  5. Calculation of the acid-base equilibrium constants at the alumina/electrolyte interface from the ph dependence of the adsorption of singly charged ions (Na+, Cl-)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gololobova, E. G.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Skvortsova, I. V.

    2011-05-01

    A procedure was proposed for the calculation of the acid-base equilibrium constants at an alumina/electrolyte interface from experimental data on the adsorption of singly charged ions (Na+, Cl-) at various pH values. The calculated constants (p K {1/0}= 4.1, p K {2/0}= 11.9, p K {3/0}= 8.3, and p K {4/0}= 7.7) are shown to agree with the values obtained from an experimental pH dependence of the electrokinetic potential and the results of potentiometric titration of Al2O3 suspensions.

  6. Temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules and associated crystallization kinetics of noncentrosymmetric Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods in microemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kass, Moustafa [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Ladj, Rachid [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Université Lyon1, CNRS, UMR 5007, LAGEP, CPE, 43 bd 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Mugnier, Yannick, E-mail: Yannick.Mugnier@univ-savoie.fr [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Le Dantec, Ronan [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Hadji, Rachid [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS n°7198, Université de Lorraine, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Marty, Jean-Christophe [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Rouxel, Didier [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS n°7198, Université de Lorraine, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Durand, Christiane [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Fontvieille, Dominique [UMR CARRTEL (INRA/Université de Savoie), Laboratoire de Microbiologie Aquatique, BP 511, 74203 Thonon Cedex (France); Rogalska, Ewa [Structure et Réactivité des Systèmes Moléculaires Complexes, UMR 7565, Nancy Université, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy cedex (France); and others

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Crystallization of Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} in microemulsions probed by hyper-Rayleigh scattering. • A faster growth and a better shape control of nanorods are obtained at 80 °C. • Different persistent cell deformations are related to the crystallization kinetics. • A temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants on nanorods is suggested. - Abstract: Aggregation-induced crystallization of iron iodate nanorods within organic–inorganic aggregates of primary amorphous precursors is probed by time-dependent hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements in Triton X-100 based-microemulsions. In the context of a growing interest of noncentrosymmetric oxide nanomaterials in multi-photon bioimaging, we demonstrate by a combination of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy that an increase in the synthesis of temperature results in faster crystallization kinetics and in a better shape-control of the final Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods. For initial microemulsions of fixed composition, room-temperature synthesis leads to bundles of 1–3 μm long nanorods, whereas shorter individual nanorods are obtained when the temperature is increased. Results are interpreted in terms of kinetically unfavorable mesoscale transformations due to the strong binding interactions with Triton molecules. The interplay between the nanorod crystallization kinetics and their corresponding unit cell deformation, evidenced by lattice parameter refinements, is attributed to a temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants molecules at the organic–inorganic interface.

  7. Room temperature adsorption of NH3 on Zn-terminated ZnO(0 0 0 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, T.; Shirotori, Y.; Ozawa, K.; Edamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption process of ammonia on the Zn-terminated ZnO(0 0 0 1) surface at room temperature has been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy utilizing synchrotron radiation. Coverage-dependent measurements of the N 1s core-level peak and the work function change have been carried out. It is revealed that ammonia adsorbs molecularly in the initial stages of adsorption, whereas deprotonated species are formed after some amount of molecular ammonia is accumulated on the surface. The reactivity of the K-modified ZnO(0 0 0 1) surface towards ammonia adsorption has also been investigated and found to be significantly lowered by predeposited K

  8. Phosphate-mediated electrochemical adsorption of cisplatin on gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, Adam; Figueiredo, Marta C.; Koper, Marc T.M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Rodriguez, Paramaconi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The potential-dependent adsorption and deposition of cisplatin on polycrystalline gold electrode is mediated by the adsorption of phosphate anions on gold electrode. •Quantitative analysis suggests that the stoichiometry of the phosphate species and the cisplatin adsorbed was 1:1. •Upon reduction of the phosphate-mediated cisplatin adsorption, the platinum deposits are formed by 3D nanoclusters -- Abstract: This manuscript reports the potential-dependent adsorption and deposition of cisplatin on polycrystalline gold electrode. It was found that this process is mediated by the adsorption of phosphate anions on the gold electrode and that the maximum coverage of Pt adsorbed is given by the maximum coverage of phosphate adsorbed at a given potential. The interaction of cisplatin with the phosphate groups was confirmed by in situ FTIR spectroscopy under external reflexion configuration. Quantitative analysis suggests that the stoichiometry of the phosphate species and the cisplatin adsorbed was 1:1. Moreover, the relationship between the charge of the Pt deposited and the charge of the electrochemical surface area of the Pt deposited on the gold electrodes indicates that 3D nanoclusters of a few atoms of Pt were formed over the gold electrode upon the electrochemical reduction of the adsorbed cisplatin. The Pt nanoclusters formed under these conditions were later evaluated for the oxidation of a monolayer of carbon monoxide. The Pt nanoclusters showed a high overpotential for the oxidation of the carbon monoxide monolayer and the high oxidation overpotential was attributed to the absence of adsorption sites for OH species on the Pt clusters: only at potentials where the OH species are adsorbed at the edge between the Pt nanocluster and the gold support, the oxidation of the carbon monoxide on the Pt nanoparticles takes place.

  9. Water Adsorption on a-Fe2O3(0001) at Near Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Susumu

    2011-08-19

    We have investigated hydroxylation and water adsorption on {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) at water vapor pressures up to 2 Torr and temperatures ranging from 277 to 647 K (relative humidity (RH) {le} 34%) using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Hydroxylation occurs at the very low RH of 1 x 10{sup -7} % and precedes the adsorption of molecular water. With increasing RH, the OH coverage increases up to one monolayer (ML) without any distinct threshold pressure. Depth profiling measurements showed that hydroxylation occurs only at the topmost surface under our experimental conditions. The onset of molecular water adsorption varies from {approx}2 x 10{sup -5} to {approx} 4 x 10{sup -2} % RH depending on sample temperature and water vapor pressure. The coverage of water reaches 1 ML at {approx}15% RH and increases to 1.5 ML at 34% RH.

  10. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  11. Immunization Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... room/fact-sheets/detail/immunization-coverage","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... Plan Global Health Observatory (GHO) data - Immunization More information on vaccines and immunization News 1 in 10 ...

  12. Functional coverages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, H.R.A.; Van Dam, A.

    2011-01-01

    A new Application Programming Interface (API) is presented which simplifies working with geospatial coverages as well as many other data structures of a multi-dimensional nature. The main idea extends the Common Data Model (CDM) developed at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

  13. Dose-dependent adsorptive capacity of activated charcoal for gastrointestinal decontamination of a simulated paracetamol overdose in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gude, Anne-Bolette Jill; Hoegberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Riis Angelo, Helle

    2010-01-01

    The amount of activated charcoal needed to treat drug overdoses has arbitrarily been set at a charcoal-drug ratio of 10:1. Recent in vitro studies have shown a larger adsorptive capacity for activated charcoal when used in a model of paracetamol overdose. In the present study, we investigated...... whether this reserve capacity exists in vivo. This is clinically relevant in cases of large overdoses or if the full standard dose of 50 g activated charcoal cannot be administered. We performed a randomized, cross-over study (n = 16). One hour after a standard breakfast, 50 mg/kg paracetamol...... was administered, followed 1 hr later by an activated charcoal-Water slurry containing 50 (control), 25 or 5 g activated charcoal. The areas under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) for paracetamol were used to estimate the efficacy of each activated charcoal dose. The AUC of the 25-g dose was found...

  14. Dependence of Rn adsorption rate and effective half-life time on diffusion barrier type and moving air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafa, Wafaa; Badran, Heba

    2005-01-01

    The variation of the adsorbed radon rate during the exposure time using charcoal canister was studied applying moving air environment inside the radon chamber and compared to the static air measurements. The air movement increases the accumulation time leading to more accurate results. Different types of membrane have been tested as diffusion barrier for activated charcoal canisters. The Makrofol and aluminized polycarbonate improve the adsorption/desorption rate more than the polyehylene membrane. The measured effective half-life time showed a remarkable correlation with the previously measured permeability constant for corresponding membranes. Different types of commercially available charcoal were investigated to develop a local version of charcoal canister for radon measurements. Applying static and moving air environments, the break point and radon collection efficiency were determined at different temperatures. Both of the temperature and air movement accelerate the appearance of the break point. Th efficiency of the locally developed charcoal is 87% and 84.5% of that Calgon PCB charcoal used by EPA. (author)

  15. Fibrinogen adsorption on blocked surface of albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen onto PET (polyethylene terephthalate) and glass surfaces and how pre-adsorption of albumin onto these surfaces can affect the adsorption of later added fibrinogen. For materials and devices being exposed to blood, adsorption...... of fibrinogen is often a non-wanted event, since fibrinogen is part of the clotting cascade and unspecific adsorption of fibrinogen can have an influence on the activation of platelets. Albumin is often used as blocking agent for avoiding unspecific protein adsorption onto surfaces in devices designed to handle...... energies, the adsorption of both albumin and fibrinogen has been monitored simultaneously on the same sample. Information about topography and coverage of adsorbed protein layers has been obtained using AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) analysis in liquid. Our studies show that albumin adsorbs in a multilayer...

  16. Random sequential adsorption with two components: asymptotic analysis and finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, Louise; Wattis, Jonathan A D

    2015-01-01

    We consider the model of random sequential adsorption (RSA) in which two lengths of rod-like polymer compete for binding on a long straight rigid one-dimensional substrate. We take all lengths to be discrete, assume that binding is irreversible, and short or long polymers are chosen at random with some probability. We consider both the cases where the polymers have similar lengths and when the lengths are vastly different. We use a combination of numerical simulations, computation and asymptotic analysis to study the adsorption process, specifically, analysing how competition between the two polymer lengths affects the final coverage, and how the coverage depends on the relative sizes of the two species and their relative binding rates. We find that the final coverage is always higher than in the one-species RSA, and that the highest coverage is achieved when the rate of binding of the longer polymer is higher. We find that for many binding rates and relative lengths of binding species, the coverage due to the shorter species decreases with increasing substrate length, although there is a small region of parameter space in which all coverages increase with substrate length. (paper)

  17. Gallium adsorption on (0001) GaN surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelmann, Christoph; Brault, Julien; Mula, Guido; Daudin, Bruno; Lymperakis, Liverios; Neugebauer, Joerg

    2003-01-01

    We study the adsorption behavior of Ga on (0001) GaN surfaces combining experimental specular reflection high-energy electron diffraction with theoretical investigations in the framework of a kinetic model for adsorption and ab initio calculations of energy parameters. Based on the experimental results we find that for substrate temperatures and Ga fluxes typically used in molecular-beam epitaxy of GaN, finite equilibrium Ga surface coverages can be obtained. The measurement of a Ga/GaN adsorption isotherm allows the quantification of the equilibrium Ga surface coverage as a function of the impinging Ga flux. In particular, we show that a large range of Ga fluxes exists, where 2.5±0.2 monolayers (in terms of the GaN surface site density) of Ga are adsorbed on the GaN surface. We further demonstrate that the structure of this adsorbed Ga film is in good agreement with the laterally contracted Ga bilayer model predicted to be most stable for strongly Ga-rich surfaces [Northrup et al., Phys. Rev. B 61, 9932 (2000)]. For lower Ga fluxes, a discontinuous transition to Ga monolayer equilibrium coverage is found, followed by a continuous decrease towards zero coverage; for higher Ga fluxes, Ga droplet formation is found, similar to what has been observed during Ga-rich GaN growth. The boundary fluxes limiting the region of 2.5 monolayers equilibrium Ga adsorption have been measured as a function of the GaN substrate temperature giving rise to a Ga/GaN adsorption phase diagram. The temperature dependence is discussed within an ab initio based growth model for adsorption taking into account the nucleation of Ga clusters. This model consistently explains recent contradictory results of the activation energy describing the critical Ga flux for the onset of Ga droplet formation during Ga-rich GaN growth [Heying et al., J. Appl. Phys. 88, 1855 (2000); Adelmann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 91, 9638 (2002).

  18. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rietra, R P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  19. Oxidized template-synthesized mesoporous carbon with pH-dependent adsorption activity: A promising adsorbent for removal of hydrophilic ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Cao, Wugang; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.; Qu, Xiaolei; Fu, Heyun; Zheng, Shourong; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2018-05-01

    Aiming to remove ionic liquid pollutants from water, an ordered mesoporous carbon CMK-3 (OMC) was prepared and modified by oxidation with nitric acid. A commercial microporous activated carbon adsorbent, Filtrasorb-300 (AC), was used as benchmark. Boehm titration showed that oxidized OMC had a substantially higher oxygen content than oxidized AC. Adsorption of the hydrophilic imidazolium-based ionic liquid 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) on OMC and AC was well-described by the Freundlich isotherm model. Surface oxidation markedly enhanced [Bmim]Cl adsorption by both OMC and AC. Nevertheless, [Bmim]Cl adsorption was much higher on oxidized OMC than on oxidized AC. Increasing pH had negligible influence on [Bmim]Cl adsorption on pristine OMC, but enhanced adsorption on oxidized OMC. Regeneration tests showed stable performance of oxidized OMC over five adsorption-desorption cycles. Thus, oxidized OMC can be a highly effective adsorbent for the removal of hydrophilic ionic liquids from water.

  20. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  1. Dependence on the mobile phase pH of the adsorption behavior of propranolol enantiomers on a cellulase protein used as the chiral selector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornstedt, T.; Goetmar, G.; Andersson, M.; Guiochon, G.

    1999-02-17

    The authors reported previously on the unusual thermodynamic characteristics of the enantioselective interactions between the enantiomers of the {beta}-blocker propranolol and the protein cellobiohydrolase I immobilized on silica. The adsorption of the more retained enantiomer, (S)-propranolol, is endothermic while that of the (R)-propranolol is exothermic. This causes a rapid increase of the selectivity factor with increasing temperature. In this work, the complex dependence of the selectivity factor on the pH of the solvent is studied. They determined the equilibrium isotherms of (R)- and (S)-propranolol in a wide concentration range (0.25 {micro}M to 1.1 mM) at six different mobile-phase pHs (4.7, 5.0, 5.2, 5.5, 5.7, and 6.0) and fitted the data obtained to the bi-Langmuir model. This gave the saturation capacity and the binding constant of the nonselective contribution for the two enantiomers. It also gave these parameters for the enantioselective contributions of each of them. The dependence of these parameters on the pH is discussed and interpreted in terms of the retention mechanism. Conclusions are in excellent agreement with recent, independent results on the structure of the protein obtained by X-ray crystallography.

  2. Adsorption of n-butane on graphene/Ru(0001)—A molecular beam scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivapragasam, Nilushni; Nayakasinghe, Mindika T.; Burghaus, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.burghaus@ndsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Adsorption kinetics/dynamics of n-butane on graphene, physical vapor deposited on Ru(0001) (hereafter G/Ru), and bare Ru(0001) (hereafter Ru) are discussed. The chemical activity of the supported-graphene as well as the support was probed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (adsorption kinetics). In addition and to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, molecular beam scattering data of larger molecules were collected for graphene (probing the adsorption dynamics). Furthermore, samples were inspected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. At the measuring conditions used here, n-butane adsorption kinetics/dynamics are molecular and nonactivated. Binding energies of butane on Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “kinetically transparent.” Initial adsorption probabilities, S{sub 0}, of n-butane decrease with increasing impact energy (0.76–1.72 eV) and are adsorption temperature independent for both Ru and G/Ru, again consistent with molecular adsorption. Also, S{sub 0} of Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “dynamically transparent.” Coverage dependent adsorption probabilities indicate precursor effects for graphene/Ru.

  3. Adsorption of n-butane on graphene/Ru(0001)—A molecular beam scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivapragasam, Nilushni; Nayakasinghe, Mindika T.; Burghaus, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics/dynamics of n-butane on graphene, physical vapor deposited on Ru(0001) (hereafter G/Ru), and bare Ru(0001) (hereafter Ru) are discussed. The chemical activity of the supported-graphene as well as the support was probed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (adsorption kinetics). In addition and to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, molecular beam scattering data of larger molecules were collected for graphene (probing the adsorption dynamics). Furthermore, samples were inspected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. At the measuring conditions used here, n-butane adsorption kinetics/dynamics are molecular and nonactivated. Binding energies of butane on Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “kinetically transparent.” Initial adsorption probabilities, S 0 , of n-butane decrease with increasing impact energy (0.76–1.72 eV) and are adsorption temperature independent for both Ru and G/Ru, again consistent with molecular adsorption. Also, S 0 of Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “dynamically transparent.” Coverage dependent adsorption probabilities indicate precursor effects for graphene/Ru.

  4. Adsorption energy of iron-phthalocyanine on crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struzzi, C.; Scardamaglia, M.; Angelucci, M; Massimi, L.; Mariani, C.; Betti, G.

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption energy of iron-phthalocyanine (FePc) deposited on different crystal surfaces is studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy. A thin film of molecules has been absorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), on graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111), and on Au(110). Activation energies for the desorption of a molecular thin film and for the FePc single layer are determined at the three surfaces. The desorption temperature measured for the thin films is only slightly dependent on the substrate, since it is mostly dominated by molecule-molecule interactions. A definitely different desorption temperature is found at the single-layer coverage: we find an increasing desorption temperature going from HOPG, to graphene/Ir, to the Au(110) surface. The different adsorption energies of the first FePc layer in contact with the substrate surface are discussed taking into account the interaction and the growth morphology.

  5. Solution pH and oligoamine molecular weight dependence of the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption at the air-water interface from sodium dodecyl sulfate/oligoamine mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halacheva, S S; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Webster, J R P

    2013-05-14

    Neutron reflectivity and surface tension have been used to investigate the solution pH and oligoamine molecular weight dependence of the adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/oligoamine mixtures at the air-water interface. For diethylenetriamine, triamine, or triethylenetetramine, tetramine mixed with SDS, there is monolayer adsorption at pH 7 and 10, and multilayer adsorption at pH 3. For the slightly higher molecular weight tetraethylenepentamine, pentamine, and pentaethylenehexamine, hexamine, the adsorption is in the form of a monolayer at pH 3 and multilayers at pH 7 and 10. Hence, there is a pH driven transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption, which shifts from low pH to higher pH as the oligoamine molecular weight increases from tetramine to pentamine. This results from the relative balance between the electrostatic attraction between the SDS and amine nitrogen group which decreases as the charge density decreases with increasing pH, the ion-dipole interaction between the amine nitrogen and SDS sulfate group which is dominant at higher pH, and the hydrophobic interalkyl chain interaction between bound SDS molecules which changes with oligoamine molecular weight.

  6. Characterization of Ag adsorption on TiC(001) substrate: an ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shangyi; Wang Shaoqing

    2008-01-01

    Ag adsorptions at 0.25–3 monolayer (ML) coverage on a perfect TiC(001) surface and at 0.25 ML coverage on C vacancy are separately investigated by using the pseudopotential-based density functional theory. The preferential adsorption sites and the adsorption-induced modifications of electronic structures of both the substrate and adsorbate are analysed. Through the analyses of adsorption energy, ideal work of separation, interface distance, projected local density of states, and the difference electron density, the characteristic evolution of the adatom-surface bonding as a function of the amount of deposited silver is studied. The nature of the Ag/TiC bonding changes as the coverage increases from 0.25 to 3 MLs. Unlike physisorption in an Ag/MgO system, polar covalent component contributes to the Ag/TiC interfacial adhesion in most cases, however, for the case of 1–3 ML coverage, an additional electrostatic interaction between the absorption layer and the substrate should be taken into account. The value of ideal work of separation, 1.55 J/m 2 for a 3-ML-thick adlayer accords well with other calculations. The calculations predict that Ag does not wet TiC(001) surface and prefers a three-dimensional growth mode in the absence of kinetic factor. This work reports on a clear site and coverage dependence of the measurable physical parameters, which would benefit the understanding of Ag/TiC (001) interface and the analysis of experimental data. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  7. Cadmium Adsorption on HDTMA Modified Montmorillionite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Elmuntasir I. Ahmed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the possibility of cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto modified montmorillonite clay is investigated. Batch adsorption experiments performed revealed an enhanced removal of cadmium using HDTMA modified montmorillonite to 100% of its exchange capacity. Modified montmorillonite adsorption capacity increases at higher pHs suggesting adsorption occurs as a result of surface precipitation and HDTMA complex formation due to the fact that the original negatively charged montmorillonite is now covered by a cationic layer of HDTMA. Adsorption isotherms generated followed a Langmuir isotherm equation possibly indicating a monolayer coverage. Adsorption capacities of up to 49 mg/g and removals greater than 90% were achieved. Anionic selectivity of the HDTMA modified monmorillonite is particularly advantageous in water treatment applications where high concentrations of less adsorbable species are present, and the lack of organoclay affinity for these species may allow the available capacity to be utilized selectively by the targeted species.

  8. Water adsorption on goethite: Application of multilayer adsorption models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. D.; Tumminello, R.; Meredith, R.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorbed water on the surface of atmospheric mineral dust has recently been shown to significantly affect the ability of mineral dust aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei. We have studied water adsorption as a function of relative humidity (RH) on goethite (α-FeO(OH)), a common component of atmospheric mineral dust. The goethite surface area and particle size was determined using BET analysis and with N2 as an adsorbate and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Water adsorption on the sample was monitored using horizontal attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR) spectroscopy equipped with a flow cell. Water content was determined using Beer's law and the optical constants for bulk water. The results were analyzed using Type II adsorption isotherms to model multilayer adsorption, including BET (Brunauer, Emmet and Teller), FHH (Frenkel, Halsey and Hill) and Freundlich. BET fits to experimental data provide parameters of monolayer coverage, while the FHH and Freundlich isotherms provide insights into multilayer adsorption mechanisms. Results indicate that goethite contains 5% H2O by mass at 50% RH, which increases to 12% by mass at 90% RH. Adsorption parameters and experimental results will be presented.

  9. Dopant Adsorption and Incorporation at Irradiated GaN Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Selloni, Annabella; Myers, Thomas; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2006-03-01

    Mg and O are two of the common dopants in GaN, but, in spite of extensive investigation, the atomic scale understanding of their adsorption and incorporation is still incomplete. In particular, high-energy electron irradiation, such as occurring during RHEED, has been reported to have an important effect on the incorporation of these impurities, but no study has addressed the detailed mechanisms of this effect yet. Here we use DFT calculations to study the adsorption and incorporation of Mg and O at the Ga- and N-polar GaN surfaces under various Ga, Mg and O coverage conditions as well as in presence of light or electron beam-induced electronic excitation. We find that the adsorption and incorporation of the two impurities have opposite surface polarity dependence: substitutional Mg prefers to incorporate at the GaN(0001) surface, while O prefers to adsorb and incorporate at the N-polar surface. In addition, our results indicate that in presence of light irradiation the tendency of Mg to surface-segregate is reduced. The O adsorption energy on the N-polar surface is also significantly reduced, consistent with the experimental observation of a much smaller concentration of oxygen in the irradiated samples.

  10. Conductometric Studies Of Adsorption Of Sulfide On Charcoal From Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rezwan Miah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of sulfide S2- from aqueous solution on commercial charcoal was studied using conductometric technique. A proportionally constant for concentration of S2- and its conductance was obtained by measuring conductance of S2- solution over a concentration range of 0.0005amp614850.02 M. The time-dependent measured conductance of S2- solution was converted to concentration using the obtained constant. The adsorption data were analyzed by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. A surface coverage equal to 2.5 mg per gram of charcoal was obtained. The adsorption was found to follow first-order kinetics having rate constant equal to 2.65 amp61620 10amp614853 s-1.

  11. [Adsorption and desorption of dyes by waste-polymer-derived activated carbons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Fei; Liu, Chang; Li, Guo-Guang; Liu, Yi-Fu; Li, Yong; Zhu, Ling-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons with high surface area were prepared from three waste polymers, i. e., tire rubber, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethyleneterephtalate (PET), by KOH activation. The adsorption/desorption characteristics of dyes (methylene blue and methyl orange) on the carbons were studied. The effects of pH, ionic strength and surface surfactants in the solution on the dye adsorption were also investigated. The results indicated that the carbons derived from PVC and PET exhibited high surface area of 2 666 and 2 831 m2 x g(-1). Their mesopore volume were as high as 1.06 and 1.30 cm3 g(-1), respectively. 98.5% and 97.0% of methylene blue and methyl orange were removed in 15 min by PVC carbon, and that of 99.5% and 95.0% for PET carbon. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity to these dyes was more than 2 mmol x g(-1), much higher than that of commercial activated carbon F400. Compared with Freundlich model, the adsorption data was fitted better by Langmiur model, indicating monolayer coverage on the carbons. The adsorption was highly dependent on solution pH, ionic strength and concentration of surface surfactants. The activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption to methylene blue than that of methyl orange, and it was very hard for both of the dyes to be desorbed. The observation in this study demonstrated that activated carbons derived from polymer waste could be effective adsorbents for the treatment of wastewater with dyes.

  12. Medicare Coverage Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Coverage Database (MCD) contains all National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs), local articles, and proposed NCD...

  13. (Amino acid + silica) adsorption thermodynamics: Effects of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebben, Damien; Pendleton, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High resolution, low concentration Gly, Lys and Glu solution adsorption isotherms. • All isotherms fitted with Langmuir–Freundlich isotherm model. • Gly, Lys and Glu show exothermic adsorption processes. • Isosteric heat analyses reveal changes in interaction strength with surface coverage. - Abstract: A thorough understanding of amino acid adsorption by mineral and oxide surfaces has a major impact on a variety of industrial and biomedical applications. Little information currently exists regarding temperature effects on most of these adsorption processes. Deeper thermodynamic analyses of their multiple temperature adsorption isotherms would aid the interpretation of the interfacial interactions. Low solution concentration adsorption isotherms for glycine, lysine and glutamic acid on a silica adsorbent were generated for T = (291, 298 and 310) K. Data analysis via the Clausius–Clapeyron method yielded the isosteric heat of adsorption as a function of fractional monolayer coverage for each adsorptive. Each amino acid showed an exothermic adsorption response. Glycine and lysine experienced a greater negative effect of increased temperature compared with glutamic acid, indicating a greater number of adsorbed molecules than glutamic acid, with the former undergoing intermolecular clustering within the adsorbed phase. Isosteric heat analyses suggest ionic interactions for lysine and hydrogen bonding for glutamic acid, both weakening with increased coverage. In contrast, initial hydrogen bonding led to ionic bonding for glycine with increasing coverage

  14. Irreversible adsorption of particles on heterogeneous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Jaszczółt, Katarzyna; Michna, Aneta; Siwek, Barbara; Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Zembala, Maria

    2005-12-30

    Methods of theoretical and experimental evaluation of irreversible adsorption of particles, e.g., colloids and globular proteins at heterogeneous surfaces were reviewed. The theoretical models were based on the generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach. Within the scope of these models, localized adsorption of particles occurring as a result of short-ranged attractive interactions with discrete adsorption sites was analyzed. Monte-Carlo type simulations performed according to this model enabled one to determine the initial flux, adsorption kinetics, jamming coverage and the structure of the particle monolayer as a function of the site coverage and the particle/site size ratio, denoted by lambda. It was revealed that the initial flux increased significantly with the site coverage theta(s) and the lambda parameter. This behavior was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the scaled particle theory. It also was demonstrated that particle adsorption kinetics and the jamming coverage increased significantly, at fixed site coverage, when the lambda parameter increased. Practically, for alpha = lambda2theta(s) > 1 the jamming coverage at the heterogeneous surfaces attained the value pertinent to continuous surfaces. The results obtained prove unequivocally that spherically shaped sites were more efficient in binding particles in comparison with disk-shaped sites. It also was predicted that for particle size ratio lambda charge. Particle deposition occurred under diffusion-controlled transport conditions and their coverage was evaluated by direct particle counting using the optical and electron microscopy. Adsorption kinetics was quantitatively interpreted in terms of numerical solutions of the governing diffusion equation with the non-linear boundary condition derived from Monte-Carlo simulations. It was proven that for site coverage as low as a few percent the initial flux at heterogeneous surfaces attained the maximum value pertinent to homogeneous

  15. A first principles kinetic Monte Carlo investigation of the adsorption and mobility of gadolinium on the (100) surface of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samin, Adib J.; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2017-01-01

    An accurate characterization of lanthanide adsorption and mobility on tungsten surfaces is important for pyroprocessing. In the present study, the adsorption and diffusion of gadolinium on the (100) surface of tungsten was investigated. It was found that the hollow sites were the most energetically favorable for the adsorption. It was further observed that a magnetic moment was induced following the adsorption of gadolinium on the tungsten surface and that the system with adsorbed hollow sites had the largest magnetization. A pathway for the surface diffusion of gadolinium was determined to occur by hopping between the nearest neighbor hollow sites via the bridge site and the activation energy for the hop was calculated to be 0.75 eV. The surface diffusion process was further assessed using two distinct kinetic Monte Carlo models; one that accounted for lateral adsorbate interactions up to the second nearest neighbor and one that did not account for such interatomic interactions in the adlayer. When the lateral interactions were included in the simulations, the diffusivity was observed to have a strong dependence on coverage (for the coverage values being studied). The effects of lateral interactions were further observed in a one-dimensional simulation of the diffusion equation where the asymmetry in the surface coverage profile upon its approach to a steady state distribution was clear in comparison with the simulations which did not account for those interactions.

  16. A first principles kinetic Monte Carlo investigation of the adsorption and mobility of gadolinium on the (100) surface of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samin, Adib J., E-mail: samin.2@osu.edu; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2017-05-15

    An accurate characterization of lanthanide adsorption and mobility on tungsten surfaces is important for pyroprocessing. In the present study, the adsorption and diffusion of gadolinium on the (100) surface of tungsten was investigated. It was found that the hollow sites were the most energetically favorable for the adsorption. It was further observed that a magnetic moment was induced following the adsorption of gadolinium on the tungsten surface and that the system with adsorbed hollow sites had the largest magnetization. A pathway for the surface diffusion of gadolinium was determined to occur by hopping between the nearest neighbor hollow sites via the bridge site and the activation energy for the hop was calculated to be 0.75 eV. The surface diffusion process was further assessed using two distinct kinetic Monte Carlo models; one that accounted for lateral adsorbate interactions up to the second nearest neighbor and one that did not account for such interatomic interactions in the adlayer. When the lateral interactions were included in the simulations, the diffusivity was observed to have a strong dependence on coverage (for the coverage values being studied). The effects of lateral interactions were further observed in a one-dimensional simulation of the diffusion equation where the asymmetry in the surface coverage profile upon its approach to a steady state distribution was clear in comparison with the simulations which did not account for those interactions.

  17. Effect of controlled deactivation on the thermochemical characteristics of hydrogen adsorption on skeletal nickel from sodium hydroxide-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozorov, D. A.; Lukin, M. V.; Ulitin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Differential heats of adsorption in a wide range of surface coverage and maximum amounts of adsorbed hydrogen are determined by adsorption calorimetry on partially deactivated skeletal nickel from aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide. The effect of the composition of solutions on the values of limiting adsorption and adsorption equilibria of individual forms of hydrogen is shown.

  18. Adsorption of gases on heterogeneous surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Rudzinski, W

    1991-01-01

    All real solid surfaces are heterogeneous to a greater or lesser extent and this book provides a broad yet detailed survey of the present state of gas adsorption. Coverage is comprehensive and extends from basic principles to computer simulation of adsorption. Underlying concepts are clarified and the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods described are discussed.Key Features* Adsorption isotherm equations for various types of heterogeneous solid surfaces* Methods of determining the nature of surface heterogeneity and porosity from experimental data* Studies of pha

  19. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  20. pH dependence of the kinetics of interfacial tension changes during protein adsorption from sessile droplets on FEP-Teflon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderVegt, W; Norde, W; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    Interfacial tension changes during protein adsorption at both the solid-liquid and the liquid-vapor interface were measured simultaneously by ADSA-P from sessile droplets of protein solutions on fluoroethylenepropylene-Teflon. Four globular proteins of similar size, viz. lysozyme, ribonuclease,

  1. Numerical evaluation of Cs adsorption in PB column by extended Langmuir formula and one-dimensional adsorption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Ogawa; Akiko Kitajima; Hisashi Tanaka; Tohru Kawamoto

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption property of granulated Prussian blue adsorbent on radioactive cesium was evaluated for efficient decontamination in Fukushima area. The adsorbent was found to show an inflective adsorption isotherm, which was expressed by extended Langmuir formula with three adsorption sites. Adsorption speeds of each site were evaluated by time-dependent batch experiment. The simulation using derived parameters and one-dimensional adsorption model successfully reproduced the experimental data of cesium decontamination by small and large columns. (author)

  2. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purewal, J. J.; Kabbour, H.; Vajo, J. J.; Ahn, C. C.; Fultz, B.

    2009-05-01

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  3. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purewal, J J; Kabbour, H; Ahn, C C; Fultz, B; Vajo, J J

    2009-01-01

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H 2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H 2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H 2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  4. Investigation of adsorption and absorption-induced stresses using microcantilever sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhiyu; Thundat, T.; Warmack, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between a vapor and a thin film adsorbed on one side of a bimaterial microcantilever produces differential stress, resulting in readily measurable curvatures of the cantilever structure. Depending upon the system studied, there exist two types of gas - solid interaction: bulk-like absorption and surface-like adsorption. The absorption of hydrogen into palladium results in film expansion whose magnitude is governed by hydrogen partial pressure. The bending of a bimaterial microcantilever (palladium/silicon) due to hydrogen absorption depends on the thickness of the palladium film and is reversible but rate limited by a surface barrier. In contrast, the stress induced by adsorption of mercury onto a bimaterial (gold/silicon) cantilever is irreversible at room temperature, is rate limited by surface coverage, and is independent of the gold - film thickness. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  5. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  6. Women's Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women's Health Policy Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Published: Oct 31, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn ... that many women continue to face. Sources of Health Insurance Coverage Employer-Sponsored Insurance: Approximately 57.9 million ...

  7. Strong Selective Adsorption of Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ting; Rubinstein, Michael

    2015-06-09

    A scaling theory is developed for selective adsorption of polymers induced by the strong binding between specific monomers and complementary surface adsorption sites. By "selective" we mean specific attraction between a subset of all monomers, called "sticky", and a subset of surface sites, called "adsorption sites". We demonstrate that, in addition to the expected dependence on the polymer volume fraction ϕ bulk in the bulk solution, selective adsorption strongly depends on the ratio between two characteristic length scales, the root-mean-square distance l between neighboring sticky monomers along the polymer, and the average distance d between neighboring surface adsorption sites. The role of the ratio l / d arises from the fact that a polymer needs to deform to enable the spatial commensurability between its sticky monomers and the surface adsorption sites for selective adsorption. We study strong selective adsorption of both telechelic polymers with two end monomers being sticky and multisticker polymers with many sticky monomers between sticky ends. For telechelic polymers, we identify four adsorption regimes at l / d 1, we expect that the adsorption layer at exponentially low ϕ bulk consists of separated unstretched loops, while as ϕ bulk increases the layer crosses over to a brush of extended loops with a second layer of weakly overlapping tails. For multisticker chains, in the limit of exponentially low ϕ bulk , adsorbed polymers are well separated from each other. As l / d increases, the conformation of an individual polymer changes from a single-end-adsorbed "mushroom" to a random walk of loops. For high ϕ bulk , adsorbed polymers at small l / d are mushrooms that cover all the adsorption sites. At sufficiently large l / d , adsorbed multisticker polymers strongly overlap. We anticipate the formation of a self-similar carpet and with increasing l / d a two-layer structure with a brush of loops covered by a self-similar carpet. As l / d exceeds the

  8. Adsorption-induced step formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thostrup, P.; Christoffersen, Ebbe; Lorensen, Henrik Qvist

    2001-01-01

    Through an interplay between density functional calculations, Monte Carlo simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments, we show that an intermediate coverage of CO on the Pt(110) surface gives rise to a new rough equilibrium structure with more than 50% step atoms. CO is shown to bind...... so strongly to low-coordinated Pt atoms that it can break Pt-Pt bonds and spontaneously form steps on the surface. It is argued that adsorption-induced step formation may be a general effect, in particular at high gas pressures and temperatures....

  9. The adsorption of Cu(II) on sodium bentonite in a synthetic saline groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, S.R.; King, F.

    1994-10-01

    The adsorption of Cu(II) on Na-bentonite has been studied under conditions that simulate those expected in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault located deep underground in the Canadian Shield. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for loose and compacted clay (compacted clay dry density 1.2 g.cm -3 ) over a wide range of copper concentrations (1 x 10 -6 mol.dm -3 to 1.0 mol.dm -3 ) at temperatures of 25 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 95 degrees C. Studies were carried out in a Na + - /Ca 2+ -based chloride solution ([Cl - ] = 0.97 mol.dm -3 ), with a clay-to-solution ratio of 1.6 g:360 cm 3 . For loose clays, the adsorption behaviour follows a Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorbate surface coverage increases with temperature, and exceeds the cation exchange capacity for Cu 2+ at temperatures of 50 degrees C and 95 degrees C. For compacted clays, the data follow a Freundlich-type isotherm, and exhibit no apparent temperature dependence. At a given pore-water copper concentration, the extent of adsorption on compacted clay is less than on loose clay. The difference between the behaviour of loose and compacted clays is explained in terms of the inaccessibility of some of the adsorption sites in compacted media. The significance of the results for calculating the corrosion rate of copper nuclear fuel waste containers is discussed. The adsorption results are used to analyze the shape and temperature dependence of copper concentration profiles observed in diffusion and corrosion experiments. 1 ref., 12 figs. 6 tabs., 1 appendix

  10. Fibrinogen adsorption on blocked surface of albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2011-05-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen onto PET (polyethylene terephthalate) and glass surfaces and how pre-adsorption of albumin onto these surfaces can affect the adsorption of later added fibrinogen. For materials and devices being exposed to blood, adsorption of fibrinogen is often a non-wanted event, since fibrinogen is part of the clotting cascade and unspecific adsorption of fibrinogen can have an influence on the activation of platelets. Albumin is often used as blocking agent for avoiding unspecific protein adsorption onto surfaces in devices designed to handle biological samples, including protein solutions. It is based on the assumption that proteins adsorbs as a monolayer on surfaces and that proteins do not adsorb on top of each other. By labelling albumin and fibrinogen with two different radioactive iodine isotopes that emit gamma radiation with different energies, the adsorption of both albumin and fibrinogen has been monitored simultaneously on the same sample. Information about topography and coverage of adsorbed protein layers has been obtained using AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) analysis in liquid. Our studies show that albumin adsorbs in a multilayer fashion on PET and that fibrinogen adsorbs on top of albumin when albumin is pre-adsorbed on the surfaces. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In situ SERS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on the pH-dependant adsorption of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on silver electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Jia, Shaojie; Fodjo, Essy Kouadio; Xu, Hu; Wang, Yuhong; Deng, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) are used to investigate the redox reaction and adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on an Ag electrode at different pH values. The obtained results indicate that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed tilted on the Ag electrode through O-atom of ring carbonyl in a potential range from -0.3 to -0.5 V vs. SCE, but the orientation turns to more tilted orientation with both O-atom of the ring carbonyl and carboxylate group in positive potential region for pH 6.0 and 7.4. However, at pH 10.0, the orientation adopts tilted conformation constantly on the Ag electrode with both O-atom of the anthraquinone ring and carboxylate group in the potential range from -0.3 to -0.5 V vs. SCE or at positive potentials. Moreover, the adsorption behavior of AQ-2-COOH has been further confirmed by AR-XPS on the Ag surface. Proposed reasons for the observed changes in orientation are presented.

  12. When Langmuir is too simple: H-2 dissociation on Pd(111) at high coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Nuria; Lodziana, Zbigniew; Illas, F.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments of H-2 adsorption on Pd(111) [T. Mitsui et al., Nature (London) 422, 705 (2003)] have questioned the classical Langmuir picture of second order adsorption kinetics at high surface coverage requiring pairs of empty sites for the dissociative chemisorption. Experiments find that ...

  13. First-principles studies on the effects of halogen adsorption on monolayer antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Keat Hoe; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Ong, Duu Sheng; Lim, Thong Leng; Zuntu Abdullahi, Yusuf

    2017-09-27

    Using first-principles calculations, we carry out systematic studies on the electronic, magnetic and structural properties of halogenated β-phase antimonene. We consider two different levels of halogen adatom coverage i.e. Θ = 1/8 and Θ = 1/18. It is found that F, Cl and Br adatoms act as acceptors whereas the I adatom acts as a donor. For a high coverage of Θ = 1/8, halogenated β-phase antimonene exhibits metallic characteristics. With a lower coverage of Θ = 1/18, through the adsorption of F, Cl and Br the semiconducting unstrained antimonene becomes metallic. In contrast, I-adsorbed antimonene remains semiconducting but exhibits magnetic behavior. We further investigate the effects of bi-axial strain on the halogenated β-phase antimonene. It is found that bi-axial strain can only induce ferromagnetism on the halogenated antimonene at Θ = 1/18. However, the ferromagnetism is suppressed when the applied strain is high. We uncover that the emergence of strain-dependent magnetism is attributed to the presence of localized states in the bandgap resulting from collective effects of bi-axial strain and the adsorption of halogen atoms.

  14. First-principle study of Mg adsorption on Si(111) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min-Ju, Ying; Ping, Zhang; Xiao-Long, Du

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out first-principle calculations of Mg adsorption on Si(111) surfaces. Different adsorption sites and coverage effects have been considered. We found that the threefold hollow adsorption is energy-favoured in each coverage considered, while for the clean Si(111) surface of metallic feature, we found that 0.25 and 0.5 ML Mg adsorption leads to a semiconducting surface. The results for the electronic behaviour suggest a polarized covalent bonding between the Mg adatom and Si(111) surface. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Processes of H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Weiwei; Peng, Liang; Peng, Daoling [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Gu, Feng Long, E-mail: gu@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Jun [Material Design and Simulation Technology Co. Ltd., Room 1716, V-Faction, 10 Vanke, 2 Ring Road of North Section, Chengdu (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • The hydrogen coverages for H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface ranging from 0.125 to 1.000 are prepared by using different surface supercells. • With the reduction of coverage, the average iron atomic energy is increased and the adsorption energy is decreased, leading to the system more stable; while coverage has little effect on the Fe(1 1 0) surface structure and the hydrogen adsorption process. • The most stable absorption site is found to be the on-top site. • DFT calculations show that it is a weak adsorption and the adsorption energy barriers under 4.4 kcal/mol. • The final state is H{sub 2} molecule dissociated into two hydrogen atoms interacting with surface iron atoms to form stable Fe-H bonds. - Abstract: Processes of H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface have been studied by the density functional theory, properties such as surface structure, adsorption position, and adsorption energies are discussed as well. To investigate the atomic geometries and stability under different hydrogen coverages for this adsorption, the hydrogen coverages ranging from 0.125 to 1.000 are prepared by using different surface supercells. It is found that with the reduction of coverage, the average iron atomic energy and the adsorption energy are increased, leading to the system more stable; while coverage has little effect on the Fe(1 1 0) surface structure and the hydrogen adsorption process. The most stable absorption site is found to be the on-top site. Our calculations show that it is a weak adsorption and the adsorption energy barriers under 4.4 kcal/mol. The final state is H{sub 2} molecule dissociated into two hydrogen atoms and interacting with surface iron atoms to form stable Fe-H bonds.

  16. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Clostridium perfringens DNA Based Morphology-Dependent DNA Adsorption Properties of CeO2 Nanorods in Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingcan Qian

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogens such as Clostridium perfringens can cause diverse illnesses and seriously threaten to human health, yet far less attention has been given to detecting these pathogenic bacteria. Herein, two morphologies of nanoceria were synthesized via adjusting the concentration of NaOH, and CeO2 nanorod has been utilized as sensing material to achieve sensitive and selective detection of C. perfringens DNA sequence due to its strong adsorption ability towards DNA compared to nanoparticle. The DNA probe was tightly immobilized on CeO2/chitosan modified electrode surface via metal coordination, and the DNA surface density was 2.51 × 10−10 mol/cm2. Under optimal experimental conditions, the electrochemical impedance biosensor displays favorable selectivity toward target DNA in comparison with base-mismatched and non-complementary DNA. The dynamic linear range of the proposed biosensor for detecting oligonucleotide sequence of Clostridium perfringens was from 1.0 × 10−14 to 1.0 × 10−7 mol/L. The detection limit was 7.06 × 10−15 mol/L. In comparison, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV method quantified the target DNA with a detection limit of 1.95 × 10−15 mol/L. Moreover, the DNA biosensor could detect C. perfringens extracted DNA in dairy products and provided a potential application in food quality control.

  17. Adsorption on smooth electrodes: A radiotracer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice-Jackson, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Adsorption on solids is a complicated process and in most cases, occurs as the early stage of other more complicated processes, i.e. chemical reactions, electrooxidation, electroreduction. The research reported here combines the electroanalytical method, cyclic voltammetry, and the use of radio-labeled isotopes, soft beta emitters, to study adsorption processes at smooth electrodes. The in-situ radiotracer method is highly anion (molecule) specific and provides information on the structure and composition of the electric double layer. The emphasis of this research was on studying adsorption processes at smooth electrodes of copper, gold, and platinum. The application of the radiotracer method to these smooth surfaces have led to direct in-situ measurements from which surface coverage was determined; anions and molecules were identified; and weak interactions of adsorbates with the surface of the electrodes were readily monitored. 179 refs

  18. Adsorption of dextrin on hydrophobic minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Beattie, David A

    2009-09-01

    The adsorption of dextrin on talc, molybdenite, and graphite (three naturally hydrophobic minerals) has been compared. Adsorption isotherms and in situ tapping mode atomic force microscope (TMAFM) imaging have enabled polymer adsorbed amount and morphology of the adsorbed layer (area coverage and polymer domain size) to be determined and also the amount of hydration water in the structure of the adsorbed layer. The effect of the polymer on the mineral contact angles, measured by the captive bubble method on cleaved mineral surfaces, indicates clear correlations between the hydrophobicity reduction of the minerals, the adsorbed amount, and the surface coverage of the adsorbed polymer. Predictions of the flotation recovery of the treated mineral phases have been confirmed by performing batch flotation experiments. The influence of the polymer surface coverage on flotation recovery has highlighted the importance of this key parameter in the predictions of depressant efficiency. The roles of the initial hydrophobicity and the surface structure of the mineral basal plane in determining adsorption parameters and flotation response of the polymer-treated minerals are also discussed.

  19. Molecular beam studies of adsorption dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumainayagam, C.R.; McMaster, M.C.; Madix, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the trapping dynamics of C 1 -C 3 alkanes and Xe on Pt(111) using supersonic molecular beams and a direct technique to measure trapping probabilities. We have extended a one-dimensional model based on classical mechanics to include trapping and have found semiquantitative agreement with experimental results for the dependence of the initial trapping probability on incident translational energy at normal incidence. Our measurements of the initial trapping probability as a function of incident translational energy at normal incidence are in agreement with previous mean translational energy measurements for Xe and CH 4 desorbing near the surface normal, in accordance with detailed balance. However, the angular dependence of the initial trapping probability shows deviations from normal energy scaling, demonstrating the importance of parallel momentum in the trapping process and the inadequacy of one-dimensional models. The dependence of the initial trapping probability of Xe on incident translational energy and angle is quite well fit by three-dimensional stochastic classical trajectory calculations utilizing a Morse potential. Angular distributions of the scattered molecules indicate that the trapping probability is not a sensitive function of surface temperature. The trapping probability increases with surface coverage in quantitative agreement with a modified Kisliuk model which incorporates enhanced trapping onto the monolayer. We have also used the direct technique to study trapping onto a saturated monolayer state to investigate the dynamics of extrinsic precursor adsorption and find that the initial trapping probability onto the monolayer is higher than on the clean surface. The initial trapping probability onto the monolayer scales with total energy, indicating a highly corrugated interaction potential

  20. Competitive protein adsorption to polymer surface from human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2008-01-01

    Surface modification by "soft" plasma polymerisation to obtain a hydrophilic and non-fouling polymer surface has been validated using radioactive labelling. Adsorption to unmodified and modified polymer surfaces, from both single protein and human serum solutions, has been investigated. By using...... different radioisotopes, albumin and Immunoglobulin G (IgG) adsorption has been monitored simultaneously during competitive adsorption processes, which to our knowledge has not been reported in the literature before. Results show that albumin and IgG adsorption is dependent on adsorption time...... and on the presence and concentration of other proteins in bulk solutions during adsorption. Generally, lower albumin and IgG adsorption was observed on the modified and more hydrophilic polymer surfaces, but otherwise the modified and unmodified polymer surfaces showed the same adsorption characteristics....

  1. Experimental determination of fission gas adsorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, R.; Underhill, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    Large charcoal beds have been used for a number of years for the holdup and decay of radioactive isotopes of krypton and xenon. Reliable design of these beds depends on an accurate knowledge of the adsorption coefficient of krypton and xenon on the adsorbents used in these beds. It is somewhat surprising that there is no standard procedure of determining the adsorption coefficient for krypton and xenon. Fundamental information needed to establish a standardized reproducible test procedure is given emphasizing the breakthrough curves commonly used to analyze dynamic adsorption data can lead to serious systematic errors and the fact that the adsorption coefficient, if calculated from the arithmetic holding time, is independent of geometric factors such as the shape of the adsorption bed and the irregular shape of the adsorbent

  2. Radon adsorption on present activated charcoals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazankin, Yu.N.; Trofimov, A.M.; Mikhajlova, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Radon adsorption from helium and air has been studied on modern activated carbons of SKT-1, SKT-2a, SKT-3, SKT-2b, SKT-6, PAU-1 within the temperature range from 100 to 80 deg. It has been shown that PAU-1 carbon has the highest activity with respect to radon in the temperature range studied. With decreasing temperature the adsorption coefficients increase sharply. It has been found that for the case of radon adsorption from helium the logarythm of the Henry coefficient linearly depends on the inverse value of absolute temperature. Adsorption of radon from air is inhibited and the above-cited relationship is deviated from linear. The results of calculating differential heats of radon and air adsorption as well as coefficients of radon and air separation on carbons are presented

  3. Potassium adsorption behaviour of three Malaysian rice soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, A.T.M.A.; Khanif, Y.M.

    2003-01-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency exists in different rice growing areas of Malaysia. A study on K adsorption was carried out in three Malaysian rice soils (Guar, Hutan and Kangar series) using six levels of K (0.00,28.77, 33.57, 38.37, 43.16 and 47.96 mmol kg/sup -1/). The data on K adsorption were fitted into Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin adsorption equations. Adsorption data were also correlated with pH, cation exchange capacity and organic matter content of the soils. Potassium adsorption increased linearly with increasing level of added K in all the three soils. The rate of increase was the highest in Guar series followed by Kangar and Hutan series, respectively. Potassium adsorption in two soils (Hutan and Kangar) fitted into Langmuir equation while he adsorption data in Guar series did not fit into this equation. Adsorption data in none of the soils fitted well in Freundlich and Temkin adsorption equations. Correlation between K adsorption and pH was significant (r = 0.881,), whereas, correlation of K adsorption with either organic matter content or cation exchange capacity was non-significant. The results of this study indicated that K adsorption is mainly dependent on soil pH. In soils with higher adsorption capacity, more K fertilizer may be needed to get immediate crop response. (author)

  4. Tellurium adsorption on tungsten and molybdenum field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.A.; Kiwanga, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of the adsorption of tellurium onto tungsten and molybdenum field emitters are described and the results obtained are compared with those obtained in previous work on the adsorption of silicon and selenium. The adsorption of Te onto W was found to be much more uniform than in the case of Se. Although Te is metallic in many of its properties its adsorptive behavior on field emitters is found to be similar to that of selenium and these adsorptive properties are basically common to all semiconductors. The most evident property of these adsorbates is that the work function and emission current decrease simultaneously at coverages of less than half a monolayer and the work function subsequently increases. (B.D.)

  5. Surface diffusion and coverage effect of Li atom on graphene as studied by several density functional theory methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhi [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad 2001, Col. Chamilpa, 62210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Contreras-Torres, Flavio F., E-mail: flavioc@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Jalbout, Abraham F.; Ramírez-Treviño, Alberto [Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Cajeme, Ciudad Obregon, Sonora (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    The adsorption of Li atom on graphene is examined using density functional theory methods. Three different adsorption sites are considered, including the on top of a carbon atom (OT), on top of a C-C bond (Bri), and on top of a hexagon (Hol), as well as Li adsorbed at different coverage. The Hol site is found to be the most stable, followed by the Bri and OT sites. The order of stabilization is independent of coverage. The localization of Li–graphene interaction at all sites has reverse order with stabilization. The localization will cause different repulsive interaction between Li atoms which is believed to take responsibility for the difference between the charge transfer order and adsorption energy order of Li adsorption at all possible sites. Repulsive interaction also causes the decreasing of adsorption energies of Li at Hol site with increasing coverage, but the corresponding influence is bigger at low coverage range (0.020–0.056 monolayers) than that at high coverage range (0.056–0.250 monolayers). The trend of charge transfer and dipole moment with increasing coverage is also in agreement with that of adsorption energy. It is also found that the distance of Li above graphene will increase with increasing coverage, but a so-called “zigzag” curve appears, which exhibits an oscillatory behavior as a function of increasing coverage. The diffusion of Li atom on graphene is also studied. Li atom migrates from a Hol site to a neighboring Hol site through the Bri site between them is found to be the minimum energy path. Within the studied coverage range, the diffusion barrier decreases with increasing coverage which can be ascribed to the phenomenon of different repulsion interactions when Li atom adsorbs at different sites. The increasing coverage amplified the phenomenon.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption on and solubility in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashenko, S.L.; Wampler, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on adsorption and solubility of hydrogen isotopes in graphite over a wide range of temperatures and pressures are reviewed. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are proposed for the hydrogen-graphite interaction. The entropy and enthalpy of adsorption are estimated, allowing for effects of relaxation of dangling sp 2 bonds. Three kinds of traps are proposed: edge carbon atoms of interstitial loops with an adsorption enthalpy relative to H 2 gas of -4.4 eV/H 2 (unrelaxed, Trap 1), edge carbon atoms at grain surfaces with an adsorption enthalpy of -2.3 eV/H 2 (relaxed, Trap 2), and basal plane adsorption sites with an enthalpy of +2.43 eV/H 2 (Trap 3). The adsorption capacity of different types of graphite depends on the concentration of traps which depends on the crystalline microstructure of the material. The number of potential sites for the 'true solubility' (Trap 3) is assumed to be about one site per carbon atom in all types of graphite, but the endothermic character of this solubility leads to a negligible H inventory compared to the concentration of hydrogen in type 1 and type 2 traps for temperatures and gas pressures used in the experiments. Irradiation with neutrons or carbon atoms increases the concentration of type 1 and type 2 traps from about 20 and 200 appm respectively for unirradiated (POCO AXF-5Q) graphite to about 1500 and 5000 appm, respectively, at damage levels above 1 dpa. (orig.)

  7. Tellurium adsorption on single crystal faces of molybdenum and tungsten field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.A.; Kiwanga, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to report the extension of previous studies of Te adsorption on Mo and W field emitters to measurements on single crystal planes. The adsorption of semiconductors on metallic emitters has been found to be characterized by simultaneous decreases in emission current and the Fowler-Nordheim work function for adsorbate coverages of less than a monolayer. (Auth.)

  8. Development of a nondestructive testing method and facility for investigation of surface reactions appearing in damage, corrosion, adsorption and catalytic processes encountered in the heat transfer systems of nuclear power plants and the energy storage problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumhalter, G.

    1986-08-01

    Studies of corrosion, oxide layer growth, etc., necessitate the investigation of processes which take place at surfaces: adsorption and desorption. Two problems are of major importance: i) initial stages of oxidative attack, e.g. the adsorptive properties of oxygen for a given system and possible synergetic effects of coadsorbed species like CO, H 2 O, OH, H 2 , SH 2 , impurities, and ii) the influence of surface conditions (crystalography, defects, pores, impurities, segregates) on the oxidative attack. An apparatus has been developed with three surface sensitive techniques: a) quartzcrystal micro-balance as a method for measuring the kinetics of deposition of thin metal films and gas adsorption, b) diode probe for the measurement of work function change caused by gas adsorption at metallic surfaces, and c) thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) which gives information on adsorption/desorption properties of a system studied: activation energy, preexponential factors for desorption, coverage, precursor states, lateral interaction, etc. The system investigated was oxygen/palladium foil (polycrystalline) by means of TDS and the following conclusions have been drawn: 1. Oxygen adsorbs on Pd foil both dissociatively and nondissociatively - depending on the adsorption temperature. 2. Certain amounts of oxygen penetrates into the surface and subsurface region, giving rise to a desorption peak around 1350K. 3. There are two groups of desorption peaks corresponding to atomically adsorbed oxygen (730K and 800K). The analysis of these peaks show the existence of strong lateral interactions between oxygen atoms at high coverages, which is not the case for low coverages. The position of the peaks and the dynamics of their evolution is consistent with the data obtained for Pd(111) and Pd(100) single crystal surfaces

  9. Interfacial adsorption of insulin - Conformational changes and reversibility of adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollmann, SH; Jorgensen, L; Bukrinsky, JT; Elofsson, U; Norde, W; Frokjaer, S

    The adsorption of human insulin to Teflon particles was studied with respect to conformational changes and the reversibility of adsorption was examined by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Adsorption isotherms for the adsorption of human insulin indicated high affinity adsorption, even

  10. Water adsorption on O(2x2)/Ru(0001) from STM experiments andfirst-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera-Sanfelix, P.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Mugarza, A.; Shimizu,T.K.; Salmeron, M.; Arnau, A.

    2007-10-15

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of water adsorption on Ru(0001) pre-covered with 0.25 monolayers (ML) of oxygen forming a (2 x 2) structure. Several structures were analyzed by means of Density Functional Theory calculations for which STM simulations were performed and compared with experimental data. Up to 0.25 monolayers the molecules bind to the exposed Ru atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell via the lone pair orbitals. The molecular plane is almost parallel to the surface with its H atoms pointing towards the chemisorbed O atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell forming hydrogen bonds. The existence of these additional hydrogen bonds increases the adsorption energy of the water molecule to approximately 616 meV, which is {approx}220 meV more stable than on the clean Ru(0001) surface with a similar configuration. The binding energy shows only a weak dependence on water coverage, with a shallow minimum for a row structure at 0.125 ML. This is consistent with the STM experiments that show a tendency of the molecules to form linear rows at intermediate coverage. Our calculations also suggest the possible formation of water dimers near 0.25 ML.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Ciudad Universitaria, Codigo Postal 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, L.F., E-mail: fernando@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arellano, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco. Avenida San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas Codigo Postal 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-06

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H{sub 2}). Nitrogen coverage was C{sub 8}N.

  12. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio; Magana, L.F.; Arellano, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H 2 ). Nitrogen coverage was C 8 N.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver

    2010-01-01

    strongly to Pd hydride than to Pd. The activation barrier for desorption at a H coverage of one mono layer is slightly lower on Pd hydride, whereas the activation energy for adsorption is similar on Pd and Pd hydride. It is concluded that the higher sticking probability on Pd hydride is most likely caused...

  14. Adsorption of hydrocarbons in chalk reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, L.

    1996-12-31

    The present work is a study on the wettability of hydrocarbon bearing chalk reservoirs. Wettability is a major factor that influences flow, location and distribution of oil and water in the reservoir. The wettability of the hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. Organic compounds such as carboxylic acids are found in formation waters from various hydrocarbon reservoirs and in crude oils. In the present investigation the wetting behaviour of chalk is studied by the adsorption of the carboxylic acids onto synthetic calcite, kaolinite, quartz, {alpha}-alumina, and chalk dispersed in an aqueous phase and an organic phase. In the aqueous phase the results clearly demonstrate the differences between the adsorption behaviour of benzoic acid and hexanoic acid onto the surfaces of oxide minerals and carbonates. With NaCl concentration of 0.1 M and with pH {approx_equal} 6 the maximum adsorption of benzoic acid decreases in the order: quartz, {alpha}-alumina, kaolinite. For synthetic calcite and chalk no detectable adsorption was obtaind. In the organic phase the order is reversed. The maximum adsorption of benzoic acid onto the different surfaces decreases in the order: synthetic calcite, chalk, kaolinite and quartz. Also a marked difference in adsorption behaviour between probes with different functional groups onto synthetic calcite from organic phase is observed. The maximum adsorption decreases in the order: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine. (au) 54 refs.

  15. Electron stimulated desorption study of oxygen adsorption on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, R.H.; Floyd, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a polycrystalline tungsten surface at approximately 800 K has been studied by means of electron stimulated desorption (ESD). Although precision gas dosing was not employed, the initial sticking probability for dissociative adsorption appears to be essentially unity, while the variation with coverage suggests that a high degree of order exists and that precursor state kinetics are significant. A most noticeable and reproducible discontinuity in ESD parameters occurs at a fractional coverage theta approximately 0.8 (exposure approximately 1.4 X 10 15 molecules/cm 2 incident) which is interpreted as an order-disorder transition within a single (β 1 ) chemisorption state, and results in an increase in the ionic desorption cross-section by a factor of approximately 1.26. A discussion of the adsorption kinetics and the disorder transition is given in terms of current models of dissociative adsoption which include the effects of nearest neighbour lateral interactions. (Auth.)

  16. Nitrogen adsorption on Fe(111), (100), and (110) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Ganduglia-Pirovano, Veronica; Hansen, Lars Bruno

    1999-01-01

    Adsorption energies and structures for N atoms on three low-index surfaces of Fe have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). At low N coverage the adsorption energy on Fe(100) is found to be similar to 0.7 eV higher than on the (111......) and (110) surfaces - particularly the c(2 x 2)-N/Fe(100) structure with the N atoms in four-fold sites is very stable. We attribute the differences in adsorption energy to the lack of four-fold sites on the (111) and (110) surfaces, We suggest that at higher N coverages, islands with a structure similar...

  17. Adsorption. What else?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Alirio E.

    2012-01-01

    [EN] Chemical Engineering today combines Molecular and Materials Engineerig and Process and Product Engineering (ChE=M2P2). Cyclic adsorptive processes (Simulated Moving Bed –SMB and Pressure Swing Adsorption-PSA) will be discussed for “old” and “new” applications making use of “old” and “new” (MOFs) adsorbent materials. After revisiting my memory as PhD student and the First Brazilian Adsorption meeting I will review the basic concepts involved in adsorption processes and then...

  18. DNA adsorption characteristics of hollow spherule allophane nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Yoko; Iyoda, Fumitoshi; Arakawa, Shuichi; John, Baiju; Okamoto, Masami; Hayashi, Hidetomo

    2013-01-01

    To understand the propensity of natural allophane to adsorb the DNA molecules, the adsorption characteristics were assessed against natural allophane (AK70), using single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) and adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP) as a reference molecule. The adsorption capacity of ss-DNA on AK70 exhibited one order of magnitude lower value as compared with that of 5′-AMP. The adsorption capacity of ss-DNA decreased with increasing pH due to the interaction generated between phosphate groups of ss-DNA and functional Al–OH groups on the wall perforations through deprotonating, associated with higher energy barrier for the adsorption of ss-DNA. The adsorption morphologies consisting of the individual ss-DNA with mono-layer coverage of the clustered allophane particle were observed successfully through transmission electron microscopy analysis. - Highlights: • The interaction between phosphate groups of ss-DNA and Al–OH groups • Higher energy barrier for the adsorption of ss-DNA • The individual ss-DNA with mono-layer coverage of the allophane clustered particle

  19. Sub-ambient carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamilarasan, P.; Ramaprabhu, Sundara, E-mail: ramp@iitm.ac.in [Alternative Energy and Nanotechnology Laboratory (AENL), Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre (NFMTC), Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2015-04-14

    Carbon dioxide adsorption on carbon surface can be enhanced by doping the surface with heterogeneous atoms, which can increase local surface affinity. This study presents the carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene at low pressures (<100 kPa). Graphene was exposed to nitrogen plasma, which dopes nitrogen atoms into carbon hexagonal lattice, mainly in pyridinic and pyrrolic forms. It is found that nitrogen doping significantly improves the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at all temperatures, due to the enrichment of local Lewis basic sites. In general, isotherm and thermodynamic parameters suggest that doped nitrogen sites have nearly same adsorption energy of surface defects and residual functional groups. The isosteric heat of adsorption remains in physisorption range, which falls with surface coverage, suggesting the distribution of magnitude of adsorption energy. The absolute values of isosteric heat and entropy of adsorption are slightly increased upon nitrogen doping.

  20. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  1. First-principles study of H, O, and N adsorption on metal embedded carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Detian [Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Institute of Micro-nano Structures & Optoelectronics, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Luo, Haijun, E-mail: luohaijun@wzu.edu.cn [Institute of Micro-nano Structures & Optoelectronics, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Cai, Jianqiu [Institute of Micro-nano Structures & Optoelectronics, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Cheng, Yongjun [Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Shao, Xiji [Institute of Micro-nano Structures & Optoelectronics, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Dong, Changkun, E-mail: dck@wzu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Institute of Micro-nano Structures & Optoelectronics, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Ni or Fe embedment and high atomic adsorption coverage benefit applications like hydrogen storage and field emission. • Ni or Fe embedment could help tune the catalytic properties. • Ni or Fe embedment enhances the adatom-SWNT interaction significantly. - Abstract: The density functional theory calculation has been conducted to investigate the structural and electronic properties, including the adsorption energies, bond structures, work functions, charge transfer behaviors, and density of states for pristine, Ni-, and Fe-embedded capped (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different coverage of atomic hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen adsorptions. Ni or Fe embedment enhances the adatom-SWNT interactions significantly for three kinds of gas atoms with the increases of the adsorption energies. The SWNT work function drops with H adsorption, while Ni or Fe embedment assists further the reduction. When increasing the coverage, the adsorption energy decreases and the work function climbs for O adsorption, but the nitrogen adsorption energy increases. The Bader charge transfer analysis implies that the cap possesses higher oxygen reduction activities than the tube, and the density of states analysis shows that Ni or Fe embedment deepens the C-adatom hybridizations.

  2. Radioactive nuclide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of a radioactive nuclide adsorption device by applying a nickel plating on a nickel plate to render the surface active. Constitution: A capturing device for radioactive nuclide such as manganese 54, cobalt 60, 58 and the like is disposed to the inside of a pipeway provided on the upper portion of fuel assemblies through which liquid sodium as the coolant for LMFBR type reactor is passed. The device comprises a cylindrical adsorption body and spacers. The adsorption body is made of nickel and applied with a nickel plating on the surface thereof. The surface of the adsorption body is unevened to result in disturbance in the coolant and thereby improve the adsorptive efficiency. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Adsorption of Hydrogen and Potassium on GaAs(110) Studied by Time-of-Flight Scattering and Recoiling Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayone, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    function of the exposure indicate that the initial strong decrease in the rate of unrelaxation is mainly a /consequence of the variation of the sticking coefficient. Below 100 L, most of the H atoms participate in the unrelaxation process. However, above 500 L, it is necessary to increase strongly the H coverage to produce small changes in the atomic structure of the surface. The measurements of the As and Ga direct recoils intensities change with the incident direction of the projectile in accordance with the crystallographic structure of the surface. On the other hand, the H recoil intensity is almost independent of the crystallographic sample orientation, indicating that an important fraction of the H atoms are not adsorbed in well ordered sites.Measurements as a function of the sample temperature show a continuous decrease of the H DR intensity for both low and high exposures. The combined results of forward recoiled atom and scattered projectile intensities suggest that an important fraction of the adsorbed H atoms is not bonded in a well ordered layer and may be forming molecules since the beginning of the adsorption process. The adsorption of K on GaAs(110) is mainly studied by DRS. The analysis of K direct recoil intensity indicates that at room temperature, the adsorption of K saturates at 0.5 ML, which corresponds to an atom density of ∼ 4.4x10 1 4 at/cm 2 . The adsorption process proceeds in two stages, which depend on the K coverage (Θ (K)). At low coverages, Θ (K)<0.1 ML, the K atoms are adsorbed exclusively on the [001] Ga rows and close to the sites of a new As layer, with a local crystallographic order. At high coverages the K atoms start to adsorb also along the As rows, although with a lower probability than on the Ga rows. At saturation, the K layer does not form an ordered structure. The dependence of the direct-recoil ion fractions on the K coverage is consistent with the structural information obtained from the analysis of the total recoiled

  4. Heats of adsorption of Pb on pristine and electron-irradiated poly(methyl methacrylate) by microcalorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, S. F.; Zhu, J. F.; Harris, J. J. W.; Goetsch, P.; Merte, L. R.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2005-12-01

    The heat of adsorption and sticking probability were measured for Pb gas atoms adsorbing onto clean poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and electron-irradiated PMMA. The Pb atoms interact very weakly with the outgassed pristine PMMA surface, with a sticking probability of 0.02 ± 0.02. They deposit a heat into the PMMA of 12.7 ± 0.7 kJ/mol of dosed Pb, independent of Pb exposure up to 10 ML. This is slightly less than would be expected even if no Pb atoms stuck to the PMMA, but if they completely thermally accommodated to the substrate temperature during their collision with the surface. This proves that thermal accommodation is incomplete, highlighting the weakness of the Pb-PMMA interaction. Damaging the PMMA surface with electrons causes an increase in reactivity with Pb, as shown by increases in the initial heat of adsorption up to 134.0 ± 0.7 kJ/mol and the initial sticking probability up to 0.51 ± 0.01. These both increase with increasing coverage toward the values expected for Pb adsorption onto a bulk Pb surface with coverage dependences suggesting that metal islands nucleate at electron-induced defects, and grow into large 3D islands of low number density. This is the first calorimetric measurement of any metal adsorption energy onto any polymer surface wherein the sticking probability of the metal also was measured. The PMMA film was spin coated directly onto the heat detector, a pyroelectric polymer foil (polyvinylidene fluoride—PVDF) precoated on both sides with thin metal electrodes. It provides a detector sensitivity of ˜450 V/J with a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation of 1.2 kJ/mol and absolute accuracy within 2%.

  5. Coverage Metrics for Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penix, John; Visser, Willem; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When using model checking to verify programs in practice, it is not usually possible to achieve complete coverage of the system. In this position paper we describe ongoing research within the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames on the use of test coverage metrics to measure partial coverage and provide heuristic guidance for program model checking. We are specifically interested in applying and developing coverage metrics for concurrent programs that might be used to support certification of next generation avionics software.

  6. Oxygen adsorption on the Al0.25Ga0.75N (0001) surface: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiaqi; Song, Tielei; Liang, Xixia; Zhao, Guojun

    2018-04-01

    To understand the interaction mechanism for the oxygen adsorption on AlGaN surface, herein, we built the possible models of oxygen adsorption on Al0.25Ga0.75N (0001) surface. For different oxygen coverage, three kinds of adsorption site are considered. Then the favorable adsorption sites are characterized by first principles calculation for (2 × 2) supercell of Al0.25Ga0.75N (0001) surface. On basis of the optimal adsorption structures, our calculated results show that all the adsorption processes are exothermic, indicating that the (0001) surface orientation is active towards the adsorption of oxygen. The doping of Al is advantage to the adsorption of O atom. Additionally, the adsorption energy decreases with reducing the oxygen coverage, and the relationship between them is approximately linear. Owing to the oxygen adsorption, the surface states in the fundamental band gap are significant reduced with respect to the free Al0.25Ga0.75N (0001) surface. Moreover, the optical properties on different oxygen coverage are also discussed.

  7. Characterization of humic acid reactivity modifications due to adsorption onto α-Al 2O 3

    KAUST Repository

    Janot, Noémie

    2012-03-01

    Adsorption of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) onto α-Al 2O 3 is studied by batch experiments at different pH, ionic strength and coverage ratios R (mg of PAHA by m 2 of mineral surface). After equilibration, samples are centrifuged and the concentration of PAHA in the supernatants is measured. The amount of adsorbed PAHA per m 2 of mineral surface is decreasing with increasing pH. At constant pH value, the amount of adsorbed PAHA increases with initial PAHA concentration until a pH-dependent constant value is reached. UV/Visible specific parameters such as specific absorbance SUVA 254, ratio of absorbance values E 2/E 3 and width of the electron-transfer absorbance band Δ ET are calculated for supernatant PAHA fractions of adsorption experiments at pH 6.8, to have an insight on the evolution of PAHA characteristics with varying coverage ratio. No modification is observed compared to original compound for R≥20mgPAHA/gα-Al2O3. Below this ratio, aromaticity decreases with initial PAHA concentration. Size-exclusion chromatography - organic carbon detection measurements on these supernatants also show a preferential adsorption of more aromatic and higher-sized fractions. Spectrophotometric titrations were done to estimate changes of reactivity of supernatants from adsorption experiments made at pH ≈6.8 and different PAHA concentrations. Evolutions of UV/Visible spectra with varying pH were treated to obtain titration curves that are interpreted within the NICA-Donnan framework. Protonation parameters of non-sorbed PAHA fractions are compared to those obtained for the PAHA before contact with the oxide. The amount of low proton-affinity type of sites and the value of their median affinity constant decrease after adsorption. From PAHA concentration in the supernatant and mass balance calculations, "titration curves" are experimentally proposed for the adsorbed fractions for the first time. These changes in reactivity to our opinion could explain the difficulty

  8. Relationship between carbon microstructure, adsorption energy and hydrogen adsorption capacity at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacek Jagiello; Matthias Thommes

    2005-01-01

    Various microporous materials such as activated carbons, nano-tubes, synthetic microporous carbons as well as metal organic framework materials are being considered for hydrogen storage applications by means of physical adsorption. To develop materials of practical significance for hydrogen storage it is important to understand the relationships between pore sizes, adsorption energies and adsorption capacities. The pore size distribution (PSD) characterization is traditionally obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 K. However, a portion of the pores accessible to H 2 may not be accessible to N 2 at this temperature. Therefore, it was recently proposed to use the DFT analysis of H 2 adsorption isotherms to characterize pore structure of materials considered for hydrogen storage applications. In present work, adsorption isotherms of H 2 and N 2 at cryogenic temperatures are used for the characterization of carbon materials. Adsorption measurements were performed with Autosorb 1 MP (Quantachrome Instruments, Boynton Beach, Florida, USA). As an example, Fig 1 compares PSDs calculated for the activated carbon sample (F400, Calgon Carbon) using combined H 2 and N 2 data, and using N 2 isotherm only. The nitrogen derived PSD does not include certain amount of micropores which are accessible to H 2 but not to N 2 molecules. Obviously, the difference in the calculated PSDs by the two methods will depend on the actual content of small micropores in a given sample. Carbon adsorption properties can also be characterized by the isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, related to the adsorption energy and dependent on the carbon pore/surface structure. Fig 2 shows Qst data calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation from H 2 isotherms measured at 77 K and 87 K for the carbon molecular sieve CMS 5A (Takeda), oxidized single wall nano-tubes (SWNT), and graphitized carbon black (Supelco). The Qst values decrease with increasing pore sizes. The

  9. Study on Shale Adsorption Equation Based on Monolayer Adsorption, Multilayer Adsorption, and Capillary Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas is an effective gas resource all over the world. The evaluation of pore structure plays a critical role in exploring shale gas efficiently. Nitrogen adsorption experiment is one of the significant approaches to analyze pore size structure of shale. Shale is extremely heterogeneous due to component diversity and structure complexity. Therefore, adsorption isotherms for homogeneous adsorbents and empirical isotherms may not apply to shale. The shape of adsorption-desorption curve indicates that nitrogen adsorption on shale includes monolayer adsorption, multilayer adsorption, and capillary condensation. Usually, Langmuir isotherm is a monolayer adsorption model for ideal interfaces; BET (Brunauer, Emmett, Teller adsorption isotherm is a multilayer adsorption model based on specific assumptions; Freundlich isotherm is an empirical equation widely applied in liquid phase adsorption. In this study, a new nitrogen adsorption isotherm is applied to simultaneously depict monolayer adsorption, multilayer adsorption, and capillary condensation, which provides more real and accurate representation of nitrogen adsorption on shale. In addition, parameters are discussed in relation to heat of adsorption which is relevant to the shape of the adsorption isotherm curve. The curve fitting results indicate that our new nitrogen adsorption isotherm can appropriately describe the whole process of nitrogen adsorption on shale.

  10. [Adsorption of heavy metals on the surface of birnessite relationship with its Mn average oxidation state and adsorption sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Tan, Wen-Feng; Feng, Xiong-Han; Qiu, Guo-Hong; Liu, Fan

    2011-10-01

    Adsorption characteristics of mineral surface for heavy metal ions are largely determined by the type and amount of surface adsorption sites. However, the effects of substructure variance in manganese oxide on the adsorption sites and adsorption characteristics remain unclear. Adsorption experiments and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were combined to examine the adsorption characteristics of Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+ sequestration by birnessites with different Mn average oxidation state (AOS), and the Mn AOS dependent adsorption sites and adsorption characteristics. The results show that the maximum adsorption capacity of Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+ increased with increasing birnessite Mn AOS. The adsorption capacity followed the order of Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Cd2+. The observations suggest that there exist two sites on the surface of birnessite, i. e., high-binding-energy site (HBE site) and low-binding-energy site (LBE site). With the increase of Mn AOS for birnessites, the amount of HBE sites for heavy metal ions adsorption remarkably increased. On the other hand, variation in the amount of LBE sites was insignificant. The amount of LBE sites is much more than those of HBE sites on the surface of birnessite with low Mn AOS. Nevertheless, both amounts on the surface of birnessite with high Mn AOS are very close to each other. Therefore, the heavy metal ions adsorption capacity on birnessite is largely determined by the amount of HBE sites. On birnessite surface, adsorption of Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ mostly occurred at HBE sites. In comparison with Zn2+ and Cd2+, more Cu2+ adsorbed on the LBW sites. Pb2+ adsorption maybe occupy at both LBE sites and HBE sites simultaneously.

  11. Adsorption of trace elements of radionuclides on hydrous iron oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.

    1988-01-01

    Factors that influence the adsorption of trace elements or radionuclides on hydrous iron oxides were investigated. The adsorption of monovalent cations (Cs + , Rb + ) on hydrous iron oxides is not strongly pH-dependent and it can be regarded as nonspecific. On the other hand, the adsorption of Ag + , divalent cations (Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ , Mn 2+ , Sr 2+ ) or trivalent cations (Cr 3+ , La 3+ , Ce 3+ , Eu 3+ , Gd 3+ , Er 3+ , Yb 3+ ) is strongly pH-dependent. The regularities of the adsorption of these cations on hydrous iron oxides are discussed. The differences in the adsorption behaviour of some divalent and trivalent cations are also explained. Freshly precipitated iron(III) hydroxide can be used for the decontamination of radionuclides from low-level waste solutions. However, the efficacy of decontamination depends on the oxidation state and the chemical properties of radionuclides. (author) 40 refs.; 9 figs

  12. Cadmium adsorption by coal combustion ashes-based sorbents-Relationship between sorbent properties and adsorption capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsamo, Marco; Di Natale, Francesco; Erto, Alessandro; Lancia, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Montagnaro, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.montagnaro@unina.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Santoro, Luciano [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    A very interesting possibility of coal combustion ashes reutilization is their use as adsorbent materials, that can also take advantage from proper beneficiation techniques. In this work, adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions was taken into consideration, with the emphasis on the intertwining among waste properties, beneficiation treatments, properties of the beneficiated materials and adsorption capacity. The characterization of three solid materials used as cadmium sorbents (as-received ash, ash sieved through a 25 {mu}m-size sieve and demineralized ash) was carried out by chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy, laser granulometry and mercury porosimetry. Cadmium adsorption thermodynamic and kinetic tests were conducted at room temperature, and test solutions were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Maximum specific adsorption capacities resulted in the range 0.5-4.3 mg g{sup -1}. Different existing models were critically considered to find out an interpretation of the controlling mechanism for adsorption kinetics. In particular, it was observed that for lower surface coverage the adsorption rate is governed by a linear driving force while, once surface coverage becomes significant, mechanisms such as the intraparticle micropore diffusion may come into play. Moreover, it was shown that both external fluid-to-particle mass transfer and macropore diffusion hardly affect the adsorption process, which was instead regulated by intraparticle micropore diffusion: characteristic times for this process ranged from 4.1 to 6.1 d, and were fully consistent with the experimentally observed equilibrium times. Results were discussed in terms of the relationship among properties of beneficiated materials and cadmium adsorption capacity. Results shed light on interesting correlations among solid properties, cadmium capture rate and maximum cadmium uptake.

  13. Study of algae's adsorption to uranium ion in water solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yang; Qiu Yongmei; Dan Guiping; Zhang Dong; Lei Jiarong

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption efficiencies of the algae to uranium ion were determined at various pH, uranium ion concentrations, adsorption temperatures and the species of coexisted metal ions, and the effect of coexisted metal ion on the adsorption efficiency was researched. The experimental results at pH= 5-8 are as follows. 1) the adsorption capacity is a constant to be about 1.40 μg/g for the Yantai red alga and the sea spinach, and is changeable in the range of 1.03-2.23 μg/g with pH for the sea edible fungus; 2) for the algae the adsorption efficiency and adsorption capacity are related to uranium ion concentration, and the maximum adsorption efficiency and capacity is 95.8% and 65.4 μg/g, respectively; 3) the adsorption process for 24 h is not dependent on the temperature; 4) the effect of the species of coexisted metal ions on the adsorption capacity of uranium ion is various with the time during adsorption process. (authors)

  14. Adsorption of phenol and 1-naphthol onto XC-72 carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Liming; Yu, Shaoming; Cheng, Leilei; Du, Erling [hefei university of technology, Hefei (China)

    2013-03-15

    XC-72 carbon (XC-72) was characterized by SEM, XPS, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, particle size distribution analysis and potentiometric acid-base titration. The adsorption of phenol and 1-naphthol on XC-72 was studied as a function of contact time, pH, adsorbent content and temperature. The kinetic adsorption data were described well by the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherms of phenol were described well by Freundlich model, while the adsorption isotherms of 1-naphthol were fitted well by Langmuir model. The results demonstrated that XC-72 had much higher adsorption capacity for 1-naphthol than for phenol. The adsorption thermodynamic data were calculated from the temperature-dependent adsorption isotherms at T=293, 313 and 333 K, and the results indicated that the adsorption of phenol was an exothermic process, whereas the adsorption of 1-naphthol was an endothermic process. XC-72 is a suitable material for the preconcentration of phenol and 1-naphthol from large volumes of aqueous solutions.

  15. adsorption, eosin, humic, peat

    OpenAIRE

    anshar, andi muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Eosin is one of the dyes commonly used in the industry and has the potential to cause pollution of the water environment. The Eosin pollution treatment methods used in this study was the adsorption method using humin fraction obtained from the peat land comes from Kalimantan. From the research data showed that the adsorption of eosin in humin result of washing with HCl / HF optimum at pH 4 and a contact time of 60 minutes with the adsorption-order rate was 8,4 x 10-3 min-1

  16. Prediction of phase equilibrium for gas hydrate in the presence of organic inhibitors and electrolytes by using an explicit pressure-dependent Langmuir adsorption constant in the van der Waals–Platteeuw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Huai-Ying; Hsieh, Min-Kang; Chen, Yan-Ping; Chen, Po-Chun; Lin, Shiang-Tai; Chen, Li-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrate phase is described by the van der Waals and Platteeuw model. • An explicit pressure-dependent Langmuir adsorption constant is used in our model. • Phase behavior of gas hydrates with organic inhibitors and electrolytes predicted. • Our model well predicts phase behavior of gas hydrates at high pressures. -- Abstract: A new approach is developed for the prediction of the melting curve of gas hydrate with single or multiple additives, including organic inhibitors and electrolytes. This is made possible by combining a predictive equation of state for the fluid phase, the Peng–Robinson–Stryjek–Vera equation of state (PRSV EoS) combined with the COSMO-SAC activity coefficient model through the first order modified Huron–Vidal (MHV1) mixing rule, and a modified van der Waals–Platteeuw model for the hydrate phase. We have examined this method for the change of the melting condition of gas hydrate upon addition of single organic inhibitor, single electrolyte, and a mixture of organic and electrolyte. The absolute average relative deviation in temperature (AARD-T) for these three types of systems are 0.79% (695 data points, T from 230.2 K to 294.0 K, P from 0.10 MPa to 33.9 MPa), 0.16% (810 data points, T from 259.5 K to 299.1 K, P from 0.13 MPa to 71.56 MPa), and 1.56% (316 data points, T from 248.2 K to 292.9 K, P from 0.90 MPa to 73.28 MPa), respectively. We believe that the proposed model is useful for the exploitation of natural or synthetic gas hydrates with multiple additives

  17. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  18. Communication: Thermodynamic analysis of critical conditions of polymer adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimino, R.; Neimark, A. V.; Rasmussen, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Polymer adsorption to solid surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which has attracted long-lasting attention. Dependent on the competition between the polymer-solid adsorption and polymer-solvent solvation interactions, a chain may assume either 3d solvated conformation when adsorption is weak or 2d adsorbed conformation when adsorption is strong. The transition between these conformations occurring upon variation of adsorption strength is quite sharp, and in the limit of “infinite” chain length, can be treated as a critical phenomenon. We suggest a novel thermodynamic definition of the critical conditions of polymer adsorption from the equality of incremental chemical potentials of adsorbed and free chains. We show with the example of freely jointed Lennard-Jones chains tethered to an adsorbing surface that this new definition provides a link between thermodynamic and geometrical features of adsorbed chains and is in line with classical scaling relationships for the fraction of adsorbed monomers, chain radii of gyration, and free energy

  19. Communication: Thermodynamic analysis of critical conditions of polymer adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimino, R.; Neimark, A. V., E-mail: aneimark@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Rasmussen, C. J. [DuPont Central Research and Development, Corporate Center for Analytical Sciences, Macromolecular Characterization, Route 141 and Henry Clay, Wilmington, Delaware 19803 (United States)

    2013-11-28

    Polymer adsorption to solid surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which has attracted long-lasting attention. Dependent on the competition between the polymer-solid adsorption and polymer-solvent solvation interactions, a chain may assume either 3d solvated conformation when adsorption is weak or 2d adsorbed conformation when adsorption is strong. The transition between these conformations occurring upon variation of adsorption strength is quite sharp, and in the limit of “infinite” chain length, can be treated as a critical phenomenon. We suggest a novel thermodynamic definition of the critical conditions of polymer adsorption from the equality of incremental chemical potentials of adsorbed and free chains. We show with the example of freely jointed Lennard-Jones chains tethered to an adsorbing surface that this new definition provides a link between thermodynamic and geometrical features of adsorbed chains and is in line with classical scaling relationships for the fraction of adsorbed monomers, chain radii of gyration, and free energy.

  20. Enhancement of the secondary ion emission from Si by O/sub 2 and H/sub 2/O adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huan, C.H.; Wee, A.T.S.; Tan, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    The positive and negative secondary ion emission of Si are examined as a function of O/sub 2 and H/sub 2/O surface coverage under conditions of simultaneous adsorption and Ar/sup+ ion bombardment. It is found that the ion-molecule mechanism accounts for the adsorbate-induced signals and that yield enhancement by H/sub 2/O adsorption is less effective than O/sub 2 adsorption. (authors)

  1. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  2. Co adsorption in kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Eliel S.; Silva, Paulo S.C.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption of metal ions in clay minerals has been used as an alternative to water and effluents treatment. Kaolinite is a clay mineral that presents low specific surface area and exchange ion capacity. Nevertheless, structural modifications can be achieved by means of acid or thermal activation. In this paper, it was studied the surface area of kaolinite/bentonite, kaolinite/activated carbon mixtures, thermal activated kaolinite and thermal activated kaolinite/activated carbon mixture. The mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon was tested for pH, contact time, interfering ions and initial concentration effects in the cobalt adsorption. Results showed that the optimized parameters are pH 6 and contact time of 30 min. Chromium acted as a competitive ion, zinc does not appear to have affected adsorption while iron seems to have favored it. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms indicated that the adsorption of Co in the mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon is a spontaneous process. (author)

  3. Co adsorption in kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Eliel S.; Silva, Paulo S.C., E-mail: eliel201019@hotmail.com, E-mail: pscsilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Adsorption of metal ions in clay minerals has been used as an alternative to water and effluents treatment. Kaolinite is a clay mineral that presents low specific surface area and exchange ion capacity. Nevertheless, structural modifications can be achieved by means of acid or thermal activation. In this paper, it was studied the surface area of kaolinite/bentonite, kaolinite/activated carbon mixtures, thermal activated kaolinite and thermal activated kaolinite/activated carbon mixture. The mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon was tested for pH, contact time, interfering ions and initial concentration effects in the cobalt adsorption. Results showed that the optimized parameters are pH 6 and contact time of 30 min. Chromium acted as a competitive ion, zinc does not appear to have affected adsorption while iron seems to have favored it. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms indicated that the adsorption of Co in the mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon is a spontaneous process. (author)

  4. Early construction and operation of the highly contaminated water treatment system in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (3). A unique simulation code to evaluate time-dependent Cs adsorption/desorption behavior in column system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Kenta; Hijikata, Takatoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi; Koyama, Tadafumi; Ishikawa, Keiji; Ono, Shoichi; Suzuki, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    A simulation code was developed to evaluate the performance of the cesium adsorption instrument operating in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Since contaminated water contains seawater whose salinity is not constant, a new model was introduced to the conventional zeolite column simulation code to deal with the variable salinity of the seawater. Another feature of the cesium adsorption instrument is that it consists of several columns arranged in both series and parallel. The spent columns are replaced in a unique manner using a merry-go-round system. The code is designed by taking those factors into account. Consequently, it enables the evaluation of the performance characteristics of the cesium adsorption instrument, such as the time history of the decontamination factor, the cesium adsorption amount in each column, and the axial distribution of the adsorbed cesium in the spent columns. The simulation is conducted for different operation patterns and its results are given to Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) to support the optimization of the operation schedule. The code is also used to investigate the cause of some events that actually occurred in the operation of the cesium adsorption instrument. (author)

  5. Structure sensitivity in adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Nielsen, Ole Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1997-01-01

    The structure sensitivity of CO adsorption on different flat, stepped, kinked and reconstructed Pt surfaces is studied using large-scale density-functional calculations. We find an extremely strong structure sensitivity in the adsorption energy with variations up to 1 eV (or 100%) from one...... structure to the next. We propose a model to explain this behavior, and use it to discuss more generally the origin of structure sensitivity in heterogeneous catalysis....

  6. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions present in aqueous solution on the oxy hydroxides: boehmite (γ-AIOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH) and manganite (γ-MnOOH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arreola L, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    Boehmite, goethite and manganite were synthesized by different methods and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric study , N 2 physisorption measurements, scanning electron microscopy (Sem), semiquantitative elemental analysis (EDS), as well as additional studies were determined the surface active sites concentration and zero point of charge. Furthermore, we studied the Pb(II) ion adsorption capacity present in aqueous solution on these synthesized materials by batch-type experiments at room temperature, as a function of contact time between the phases liquid-solid system (adsorption kinetics), initial concentration of the adsorbate (adsorption isotherms), ph and temperature. The adsorption equilibrium time of adsorption processes in these studied systems was found at 60 minutes for boehmite and 30 minutes for goethite and manganite respectively after contacting the solid-liquid phase systems. The adsorption capacity of the lead ions on these adsorbent materials depended of lead concentration, ph and temperature of the systems. Were evaluated lead adsorption capacities in these materials to different contact times using an initial concentration of 20 mg/L of Pb(II) ions at ph = 4, the results of three systems were adjusted to second pseudo kinetic model order. With respect to the study of the adsorbate concentration effect, boehmite-Pb(II) and goethite-Pb(II) systems were adjusted to Langmuir isotherm model which proposes that the adsorption is carried out in a monolayer, moreover manganite-Pb(II) system was adjusted Temp kin isotherm model, which assumes that the adsorption heat of all the molecules in the layer decreases linearly with coverage due to adsorbent-adsorbate interactions and adsorption is characterized by a uniform distribution of the binding energies. Were studied the ph effect of Pb(II) ions solution on the adsorption capacity of such adsorbents, it was found that as the ph increases lead solution

  7. Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Orlando Jose

    Surface tension and high-resolution laser light scattering experiments were used to investigate the adsorption of isomeric sugar-based surfactants at the air/liquid interface in terms of surfactant surface packing and rheology. Soluble monolayers of submicellar surfactant solutions exhibited a relatively viscous behavior. It was also proved that light scattering of high-frequency thermally-induced capillary waves can be utilized to study surfactant exchange between the surface and the bulk solution. Such analysis revealed the existence of a diffusional relaxation mechanism. A procedure based on XPS was developed for quantification, on an absolute basis, of polymer adsorption on mica and Langmuir-Blodgett cellulose films. The adsorption of cationic polyelectrolytes on negatively-charged solid surfaces was highly dependent on the polymer ionicity. It was found that the adsorption process is driven by electrostatic mechanisms. Charge overcompensation (or charge reversal) of mica occurred after adsorption of polyelectrolytes of ca. 50% charge density, or higher. It was demonstrated that low-charge-density polyelectrolytes adsorb on solid surfaces with an extended configuration dominated by loops and tails. In this case the extent of adsorption is limited by steric constraints. The conformation of the polyelectrolyte in the adsorbed layer is dramatically affected by the presence of salts or surfactants in aqueous solution. The phenomena which occur upon increasing the ionic strength are consistent with the screening of the electrostatic attraction between polyelectrolyte segments and solid surface. This situation leads to polyelectrolyte desorption accompanied by both an increase in the layer thickness and the range of the steric force. Adsorbed polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants readily associate at the solid/liquid interface. Such association induces polyelectrolyte desorption at a surfactant concentration which depends on the polyelectrolyte charge

  8. Diaminoethane adsorption and water substitution on hydrated TiO2: a thermochemical study based on first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hémeryck, Anne; Motta, Alessandro; Swiatowska, Jolanta; Pereira-Nabais, Catarina; Marcus, Philippe; Costa, Dominique

    2013-07-14

    Epoxy-amines are used as structural adhesives deposited on Ti. The amine adhesion to a Ti surface depends highly on the surface state (oxidation, hydroxylation). Amines may adsorb above preadsorbed water molecules or substitute them to bind directly to surface Ti(4+) Lewis acid sites. The adsorption of a model amine molecule, diaminoethane (DAE), on a model surface, hydrated TiO2-anatase (101) surface, is investigated using Density Functional Theory including Dispersive forces (DFT-D) calculations. DAE adsorption and water substitution by DAE are exothermic processes and turn nearly isoenergetic at high coverage with adsorption-substitution energies around -0.3 eV (including dispersion forces and ZPE). Complementary ab initio molecular dynamics studies also suggest that the formation of an amine-water interaction induces water desorption from the surface at room temperature, a preliminary step towards the amine-Ti bond formation. An atomistic thermodynamic approach is developed to evaluate the interfacial free energy balance of both processes (adsorption and substitution). The main contributions to the energetic balance are dispersive interactions between molecules and the surface on the exergonic side, translational and rotational entropic contributions on the endergonic one. The substitution process is stabilized by 0.55 eV versus the adsorption one when free solvation, rotational and vibrational energies are considered. The main contribution to this free energy gain is due to water solvation. The calculations suggest that in toluene solvent with a water concentration of 10(-4) M or less, a full DAE layer replaces a preadsorbed water layer for a threshold concentration of DAE ≥ 0.1 M.

  9. First-principles simulations of iron with nitrogen: from surface adsorption to bulk diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M H; Liu, X H; Gu, J F; Jin, Z H

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption, absorption and diffusion pathways of nitrogen are studied for ferromagnetic body-centered cubic iron via spin-polarized density functional theory in combination with the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The computed data suggest that, depending on the coverage of N atoms, N prefers to stay on particular surface sites. Once pinned down well below the surface, N prefers to move into octahedral interstices rather than tetrahedral interstices. However, the tetrahedral interstices are crucial because they act as transition states and yield the saddle point energies of the corresponding minimum energy pathways. In comparison with carbon, we found that nitrogen prefers a different pathway from the (1 0 0) surface to the subsurface due to its strong repulsive interaction with Fe ions. (paper)

  10. Optimization of Adsorptive Immobilization of Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivedi, Archana; Heinemann, Matthias; Spiess, Antje C.; Daussmann, Thomas; Büchs, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a systematic examination of various parameters of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) on solid support is performed and the impact of these parameters on immobilization efficiency is studied. Depending on the source of the enzymes, these parameters differently

  11. A review on adsorption refrigeration technology and adsorption deterioration in physical adsorption systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D.C.; Li, Y.H. [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, the Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Li, D.; Zhang, J.P. [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Xia, Y.Z. [Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, the Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2010-01-15

    As one kind of environmentally friendly refrigeration, the adsorption refrigeration has attracted many attentions in resent decades. This paper introduces the researches of adsorption refrigeration systems with the commonly used working pairs, advanced adsorption cycles, heat and mass transfer enhancement and attempts of adsorption refrigeration applications. Poor heat and mass transfer problem is a bottleneck to prevent the improvements of the adsorption refrigeration technique. Two ways to enhance the heat and mass transfer are discussed in this paper. The adsorption deterioration of adsorbent, another obstacle to physical adsorption refrigeration applications, is also pointed out. And the possible reasons and the possible methods are analyzed. (author)

  12. Adlayer structure dependent ultrafast desorption dynamics in carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pd (111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung-Young; Camillone, Nina R.; Camillone, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas@bnl.gov [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Xu, Pan [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); White, Michael G. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    We report our ultrafast photoinduced desorption investigation of the coverage dependence of substrate–adsorbate energy transfer in carbon monoxide adlayers on the (111) surface of palladium. As the CO coverage is increased, the adsorption site population shifts from all threefold hollows (up to 0.33 ML), to bridge and near bridge (>0.5 to 0.6 ML) and finally to mixed threefold hollow plus top site (at saturation at 0.75 ML). We show that between 0.24 and 0.75 ML this progression of binding site motifs is accompanied by two remarkable features in the ultrafast photoinduced desorption of the adsorbates: (i) the desorption probability increases roughly two orders magnitude, and (ii) the adsorbate–substrate energy transfer rate observed in two-pulse correlation experiments varies nonmonotonically, having a minimum at intermediate coverages. Simulations using a phenomenological model to describe the adsorbate–substrate energy transfer in terms of frictional coupling indicate that these features are consistent with an adsorption-site dependent electron-mediated energy coupling strength, η{sub el}, that decreases with binding site in the order: three-fold hollow > bridge and near bridge > top site. This weakening of η{sub el} largely counterbalances the decrease in the desorption activation energy that accompanies this progression of adsorption site motifs, moderating what would otherwise be a rise of several orders of magnitude in the desorption probability. Within this framework, the observed energy transfer rate enhancement at saturation coverage is due to interadsorbate energy transfer from the copopulation of molecules bound in three-fold hollows to their top-site neighbors.

  13. Adsorption mechanism of microcrystalline cellulose as green adsorbent for the removal of cationic methylene blue dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, K.B.; Salamatinia, B.

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of pure cellulose is yet to be explored. Thus, in this study, the adsorption mechanism of Microcrystalline Cellulose (MCC), a polysaccharide which is renewable, low cost and non-toxic, was studied on the adsorption of model dye Methylene blue (MB). It was found that the main adsorption mechanism of MB on MCC was due to the electrostatic attraction between the positively charged MB dye and negatively charged MCC. Thus, physical adsorption was the dominant effect, since electrostatic attraction is categorized as physical adsorption. This was verified by Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm, whereby mean free energy adsorption value was found to be less than 8 kJ/mol. The values of Gibbs free energy for thermodynamics studies were found to be within the range of -20 kJ/mol and 0 kJ/mol, which also indicated physical adsorption. It was due to the electrostatic attraction as adsorption mechanism of this adsorption process which resulted rapid adsorption of MB dye. It was found that equilibrium dye concentration was achieved between 1-3 minutes, depending on the adsorption temperature. The rapid adsorption, as compared to a lot of materials, showed the potential of MCC as the future of green adsorbent. The adsorption of Methylene Blue on MCC fitted well in Langmuir Isotherm, with R2 values of higher than 0.99, while fitted moderately in Freundlich Isotherm, with R2 values between 0.9224 and 0.9223. Comparatively, the adsorption of MB on MCC fitted best Langmuir Isotherm as compared to Freundlich Isotherm which monolayer adsorption occurred at the homogenous surface of MCC. This also indicated adsorbed MB molecules do not interact with each other at neighboring adsorption sites. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir Isotherm was found to be 4.95 mg/g. Despite the potential of MCC as green adsorbent, the challenge of low adsorption capacity has to be addressed in the future. (author)

  14. Some adsorption characteristics of polysterene base scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seredenko, T.N.; Ehkkerman, V.M.; Solomonov, V.M.; Gen, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    It is necessary to account for the adsorption on the surface of a scintillator when measuring nuclide activity in solutions by submerging into these solutions plastic scintillators. Dependences of 144 Ce, 90 Y, 137 Cs adsorption on specific activities (α) and pH value of solution were investigated. It is shown that K-α ratio is described by the equation K=Casup(p), where K is the specific surface activity of the polystyrene scintillator. Values of C and p are presented for investigated nuclides. The criterion estimating the possibility for repeated usage of scintillator are considered

  15. Optimization and Control of Pressure Swing Adsorption Processes Under Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Khajuria, Harish; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N.

    2012-01-01

    The real-time periodic performance of a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system strongly depends on the choice of key decision variables and operational considerations such as processing steps and column pressure temporal profiles, making its design

  16. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  17. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  18. Mechanics of adsorption-deformation coupling in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yida

    2018-05-01

    This work extends Coussy's macroscale theory for porous materials interacting with adsorptive fluid mixtures. The solid-fluid interface is treated as an independent phase that obeys its own mass, momentum and energy balance laws. As a result, a surface strain energy term appears in the free energy balance equation of the solid phase, which further introduces the so-called adsorption stress in the constitutive equations of the porous skeleton. This establishes a fundamental link between the adsorption characteristics of the solid-fluid interface and the mechanical response of the porous media. The thermodynamic framework is quite general in that it recovers the coupled conduction laws, Gibbs isotherm and the Shuttleworth's equation for surface stress, and imposes no constraints on the magnitude of deformation and the functional form of the adsorption isotherms. A rich variety of coupling between adsorption and deformation is recovered as a result of combining different poroelastic models (isotropic vs. anisotropic, linear vs. nonlinear) and adsorption models (unary vs. mixture adsorption, uncoupled vs. stretch-dependent adsorption). These predictions are discussed against the backdrop of recent experimental data on coal swelling subjected to CO2 and CO2sbnd CH4 injections, showing the capability and versatility of the theory in capturing adsorption-induced deformation of porous materials.

  19. Adsorption of antimony onto iron oxyhydroxides: Adsorption behavior and surface structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xuejun; Wu, Zhijun [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19 Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); He, Mengchang, E-mail: hemc@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19 Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Meng, Xiaoguang [Center for Environmental Systems, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Jin, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, No. 19 Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Qiu, Nan; Zhang, Jing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Antimony adsorption depended on the Sb species, pH, and the type of iron oxides. • Sb(V) adsorption favored at acidic pH, Sb(III) adsorption optimized in wider pH. • Antimony was adsorbed onto the iron oxides by the inner-sphere surface complex. • Bidentate mononuclear ({sup 2}E) was the dominant form of Sb incorporated into HFO. • XAFS and XPS indicated Sb(III) adsorbed was slowly oxidized to Sb(V). - Abstract: Antimony is detected in soil and water with elevated concentration due to a variety of industrial applications and mining activities. Though antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority interest by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Europe Union (EU), very little is known about its environmental behavior and adsorption mechanism. In this study, the adsorption behaviors and surface structure of antimony (III/V) on iron oxides were investigated using batch adsorption techniques, surface complexation modeling (SCM), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The adsorption isotherms and edges indicated that the affinity of Sb(V) and Sb(III) toward the iron oxides depended on the Sb species, solution pH, and the characteristics of iron oxides. Sb(V) adsorption was favored at acidic pH and decreased dramatically with increasing pH, while Sb(III) adsorption was constant over a broad pH range. When pH is higher than 7, Sb(III) adsorption by goethite and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was greater than Sb(V). EXAFS analysis indicated that the majority of Sb(III), either adsorbed onto HFO or co-precipitated by FeCl{sub 3}, was oxidized into Sb(V) probably due to the involvement of O{sub 2} in the long duration of sample preservation. Only one Sb–Fe subshell was filtered in the EXAFS spectra of antimony adsorption onto HFO, with the coordination number of 1.0–1.9 attributed to bidentate mononuclear edge-sharing ({sup 2}E) between Sb and

  20. Adsorption characteristics of brilliant green dye on kaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, B.K.; Goswami, A.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations were carried out to adsorb toxic brilliant green dye from aqueous medium using kaolin as an adsorbent. Characterization of kaolin is done by measuring: (i) particle size distribution using particle size analyzer, (ii) BET surface area using BET surface analyzer, and (iii) structural analysis using X-ray diffractometer. The effects of initial dye concentration, contact time, kaolin dose, stirring speed, pH and temperature were studied for the adsorption of brilliant green in batch mode. Adsorption experiments indicate that the extent of adsorption is strongly dependent on pH of solution. Free energy of adsorption (ΔG 0 ), enthalpy (ΔH 0 ) and entropy (ΔS 0 ) changes are calculated to know the nature of adsorption. The calculated values of ΔG 0 at 299 K and 323 K indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous. The estimated values of ΔH 0 and ΔS 0 both show the negative sign, which indicate that the adsorption process is exothermic and the dye molecules are organized on the kaolin surface in less randomly fashion than in solution. The adsorption kinetic has been described by first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle-diffusion models. It was observed that the rate of dye adsorption follows pseudo-second-order model for the dye concentration range studied in the present case. Standard adsorption isotherms were used to fit the experimental equilibrium data. It was found that the adsorption of brilliant green on kaolin follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm

  1. Measurement and analysis of adsorption isotherms of CO_2 on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vinod Kumar; Anil Kumar, E.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work CO_2 adsorption isotherms of a commercially available activated carbon, Norit Darco type obtained from lignite granular material, were measured. Adsorption isotherms were measured at different temperatures 298 K, 308 K, 318 K and 338 K and over a pressure range of 0–45 bar using Sievert's type experimental setup. Experimental data of CO_2 adsorption isotherms were modelled using Langmuir and Dubinin–Astakhov (D–A) isotherm models. Based on coefficient of correlation and normalized standard deviation it was found that D–A isotherm model was well suited with the experimental data of CO_2 adsorption isotherms. The important thermodynamic properties viz., limiting heat of adsorption at zero coverage, entropy, Gibbs free energy and isosteric heat of adsorption as a function of surface coverage were evaluated using van't Hoff and Clausius–Clapeyron equations. These thermodynamic properties were indicating that CO_2 uptake by activated carbon is a physisorption phenomenon. The adsorption isotherms data and the thermodynamic parameters estimated in the present study are useful for designing of an adsorption based gas storage systems.

  2. Adsorption of lead onto smectite from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhamdi, M; Galai, H; Mnasri, N; Elaloui, E; Trabelsi-Ayadi, M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of a new method of adsorption using membrane filtration to determine the maximum amount of lead adsorbed by clay and investigate the behavior of the clay after adsorption of the said metal. Treatment of wastewater contaminated with heavy metals depends on the characteristics of the effluent, the amount of final discharge, the cost of treatment, and the compatibility of the treatment process. The process of adsorption of heavy metals by clays may be a simple, selective, and economically viable alternative to the conventional physical-chemical treatment. This is justified by the importance of the surface developed by this material, the presence of negative charges on the said surface, the possibility of ion exchange taking place, and its wide availability in nature. The removal of lead from wastewater was studied by using the adsorption technique and using clay as the adsorbent. A method was optimized for adsorption through a membrane approaching natural adsorption. This new method is simple, selective, and the lead adsorption time is about 3 days. The various properties of clay were determined. It was observed that the cation exchange capacity of the clay was 56 meq/100 g of hydrated clay for the raw sample and 82 meq/100 g for the purified sample. The total surface area determined by the methylene blue method was equal to 556 and 783 m(2)/g for the raw and purified samples, respectively. The adsorption kinetics depends on several parameters. The Pb(II) clay, obeys the Langmuir, Freundlich, and the Elovich adsorption isotherms with high regression coefficients. The use of this adsorbent notably decreases the cost of treatment. It was concluded that clay shows a strong adsorption capacity on Pb(II), the maximum interaction occurring with purified clay treated at high concentration of lead. It is proposed that this adsorption through a membrane be extended for the treatment of effluents containing other metals.

  3. Lithium adsorption on amorphous aluminum hydroxides and gibbsite

    OpenAIRE

    Prodromou, Konstantinos P.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium (Li) adsorption on both amorphous aluminum hydroxides and gibbsite was studied. For the amorphous Al(OH)3 the adsorption was found to be pH dependent. Generally, 1.6 times more Li was adsorbed at initial pH value 8.0 compared with pH value 6.50. Gibbsite adsorbed 11.6 to 45.5 times less Li quantities compared with amorphous Al(OH)3. Lithium adsorption was not depended on equilibrium times. It remained stable for all equilibrium times used. Lithium quantities extracted with 1N CH3COONH...

  4. Lithium adsorption on amorphous aluminum hydroxides and gibbsite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos P. Prodromou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium (Li adsorption on both amorphous aluminum hydroxides and gibbsite was studied. For the amorphous Al(OH3 the adsorption was found to be pH dependent. Generally, 1.6 times more Li was adsorbed at initial pH value 8.0 compared with pH value 6.50. Gibbsite adsorbed 11.6 to 45.5 times less Li quantities compared with amorphous Al(OH3. Lithium adsorption was not depended on equilibrium times. It remained stable for all equilibrium times used. Lithium quantities extracted with 1N CH3COONH4 pH 7 , represent the physical adsorption, while the remaining Li that was adsorbed on Al(OH3, represents the chemical adsorption. During the desorption process 19% of Li extracted with NH4+, represents the physical adsorption, while the remaining 81% of Li, which was adsorbed represents the chemical adsorption. In gibbsite, 9.6% of Li represents the physical adsorption and 90.4% the chemical one. The experimental data conformed well to Freundlich isotherm equation.

  5. Activated Carbon Preparation and Modification for Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuhe

    Butanol is considered a promising, infrastructure-compatible biofuel. Butanol has a higher energy content than ethanol and can be used in conventional gas engines without modifications. Unfortunately, the fermentation pathway for butanol production is restricted by its toxicity to the microbial strains used in the process. Butanol is toxic to the microbes, and this can slow fermentation rates and reduce butanol yields. Gas stripping technology can efficiently remove butanol from the fermentation broth as it is produced, thereby decreasing its inhibitory effects. Traditional butanol separation heavily depends on the energy intensive distillation method. One of the main issues in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation is that butanol concentrations in the fermentation broth are low, ranging from 1 to 1.2 percent in weight, because of its toxicity to the microorganisms. Therefore distillation of butanol is even worse than distillation of corn ethanol. Even new separation methods, such as solid- extraction methods involve adding substances, such as polymer resin and zeolite or activated carbon, to biobutanol fermentatioon broth did not achieve energy efficient separation of butanol due to low adsorption selectivity and fouling in broth. Gas-stripping - condensation is another new butanol recovery method, however, the butanol in gas-stripping stream is too low to be condensed without using expensive and energy intensive liquid nitrogen. Adsorption can then be used to recover butanol from the vapor phase. Activated carbon (AC) samples and zeolite were investigated for their butanol vapor adsorption capacities. Commercial activated carbon was modified via hydrothermal H2O2 treatment, and the specific surface area and oxygen-containing functional groups of activated carbon were tested before and after treatment. Hydrothermal H2O 2 modification increased the surface oxygen content, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, micropore volume, and total pore volume of active carbon

  6. High pressure adsorption isotherms of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon for a single bed pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V.; Anupam, Kumar; Roy, Zunipa; Saha, B. B.; Halder, G. N.

    2017-10-01

    Adsorption characteristics of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon for the wide range of temperature (303-323 K) and pressure (0.2027-2.0265 MPa) have been reported for a single bed pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system. The experimental data were fitted to Langmuir, Dubinin-Astakhov and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The Langmuir and D-R isotherm models were found appropriate in correlating experimental adsorption data with an average relative error of ±2.0541% and ±0.6659% respectively. The isosteric heat of adsorption data were estimated as a function of surface coverage of nitrogen and temperature using D-R isotherm. The heat of adsorption was observed to decrease from 12.65 to 6.98 kJ.mol-1 with an increase in surface concentration at 303 K and it followed the same pattern for other temperatures. It was found that an increase in temperature enhances the magnitude of the heat of adsorption.

  7. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  8. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw; Amy, Gary; Chunggaze, Mohammed; Al-Ghasham, Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  9. Modelling the implications of moving towards universal coverage in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Josephine; Mtei, Gemini; Ally, Mariam

    2012-03-01

    promote universal coverage will depend on the ability of the system to contain costs.

  10. Adsorption of ammonia at GaN(0001) surface in the mixed ammonia/hydrogen ambient - a summary of ab initio data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempisty, Paweł; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of ammonia at NH 3 /NH 2 /H-covered GaN(0001) surface was analyzed using results of ab initio calculations. The whole configuration space of partially NH 3 /NH 2 /H-covered GaN(0001) surface was divided into zones of differently pinned Fermi level: at the Ga broken bond state for dominantly bare surface (region I), at the valence band maximum (VBM) for NH 2 and H-covered surface (region II), and at the conduction band minimum (CBM) for NH 3 -covered surface (region III). The electron counting rule (ECR) extension was formulated for the case of adsorbed molecules. The extensive ab intio calculations show the validity of the ECR in case of all mixed H-NH 2 -NH 3 coverages for the determination of the borders between the three regions. The adsorption was analyzed using the recently identified dependence of the adsorption energy on the charge transfer at the surface. For region I ammonia adsorbs dissociatively, disintegrating into a H adatom and a HN 2 radical for a large fraction of vacant sites, while for region II adsorption of ammonia is molecular. The dissociative adsorption energy strongly depends on the Fermi level at the surface (pinned) and in the bulk (unpinned) while the molecular adsorption energy is determined by bonding to surface only, in accordance to the recently published theory. Adsorption of Ammonia in region III (Fermi level pinned at CBM) leads to an unstable configuration both molecular and dissociative, which is explained by the fact that broken Ga-bonds are doubly occupied by electrons. The adsorbing ammonia brings 8 electrons to the surface, necessitating the transfer of these two electrons from the Ga broken bond state to the Fermi level. This is an energetically costly process. Adsorption of ammonia at H-covered site leads to the creation of a NH 2 radical at the surface and escape of H 2 molecule. The process energy is close to 0.12 eV, thus not large, but the direct inverse process is not possible due to the escape of the

  11. Physical adsorption and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohan, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of noble gases adsorption (except He) on graphite substracts are reviewed. Experimental results from this adsorption are analyzed and compared with molecular dynamics calculations. (L.C.) [pt

  12. Determination of deuterium adsorption site on palladium(1 0 0) using low energy ion recoil spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambali, I. [Department of Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan (Australia); O' Connor, D.J. [Department of Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan (Australia)], E-mail: john.oconnor@newcastle.edu.au; Gladys, M.J. [Department of Physics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan (Australia); Karolewski, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Brunei Darussalam, Gadong BE1410 (Brunei Darussalam)

    2008-05-15

    Ion beam analysis has been recently applied to study the adsorption phenomena of some adsorbates on metal surfaces. In this paper, surface recoils created by low energy Ne{sup +} ions are employed to study the adsorption site of deuterium (D) atoms on Pd(1 0 0). This technique is extremely surface sensitive with the capacity for atomic layer depth resolution. From azimuthal angle observations of Pd(1 0 0) specimen, it was found that at room temperature, D was adsorbed in the fourfold hollow site of Pd(1 0 0) at a height of 0.25 {+-} 0.05 A above the surface. The adsorbate remains in the hollow site at all temperatures to 383 K though the vertical height above the surface is found to depend on coverage and for the first time evidence is found of a transition to a p(2 x 2) structure for the adsorbate. There is no evidence of D sitting in the Pd(1 0 0) subsurface at room and higher temperatures.

  13. Adsorption behavior of glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxy-silane on titanium alloy Ti-6.5Al-1Mo-1V-2Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jianhua; Zhan Zhongwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu Mei, E-mail: yumei@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li Songmei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption isotherm of glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxy-silane (GTMS) on a titanium alloy was found fitting Temkin isotherm by XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From an electrochemical point of view, the in situ adsorption process of GTMS molecules agreed with XPS results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At 30 Degree-Sign C, the adsorption of GTMS molecules is spontaneous, and follows a chemisorption-based mechanism. - Abstract: The adsorption behavior of glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxy-silane (GTMS) on titanium alloy Ti-6.5Al-1Mo-1V-2Zr was investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Tafel polarization test, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the XPS results, it was found that the silane coverage on the titanium surface generally increased with GTMS concentration, with a slight decrease at concentration of 0.1%. Based on the relationship between isoelectronic point (IEP) of titanium surface and the pH values of silane solutions, adsorption mechanisms at different concentrations were proposed. The surface coverage data of GTMS on titanium surface was also derived from electrochemical measurements. By linear fitting the coverage data, it revealed that the adsorption of GTMS on the titanium alloy surface at 30 Degree-Sign C was of a physisorption-based mechanism, and obeyed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption equilibrium constant (K{sub ads}) and free energy of adsorption process ({Delta}G{sub ads}) were calculated to elaborate the mechanism of GTMS adsorption.

  14. First-principles calculation of adsorption of shale gas on CaCO3 (100) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiang; Pan, Yikun; Guo, Ping; Wang, Zhouhua; Wei, Na; Sun, Pengfei; Liu, Yuxiao

    2017-06-16

    To demonstrate the adsorption strength of shale gas to calcium carbonate in shale matrix, the adsorption of shale gas on CaCO3 (100) surfaces was studied using the first-principles method, which is based on the density functional theory (DFT). The structures and electronic properties of CH4, C2H6, CO2 and N2 molecules were calculated by the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), for a coverage of 1 monolayer (ML). Under the same conditions, the density of states (DOS) of CaCO3 (100) surfaces before and after the adsorption of shale gas molecules at high-symmetry adsorption sites were compared. The results showed that the adsorption energies of CH4, C2H6, CO2 and N2 on CaCO3 (100) surfaces were between 0.2683 eV and -0.7388 eV. When a CH4 molecule was adsorbed at a hollow site and its 2 hydrogen atoms were parallel to the long diagonal (H3) on the CaCO3 (100) surface, it had the most stable adsorption, and the adsorption energy was only -0.4160 eV. The change of adsorption energy of CH4 was no more than 0.0535 eV. Compared with the DOS distribution of CH4 before adsorption, it shifted to the left overall after adsorption. At the same time, the partial density of states (PDOS) curves of CaCO3 (100) surfaces before and after adsorption basically overlapped. This work showed that the adsorption effect of shale gas on calcium carbonate is very weak, and the adsorption is physisorption at the molecular level.

  15. Combined adsorption of lithium and oxygen on (111) face of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozovoj, Ya.B.; Smereka, T.P.; Babkin, G.V.; Payukh, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    A contact potential difference technique has been employed to study the electron-adsorption properties of lithium films on a (111) face of tungsten, preliminary coated with different doses of oxygen. At all the lithium coverages studied the presence of oxygen on the surface leads to a significant decrease of the work function φ min and an increase of the thermal stability of lithium films. For optimal coverage φ=1.8 eV, q=2.2 eV

  16. Determination of preferential rare earth adatom adsorption geometries on Si(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, Aniketa; Cao Juexian; Ouyang Wenjie; Wu Ruqian; Ragan, Regina

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption patterns of rare earth atoms on Si(001) were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and density functional calculations. Stable configurations were systematically determined via calculation of binding energies of various adatom coverage and adsorption geometry. Competition between inter-adatom hybridization and Coulomb repulsion is the mechanism contributing to binding energy minima associated with commonly observed rare earth adsorption geometries. Comparison of stable configurations with experimental scanning tunneling microscopy images demonstrated accuracy of the theoretical models. This paves a way for the understanding of self-assembly of rare earth disilicide nanowires on vicinal Si(001) substrates.

  17. Adsorption of gold (III) from aqueous solutions on bagasse ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, G.; Khan, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential of cheap biomass materials for the recovery of gold from industrial, and electroplating waste water effluents, adsorption of gold (III) from dilute solutions of hydrochloric acid on bagasse ash has been studied under various experimental conditions by using batch technique. Percentage extraction of gold (III) on bagasse ash was determined from its distribution coefficients as a function of contact time, pH, adsorbent, adsorbate concentrations, and temperature. The uptake of gold (III) by bagasse ash is time, pH, metal concentration, amount of adsorbate, and temperature dependent. Adsorption data have been interpreted in terms of Langmuir, and the Freundlich equations. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption of gold (III) on bagasse ash have been determined at three different temperatures. The positive value of heat of adsorption; delta H 44.52 kJ/mol shows that the adsorption of gold (III) on bagasse ash is endothermic where as the negative value of delta G = -0.5303 kJ/mol at 318 K shows the spontaneity of the process. Delta G becomes more negative with increase in temperature which shows that the adsorption is more favorable at higher temperatures. Under the optimal adsorption conditions the adsorption capacity of gold is 0.70 mg /g of the adsorbent out of which 0.65 mg of gold gets desorbed with 0.1 % thiourea solution. (author)

  18. Adsorption of heavy metal ions by sawdust of deciduous trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, D.; Stankovic, V.; Gorgievski, M.; Bogdanovic, G.; Kovacevic, R.

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption of heavy metal ions from synthetic solutions was performed using sawdust of beech, linden and poplar trees. The adsorption depends on the process time, pH of the solution, type of ions, initial concentration of metals and the sawdust concentration in suspension. The kinetics of adsorption was relatively fast, reaching equilibrium for less than 20 min. The adsorption equilibrium follows Langmuir adsorption model. The ion exchange mechanism was confirmed assuming that the alkali-earth metals from the adsorbent are substituted by heavy metal ions and protons. On lowering the initial pH, the adsorption capacity decreased, achieving a zero value at a pH close to unity. The maximum adsorption capacity (7-8 mg g -1 of sawdust) was achieved at a pH between 3.5 and 5 for all the studied kinds of sawdust. The initial concentration of the adsorbate and the concentration of sawdust strongly affect the process. No influence of particles size was evidenced. A degree of adsorption higher than 80% can be achieved for Cu 2+ ions but it is very low for Fe 2+ ions, not exceeding 10%.

  19. Study of 63Ni adsorption on NKF-6 zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Yu Xianjin; Chen Lei; Jing Yongjie; Ge Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of 63 Ni from aqueous solutions using NKF-6 zeolite was investigated by a batch technique under ambient conditions. The adsorption was investigated as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic substances (FA/HA) and temperature. The kinetic adsorption was well described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation. The adsorption of 63 Ni on NKF-6 zeolite was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, and the adsorption of 63 Ni increased with increasing NKF-6 zeolite content. At low pH values, the presence of FA enhanced the adsorption of 63 Ni on NKF-6 zeolite, but the presence of HA had no drastic effect. At high pH values, the presence of FA or HA decreased the adsorption of 63 Ni on NKF-6 zeolite. The adsorption isotherms were well represented by the Langmuir model. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 ) for the adsorption of 63 Ni were determined from the temperature dependent isotherms at 293.15, 313.15 and 333.15 o K, respectively, and the results indicate that the adsorption reaction was favored at high temperature. The results suggest that the adsorption process of 63 Ni on NKF-6 zeolite is spontaneous and endothermic. - Research highlights: → As an economical and efficient method, adsorption technique has been widely applied in the disposal of wastewaters. The study of 63 Ni on NKF-6 zeolite, especially the thermodynamic data of 63 Ni adsorption on NKF-6 zeolite and the effect of humic substances on 63 Ni uptake to humic-zeolite hybrids, is still scarce. In this paper, the sorption of 63 Ni on NKF-6 zeolite is studied as a function of various environmental conditions such as contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic substances and temperature. Based on the obtained experimental results, the adsorption mechanism of 63 Ni on NKF-6 zeolite is stated in detail. This study will have an important reference value in evaluating the physiochemical behavior of radionuclide 63 Ni.

  20. Assuring Access to Affordable Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Under the Affordable Care Act, millions of uninsured Americans will gain access to affordable coverage through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and improvements in...

  1. Ferric chloride modified zeolite in wastewater on Cr (VI) adsorption characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Hua

    2018-03-01

    Zeolite was modified by ferric chloride(Fe-Z) removal Cr (VI) ion from wastewater. The results showed that the effect of Cr(VI) adsorption on modified zeolite depended significantly on pH. It is favorable for the adsorption of Cr(VI) in acid condition. The Langmuir isotherm model has high fitting accuracy with experimental data, demonstrated that is monolayer adsorption and chemical adsorption.The pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation to the data. The model can describe the adsorption reaction process well.

  2. Study of adsorption properties of impregnated charcoal for airborne iodine and methyl iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi-dong, L.; Sui-yuang, H.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of airborne radioiodine and methyl iodide on impregnated charcoal were investigated. The activated charcoal tested was made from home-made oil-palm shells, and KI and TEDA were used as impregnants. A new technique was used to plot the dynamic partial adsorption isotherm at challenge concentrations (concentration range of iodine: 1-20 ppm v/v). Some adsorption properties of the impregnated charcoal were estimated with the dynamic partial adsorption isotherm. The dependences of the adsorption capacity and penetration behavior for airborne iodine and methyl iodide on the ambient conditions (temperature, relative humidity, and superficial velocity) were studied

  3. pH-Dependent Surface Chemistry from First Principles: Application to the BiVO4(010)-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Francesco; Wiktor, Julia; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2018-03-28

    We present a theoretical formulation for studying the pH-dependent interfacial coverage of semiconductor-water interfaces through ab initio electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and the thermodynamic integration method. This general methodology allows one to calculate the acidity of the individual adsorption sites on the surface and consequently the pH at the point of zero charge, pH PZC , and the preferential adsorption mode of water molecules, either molecular or dissociative, at the semiconductor-water interface. The proposed method is applied to study the BiVO 4 (010)-water interface, yields a pH PZC in excellent agreement with the experimental characterization. Furthermore, from the calculated p K a values of the individual adsorption sites, we construct an ab initio concentration diagram of all adsorbed species at the interface as a function of the pH of the aqueous solution. The diagram clearly illustrates the pH-dependent coverage of the surface and indicates that protons are found to be significantly adsorbed (∼1% of available sites) only in highly acidic conditions. The surface is found to be mostly covered by molecularly adsorbed water molecules in a wide interval of pH values ranging from 2 to 8. Hydroxyl ions are identified as the dominant adsorbed species at pH larger than 8.2.

  4. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L. [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China). High Pressure Adsorption Laboratory

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  5. Adsorption of Remazol Black B dye on Activated Carbon Felt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnaperna Lucio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Remazol Black B (anionic dye on a microporous activated carbon felt is investigated from its aqueous solution. The surface chemistry of activated carbon is studied using X-ray microanalysis, "Boehm" titrations and pH of PZC measurements which indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly acidic in nature. The kinetics of Remazol Black B adsorption is observed to be pH dependent and governed by the diffusion of the dye molecules. The experimental data can be explained by "intra-particle diffusion model". For Remazol Black B, the Khan model is best suited to simulate the adsorption isotherms.

  6. A coordination chemistry approach for modeling trace element adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, A.C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The traditional distribution coefficient, Kd, is highly dependent on the water chemistry and the surface properties of the geological system being studied and is therefore quite inappropriate for use in predictive models. Adsorption, one of the many processes included in Kd values, is described here using a coordination chemistry approach. The concept of adsorption of cationic trace elements by solid hydrous oxides can be applied to natural solids. The adsorption process is thus understood in terms of a classical complexation leading to the formation of surface (heterogeneous) ligands. Applications of this concept to some freshwater, estuarine and marine environments are discussed. (author)

  7. Traps for phosphorus adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Nawer D; Villegas, Wilson E; Rodriguez, Lino M; Taborda, Nelson; Montes de C, Consuelo

    2001-01-01

    Several AL 2 O 3 supported oxides such as: NiO, CuO, Co 2 O 3 BaO, CeO 2 and ZnO were investigated for phosphorus adsorption. Zno/y-Al 2 O 3 exhibited the highest phosphorus adsorption capacity. However, since it diminishes the activity of to the reaction mixture it should be located upstream of the NoX catalyst, i.e. 0,3% Pd-H-MOR, in order to protect it against p poisoning. The treatment procedure with citric acid was effective for the removal of more than 70% phosphorus from the adsorbent, ZnO/y-Al 2 O 3

  8. SAPO-34 coated adsorbent heat exchanger for adsorption chillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freni, Angelo; Bonaccorsi, Lucio; Calabrese, Luigi; Caprì, Angela; Frazzica, Andrea; Sapienza, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    In this work, adsorbent coatings on aluminum surfaces were prepared by dip-coating method starting from a water suspension of SAPO-34 zeolite and a silane-based binder. Silane-zeolite coatings morphology and surface coverage grade were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Adhesive and mechanical properties were evaluated by peel, pull-off, impact and micro-hardness tests, confirming the good interaction between metal substrate, binder and zeolite. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the adsorbent coating were studied in the range T = 30–150 °C and pH 2 O = 11 mbar using a CAHN 2000 thermo-balance. It was found that, in the investigated conditions, the organic binder doesn't affect the water adsorption capacity and adsorption kinetics of the original SAPO-34 zeolite. Subsequently, the zeolite coating was applied on a finned flat-tubes aluminum heat exchanger realizing a full-scale AdHEx with an uniform adsorbent coating 0.1 mm thick and a metal/adsorbent mass ratio = 6. The cooling capacity of the realized coated AdHEx was measured by a lab-scale adsorption chiller under realistic operating conditions for air conditioning applications. The coated AdHEx produced up to 675 W/kg ads specific cooling power with a cycle time of 5 min. Adsorption stability of the coated adsorber subjected to 600 sorption cycles was successfully verified. - Highlights: • Adsorbent coatings on aluminum surfaces were prepared by dip-coating method. • Silane-zeolite coatings morphology, and mechanical properties were studied. • The zeolite coating was applied on a finned flat-tubes aluminum heat exchanger. • The coated AdHEx was tested in a lab scale adsorption chiller

  9. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were realized by selecting the particles size with a differential mobility analyser. We observed a strong size-dependent increase in reactivity with the decrease of particles size. This result is relevant for the health issues. Indeed the smallest particles are most likely to penetrate deep into the lungs. Competitive reactions between ozone and other species like H2O or atomic oxygen were also considered. Oxygen atoms were generated by photolysis of O3

  10. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers--or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  11. Behaviors and kinetics of toluene adsorption-desorption on activated carbons with varying pore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Shunzheng; Yang, Zhongyu; Ma, Yueqiang; Feng, Tiecheng; Cui, Xiaoxu

    2018-05-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the behaviors and kinetics of toluene adsorption and desorption on activated carbons with varying pore structure. Five kinds of activated carbon from different raw materials were selected. Adsorption isotherms and breakthrough curves for toluene were measured. Langmuir and Freundlich equations were fitted to the equilibrium data, and the Freundlich equation was more suitable for simulating toluene adsorption. The process consisted of monolayer, multilayer and partial active site adsorption types. The effect of the pore structure of the activated carbons on toluene adsorption capacity was investigated. The quasi-first-order model was more suitable for describing the process than the quasi-second-order model. The adsorption data was also modeled by the internal particle diffusion model and it was found that the adsorption process could be divided into three stages. In the external surface adsorption process, the rate depended on the specific surface area. During the particle diffusion stage, pore structure and volume were the main factors affecting adsorption rate. In the final equilibrium stage, the rate was determined by the ratio of meso- and macro-pores to total pore volume. The rate over the whole adsorption process was dominated by the toluene concentration. The desorption behavior of toluene on activated carbons was investigated, and the process was divided into heat and mass transfer parts corresponding to emission and diffusion mechanisms, respectively. Physical adsorption played the main role during the adsorption process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions present in aqueous solution on the oxy hydroxides: boehmite (γ-AIOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH) and manganite (γ-MnOOH); Adsorcion de iones Pb(II) presentes en solucion acuosa sobre los oxihidroxidos: boehmita (γ-AlOOH), goetita (α-FeOOH) y manganita (γ-MnOOH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arreola L, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    Boehmite, goethite and manganite were synthesized by different methods and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric study , N{sub 2} physisorption measurements, scanning electron microscopy (Sem), semiquantitative elemental analysis (EDS), as well as additional studies were determined the surface active sites concentration and zero point of charge. Furthermore, we studied the Pb(II) ion adsorption capacity present in aqueous solution on these synthesized materials by batch-type experiments at room temperature, as a function of contact time between the phases liquid-solid system (adsorption kinetics), initial concentration of the adsorbate (adsorption isotherms), ph and temperature. The adsorption equilibrium time of adsorption processes in these studied systems was found at 60 minutes for boehmite and 30 minutes for goethite and manganite respectively after contacting the solid-liquid phase systems. The adsorption capacity of the lead ions on these adsorbent materials depended of lead concentration, ph and temperature of the systems. Were evaluated lead adsorption capacities in these materials to different contact times using an initial concentration of 20 mg/L of Pb(II) ions at ph = 4, the results of three systems were adjusted to second pseudo kinetic model order. With respect to the study of the adsorbate concentration effect, boehmite-Pb(II) and goethite-Pb(II) systems were adjusted to Langmuir isotherm model which proposes that the adsorption is carried out in a monolayer, moreover manganite-Pb(II) system was adjusted Temp kin isotherm model, which assumes that the adsorption heat of all the molecules in the layer decreases linearly with coverage due to adsorbent-adsorbate interactions and adsorption is characterized by a uniform distribution of the binding energies. Were studied the ph effect of Pb(II) ions solution on the adsorption capacity of such adsorbents, it was found that as the ph increases lead

  13. Adsorption of zirconium from nitric acid solutions on hydrated tin dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tret' yakov, S Ya; Sharygin, L M; Egorov, Yu V

    1977-01-01

    Adsorption of zirconium from nitric acid solutions has been studied with the use of the labeled atom method on hydrated tin dioxide depending on the sorbate concentration, pH and prehistory of the solution. It has been found that adsorption behavior of zirconium essentially depends on its state in the solution.

  14. Relationship between carbon microstructure, adsorption energy and hydrogen adsorption capacity at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagiello, J.; Thommes, M.

    2005-01-01

    Various microporous materials such as activated carbons, nano-tubes, synthetic micro-porous carbons as well as metal organic framework materials are being considered for hydrogen storage applications by means of physical adsorption. To develop materials of practical significance for hydrogen storage it is important to understand the relationships between pore sizes, adsorption energies and adsorption capacities. The pore size distribution (PSD) characterization is traditionally obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 K. However, a portion of the pores accessible to H 2 may not be accessible to N 2 at this temperature. Therefore, it was recently proposed to use the DFT analysis of H 2 adsorption isotherms to characterize pore structure of materials considered for hydrogen storage applications [1]. In present work, adsorption isotherms of H 2 and N 2 at cryogenic temperatures are used for the characterization of carbon materials. Adsorption measurements were performed with Autosorb 1 MP [Quantachrome Instruments, Boynton Beach, Florida, USA]. As an example, Fig 1 compares PSDs calculated for the activated carbon sample (F400, Calgon Carbon) using combined H 2 and N 2 data, and using N 2 isotherm only. The nitrogen derived PSD does not include certain amount of micro-pores which are accessible to H 2 but not to N 2 molecules. Obviously, the difference in the calculated PSDs by the two methods will depend on the actual content of small micro-pores in a given sample. Carbon adsorption properties can also be characterized by the isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, related to the adsorption energy and dependent on the carbon pore/surface structure. Fig 2 shows Qst data calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation from H 2 isotherms measured at 77 K and 87 K for the carbon molecular sieve CMS 5A (Takeda), oxidized single wall nano-tubes (SWNT) [2], and graphitized carbon black (Supelco). The Qst values decrease with increasing pore

  15. The effect of atomic hydrogen adsorption on single-walled carbon nano tubes properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, S.; Majidi, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the adsorption of hydrogen atoms on metallic single-walled carbon nano tubes using ab initio molecular dynamics method. It was found that the geometric structures and the electronic properties of hydrogenated SWNTs can be strongly changed by varying hydrogen coverage. The circular cross sections of the CNTs were changed with different hydrogen coverage. When hydrogen is chemisorbed on the surface of the carbon nano tube, the energy gap will be appeared. This is due to the degree of the Sp 3 hybridization, and the hydrogen coverage can control the band gap of the carbon nano tube

  16. Arsenite adsorption on goethite at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersten, Michael; Vlasova, Nataliya

    2009-01-01

    Experimental closed-system ΔT acid-base titrations between 10 deg. C and 75 deg. C were used to constrain a temperature-dependent 1-pK basic Stern model of the goethite surface complexation reactions. Experimental data for the temperature dependence of pH PZC determined by the one-term Van't Hoff extrapolation yield a value for goethite surface protonation enthalpy of -49.6 kJ mol -1 in good agreement with literature data. Batch titration data between 10 deg. C and 75 deg. C with arsenite concentrations between 10 μM and 100 μM yield adsorption curves, which increases with pH, peak at a pH of 9, and decrease at higher pH values. The slope of this bend becomes steeper with increasing temperature. A 1-pK charge distribution model in combination with a basic Stern layer option could be established for the pH-dependent arsenite adsorption. Formation of two inner-sphere bidentate surface complexes best matched the experimental data in agreement with published EXAFS spectroscopic information. The temperature behaviour of the thus derived intrinsic equilibrium constants can be well represented by the linear Van't Hoff logK T int vs. 1/T plot. Adsorption of arsenite on the goethite surface is exothermic (negative Δ r H 298 values) and therefore becomes weaker with increasing temperature. Application of the new constants with the aqueous speciation code VMINTEQ predicts that the As(III) concentration in presence of goethite sorbent decreases by 10 times once the hydrothermal solution is cooled from 99 deg. C to 1 deg. C. The model curve matches data from a natural thermal water spring system. The increase of adsorption efficiency for As along the temperature gradient may well serve as an additional process to prevent ecosystem contamination by As-rich water seepage from geothermal energy generation facilities

  17. Effect of nitrogen doping of graphene oxide on hydrogen and hydroxyl adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung [Daegu University, Kyungsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We investigate how nitrogen-doping affects the hydrogen (H) and the hydroxyl (OH) adsorption on graphene oxide (GO) and on nitrogen-doped GO (NGO) via pseudopotential plane wave density functional calculations within the local spin density approximation. We find that the nitrogen doping brings about drastic changes in the hydrogen and the hydroxyl adsorption energetics, but its effects depend sensitively on the nitrogen configuration in NGO. The H and the OH adsorption energies are comparable only for pyrrolic NGO. In GO and quarternary NGO, the H adsorption energy is greater than the OH adsorption energy while the trend is reversed in pyridinic NGO. Also, the OH adsorption process is less affected by nitrogen-doping than the H adsorption is.

  18. Adsorption of arsenate from aqueous solution by rice husk-based adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Taimur; Chaudhuri, Malay

    2013-01-01

    Rice husk-based adsorbent (RHBA) was prepared by burning rice husk in a muffle furnace at 400°C for 4 h and adsorption of arsenate by the RHBA from aqueous solution was examined. Batch adsorption test showed that extent of arsenate adsorption depended on contact time and pH. Equilibrium adsorption was attained in 60 min, with maximum adsorption occurring at pH 7. Equilibrium adsorption data were well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. Freundlich constants K f and 1/n were 3.62 and 2, respectively. The RHBA is effective in the adsorption of arsenate from water and is a potentially suitable filter medium for removing arsenate from groundwater at wells or in households.

  19. How strong is the edge effect in the adsorption of anticancer drugs on a graphene cluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Chanajaree, Rungroj; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hannongbua, Supot; Kungwan, Nawee; Wolschann, Peter; Karpfen, Alfred; Parasuk, Vudhichai

    2016-04-01

    The adsorption of nucleobase-analog anticancer drugs (fluorouracil, thioguanine, and mercaptopurine) on a graphene flake (C54H18) was investigated by shifting the site at which adsorption occurs from one end of the sheet to the other end. The counterpoise-corrected M06-2X/cc-pVDZ binding energies revealed that the binding stability decreases in the sequence thioguanine > mercaptopurine > fluorouracil. We found that adsorption near the middle of the sheet is more favorable than adsorption near the edge due to the edge effect. This edge effect is stronger for the adsorption of thioguanine or mercaptopurine than for fluorouracil adsorption. However, the edge effect reduces the binding energy of the drug to the flake by only a small amount, <5 kcal/mol, depending on the adsorption site and the alignment of the drug at this site.

  20. Copper adsorption in tropical oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Maria Lucia Azevedo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu adsorption, at concentrations between 0 to 800 mg L-1, was evaluated in surface and subsurface samples of three Brazilian soils: a heavy clayey-textured Rhodic Hapludalf (RH, a heavy clayey-textured Anionic ''Rhodic'' Acrudox (RA and a medium-textured Anionic ''Xanthic'' Acrudox (XA. After adsorption, two consecutive extractions were performed to the samples which received 100 mg L-1 copper. Surface samples adsorbed higher amounts of Cu than the subsurface, and exhibited lower Cu removed after the extractions, reinforcing the influence of the organic matter in the reactions. Cu adsorption was significant in the subsurface horizons of the Oxisols, despite the positive balance of charge, demonstrating the existence of mechanisms for specific adsorption, mainly related to the predominance of iron and aluminum oxides in the mineral fractions. In these samples, Cu was easily removed from the adsorption sites. RH demonstrated a higher capacity for the Cu adsorption in both horizons.

  1. A new theoretical approach to adsorption desorption behavior of Ga on GaAs surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangawa, Y.; Ito, T.; Taguchi, A.; Shiraishi, K.; Ohachi, T.

    2001-11-01

    We propose a new theoretical approach for studying adsorption-desorption behavior of atoms on semiconductor surfaces. The new theoretical approach based on the ab initio calculations incorporates the free energy of gas phase; therefore we can calculate how adsorption and desorption depends on growth temperature and beam equivalent pressure (BEP). The versatility of the new theoretical approach was confirmed by the calculation of Ga adsorption-desorption transition temperatures and transition BEPs on the GaAs(0 0 1)-(4×2)β2 Ga-rich surface. This new approach is feasible to predict how adsorption and desorption depend on the growth conditions.

  2. Albumin adsorption on oxide thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Bermudez, P., E-mail: suriel21@yahoo.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, C.U., 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Unidad de Posgrado, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodil, S.E.; Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, C.U., 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    Thin films of tantalum, niobium, zirconium and titanium oxides were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering and their wettability and surface energy, optical properties, roughness, chemical composition and microstructure were characterized using contact angle measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, profilometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The purpose of the work was to correlate the surface properties of the films to the Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption, as a first step into the development of an initial in vitro test of the films biocompatibility, based on standardized protein adsorption essays. The films were immersed into BSA solutions with different protein concentrations and protein adsorption was monitored in situ by dynamic ellipsometry; the adsorption-rate was dependent on the solution concentration and the immersion time. The overall BSA adsorption was studied in situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry and it was found to be influenced by the wettability of the films; larger BSA adsorption occurred on the more hydrophobic surface, the ZrO{sub 2} film. On the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and TiO{sub 2} films, hydrophilic surfaces, the overall BSA adsorption increased with the surface roughness or the polar component of the surface energy.

  3. Influence of organobentonite structure on toluene adsorption from water solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Vidal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to increase water pollution by organic compound derived from hydrocarbons such as toluene, several alternative technologies for remediation of polluted water have been originated. In this work natural bentonites were modified with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA+ for obtaining organophilic bentonites. The obtained CTMA-bentonites would be suitable for use as adsorbents of toluene present in water. The influence of structural characteristics of CTMA-bentonites on their adsorption capacity was studied. It was shown that adsorption of toluene depended on homogeneous interlayer space associated with arrangements of CTMA+ paraffin-monolayer and bilayer models, accompanied by a high degree ordering of the carbon chain of organic cation in both arrangements. However, packing density would not have an evident influence on the retention capacity of these materials. The solids obtained were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffractions and infrared spectroscopy. Toluene adsorption was measured by UV-visible spectrophotometer. Adsorption capacity was studied by determining adsorption isotherms and adsorption coefficient calculation. The adsorption isotherms were straight-line indicating a partition phenomenon of toluene between the aqueous and organic phase present in organophilic bentonites.

  4. Adsorption of sugar surfactants at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Imre; Mészáros, Róbert; Stubenrauch, Cosima; Gilányi, Tibor

    2012-08-01

    The adsorption isotherms of n-decyl-β-D-glucoside (β-C(10)G(1)) as well as various n-alkyl-β-D-maltosides (β-C(n)G(2)) with n=8, 10, 12 and 14 were determined from surface tension measurements. Based on the analysis of the adsorption isotherms, the total free energy change of adsorption was determined and a novel method was proposed to determine the maximum adsorbed amount of surfactant. It can be concluded that the driving force for adsorption first increases with increasing adsorbed amount of the sugar surfactants and then levels off in a plateau. This peculiar behaviour is interpreted as formation of a thin liquid-like alkane film of overlapping alkyl chains at the air/water interface once a certain adsorbed amount is exceeded. The driving force of adsorption depends on the alkyl chain length only and is not affected by the type of the head group. The hydrophobic contribution to the standard free energy change of adsorption was compared with the values of sodium alkylsulfate and alkyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants. This comparison reveals that the hydrophobic driving force of adsorption is the largest for the sodium alkylsulfates, whereas it is the same for the sugar surfactants and the alkyltrimethylammonium bromides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mediating Trust in Terrorism Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    crisis. While the framework is presented in the context of television coverage of a terror-related crisis situation, it can equally be used in connection with all other forms of mediated trust. Key words: National crisis, risk communication, crisis management, television coverage, mediated trust.......Mass mediated risk communication can contribute to perceptions of threats and fear of “others” and/or to perceptions of trust in fellow citizens and society to overcome problems. This paper outlines a cross-disciplinary holistic framework for research in mediated trust building during an acute...

  6. Removal of binary dyes mixtures with opposite and similar charges by adsorption, coagulation/flocculation and catalytic oxidation in the presence of CeO2/H2O2 Fenton-like system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa Hamoud, Houeida; Finqueneisel, Gisèle; Azambre, Bruno

    2017-06-15

    In this study, the removal of binary mixtures of dyes with similar (Orange II/Acid Green 25) or opposite charges (Orange II/Malachite Green) was investigated either by simple adsorption on ceria or by the heterogeneous Fenton reaction in presence of H 2 O 2 . First, the CeO 2 nanocatalyst with high specific surface area (269 m 2 /g) and small crystal size (5 nm) was characterized using XRD, Raman spectroscopy and N 2 physisorption at 77 K. The adsorption of single dyes was studied either from thermodynamic and kinetic viewpoints. It is shown that the adsorption of dyes on ceria surface is highly pH-dependent and followed a pseudo-second order kinetic model. Adsorption isotherms fit well the Langmuir model with a complete monolayer coverage and higher affinity towards Orange II at pH 3, compared to other dyes. For the (Orange II/Acid Green 25) mixture, both the amounts of dyes adsorbed on ceria surface and discoloration rates measured from Fenton experiments were decreased by comparison with single dyes. This is due to the adsorption competition existing onto the same surface Ce x+ sites and the reaction competition with hydroxyl radicals, respectively. The behavior of the (Orange II/Malachite Green) mixture is markedly different. Dyes with opposite charges undergo paired adsorption on ceria as well as homogeneous and heterogeneous coagulation/flocculation processes, but can also be removed by heterogeneous Fenton process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acetate and phosphate anion adsorption linear sweep voltammograms simulated using density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Savizi, Iman Shahidi Pour

    2011-04-01

    Specific adsorption of anions to electrode surfaces may alter the rates of electrocatalytic reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) methods are used to predict the adsorption free energy of acetate and phosphate anions as a function of Pt(1 1 1) electrode potential. Four models of the electrode potential are used including a simple vacuum slab model, an applied electric field model with and without the inclusion of a solvating water bi-layer, and the double reference model. The linear sweep voltammogram (LSV) due to anion adsorption is simulated using the DFT results. The inclusion of solvation at the electrochemical interface is necessary for accurately predicting the adsorption peak position. The Langmuir model is sufficient for predicting the adsorption peak shape, indicating coverage effects are minor in altering the LSV for acetate and phosphate adsorption. Anion adsorption peak positions are determined for solution phase anion concentrations present in microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells and discussion is provided as to the impact of anion adsorption on oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reaction rates in these devices. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Monitoring intervention coverage in the context of universal health coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ties Boerma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring universal health coverage (UHC focuses on information on health intervention coverage and financial protection. This paper addresses monitoring intervention coverage, related to the full spectrum of UHC, including health promotion and disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation. A comprehensive core set of indicators most relevant to the country situation should be monitored on a regular basis as part of health progress and systems performance assessment for all countries. UHC monitoring should be embedded in a broad results framework for the country health system, but focus on indicators related to the coverage of interventions that most directly reflect the results of UHC investments and strategies in each country. A set of tracer coverage indicators can be selected, divided into two groups-promotion/prevention, and treatment/care-as illustrated in this paper. Disaggregation of the indicators by the main equity stratifiers is critical to monitor progress in all population groups. Targets need to be set in accordance with baselines, historical rate of progress, and measurement considerations. Critical measurement gaps also exist, especially for treatment indicators, covering issues such as mental health, injuries, chronic conditions, surgical interventions, rehabilitation, and palliation. Consequently, further research and proxy indicators need to be used in the interim. Ideally, indicators should include a quality of intervention dimension. For some interventions, use of a single indicator is feasible, such as management of hypertension; but in many areas additional indicators are needed to capture quality of service provision. The monitoring of UHC has significant implications for health information systems. Major data gaps will need to be filled. At a minimum, countries will need to administer regular household health surveys with biological and clinical data collection. Countries will also need to improve the

  9. Adsorption and collective paramagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Selwood, Pierce W

    1962-01-01

    Adsorption and Collective Paramagnetism describes a novel method for studying chemisorption. The method is based on the change in the number of unpaired electrons in the adsorbent as chemisorption occurs. The method is applicable to almost all adsorbates, but it is restricted to ferromagnetic adsorbents such as nickel, which may be obtained in the form of very small particles, that is to say, to ferromagnetic adsorbents with a high specific surface. While almost all the data used illustratively have been published elsewhere this is the first complete review of the subject. The book is addresse

  10. Comparison of reactivity on step and terrace sites of Pd (3 3 2) surface for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Farouq; Nagumo, Ryo; Miura, Ryuji; Ai, Suzuki; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The notion of 'active sites' is fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis. However, the exact nature of the active sites, and hence the mechanism by which they act, are still largely a matter of speculation. In this study, we have presented a systematic quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations for the interaction of hydrogen on different step and terrace sites of the Pd (3 3 2) surface. Finally the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on step and terrace as well as the influence of surface hydrogen vacancy for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen has been investigated through QCMD. This is a state-of-the-art method for calculating the interaction of atoms and molecules with metal surfaces. It is found that fully hydrogen covered (saturated) step sites can dissociate hydrogen moderately and that a monovacancy surface is suitable for significant dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. However in terrace site of the surface we have found that dissociation of hydrogen takes place only on Pd sites where the metal atom is not bound to any pre-adsorbed hydrogen atoms. Furthermore, from the molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations, we identify a number of consequences for the interpretation and modeling of diffusion experiments demonstrating the coverage and directional dependence of atomic hydrogen diffusion on stepped palladium surface.

  11. A KINETIC MODEL FOR MONO-LAYER GLOBULAR PROTEIN ADSORPTION ON SOLID/LIQUID INTERFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal I. M. Al-Malah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model was derived for globular protein adsorption. The model takes into account the three possible scenarios of a protein molecule in solution, being exposed to an interface: adsorption step from the solution to the interface; the possible desorption back into the solution; and the surface-induced unfolding or spreading of the protein unto the substrate surface. A globular protein molecule is visualized as a sphere with radius D. In addition to the general case of protein adsorption, which portrays either the surface coverage (Theta or surface concentration (� as a function of the adsorption time, special cases, like equilibrium condition, lowsurface coverage, irreversible, and Langmuirian were also presented and treated in light of the derived model. The general model was simplified for each of the subset cases. The irreversibility versus reversibility of protein adsorption was discussed. The substrate surface energetics or effects are accounted for via the proposition of the percent relative change in D/V ratio for the adsorbing protein, called (D/VPRC parameter. (D/VPRC is calculated with respect to the monolayer surface concentration of protein, where the latter is given by D/Vratio. This can be used as a landmark to protein adsorption isotherms or even kinetics. This is visualized as an indicator for solid substrate effects on the adsorbing proteins. (D/VPRC can be zero (fresh monolayer, negative (aged monolayer, or positive (multi-layer. The reference surface concentration is reported for some selected proteins.

  12. Generalized random sequential adsorption of polydisperse mixtures on a one-dimensional lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lončarević, I; Budinski-Petković, Lj; Vrhovac, S B; Belić, A

    2010-01-01

    Generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) of polydisperse mixtures of k-mers on a one-dimensional lattice is studied numerically by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetics of the deposition process of mixtures is studied for the irreversible case, for adsorption–desorption processes and for the case where adsorption, desorption and diffusion are present simultaneously. We concentrate here on the influence of the number of mixture components and the length of the k-mers making up the mixture on the temporal behavior of the coverage fraction θ(t). The approach of the coverage θ(t) to the jamming limit θ jam in the case of irreversible RSA is found to be exponential, θ jam -θ(t)∝ exp(-t/σ), not only for a whole mixture, but also for the individual components. For the reversible deposition of polydisperse mixtures, we find that after the initial 'jamming', a stretched exponential growth of the coverage θ(t) towards the equilibrium state value θ eq occurs, i.e., θ eq -θ(t)∝ exp[-(t/τ) β ]. The characteristic timescale τ is found to decrease with the desorption probability P des . When adsorption, desorption and diffusion occur simultaneously, the coverage of a mixture always reaches an equilibrium value θ eq , but there is a significant difference in temporal evolution between the coverage with diffusion and that without

  13. Ab initio study of the adsorption of antimony and arsenic on the Si(110) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huitzil-Tepanecatl, Arely; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2010-01-01

    We have performed first principles total energy calculations to investigate the adsorption of Sb and As adatoms on the Si(110) surface using a (2 x 3) supercell. The energetics and atomic structures have been investigated in four atomic configurations. One structure is obtained by placing 1/3 of a monolayer (ML) of Sb (As) atoms on the Si(110) surface. The other three geometries are obtained by depositing 1 ML of Sb (As) atoms on the surface. In the first case the structure is formed by four trimers, in the second case the geometry is formed by zigzag atomic chains and in the third case the structure contains 'microfacets'. The energetics results of the Sb adsorption show that for low coverage the tetrahedrons formed by the adsorption of 1/3 ML is the most stable configuration, while in the monolayer region the zigzag atomic chain is the most stable structure. However, the total energies of the trimer and microfacet structures are slightly higher, indicating that under some conditions, they may be formed. In an experimental report it has been suggested that the adsorption of 1/3 and 1 ML of Sb corresponds to the low and high coverage in the experiments of Zotov et al. [A. V. Zotov, V. G. Lifshifts, and A. N. Demidchik, Surf. Sci. 274, L583 (1992)]. On the other hand, our results of the As adsorption show that for low coverage, the tetrahedrons in the adsorption of 1/3 ML also give the most stable configuration. However, at the 1 ML coverage, a structure formed by microfacets is the most stable structure, in agreement with previous results.

  14. Ab initio study of the adsorption of antimony and arsenic on the Si(110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huitzil-Tepanecatl, Arely [Postgrado en Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, BUAP, Apartado Postal 52, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Cocoletzi, Gregorio H., E-mail: cocoletz@sirio.ifuap.buap.m [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Codigo Postal 22860, Apartado Postal 2732 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 2681, Ensenada, Baja California, 22800 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Takeuchi, Noboru [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 2681, Ensenada, Baja California, 22800 (Mexico)

    2010-10-29

    We have performed first principles total energy calculations to investigate the adsorption of Sb and As adatoms on the Si(110) surface using a (2 x 3) supercell. The energetics and atomic structures have been investigated in four atomic configurations. One structure is obtained by placing 1/3 of a monolayer (ML) of Sb (As) atoms on the Si(110) surface. The other three geometries are obtained by depositing 1 ML of Sb (As) atoms on the surface. In the first case the structure is formed by four trimers, in the second case the geometry is formed by zigzag atomic chains and in the third case the structure contains 'microfacets'. The energetics results of the Sb adsorption show that for low coverage the tetrahedrons formed by the adsorption of 1/3 ML is the most stable configuration, while in the monolayer region the zigzag atomic chain is the most stable structure. However, the total energies of the trimer and microfacet structures are slightly higher, indicating that under some conditions, they may be formed. In an experimental report it has been suggested that the adsorption of 1/3 and 1 ML of Sb corresponds to the low and high coverage in the experiments of Zotov et al. [A. V. Zotov, V. G. Lifshifts, and A. N. Demidchik, Surf. Sci. 274, L583 (1992)]. On the other hand, our results of the As adsorption show that for low coverage, the tetrahedrons in the adsorption of 1/3 ML also give the most stable configuration. However, at the 1 ML coverage, a structure formed by microfacets is the most stable structure, in agreement with previous results.

  15. Study on Shale Adsorption Equation Based on Monolayer Adsorption, Multilayer Adsorption, and Capillary Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qing; Tian, Yuanyuan; Li, Peng; Yan, Changhui; Pang, Yu; Zheng, Li; Deng, Hucheng; Zhou, Wen; Meng, Xianghao

    2017-01-01

    Shale gas is an effective gas resource all over the world. The evaluation of pore structure plays a critical role in exploring shale gas efficiently. Nitrogen adsorption experiment is one of the significant approaches to analyze pore size structure of shale. Shale is extremely heterogeneous due to component diversity and structure complexity. Therefore, adsorption isotherms for homogeneous adsorbents and empirical isotherms may not apply to shale. The shape of adsorption-desorption curve indi...

  16. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  17. Improved Isotherm Data for Adsorption of Methane on Activated Carbons

    KAUST Repository

    Loh, Wai Soong

    2010-08-12

    This article presents the adsorption isotherms of methane onto two different types of activated carbons, namely, Maxsorb III and ACF (A-20) at temperatures from (5 to 75) °C and pressures up to 2.5 MPa. The volumetric technique has been employed to measure the adsorption isotherms. The experimental results presented herein demonstrate the improved accuracy of the uptake values compared with previous measurement techniques for similar adsorbate-adsorbent combinations. The results are analyzed with various adsorption isotherm models. The heat of adsorption, which is concentration and temperature dependent, has been calculated from the measured isotherm data. Henry\\'s law coefficients for these adsorbent-methane pairs are also evaluated at various temperatures. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xia; Huang Xin [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liao Xuepin, E-mail: xpliao@scu.edu.cn [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi Bi, E-mail: shibi@scu.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2011-02-28

    The collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via a reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to Cu(II) were systematically investigated, including pH effect, adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, and column adsorption. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on CTR was pH-dependent, and it increased with the increase of solution pH. The adsorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir isotherm model with correlating constant (R{sup 2}) higher than 0.99. The adsorption capacity determined at 303 K was high up to 0.26 mmol/g, which was close to the value (0.266 mmol/g) estimated from Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity was increased with the increase of temperature, and thermodynamic calculations suggested that the adsorption of Cu(II) on CTR is an endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Further column studies suggested that CTR was effective for the removal of Cu(II) from solutions, and more than 99% of Cu(II) was desorbed from column using 0.1 mol/L HNO{sub 3} solution. The CTR column can be reused to adsorb Cu(II) without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  19. [Application of classical isothermal adsorption models in heavy metal ions/ diatomite system and related problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Wu, Qing-Ding; Wang, Ping; Li, Ke-Lin; Lei, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2013-11-01

    In order to fully understand adsorption nature of Cu2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite, and to find problems of classical isothermal adsorption models' application in liquid/solid system, a series of isothermal adsorption tests were conducted. As results indicate, the most suitable isotherm models for describing adsorption of Pb2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite are Tenkin, Tenkin, Langmuir, Tenkin, Freundlich and Freundlich, respectively, the adsorption of each ion onto natural diatomite is mainly a physical process, and the adsorption reaction is favorable. It also can be found that, when using classical isothermal adsorption models to fit the experimental data in liquid/solid system, the equilibrium adsorption amount q(e) is not a single function of ion equilibrium concentration c(e), while is a function of two variables, namely c(e) and the adsorbent concentration W0, q(e) only depends on c(e)/W(0). Results also show that the classical isothermal adsorption models have a significant adsorbent effect, and their parameter values are unstable, the simulation values of parameter differ greatly from the measured values, which is unhelpful for practical use. The tests prove that four-adsorption-components model can be used for describing adsorption behavior of single ion in nature diatomite-liquid system, its parameters k and q(m) have constant values, which is favorable for practical quantitative calculation in a given system.

  20. Adsorption of emerging contaminant metformin using graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuai; Liu, Yun-Guo; Liu, Shao-Bo; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Jiang, Lu-Hua; Tan, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Lu; Zeng, Wei; Li, Ting-Ting; Yang, Chun-Ping

    2017-07-01

    The occurrence of emerging contaminants in our water resources poses potential threats to the livings. Due to the poor treatment in wastewater management, treatment technologies are needed to effectively remove these products for living organism safety. In this study, Graphene oxide (GO) was tested for the first time for its capacity to remove a kind of emerging wastewater contaminants, metformin. The research was conducted by using a series of systematic adsorption and kinetic experiments. The results indicated that GO could rapidly and efficiently reduce the concentration of metformin, which could provide a solution in handling this problem. The uptake of metformin on the graphene oxide was strongly dependent on temperature, pH, ionic strength, and background electrolyte. The adsorption kinetic experiments revealed that almost 80% removal of metformin was achieved within 20 min for all the doses studied, corresponding to the relatively high k 1 (0.232 min -1 ) and k 2 (0.007 g mg -1  min -1 ) values in the kinetic models. It indicated that the highest adsorption capacity in the investigated range (q m ) of GO for metformin was at pH 6.0 and 288 K. Thermodynamic study indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous (ΔG 0  adsorption of metformin increased when the pH values changed from 4.0 to 6.0, and decreased adsorption were observed at pH 6.0-11.0. GO still exhibited excellent adsorption capacity after several desorption/adsorption cycles. Besides, both so-called π-π interactions and hydrogen bonds might be mainly responsible for the adsorption of metformin onto GO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adsorption of tannic acid from aqueous solution onto surfactant-modified zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jianwei, E-mail: jwlin@shou.edu.cn [College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, No. 999 Hucheng Huan Road, Pudong District, Shanghai 201306 (China); Zhan, Yanhui; Zhu, Zhiliang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing, Yunqing [College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, No. 999 Hucheng Huan Road, Pudong District, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZs) with various loadings of cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) were used as adsorbents to remove tannic acid (TA) from aqueous solution. Highlights: {yields} Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) have a good tannic acid (TA) adsorption capacity. {yields} Adsorption capacity for SMZ with bilayer was relatively high at solution pH 3.5-7.0. {yields} Adsorption was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. {yields} Adsorption fitted well with Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherm models. {yields} Coexisting Cu(II) in aqueous solution resulted in markedly enhanced TA adsorption. - Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZs) with various loadings of cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) were used as adsorbents to remove tannic acid (TA) from aqueous solution. The TA adsorption efficiencies for natural zeolite and various SMZs were compared. SMZ presented higher TA adsorption efficiency than natural zeolite, and SMZ with higher loading amount of CPB exhibited higher TA adsorption efficiency. The adsorption of TA onto SMZ as a function of contact time, initial adsorbate concentration, temperature, ionic strength, coexisting Cu(II) and solution pH was investigated. The adsorbents before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of TA onto SMZ with CPB bilayer coverage (SMZ-CBC) followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of TA onto SMZ-CBC were well represented by Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that TA adsorption onto SMZ-CBC was spontaneous and exothermic. The TA adsorption capacity for SMZ-CBC slightly decreased with increasing ionic strength but significantly increased with increasing Cu(II) concentration. The TA adsorption

  2. Investigating the Heterogeneous Interaction of VOCs with Natural Atmospheric Particles: Adsorption of Limonene and Toluene on Saharan Mineral Dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanías, Manolis N; Ourrad, Habib; Thévenet, Frédéric; Riffault, Véronique

    2016-03-03

    The heterogeneous interaction of limonene and toluene with Saharan dusts was investigated under dark conditions, pressure of 1 atm, and temperature 293 K. The mineral dust samples were collected from six different regions along the Sahara desert, extending from Tunisia to the western Atlantic coastal areas of Morocco, and experiments were carried out with the smallest sieved fractions, that is, inferior to 100 μm. N2 sorption measurements, granulometric analysis, and X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (XRF and XRD) measurements were conducted to determine the physicochemical properties of the particles. The chemical characterization showed that dust originating from mideastern Sahara has a significantly higher SiO2 content (∼ 82%) than dust collected from the western coastal regions where the SiO2 relative abundance was ∼ 50%. A novel experimental setup combining diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), selected-ion flow-tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS), and long path transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) allowed us to follow both the adsorbed and gas phases. The kinetic adsorption/desorption measurements were performed using purified dry air as bath gas, exposing each dust surface to 10 ppm of the selective volatile organic compound (VOC). The adsorption of limonene was independent of the SiO2 content, given the experimental uncertainties, and the coverage measurements ranged between (10 and 18) × 10(13) molecules cm(-2). Experimental results suggest that other metal oxides that could possibly influence dust acidity may enhance the adsorption of limonene. On the contrary, in the case of toluene, the adsorption capacities of the Saharan samples increased with decreasing SiO2 content; however, the coverage measurements were significantly lower than those of limonene and ranged between (2 and 12) × 10(13) molecules cm(-2). Flushing the surface with purified dry air showed that VOC desorption is not a

  3. Adsorption of Dyes in Studying the Surface Chemistry of Ultradispersed Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, T. D.; Yunusova, G. R.; Lanin, S. N.

    2018-05-01

    The effect the surface chemistry of ultradispersed diamond (UDD) has on the adsorption of watersoluble dyes is considered. A comparison is made to adsorption on graphitized thermal carbon black (GTCB), which has a homogeneous and nonporous surface. The adsorption isotherms of dyes and the dependence of the adsorption on the pH of solutions are measured. It is found that UDD adsorbs acid (anionic) dyes—acid orange (AO) and acid anthraquinone blue (AAB)—but barely adsorbs a basic (cationic) dye, methylene blue (MB), because of the predominance of positively charged basic groups on the surface of UDD. The maximum adsorption of AO is much lower on UDD than on GTCB, while the maximum adsorption of AAB is similar for both surfaces. The adsorption of AO on UDD depends strongly on the pH of the solution, while the adsorption of AAB is independent of this parameter. It is suggested that the adsorption of AAB is determined not only by ionic and hydrophobic interactions but also by coordination interactions with impurity metal ions on a UDD surface. It is concluded that the adsorption of dyes characterizes the chemistry of a UDD surface with high sensitivity.

  4. Effects of chlorine and oxygen coverage on the structure of the Au(111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Thomas A.; Friend, Cynthia M.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of Cl and O coverage on the atomic structure of the Au(111) surface using density functional theory calculations. We find that the release and incorporation of gold atoms in the adsorbate layer becomes energetically favorable only at high coverages of either O or Cl (>0.66 ML (monolayer) for O and >0.33 ML for Cl), whereas adsorption without the incorporation of gold is favorable at lower coverages. The bonding between the adsorbate and gold substrate changes significantly with coverage, becoming more covalent (less ionic) at higher Cl and O coverage. This is based on the fact that at higher coverages there is less ionic charge transfer to the adsorbate, while the electron density in the region between the adsorbate and a surface gold atom is increased. Our results illustrate that the O and Cl coverage on Au(111) can dramatically affect its structure and bonding, which are important features in any application of gold involving these adsorbates.

  5. Interactive computation of coverage regions for indoor wireless communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, A. Lynn; Bhat, Nitin; Rappaport, Theodore S.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes a system which assists in the strategic placement of rf base stations within buildings. Known as the site modeling tool (SMT), this system allows the user to display graphical floor plans and to select base station transceiver parameters, including location and orientation, interactively. The system then computes and highlights estimated coverage regions for each transceiver, enabling the user to assess the total coverage within the building. For single-floor operation, the user can choose between distance-dependent and partition- dependent path-loss models. Similar path-loss models are also available for the case of multiple floors. This paper describes the method used by the system to estimate coverage for both directional and omnidirectional antennas. The site modeling tool is intended to be simple to use by individuals who are not experts at wireless communication system design, and is expected to be very useful in the specification of indoor wireless systems.

  6. Terrorism and nuclear damage coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbach, N. L. J. T.; Brown, O. F.; Vanden Borre, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with nuclear terrorism and the manner in which nuclear operators can insure themselves against it, based on the international nuclear liability conventions. It concludes that terrorism is currently not covered under the treaty exoneration provisions on 'war-like events' based on an analysis of the concept on 'terrorism' and travaux preparatoires. Consequently, operators remain liable for nuclear damage resulting from terrorist acts, for which mandatory insurance is applicable. Since nuclear insurance industry looks at excluding such insurance coverage from their policies in the near future, this article aims to suggest alternative means for insurance, in order to ensure adequate compensation for innocent victims. The September 11, 2001 attacks at the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC resulted in the largest loss in the history of insurance, inevitably leading to concerns about nuclear damage coverage, should future such assaults target a nuclear power plant or other nuclear installation. Since the attacks, some insurers have signalled their intentions to exclude coverage for terrorism from their nuclear liability and property insurance policies. Other insurers are maintaining coverage for terrorism, but are establishing aggregate limits or sublimits and are increasing premiums. Additional changes by insurers are likely to occur. Highlighted by the September 11th events, and most recently by those in Madrid on 11 March 2004, are questions about how to define acts of terrorism and the extent to which such are covered under the international nuclear liability conventions and various domestic nuclear liability laws. Of particular concern to insurers is the possibility of coordinated simultaneous attacks on multiple nuclear facilities. This paper provides a survey of the issues, and recommendations for future clarifications and coverage options.(author)

  7. Calculation of Binary Adsorption Equilibria: Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Lis; Krøll, A.

    1999-01-01

    Binary adsorption equilibria are calculated by means of a mathematical model for multicomponent mixtures combined with the SPD (Spreading Pressure Dependent) model for calculation of activity coefficients in the adsorbed phase. The model has been applied successfully for the adsorption of binary ...... mixtures of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide on activated carbons. The model parameters have been determined, and the model has proven to be suited for prediction of adsorption equilibria in the investigated systems....

  8. New developments for localized adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudh-hir, M.E.

    1989-02-01

    Using the diagrammatic expansion, new developments for localized adsorption are found. It is proved that the correlations in the system, in the absence of the attractive site potential, and the periodicity of the sites play a fundamental role in the adsorption phenomena. 14 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Protein adsorption onto nanozeolite: effect of micropore openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiamin; Li, Xiang; Yan, Yueer; Hu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yahong; Tang, Yi

    2013-09-15

    A clear and deep understanding of protein adsorption on porous surfaces is desirable for the reasonable design and applications of porous materials. In this study, the effect of surface micropores on protein adsorption was systematically investigated by comparing adsorption behavior of cytochrome c (Cyto-c) and Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) on porous and non-porous nanozeolites silicalite-1 and Beta. It was found that micropore openings on the surface of nanozeolites played a key role in determining adsorption affinity, conformations, and activities of proteins. Both Cyto-c and CALB showed higher affinity to porous nanozeolites than to non-porous ones, resulting in greater conformational change of proteins on porous surfaces which in turn affected their bio-catalytic performance. The activity of Cyto-c improved while that of CALB decreased on porous nanozeolites. Recognition of certain amino acid residues or size-matching secondary structures by micropore openings on the surface of nanozeolites was proposed to be the reason. Moreover, the pore opening effect of porous nanozeolites on protein behavior could be altered by changing protein coverage on them. This study gives a novel insight into the interaction between proteins and microporous materials, which will help to guide the rational fabrication and bio-applications of porous materials in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Krypton Adsorption on Zeolite-Templated Carbon and Anomalous Surface Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murialdo, Maxwell; Stadie, Nicholas P; Ahn, Channing C; Fultz, Brent

    2015-07-28

    Krypton adsorption was measured at eight temperatures between 253 and 433 K on a zeolite-templated carbon and two commercial carbons. The data were fitted using a generalized Langmuir isotherm model and thermodynamic properties were extracted. Differing from that on commercial carbons, krypton adsorption on the zeolite-templated carbon is accompanied by an increasing isosteric enthalpy of adsorption, rising by up to 1.4 kJ mol(-1) as a function of coverage. This increase is a result of enhanced adsorbate-adsorbate interactions promoted by the ordered, nanostructured surface of the adsorbent. An assessment of the strength and nature of these adsorbate-adsorbate interactions is made by comparing the measured isosteric enthalpies of adsorption (and other thermodynamic quantities) to fundamental metrics of intermolecular interactions of krypton and other common gases.

  11. 78 FR 54986 - Information Reporting of Minimum Essential Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... employees, and offer that coverage to spouses and dependents, all with no employee contribution, to forgo... health benefits provided through a contribution to a health savings account. Health savings accounts are... agenda will be available free of charge at the hearing. Drafting Information The principal authors of...

  12. Reactivity of transition metal atoms supported or not on TiO2(110) toward CO and H adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Helali, Zeineb

    2015-04-01

    Following our strategy to analyze the metal–support interaction, we present periodic DFT calculations for adsorption of metal atoms on a perfect rutile TiO2(110) surface (at low coverage, θ = 1/3) to investigate the interaction of an individual metal atom, M, with TiO2 and its consequence on the coadsorption of H and CO over M/TiO2. M under investigation varies in a systematic way from K to Zn. It is found that the presence of the support decreases or increases the strength of M–H or M–CO interaction according to the nature of M. The site of the adsorption for H and the formation of HCO/M also depend on M. From the left- to the right-hand side of the period, C and O both interact while O progressively detaches from M. On the contrary, for M = Fe–Cu, CO dissociation is more likely to happen. For CO and H coadsorption, two extreme cases emerge: For Ni, the hydrogen adsorbed should easily move on the support and CO dissociation is more likely. For Ti or Sc, H is easily coadsorbed with CO on the metal and CO hydrogenation could be the initial step. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  13. Intra-disciplinary differences in database coverage and the consequences for bibliometric research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2008-01-01

    Bibliographic databases (including databases based on open access) are routinely used for bibliometric research. The value of a specific database depends to a large extent on the coverage of the discipline(s) under study. A number of studies have determined the coverage of databases in specific d...... and psychology). The point extends to include both the uneven coverage of specialties and research traditions. The implications for bibliometric research are discussed, and precautions which need to be taken are outlined. ...

  14. Root coverage with bridge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession in anterior teeth is a common concern due to esthetic reasons or root sensitivity. Gingival recession, especially in multiple anterior teeth, is of huge concern due to esthetic reasons. Various mucogingival surgeries are available for root coverage. This case report presents a new bridge flap technique, which allows the dentist not only to cover the previously denuded root surfaces but also to increase the zone of attached gingiva at a single step. In this case, a coronally advanced flap along with vestibular deepening technique was used as root coverage procedure for the treatment of multiple recession-type defect. Here, vestibular deepening technique is used to increase the width of the attached gingiva. The predictability of this procedure results in an esthetically healthy periodontium, along with gain in keratinized tissue and good patient′s acceptance.

  15. -Net Approach to Sensor -Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusco Giordano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensors rely on battery power, and in many applications it is difficult or prohibitive to replace them. Hence, in order to prolongate the system's lifetime, some sensors can be kept inactive while others perform all the tasks. In this paper, we study the -coverage problem of activating the minimum number of sensors to ensure that every point in the area is covered by at least sensors. This ensures higher fault tolerance, robustness, and improves many operations, among which position detection and intrusion detection. The -coverage problem is trivially NP-complete, and hence we can only provide approximation algorithms. In this paper, we present an algorithm based on an extension of the classical -net technique. This method gives an -approximation, where is the number of sensors in an optimal solution. We do not make any particular assumption on the shape of the areas covered by each sensor, besides that they must be closed, connected, and without holes.

  16. Engineering the work function of buckled boron α-sheet by lithium adsorption: a first-principles investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bing; Yu, Hai-tao; Xie, Ying; Lian, Yong-fu

    2014-11-26

    First-principles density functional theory calculations were performed to study the effect of Li adsorption on the structural and electronic properties, particularly the work function, of boron α-sheet. The calculated binding energies indicated that boron α-sheet could be well stabilized by the adsorption of Li atoms. Furthermore, the work functions of Li-adsorbed boron α-sheets were observed to decrease drastically with increasing Li coverage. The work functions are lower than that of Mg and even, for some of them, lower than that of Ca, indicating a considerable potential application of Li-adsorbed boron α-sheets as field-emission and electrode materials. Based on the calculated geometric and electronic structures, we discuss in details some possible aspects affecting the work function. The Li coverage dependence of the work functions of Li-adsorbed boron α-sheets was further confirmed by electrostatic potential analyses. The relationship between the work function variation and the Fermi and vacuum energy level shifts was also discussed, and we observed that the variation of the work function is primarily associated with the shift of the Fermi energy level. It is the surface dipole formed by the interaction between adatoms and substrate that should be responsible for the observed variation of the work function, whereas the increasing negative charge and rumpling for boron α-sheet only play minor roles. Additionally, the effect of Li adatoms on the work function of boron α-sheet was confirmed to be much stronger than that of graphene or a graphene double layer.

  17. Density functional theory study of oxygen and water adsorption on SrTiO{sub 3}(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guhl, Hannes

    2010-12-03

    Strontium titanate is an extensively studied material with a wide range of application, for instance in photo-catalysis and most importantly, it is used as a substrate in growth of functional oxides. The surface chemistry is crucial and hence understanding the surface structure on atomic scale is essential for gaining insight into the fundamental processes in the aforementioned applications. Moreover, there exist a lot of evidence that this surface chemistry might be controlled to considerably by extrinsic species, such as residual hydrogen and water. Investigating the properties of water and oxygen on the strontium titanate surface is certainly a natural starting point for a theoretical study based on density functional theory, because these species are practically present on the surface on a wide range of experimental conditions and they are computationally feasible. For the oxygen and water adsorption the binding energy is controlled by long-range surface relaxations leading to an effective repulsion of the adsorbed specimen. The isolated oxygen ad-atom forms a covalently bonded ''quasi-peroxide anion'' in combination with a lattice oxygen atom. Contrariwise, in all investigated configurations containing water molecules and hydroxyl groups, the respective oxygen atoms assumed positions close to the oxygen sites of the continued perovskite lattice of the substrate. Most remarkably, on the strontium oxide termination, the water molecules adsorbs and dissociates effortlessly leading to the formation of a pair of hydroxyl groups. For the titanium dioxide termination, a coverage dependent adsorption mode is observed. Densely packings stabilize water molecules, whereas at lower coverage and finite temperatures the formation of hydroxyl groups is found. The energetics responsible for this behavior is consistent with recent experiments by Iwahori and coworkers. (orig.)

  18. Density functional theory study of oxygen and water adsorption on SrTiO3(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guhl, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    Strontium titanate is an extensively studied material with a wide range of application, for instance in photo-catalysis and most importantly, it is used as a substrate in growth of functional oxides. The surface chemistry is crucial and hence understanding the surface structure on atomic scale is essential for gaining insight into the fundamental processes in the aforementioned applications. Moreover, there exist a lot of evidence that this surface chemistry might be controlled to considerably by extrinsic species, such as residual hydrogen and water. Investigating the properties of water and oxygen on the strontium titanate surface is certainly a natural starting point for a theoretical study based on density functional theory, because these species are practically present on the surface on a wide range of experimental conditions and they are computationally feasible. For the oxygen and water adsorption the binding energy is controlled by long-range surface relaxations leading to an effective repulsion of the adsorbed specimen. The isolated oxygen ad-atom forms a covalently bonded ''quasi-peroxide anion'' in combination with a lattice oxygen atom. Contrariwise, in all investigated configurations containing water molecules and hydroxyl groups, the respective oxygen atoms assumed positions close to the oxygen sites of the continued perovskite lattice of the substrate. Most remarkably, on the strontium oxide termination, the water molecules adsorbs and dissociates effortlessly leading to the formation of a pair of hydroxyl groups. For the titanium dioxide termination, a coverage dependent adsorption mode is observed. Densely packings stabilize water molecules, whereas at lower coverage and finite temperatures the formation of hydroxyl groups is found. The energetics responsible for this behavior is consistent with recent experiments by Iwahori and coworkers. (orig.)

  19. Mechanisms of chain adsorption on porous substrates and critical conditions of polymer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Richard T; Rasmussen, Christopher J; Brun, Yefim; Neimark, Alexander V

    2016-11-01

    Polymer adsorption is a ubiquitous phenomenon with numerous technological and healthcare applications. The mechanisms of polymer adsorption on surfaces and in pores are complex owing to a competition between various entropic and enthalpic factors. Due to adsorption of monomers to the surface, the chain gains in enthalpy yet loses in entropy because of confining effects. This competition leads to the existence of critical conditions of adsorption when enthalpy gain and entropy loss are in balance. The critical conditions are controlled by the confining geometry and effective adsorption energy, which depends on the solvent composition and temperature. This phenomenon has important implications in polymer chromatography, since the retention at the critical point of adsorption (CPA) is chain length independent. However, the mechanisms of polymer adsorption in pores are poorly understood and there is an ongoing discussion in the theoretical literature about the very existence of CPA for polymer adsorption on porous substrates. In this work, we examine the mechanisms of chain adsorption on a model porous substrate using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. We distinguish three adsorption mechanisms depending on the chain location: on external surface, completely confined in pores, and also partially confined in pores in so-called "flower" conformations. The free energies of different conformations of adsorbed chains are calculated by the incremental gauge cell MC method that allows one to determine the partition coefficient as a function of the adsorption potential, pore size, and chain length. We confirm the existence of the CPA for chain length independent separation on porous substrates, which is explained by the dominant contributions of the chain adsorption at the external surface, in particular in flower conformations. Moreover, we show that the critical conditions for porous and nonporous substrates are identical and depend only on the surface chemistry. The theoretical

  20. [Quantification of acetabular coverage in normal adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R M; Yang, C Y; Yu, C Y; Yang, C R; Chang, G L; Chou, Y L

    1991-03-01

    Quantification of acetabular coverage is important and can be expressed by superimposition of cartilage tracings on the maximum cross-sectional area of the femoral head. A practical Autolisp program on PC AutoCAD has been developed by us to quantify the acetabular coverage through numerical expression of the images of computed tomography. Thirty adults (60 hips) with normal center-edge angle and acetabular index in plain X ray were randomly selected for serial drops. These slices were prepared with a fixed coordination and in continuous sections of 5 mm in thickness. The contours of the cartilage of each section were digitized into a PC computer and processed by AutoCAD programs to quantify and characterize the acetabular coverage of normal and dysplastic adult hips. We found that a total coverage ratio of greater than 80%, an anterior coverage ratio of greater than 75% and a posterior coverage ratio of greater than 80% can be categorized in a normal group. Polar edge distance is a good indicator for the evaluation of preoperative and postoperative coverage conditions. For standardization and evaluation of acetabular coverage, the most suitable parameters are the total coverage ratio, anterior coverage ratio, posterior coverage ratio and polar edge distance. However, medial coverage and lateral coverage ratios are indispensable in cases of dysplastic hip because variations between them are so great that acetabuloplasty may be impossible. This program can also be used to classify precisely the type of dysplastic hip.

  1. The adsorption and dissociation of water molecule on goethite (010) surface: A DFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Long, E-mail: shuweixia@ouc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Xiu, Fangyuan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Qiu, Meng [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (China); Xia, Shuwei; Yu, Liangmin [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The optimized structure of hydrated goethite (010) surface with medium water coverage (water density about 6.7 H{sub 2}O/nm{sup 2}). - Highlights: • Stable adsorption and dissociation structure of H{sub 2}O on goethite (010) surface was investigated by DFT. • Reasonable path for water dissociation was proposed by transitional state analysis. • The mechanism of water adsorption on goethite and binding nature were revealed by PDOS. - Abstract: Using density functional theory (DFT) calculation, we investigate the configuration, stability and electronic properties of fresh cleaved (010) goethite surface (Pnma) and this surface exposed to water monolayer at low, medium and high coverage. Water is predicted to be chemisorbed to the surface, together with the surface reconstruction. The interaction energy of the most stable configuration of both low and medium coverage per water molecule is almost the same (−1.17 eV), while that of high coverage is much lower (less than 1.03 eV). It indicates that highly hydrated surface is less stable. PDOS analysis reveals the adsorption of H{sub 2}O is due to the formation of Fe−O bond, caused by overlapping of Fe's 3d and O's 2p orbitals. Dissociation processes at low and medium water coverage are non-spontaneous; while at high coverage, it can undertake spontaneously both thermodynamically and dynamically. The dissociation paths of all three water coverage are the similar. The proton from one adsorbed water is likely to dissociate to bind to the vicinal surface μ{sub 3}−O as an intermediate product; the proton belonged to μ{sub 3}−O transferred to the neighbor surface μ{sub 2}−O as the dissociative configuration.

  2. Adsorption Desalination: A Novel Method

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2010-11-15

    The search for potable water for quenching global thirst remains a pressing concern throughout many regions of the world. The demand for new and sustainable sources and the associated technologies for producing fresh water are intrinsically linked to the solving of potable water availability and hitherto, innovative and energy efficient desalination methods seems to be the practical solutions. Quenching global thirst by adsorption desalination is a practical and inexpensive method of desalinating the saline and brackish water to produce fresh water for agriculture irrigation, industrial, and building applications. This chapter provides a general overview of the adsorption fundamentals in terms of adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and heat of adsorption. It is then being more focused on the principles of thermally driven adsorption desalination methods. The recent developments of adsorption desalination plants and the effect of operating conditions on the system performance in terms of specific daily water production and performance ratio are presented. Design of a large commercial adsorption desalination plant is also discussed herein.

  3. Controlled swelling and adsorption properties of polyacrylate/montmorillonite composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natkanski, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Kustrowski, Piotr, E-mail: kustrows@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Bialas, Anna; Piwowarska, Zofia [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Michalik, Marek [Institute of Geological Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Oleandry 2a, 30-063 Krakow (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    A series of novel polyacrylate/montmorillonite composites was synthesized by in situ polymerization in aqueous slurry of clay. Dissociated (obtained by adding ammonium or sodium hydroxide) and undissociated forms of acrylic acid were used as monomers in the hydrogel synthesis. The structure and composition of the samples were studied by powder X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance infra-red Fourier transform spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. It has been found that the kind of monomer influences strongly the location of a polymer chain in the formed composite. Complete intercalation of hydrogel into the interlayer space of montmorillonite was observed for sodium polyacrylate, whereas polyacrylic acid and ammonium polyacrylate mainly occupied the outer surface of the clay. The position of hydrogel determined the swelling and adsorption properties of the studied composites. The important factor influencing the kinetics of Fe(III) cation adsorption was pH. The analysis of adsorption isotherms allowed to propose the mechanism of Fe(III) cation adsorption. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyacrylate hydrogels can be introduced into the interlayers of clay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The position of hydrogel in the composite depends on the polymer type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonium polyacrylate places outside the clay, sodium one is intercalated into it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swelling and adsorption capacities can be controlled by the polymer position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High adsorption efficiency in Fe(III) removal was observed.

  4. Thermodynamics of adsorption of dithiocarbamates at the hanging mercury drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulos, Evangelos; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2007-02-27

    Two dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDTC) pesticides, thiram and ziram, are adsorbed onto a Hg drop via an entropically driven process. The adsorption isotherms are described by the Frumkin equation. For both molecules, the adsorption is characterized by a nonlinear pseudosigmoid temperature dependence of the Gibbs free energy. For the temperature range of 273-313 K, DeltaGADS varies between -43.4 and -56.71 kJ/mol for thiram and -42.60 and -55.67 kJ/mol for ziram. This variation of DeltaGADS reveals that the adsorption strength is increased at higher temperatures. During the adsorption of either molecule, strong lateral interactions are developed between neighboring adsorbates, which are severely weakened as the temperature increases. A unified reaction scheme is suggested for both ziram and thiram that predicts the formation and adsorption of a surface complex, (DMDTC)2Hg. In the case of thiram, two DMDTC molecules are formed by the cleavage of the disulfide S-S bond near the Hg electrode. The thermodynamic and structural parameters reveal that there are two limiting thermodynamic regimes for the adsorbed (DMDTC)2Hg species that originate from two limiting adsorption conformations of the adsorbates on the Hg surface. A transition occurs between these two conformations at temperatures in the region of 285-295 K. This transition is accompanied by large entropic and enthalpic changes.

  5. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift (Δf) and dissipation energy shift (ΔD), and the viscoelastic change as ΔD-Δf plot. The Col adsorption showed larger Δf and ΔD values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The ΔD-Δf plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  6. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka, E-mail: tagaya.m.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift ({Delta}f) and dissipation energy shift ({Delta}D), and the viscoelastic change as {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot. The Col adsorption showed larger {Delta}f and {Delta}D values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  7. Nonlinear optical probe of biopolymer adsorption on colloidal particle surface: poly-L-lysine on polystyrene sulfate microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrode, Heather M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2004-10-12

    A nonlinear optical technique--second harmonic generation (SHG)--has been applied to characterize the adsorption of poly-L-lysine on micrometer size polystyrene particles, whose surface is covered with negatively charged sulfonate groups, in aqueous solutions. Adsorption behavior of the biopolymer with two chain lengths (14 and 75 amino acid units; PL14 and PL75) has been examined. Centrifugation experiments were also performed to support the adsorption measurements made using SHG. The adsorption free energies of the two polymers PL75 and PL14 are determined as -16.57 and -14.40 kcal/mol, respectively. The small difference in the adsorption free energies of the two chain lengths, however, leads to dramatic difference in the concentration needed for saturated surface coverage: nearly 50 times higher concentration is needed for the smaller polymer. Under acidic colloidal conditions, polylysine is found to adsorb in a relatively flat conformation on the surface. The surface area that each polylysine molecule occupies is nearly 1 order of magnitude larger than the size of the molecule in its extended form. The low adsorption density is likely a result from Coulombic repulsion between the positive charges on the amino acid units of PL. The measurements demonstrate the utility of SHG as an efficient and sensitive experimental approach for measuring adsorption characteristics of bio/macromolecules on colloidal particles and define surface and colloidal conditions for achieving maximum surface coverage of a widely used biopolymer. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  8. Adsorption of cationic dye on a biohybrid SiO2-alginate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrón Zambrano, J A; Ávila Ortega, A; Muñoz Rodríguez, D; Carrera Figueiras, C; López-Pérez, A J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a biohybrid material based on SiO 2 -alginate was obtained and its properties of adsorption evaluated using methylene blue as a model dye. The experimental results showed that the biohybrid SiO 2 -alginate has a higher adsorption ability compared to their base compounds (SiO 2 and alginate). Methylene blue adsorption is pH dependent, resulting in a maximum adsorption at pH = 8. The sorption kinetics rate is similar to SiO 2 . Kinetic data were fitted to a model of pseudosecond order. The experimental isotherms fit well the Langmuir model.

  9. 29 CFR 95.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms and conditions of the... § 95.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage...

  10. Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage From the National Health Interview Survey Using linked administrative data, to validate Medicare coverage estimates...

  11. 76 FR 7767 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... Student Health Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION... health insurance coverage under the Public Health Service Act and the Affordable Care Act. The proposed rule would define ``student health insurance [[Page 7768

  12. Adsorption indicators in double precipitation volumetric. II. Use of radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnicero Tejerina, M. I.

    1961-01-01

    1 31I-fluorescein and 1 10Ag-silver sulphate have been used in order to check the role of adsorption indicators in the volumetric analysis of double precipitation reactions. It has been shown by using isotopes that adsorption of fluorescein on silver halides depends on the foreign cations present in the solution. (Author) 8 refs

  13. On the Adsorption of DNA Origami Nanostructures in Nanohole Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassat, Katharina; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Bürger, Julius; Hanke, Marcel; Doostdar, Mahnaz; Lindner, Jörg K N; Grundmeier, Guido; Keller, Adrian

    2018-05-22

    DNA origami nanostructures are versatile substrates for the controlled arrangement of molecular capture sites with nanometer precision and thus have many promising applications in single-molecule bioanalysis. Here, we investigate the adsorption of DNA origami nanostructures in nanohole arrays which represent an important class of biosensors and may benefit from the incorporation of DNA origami-based molecular probes. Nanoholes with well-defined diameter that enable the adsorption of single DNA origami triangles are fabricated in Au films on Si wafers by nanosphere lithography. The efficiency of directed DNA origami adsorption on the exposed SiO 2 areas at the bottoms of the nanoholes is evaluated in dependence of various parameters, i.e., Mg 2+ and DNA origami concentrations, buffer strength, adsorption time, and nanohole diameter. We observe that the buffer strength has a surprisingly strong effect on DNA origami adsorption in the nanoholes and that multiple DNA origami triangles with 120 nm edge length can adsorb in nanoholes as small as 120 nm in diameter. We attribute the latter observation to the low lateral mobility of once adsorbed DNA origami on the SiO 2 surface, in combination with parasitic adsorption to the Au film. Although parasitic adsorption can be suppressed by modifying the Au film with a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer, the limited surface mobility of the adsorbed DNA origami still leads to poor localization accuracy in the nanoholes and results in many DNA origami crossing the boundary to the Au film even under optimized conditions. We discuss possible ways to minimize this effect by varying the composition of the adsorption buffer, employing different fabrication conditions, or using other substrate materials for nanohole array fabrication.

  14. The adsorption of nitrogen oxides on crystalline ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bartels

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of nitrogen oxides between ice and air is of importance to the ozone budget in the upper troposphere. In the present study, adsorption of nitrogen oxides on ice was investigated at atmospheric pressure using a chromatographic technique with radioactively labelled nitrogen oxides at low concentrations. The measured retentions solely depended on molecular adsorption and were not influenced by dimerisation, formation of encapsulated hydrates on the ice surface, dissociation of the acids, nor by migration into a quasi-liquid layer or grain boundaries. Based on the chromatographic retention and the model of thermo-chromatography, the standard adsorption enthalpy of -20 kJ mol-1 for NO, -22kJ mol-1 for NO2, -30kJ mol-1 for peroxyacetyl nitrate, -32kJ mol-1 for HON} and -44 kJ mol-1 for HNO3 was calculated. To perform those calculations within the model of thermo-chromatography, the standard adsorption entropy was calculated based on statistical thermodynamics. In this work, two different choices of standard states were applied, and consequently different values of the standard adsorption entropy, of either between -39 kJ mol-1 and -45kJ mol-1, or -164 kJ mol-1 and -169 kJ mol-1 for each nitrogen oxide were derived. The standard adsorption enthalpy was identical for both standard adsorption entropies and thus shown to be independent of the choice of standard state. A brief outlook on environmental implications of our findings indicates that adsorption on ice might be an important removal process of HNO3. In addition, it might be of some importance for HONO and peroxyacetyl nitrate and irrelevant for NO and NO2.

  15. A comparison of the adsorption of O2 and CO on molybdenum using low-energy SIMS and EID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption of O 2 and CO on molybdenum was studied in the monolayer region using a combination of secondary ion mass spectrometry at low primary energies and electron impact desorption. By examining ion yields during adsorption and desorption at various temperatures, it was possible to identify several α and β states of adsorption and, in some cases, to estimate activation energies for desorption. Each state of adsorption has a characteristic influence of the secondary ion yields reflecting the different chemical natures involved. The variations in ion yield tend to be linear at low coverage for each of the states involved when individual states can be isolated. The α adsorption produced larger changes in Mo + secondary ion yields than β adsorption. During oxygen adsorption the α states are also associated with the ready production of MoO + . For the β states Mo 2 O + is relatively more significant, although there is no simple correspondence of a given state and a particular ion. For CO adsorption, the main ion remains Mo + . Below 450 0 K, the MoCO + ion is observed in the later stages of adsorption corresponding to the formation of a very weakly bound state which also produces CO + on electron bombardment. (Auth.)

  16. Adsorption facility and adsorption vessel for radioactive carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi; Miwa, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Takeo.

    1992-01-01

    If 14 CO 2 gas-containing gases to be adsorbed are pressurized and sent to a packaging adsorption means, CO 2 ingredient in the gases to be adsorbed is adsorbed or absorbed, and remaining gases are passed through and sent out to downstream. CO 2 adsorption or absorption of the packaging adsorption means is judged by monitoring the state of the remaining gases, and if it is normal, remaining gases are sent further to downstream and processed. If abnormality is found, a gas feedback system is operated, and CO 2 removing gas is sent again to the packaging adsorption means, in which CO 2 gases are adsorbed or absorbed again repeatingly. With such procedures, in a case where C 14 nuclides having a long half decay time are supplied in the form of 14 CO 2 gas, they are efficiently adsorbed or absorbed in the packaging system to improve removing and storing property of 14 C nuclides. (T.M.)

  17. Adsorption thermal energy storage for cogeneration in industrial batch processes: Experiment, dynamic modeling and system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, Heike; Graf, Stefan; Lanzerath, Franz; Bardow, André

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption thermal energy storage is investigated for heat supply with cogeneration in industrial batch processes. The feasibility of adsorption thermal energy storage is demonstrated with a lab-scale prototype. Based on these experiments, a dynamic model is developed and successfully calibrated to measurement data. Thereby, a reliable description of the dynamic behavior of the adsorption thermal energy storage unit is achieved. The model is used to study and benchmark the performance of adsorption thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration for batch process energy supply. As benchmark, we consider both a peak boiler and latent thermal energy storage based on a phase change material. Beer brewing is considered as an example of an industrial batch process. The study shows that adsorption thermal energy storage has the potential to increase energy efficiency significantly; primary energy consumption can be reduced by up to 25%. However, successful integration of adsorption thermal storage requires appropriate integration of low grade heat: Preferentially, low grade heat is available at times of discharging and in demand when charging the storage unit. Thus, adsorption thermal energy storage is most beneficial if applied to a batch process with heat demands on several temperature levels. - Highlights: • A highly efficient energy supply for industrial batch processes is presented. • Adsorption thermal energy storage (TES) is analyzed in experiment and simulation. • Adsorption TES can outperform both peak boilers and latent TES. • Performance of adsorption TES strongly depends on low grade heat temperature.

  18. Carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Research in adsorption of gases by carbon nanomaterials has experienced considerable growth in recent years, with increasing interest for practical applications. Many research groups are now producing or using such materials for gas adsorption, storage, purification, and sensing. This book provides a selected overview of some of the most interesting scientific results regarding the outstanding properties of carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption and of interest both for basic research and technological applications. Topics receiving special attention in this book include storage of H, purific

  19. Hydrogen purification by periodic adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barg, Christian; Secchi, Argimiro R.; Trierweiler, Jorge O. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: cbarg@enq.ufrgs.br; arge@enq.ufrgs.br; jorge@enq.ufrgs.br

    2000-07-01

    The periodic adsorption processes have been widely used for industrial applications, mainly because it spends less energy than the usual gas separation processes, like the cryogenic distillation. The largest commercial application of periodic adsorption processes is the pressure swing adsorption (PSA) applied to hydrogen purification. Although its wide use in the chemical and petrochemical industry, there are no reports in the open literature about complete modeling studies of a complex commercial unit, with multiple adsorbents and multiple beds and several feed components. This study has as objective the modeling, optimization and dynamical analysis of an industrial PSA unit for hydrogen purification. (author)

  20. Humic acid adsorption onto cationic cellulose nanofibers for bioinspired removal of copper( ii ) and a positively charged dye

    KAUST Repository

    Sehaqui, H.

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry. Waste pulp residues are herein exploited for the synthesis of a sorbent for humic acid (HA), which is a major water pollutant. Cellulose pulp was etherified with a quaternary ammonium salt in water thereby introducing positive charges onto the surface of the pulp fibers, and subsequently mechanically disintegrated into high surface area cellulose nanofibers (CNF). CNF with three different charge contents were produced and their adsorption capacity towards HA was investigated with UV-spectrophotometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, and ζ-potential measurements. Substantial coverage of the CNF surface with HA in a wide pH range led to a reversal of the positive ζ-potentials of CNF suspensions. The HA adsorption capacity and the kinetics of HA uptake were found to be promoted by both acidic pH conditions and the surface charge content of CNF. It is suggested that HA adsorption onto CNF depends on electrostatic interactions between the two components, as well as on the conformation of HA. At pH ∼ 6, up to 310 mg g-1 of HA were adsorbed by the functionalized CNF, a substantially higher capacity than that of previously reported HA sorbents in the literature. It is further shown that CNF-HA complexes could be freeze-dried into "soil-mimicking" porous foams having good capacity to capture Cu(ii) ions and positive dyes from contaminated water. Thus, the most abundant natural polymer, i.e., cellulose could effectively bind the most abundant natural organic matter for environmental remediation purpose.

  1. Bimetallic Cobalt-Based Phosphide Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework: CoP x Phase-Dependent Electrical Conductivity and Hydrogen Atom Adsorption Energy for Efficient Overall Water Splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Xu, Bo Z. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Ye, Ranfeng [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Beckman, Scott P. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-10-25

    Cobalt-based bimetallic phosphide encapsulated in carbonized zeolitic imadazolate frameworks has been successfully synthesized and showed excellent activities toward both hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Density functional theory calculation and electrochemical measurements reveal that the electrical conductivity and electrochemical activity are closely associated with the Co2P/CoP mixed phase behaviors upon Cu metal doping. This relationship is found to be the decisive factor for enhanced electrocatalytic performance. Moreover, the precise control of Cu content in Co-host lattice effectively alters the Gibbs free energy for H* adsorption, which is favorable for facilitating reaction kinetics. Impressively, an optimized performance has been achieved with mild Cu doping in Cu0.3Co2.7P/nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) which exhibits an ultralow overpotential of 0.19 V at 10 mA cm–2 and satisfying stability for OER. Cu0.3Co2.7P/NC also shows excellent HER activity, affording a current density of 10 mA cm–2 at a low overpotential of 0.22 V. In addition, a homemade electrolyzer with Cu0.3Co2.7P/NC paired electrodes shows 60% larger current density than Pt/ RuO2 couple at 1.74 V, along with negligible catalytic deactivation after 50 h operation. The manipulation of electronic structure by controlled incorporation of second metal sheds light on understanding and synthesizing bimetallic transition metal phosphides for electrolysis-based energy conversion.

  2. The corrosive influence of chloride ions preference adsorption on α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0 0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chuan-Hui, E-mail: zhangch@ustb.edu.cn; Liu, Min; Jin, Ying; Sun, Dong-Bai, E-mail: dbsun@mater.ustb.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The preference adsorption and interaction of Cl{sup −} at increasing monolayer coverage on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in solution environment are modeling by DFT with COSMO. • A redefinition critical one plane monolayer of Cl{sup −} is 3/7, and the adsorption energy decrease in three steps, each adsorption energy step only relate to the adsorption site and the morphology. • The weaker interaction between Cl{sup −} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface but stronger interactions between three Cl{sup −} make the electrons uniformly occupy on the energy levels of three ions. - Abstract: Conductor-like screening model (COSMO), Periodic DFT calculations have been performed on a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface to model the influence of preference adsorption and interaction of chloride ions at increasing monolayer coverage on undefective passive film on Aluminum in solution environment. The results evidence that the critical monolayer of Cl{sup −} is 3/7, which is redefined. With increasing Cl{sup −} adsorption, both the first and second Cl{sup −} move from Al(1) atop and bridge10 sites to O(5) sites, suggesting that the weaker interaction between Cl{sup −} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface but stronger interactions between three ions make the electrons uniformly occupy on the energy levels of them. More calculations shows that the preference adsorption sites of Cl{sup −} are independent of the surface area of oxide, and the adsorption energy decrease in three steps, each adsorption energy step only relate to the adsorption site and the morphology. On undefective oxide film, low coverage Cl{sup −} adsorption would restrain surface breakdown to happen which is consistent with the experiment results.

  3. Adsorption of benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium chloride at the hydrophobic silica-water interface studied by total internal reflection Raman spectroscopy: effects of silica surface properties and metal salt addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenoble, Zlata; Baldelli, Steven

    2013-08-29

    The adsorption of the cationic surfactant benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium (BDMHA(+)) chloride was studied at an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-monolayer-modified silica-water interface by Raman spectroscopy in total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. The present study demonstrates the capabilities of this spectroscopic technique to evaluate thermodynamic and kinetic BDMHA(+)Cl(-) adsorption properties at the hydrophobic silica surface. The surface coverage of BDMHA(+) decreased by 50% at the hydrophobic OTS-silica surface relative to the surface coverage on bare silica; the dominating driving mechanisms for surfactant adsorption were identified as hydrophobic effects and head group charge screening by the electrolyte counterions. Addition of magnesium metal salt (MgCl2) to the aqueous solution (∼ neutral pH) lowered the surface coverage and moderately increased the Langmuir adsorption constants relative to those of the pure surfactant. These trends were previously observed at the hydrophilic, negatively charged silica surface but with a smaller change in the Gibbs free energy of adsorption at the hydrophobic silica surface. The hydrophobic OTS-silica surface properties resulted in shorter times for the surfactant to reach steady-state adsorption conditions compared to the slow adsorption kinetics previously seen with the surfactant at the hydrophilic surface. Adsorption isotherms, based on Raman signal intensities from spectral analysis, were developed according to the Langmuir adsorption model for the pure surfactant at the OTS-silica-water interface; the modified Langmuir model was applied to the surfactant adsorption in the presence of 5, 10, 50, and 100 mM magnesium chloride. Spectral analysis of the Raman scattering intensities and geometric considerations suggests a hemimicelle-type surface aggregate as the most likely surfactant structure at the OTS-silica surface. The different kinetics observed at the hydrophilic versus the hydrophobic silica surface

  4. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Siegel, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  5. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption

  6. A Study on Astrazon Black AFDL Dye Adsorption onto Vietnamese Diatomite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Hai Dang Son

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the adsorption of Astrazon Black AFDL dye onto Vietnamese diatomite has been demonstrated. The diatomite was characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EDS, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. The results show that diatomite mainly constituted centric type frustules characterized by pores as discs or as cylindrical shapes. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of dye onto Vietnam diatomite were investigated. The experimental data were fitted well to both Freundlich and Langmuir in the initial concentration range of 400–1400 mg L−1. The average value of maximum adsorption capacity, qm, calculated from Freundlich equation is statistically similar to the average value of maximum monolayer adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir equation. The thermodynamic parameters evaluated from the temperature dependent on adsorption isotherms in the range of 303–343 K show that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The Webber and pseudo-first/second-order kinetic models were used to analyze the mechanism of adsorption. The piecewise linear regression and Akaike’s Information Criterion were used to analyze experimental data. The results show that the dye adsorption onto diatomite was film diffusion controlled and the goodness of fit of experimental data for kinetics modes was dependent on the initial concentration.

  7. 5 CFR 890.1106 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... family member is an individual whose relationship to the enrollee meets the requirements of 5 U.S.C. 8901... EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Temporary Continuation of Coverage § 890.1106 Coverage. (a) Type of enrollment. An individual who enrolls under this subpart may elect coverage for self alone or self and family...

  8. 40 CFR 51.356 - Vehicle coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle coverage. 51.356 Section 51.356....356 Vehicle coverage. The performance standard for enhanced I/M programs assumes coverage of all 1968 and later model year light duty vehicles and light duty trucks up to 8,500 pounds GVWR, and includes...

  9. 29 CFR 801.3 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coverage. 801.3 Section 801.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 General § 801.3 Coverage. (a) The coverage of the Act extends to “any...

  10. Early stages of Cs adsorption mechanism for GaAs nanowire surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yu; Liu, Lei; Xia, Sihao; Feng, Shu

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the adsorption mechanism of Cs adatoms on the (100) surface of GaAs nanowire with [0001] growth direction is investigated utilizing first principles method based on density function theory. The adsorption energy, work function, atomic structure and electronic property of clean surface and Cs-covered surfaces with different coverage are discussed. Results show that when only one Cs is adsorbed on the surface, the most favorable adsorption site is BGa-As. With increasing Cs coverage, work function gradually decreases and gets its minimum at 0.75 ML, then rises slightly when Cs coverage comes to 1 ML, indicating the existence of 'Cs-kill' phenomenon. According to further analysis, Cs activation process can effectively reduce the work function due to the formation of a downward band bending region and surface dipole moment directing from Cs adatom to the surface. As Cs coverage increases, the conduction band minimum and valence band maximum both shift towards lower energy side, contributed by the orbital hybridization between Cs-5s, Cs-5p states and Ga-4p, As-4s, As-4p states near Fermi level. The theoretical calculations and analysis in this study can improve the Cs activation technology for negative electron affinity optoelectronic devices based on GaAs nanowires, and also provide a reference for the further Cs/O or Cs/NF3 activation process.

  11. Medicaid Coverage of Tobacco Dependency Treatments | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Fe(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lang; Kirvassilis, Demetrios; Bai, Yunhai; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2018-01-01

    Iron is the principal catalyst for the ammonia synthesis process and the Fischer-Tropsch process, as well as many other heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. It is thus of fundamental importance to understand the interactions between the iron surface and various reaction intermediates. Here, we present a systematic study of atomic and molecular adsorption behavior over Fe(110) using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations. The preferred binding sites, binding energies, and the corresponding surface deformation energies of five atomic species (H, C, N, O, and S), six molecular species (NH3, CH4, N2, CO, HCN, and NO), and eleven molecular fragments (CH, CH2, CH3, NH, NH2, OH, CN, COH, HCO, NOH, and HNO) were determined on the Fe(110) surface at a coverage of 0.25 monolayer. The binding strengths calculated using the PW91 functional decreased in the following order: C > CH >N > O > S > NH > COH > CN > CH2 > NOH > OH > HNO > HCO > NH2 > H > NO > HCN > CH3 > CO > N2 > NH3. No stable binding structures were observed for CH4. The estimated diffusion barriers and pathways, as well as the adsorbate-surface and intramolecular vibrational modes of all the adsorbates at their preferred binding sites, were identified. Using the calculated adsorption energetics, we constructed the potential energy surfaces for a few surface reactions including the decomposition of methane, ammonia, dinitrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. These potential energy surfaces provide valuable insight into the ability of Fe(110) to catalyze common elementary steps.

  13. Multiscale simulations of ligand adsorption and exchange on gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-Min; Liu, Hong; Qian, Hu-Jun; Jiao, Gui-Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2018-01-17

    We have developed a multiscale model that combines first-principles methods with atomistic and mesoscopic simulations to explore the molecular structures and packing density of the ligands present on the gold nanoparticle (AuNP) surface, as well as the adsorption/exchange reaction kinetics of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/PEG-SH ligands on different facets of gold, namely, Au(111), Au(100), and Au(110). Our model predicts that on clean gold surfaces, CTAB adsorption is diffusion limited. Specifically, CTAB has the preferentially higher adsorption rate and coverage density on Au(100) and Au(110) surfaces, forming a more compact layer with respect to that on the Au(111) surface, which could result in greater growth of gold nanoparticles along the (111) direction. As opposed to CTAB adsorption, the exchange reaction between PEG-SH with CTAB shows no selectivity to different crystal faces, and the reaction process follows Langmuir diffusion kinetics. Kinetic analysis reveals that, in water, the exchange reaction is zeroth order with respect to the concentration of an incoming PEG-SH, indicative of a dissociative exchange mechanism. The observed rate constant decreases exponentially with the PEG-SH chain length, consistent with a diffusion process for the free PEG-SH in water. In particular, we show that the exchange efficiency increases as the chain rigidness and size of the incoming ligand and/or steric bulk of the initial protecting ligand shell are decreased. Our objectives are to provide a model to assess the kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption/exchange reaction process, and we expect that these findings will have important implications for routine surface characterization of AuNPs.

  14. Preparation of crosslinked poly (acryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) microsphere and its adsorption and mechanism towards shikimic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Jiying, E-mail: menjiying@nuc.edu.cn; Wang, Ruixin; Li, Huan; Li, Xinyan; Yang, Shanshan; Liu, Haisi; Gao, Baojiao

    2017-02-01

    Shikimic acid (SA) is a key raw material for the synthesis of the antiviral drug, but its extraction and separation from plants is still limited. Crosslinked poly (acryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride, DAC) microspheres were synthesized via inverse-phase suspension polymerization. In the synthesizing, N,N′-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA) was used as crosslinker, cyclohexane as dispersed medium and span-60 as dispersants, obtaining CPDAC gel microspheres. The effect of polymerization condition on balling performance and the characteristics of CPDAC were examined. The adsorption properties of CPDAC towards SA were mainly explored and the data of adsorption isotherm were analyzed by using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Sips and Toth models. Furthermore, the adsorption mechanism was analyzed in depth, and the adsorption thermodynamics was also investigated. The results show that in order to prepare CPDAC, water phase must be added dropwise to oil phase, and the volume ratio of oil-water is more than 2:1. The mean diameter of CPDAC decreases with increasing span-60 and accelerating agitating rate. The strong electrostatic interaction is formed between quaternary ammonium nitrogen of CPDAC and −COO{sup –} of SA. The adsorption kinetic data is fitted well with pseudo-first-order model. The adsorption ability is higher in aqueous water than ethanol, reaching 108 mg/g, and Toth model is more suitable for describing the actual adsorption process. The adsorption of CPDAC towards SA is dependent on the pH value of the medium. The adsorption process is exothermic, the adsorption amount decreases with the increase of temperature, and the process is driven by enthalpy. The adsorption amount decreases with the increase of salinity. The reusability of CPDAC towards SA can keep 86.1% at the sixth cycle. - Highlights: • CPDAC microspheres were synthesized via inverse-phase suspension polymerization. • SA was adsorbed strongly by strong electrostatic interaction.

  15. Prediction of Pure Component Adsorption Equilibria Using an Adsorption Isotherm Equation Based on Vacancy Solution Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Lis; Aasberg-Petersen, K.; Krøll, Annette Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    An adsorption isotherm equation for nonideal pure component adsorption based on vacancy solution theory and the Non-Random-Two-Liquid (NRTL) equation is found to be useful for predicting pure component adsorption equilibria at a variety of conditions. The isotherm equation is evaluated successfully...... adsorption systems, spreading pressure and isosteric heat of adsorption are also calculated....

  16. Adsorption behavior of radionuclide in water containing sea salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kani, Yuko; Kamoshida, Mamoru; Asano, Takashi; Tamata, Shin

    2012-01-01

    Waste water caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Reactor accident contains high level radioactive material with impurities of sea water origin, such as chloride, sodium and magnesium. These impurities have the potential to inhibit the adsorption reaction of radioactive cesium and strontium to adsorbents. We have studied adsorption behavior of radioactive cesium and strontium to adsorbents to measure distribution coefficients (Kd) in the condition of different sea water concentrations. For cesium adsorption, the dependence of Kd on the sea water concentration was affected by the adsorption mechanism of adsorbent; the adsorbents which adsorbed cesium by intercalation showed less dependence of Kd on the sea water concentration, while those adsorbed cesium by ion exchange had smaller Kd with increasing the sea water concentration. For strontium adsorption, Kd decreased as the sea water concentration increased for both adsorbents which adsorbed strontium by intercalation and by ion exchange. The inhibition of intercalation and ion exchange reaction of strontium by calcium ion, that exists high concentration in sea water (400 ppm) and similar hydrated ionic radius with strontium, will cause the decrease of Kd for strontium in the sea water with higher concentration. (author)

  17. Ultra Low Concentration Adsorption Equilibria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahle, John J; Buettner, Leonard C; LeVan, M. D; Schindler, Bryan J

    2006-01-01

    .... Specifically this work focuses on novel experimental and modeling methods to characterize and predict at ultra-low chemical vapor concentrations the protection afforded by adsorption-based vapor filtration systems...

  18. Potential Theory of Multicomponent Adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    We developed a theory of multicomponent adsorption on the basis of the potential concept originally suggested by Polanyi. The mixture is considered as a heterogeneous substance segregated in the external field emitted by the adsorbent. The same standard equation of state, with no additional fitting...... parameters, is used for the segregated and for the bulk phases. With this approach, few parameters are needed to correlate pure component adsorption isotherms. These parameters may be used to predict adsorption equilibria of multicomponent mixtures without additional adjustment. A connection between...... the potential theory and the spreading pressure concept is established, and problems of the theory consistency are studied. Numerical algorithms are suggested for evaluation of the segregated state of the mixture in the potential field of adsorption forces. Comparison with experimental data shows good agreement...

  19. Adsorption kinetics of surfactants on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnelli; Aditama, WP; Fikriani, Z.; Astuti, Y.

    2018-04-01

    A study on the adsorption of both cationic and anionic surfactants using activated carbon as well as the investigation of the adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics has been conducted. The results showed that the adsorption of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) by activated carbon was Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm while its adsorption kinetics showed pseudo-second order with an adsorption rate constant of 2.23 x 103 g mg-1 hour-1. Meanwhile, the adsorption of HDTMA-Br by activated carbon showed that the isotherm adsorption tended to follow Freundlich’s isotherm and was pseudo-second order with an adsorption rate constant of 89.39 g mg-1 hour-1.

  20. Adsorption of antibiotics on microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Kaina; Zhang, Hua

    2018-06-01

    Microplastics and antibiotics are two classes of emerging contaminants with proposed negative impacts to aqueous ecosystems. Adsorption of antibiotics on microplastics may result in their long-range transport and may cause compound combination effects. In this study, we investigated the adsorption of 5 antibiotics [sulfadiazine (SDZ), amoxicillin (AMX), tetracycline (TC), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and trimethoprim (TMP)] on 5 types of microplastics [polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyamide (PA), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)] in the freshwater and seawater systems. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis revealed that microplastics have different surface characterizes and various degrees of crystalline. Adsorption isotherms demonstrated that PA had the strongest adsorption capacity for antibiotics with distribution coefficient (K d ) values ranged from 7.36 ± 0.257 to 756 ± 48.0 L kg -1 in the freshwater system, which can be attributed to its porous structure and hydrogen bonding. Relatively low adsorption capacity was observed on other four microplastics. The adsorption amounts of 5 antibiotics on PS, PE, PP, and PVC decreased in the order of CIP > AMX > TMP > SDZ > TC with K f correlated positively with octanol-water partition coefficients (Log K ow ). Comparing to freshwater system, adsorption capacity in seawater decreased significantly and no adsorption was observed for CIP and AMX. Our results indicated that commonly observed polyamide particles can serve as a carrier of antibiotics in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of the adsorption of amino acids on Pd(1 1 1): A density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Joanna N.; Han, Jeong Woo; Sholl, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the adsorption of glycine, alanine, norvaline, valine, proline, cysteine, and serine on Pd(1 1 1). • The common structural framework for the adsorption of most amino acids onto Pd(1 1 1) is in a tridentate fashion via a nitrogen atom and two oxygen atoms. • The shifts in vibrational frequencies associated with NHH and COO support the adsorption patterns of amino acids we examined. • The adsorption strength of amino acids depends on how much the molecules deform during the adsorption process. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations have been used to study the adsorption of glycine, alanine, norvaline, valine, proline, cysteine, and serine on Pd(1 1 1). Most amino acids except cysteine adsorb onto the surface in a tridentate fashion through a nitrogen atom and both oxygen atoms. For cysteine, an additional bond is formed with the surface due to the strong affinity of the sulfur atom, resulting in a significantly larger adsorption energy. The adsorption patterns of amino acids we examined are supported by the shifts in vibrational frequencies associated with NHH and COO. The adsorption strength of amino acids depends on how much the molecules deform during the adsorption process. Understanding the adsorption of amino acids on Pd(1 1 1) provides fundamental information for future consideration of the interactions between their derivatives or more complicated biomolecules and metal surfaces

  2. Adsorption of fluids on solid surfaces: A route toward very dense layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartarelli, S.A. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, San Miguel (Argentina); Szybisz, L., E-mail: szybisz@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Laboratorio TANDAR, Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, RA-1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fiica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, RA-1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    Adsorption of Xe on single planar walls is investigated in the frame of a density functional theory. The strength of the adsorbate-substrate attraction is changed by considering surfaces of Cs, Na, Li, and Mg. The behavior is analyzed by varying the temperature T (between the triple point T{sub t} and the critical T{sub c}) and the coverage {Gamma}{sub Script-Small-L }. The obtained adsorption isotherms exhibit a variety of wetting situations. Density profiles are reported. It is shown that for strongly attractive surfaces the adsorbed liquid becomes very dense reaching densities characteristic of solids.

  3. Hospital emergency on-call coverage: is there a doctor in the house?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Draper, Debra A; Felland, Laurie E

    2007-11-01

    The nation's community hospitals face increasing problems obtaining emergency on-call coverage from specialist physicians, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. The diminished willingness of specialist physicians to provide on-call coverage is occurring as hospital emergency departments confront an ever-increasing demand for services. Factors influencing physician reluctance to provide on-call coverage include decreased dependence on hospital admitting privileges as more services shift to non-hospital settings; payment for emergency care, especially for uninsured patients; and medical liability concerns. Hospital strategies to secure on-call coverage include enforcing hospital medical staff bylaws that require physicians to take call, contracting with physicians to provide coverage, paying physicians stipends, and employing physicians. Nonetheless, many hospitals continue to struggle with inadequate on-call coverage, which threatens patients' timely access to high-quality emergency care and may raise health care costs.

  4. Adsorption refrigeration technology theory and application

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ruzhu; Wu, Jingyi

    2014-01-01

    Gives readers a detailed understanding of adsorption refrigeration technology, with a focus on practical applications and environmental concerns Systematically covering the technology of adsorption refrigeration, this book provides readers with a technical understanding of the topic as well as detailed information on the state-of-the-art from leading researchers in the field. Introducing readers to background on the development of adsorption refrigeration, the authors also cover the development of adsorbents, various thermodynamic theories, the design of adsorption systems and adsorption refri

  5. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemal Oezeroglu; Niluefer Metin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH o ), entropy (ΔS o ) and free energy change (ΔG o ) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  6. Arsenite adsorption on goethite at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, Michael [Environmental Geochemistry Group, Institute of Geosciences, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz 55099 (Germany)], E-mail: kersten@uni-mainz.de; Vlasova, Nataliya [Environmental Geochemistry Group, Institute of Geosciences, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz 55099 (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Experimental closed-system {delta}T acid-base titrations between 10 deg. C and 75 deg. C were used to constrain a temperature-dependent 1-pK basic Stern model of the goethite surface complexation reactions. Experimental data for the temperature dependence of pH{sub PZC} determined by the one-term Van't Hoff extrapolation yield a value for goethite surface protonation enthalpy of -49.6 kJ mol{sup -1} in good agreement with literature data. Batch titration data between 10 deg. C and 75 deg. C with arsenite concentrations between 10 {mu}M and 100 {mu}M yield adsorption curves, which increases with pH, peak at a pH of 9, and decrease at higher pH values. The slope of this bend becomes steeper with increasing temperature. A 1-pK charge distribution model in combination with a basic Stern layer option could be established for the pH-dependent arsenite adsorption. Formation of two inner-sphere bidentate surface complexes best matched the experimental data in agreement with published EXAFS spectroscopic information. The temperature behaviour of the thus derived intrinsic equilibrium constants can be well represented by the linear Van't Hoff logK{sub T}{sup int} vs. 1/T plot. Adsorption of arsenite on the goethite surface is exothermic (negative {delta}{sub r}H{sub 298} values) and therefore becomes weaker with increasing temperature. Application of the new constants with the aqueous speciation code VMINTEQ predicts that the As(III) concentration in presence of goethite sorbent decreases by 10 times once the hydrothermal solution is cooled from 99 deg. C to 1 deg. C. The model curve matches data from a natural thermal water spring system. The increase of adsorption efficiency for As along the temperature gradient may well serve as an additional process to prevent ecosystem contamination by As-rich water seepage from geothermal energy generation facilities.

  7. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmer, B.J.; Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van; Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K.; Wermer, M.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  8. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  9. Reactivity of transition metal atoms supported or not on TiO2(110) toward CO and H adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Helali, Zeineb; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Markovits, Alexis; Minot, Christian; Abderrabba, Manef Ben

    2015-01-01

    Following our strategy to analyze the metal–support interaction, we present periodic DFT calculations for adsorption of metal atoms on a perfect rutile TiO2(110) surface (at low coverage, θ = 1/3) to investigate the interaction of an individual

  10. Counterion adsorption and desorption rate of a charged macromolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Yang, Jingfa; Zhao, Jiang

    The rate constant of counterion adsorption to and desorption from a synthetic polyelectrolyte, polystyrene sulfonate (PSS-), is measured in aqueous solution by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that both adsorption and desorption rate of counterions have strong dependence on polymer concentration, salt concentration as well as the molecular weight of polyelectrolytes. The results clearly demonstrate that the contribution of electrostatic interaction and the translational entropy to the distribution of counterions of a polyelectrolyte molecule. The information is helpful to the understanding of polyelectrolyte physics. National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  11. Adsorption of Hydrogen and Potassium on GaAs(110) Studied by Time-of-Flight Scattering and Recoiling Spectrometry; Espectrometria de Iones Aplicada al Estudio de la Adsorcion de H y K en GaAs(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayone, J E [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    (with ISS) as a function of the exposure indicate that the initial strong decrease in the rate of unrelaxation is mainly a consequence of the variation of the sticking coefficient. Below 100 L, most of the H atoms participate in the unrelaxation process. However, above 500 L, it is necessary to increase strongly the H coverage to produce small changes in the atomic structure of the surface. The measurements of the As and Ga direct recoils intensities change with the incident direction of the projectile in accordance with the crystallographic structure of the surface. On the other hand, the H recoil intensity is almost independent of the crystallographic sample orientation, indicating that an important fraction of the H atoms are not adsorbed in well ordered sites.Measurements as a function of the sample temperature show a continuous decrease of the H DR intensity for both low and high exposures. The combined results of forward recoiled atom and scattered projectile intensities suggest that an important fraction of the adsorbed H atoms is not bonded in a well ordered layer and may be forming molecules since the beginning of the adsorption process. The adsorption of K on GaAs(110) is mainly studied by DRS. The analysis of K direct recoil intensity indicates that at room temperature, the adsorption of K saturates at 0.5 ML, which corresponds to an atom density of {approx} 4.4x10{sup 1}4 at/cm{sup -2}. The adsorption process proceeds in two stages, which depend on the K coverage ({theta} (K)). At low coverages, {theta} (K)<0.1 ML, the K atoms are adsorbed exclusively on the [001] Ga rows and close to the sites of a new As layer, with a local crystallographic order. At high coverages the K atoms start to adsorb also along the As rows, although with a lower probability than on the Ga rows. At saturation, the K layer does not form an ordered structure. The dependence of the direct-recoil ion fractions on the K coverage is consistent with the structural information obtained

  12. One-of-A-Kind: A Microporous Metal-Organic Framework Capable of Adsorptive Separation of Linear, Mono- and Di-branched Alkane Isomers via Temperature- and Adsorbate-Dependent Molecular Sieving

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2018-03-29

    Separation of alkane isomers represents a crucial process in the petrochemical industry in order to achieve high octane rating of gasoline. Herein, we report the first example of complete separation of linear, monobranched and dibranched alkane isomers by a single adsorbent. A calcium-based robust microporous metal-organic framework, Ca(H2tcpb) (tcpb = 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-benzene) exhibits unique molecular exclusion behavior which enables full separation of binary or ternary mixtures of alkane isomers into pure form of each isomerate. The successful separation of monobranched and dibranched hexane isomers will not only lead to the production of higher quality gasoline with maximum possible octane numbers but also fill the gap in the current separation technology. Exploration of separation mechanism indicates that structural flexibility and adsorbate-dependent structure change of the porous framework plays a vital role for the observed temperature-dependent molecular sieving property of the adsorbent.

  13. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  14. Metal adsorption on monolayer blue phosphorene: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Son, Jicheol; Hong, Jisang

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the electronic structure, adsorption energies, magnetic properties, dipole moment and work function of metal adatoms (Mg, Cr, Mo, Pd, Pt, and Au) adsorption on a blue phosphorene monolayer. For Mg, Pt and Au metals, the most stable state was found in hollow site while for Cr, Mo and Pd metals we found an adsorption in valley site. We suggest that the Pd and Pt atoms prefer 2D growth mode while the Mg, Cr, Mo and Au atoms prefer 3D island growth mode on monolayer phosphorene. The electronic band structures and magnetic properties were dependent on the doping site and dopant materials. For instance, the semiconducting features were preserved in Mg, Pd, Pt, and Au doped systems. However, the Cr and Mo doped systems displayed half-metallic band structures. The total magnetic moment of 4.05, 2.0 and 0.77 μB /impurity atom were obtained in Cr, Mo and Au doped systems whereas the Mg, Pd and Pt doped systems remained nonmagnetic. We also investigated the magnetic interaction between two transition metal impurities. We observed ferromagnetic coupling between two transition metal impurities in Cr and Mo doped systems while the Au doped system displayed almost degenerated magnetic state. For Mg, Cr, and Mo adsorptions, we found relatively large values of dipole moments compared to those in the Pd, Pt and Au adsorptions. This resulted in a significant suppression of the work function in Mg, Cr and Mo adsorptions. Overall, adsorption can tune the physical and magnetic properties of phosphorene monolayer.

  15. Surface complexation modeling of the effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gonzalez, M.R.; Cheng, T.; Barnett, M.O. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engeneering; Roden, E.E. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2007-07-01

    Previous published data for the adsorption of U(VI) and/or phosphate onto amorphous Fe(III) oxides (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO) and crystalline Fe(III) oxides (goethite) was examined. These data were then used to test the ability of a commonly-used surface complexation model (SCM) to describe the adsorption of U(VI) and phosphate onto pure amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and synthetic goethite-coated sand, a surrogate for a natural Fe(III)-coated material, using the component additivity (CA) approach. Our modeling results show that this model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and also goethite-coated sand quite well in the absence of phosphate. However, because phosphate adsorption exhibits a stronger dependence on Fe(III) oxide type than U(VI) adsorption, we could not use this model to consistently describe phosphate adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand. However, the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption could be incorporated into the model to describe U(VI) adsorption to both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand, at least for an initial approximation. These results illustrate both the potential and limitations of using surface complexation models developed from pure systems to describe metal/radionuclide adsorption under more complex conditions. (orig.)

  16. Surface complexation modeling of the effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Gonzalez, M.R.; Cheng, T.; Barnett, M.O.; Roden, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous published data for the adsorption of U(VI) and/or phosphate onto amorphous Fe(III) oxides (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO) and crystalline Fe(III) oxides (goethite) was examined. These data were then used to test the ability of a commonly-used surface complexation model (SCM) to describe the adsorption of U(VI) and phosphate onto pure amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and synthetic goethite-coated sand, a surrogate for a natural Fe(III)-coated material, using the component additivity (CA) approach. Our modeling results show that this model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and also goethite-coated sand quite well in the absence of phosphate. However, because phosphate adsorption exhibits a stronger dependence on Fe(III) oxide type than U(VI) adsorption, we could not use this model to consistently describe phosphate adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand. However, the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption could be incorporated into the model to describe U(VI) adsorption to both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand, at least for an initial approximation. These results illustrate both the potential and limitations of using surface complexation models developed from pure systems to describe metal/radionuclide adsorption under more complex conditions. (orig.)

  17. Adsorption affinity and selectivity of 3-ureidopropyltriethoxysilane grafted oil palm empty fruit bunches towards mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjirama, Magendran; Saman, Norasikin; Johari, Khairiraihanna; Song, Shiow-Tien; Kong, Helen; Cheu, Siew-Chin; Lye, Jimmy Wei Ping; Mat, Hanapi

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the potential application of oil palm empty fruit branches (OPEFB) as adsorbents to remove organic methylmercurry, MeHg(II), and inorganic Hg(II) from aqueous solution. The OPEFB was functionalized with amine containing ligand namely 3-ureidopropyltriethoxysilane (UPTES) aiming for better adsorption performance towards both mercury ions. The adsorption was found to be dependent on initial pH, initial concentraton, temperatures, and contact time. The maximum adsorption capacities (Q m.exp ) of Hg(II) adsorption onto OPEFB and UPTES-OPEFB were 0.226 and 0.773 mmol/g, respectively. The Q m.exp of MeHg(II) onto OPEFB, however, was higher than UPTES-OPEFB. The adsorption kinetic data obeyed the Elovich model and the adsorption was controlled by the film-diffusion step. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicate an endothermic adsorption process. Adsorption data analysis indicates that the adsorption mechanism may include ion-exchange, complexation, and physisorption interactions. The potential applications of adsorbents were demonstrated using oilfield produced water and natural gas condensate. The UPTES-OPEFB offered higher selectivity towards both mercury ions than OPEFB. The regenerability studies indicated that the adsorbent could be reused for multiple cycles.

  18. The Influence of Salt Anions on Heavy Metal Ion Adsorption on the Example of Nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Mandy; Schwarz, Dana; Steinbach, Christine; Schwarz, Simona

    2018-01-01

    The biodegradable polysaccharide chitosan possesses protonated and natural amino groups at medium pH values and has therefore been used as an adsorbing material for nickel salts in water treatment. Nickel is a problematic heavy metal ion which can cause various diseases and disorders in living organisms. Here, we show the influence of oxyanions (e.g., nitrate and sulfate) to the adsorption of nickel ions. Hence, simultaneously we are addressing the increasing global problem of nitrate and sulfate ion pollution in groundwater and surface water. A series of adsorption experiments was carried out in order to determine (i) the adsorption equilibrium, (ii) the adsorption capacity in dependence on the initial nickel ion concentration, and (iii) the influence of the anion presented in solution for the adsorption capacity. Surface morphology of chitosan flakes before and after the adsorption process has been studied with SEM-EDX analysis. The chitosan flakes exhibited promising adsorption capacities of 81.9 mg·g−1 and 21.2 mg·g−1 for nickel (sulfate) and nickel (nitrate), respectively. The calculated values of Gibbs free energy change ΔG0 confirm the higher adsorption of nickel ions in presence of sulfate ions. Hence, higher anion valence leads to a higher adsorption capacity. PMID:29510485

  19. Adsorption of parahydrogen on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusseault, Marisa; Boninsegni, Massimo

    2018-05-01

    We study the low-temperature properties of a single layer of parahydrogen adsorbed on graphene, by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The computed phase diagram is very similar to that of helium on the same substrate, featuring commensurate solid phases with fillings 1/3 and 7/16, as well as domain-wall phases at intermediate coverages. At higher coverage the system transitions to an incommensurate, compressible phase. Evidence of promotion of molecules to the second layer is observed at a coverage ˜0.112 Å-2, significantly above existing theoretical estimates.

  20. Sideline coverage of youth football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzone, Katie; Diamond, Alex; Gregory, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Youth football is a popular sport in the United States and has been for some time. There are currently more than 3 million participants in youth football leagues according to USA Football. While the number of participants and overall injuries may be higher in other sports, football has a higher rate of injuries. Most youth sporting events do not have medical personnel on the sidelines in event of an injury or emergency. Therefore it is necessary for youth sports coaches to undergo basic medical training in order to effectively act in these situations. In addition, an argument could be made that appropriate medical personnel should be on the sideline for collision sports at all levels, from youth to professional. This article will discuss issues pertinent to sideline coverage of youth football, including coaching education, sideline personnel, emergency action plans, age and size divisions, tackle versus flag football, and injury prevention.

  1. Adsorption preference for divalent metal ions by Lactobacillus casei JCM1134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Rin; Aoyagi, Hideki

    2018-05-09

    The removal of harmful metals from the intestinal environment can be inhibited by various ions which can interfere with the adsorption of target metal ions. Therefore, it is important to understand the ion selectivity and adsorption mechanism of the adsorbent. In this study, we estimated the adsorption properties of Lactobacillus casei JCM1134 by analyzing the correlation between its maximum adsorption level (q max ) for seven metals and their ion characteristics. Some metal ions showed altered adsorption levels by L. casei JCM1134 as culture growth time increased. Although it was impossible to identify specific adsorption components, adsorption of Sr and Ba may depend on capsular polysaccharide levels. The maximum adsorption of L. casei JCM1134 (9 h of growth in culture) for divalent metal ions was in the following order: Cu 2+  > Ba 2+  > Sr 2+  > Cd 2+  > Co 2+  > Mg 2+  > Ni 2+ . The q max showed a high positive correlation with the ionic radius. Because this tendency is similar to adsorption occurring through an ion exchange mechanism, it was inferred that an ion exchange mechanism contributed greatly to adsorption by L. casei JCM1134. Because the decrease in the amount of adsorption due to prolonged culture time was remarkable for metals with a large ion radius, it is likely that the adsorption components involved in the ion exchange mechanism decomposed over time. These results and analytical concept may be helpful for designing means to remove harmful metals from the intestinal tract.

  2. Tritium Isotope Separation Using Adsorption-Distillation Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    In order to miniaturize the height of a distillation tower for the detritiation of waste water from fusion reactors, two experiments were conducted: (1) liquid frontal chromatography of tritium water eluting through an adsorption column and (2) water distillation using a column packed with adsorbent particles. The height of the distillation tower depends on the height equivalent to a theoretical plate, HETP, and the equilibrium isotope separation factor, α H-T equi . The adsorption action improved not only HETP but also α H-T equi . Since the adsorption-distillation method proposed here can shorten the tower height with keeping advantages of the distillation, it may bring an excellent way for miniaturizing the distillation tower to detritiate a large amount of waste water from fusion reactors

  3. Adsorption phenomena and anchoring energy in nematic liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Barbero, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Despite the large quantity of phenomenological information concerning the bulk properties of nematic phase liquid crystals, little is understood about the origin of the surface energy, particularly the surface, interfacial, and anchoring properties of liquid crystals that affect the performance of liquid crystal devices. Self-contained and unique, Adsorption Phenomena and Anchoring Energy in Nematic Liquid Crystals provides an account of new and established results spanning three decades of research into the problems of anchoring energy and adsorption phenomena in liquid crystals.The book contains a detailed discussion of the origin and possible sources of anchoring energy in nematic liquid crystals, emphasizing the dielectric contribution to the anchoring energy in particular. Beginning with fundamental surface and anchoring properties of liquid crystals and the definition of the nematic phase, the authors explain how selective ion adsorption, dielectric energy density, thickness dependence, and bias voltage...

  4. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on stanene: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Yelda; Ersan, Fatih [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Gökoğlu, Gökhan [Department of Physics, Karabük University, 78050 Karabük (Turkey); Aktürk, Olcay Üzengi [Department of Electrical & Electronics Engineering, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Aktürk, Ethem, E-mail: ethem.akturk@adu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey)

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a study on the adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on single-layer stanene with different levels of coverage using first-principles plane wave calculations within spin-polarized density functional theory. The most favorable adsorption site for alkali atoms (Li, Na, K) were found to be the hollow site similar to other group IV single-layers, but the case of alkaline-earths on stanene is different from silicene and germanene. Whereas Mg and Ca are bound to stanene at hollow site, the bridge site is found to be energetically favorable for Be adatom. All adsorbed atoms are positively charged due to the charge transfer from adatom to stanene single-layer. The semimetallic bare stanene become metallic except for Be adsorption. The Beryllium adsorption give rise to non-magnetic semiconducting ground state. Our results illustrate that stanene has a reactive and functionalizable surface similar to graphene or silicene. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms form stronger bonds with stanene compared to other group IV monolayers. • Semi-metallic stanene becomes nonmagnetic metal for Li, Na, K, Mg, and Ca atoms adsorption. • Semi-metallic stanene becomes nonmagnetic semiconductor with 94 meV band gap for Be atom adsorption.

  5. A biological oil adsorption filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasila, A [University of Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering and Household Technology

    2005-12-01

    A new oil adsorption method called adsorption filtration (AF) has been developed. It is a technology where by oil residues can be cleaned from water by running it through a simple filter made from freeze treated, dried, milled and then fragmented plant material. By choosing suitable plants and fragmentation sizes it is possible to produce filters, which pass water but adsorb oil. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of manufacturing oil adsorbing filter materials from reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) or hemp fibre (Cannabis sativa L.). The oil (80 ml) was mixed with de-ionised water (200 ml) and this mixture was filtered through 10 or 20 g adsorption filters. Fine spring harvested hemp fibre (diameter less than 1 mm) and reed canary grass fragments adsorb 2-4 g of oil per gram of adsorption material compared to 1-3 g of water. Adsorption filtration is thus a novel way of gathering spilled oil in shallow coastal waters before the oil reaches the shore. (author)

  6. A biological oil adsorption filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasila, A.

    2005-01-01

    A new oil adsorption method called adsorption filtration (AF) has been developed. It is a technology where by oil residues can be cleaned from water by running it through a simple filter made from freeze treated, dried, milled and then fragmented plant material. By choosing suitable plants and fragmentation sizes it is possible to produce filters, which pass water but adsorb oil. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of manufacturing oil adsorbing filter materials from reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) or hemp fibre (Cannabis sativa L.). The oil (80 ml) was mixed with de-ionised water (200 ml) and this mixture was filtered through 10 or 20 g adsorption filters. Fine spring harvested hemp fibre (diameter less than 1 mm) and reed canary grass fragments adsorb 2-4 g of oil per gram of adsorption material compared to 1-3 g of water. Adsorption filtration is thus a novel way of gathering spilled oil in shallow coastal waters before the oil reaches the shore. (author)

  7. Driving forces for adsorption of amphiphilic peptides to the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Ozge; Villa, Alessandra; Sayar, Mehmet; Hess, Berk

    2010-09-02

    We have studied the partitioning of amphiphilic peptides at the air-water interface. The free energy of adsorption from bulk to interface was calculated by determining the potential of mean force via atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. To this end a method is introduced to restrain or constrain the center of mass of a group of molecules in a periodic system. The model amphiphilic peptides are composed of alternating valine and asparagine residues. The decomposition of the free energy difference between the bulk and interface is studied for different peptide block lengths. Our analysis revealed that for short amphiphilic peptides the surface driving force dominantly stems from the dehydration of hydrophobic side chains. The only opposing force is associated with the loss of orientational freedom of the peptide at the interface. For the peptides studied, the free energy difference scales linearly with the size of the molecule, since the peptides mainly adopt extended conformations both in bulk and at the interface. The free energy difference depends strongly on the water model, which can be rationalized through the hydration thermodynamics of hydrophobic solutes. Finally, we measured the reduction of the surface tension associated with complete coverage of the interface with peptides.

  8. Adsorption of H atoms on cubic Er2O3 (0 0 1) surface: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Wei; Chikada, Takumi; Shimura, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Terai, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    First-principles plane wave calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been used to study the adsorption of H atoms on cubic Er 2 O 3 (0 0 1) surface. We identify stable adsorption positions and find that H preferentially adsorbs on top of fourfold-hollow sites and transfers electrons to the surface, resulting in the formations of covalent bonds to the nearest neighboring four oxygen atoms. In the most energetically favorable adsorption sites, It was found that H bonds with O atoms at the cubic Er 2 O 3 (0 0 1) surface with an adsorption energy of −295.68 kJ mol −1 at coverage 1/8 ML, and the adsorption energy is inclined to decrease with the increase of H coverage (>1/4 ML). In addition, our calculations indicate that the dissociative H atom configurations have adsorption energies that are at least 152.64 kJ mol −1 greater than the H 2 molecule configurations on the surface. These results discussed in the context of erbium oxide slabs are employed to rationalize some processes regarding to the hydrogen isotope permeation behavior of tritium permeation barrier

  9. In vitro investigation of sodium diclofenac adsorption on sucralfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimling, Bozena; Pluta, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption of sodium diclofenac was investigated in the presence of sucralfate--a cytoprotective agent preventing gastropathy, adverse effect of diclofenac. Evaluation of adsorption was performed by means of a static method in vitro taking into account pH of the environment, temperature, concentration of the investigated agents and the form of sucralfate. Findings obtained prove that sodium diclofenac is adsorbed on sucralfate in all investigated pH ranges and the capability of sucralfate binding depends on its form, temperature and environmental pH. The highest binding was observed at pH 5.0 in the presence of sucralfate, which at this pH has the form of a suspension, while the lowest--at pH 1.5 in the presence of sucralfate in the form of paste. Low values of adsorption temperature of diclofenac as well as the relationship between the level of its adsorption and environmental pH are the dominating factors pointing to the physical and exothermic adsorption.

  10. Activated carbon oxygen content influence on water and surfactant adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Phillip; Wu, Sophie Hua; Badalyan, Alexander

    2002-02-15

    This research investigates the adsorption properties of three activated carbons (AC) derived from coconut, coal, and wood origin. Each carbon demonstrates different levels of resistance to 2 M NaOH treatment. The coconut AC offers the greatest and wood AC the least resistance. The influence of base treatment is mapped in terms of its effects on specific surface area, micropore volume, water adsorption, and dodecanoic acid adsorption from both water and 2 M NaOH solution. A linear relationship exists between the number of water molecules adsorbed at the B-point of the water adsorption isotherm and the oxygen content determined from elemental analysis. Surfactant adsorption isotherms from water and 2 M NaOH indicate that the AC oxygen content effects a greater dependence on affinity for surfactant than specific surface area and micropore volume. We show a linear relationship between the plateau amount of surfactant adsorbed and the AC oxygen content in both water and NaOH phases. The higher the AC oxygen content, the lower the amount of surfactant adsorbed. In contrast, no obvious relationship could be drawn between the surfactant amount adsorbed and the surface area.

  11. Providing Universal Health Insurance Coverage in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okebukola, Peter O; Brieger, William R

    2016-07-07

    Despite a stated goal of achieving universal coverage, the National Health Insurance Scheme of Nigeria had achieved only 4% coverage 12 years after it was launched. This study assessed the plans of the National Health Insurance Scheme to achieve universal health insurance coverage in Nigeria by 2015 and discusses the challenges facing the scheme in achieving insurance coverage. In-depth interviews from various levels of the health-care system in the country, including providers, were conducted. The results of the analysis suggest that challenges to extending coverage include the difficulty in convincing autonomous state governments to buy into the scheme and an inadequate health workforce that might not be able to meet increased demand. Recommendations for increasing the scheme's coverage include increasing decentralization and strengthening human resources for health in the service delivery systems. Strong political will is needed as a catalyst to achieving these goals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Combined quantum chemistry and Monte Carlo simulation of competitive adsorption of O{sub 2} and OH on Pt surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Rui, E-mail: ruililcu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Li, Haibo; Xu, Shuling [Department of Chemistry, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Liu, Jifeng, E-mail: liujifeng111@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Competitive adsorption of O{sub 2} and OH on different Pt surfaces was theoretically studied. • The adsorption energies of O{sub 2} and OH depend on the Pt surfaces and the adsorption sites. • The order of O{sub 2} adsorption efficiency was characterized. - Abstract: To obtain a microscopic explanation on the difference of oxygen reduction reaction activity on different Pt low index surfaces, we simulated competitive adsorptions of O{sub 2} and OH on four Pt low index surfaces. Firstly, all possible chemical adsorption configurations of the O{sub 2} and OH molecules on the three surfaces were acquired through density functional theory. The distribution of these configurations on the different surfaces was collected from Monte Carlo simulations. Our results demonstrated that the adsorption energy order of O{sub 2} on different surfaces was (110)(1 × 2) > (110) > (100) > (111) and that the adsorption energy order of the OH molecules on Pt surfaces was the same. Considering the competitive adsorption of O{sub 2} and OH on Pt surfaces, the final O{sub 2} adsorption efficiencies order of three surfaces was (111) > (110) > (100) > (110)(1 × 2), which was consistent with the experimental activities of oxygen reduction. Our study provided theoretical references for previous experimental studies and had important significance for the understanding of oxygen adsorption on Pt surfaces.

  13. Adsorption studies on Pt(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopster, H.

    1977-06-01

    The adsorption of O 2 , CO, and C 2 H 2 as well as the CO oxidation on Pt(111) were studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy. Using a platinum monocrystal sample with a contonuous stage density, the adhesion coefficient for O 2 and the reaction probability for CO were determined as a function of stage density and oxygen cover by measuring the oxygen cover and its time behaviour. The study of vibrations of adsorbed CO showed that CO is bound in linear form on two different adsorption sites. The adsorption of acetylene was studied at 140 K and 300 K. The frequencies of the C-H stretching and flexural vibrations as well as the C-C-H bonding angle were determined. (orig./GSC) [de

  14. Effect of hydrogen coverage on hydrogenation of o-cresol on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C.; Wang, Sanwu

    2018-06-01

    The conversion of phenolics over metal catalysts is an important process for upgrading biofuels. With density functional calculations, hydrogenation of o-cresol on the hydrogen-covered Pt(111) surface was investigated. The results show that the coverage of hydrogen plays a significant role in the reaction rate while it does not affect the reaction selectivity. The reaction barriers of the hydrogenation process leading to the formation of both 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (the intermediate product) and 2-methyl-cyclohexanol (the final product) at high H coverages (∼1 ML) are found to be smaller by 0.14-0.69 eV than those at lower H coverages (∼1/25 ML). After both hydrogen and cresol are adsorbed on Pt(111) from their initial gas phase state, the reaction energy of each hydrogenation step on the surface is also dependent on the hydrogen coverage. On the H-covered Pt(111) surface, most steps of hydrogenation involve exothermic reactions when the hydrogen coverage is high while they are endothermic reactions at low hydrogen coverages. The differences in reaction rate and reaction energy between high and low H coverages can be understood with the coverage-dependent bonding strength and configurations.

  15. Adsorption of Cu(II) on Oxidized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Presence of Hydroxylated and Carboxylated Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Zhan; Li, Shicheng; Qi, Wei; Liu, Peng; Liu, Fuqiang; Ye, Yuanlv; Wu, Liansheng; Wang, Lei; Wu, Wangsuo

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption of Cu(II) on oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (oMWCNTs) as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and hydroxylated fullerene (C60(OH)n) and carboxylated fullerene (C60(C(COOH)2)n) were studied under ambient conditions using batch techniques. The results showed that the adsorption of Cu(II) had rapidly reached equilibrium and the kinetic process was well described by a pseudo-second-order rate model. Cu(II) adsorption on oMWCNTs was dependent on pH but independent of ionic strength. Compared with the Freundlich model, the Langmuir model was more suitable for analyzing the adsorption isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from temperature-dependent adsorption isotherms suggested that Cu(II) adsorption on oMWCNTs was spontaneous and endothermic. The effect of C60(OH)n on Cu(II) adsorption of oMWCNTs was not significant at low C60(OH)n concentration, whereas a negative effect was observed at higher concentration. The adsorption of Cu(II) on oMWCNTs was enhanced with increasing pH values at pH adsorption of Cu(II) onto oMWCNTs at pH 4–6. The double sorption site model was applied to simulate the adsorption isotherms of Cu(II) in the presence of C60(OH)n and fitted the experimental data well. PMID:24009683

  16. Theoretical insight of adsorption cooling

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2011-06-03

    This letter proposes and presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the energetic performances of an adsorption cooler as a function of pore widths and volumes of solid adsorbents. The simulated results in terms of the coefficient of performance are validated with experimental data. It is found from the present analysis that the performance of an adsorption cooling device is influenced mainly by the physical characteristics of solid adsorbents, and the characteristics energy between the adsorbent-adsorbate systems. The present study confirms that there exists a special type of silicagel having optimal physical characteristics that allows us to obtain the best performance.

  17. Theoretical insight of adsorption cooling

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh; Leong, Kai Choong; Thu, Kyaw; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, Kim Choon

    2011-01-01

    This letter proposes and presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the energetic performances of an adsorption cooler as a function of pore widths and volumes of solid adsorbents. The simulated results in terms of the coefficient of performance are validated with experimental data. It is found from the present analysis that the performance of an adsorption cooling device is influenced mainly by the physical characteristics of solid adsorbents, and the characteristics energy between the adsorbent-adsorbate systems. The present study confirms that there exists a special type of silicagel having optimal physical characteristics that allows us to obtain the best performance.

  18. Potential Theory of Multicomponent Adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    We developed a theory of multicomponent adsorption on the basis of the potential concept originally suggested by Polanyi. The mixture is considered as a heterogeneous substance segregated in the external field emitted by the adsorbent. The same standard equation of state, with no additional fitting...... and high degree of predictability of the theory developed....... the potential theory and the spreading pressure concept is established, and problems of the theory consistency are studied. Numerical algorithms are suggested for evaluation of the segregated state of the mixture in the potential field of adsorption forces. Comparison with experimental data shows good agreement...

  19. Study of adsorption of zinc in clay smectite type Bofe in system of finite bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R.S.; Mota, J.D.; Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Clays are demonstrably excellent adsorbents, both for their physical and chemical characteristics and the wide coverage and low cost. Among the various groups of clay minerals, the smectite are noted for having large surface areas. The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Bofe through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET). To evaluate the adsorption of metal ions zinc (synthetic sewage), we used a system in finite bath, following a factorial design 2 2 , taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of zinc (Zn2 +) and output variables: percentage removal and removal capacity. The characterization results showed that Bofe clay belongs to the family of smectite and therefore has great potential for adsorption. (author)

  20. Fast gas adsorption measurements for complicated adsorption mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robens, E.; Poulis, J.A.; Massen, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Jäntti introduced a method to reduce the time required for the stepwise measurement of adsorption isotherms. After each pressure change he measured the adsorbed mass three times and calculated its equilibrium value at the new pressure. In the present paper, we discuss the applicability of this

  1. Physical adsorption and charge transfer of molecular Br2 on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheyuan; Darancet, Pierre; Wang, Lei; Crowther, Andrew C; Gao, Yuanda; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Marianetti, Chris A; Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-25

    We present a detailed study of gaseous Br2 adsorption and charge transfer on graphene, combining in situ Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). When graphene is encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers on both sides, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, it is protected from doping by strongly oxidizing Br2. Graphene supported on only one side by h-BN shows strong hole doping by adsorbed Br2. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determine the graphene charge density as a function of pressure. DFT calculations reveal the variation in charge transfer per adsorbed molecule as a function of coverage. The molecular adsorption isotherm (coverage versus pressure) is obtained by combining Raman spectra with DFT calculations. The Fowler-Guggenheim isotherm fits better than the Langmuir isotherm. The fitting yields the adsorption equilibrium constant (∼0.31 Torr(-1)) and repulsive lateral interaction (∼20 meV) between adsorbed Br2 molecules. The Br2 molecule binding energy is ∼0.35 eV. We estimate that at monolayer coverage each Br2 molecule accepts 0.09 e- from single-layer graphene. If graphene is supported on SiO2 instead of h-BN, a threshold pressure is observed for diffusion of Br2 along the (somewhat rough) SiO2/graphene interface. At high pressure, graphene supported on SiO2 is doped by adsorbed Br2 on both sides.

  2. Adsorption of small hydrocarbons on rutile TiO2(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Long; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2016-08-01

    Temperature programmed desorption and molecular beam scattering were used to study the adsorption and desorption of small hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes with 1 - 4 carbon atoms of C1-C4) on rutile TiO2(110). We show that the sticking coefficients for all the hydrocarbons are close to unity (> 0.95) at an adsorption temperature of 60 K. The desorption energies for hydrocarbons of the same chain length increase from n-alkanes to 1-alkenes and to 1-alkynes. This trend is likely a consequence of an additional dative bonding of the alkene and alkyne π system to the coordinatively unsaturated Ti5c sites. Similar to previous studies on the adsorption of n-alkanes on metal and metal oxide surfaces, we find the desorption energies within each group (n-alkanes vs. 1-alkenes vs. 1-alkynes) from Ti5c sites increase linearly with the chain length. The absolute saturation coverages of each hydrocarbon on Ti5c sites were also determined. The saturation coverage of CH4, is found to be ~ 2/3 monolayer (ML). The saturation coverages of C2-C4 hydrocarbons are found nearly independent of the chain length with values of ~1/2 ML for n-alkanes and 1-alkenes and 2/3 ML for 1-alkynes. This result is surprising considering their similar sizes.

  3. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  4. Coverage-based constraints for IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, H.; Ulrich, S.; Bangert, M.

    2017-09-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning requires an incorporation of uncertainties in order to guarantee an adequate irradiation of the tumor volumes. In current clinical practice, uncertainties are accounted for implicitly with an expansion of the target volume according to generic margin recipes. Alternatively, it is possible to account for uncertainties by explicit minimization of objectives that describe worst-case treatment scenarios, the expectation value of the treatment or the coverage probability of the target volumes during treatment planning. In this note we show that approaches relying on objectives to induce a specific coverage of the clinical target volumes are inevitably sensitive to variation of the relative weighting of the objectives. To address this issue, we introduce coverage-based constraints for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Our implementation follows the concept of coverage-optimized planning that considers explicit error scenarios to calculate and optimize patient-specific probabilities q(\\hat{d}, \\hat{v}) of covering a specific target volume fraction \\hat{v} with a certain dose \\hat{d} . Using a constraint-based reformulation of coverage-based objectives we eliminate the trade-off between coverage and competing objectives during treatment planning. In-depth convergence tests including 324 treatment plan optimizations demonstrate the reliability of coverage-based constraints for varying levels of probability, dose and volume. General clinical applicability of coverage-based constraints is demonstrated for two cases. A sensitivity analysis regarding penalty variations within this planing study based on IMRT treatment planning using (1) coverage-based constraints, (2) coverage-based objectives, (3) probabilistic optimization, (4) robust optimization and (5) conventional margins illustrates the potential benefit of coverage-based constraints that do not require tedious adjustment of target volume objectives.

  5. Thermodynamics of Methane Adsorption on Copper HKUST-1 at Low Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-02

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be engineered as natural gas storage materials by tuning the pore structures and surface properties. Here we report the direct measurement of CH4 adsorption enthalpy on a paddlewheel MOF (Cu HKUST-1) using gas adsorption calorimetry at 25 °C at low pressures (below 1 bar). In this pressure region, the CH4-CH4 intermolecular interactions are minimized and the energetics solely reflects the CH4-MOF interactions. Our results suggest moderately exothermic physisorption with an enthalpy of -21.1 ± 1.1 kJ/mol CH4 independent of coverage. This calorimetric investigation complements previous computational and crystallographic studies by providing zero coverage enthalpies of CH4 adsorption. The analysis of the new and literature data suggests that in initial stages of adsorption the CH4-HKUST-1 interaction tends to be more sensitive to the pore dimension than to the guest polarizability, suggesting a less specific chemical binding role for the open Cu site.

  6. Radionuclide adsorption characteristics around coastal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Young Il; Chung, Yang Geun; Hong, Sung Yul; Lee, Gab Bock

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption capacity of radionuclides onto suspended sediment was experimented on each of the coastal seawater sampled around the Kori and the Wolsung nuclear power plant. During the experiment the quantity and size fraction of suspended sediment were adjusted and the seawater and sediment chemistry is approximated to the expected field condition. Because the sorption capacity depends on the specific minerals, ocean chemistry and radionuclide involved, it is necessary to analyze sediment mineralogy. Clay mineral is dominant in seabed mineral and suspended sediment as the result of x-ray diffraction. Radionuclide sorbed to silty-clay mineral can be rather transported to ocean than scavenged to seabed because of low quantity and fine grained suspended sediment in the coast around the Kori and the Wolsung. The result of adsorption examinations shows that 139 Ce and 51 Cr and 110m Ag are strongly sorbed to suspended particle, while 137 Cs is less sorbed and 60 Co uptake is varied with experiment condition, which can be inferred from various biological factors. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  7. An exploration of the relationship between adsorption and bioavailability of pesticides in soil to earthworm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yunlong [Department of Plant Protection, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan Road 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)]. E-mail: ylyu@zju.edu.cn; Wu Xiaomao [Department of Plant Protection, College of Agriculture, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Li Shaonan [Department of Plant Protection, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan Road 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China); Fang Hua [Department of Plant Protection, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan Road 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China); Zhan Haiyan [Department of Plant Protection, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan Road 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China); Yu Jingquan [Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2006-06-15

    A study was conducted to determine the adsorption/desorption of butachlor, myclobutanil and chlorpyrifos on five soils using a batch equilibration technique and to study the relationship between bioavailability to Allolobophora caliginosa and the adsorption/desorption of these three pesticides. The results showed that the adsorption/desorption processes of the tested compounds were mainly controlled by soil organic matter content (OM) and octanol/water-partitioning coefficient (K {sub ow}), and that the bioavailability of the pesticides was dependent on characteristics of pesticides, properties of soils, and uptake routes of earthworms. Bioconcentration of butachlor and myclobutanil was negatively correlated with Freundlich adsorption constant K {sub af} and K {sub df}. However, only a slightly positive correlation between bioconcentration and K {sub af} and K {sub df} was observed for chlorpyrifos due to its high affinity onto soil. - Bioavailability of pesticides in soil to earthworm is governed by adsorption characteristics.

  8. The adsorption ability of Cr(VI) on sawdust–polyaniline nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binh Phan, Thi; Que Do, Ngoc; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi

    2010-01-01

    The results of this study of sawdust–polyaniline nanocomposite synthesized by a chemical method for Cr(VI) treatment in the environment are presented. Cr(VI) adsorption on a composite was determined by colorimetry. The results showed that sawdust–polyaniline composite synthesized with an aniline:sawdust ratio equal to 0.5 had an adsorption degree of 21.4 mg g −1 and adsorbed nearly 99% of the Cr(VI) after 2 h. The composite could be used for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from waste water. The Cr(VI) adsorption ability of the composite slightly depends on the pH value of the medium. The adsorption is fast during the first half hour and then the rate decreases

  9. Copper adsorption on magnetite-loaded chitosan microspheres: A kinetic and equilibrium study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podzus, P.E., E-mail: ppodzus@gmail.com [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); Debandi, M.V. [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daraio, M.E., E-mail: medit@fi.uba.ar [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    A composite of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and the biopolymer chitosan, chemically crosslinked, was prepared as microspheres and used to adsorb copper ions, which were chosen as a model of contaminant metal in water. The adsorption of copper on the magnetic microspheres was studied in a batch process, with different aqueous solutions of Cu (II) at concentrations ranging from 40 to 1100 ppm. Kinetic and equilibrium aspects of the adsorption process were studied. The time-dependent Cu (II) adsorption data were well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. It was found that the equilibrium data follow the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum adsorption capacity of around 500 mg Cu/g chitosan. The used microspheres were removed and after desorption the material was able to be reused as an adsorbent. The prepared microspheres proved efficient in the removal of copper ions through an adsorption process whose kinetic and equilibrium characteristics were analyzed.

  10. Adsorptive removal of naproxen and clofibric acid from water using metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Zubair; Jeon, Jaewoo; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2012-03-30

    Adsorptive removal of naproxen and clofibric acid, two typical PPCPs (pharmaceuticals and personal care products), has been studied using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for the first time. The removal efficiency decreases in the order of MIL-101>MIL-100-Fe>activated carbon both in adsorption rate and adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetics and capacity of PPCPs generally depend on the average pore size and surface area (or pore volume), respectively, of the adsorbents. The adsorption mechanism may be explained with a simple electrostatic interaction between PPCPs and the adsorbent. Finally, it can be suggested that MOFs having high porosity and large pore size can be potential adsorbents to remove harmful PPCPs in contaminated water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption kinetics of c-Fos and c-Jun to air-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Boca, Maximiliano; Nobre, Thatyane Morimoto; Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete Darbello; Maggio, Bruno; Borioli, Graciela A

    2007-11-01

    The kinetics of adsorption to air-water interfaces of the biomembrane active transcription factors c-Fos, c-Jun and their mixtures is investigated. The adsorption process shows three distinct stages: a lag time, a fast pseudo zero-order stage, and a halting stage. The initial stage determines the course of the process, which is concentration dependent until the end of the fast stage. We show that c-Fos has faster adsorption kinetics than c-Jun over all three stages and that the interaction between both proteins is apparent in the adsorption profiles of the mixtures. Protein molecular reorganization at the interface determines the transition to the final adsorption stage of the pure proteins as well as that of the mixtures.

  12. Parameterization and evaluation of sulfate adsorption in a dynamic soil chemistry model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, Liisa; Alveteg, Mattias; Warfvinge, Per

    2003-01-01

    Including sulfate adsorption improves the dynamic behavior of the SAFE model. - Sulfate adsorption was implemented in the dynamic, multi-layer soil chemistry model SAFE. The process is modeled by an isotherm in which sulfate adsorption is considered to be fully reversible and dependent on sulfate concentration as well as pH in soil solution. The isotherm was parameterized by a site-specific series of simple batch experiments at different pH (3.8-5.0) and sulfate concentration (10-260 μmol l -1 ) levels. Application of the model to the Lake Gaardsjoen roof covered site shows that including sulfate adsorption improves the dynamic behavior of the model and sulfate adsorption and desorption delay acidification and recovery of the soil. The modeled adsorbed pool of sulfate at the site reached a maximum level of 700 mmol/m 2 in the late 1980s, well in line with experimental data

  13. Copper adsorption on magnetite-loaded chitosan microspheres: A kinetic and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podzus, P.E.; Debandi, M.V.; Daraio, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    A composite of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and the biopolymer chitosan, chemically crosslinked, was prepared as microspheres and used to adsorb copper ions, which were chosen as a model of contaminant metal in water. The adsorption of copper on the magnetic microspheres was studied in a batch process, with different aqueous solutions of Cu (II) at concentrations ranging from 40 to 1100 ppm. Kinetic and equilibrium aspects of the adsorption process were studied. The time-dependent Cu (II) adsorption data were well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. It was found that the equilibrium data follow the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum adsorption capacity of around 500 mg Cu/g chitosan. The used microspheres were removed and after desorption the material was able to be reused as an adsorbent. The prepared microspheres proved efficient in the removal of copper ions through an adsorption process whose kinetic and equilibrium characteristics were analyzed.

  14. Adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate on granular activated carbon from date pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzougui, Z.; Nedjah, S.; Azoudj, Y.; Addoun, F. [Laboratoire d' etude physic-chimique des materiaux et application a l' environnement, Faculte de Chimie, USTHB (Algeria)], E-mail: zmerzougi@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Activated carbons, thanks to their versatility, are being used in the water treatment sector to absorb pollutants. Several factors influence the adsorption capacity of activated carbon and the aim of this study was to assess the effects of the porous texture and chemical nature of activated carbons on the adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate. Activated carbons used in this study were prepared from date pits with ZnCl2, KOH and H3PO4 by carbonization without adjuvant and adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate was conducted at 298K. Results showed that activated carbons prepared from date pits have a great potential for removing organic and inorganic pollutants from water and that the adsorption potential depends on the degree of activation of the activated carbons and on the compounds to absorb. This study highlighted that an increase of the carbon surface area and porosity results in a better adsorption capacity.

  15. Kinetics Study of Gas Pollutant Adsorption and Thermal Desorption on Silica Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Silica gel is a typical porous desiccant material. Its adsorption performance for gaseous air pollutants was investigated to determine its potential contribution to reducing such pollutants. Three gaseous air pollutants, toluene, carbon dioxide, and methane, were investigated in this paper. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to obtain the equilibrium adsorption capacity of gases on single silica gel particles. The silica gel adsorption capacity for toluene is much higher than that for carbon dioxide and methane. To understand gas pollutant thermal desorption from silica gel, the thermogravimetric analysis of toluene desorption was conducted with 609 ppm toluene vapor at 313 K, 323 K, and 333 K. The overall regeneration rate of silica gel was strongly dependent on temperature and the enthalpy of desorption. The gas pollutant adsorption performance and thermal desorption on silica gel material may be used to estimate the operating and design parameters for gas pollutant adsorption by desiccant wheels.

  16. An exploration of the relationship between adsorption and bioavailability of pesticides in soil to earthworm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yunlong; Wu Xiaomao; Li Shaonan; Fang Hua; Zhan Haiyan; Yu Jingquan

    2006-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the adsorption/desorption of butachlor, myclobutanil and chlorpyrifos on five soils using a batch equilibration technique and to study the relationship between bioavailability to Allolobophora caliginosa and the adsorption/desorption of these three pesticides. The results showed that the adsorption/desorption processes of the tested compounds were mainly controlled by soil organic matter content (OM) and octanol/water-partitioning coefficient (K ow ), and that the bioavailability of the pesticides was dependent on characteristics of pesticides, properties of soils, and uptake routes of earthworms. Bioconcentration of butachlor and myclobutanil was negatively correlated with Freundlich adsorption constant K af and K df . However, only a slightly positive correlation between bioconcentration and K af and K df was observed for chlorpyrifos due to its high affinity onto soil. - Bioavailability of pesticides in soil to earthworm is governed by adsorption characteristics

  17. ADSORPTION MALACHITE GREEN ON NATURAL ZEOLITE

    OpenAIRE

    Eko Ariyanto

    2012-01-01

    A natural zeolite was employed as adsorbent for reducing of malachite green from aqueous solution. A batch system was applied to study the adsorption of malachite green in single system on natural zeolite. The adsorption studies indicate that malachite green in single component system follows the second-order kinetics and the adsorption is diffusion process with two stages for malachite green. Malachite green adsorption isotherm follows the Langmuir model.

  18. ADSORPTION MALACHITE GREEN ON NATURAL ZEOLITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Ariyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A natural zeolite was employed as adsorbent for reducing of malachite green from aqueous solution. A batch system was applied to study the adsorption of malachite green in single system on natural zeolite. The adsorption studies indicate that malachite green in single component system follows the second-order kinetics and the adsorption is diffusion process with two stages for malachite green. Malachite green adsorption isotherm follows the Langmuir model.

  19. Modulating Protein Adsorption on Oxygen Plasma Modified Polysiloxane Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marletta, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we report the study on the adsorption behaviour of three model globular proteins, Human Serum Albumin, Lactoferrin and Egg Chicken Lysozyme onto both unmodified surfaces of a silicon-based polymer and the corresponding plasma treated surfaces. In particular, thin films of hydrophobic polysiloxane (about 90 degree of static water contact angle, WCA) were converted by oxygen plasma treatment at reduced pressure into very hydrophilic phases of SiOx (WCA less than 5 degree). The kinetics of protein adsorption processes were investigated by QCM-D technique, while the chemical structure and topography of the protein adlayer have been studied by Angular resolved-XPS and AFM respectively. It turned out that Albumin and Lysozyme exhibited the opposite preferential adsorption respectively onto the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, while Lactoferrin did not exhibit significant differences. The observed protein behaviour are discussed both in terms of surface-dependent parameters, including surface free energy and chemical structure, and in terms of protein-dependent parameters, including charge as well as the average molecular orientation in the adlayers. Finally, some examples of differential adsorption behaviour of the investigated proteins are reported onto nanopatterned polysiloxane surfaces consisting of hydrophobic nanopores surrounded by hydrophilic (plasma-treated) matrix and the reverse

  20. Atomic geometry and electronic structure of Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N(0 0 0 1) surfaces covered with different coverages of cesium: A first-principle research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mingzhu [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Optical Technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210094 (China); Chang, Benkang, E-mail: bkchang@mail.njust.edu.cn [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Optical Technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210094 (China); Wang, Meishan [Institute of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai, Shandong 264025 (China)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Adsorption energy of Cs adsorption on Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N(0 0 0 1) surface increases as the increasing of Cs coverage. • Electrons transfer from Cs adatoms to substrate during Cs adsorption process, meanwhile the transfer efficiency decreases as Cs coverage increases. • The length of Ga-N bond in the first and second bilayers increases after Cs adsorption. • There appear new energy bands at −25 to −23 eV and −14 to −10 eV, which were induced by Cs 5s and Cs 5p state electrons respectively. - Abstract: We investigate cesium adsorption on Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N(0 0 0 1) surface at different coverages using first principle method based on density functional theory. Adsorption energies, atomic structure, Mulliken charge distribution, electron transfer, band structures, and density of states of the adsorption systems corresponding to different Cs coverages were obtained. Total-energy calculations show that cesium adsorption on Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N(0 0 0 1) surface is more and more difficult as the increase of cesium coverage. A single cesium adatom is preferred to locate at the top of Ga atom (T{sub Ga}). Meanwhile, it is not the most stable configuration when two cesium atoms were located on the top of two Ga neighbors at the same time. This is mainly because the distance of Cs adatoms is so small that repulsive force between adatoms rises. At low coverage, electrons transfer from Cs adatom to Ga atoms on the topmost and second topmost bilayers. Meanwhile, the efficiency of electron transfer decreases as the increasing of Cs coverage. There appear new bands at −25 to −23 eV and −14 to −10 eV, which were caused by Cs 5s and Cs 5p state electrons. Under the joint effect of Cs 5s and 5p state electrons, density of states at Fermi level increases, and the adsorption surfaces show more metal properties. Electrons transferring from Cs adatoms to Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N substrate induces dipole moment, which is useful to

  1. Atomic geometry and electronic structure of Al0.25Ga0.75N(0 0 0 1) surfaces covered with different coverages of cesium: A first-principle research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mingzhu; Chang, Benkang; Wang, Meishan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adsorption energy of Cs adsorption on Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 N(0 0 0 1) surface increases as the increasing of Cs coverage. • Electrons transfer from Cs adatoms to substrate during Cs adsorption process, meanwhile the transfer efficiency decreases as Cs coverage increases. • The length of Ga-N bond in the first and second bilayers increases after Cs adsorption. • There appear new energy bands at −25 to −23 eV and −14 to −10 eV, which were induced by Cs 5s and Cs 5p state electrons respectively. - Abstract: We investigate cesium adsorption on Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 N(0 0 0 1) surface at different coverages using first principle method based on density functional theory. Adsorption energies, atomic structure, Mulliken charge distribution, electron transfer, band structures, and density of states of the adsorption systems corresponding to different Cs coverages were obtained. Total-energy calculations show that cesium adsorption on Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 N(0 0 0 1) surface is more and more difficult as the increase of cesium coverage. A single cesium adatom is preferred to locate at the top of Ga atom (T Ga ). Meanwhile, it is not the most stable configuration when two cesium atoms were located on the top of two Ga neighbors at the same time. This is mainly because the distance of Cs adatoms is so small that repulsive force between adatoms rises. At low coverage, electrons transfer from Cs adatom to Ga atoms on the topmost and second topmost bilayers. Meanwhile, the efficiency of electron transfer decreases as the increasing of Cs coverage. There appear new bands at −25 to −23 eV and −14 to −10 eV, which were caused by Cs 5s and Cs 5p state electrons. Under the joint effect of Cs 5s and 5p state electrons, density of states at Fermi level increases, and the adsorption surfaces show more metal properties. Electrons transferring from Cs adatoms to Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 N substrate induces dipole moment, which is useful to lower work function. What is more

  2. CDMA coverage under mobile heterogeneous network load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saban, D.; van den Berg, Hans Leo; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Endrayanto, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    We analytically investigate coverage (determined by the uplink) under non-homogeneous and moving traffic load of third generation UMTS mobile networks. In particular, for different call assignment policies, we investigate cell breathing and the movement of the coverage gap occurring between cells

  3. 5 CFR 531.402 - Employee coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee coverage. 531.402 Section 531... GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.402 Employee coverage. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, this subpart applies to employees who— (1) Are classified and paid under the...

  4. 22 CFR 226.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 226.31 Section 226.31 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Property Standards § 226.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients...

  5. 14 CFR 1260.131 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with Federal funds as provided for property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms and conditions of the award. ...

  6. 2 CFR 215.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with Federal funds as provided to property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms and conditions of the award. ...

  7. 36 CFR 1210.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with NHPRC funds as provided to property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms and conditions of the award. ...

  8. Coverage matters: insurance and health care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Health Care Services Staff; Institute of Medicine Staff; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    2001-01-01

    ...? How does the system of insurance coverage in the U.S. operate, and where does it fail? The first of six Institute of Medicine reports that will examine in detail the consequences of having a large uninsured population, Coverage Matters...

  9. Legislating health care coverage for the unemployed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palley, H A; Feldman, G; Gallner, I; Tysor, M

    1985-01-01

    Because the unemployed and their families are often likely to develop stress-related health problems, ensuring them access to health care is a public health issue. Congressional efforts thus far to legislate health coverage for the unemployed have proposed a system that recognizes people's basic need for coverage but has several limitations.

  10. Thermodynamic features of dioxins’ adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisciandaro, Marina [Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and of Economics, University of L’Aquila, Viale Giovanni Gronchi 18, L’Aquila 67100 (Italy); Piemonte, Vincenzo, E-mail: v.piemonte@unicampus.it [Faculty of Engineering, University Campus Biomedico of Rome, Via Alvaro del Portillo 21, Rome 00128 (Italy); Mazziotti di Celso, Giuseppe [Faculty of Bioscience, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini, 1, 64100 Teramo (Italy); Ronconi, Silvia [Arta Abruzzo, Department of L’Aquila, Bazzano (AQ), 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Capocelli, Mauro [Faculty of Engineering, University Campus Biomedico of Rome, Via Alvaro del Portillo 21, Rome 00128 (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We develop the P-T diagram for six PCDD. • We derive theoretical adsorption isotherms according to the Langmuir’s model. • We calculate K and w{sub max} values for several temperatures. • We estimate the adsorption heat with a good agreement with literature data. - Abstract: In this paper, the six more poisonous species among all congeners of dioxin group are taken into account, and the P-T diagram for each of them is developed. Starting from the knowledge of vapour tensions and thermodynamic parameters, the theoretical adsorption isotherms are calculated according to the Langmuir’s model. In particular, the Langmuir isotherm parameters (K and w{sub max}) have been validated through the estimation of the adsorption heat (ΔH{sub ads}), which varies in the range 20–24 kJ/mol, in agreement with literature values. This result will allow to put the thermodynamical basis for a rational design of different process units devoted to dioxins removal.

  11. Adsorptive storage of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Song; Lang, Liu; Licheng, Ling

    2001-01-01

    The Adsorbed Natural Gas (ANG) storage technology is reviewed. The present status, theoretical limits and operational problems are discussed. Natural gas (NG) has a considerable advantage over conventional fuels both from an environmental point of view and for its natural abundance. However, as well known, it has a two fold disadvantage compared with liquid fuels: it is relatively expensive to transport from the remote areas, and its energy density (heat of combustion/volume) is low. All these will restrict its use. Compressed natural gas (CNG) may be a solution, but high pressures are needed (up to 25 MPa) for use in natural-gas fueled vehicles, and the large cost of the cylinders for storage and the high-pressure facilities necessary limit the practical use of CNG. Alternatively, adsorbed natural gas (ANG) at 3 - 4 MPa offers a very high potential for exploitation in both transport and large-scale applications. At present, research about this technology mainly focuses on: to make adsorbents with high methane adsorption capacity; to make clear the effects of heat of adsorption and the effect of impurities in natural gas on adsorption and desorption capacity. This paper provides an overview of current technology and examines the relations between fundamentals of adsorption and ANG storage. (authors)

  12. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  13. Immunoglobulin adsorption on modified surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, M.G.E.G.

    2001-01-01

    Preservation of biological functioning of proteins during immobilisation is of special interest in various biomedical and biotechnical applications. In industry physical adsorption of immunoglobulins (IgGs) onto solid surfaces is still the predominant immobilisation procedure because it is

  14. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial pH, solution temperature, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations on the adsorption efficiency was investigated using batch equilibrium assays. From the results obtained for the adsorption ...

  15. Competitive Adsorption of Chloroform and Bromoform Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained were checked with Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. This model expresses well adsorption of one THM species in the presence of another with R2 > 0.95. Based on the model, adsorption capacity of Calgon F200 and Norit GCN1240 were found higher for bromoform than chloroform. Calgon F200 ...

  16. Environmentally benign working pairs for adsorption refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Qun; Tao Gang; Chen Haijun; Guo Xinyue; Yao Huqing

    2005-01-01

    This paper begins from adsorption working pairs: water and ethanol were selected as refrigerants; 13x molecular sieve, silica gel, activated carbon, adsorbent NA and NB, proposed by authors, were selected as adsorbents, and the performance of adsorption working pairs in adsorption refrigeration cycle was studied. The adsorption isotherms of adsorbents (NA and NB) were obtained by high-vacuum gravimetric method. Desorption properties of adsorbents were analyzed and compared by thermal analysis method. The performance of adsorption refrigeration was studied on simulation device of adsorption refrigeration cycle. After presentation of adsorption isotherms, the thermodynamic performance for their use in adsorption refrigeration system was calculated. The results show: (1) the maximum adsorption capacity of water on adsorbent NA reaches 0.7 kg/kg, and the maximum adsorption capacity of ethanol on adsorbent NB is 0.68 kg/kg, which is three times that of ethanol on activated carbon, (2) the refrigeration capacity of NA-water working pair is 922 kJ/kg, the refrigeration capacity of NB-ethanol is 2.4 times that of activated carbon-methanol, (3) as environmental friendly and no public hazard adsorption working pair, NA-H 2 O and NB-ethanol can substitute activated carbon-methanol in adsorption refrigeration system using low-grade heat source

  17. Comparison of adsorption of Remazol Black B and Acidol Red on microporous activated carbon felt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnaperna, L; Duclaux, L; Gadiou, R; Hirn, M-P; Merli, C; Pietrelli, L

    2009-11-15

    The adsorption of two anionic dyes, Remazol Black B (RB5) and Acidol Red 2BE-NW (AR42), onto a microporous activated carbon felt was investigated. The characterization of carbon surface chemistry by X-ray microanalysis, Boehm titrations, and pH-PZC measurements indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly acidic. The rate of adsorption depends on the pH and the experimental data fit the intraparticle diffusion model. The pore size distribution obtained by DFT analysis shows that the mean pore size is close to 1nm, which indicates that a slow intraparticle diffusion process control the adsorption. The adsorption isotherms were measured for different pH values. The Khan and the Langmuir-Freundlich models lead to the best agreement with experimental data for RB5 and AR42, respectively. These isotherm simulations and the pH dependence of adsorption show that the adsorption capacity is mainly controlled by nondispersive electrostatic interactions for pH values below 4. The adsorption kinetics, the irreversibility of the process, and the influence of the pH indicate that the rate of adsorption in this microporous felt proceeds through two steps. The first one is fast and results from direct interaction of dye molecules with the external surface of the carbon material (which account for 10% of the whole surface area); in the second, slow step, the adsorption rate is controlled by the slow diffusion of dye molecules into the narrow micropores. The influence of temperature on the adsorption isotherms was studied and the thermodynamic parameters were obtained. They show that the process is spontaneous and exothermic.

  18. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchek, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.volchek@ec.gc.ca [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Miah, Muhammed Yusuf [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Noakhali Science and Technology University (Bangladesh); Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Tezel, F. Handan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar was investigated in a range of temperatures and cesium concentrations. {yields} The pseudo-second order kinetic model produced a good fit with the experimental kinetic data. {yields} Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. {yields} The interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar was dominated by chemical adsorption. - Abstract: The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L{sup -1} and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive {sup 137}Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L{sup -1} while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol{sup -1} suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  19. Removal of Arsenic from Drinking Water by Adsorption and Coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Removal of arsenic from drinking water has been an important issue worldwide, which has attracted greater attentions in recent years especially for supplying safe drinking water in developing countries. Although many kinds of treatment approaches that are available or applicable both in principle and practice, such as adsorption, coagulation, membrane filtration, ion exchange, biological process, electrocoagulation and so on, the first 2 approaches (i.e., adsorption and coagulation) are most promising due to the low-cost, high-efficiency, simplicity of treating systems, and thus can be practically used in developing countries. In this study, a literature survey on water quality in Bangladesh was performed to understand the ranges of arsenic concentration and pH of groundwater in Bangladesh. A series of tests were then organized and performed to investigate the effects of arsenic concentration, arsenic forms, pH, chemical compositions of the materials used for adsorption and coagulation, particle size distribution and treatment time on quality of treated water. The experimental results obtained in the study illustrated that both adsorption and coagulation can be used to effectively reduce the concentrations of either arsenic (V) or arsenic (III) from the contaminated water. Coagulation of arsenic with a magnesium-based material developed in this study can be very effective to remove arsenic, especially arsenic (V), from contaminated water with a concentration of 10 ppm to an undetectable level of 0.002 ppm by ICP analyses. Compared to arsenic (III), arsenic (V) is easier to be removed. The materials used for adsorption and coagulation in this study can remove arsenic (V) up to 9 mg/g and 6 mg/g, and arsenic (III) up to 4 mg/g and 3 mg/g, respectively, depending on test conditions and compositions of the materials being used. The control of pH during treatment can be a challenging technical issue for developing both adsorbent and coagulant. Keywords: Water Treatment

  20. Adsorption of Xyloglucan onto Cellulose Surfaces of Different Morphologies: An Entropy-Driven Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benselfelt, Tobias; Cranston, Emily D; Ondaral, Sedat; Johansson, Erik; Brumer, Harry; Rutland, Mark W; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-09-12

    The temperature-dependence of xyloglucan (XG) adsorption onto smooth cellulose model films regenerated from N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO) was investigated using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the adsorbed amount increased with increasing temperature. This implies that the adsorption of XG to NMMO-regenerated cellulose is endothermic and supports the hypothesis that the adsorption of XG onto cellulose is an entropy-driven process. We suggest that XG adsorption is mainly driven by the release of water molecules from the highly hydrated cellulose surfaces and from the XG molecules, rather than through hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces as previously suggested. To test this hypothesis, the adsorption of XG onto cellulose was studied using cellulose films with different morphologies prepared from cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), semicrystalline NMMO-regenerated cellulose, and amorphous cellulose regenerated from lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide. The total amount of high molecular weight xyloglucan (XGHMW) adsorbed was studied by quartz crystal microbalance and reflectometry measurements, and it was found that the adsorption was greatest on the amorphous cellulose followed by the CNC and NMMO-regenerated cellulose films. There was a significant correlation between the cellulose dry film thickness and the adsorbed XG amount, indicating that XG penetrated into the films. There was also a correlation between the swelling of the films and the adsorbed amounts and conformation of XG, which further strengthened the conclusion that the water content and the subsequent release of the water upon adsorption are important components of the adsorption process.

  1. Effect of Humid Aging on the Oxygen Adsorption in SnO₂ Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Koichi; Ma, Nan; Watanabe, Ken; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Kida, Tetsuya; Shimanoe, Kengo

    2018-01-16

    To investigate the effect of aging at 580 °C in wet air (humid aging) on the oxygen adsorption on the surface of SnO₂ particles, the electric properties and the sensor response to hydrogen in dry and humid atmospheres for SnO₂ resistive-type gas sensors were evaluated. The electric resistance in dry and wet atmospheres at 350 °C was strongly increased by humid aging. From the results of oxygen partial pressure dependence of the electric resistance, the oxygen adsorption equilibrium constants ( K ₁; for O - adsorption, K ₂; for O 2- adsorption) were estimated on the basis of the theoretical model of oxygen adsorption. The K ₁ and K ₂ in dry and wet atmospheres at 350 °C were increased by humid aging at 580 °C, indicating an increase in the adsorption amount of both O - and O 2- . These results suggest that hydroxyl poisoning on the oxygen adsorption is suppressed by humid aging. The sensor response to hydrogen in dry and wet atmosphere at 350 °C was clearly improved by humid aging. Such an improvement of the sensor response seems to be caused by increasing the oxygen adsorption amount. Thus, the humid aging offers an effective way to improve the sensor response of SnO₂ resistive-type gas sensors in dry and wet atmospheres.

  2. Effect of Humid Aging on the Oxygen Adsorption in SnO2 Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Suematsu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of aging at 580 °C in wet air (humid aging on the oxygen adsorption on the surface of SnO2 particles, the electric properties and the sensor response to hydrogen in dry and humid atmospheres for SnO2 resistive-type gas sensors were evaluated. The electric resistance in dry and wet atmospheres at 350 °C was strongly increased by humid aging. From the results of oxygen partial pressure dependence of the electric resistance, the oxygen adsorption equilibrium constants (K1; for O− adsorption, K2; for O2− adsorption were estimated on the basis of the theoretical model of oxygen adsorption. The K1 and K2 in dry and wet atmospheres at 350 °C were increased by humid aging at 580 °C, indicating an increase in the adsorption amount of both O− and O2−. These results suggest that hydroxyl poisoning on the oxygen adsorption is suppressed by humid aging. The sensor response to hydrogen in dry and wet atmosphere at 350 °C was clearly improved by humid aging. Such an improvement of the sensor response seems to be caused by increasing the oxygen adsorption amount. Thus, the humid aging offers an effective way to improve the sensor response of SnO2 resistive-type gas sensors in dry and wet atmospheres.

  3. Theoretical insights into acetylene adsorption on nanoporous gold surfaces: Role of residual silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yafei; Chen, Zhongzhu; Xu, Zhigang; Yang, Donglin; Zhang, Jin; Tang, Dianyong

    2018-03-01

    Unveiling the acetylene adsorption is crucial for designing novel and highly active catalyst for the semihydrogenation of alkyne. In order to achieve this goal, we have studied C2H2 adsorption on the various nanoporous gold models in detail, including the Au(100), Au(111) and Au(321) slab models. The calculated results indicate that the C atoms of C2H2 experience rehybridization from sp toward sp2/sp3 when the adsorption occurs on bridge and hollow sites, which can be illustrated via the projected density of state (PDOS) and crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP). Meanwhile, the formation of σ(Ausbnd C) bond is beneficial for facilitating acetylene adsorption and the kink Au atom plays an important role for the C2H2 adsorption. In addition, for C2H2 adsorption on the Ag doped nanoporous gold, the configurations strongly depend on the position of superficial unsubstituted Au atoms. Further, the inversely relationship has been found between the adsorption energies and number of the Ag substituents, demonstrating that the superficial Ag substituents are harmful for C2H2 adsorption and activation.

  4. A Study on adsorption of Li from aqueous solution using various adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryoo, Keon Sang [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Andong National University, Andon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Ik [School of Electrical, Electronic Communication, and Computer Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The aim of the present study is to explore the possibility of utilizing fly ash, loess and activated charcoal for the adsorption of Li in aqueous solution. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the influences of various factors like initial concentration, contact time, and temperature. The adsorption data showed that fly ash and activated charcoal are not effective for the adsorption of Li. On the contrary, loess showed much higher adsorption capacity for Li. The adsorption of Li on loess was highly concentration dependent. It was found that the adsorption capacity of loess is favored at a lower Li concentration. At equilibrium, approximately 95% of adsorption was achieved by loess. The equilibrium data were fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model appeared to be the better-fitting model because it has higher R 2 compared to the pseudo-first-order kinetic models. The thermodynamic parameters such as free energy ΔG, the enthalpy ΔH, and the entropy ΔS were calculated.

  5. Adsorption and desorption study of 14C-Chloropyrifos in two Malaysian agricultural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimah Muhammad; Nashriyah Mat; Tan Yew Ai; Ismail, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption equilibrium time and effects of pH and concentration of 14 C-labeled chloropyrifos 0,0-diethyl 0-(3, 5, 6 tricloro-2-pyridyl)-phosphorothiote in soil were investigated. Two types of Malaysian soil under oil palm were used in this study; namely clay loam and clay soil obtained from the Sungai Sedu and Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) Estates, respectively. Equilibrium studies of chloropyrifos between the agricultural soil and the pesticide solution were conducted. Adsorption equilibrium time was achieved within 6 and 24 hours for clay loam and clay soil, respectively. It was found that chloropyrifos adsorbed by the soil samples was characterized by an initial rapid adsorption after which adsorption remained approximately constant. The percentage of 14 C-labeled chloropyrifos adsorption on soil was found to be higher in clay loam than in clay soils. Results of the study demonstrated that pH affected the adsorption of chloropyrifos on both clay loam and clay soils. The adsorption of chloropyrifos on both types of soil was higher at low pH with the adsorption reduced as the pH increased. Results also suggest that chloropyrifos sorption by soil is concentration dependent. (Author)

  6. Adsorption of Candida rugosa lipase at water-polymer interface: The case of poly( DL)lactide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Gihan; Bordi, Federico; Chronopoulou, Laura; Lupi, Stefano; Palocci, Cleofe; Sennato, Simona; Verdes, Pedro V.

    2011-12-01

    Insights into the interactions between biological macromolecules and polymeric surfaces are of great interest because of potential uses in developing biotechnologies. In this study we focused on the adsorption of a model lipolytic enzyme, Candida rugosa lipase (CRL), on poly-(D,L)-lactic acid (PDLLA) polymer with the aim to gain deeper insights into the interactions between the enzyme and the carrier. Such studies are of particular relevance in order to establish the optimal conditions for enzyme immobilization and its applications. We employed two different approaches; by analyzing the influence of adsorbed CRL molecules on the thermodynamic behavior of Langmuir films of PDLLA deposited at air-water interface, we gained interesting information on the molecular interactions between the protein and the polymer. Successively, by a systematic analysis of the adsorption of CRL on PDLLA nanoparticles, we showed that the adsorption of a model lipase, CRL, on PDLLA is described in terms of a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior. In this model, only monomolecular adsorption takes place (i.e. only a single layer of the protein adsorbs on the support) and the interactions between adsorbed molecules and surface are short ranged. Moreover, both the adsorption and desorption are activated processes, and the heat of adsorption (the difference between the activation energy for adsorption and desorption) is independent from the surface coverage of the adsorbing species. Finally, we obtained an estimate of the number of molecules of the protein adsorbed per surface unit on the particles, a parameter of a practical relevance for applications in biocatalysis, and a semi-quantitative estimate of the energies (heat of adsorption) involved in the adsorption process.

  7. Adsorption of modified dextrins on molybdenite: AFM imaging, contact angle, and flotation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Parkinson, Luke; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Beattie, David A

    2012-02-15

    The adsorption of three dextrins (a regular wheat dextrin, Dextrin TY, carboxymethyl (CM) Dextrin, and hydroxypropyl (HP) Dextrin) on molybdenite has been investigated using adsorption isotherms, tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM), contact angle measurements, and dynamic bubble-surface collisions. In addition, the effect of the polymers on the flotation recovery of molybdenite has been determined. The isotherms revealed the importance of molecular weight in determining the adsorbed amounts of the polymers on molybdenite at plateau coverage. TMAFM revealed the morphology of the three polymers, which consisted of randomly dispersed domains with a higher area fraction of surface coverage for the substituted dextrins. The contact angle of polymer-treated molybdenite indicated that polymer layer coverage and hydration influenced the mineral surface hydrophobicity. Bubble-surface collisions indicated that the polymers affected thin film rupture and dewetting rate differently, correlating with differences in the adsorbed layer morphology. Direct correlations were found between the surface coverage of the adsorbed layers, their impact on thin film rupture time, and their impact on flotation recovery, highlighting the paramount role of the polymer morphology in the bubble/particle attachment process and subsequent flotation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calorimetric study at different temperatures of iodine adsorption from organic solutions on outgassed 'eta' alumina and bayerite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Gatta, G.; Stradella, L.; Venturello, G.

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption of iodine from solution in n-pentane at 27 0 C and in cyclohexane at 35 0 C and 50 0 C on eta-Al 2 O 3 and bayerite outgassed at R.T. has been studied with a calorimetric technique. The measurements were performed by means of a Calvet type calorimeter using a new cell conceived for the adsorption from solution. The integral molar energies of adsorption show, at low coverages, a very strong interaction of iodine with surface hydroxyl groups, possibly leading to charge-transfer complexes and reactions. A peculiar exothermic effect has been also evidenced before the monolayer completion, in correspondence with a 'step' on the adsorption isotherms. This result is interpreted in terms of cooperative adsorption implying the possible formation of surface clusters around the strongly absorbed molecules. On non-porous samples (bayerite) the adsorption temperature rise decrease the total amounts adsorbed. But on porous ones (eta-Al 2 O 3 ) the adsorption is increased. (orig./HK) [de

  9. From aggregative adsorption to surface depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rother, Gernot; Müter, Dirk; Bock, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption of a short-chain nonionic amphiphile (C6E3) at the surface of mesoporous silica glass (CPG) was studied by a combination of adsorption measurements and mesoscale simulations. Adsorption measurements covering a wide composition range of the C6E3 + water system show that no adsorption...... occurs up to the critical micelle concentration, at which a sharp increase of adsorption is observed that is attributed to ad-micelle formation at the pore walls. Intriguingly, as the concentration is increased further, the surface excess of the amphiphile begins to decrease and eventually becomes...

  10. Adsorption from solutions of non-electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    Kipling, J J

    1965-01-01

    Adsorption from Solutions of Non-Electrolytes provides a general discussion of the subject, which has so far been given little or no attention in current textbooks of physical chemistry. A general view of the subject is particularly needed at a time when we wish to see how far it will be possible to use theories of solutions to explain the phenomena of adsorption. The book opens with an introductory chapter on the types of interface, aspects of adsorption from solution, types of adsorption, and classification of systems. This is followed by separate chapters on experimental methods, adsorption

  11. Adsorption Studies of Radish Leaf Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radish leaves (Raphanus sativus powder fractions was subjected to moisture adsorption isotherms at different isothermal temperature conditions from 15-45°C with an equal interval of 10°C. The sorption data obtained in gravimetric static method under 0.11–0.90 water activity conditions were subjected for sorption isotherms and found to be typical sigmoid trend. Experimental data were assessed for the applicability in the prediction through sorption models fitting and found that Polynomial and GAB equations performed well over all fitted models in describing equilibrium moisture content – equilibrium relative humidity (EMC–ERH relationships for shelf stable dehydrated radish leaf powder, over the entire range of temperatures condition under study. The net isosteric heat of sorption, differential entropy and free energy were determined at different temperatures and their dependence was seen with respect to equilibrium moisture content.

  12. Study of the processes of adsorption of amine-containing surface-active substance on the surface of Aluminum powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Dyuryagina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Equilibrium characteristics of adsorption on a surface of a pigment depending on concentration factors and temperature of the dispersive environment are defined. Kinetic laws of superficial activity of binary, threefold homogeneous and heterogeneous modeling systems are studied. The estimation of mechanisms of process of adsorption is carried out.

  13. Self-consistent meta-generalized gradient approximation study of adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Madsen, Georg Kent Hellerup; Hammer, Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    aromatic molecules considered. The adsorption of pentacene is studied on Au, Ag, and Cu surfaces. In agreement with experiment, the adsorption energies are found to increase with decreasing nobleness, but the dependency is underestimated. We point out how the kinetic energy density can discriminate between...

  14. The effect of various cations and pH on the adsorption of U(VI) on Amberlite IR-118H resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2003-01-01

    The effects of various metal cations and pH on the adsorption of uranium(VI) on strongly acidic cation exchanger Amberlite IR-118H (AIR-118H) were studied. The metal cations suppress U(VI) adsorption differently depending on their ionic radii. Adsorption of U(VI) on AIR-118H peaks at pH 3.4, which was attributed to the occurrence of different forms of U(VI) at different pH values. The adsorption data were then processed using the Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim equation, and the standard free energy of adsorption was calculated

  15. Adsorption kinetics of WS2 quantum dots onto a polycrystalline gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhukil Valappil, Manila; Roopesh, Mekkat; Alwarappan, Subbiah; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K

    2018-04-18

    In this work, we report the adsorption kinetics of electrochemically synthesized WS2 quantum dots (ca. 3 nm) onto a polycrystalline gold electrode. Langmuir adsorption isotherm approach was employed to explore the temperature and adsorbate concentration dependence of experimentally calculated equilibrium constant of adsorption (Keq) and free energy for adsorption (ΔGads). Subsequently, we extract other thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption rate constant (Kads), desorption rate constant (Kd), the enthalpy of adsorption (ΔHads) and the entropy of adsorption (ΔSads). Our findings indicate that ΔGads is temperature dependent and ca. -1.74 kcal mol-1, ΔHads = -10.697 kcal mol-1 and ΔSads = -30 cal/(mol.K). These investigations on the contribution of the enthalpic and entropic forces to the total free energy of this system underscore the role of entropic forces on the stability of the WS2 QDs monolayer and provide new thermodynamic insights into other TMDQDs monolayers as well.

  16. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E., E-mail: mateome@cab.inta-csic.es

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • Successful adsorption of cystine on pyrite surface under several conditions. • Detailed XPS spectroscopic characterization of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface. • Spectroscopy evidence, oxidation and anoxic conditions adjust molecular adsorption. • Molecular chemistry on pyrite is driven depending on the surrounding conditions. • The cystine/pyrite(100) model is in good agreement with Wächtershäuser’s theory. - Abstract: We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions.

  17. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Successful adsorption of cystine on pyrite surface under several conditions. • Detailed XPS spectroscopic characterization of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface. • Spectroscopy evidence, oxidation and anoxic conditions adjust molecular adsorption. • Molecular chemistry on pyrite is driven depending on the surrounding conditions. • The cystine/pyrite(100) model is in good agreement with Wächtershäuser’s theory. - Abstract: We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions

  18. Preparation and adsorption behavior for metal ions and humic acid of chitosan derivatives crosslinked by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Long; Wasikiewicz, J.M.; Mitomo, H.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the determination of the adsorption properties of metal ions and humic acid in wa- ter on crosslinked chitosan derivatives (carboxymethylchitosan) which were formed using the irradiation technique without any additives. The solubility test of these crosslinked materials were investigated in acidic, alkaline media, distilled water, and certain organic solvents. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images showed that the crosslinked chitosan derivatives possessed a porous morphological structure. Charged characteristic analyses demonstrated typically pH-dependent properties of the crosslinked materials. The adsorption studies were carded out by the batch method at room temperature. Adsorption of heavy metal ions (such as Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ ) and humic acid onto crosslinked samples was found to be strongly pH-dependent. Adsorption kinetic studies indicated the rapid removal of metal ions, and humic acid from the aqueous solutions. Moreover, isothermal adsorption data revealed that Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and humic acid were removed by these crosslinked materials with high efficiency. Adsorption isothermal data were interpreted well by the Langmuir equation. These crosslinked carboxymethylated chitosan derivatives indicate favorable adsorption of metal ions and humic acid. (authors)

  19. Network television news coverage of environmental risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, M.R.; Sandman, P.M.; Sachsman, D.V.; Salomone, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the criticisms that surround television coverage of environmental risk, there have been relatively few attempts to measure what and whom television shows. Most research has focused analysis on a few weeks of coverage of major stories like the gas leak at Bhopal, the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, or the Mount St. Helen's eruption. To advance the research into television coverage of environmental risk, an analysis has been made of all environmental risk coverage by the network nightly news broadcasts for a period of more than two years. Researchers have analyzed all environmental risk coverage-564 stories in 26 months-presented on ABC, CBS, and NBC's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986. The quantitative information from the 564 stories was balanced by a more qualitative analysis of the television coverage of two case studies-the dioxin contamination in Times Beach, Missouri, and the suspected methyl isocyanate emissions from the Union Carbide plant in Institute, West Virginia. Both qualitative and quantitative data contributed to the analysis of the role played by experts and environmental advocacy sources in coverage of environmental risk and to the suggestions for increasing that role

  20. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hresko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related and pharmacogenetic (PGx tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  1. First-principles investigation of methanethiol adsorption and dissociation mechanisms on the high-Miller-index vicinal surface Cu(4 1 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouafi, Faycal; Lassoued, Karima; Seydou, Mahamadou; Taleb, Abdelhafed; Diawara, Boubakar

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present detailed investigations of methanethiol adsorption on a Cu(4 1 0) surface within the framework of the self-consistent first-principles calculations as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). In particular, the adsorption sites, the surface coverage rate and electronic properties have been determined and compared to experimental values. The results indicate that the favorable adsorption site in the case of low coverage rate is a bridge on the step followed by the hollow site on the terrace. The adsorption significantly affects the outermost layer of the surface mainly for a higher coverage rate in a (2  ×  2) supercell. The nature of the chemisorption process on the surface is analyzed by means of the density of states which, combined with charge density difference and atomic charge calculations, confirms the ionic character of the S–Cu bond. The specific effect of the presence of steps is highlighted by comparing the adsorption on the (1 0 0) terrace to the adsorption on the extended Cu(1 0 0) surface. Compared to the flat Cu(1 0 0), it is found here that while the stability is almost the same at p(2  ×  2) coverage, the CH 3 S/Cu(4 1 0) becomes more stable than CH 3 S/Cu(1 0 0) at c(2  ×  2) coverage with 0.30 eV per molecule. The mechanism of methanethiol dissociation is explored by the nudged elastic band method and demonstrates that the most favorable path is dissociation followed by migration of hydrogen from the step to its most stable position (hollow on the terrace) with energy barriers less than 0.5 eV. (paper)

  2. The influence of temperature on selenate adsorption by goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, M.; Vlasova, N. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Geosciences Inst.

    2013-08-01

    Acid-base batch titration data up to 75 C were used to constrain a temperature-dependent 1-pK basic Stern model of the surface protonation reactions of goethite. Experimental data for the temperature dependence of pH{sub PZC} (as determined using the two-term Van't Hoff extrapolation) yielded a negative value of -44.9 kJ/mol for the surface protonation enthalpy, and therefore a shift of the zero point of charge towards lower pH values with increasing temperature. Batch titrations at selenate concentrations of between 10 and 100 {mu}M showed an increased degree of adsorption in the acidic pH range, which appeared to be sensitive to the ionic strength of the solution. The selenate adsorption edges shifted towards more acidic pH values with increasing temperature. A 1-pK charge distribution multi-site surface complexation (CD-MUSIC) model was applied, assuming the formation of an outer-spheric surface complex together with an inner-spheric one, in agreement with published spectroscopic information. The temperature behaviour of the intrinsic equilibrium constants were well represented by a linear Van't Hoff log K vs. 1/T plot, from which negative enthalpy values could be derived for both adsorption reactions. The adsorption of the selenate was therefore exothermic and became weaker with increasing temperature. The bidentate inner-spheric complex was more sensitive to rises in temperature (-70 kJ/mol), compared to the outer-spheric complex (-36 kJ/mol). The latter ultimately became the dominating adsorption process at the highest temperature studied. (orig.)

  3. The influence of temperature on selenate adsorption by goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersten, M.; Vlasova, N.

    2013-01-01

    Acid-base batch titration data up to 75 C were used to constrain a temperature-dependent 1-pK basic Stern model of the surface protonation reactions of goethite. Experimental data for the temperature dependence of pH PZC (as determined using the two-term Van't Hoff extrapolation) yielded a negative value of -44.9 kJ/mol for the surface protonation enthalpy, and therefore a shift of the zero point of charge towards lower pH values with increasing temperature. Batch titrations at selenate concentrations of between 10 and 100 μM showed an increased degree of adsorption in the acidic pH range, which appeared to be sensitive to the ionic strength of the solution. The selenate adsorption edges shifted towards more acidic pH values with increasing temperature. A 1-pK charge distribution multi-site surface complexation (CD-MUSIC) model was applied, assuming the formation of an outer-spheric surface complex together with an inner-spheric one, in agreement with published spectroscopic information. The temperature behaviour of the intrinsic equilibrium constants were well represented by a linear Van't Hoff log K vs. 1/T plot, from which negative enthalpy values could be derived for both adsorption reactions. The adsorption of the selenate was therefore exothermic and became weaker with increasing temperature. The bidentate inner-spheric complex was more sensitive to rises in temperature (-70 kJ/mol), compared to the outer-spheric complex (-36 kJ/mol). The latter ultimately became the dominating adsorption process at the highest temperature studied. (orig.)

  4. A parametric study of rate of advance and area coverage rate performance of synthetic aperture radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynal, Ann Marie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hensley, Jr., William H. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, Bryan L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The linear ground distance per unit time and ground area covered per unit time of producing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, termed rate of advance (ROA) and area coverage rate (ACR), are important metrics for platform and radar performance in surveillance applications. These metrics depend on many parameters of a SAR system such as wavelength, aircraft velocity, resolution, antenna beamwidth, imaging mode, and geometry. Often the effects of these parameters on rate of advance and area coverage rate are non-linear. This report addresses the impact of different parameter spaces as they relate to rate of advance and area coverage rate performance.

  5. Changes in health insurance coverage during the economic downturn: 2000-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, John; Wang, Marie

    2004-01-01

    Using Current Population Survey data from 2000-2002, this paper documents the changes that led the uninsured population to grow by 3.8 million during that time period. All of the increase in the uninsured occurred among adults, and two-thirds was among low-income adults. The extent to which the loss of employer coverage resulted in people becoming uninsured depended on their access to public programs: Children were more likely than adults to gain public coverage; women more likely than men; and parents more likely than nonparents. Middle- and higher-income Americans were also affected because many lost income and because rates of employer coverage were lower.

  6. Optimized electrode coverage of membrane actuators based on epitaxial PZT thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, M D; Dekkers, M; Blank, D H A; Rijnders, G; Nazeer, H

    2013-01-01

    This research presents an optimization of piezoelectric membrane actuators by maximizing the actuator displacement. Membrane actuators based on epitaxial Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 thin films grown on all-oxide electrodes and buffer layers using silicon technology were fabricated. Electrode coverage was found to be an important factor in the actuation displacement of the piezoelectric membranes. The optimum electrode coverage for maximum displacement was theoretically determined to be 39%, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. Dependences of membrane displacement and optimum electrode coverage on membrane diameter and PZT-film/Si-device-layer thickness ratio have also been investigated. (paper)

  7. Characterisation of silica surfaces III: Characterisation of aerosil samples through ethanol adsorption and contact angle studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Nadiye–Tabbiruka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosil samples, heat treated and then silylated with various silanes at various temperatures have been characterised by adsorption of ethanol at 293 K. Adsorption isotherms were plotted and the BET specific surface areas were determined. Contact angles were measured by the captive bubble method at the three phase contact line in ethanol, on glass slides similarly modified. Silylation was found to alter the ethanol adsorptive properties on aerosil and increase the contact angles on the glass slides to extents that depend on the silane used as well as the concentration of residual silanols and that of surface silyl groups.

  8. Base adsorption calorimetry for characterising surface acidity: a comparison between pulse flow and conventional ''static'' techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, S.P.; Savill-Jowitt, C.; Brown, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    A pulsed flow adsorption microcalorimeter (pulse-FMC) has been developed by modifying a Setaram 111. It is tested in comparison with a conventional pulsed static adsorption microcalorimeter (pulse-SMC) for characterising surface acidity of solid acid catalysts. Small pulses of 1% ammonia in helium are delivered to an activated catalyst sample and its surface acidity is differentially profiled in terms of the molar enthalpy of ammonia adsorption (ΔH ads o ) using a combination of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a downstream thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The pulsing action and its sequences are controlled by in-house developed software and the TCD output also is logged into a PC. Thus, the pulse-FMC is fully automated. Two sulfonated polystyrene resin-type catalysts, Amberlyst 15 and Amberlyst 35, a zeolite of the type H + -ZSM-5 (CT 410) and an acid activated clay (Fulcat 220) are characterised at appropriate temperatures using both the new technique and the conventional static base adsorption method. ΔH ads o versus surface coverage profiles of all the four catalysts obtained from both pulse-FMC and the conventional method are found to be comparable. Results are interpreted in terms of the extent to which NH 3 adsorption on the catalysts surface is under thermodynamic control in the two methods

  9. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  10. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M., E-mail: mitjan.kalin@tint.fs.uni-lj.si

    2013-10-15

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  11. NH3 adsorption on anatase-TiO2(101)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koust, Stig; Adamsen, Kræn C.; Kolsbjerg, Esben Leonhard; Li, Zheshen; Hammer, Bjørk; Wendt, Stefan; Lauritsen, Jeppe V.

    2018-03-01

    The adsorption of ammonia on anatase TiO2 is of fundamental importance for several catalytic applications of TiO2 and for probing acid-base interactions. Utilizing high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and density functional theory (DFT), we identify the adsorption mode and quantify the adsorption strength on the anatase TiO2(101) surface. It was found that ammonia adsorbs non-dissociatively as NH3 on regular five-fold coordinated titanium surface sites (5f-Ti) with an estimated exothermic adsorption energy of 1.2 eV for an isolated ammonia molecule. For higher adsorbate coverages, the adsorption energy progressively shifts to smaller values, due to repulsive intermolecular interactions. The repulsive adsorbate-adsorbate interactions are quantified using DFT and autocorrelation analysis of STM images, which both showed a repulsive energy of ˜50 meV for nearest neighbor sites and a lowering in binding energy for an ammonia molecule in a full monolayer of 0.28 eV, which is in agreement with TPD spectra.

  12. [Medical coverage of a road bicycle race].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifferscheid, Florian; Stuhr, Markus; Harding, Ulf; Schüler, Christine; Thoms, Jürgen; Püschel, Klaus; Kappus, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Major sport events require adequate expertise and experience concerning medical coverage and support. Medical and ambulance services need to cover both participants and spectators. Likewise, residents at the venue need to be provided for. Concepts have to include the possibility of major incidents related to the event. Using the example of the Hamburg Cyclassics, a road bicycle race and major event for professional and amateur cyclists, this article describes the medical coverage, number of patients, types of injuries and emergencies. Objectives regarding the planning of future events and essential medical coverage are consequently discussed. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart-New York.

  13. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Federal Employees Health Benefit Plan Equivalent Coverage (FEHBP—Equivalent Health Insurance Coverage). A... coverage. Health benefits coverage that is offered and generally available to State employees in the State... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section...

  14. Investigation of adsorption performance deterioration in silica gel–water adsorption refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dechang; Zhang Jipeng; Xia Yanzhi; Han Yanpei; Wang Shuwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adsorption deterioration of silica gel in refrigeration systems is verified. ► Possible factors to cause such deterioration are analyzed. ► Specific surface area, silanol content and adsorption capacity are tested. ► The pollution is the primary factor to decline the adsorption capacity. ► Deteriorated samples are partly restored after being processed by acid solution. - Abstract: Silica gel acts as a key role in adsorption refrigeration systems. The adsorption deterioration must greatly impact the performance of the silica gel–water adsorption refrigeration system. In order to investigate the adsorption deterioration of silica gel, many different silica gel samples were prepared according to the application surroundings of silica gel in adsorption refrigeration systems after the likely factors to cause such deterioration were analyzed. The specific surface area, silanol content, adsorption capacity and pore size distribution of those samples were tested and the corresponding adsorption isotherms were achieved. In terms of the experimental data comparisons, it could be found that there are many factors to affect the adsorption performance of silica gel, but the pollution was the primary one to decline the adsorption capacity. In addition, the adsorption performance of the deteriorated samples after being processed by acid solution was explored in order to find the possible methods to restore its adsorption performance.

  15. Hydrogen Adsorption on Nanoporous Biocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. B.; Burress, J. W.; Lapilli, C. M.; Pfeifer, P.; Shah, P. S.; Suppes, G. J.; Dillon, A. C.; Parilla, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    As a part of the Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology (http://all-craft.missouri.edu) we study activated carbons made from corncob, optimized for storing methane and hydrogen (H2) by physisorption at low pressure. We report here: (a) storage capacities of 73-91 g H2/kg carbon at 77 K and 47 bar, validated in three different laboratories (the 2010 DOE target is 60 g H2/kg system); (b) binding energies from H2 adsorption isotherms (c) temperature-programmed desorption data; (d) degree of graphitization of the carbon surface from Raman spectra; (e) pore structure of carbon from nitrogen and methane adsorption isotherms, and small-angle x-ray scattering. The structural analysis shows that the carbon is highly microporous and that the pore space is highly correlated (micropores do not scatter independently).

  16. Random and cooperative sequential adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. W.

    1993-10-01

    Irreversible random sequential adsorption (RSA) on lattices, and continuum "car parking" analogues, have long received attention as models for reactions on polymer chains, chemisorption on single-crystal surfaces, adsorption in colloidal systems, and solid state transformations. Cooperative generalizations of these models (CSA) are sometimes more appropriate, and can exhibit richer kinetics and spatial structure, e.g., autocatalysis and clustering. The distribution of filled or transformed sites in RSA and CSA is not described by an equilibrium Gibbs measure. This is the case even for the saturation "jammed" state of models where the lattice or space cannot fill completely. However exact analysis is often possible in one dimension, and a variety of powerful analytic methods have been developed for higher dimensional models. Here we review the detailed understanding of asymptotic kinetics, spatial correlations, percolative structure, etc., which is emerging for these far-from-equilibrium processes.

  17. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of  ∼  10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ, we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity  =  0 %, an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05  ×  10−4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4  ×  10−5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition at the atmosphere–soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  18. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  19. Adsorption, aggregation and phase separation in colloidal systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The thesis presents work regarding amphiphilic molecules associated in aqueous solution or at the liquid/solid interface. Two main topics are included: the temperature-dependent behavior of micelles and the adsorption of dispersants on carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. Various NMR methods were used to analyze those systems, such as chemical shift detection, spectral intensity measurements, spin relaxation and, in particular, self-diffusion experiments. Besides this, small angle X-ray scattering...

  20. Kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Funakawa, Shinya; Kosaki, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    137 Cs is one of the main radioisotopes released into the environment by nuclear powerstation accidents (e.g. Chernobyl) and nuclear weapons tests. Many studies have shown that Cs tends to remain at surface soils due to the high adsorption selectivity of clay minerals for this element. This behavior of the Cs + ion is, however, assumed to vary significantly depending on the mineralogical composition of the soil. The main objective of this study is to analyze the kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition. Soil samples used in this study were Mollisols (Um) and Alfisols (Ua) from Ukraine, Ultisols (Tu) from Thailand and Spodosols (Js) from Japan. The dominant clay species of these soils are montmorillonite (Um, Ua), kaolinite and mica (Tu) and beidellite (Js). The rates of Cs adsorption and Ca or K desorption were measured using a continuous flow method. Soil samples that were previously saturated with Ca 2+ were leached with a 0.75 mmol/l Cs + solution at a constant rate of 2.0 ml/min. The leachate was collected every 10 minutes and the concentrations of Cs + , Ca 2+ and K + of each aliquot were measured by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry (Cs + , Ca 2+ ) and flame spectrophotometry (K + ). The datasets obtained were simulated using the first order kinetic model: y = a(1 - exp(-kt)), where a is the adsorption (desorption) maximum and k the rate constant. It is here assumed that Ca 2+ is desorbed from cation exchange sites and K + desorbed from the frayed edges of micaceous minerals. The values of a obtained for both Cs adsorption and Ca desorption was in the order Js>Um>Tu>Ua, whereas the values of k were in the order Tu>Ua>Um>Js. This result reflects the values of permanent negative charge of clays which are originated from the substitution of cations in the structure of 2:1 clay minerals. The value of a for K + desorption was, however, highest in Tu, suggesting that the values of Cs + -exchangeable K + correspond to the amount

  1. Random sequential adsorption of cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Michał; Kubala, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Random packings built of cubes are studied numerically using a random sequential adsorption algorithm. To compare the obtained results with previous reports, three different models of cube orientation sampling were used. Also, three different cube-cube intersection algorithms were tested to find the most efficient one. The study focuses on the mean saturated packing fraction as well as kinetics of packing growth. Microstructural properties of packings were analyzed using density autocorrelation function.

  2. Adsorption behavior of lithium from seawater using manganese oxide adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajima, Takaaki; Munakata, Kenzo; Uda, Tatsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactor system is expected to provide the main source of electricity in the future. Large amounts of lithium will be required, dependent on the reactor design concept, and alternative resources should be found to provide lithium inventories for nuclear fusion plants. Seawater has recently become an attractive source of this element and the separation and recovery of lithium from seawater by co-precipitation, solvent extraction and adsorption have been investigated. Amongst these techniques, the adsorption method is suitable for recovery of lithium from seawater, because certain inorganic ion-exchange materials, especially spinel-type manganese oxides, show extremely high selectivity for the lithium ion. In this study, we prepared a lithium adsorbent (HMn 2 O 4 ) by elution of spinel-type lithium di-manganese-tetra-oxide (LiMn 2 O 4 ) and examined the kinetics of the adsorbent for lithium ions in seawater using a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intermediate, LiMn 2 O 4 , can be synthesized from LiOH·H 2 O and Mn 3 O 4 , from which the lithium adsorbent can subsequently be prepared via acid treatment., The adsorption kinetics become faster and the amount of lithium adsorbed on the adsorbent increases with increasing solution temperature. The thermodynamic values, ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 and ΔS 0 , indicate that adsorption is an endothermic and spontaneous process. (author)

  3. The influence of a fulvic acid on the adsorption of europium and strontium by alumina and quartz: effects of pH and ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norden, M.; Ephraim, J.H.; Allard, B.

    1994-01-01

    A batch method has been employed to study the adsorption of trace quantities of Eu and Sr on α-Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 as a function of pH (3-9), ionic strength (0.10 and 0.01 M NaClO 4 ) and the presence of a well-characterized aquatic fulvic acid (FA). A comparison of Eu and Sr adsorption by alumina showed that FA could both reduce and enhance metal ion adsorption. In the absence of FA the adsorption of the metal ions onto alumina was a function of both pH and ionic strength. In the presence of FA the ionic strength effect on the Eu adsorption vanished, while the Sr adsorption showed a clear dependence on ionic strength. The adsorption of Eu and Sr on quartz was lower than the adsorption of the metals on alumina. Additionally, the adsorption of Eu and Sr on quartz was apparently lower than the adsorption on alumina in the presence of Fa. For both metal ions the adsorption on quartz was higher at 0.10 M than at 0.01 M NaClO 4 - an observation that was reversed in the case of alumina. Increasing concentrations of FA lowered the pH at which Eu adsorption on alumina would be reduced. (orig.)

  4. Effect of pH on the adsorption of carbendazim in Polish mineral soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszko, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the influence of pH on the adsorption of carbendazim in soil profiles of three mineral agricultural soils: Hyperdystric Arenosol, Haplic Luvisol and Hypereutric Cambisol. In the examined pH range between 3 and 7 the adsorption of carbendazim was inversely correlated to the pH of the soil. The adsorption coefficients were in the range between 0.3 and 151.8 mL g −1 . Decreasing the pH in the soil suspensions from 7 to 3 increased the value of this coefficient by 3 to 70 times. A decrease in the amounts of organic matter down the soil profiles was not associated with weaker carbendazim adsorption. In the samples from all soil horizons, at pH values between 3 and 6, the predominant sorption process was carbendazim adsorption on clay minerals. The adsorption of carbendazim on organic matter prevailed over that on clays only at pH > 6 and only in the Ap horizon of the examined soils. The developed mathematical models yielded very good results when the adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim was assumed to be the predominant adsorption process on clays together with the adsorption of neutral molecules on organic matter and clays. The results from both the model fitting and the experiments revealed the negative effect of Al oxides and hydroxides and Al cations on the adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim on clay minerals. The developed models successfully described the pH-dependent adsorption processes of carbendazim for both data from particular soil horizons and those from all three examined soil profiles. -- Highlights: ► Adsorption of carbendazim in soils was inversely correlated to soil pH. ► At low pH carbendazim was adsorbed predominantly by clay minerals. ► Al 3+ influenced adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim on clays. ► Created models predict pH-dependent sorption processes in the whole soil profiles.

  5. The effect of high ionic strength on neptunium (V) adsorption to a halophilic bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Richmann, Michael; Reed, Donald T.

    2013-06-01

    The mobility of neptunium (V) in subsurface high ionic strength aqueous systems may be strongly influenced by adsorption to the cell wall of the halophilic bacteria Chromohalobacter sp. This study is the first to evaluate the adsorption of neptunium (V) to the surface of a halophilic bacterium as a function of pH from approximately 2 to 10 and at ionic strengths of 2 and 4 M. This is also the first study to evaluate the effects of carbonate complexation with neptunium (V) on adsorption to whole bacterial cells under high pH conditions. A thermodynamically-based surface complexation model was adapted to describe experimental adsorption data under high ionic strength conditions where traditional corrections for aqueous ion activity are invalid. Adsorption of neptunium (V) was rapid and reversible under the conditions of the study. Adsorption was significant over the entire pH range evaluated for both ionic strength conditions and was shown to be dependent on the speciation of the sites on the bacterial surface and neptunium (V) in solution. Adsorption behavior was controlled by the relatively strong electrostatic attraction of the positively charged neptunyl ion to the negatively charged bacterial surface at pH below circum-neutral. At pH above circum-neutral, the adsorption behavior was controlled by the presence of negatively charged neptunium (V) carbonate complexes resulting in decreased adsorption, although adsorption was still significant due to the adsorption of negatively charged neptunyl-carbonate species. Adsorption in 4 M NaClO4 was enhanced relative to adsorption in 2 M NaClO4 over the majority of the pH range evaluated, likely due to the effect of increasing aqueous ion activity at high ionic strength. The protonation/deprotonation characteristics of the cell wall of Chromohalobacter sp. were evaluated by potentiometric titrations in 2 and 4 M NaClO4. Bacterial titration results indicated that Chromohalobacter sp. exhibits similar proton buffering

  6. Equilibrium modeling and pH-dependence of the adsorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-04

    Feb 4, 2009 ... 2005). The presence of heavy metal ions in waste waters has generated ... calcium because of size and charge similarities and can therefore be included in bone ... low cost, high efficiency of metal removal from dilute solution ...

  7. Summary of DOD Acquisition Program Audit Coverage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    This report will provide the DoD audit community with information to support their planning efforts and provide management with information on the extent of audit coverage of DoD acquisition programs...

  8. NOAA Weather Radio - County Coverage by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-Zero All Hazards Logo Emergency Alert Description Event Codes Fact Sheet FAQ Organization Search Coverage Listings NWR Station Search Maps SAME SAME Coding Using SAME SAME Non-Zero Codes DOCUMENTS NWR

  9. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  10. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  11. 22 CFR 518.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms... Requirements Property Standards § 518.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the...

  12. 7 CFR 3019.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms and conditions of the... Standards § 3019.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance...

  13. 34 CFR 74.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms and... Property Standards § 74.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent...

  14. 49 CFR 19.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required by the terms... Requirements Property Standards § 19.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the...

  15. 10 CFR 600.131 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... provided to property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured unless required... Nonprofit Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 600.131 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum...

  16. 20 CFR 435.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... funds as provided to property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be insured... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 435.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients must, at a...

  17. 28 CFR 70.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... with Federal funds as provided to property owned by the recipient. Federally-owned property need not be...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 70.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients...

  18. Coverage for SCS Pre-1941 Aerial Photography

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This shapefile was generated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) at the New Mexico State Office to show the coverage for the Pre-1941 aerial photography...

  19. Surface Adsorption in Nonpolarizable Atomic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K; Joshi, Abhijeet A; Carlton, Rebecca J; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2014-12-09

    Many ionic solutions exhibit species-dependent properties, including surface tension and the salting-out of proteins. These effects may be loosely quantified in terms of the Hofmeister series, first identified in the context of protein solubility. Here, our interest is to develop atomistic models capable of capturing Hofmeister effects rigorously. Importantly, we aim to capture this dependence in computationally cheap "hard" ionic models, which do not exhibit dynamic polarization. To do this, we have performed an investigation detailing the effects of the water model on these properties. Though incredibly important, the role of water models in simulation of ionic solutions and biological systems is essentially unexplored. We quantify this via the ion-dependent surface attraction of the halide series (Cl, Br, I) and, in so doing, determine the relative importance of various hypothesized contributions to ionic surface free energies. Importantly, we demonstrate surface adsorption can result in hard ionic models combined with a thermodynamically accurate representation of the water molecule (TIP4Q). The effect observed in simulations of iodide is commensurate with previous calculations of the surface potential of mean force in rigid molecular dynamics and polarizable density-functional models. Our calculations are direct simulation evidence of the subtle but sensitive role of water thermodynamics in atomistic simulations.

  20. Length and coverage of inhibitory decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Authors present algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. Inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute ≠ value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. Paper contains also comparison of length and coverage of inhibitory rules constructed by a greedy algorithm and by the dynamic programming algorithm. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Preliminary investigation of phosphorus adsorption onto two types of iron oxide-organic matter complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinlong; Jiang, Tao; Yao, Ying; Lu, Song; Wang, Qilei; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Iron oxide (FeO) coated by natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous. The associations of minerals with organic matter (OM) significantly changes their surface properties and reactivity, and thus affect the environmental fate of pollutants, including nutrients (e.g., phosphorus (P)). In this study, ferrihydrite/goethite-humic acid (FH/GE-HA) complexes were prepared and their adsorption characteristics on P at various pH and ionic strength were investigated. The results indicated that the FeO-OM complexes showed a decreased P adsorption capacity in comparison with bare FeO. The maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) decreased in the order of FH (22.17 mg/g)>FH-HA (5.43 mg/g)>GE (4.67 mg/g)>GE-HA (3.27 mg/g). After coating with HA, the amorphous FH-HA complex still showed higher P adsorption than the crystalline GE-HA complex. The decreased P adsorption observed might be attributed to changes of the FeO surface charges caused by OM association. The dependence of P adsorption on the specific surface area of adsorbents suggests that the FeO component in the complexes is still the main contributor for the adsorption surfaces. The P adsorptions on FeO-HA complexes decreased with increasing initial pH or decreasing initial ionic strength. A strong dependence of P adsorption on ionic strength and pH may demonstrate that outer-sphere complexes between the OM component on the surface and P possibly coexist with inner-sphere surface complexes between the FeO component and P. Therefore, previous over-emphasis on the contributions of original minerals to P immobilization possibly over-estimates the P loading capacity of soils, especially in humic-rich areas. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A thermodynamic approach to assess organic solute adsorption onto activated carbon in water

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.; Verliefde, Arne R. D.; Heijman, Bas G J; Gelin, Simon; Pereira, Manuel Fernando Ribeiro; Rocha, Raquel P.; Figueiredo, José Luí s M; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Hans C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the hydrophobicity of 13 activated carbons is determined by various methods; water vapour adsorption, immersion calorimetry, and contact angle measurements. The quantity and type of oxygen-containing groups on the activated carbon were measured and related to the methods used to measure hydrophobicity. It was found that the water-activated carbon adsorption strength (based on immersion calorimetry, contact angles) depended on both type and quantity of oxygen-containing groups, while water vapour adsorption depended only on their quantity. Activated carbon hydrophobicity measurements alone could not be related to 1-hexanol and 1,3-dichloropropene adsorption. However, a relationship was found between work of adhesion and adsorption of these solutes. The work of adhesion depends not only on activated carbon-water interaction (carbon hydrophobicity), but also on solute-water (solute hydrophobicity) and activated carbon-solute interactions. Our research shows that the work of adhesion can explain solute adsorption and includes the effect of hydrogen bond formation between solute and activated carbon. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A thermodynamic approach to assess organic solute adsorption onto activated carbon in water

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrophobicity of 13 activated carbons is determined by various methods; water vapour adsorption, immersion calorimetry, and contact angle measurements. The quantity and type of oxygen-containing groups on the activated carbon were measured and related to the methods used to measure hydrophobicity. It was found that the water-activated carbon adsorption strength (based on immersion calorimetry, contact angles) depended on both type and quantity of oxygen-containing groups, while water vapour adsorption depended only on their quantity. Activated carbon hydrophobicity measurements alone could not be related to 1-hexanol and 1,3-dichloropropene adsorption. However, a relationship was found between work of adhesion and adsorption of these solutes. The work of adhesion depends not only on activated carbon-water interaction (carbon hydrophobicity), but also on solute-water (solute hydrophobicity) and activated carbon-solute interactions. Our research shows that the work of adhesion can explain solute adsorption and includes the effect of hydrogen bond formation between solute and activated carbon. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cooperative Cloud Service Aware Mobile Internet Coverage Connectivity Guarantee Protocol Based on Sensor Opportunistic Coverage Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the Internet coverage ratio and provide connectivity guarantee, based on sensor opportunistic coverage mechanism and cooperative cloud service, we proposed the coverage connectivity guarantee protocol for mobile Internet. In this scheme, based on the opportunistic covering rules, the network coverage algorithm of high reliability and real-time security was achieved by using the opportunity of sensor nodes and the Internet mobile node. Then, the cloud service business support platform is created based on the Internet application service management capabilities and wireless sensor network communication service capabilities, which is the architecture of the cloud support layer. The cooperative cloud service aware model was proposed. Finally, we proposed the mobile Internet coverage connectivity guarantee protocol. The results of experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has excellent performance, in terms of the security of the Internet and the stability, as well as coverage connectivity ability.

  5. Study of Cs adsorption on (100) surface of [001]-oriented GaN nanowires: A first principle research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Sihao [Department of Optoelectronic Technology, School of Electronic and Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology Nanjing, 210094 (China); Liu, Lei, E-mail: liu1133_cn@sina.com.cn [Department of Optoelectronic Technology, School of Electronic and Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology Nanjing, 210094 (China); Kong, Yike [Department of Optoelectronic Technology, School of Electronic and Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology Nanjing, 210094 (China); Wang, Honggang; Wang, Meishan [School of Information and Electrical Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • B{sub N} is the most stable adsorption site. • Work function is reduced after Cs adsorption. • Surface atomic structures are reconstructed. • Surface states near fermi level is contributed to the hybridization of Cs 5s state with Ga 4p and N 2p state. • NEA surface is demonstrated after Cs adsorption on GaN nanowire surface. - Abstract: Based on first-principle study, the adsorption mechanism of Cs on (100) crystal plane of GaN nanowire surface with coverage of 1/12 monolayer is explored. It is discovered that the most stable adsorption site is B{sub N} because of its lowest adsorption energy. The work function of GaN nanowire surface is reduced by 1.69 eV and will be further reduced with increasing Cs adsorption, which promotes the development of negative electron affinity (NEA) state of the materials. Furthermore, Cs adatom will make a great influence on the surface atomic structure, oppositely, little influence on the center atomic structure. There appears a dipole moment valued −6.93 Debye on the nanowire surface contributed to the formation the heterojunction on the surface, which is beneficial to the photoelectrons liberation. After Cs adsorption, the valence band and conduction band both move to lower energy side. The surface states mainly result from the hybridization of Cs 5s state with Ga 4p state and N 2p state. This study can help us to further experiment on the Cs adsorption processing on GaN nanowire and improve the photoemission performance of GaN nanowire devices.

  6. Study of Cs adsorption on (100) surface of [001]-oriented GaN nanowires: A first principle research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Kong, Yike; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Meishan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • B N is the most stable adsorption site. • Work function is reduced after Cs adsorption. • Surface atomic structures are reconstructed. • Surface states near fermi level is contributed to the hybridization of Cs 5s state with Ga 4p and N 2p state. • NEA surface is demonstrated after Cs adsorption on GaN nanowire surface. - Abstract: Based on first-principle study, the adsorption mechanism of Cs on (100) crystal plane of GaN nanowire surface with coverage of 1/12 monolayer is explored. It is discovered that the most stable adsorption site is B N because of its lowest adsorption energy. The work function of GaN nanowire surface is reduced by 1.69 eV and will be further reduced with increasing Cs adsorption, which promotes the development of negative electron affinity (NEA) state of the materials. Furthermore, Cs adatom will make a great influence on the surface atomic structure, oppositely, little influence on the center atomic structure. There appears a dipole moment valued −6.93 Debye on the nanowire surface contributed to the formation the heterojunction on the surface, which is beneficial to the photoelectrons liberation. After Cs adsorption, the valence band and conduction band both move to lower energy side. The surface states mainly result from the hybridization of Cs 5s state with Ga 4p state and N 2p state. This study can help us to further experiment on the Cs adsorption processing on GaN nanowire and improve the photoemission performance of GaN nanowire devices.

  7. Initial stages of benzotriazole adsorption on the Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Federico; Tee, Daniel W.; Francis, Stephen M.; Früchtl, Herbert; Richardson, Neville V.

    2013-05-01

    Benzotriazole (BTAH) has been used as a copper corrosion inhibitor since the 1950s; however, the molecular level detail of how inhibition occurs remains a matter of debate. The onset of BTAH adsorption on a Cu(111) single crystal was investigated via scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), vibrational spectroscopy (RAIRS) and supporting DFT modelling. BTAH adsorbs as anionic (BTA-), CuBTA is a minority species, while Cu(BTA)2, the majority of the adsorbed species, form chains, whose sections appear to diffuse in a concerted manner. The copper surface appears to reconstruct in a (2 × 1) fashion.Benzotriazole (BTAH) has been used as a copper corrosion inhibitor since the 1950s; however, the molecular level detail of how inhibition occurs remains a matter of debate. The onset of BTAH adsorption on a Cu(111) single crystal was investigated via scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), vibrational spectroscopy (RAIRS) and supporting DFT modelling. BTAH adsorbs as anionic (BTA-), CuBTA is a minority species, while Cu(BTA)2, the majority of the adsorbed species, form chains, whose sections appear to diffuse in a concerted manner. The copper surface appears to reconstruct in a (2 × 1) fashion. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Calculated IR spectra, RAIRS assignments, modeling details, statistics on diffusion, experimental details, additional STM images, movie low coverage diffusing species. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00724c

  8. Adsorption of aromatic hydrocarbons and ozone at environmental aqueous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vácha, Robert; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Rezác, Jan; Hobza, Pavel; Jungwirth, Pavel; Valsaraj, Kalliat; Bahr, Stephan; Kempter, Volker

    2008-06-05

    Adsorption of environmentally important aromatic molecules on a water surface is studied by means of classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. Both techniques show strong activity and orientational preference of these molecules at the surface. Benzene and naphthalene, which bind weakly to water surface with a significant contribution of dispersion interactions, prefer to lie flat on water but retain a large degree of orientational flexibility. Pyridine is more rigid at the surface. It is tilted with the nitrogen end having strong hydrogen bonding interactions with water molecules. The degree of adsorption and orientation of aromatic molecules on aqueous droplets has atmospheric implications for heterogeneous ozonolysis, for which the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics mechanism is discussed. At higher coverages of aromatic molecules the incoming ozone almost does not come into contact with the underlying aqueous phase. This may rationalize the experimental insensitivity of the ozonolysis on the chemical nature of the substrate on which the aromatic molecules adsorb.

  9. First principles study of halogens adsorption on intermetallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Quanxi; Wang, Shao-qing

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The linear relation between adsorbates induced work function change and dipole moment change also exists for intermetallic surfaces. • It is just a common linear relationship rather than a directly proportion. • A new weight parameter β is proposed to describe different factors effect on work function shift. - Abstract: Halides are often present at electrochemical environment, they can directly influence the electrode potential or zero charge potential through the induced work-function change. In this work, we focused in particular on the halogen-induced work function change as a function of the coverage of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine on Al_2Au and Al_2Pt (110) surfaces. Results show that the real relation between work function change and dipole moment change for halogens adsorption on intermetallic surfaces is just a common linear relationship rather than a directly proportion. Besides, the different slopes between fitted lines and the theoretical slope employed in pure metal surfaces demonstrating that the halogens adsorption on intermetallic surfaces are more complicated. We also present a weight parameter β to describe different factors effect on work function shift and finally qualify which factor dominates the shift direction.

  10. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric methods for determination of aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Aşangil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anodic behavior of aripiprazole (ARP was studied using electrochemical methods. Charge transfer, diffusion and surface coverage coefficients of adsorbed molecules and the number of electrons transferred in electrode mechanisms were calculated for quasi-reversible and adsorption-controlled electrochemical oxidation of ARP at 1.15 V versus Ag/AgCl at pH 4.0 in Britton–Robinson buffer (BR on glassy carbon electrode. Voltammetric methods for direct determination of ARP in pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological samples were developed. Linearity range is found as from 11.4 μM (5.11 mg/L to 157 μM (70.41 mg/L without stripping mode and it is found as from 0.221 μM (0.10 mg/L to 13.6 μM (6.10 mg/L with stripping mode. Limit of detection (LOD was found to be 0.11 μM (0.05 mg/L in stripping voltammetry. Methods were successfully applied to assay the drug in tablets, human serum and human urine with good recoveries between 95.0% and 104.6% with relative standard deviation less than 10%. Keywords: Adsorptive stripping voltammetry, Aripiprazole, Electrochemical behavior, Human serum and urine, Pharmaceuticals

  11. Kinetics study of antimony adsorption on Si(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, L.; Mueller, P.; Quentel, G.; Guesmi, H.; Treglia, G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we use mass spectrometry (MS) and reflection high-energy electron (RHEED) to study the kinetics of adsorption of Sb on Si(1 1 1) surface and its relation to the corresponding surface structure. At high temperature (T>800 deg. C) all the impinging Sb 4 molecules completely dissociate at the silicon surface and a 2D gas of Sb monomers reversibly adsorbs on the (1x1) surface. At low temperature (T 4 molecules act as precursors and can be partially reflected or desorbed while a 2D stable layer of Sb monomers irreversibly adsorbs. The surface continuously shifts from a blurred (7x7) surface to a (1x1) structure near completion of the 2D layer. In the intermediate range (600 deg. C< T<800 deg. C) provided that the coverage is large enough (θ ∼ 2/3) the condensation of the 2D gas leads to a 2D (5√3 x 5√3) reconstruction. We show that introducing the formation of a condensed phase in a kinetics model allows us to reproduce our experimental data. Finally, we determine the adsorption geometry from ab initio calculations: Sb is adsorbed on top positions, somewhat passivating the Si surface dangling bonds

  12. DFT study of oxygen adsorption on Mo{sub 2}C(001) and (201) surfaces at different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lihong, E-mail: chenglihong001@126.com [School of Materials and Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013, Jiangxi (China); Li, Wenkui; Chen, Zhiqin; Ai, Jianping; Zhou, Zehua [School of Materials and Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013, Jiangxi (China); Liu, Jianwen, E-mail: liujw@nsccsz.gov.cn [National Supercomputing Center in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • O adsorption manners on Mo{sub 2}C surfaces were calculated by DFT method. • Stable oxygen adsorption states and coverage were identified at given T and p. • O{sub 2} results in full oxidation while H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} cause partial oxidation of Mo{sub 2}C surfaces. • Hydrogen could be used to avoid Mo{sub 2}C surface oxidation. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate oxygen adsorption on Mo{sub 2}C(001) and (201)surfaces at different coverage. The energies and structures of oxygen from lowest to saturated coverages were clearly identified on each surface. Thermodynamics method was introduced to reveal the roles of temperature, pressure as well as oxygen sources (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}) on the surface oxygen coverage, which is related to the surface oxidation. On the basis of phase diagram, we can easily identify the stable oxygen coverage at different defined conditions. In addition, it reveals that O{sub 2} is the strongest oxidant, which results in the full coverage of oxygen on both surfaces in a wide range of temperature and pressure. Then, H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} are weaker oxidants, which could only cause partial oxidation of Mo{sub 2}C surfaces. These results indicate the facile oxidation of Mo{sub 2}C catalyst. The possible ways to avoid surface oxidation are keeping higher temperature and H{sub 2} pressure in the gas phase.

  13. Water Adsorption Isotherms on Fly Ash from Several Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navea, Juan G; Richmond, Emily; Stortini, Talia; Greenspan, Jillian

    2017-10-03

    In this study, horizontal attenuated total reflection (HATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was combined with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gravimetry to investigate the adsorption isotherms of water on fly ash, a byproduct of coal combustion in power plants. Because of composition variability with the source region, water uptake was studied at room temperature as a function of relative humidity (RH) on fly ash from several regions: United States, India, The Netherlands, and Germany. The FT-IR spectra show water features growth as a function of RH, with water absorbing on the particle surface in both an ordered (ice-like) and a disordered (liquid-like) structure. The QCM data was modeled using the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) adsorption isotherm model. The BET model was found to describe the data well over the entire range of RH, showing that water uptake on fly ash takes place mostly on the surface of the particle, even for poorly combusted samples. In addition, the source region and power-plant efficiency play important roles in the water uptake and ice nucleation (IN) ability of fly ash. The difference in the observed water uptake and IN behavior between the four samples and mullite (3Al 2 O 3 ·2SiO 2 ), the aluminosilicate main component of fly ash, is attributed to differences in composition and the density of OH binding sites on the surface of each sample. A discussion is presented on the RH required to reach monolayer coverage on each sample as well as a comparison between surface sites of fly ash samples and enthalpies of adsorption of water between the samples and mullite.

  14. 45 CFR 148.124 - Certification and disclosure of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... method of counting creditable coverage, and the requesting entity may identify specific information that... a payroll deduction for health coverage, a health insurance identification card, a certificate of...

  15. ADSORPTION AND RELEASING PROPERTIES OF BEAD CELLULOSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Morales; E. Bordallo; V. Leon; J. Rieumont

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of some dyes on samples of bead cellulose obtained in the Unit of Research-Production "Cuba 9"was studied. Methylene blue, alizarin red and congo red fitted the adsorption isotherm of Langmuir. Adsorption kinetics at pH = 6 was linear with the square root of time indicating the diffusion is the controlling step. At pH = 12 a non-Fickian trend was observed and adsorption was higher for the first two dyes. Experiments carried out to release the methylene blue occluded in the cellulose beads gave a kinetic behavior of zero order. The study of cytochrome C adsorption was included to test a proteinic material. Crosslinking of bead cellulose was performed with epichlorohydrin decreasing its adsorption capacity in acidic or alkaline solution.

  16. Interpregnancy intervals: impact of postpartum contraceptive effectiveness and coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike; Chang, Richard; Howell, Mike; Darney, Philip

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use of contraceptive methods, which was defined by effectiveness, length of coverage, and their association with short interpregnancy intervals, when controlling for provider type and client demographics. We identified a cohort of 117,644 women from the 2008 California Birth Statistical Master file with second or higher order birth and at least 1 Medicaid (Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment [Family PACT] program or Medi-Cal) claim within 18 months after index birth. We explored the effect of contraceptive method provision on the odds of having an optimal interpregnancy interval and controlled for covariates. The average length of contraceptive coverage was 3.81 months (SD = 4.84). Most women received user-dependent hormonal contraceptives as their most effective contraceptive method (55%; n = 65,103 women) and one-third (33%; n = 39,090 women) had no contraceptive claim. Women who used long-acting reversible contraceptive methods had 3.89 times the odds and women who used user-dependent hormonal methods had 1.89 times the odds of achieving an optimal birth interval compared with women who used barrier methods only; women with no method had 0.66 times the odds. When user-dependent methods are considered, the odds of having an optimal birth interval increased for each additional month of contraceptive coverage by 8% (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.09). Women who were seen by Family PACT or by both Family PACT and Medi-Cal providers had significantly higher odds of optimal birth intervals compared with women who were served by Medi-Cal only. To achieve optimal birth spacing and ultimately to improve birth outcomes, attention should be given to contraceptive counseling and access to contraceptive methods in the postpartum period. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adsorption of human tear lipocalin to human meibomian lipid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Thomas J; Mudgil, Poonam; Butovich, Igor A; Palaniappan, Chendur K

    2009-01-01

    Tear lipocalin (Tlc) is a major lipid binding protein in tears and is thought to have an important role in stabilizing the Meibomian lipid layer by transferring lipids to it from the aqueous layer or ocular surface, or by adsorbing to it directly. These possible roles have been investigated in vitro using human Tlc. Tlc was purified from human tears by size exclusion chromatography followed by ion exchange chromatography. Three additional samples of the Tlc were prepared by lipidation, delipidation, and relipidation. The lipids extracted from the purified Tlc were analyzed by HPLC-MS followed by fragmentation. Adsorption of these different forms of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film spread on the surface of an artificial tear buffer in a Langmuir trough were observed by recording changes in the pressure with time (Pi-T profile) and monitoring the appearance of the film microscopically. These results were compared with similar experiments using a bovine Meibomian lipid film. The results indicated that Tlc binds slowly to a human Meibomian lipid film compared with lysozyme or lactoferrin, even at 37 degrees C. The adsorption of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film was very different from its adsorption to a bovine Meibomian lipid film, indicating the nature of the lipids in the film is critical to the adsorption process. Similarly, the different forms of Tlc had quite distinct adsorption patterns, as indicated both by changes in Pi-T profiles and the microscopic appearance of the films. It was concluded that human Tlc was capable of adsorbing to and penetrating into a Meibomian lipid layer, but this process is very complex and depends on both the types of lipids bound to Tlc and the lipid complement comprising the Meibomian lipid film.

  18. Adsorption of Human Tear Lipocalin to Human Meibomian Lipid Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Thomas J.; Mudgil, Poonam; Butovich, Igor A.; Palaniappan, Chendur K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tear lipocalin (Tlc) is a major lipid binding protein in tears and is thought to have an important role in stabilizing the Meibomian lipid layer by transferring lipids to it from the aqueous layer or ocular surface, or by adsorbing to it directly. These possible roles have been investigated in vitro using human Tlc. Methods Tlc was purified from human tears by size exclusion chromatography followed by ion exchange chromatography. Three additional samples of the Tlc were prepared by lipidation, delipidation, and relipidation. The lipids extracted from the purified Tlc were analyzed by HPLC-MS followed by fragmentation. Adsorption of these different forms of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film spread on the surface of an artificial tear buffer in a Langmuir trough were observed by recording changes in the pressure with time (∏-T profile) and monitoring the appearance of the film microscopically. These results were compared with similar experiments using a bovine Meibomian lipid film. Results The results indicated that Tlc binds slowly to a human Meibomian lipid film compared with lysozyme or lactoferrin, even at 37°C. The adsorption of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film was very different from its adsorption to a bovine Meibomian lipid film, indicating the nature of the lipids in the film is critical to the adsorption process. Similarly, the different forms of Tlc had quite distinct adsorption patterns, as indicated both by changes in ∏-T profiles and the microscopic appearance of the films. Conclusions It was concluded that human Tlc was capable of adsorbing to and penetrating into a Meibomian lipid layer, but this process is very complex and depends on both the types of lipids bound to Tlc and the lipid complement comprising the Meibomian lipid film. PMID:18757516

  19. Adsorption of Emerging Ionizable Contaminants on Carbon Nanotubes: Advancements and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmao Ma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The superior adsorption capacity of carbon nanotubes has been well recognized and there is a wealth of information in the literature concerning the adsorption of unionized organic pollutants on carbon nanotubes. Recently, the adsorption of emerging environmental pollutants, most of which are ionizable, has attracted increasing attention due to the heightened concerns about the accumulation of these emerging contaminants in the environment. These recent studies suggest that the adsorption of emerging ionizable contaminants on carbon nanotubes exhibit different characteristics than unionized ones. For example, a new charge-assisted intermolecular force has been proposed for ionizable compounds because some adsorption phenomenon cannot be easily explained by the conventional force theory. The adsorption of ionizable compounds also displayed much stronger dependence on solution pH and ionic strength than unionized compounds. This article aims to present a brief review on the current understanding of the adsorption of emerging ionizable contaminants to carbon nanotubes and discuss further research needs required to advance the mechanistic understanding of the interactions between ionizable contaminants and carbon nanotubes.

  20. Competitive Adsorption of Metals onto Magnetic Graphene Oxide: Comparison with Other Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive adsorption isotherms of Cu(II, Pb(II, and Cd(II were examined on a magnetic graphene oxide (GO, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, and powered activated carbon (PAC. A series of analyses confirmed the successful synthesis of the magnetic GO based on a simple ultrasonification method. Irrespective of the adsorbents, the adsorption was highly dependent on pH, and the adsorption was well described by the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorbents were generally higher in the order of Pb(II > Cu(II > Cd(II, which is the same as the degree of the electronegativity and the hydrated radius of the metals, suggesting that the metal adsorption may be governed by an ion exchange between positively charged metals and negatively charged surfaces, as well as diffusion of metals into the surface layer. The adsorption of each metal was mostly lower for multi- versus single-metal systems. The antagonistic effects were influenced by solution pH as well as the type of metals, and they were higher in the order of the magnetic GO > MWCNT > PAC. Dissolved HS played a greater role than HS adsorbed onto the adsorbents, competing with the adsorption sites for metal complexation.

  1. Uranium adsorption by non-treated and chemically modified cactus fibres in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melpomeni Prodromou; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption efficiency of Opuntia ficus indica fibres regarding the removal of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from aqueous solutions has been investigated prior and after the chemical treatment (e.g. phosphorylation and MnO 2 -coating) of the biomass. The separation/removal efficiency has been studied as a function of pH, uranium concentration, adsorbent mass, ionic strength, temperature and contact time. Evaluation of the experimental data shows that biosorption is strongly pH-depended and that the MnO 2 -coated product presents the highest adsorption capacity followed by the phosphorylated and non-treated material. Experiments with varying ionic strength/salinity don't show any significant effect on the adsorption efficiency, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. The adsorption reactions are in all cases exothermic and relatively fast, particularly regarding the adsorption on the MnO 2 -coated product. The results of the present study indicate that adsorption of uranium from waters is very effective by cactus fibres and particularly the modified treated fibres. The increased adsorption efficiency of the cactus fibres is attributed to their primary and secondary fibrillar structure, which result in a relative relative high specific surface available for sorption. (author)

  2. Adsorption and activation of methane and methanol on Pt(100) surface: a density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussounda, P.S.

    2006-11-01

    The activation of methane (CH 4 ) and methanol (CH 3 OH) on Pt(100) surface has been investigated using density functional theory calculations based on plane-wave basis and pseudo-potential. We optimised CH 4 /Pt(100) system. The calculated adsorption energies over the top, bridge and hollow sites are small, weakly dependent on the molecular orientation. The nature of the CH 4 -Pt interaction was examined through the electronic structure changes. The adsorption of methyl (CH 3 ) and hydrogen (H) and the co-adsorption of CH 3 +H were also calculated. From these results, we examined the dissociation of CH 4 to CH 3 +H, and the activation energies found are in good agreement with the experimental and theoretical values. The activation of CH 3 OH/Pt(100) has been studied. All the sites have almost the same adsorption energy. The adsorption of oxygen (O) and the co-adsorption of CH 4 and O were also examined. In addition, the formation of CH 3 OH assuming a one-step mechanism step via the co-adsorption of CH 4 +O has been studied and the barrier height was found to be high. (authors)

  3. Influence of activated carbon characteristics on toluene and hexane adsorption: Application of surface response methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Mª Teresa; de Yuso, Alicia Martínez; Valenciano, Raquel; Rubio, Begoña; Pino, Mª Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption capacity of toluene and hexane over activated carbons prepared according an experimental design, considering as variables the activation temperature, the impregnation ratio and the activation time. The response surface methodology was applied to optimize the adsorption capacity of the carbons regarding the preparation conditions that determine the physicochemical characteristics of the activated carbons. The methodology of preparation produced activated carbons with surface areas and micropore volumes as high as 1128 m2/g and 0.52 cm3/g, respectively. Moreover, the activated carbons exhibit mesoporosity, ranging from 64.6% to 89.1% the percentage of microporosity. The surface chemistry was characterized by TPD, FTIR and acid-base titration obtaining different values of surface groups from the different techniques because the limitation of each technique, but obtaining similar trends for the activated carbons studied. The exhaustive characterization of the activated carbons allows to state that the measured surface area does not explain the adsorption capacity for either toluene or n-hexane. On the other hand, the surface chemistry does not explain the adsorption results either. A compromise between physical and chemical characteristics can be obtained from the appropriate activation conditions, and the response surface methodology gives the optimal activated carbon to maximize adsorption capacity. Low activation temperature, intermediate impregnation ratio lead to high toluene and n-hexane adsorption capacities depending on the activation time, which a determining factor to maximize toluene adsorption.

  4. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals to microporous activated carbon treated with potassium hydroxide, carbon dioxide, and steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Heyun; Yang, Liuyan; Wan, Yuqiu; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of sulfapyridine, tetracycline, and tylosin to a commercial microporous activated carbon (AC) and its potassium hydroxide (KOH)-, CO-, and steam-treated counterparts (prepared by heating at 850°C) was studied to explore efficient adsorbents for the removal of selected pharmaceuticals from water. Phenol and nitrobenzene were included as additional adsorbates, and nonporous graphite was included as a model adsorbent. The activation treatments markedly increased the specific surface area and enlarged the pore sizes of the mesopores of AC (with the strongest effects shown on the KOH-treated AC). Adsorption of large-size tetracycline and tylosin was greatly enhanced, especially for the KOH-treated AC (more than one order of magnitude), probably due to the alleviated size-exclusion effect. However, the treatments had little effect on adsorption of low-size phenol and nitrobenzene due to the predominance of micropore-filling effect in adsorption and the nearly unaffected content of small micropores causative to such effect. These hypothesized mechanisms on pore-size dependent adsorption were further tested by comparing surface area-normalized adsorption data and adsorbent pore size distributions with and without the presence of adsorbed antibiotics. The findings indicate that efficient adsorption of bulky pharmaceuticals to AC can be achieved by enlarging the adsorbent pore size through suitable activation treatments. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Adsorption of asparagine on the gold electrode and air/solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slojkowska, R.; Palys, B.; Jurkiewicz-Herbich, M.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of asparagine (Asn) on a gold electrode from 0.1 M LiClO 4 aqueous solutions was investigated. The experimental data obtained from ac impedance measurements were analyzed to determine the dependence of adsorption parameters, i.e. the standard Gibbs energy of adsorption (ΔG 0 ), maximal value of surface excess concentration (Γ max ) of Asn and parameter of interactions in the adsorbed layer (A) on the electrode potential. The relatively large value of Gibbs energy of adsorption (∼ -47 kJ mol -1 ) gives the evidence of a very strong adsorption of Asn at the polycrystalline Au electrode. The comparison of the adsorption behavior of Asn at the air/solution and the Au/solution interfaces points out to the significant electronic interactions of adsorbate molecules with the Au electrode, since the adsorption of Asn on a free surface (from the same solutions) is very week. The analysis of the electrochemical data as well as the infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) results reveal that Asn molecules are anchored to the Au surface through oxygen atoms of the carboxylate group COO - and through the amide carbonyl group

  6. Effects of nano-SiO2 on the adsorption of chiral metalaxyl to agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junxing; Liang, Chuanzhou; Zhang, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The application of nanotechnology in agriculture, pesticide delivery and other related fields increases the occurrence of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in soil. Since ENPs have larger surface areas and normally a high adsorption capacity for organic pollutants, they are thought to influence the transport of pesticides in soils and thereafter influence the uptake and transformation of pesticides. The adsorption pattern of racemic-metalaxyl on agricultural soils including kinetics and isotherms changed in the presence of nano-SiO 2 . The adsorption of racemic-metalaxyl on agricultural soil was not enantioselective, in either the presence or the absence of SiO 2 . The adsorption of racemic-metalaxyl on SiO 2 decreased to some extent in soil-SiO 2 mixture, and the absolute decrease was dependent on soil properties. The decreased adsorption of metalaxyl on SiO 2 in soil-SiO 2 mixture arose from the competitive adsorption of soil-dissolved organic matter and the different dispersion and aggregation behaviors of SiO 2 in the presence of soil. Interactions between SiO 2 and soil particles also contributed to the decreased adsorption of metalaxyl on SiO 2 , and the interactions were analyzed by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. The results showed that the presence of nano-particles in soils could decrease the mobility of pesticides in soils and that this effect varied with different soil compositions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adsorption of Emerging Ionizable Contaminants on Carbon Nanotubes: Advancements and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingmao; Agarwal, Sarang

    2016-05-12

    The superior adsorption capacity of carbon nanotubes has been well recognized and there is a wealth of information in the literature concerning the adsorption of unionized organic pollutants on carbon nanotubes. Recently, the adsorption of emerging environmental pollutants, most of which are ionizable, has attracted increasing attention due to the heightened concerns about the accumulation of these emerging contaminants in the environment. These recent studies suggest that the adsorption of emerging ionizable contaminants on carbon nanotubes exhibit different characteristics than unionized ones. For example, a new charge-assisted intermolecular force has been proposed for ionizable compounds because some adsorption phenomenon cannot be easily explained by the conventional force theory. The adsorption of ionizable compounds also displayed much stronger dependence on solution pH and ionic strength than unionized compounds. This article aims to present a brief review on the current understanding of the adsorption of emerging ionizable contaminants to carbon nanotubes and discuss further research needs required to advance the mechanistic understanding of the interactions between ionizable contaminants and carbon nanotubes.

  8. Protein Adsorption to In-Line Filters of Intravenous Administration Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besheer, Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Ensuring compatibility of administered therapeutic proteins with intravenous administration sets is an important regulatory requirement. A low-dose recovery during administration of low protein concentrations is among the commonly observed incompatibilities, and it is mainly due to adsorption to in-line filters. To better understand this phenomenon, we studied the adsorption of 4 different therapeutic proteins (2 IgG1s, 1 IgG4, and 1 Fc fusion protein) diluted to 0.01 mg/mL in 5% glucose (B. Braun EcoFlac; B. Braun Melsungen AG, Melsungen, Germany) or 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl; Freeflex; Fresenius Kabi, Friedberg, Germany) solutions to 8 in-line filters (5 positively charged and 3 neutral filters made of different polymers and by different suppliers). The results show certain patterns of protein adsorption, which depend to a large extent on the dilution solution and filter material, and to a much lower extent on the proteins' biophysical properties. Investigation of the filter membranes' zeta potential showed a correlation between the observed adsorption pattern in 5% glucose solution and the filter's surface charge, with higher protein adsorption for the strongly negatively charged membranes. In 0.9% NaCl solution, the surface charges are masked, leading to different adsorption patterns. These results contribute to the general understanding of the protein adsorption to IV infusion filters and allow the design of more efficient compatibility studies. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemical specific adsorption of halides on Cu 111, 100, and 211: A Density Functional Theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrum, Ian T.; Akhade, Sneha A.; Janik, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The specific adsorption of ions onto electrode surfaces can affect electrocatalytic reactions. Density functional theory is used to investigate the specific adsorption of aqueous F − , Cl − , Br − , and I − onto Cu (111), (100), and (211) surfaces. The adsorption is increasingly favorable in the order of F − < Cl − < Br − < I − . The adsorption has a weak dependence on the surface facet, with adsorption most favorable on Cu (100) and least favorable on Cu (111). Potential ranges where specific adsorption would be expected on each facet are reported. The thermodynamics of bulk copper halide (CuX, CuX 2 ) formation are also investigated as a function of potential. CuX formation occurs at potentials slightly more positive of halide specific adsorption and of copper oxidation in aqueous electrolytes. Specifically adsorbed halides and bulk CuX may be present during a variety of electrochemical reactions carried out over a Cu electrode in halide containing electrolyte solutions

  10. Adsorption of Mefenamic Acid From Water by Bentonite Poly urea formaldehyde Composite Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma Abbas Abdel Majeed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Poly urea formaldehyde –Bentonite (PUF-Bentonite composite was tested as new adsorbent for removal of mefenamic acid (MA from simulated wastewater in batch adsorption procedure. Developed a method for preparing poly urea formaldehyde gel in basic media by using condensation polymerization. Adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of water pH, temperature, contact time, adsorbent dose and initial MA concentration .Effect of sharing surface with other analgesic pharmaceuticals at different pH also studied. The adsorption of MA was found to be strongly dependent to pH. The Freundlich isotherm model showed a good fit to the equilibrium adsorption data. From Dubinin–Radushkevich model the mean free energy (E was calculated and the value of 5 KJ/mole indicated that the main mechanism governing the adsorption of MA on PUF-Bentonite composite was physical in nature. The kinetics of adsorption tested for first order, pseudo second order models and Elovich’s equation, results showed the adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order model

  11. High Pressure Multicomponent Adsorption in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1999-01-01

    We analyse adsorption of a multicomponent mixture at high pressure on the basis of the potential theory of adsorption. The adsorbate is considered as a segregated mixture in the external field produced by a solid adsorbent. we derive an analytical equation for the thickness of a multicomponent fi...... close to a dew point. This equation (asymptotic adsorption equation, AAE) is a first order approximation with regard to the distance from a phase envelope....

  12. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of Basic Yellow 28 and Basic Red 46 by a boron industry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olgun, Asim; Atar, Necip

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of Basic Yellow 28 (BY 28) and Basic Red 46 (BR 46) onto boron waste (BW), a waste produced from boron processing plant were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of two dyes could be described reasonably well by a generalized isotherm. Kinetic studies indicated that the kinetics of the adsorption of BY 28 and BR 46 onto BW follows a pseudo-second-order model. The result showed that the BW exhibited high-adsorption capacity for basic dyes and the capacity slightly decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of BY 28 and BR 46 are reported at 75.00 and 74.73 mg g -1 , respectively. The dye adsorption depended on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at about pH 9 and electrokinetic behavior of BW. Activation energy of 15.23 kJ/mol for BY 28 and 18.15 kJ/mol for BR 46 were determined confirming the nature of the physisorption onto BW. These results indicate that BW could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of the textile dyes from effluents

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of Basic Yellow 28 and Basic Red 46 by a boron industry waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olgun, Asim [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and science, University of Dumlupinar, Kuetahya (Turkey)], E-mail: aolgun@dumlupinar.edu.tr; Atar, Necip [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and science, University of Dumlupinar, Kuetahya (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of Basic Yellow 28 (BY 28) and Basic Red 46 (BR 46) onto boron waste (BW), a waste produced from boron processing plant were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of two dyes could be described reasonably well by a generalized isotherm. Kinetic studies indicated that the kinetics of the adsorption of BY 28 and BR 46 onto BW follows a pseudo-second-order model. The result showed that the BW exhibited high-adsorption capacity for basic dyes and the capacity slightly decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of BY 28 and BR 46 are reported at 75.00 and 74.73 mg g{sup -1}, respectively. The dye adsorption depended on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at about pH 9 and electrokinetic behavior of BW. Activation energy of 15.23 kJ/mol for BY 28 and 18.15 kJ/mol for BR 46 were determined confirming the nature of the physisorption onto BW. These results indicate that BW could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of the textile dyes from effluents.

  14. Comparative potential of black tea leaves waste to granular activated carbon in adsorption of endocrine disrupting compounds from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ifelebuegu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption properties and mechanics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds; 17 β-estradiol, 17 α – ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A on locally available black tea leaves waste and granular activated carbon were investigated. The results obtained indicated that the kinetics of adsorption were pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature dependent with equilibrium being reached at 20 to 40 minutes for tea leaves waste and 40 to 60 minutes for granular activated compound. Maximum adsorption capacities of 3.46, 2.44 and 18.35 mg/g were achieved for tea leaves waste compared to granular activated compound capacities of 4.01, 2.97 and 16.26 mg/g for 17 β- estradiol, 17 α-ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A respectively. Tea leaves waste adsorption followed pseudo-first order kinetics while granular activated compound fitted better to the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The experimental isotherm data for both tea leaves waste and granular activated compound showed a good fit to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models with the Langmuir model showing the best fit. The thermodynamic and kinetic data for the adsorption indicated that the adsorption process for tea leaves waste was predominantly by physical adsorption while the granular activated compound adsorption was more chemical in nature. The results have demonstrated the potential of waste tea leaves for the adsorptive removal of endocrine disrupting compounds from water.

  15. Investigation of mono/competitive adsorption of environmentally relevant ionized weak acids on graphite: impact of molecular properties and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; McPhedran, Kerry N; Moreira, Jesús; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-12-16

    The thermodynamics of adsorption and competitive interactions of five weak acids on a graphite surface was assessed in alkaline solutions. Adsorption of the acids in mono- and multicompound solutions followed their Freundlich isotherms which suggest a diversity of graphite adsorption sites as confirmed by the presence of carboxylic and phenolic groups observed on graphite surfaces. Thermodynamic calculations assigned the formation of the negatively charged assisted hydrogen bond (-CAHB) between ionized solutes and adsorbent surface groups as the possible adsorption mechanism. However, the similar pKa values of current acids resulted in comparable free energies for -CAHB formation (ΔG(-CAHB)) being less than solvation free energies (ΔGSolv). Thus, additional ΔG is supplemented by increased hydrophobicity due to proton exchange of ionized acids with water (ΔΔG Hydrophobicity). Adsorption capacities and competition coefficients indicated that ΔΔG Hydrophobicity values depend on the neutral and ionized acid Kow. Competitive adsorption implies that multilayer adsorption may occur via hydrophobic bonding with the CH3 ends of the self-assembled layer which affects the acid adsorption capacities in mixtures as compared to monocompound solutions. The determination of adsorption mechanisms will assist in understanding of the fate and bioavailability of emerging and classical weak acids released into natural waters.

  16. Effect of the degree of oxidation and defects of graphene oxide on adsorption of Cu2+ from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ping; Bi, Qi; Hu, Yongyou; Fang, Zheng; Chen, Yuancai; Cheng, Jianhua

    2017-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising adsorbent for heavy metal ions from water. However, the relationship between the degree of oxidation and defects of GO and the adsorption performance has been rarely reported. In this study, a series of GO with different degree of oxidation (GO1, GO5, GO6) and defects (GO1-GO4) were prepared by the improved Hummers method and were employed to explore the relationship between the degree of oxidation and defects of GO and the Cu2+ adsorption. The results showed that the adsorption of Cu2+ on GO was strongly dependent on the degree of oxidation and independent of the defects under various pH levels and ionic strength. The adsorption isotherms of Cu2+ on GO with different degree of oxidation and defects were well described by the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity of GO for Cu2+ increased with the improvement of the degree of oxidation but was independent of the defects, indicating that the adsorption of Cu2+ on GO was mainly proportional to the degree of oxidation but become insignificant in the structure integrity of aromatic matrixes, which might be due to the shielding effect of oxygen-containing groups. The adsorption of Cu2+ on GO with different degree of oxidation and defects reached an equilibrium state after 50 min, the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption process was controlled by the degree of oxidation.

  17. Adsorption of Radioactive Strontium and Caesium from Mixtures of Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haznedaroglu, H.N.

    2002-07-01

    In this thesis, the adsorption of the radioactive Cs and Sr on two different types of cement, Sulfate Resistant Cement and Portland Composed Cement, was investigated. The gamma-active Cs-137 and Sr-85 were used as tracers. Four different mixtures of solutions of Cs and Sr were used in experiments; a) The solution containing trace amount of Sr-85 and Cs-137 b) 1.10 - 5 - 1.10 - 1 M *SrCl 2 solutions containing trace amount of Cs-137 c) 1.10 - 5 - 1.10 - 1 M *CsCl solutions containing trace amount of Sr-85 d) The equal amount of mixtures of 1.10 - 5 - 1.10 - 1 M SrCl 2 and 1.10 - 5 - 1.10 - 1 M CsCl solutions. It was shown that the convenient ph values for the comparison of Cs and Sr adsorption on both cement were 2.5 and 11.0. It was observed that the adsorption capacity of Sr on Sulfate Resistant Cement was twice that for the Portland Composed Cement in the solutions containing trace amount of Cs-137 and 1.10 - 5 - 1.10 - 1 *SrCl 2 . The in cease in adsorption capacity is related to the Ca to Sr ion exchange in Sulfate Resistant Cement containing appreciable amount of C 3 S. The adsorption of Cs and Sr on both types of cement in solutions containing equal amount of CsCl and SrCl 2 was greater than that of individual solutions of CsCl and SrCl 2 . This latter behavior is related to the ion charge, the hydration of ions and the interaction of the Cs with the Sr on the surface of adsorbent. It was observed that although Portland Composed Cement adsorbs Cs selectively, Sulfate Resistant Cement has a greater affinity for Sr. Cs adsorption is not affected by ph changes whilst Sr adsorption is highly dependent on ph

  18. Adsorption induced losses in interfacial cohesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaro, R.J.

    1977-07-01

    A model for interfacial cohesion is developed which describes the loss in the strength of an interface due to the segregation and adsorption of impurities on it. Distinctions are made between interface separations that occur too rapidly for any significant redistribution of adsorbing matter to take place and separations that are slow enough to allow full adsorption equilibrium. Expressions for the total work of complete decohesion are presented for both cases. The results are applied to well-known model adsorption isotherms and some experimental data for grain boundary adsorption of phosphorus in iron is analyzed with respect to the losses in intergranular cohesion

  19. Adsorptive property of rice husk for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yuan; Yi Facheng

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption experiments were researched by using the rice husk powder as the adsorbent to remove the U(VI) from aqueous solution. The affecting factors on the U(VI) removal rate such as rice husk particle size, pH, initial concentration, adsorption time, temperature and dosage of adsorbent were evaluated, kinetics and adsorption isotherm law were analyzed, and mechanisms for U(VI) removal were discussed by SEM, FT-IR and energy spectrum analysis. The results show that U(VI) removal rate increases with the decrease of the size of adsorbent, and with the increase of adsorbent dosage and temperature. The process of adsorption can be described by an equation of pseudo 2nd-order mode, and the relation coefficient is 1. The process of adsorption also fits to Freundlich isotherm (R 2 =0.995 4). The adsorption of uranium on rice husk changes the surface form of rice husk. Hydroxyl, carboxylic, P-O and Si-O are the main functional groups in the reaction with U(VI). The adsorption mechanism is mixture adsorption, including the physical and chemical adsorption. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of adsorption and Fenton-adsorption processes for landfill leachate treatment

    OpenAIRE

    San Pedro-Cedillo, L.; Méndez-Novelo, R.I.; Rojas-Valencia, M.N.; Barceló-Quintal, M.; Castillo-Borges, E.R.; Sauri-Riancho, M.R.; Marrufo-Gómez, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the adsorption and Fenton-adsorption treatments for the removal of contaminants in leachate from landfills and thus determine the most efficient one. The adsorption process with granular activated carbon was tested in two types of samples: raw leachate and leachate treated by Fenton. The results showed color, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) removal rates higher than 99% through the Fenton-adsorption proc...