WorldWideScience

Sample records for coupled ultrasonic flaw

  1. Real time automatic discriminating of ultrasonic flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhairy Sani; Mohd Hanif Md Saad; Marzuki Mustafa; Mohd Redzwan Rosli

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the real time automatic discriminating of flaws from two categories; i. cracks (planar defect) and ii. Non-cracks (volumetric defect such as cluster porosity and slag) using pulse-echo ultrasound. The raw ultrasonic flaws signal were collected from a computerized robotic plane scanning system over the whole of each reflector as the primary source of data. The signal is then filtered and the analysis in both time and frequency domain were executed to obtain the selected feature. The real time feature analysis techniques measured the number of peaks, maximum index, pulse duration, rise time and fall time. The obtained features could be used to distinguish between quantitatively classified flaws by using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. The proposed algorithm and complete system were implemented in a computer software developed using Microsoft Visual BASIC 6.0 (author)

  2. An intelligent software approach to ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Lee, Hyun

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic pattern recognition is the most effective approach to the problem of discriminating types of flaws in weldments based on ultrasonic flaw signals. In spite of significant progress on this methodology, it has not been widely used in practical ultrasonic inspection of weldments in industry. Hence, for the convenient application of this approach in many practical situations, we develop an intelligent ultrasonic signature classification software which can discriminate types of flaws in weldments using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. This software shows excellent performances in an experimental problem where flaws in weldments are classified into two categories of cracks and non-cracks.

  3. Ultrasonic flaw detection in a monorail box beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2009-03-01

    A steel box beam in a monorail application is constructed with an epoxy grout wearing surface, precluding visual inspection of its top flange. This paper describes a sequence of experimental research tasks to develop an ultrasonic system to detect flaws (such as fatigue cracks) in that flange, and the results of a field test to demonstrate system performance. The problem is constrained by the fact that the flange is exposed only along its longitudinal edges, and by the fact that permanent installation of transducers at close spacing was deemed to be impractical. The system chosen for development, after experimental comparison of alternate technologies, features angle-beam ultrasonic transducers with fluid coupling to the flange edge; the emitting transducers create transverse waves that travel diagonally across the width of the flange, where an array of receiving transducers detect flaw reflections and flaw shadows. The system rolls along the box beam, surveying (screening) the top flange for the presence of flaws. In a first research task, conducted on a full-size beam specimen, we compared waves generated from different transducer locations, either the flange edge or the web face, and at different frequency ranges. At relatively low frequencies, such as 100 kHz, we observed Lamb wave modes, and at higher frequency, in the MHz range, we observed nearlylongitudinal waves with trailing pulses. In all cases we observed little attenuation by the wearing surface and little influence of reflection at the web-flange joints. At the conclusion of this task we made the design decision to use edgemounted transducers at relatively high frequency, with correspondingly short wavelength, for best scattering from flaws. In a second research task we conducted experiments at 55% scale on a steel plate, with machined flaws of different size, and detected flaws of target size for the intended application. We then compared the performance of bonded transducers, fluid-coupled

  4. Detecting accuracy of flaws by manual and automatic ultrasonic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, K.

    1988-01-01

    As the final stage work in the nine year project on proving tests of the ultrasonic inspection technique applied to the ISI of LWR plants, automatic ultrasonic inspection tests were carried out on EDM notches, surface fatigue cracks, weld defects and stress corrosion cracks, which were deliberately introduced in full size structural components simulating a 1,100 MWe BWR. Investigated items are the performance of a newly assembled automatic inspection apparatus, detection limit of flaws, detection resolution of adjacent collinear or parallel EDM notches, detection reproducibility and detection accuracy. The manual ultrasonic inspection of the same flaws as inspected by the automatic ultrasonic inspection was also carried out in order to have comparative data. This paper reports how it was confirmed that the automatic ultrasonic inspection is much superior to the manual inspection in the flaw detection rate and in the detection reproducibility

  5. Ultrasonic imaging of material flaws exploiting multipath information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xizhong; Zhang, Yimin D.; Demirli, Ramazan; Amin, Moeness G.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we consider ultrasonic imaging for the visualization of flaws in a material. Ultrasonic imaging is a powerful nondestructive testing (NDT) tool which assesses material conditions via the detection, localization, and classification of flaws inside a structure. Multipath exploitations provide extended virtual array apertures and, in turn, enhance imaging capability beyond the limitation of traditional multisensor approaches. We utilize reflections of ultrasonic signals which occur when encountering different media and interior discontinuities. The waveforms observed at the physical as well as virtual sensors yield additional measurements corresponding to different aspect angles. Exploitation of multipath information addresses unique issues observed in ultrasonic imaging. (1) Utilization of physical and virtual sensors significantly extends the array aperture for image enhancement. (2) Multipath signals extend the angle of view of the narrow beamwidth of the ultrasound transducers, allowing improved visibility and array design flexibility. (3) Ultrasonic signals experience difficulty in penetrating a flaw, thus the aspect angle of the observation is limited unless access to other sides is available. The significant extension of the aperture makes it possible to yield flaw observation from multiple aspect angles. We show that data fusion of physical and virtual sensor data significantly improves the detection and localization performance. The effectiveness of the proposed multipath exploitation approach is demonstrated through experimental studies.

  6. Ultrasonic signal processing for sizing under-clad flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, R.; Paradiso, T.J.; Lane, S.S.; Quinn, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonic digital data were collected from underclad cracks in sample pressure vessel specimen blocks. These blocks were weld cladded under different processes to simulate actual conditions in US Pressure Water Reactors. Each crack was represented by a flaw-echo dynamic curve which is a plot of the transducer motion on the surface as a function of the ultrasonic response into the material. Crack depth sizing was performed by identifying in the dynamic curve the crack tip diffraction signals from the upper and lower tips. This paper describes the experimental procedure, digital signal processing methods used and algorithms developed for crack depth sizing

  7. Development of an Intelligent Ultrasonic Signature Classification Software for Discrimination of Flaws in Weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Jeong, H. D.

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic pattern recognition is the most effective approach to the problem of discriminating types of flaws in weldments based on ultrasonic flaw signals. In spite of significant progress in the research on this methodology, it has not been widely used in many practical ultrasonic inspections of weldments in industry. Hence, for the convenient application of this approach in many practical situations, we develop an intelligent ultrasonic signature classification software which can discriminate types of flaws in weldments based on their ultrasonic signals using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. This software shows the excellent performance in an experimental problem where flaws in weldments are classified into two categories of cracks and non-cracks. This performance demonstrates the high possibility of this software as a practical tool for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments

  8. Ultrasonic simulation studies for sizing of planar flaws in thick carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic non-destructive testing typically involves detection of flaws that may affect the integrity of component under test. Once detected, the flaw is sized for its critical dimensions and its nature. The detection of flaw in the component by ultrasonic test is based on the principle of echo or reflection. Once the echo from a flaw is received, there are several approaches for analyzing the signal so that more and accurate information is obtained on the size of the flaw and its nature. The 6dB drop method is commonly used for sizing of flaws. This technique is based on determining the end points where the ultrasonic signal amplitude from the flaw drops to half of the peak amplitude. Though this method works well for large flaws whose size is larger than the beam width, it has a tendency to oversize the flaw which is smaller than the beam dimensions. In addition to beam divergence, flaw sizing also depends upon the orientation of the flaw with respect to incident sound beam. The paper describes the results of simulation studies on ultrasonic response from planar flaws of various orientations, their imaging and the methodology to be adopted for their accurate depth sizing. The paper also describes the experimental results to validate the flaw sizing approach

  9. A study on the development of a real-time intelligent system for ultrasonic flaw classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Lee, Hyun; Lee, Seung Seok

    1998-01-01

    In spite of significant progress in research on ultrasonic pattern recognition it is not widely used in many practical field inspection in weldments. For the convenience of field application of this methodology, following four key issues have to be suitably addressed; 1) a software where the ultrasonic pattern recognition algorithm is efficiently implemented, 2) a real-time ultrasonic testing system which can capture the digitized ultrasonic flaw signal so the pattern recognition software can be applied in a real-time fashion, 3) database of ultrasonic flaw signals in weldments, which is served as a foundation of the ultrasonic pattern recognition algorithm, and finally, 4) ultrasonic features which should be invariant to operational variables of the ultrasonic test system. Presented here is the recent progress in the development of a real-time ultrasonic flaw classification by the novel combination of followings; an intelligent software for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments, a computer-base real-time ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation system, database of ultrasonic flaw signals, and invariant ultrasonic features called 'normalized features.'

  10. Evaluation of Effect by Internal Flow on Ultrasonic Testing Flaw Sizing in Piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Yoon, Byung Sik; Kim, Yong Sik

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the ultrasonic amplitude difference between air filled and water filled piping in nuclear power plant is compared by modeling approach. In this study, ultrasonic amplitude differences between air and water filled pipe are evaluated by modeling approach. Consequently, we propose the following results. The ultrasonic amplitude difference between air and water filled condition is measured by lower than 1 dB in modeling calculation. The flaw length sizing error between air and water filled condition shows same results based on 12 dB drop method even thought the amplitude difference is 1 dB. Most of the piping welds in nuclear power plants are inspected periodically using ultrasonic techniques to detect service-induced flaws such as IGSCC cracking. The inspection results provide information such as location, maximum amplitude response, ultrasonic length, height and finally the nature or flaw pattern. The founded flaw in ultrasonic inspection is accepted or rejected based on these information. Specially, the amplitude of flaw response is very important to estimate the flaw size. Currently the ultrasonic inspections in nuclear power plant components are performed by specific inspection procedure which describing inspection technique include inspection system, calibration methodology and flaw characterizing methodology. To perform ultrasonic inspection during in-service inspection, reference gain should be established before starting ultrasonic inspection by requirement of ASME code. This reference gain used as basic criteria to evaluate flaw sizing. Sometimes, a little difference in establishing reference gain between calibration and field condition can lead to deviation in flaw sizing. Due to this difference, the inspection result may cause flaw sizing error

  11. Ultrasonic Transducer Design for the Axial Flaw Detection of Dissimilar Metal Weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byung Sik; Kim, Yong Sik; Yang, Seung Han

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilar metal welds in nuclear power plant are known as very susceptible to PWSCC flaws, and periodically inspected by the qualified inspector and qualified procedure during in-service inspection period. According to field survey data, the majority of their DMWs are located on tapered nozzle or adjacent to a tapered component. These types of configurations restrict examination access and also limit examination volume coverage. Additionally, circumferential scan for axially oriented flaw is very difficult to detect located on tapered surface because the transducer can't receive flaw response from reflector for miss-orientation. To overcome this miss-orientation, it is necessary adapt skewed ultrasonic transducer accommodate tapered surface. The skewed refracted longitudinal ultrasonic transducer designed by modeling and manufactured from the modelling result for axial flaw detection. Experimental results showed that the skewed refracted longitudinal ultrasonic transducer get higher flaw response than non-skewed refracted longitudinal ultrasonic transducer

  12. Measurement of flaw size in a weld sample by ultrasonic frequency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, H.L. Jr.; Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1975-05-01

    An ultrasonic frequency analysis technique has been developed and applied to the measurement of flaws in an 8-in.-thick heavy-section steel specimen belonging to the Pressure Vessel Research Committee program. Using the technique the flaws occurring in the weld area were characterized in quantitative terms of both dimension and orientation. Several modifications of the technique were made during the study to include the application of several transducers and to consider ultrasonic mode conversion. (U.S.)

  13. Development of an intelligent system for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Hak-Joon; Cho, Hyeon

    2002-01-01

    Even though ultrasonic pattern recognition is considered as the most effective and promising approach to flaw classification in weldments, its application to the realistic field inspection is still very limited due to the crucial barriers in cost, time and reliability. To reduce such barriers, previously we have proposed an intelligent system approach that consisted of the following four ingredients: (1) a PC-based ultrasonic testing (PC-UT) system; (2) an effective invariant ultrasonic flaw classification algorithm; (3) an intelligent flaw classification software; and (4) a database with abundant experimental flaw signals. In the present work, for performing the ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments in a real-time fashion in many real word situations, we develop an intelligent system, which is called the 'Intelligent Ultrasonic Evaluation System (IUES)' by the integration of the above four ingredients into a single, unified system. In addition, for the improvement of classification accuracy of flaws, especially slag inclusions, we expand the feature set by adding new informative features, and demonstrate the enhanced performance of the IUES with flaw signals in the database constructed previously. And then, to take care of the increased redundancy in the feature set due to the addition of features, we also propose two efficient schemes for feature selection: the forward selection with trial and error, and the forward selection with criteria of the error probability and the linear correlation coefficients of individual features

  14. Flaw-size measurement in a weld samples by ultrasonic frequency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; Whaley, H.L. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    An ultrasonic frequency-analysis technique was developed and applies to characterize flaws in an 8-in. (203-mm) thick heavy-section steel weld specimen. The technique applies a multitransducer system. The spectrum of the received broad-band signal is frequency analyzed at two different receivers for each of the flaws. From the two spectra, the size and orientation of the flaw are determined by the use of an analytic model proposed earlier. (auth)

  15. Comparison of three flaw-location methods for automated ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiger, H.

    1982-01-01

    Two well-known methods for locating flaws by measurement of the transit time of ultrasonic pulses are examined theoretically. It is shown that neither is sufficiently reliable for use in automated ultrasonic testing. A third method, which takes into account the shape of the sound field from the probe and the uncertainty in measurement of probe-flaw distance and probe position, is introduced. An experimental comparison of the three methods indicates that use of the advanced method results in more accurate location of flaws. (author)

  16. Development of the Automated Ultrasonic Testing System for Inspection of the flaw in the Socket Weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ki; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Ki Sung; Lee, Jae Ho; Lim, Sung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Socket weldment used to change the flow direction of fluid nay have flaws such as lack of fusion and cracks. Liquid penetrant testing or Radiography testing have been applied as NDT methods for flaw detection of the socket weldment. But it is difficult to detect the flaw inside of the socket weldment with these methods. In order to inspect the flaws inside the socket weldment, a ultrasonic testing method is established and a ultrasonic transducer and automated ultrasonic testing system are developed for the inspection. The automated ultrasonic testing system is based on the portable personal computer and operated by the program based Windows 98 or 2000. The system has a pulser/receiver, 100MHz high speed A/D board, and basic functions of ultrasonic flaw detector using the program. For the automated testing, motion controller board of ISA interface type is developed to control the 4-axis scanner and a real time iC-scan image of the automated testing is displayed on the monitor. A flaws with the size of less than 1mm in depth are evaluated smaller than its actual site in the testing, but the flaws larger than 1mm appear larger than its actual size on the contrary. This tendency is shown to be increasing as the flaw size increases. h reliable and objective testing results are obtained with the developed system, so that it is expected that it can contribute to safety management and detection of repair position of pipe lines of nuclear power plants and chemical plants

  17. Flaw characterization through nonlinear ultrasonics and wavelet cross-correlation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunget, Gheorghe; Yee, Andrew; Stewart, Dylan; Rogers, James; Henley, Stanley; Bugg, Chris; Cline, John; Webster, Matthew; Farinholt, Kevin; Friedersdorf, Fritz

    2018-04-01

    Ultrasonic measurements have become increasingly important non-destructive techniques to characterize flaws found within various in-service industrial components. The prediction of remaining useful life based on fracture analysis depends on the accurate estimation of flaw size and orientation. However, amplitude-based ultrasonic measurements are not able to estimate the plastic zones that exist ahead of crack tips. Estimating the size of the plastic zone is an advantage since some flaws may propagate faster than others. This paper presents a wavelet cross-correlation (WCC) algorithm that was applied to nonlinear analysis of ultrasonically guided waves (GW). By using this algorithm, harmonics present in the waveforms were extracted and nonlinearity parameters were used to indicate both the tip of the cracks and size of the plastic zone. B-scans performed with the quadratic nonlinearities were sensitive to micro-damage specific to plastic zones.

  18. Determination of Flaw Type and Location Using an Expert Module in Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing for Weld Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, D.; Zolfaghari, A.; Masoumi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation is explained as nondestructive testing, nondestructive inspection, and nondestructive examination. It is a desire to determine some characteristic of the object or to determine whether the object contains irregularities, discontinuities, or flaws. Ultrasound based inspection techniques are used extensively throughout industry for detection of flaws in engineering materials. The range and variety of imperfections encountered is large, and critical assessment of location, size, orientation and type is often difficult. In addition, increasing quality requirements of new standards and codes of practice relating to fitness for purpose are placing higher demands on operators. Applying of an expert knowledge-based analysis in ultrasonic examination is a powerful tool that can help assure safety, quality, and reliability; increase productivity; decrease liability; and save money. In this research, an expert module system is coupled with ultrasonic examination (A-Scan Procedure) to determine and evaluate type and location of flaws that embedded during welding parts. The processing module of this expert system is implemented based on EN standard to classify welding defects, acceptance condition and measuring of their location via echo static pattern and image processing. The designed module introduces new system that can automate evaluating of the results of A-scan method according to EN standard. It can simultaneously recognize the number and type of defects, and determine flaw position during each scan.

  19. A robust indicator based on singular value decomposition for flaw feature detection from noisy ultrasonic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ximing; Wang, Zhe; Kang, Yihua; Pu, Haiming; Deng, Zhiyang

    2018-05-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) has been proven to be an effective de-noising tool for flaw echo signal feature detection in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, the uncertainty in the arbitrary manner of the selection of an effective singular value weakens the robustness of this technique. Improper selection of effective singular values will lead to bad performance of SVD de-noising. What is more, the computational complexity of SVD is too large for it to be applied in real-time applications. In this paper, to eliminate the uncertainty in SVD de-noising, a novel flaw indicator, named the maximum singular value indicator (MSI), based on short-time SVD (STSVD), is proposed for flaw feature detection from a measured signal in ultrasonic NDE. In this technique, the measured signal is first truncated into overlapping short-time data segments to put feature information of a transient flaw echo signal in local field, and then the MSI can be obtained from the SVD of each short-time data segment. Research shows that this indicator can clearly indicate the location of ultrasonic flaw signals, and the computational complexity of this STSVD-based indicator is significantly reduced with the algorithm proposed in this paper. Both simulation and experiments show that this technique is very efficient for real-time application in flaw detection from noisy data.

  20. Rail flaw sizing using conventional and phased array ultrasonic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    An approach to detecting and characterizing internal defects in rail through the use of phased array ultrasonic testing has shown the potential to reduce the risk of missed defects and improve transverse defect characterization. : Transportation Tech...

  1. Mode Selection for Axial Flaw Detection in Steam Generator Tube Using Ultrasonic Guided Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byung Sik; Yang, Seung Han; Guon, Ki Il; Kim, Yong Sik

    2009-01-01

    The eddy current testing method is mainly used to inspect steam generator tube during in-service inspection period. But the general problem of assessing the structural integrity of the steam generator tube using eddy current inspection is rather complex due to the presence of noise and interference signal under various conditions. However, ultrasonic testing as a nondestructive testing tool has become quite popular and effective for the flaw detection and material characterization. Currently, ultrasonic guided wave is emerging technique in power industry because of its various merits. But most of previous studies are focused on detection of circumferential oriented flaws. In this study, the steam generator tube of nuclear power plant was selected to detect axially oriented flaws and investigate guided wave mode identification. The longitudinal wave mode is generated using piezoelectric transducer frequency from 0.5 MHz, 1.0 MHz, 2.25MHz and 5MHz. Dispersion based STFT algorithm is used as mode identification tool

  2. Nickel-base alloy overlay weld with improved ultrasonic flaw detection by magnetic stirring welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi, Hirano; Kenji, Hirano; Masayuki, Watando; Takahiro, Arakawa; Minoru, Maeda

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic flaw detection is more difficult in Nickel-base alloy welds containing dendrites owing to the decrease ultrasonic transmissibility they cause. The present paper discusses application of magnetic stirring welding as a means for reducing dendrite growth with consequent improvement in ultrasonic transmissibility. Single pass and multi-pass welding tests were conducted to determine optimal welding conditions. By PT and macro observation subsequent to welding was carried out, optimal operation conditions were clarified. Overlay welding tests and UT clearly indicated ultrasonic beam transmissibility in overlay welds to be improved and detection capacity to be greater through application of magnetic stirring welding. Optimal operation conditions were determined based on examination of temper bead effects in the heat affected zone of low alloy steel by application of magnetic stirring welding to the butt welded joints between low alloy and stainless steel. Hardness in this zone of low alloy steel after the fourth layer was less than 350 HV. (author)

  3. Ultrasonic Phased Array Techniques for Detection of Flaws of Stud Bolts in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Choi, Sang Woo

    2006-01-01

    The reactor vessel body and closure head are fastened with the stud bolt that is one of crucial parts for safety of the reactor vessels in nuclear power plants. It is reported that the stud bolt is often experienced by fatigue cracks initiated at threads. Stud bolts are inspected by the ultrasonic technique during the overhaul periodically for the prevention of failure which leads to radioactive leakage from the nuclear reactor. The conventional ultrasonic inspection for stud bolts was mainly conducted by reflected echo method based on shadow effect. However, in this technique, there were numerous spurious signals reflected from every oblique surfaces of the thread. In this study, ultrasonic phased array technique was applied to investigate detectability of flaws in stud bolts and characteristics of ultrasonic images corresponding to different scanning methods, that is, sector and linear scan. For this purpose, simplified stud bolt specimens with artificial defects of various depths were prepared

  4. Visualization of flaws within heavy section ultrasonic test blocks using high energy computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, M.B.; Ross, D.M.; Janucik, F.X.; Friedman, W.D.; Yancey, R.N.

    1996-05-01

    The feasibility of high energy computed tomography (9 MeV) to detect volumetric and planar discontinuities in large pressure vessel mock-up blocks was studied. The data supplied by the manufacturer of the test blocks on the intended flaw geometry were compared to manual, contact ultrasonic test and computed tomography test data. Subsequently, a visualization program was used to construct fully three-dimensional morphological information enabling interactive data analysis on the detected flaws. Density isosurfaces show the relative shape and location of the volumetric defects within the mock-up blocks. Such a technique may be used to qualify personnel or newly developed ultrasonic test methods without the associated high cost of destructive evaluation. Data is presented showing the capability of the volumetric data analysis program to overlay the computed tomography and destructive evaluation (serial metallography) data for a direct, three-dimensional comparison

  5. Focussed probes ultrasonic follow-up of actual flaw growth during fatigue testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinotti, C.; Dufresne, J.; Prot, A.C.; Touffait, A.M.; Saglio, R.

    1979-01-01

    A programme was undertaken to follow-up the growth of actual flaws purposely introduced during the welding process of five test specimens. The aim of this programme is to measure the actual size of the cracks which develop from the known defects during the fatigue testing. The sizing method is based on the use of focussed probes, which allow good accuracy and repeatability, as well as good sensitivity. Examples are given of the first results: sizing before testing, then step by step during the fatigue testing and also under compression. This last point is very important in view of the ultrasonic testing during periodic in-service inspection

  6. Developmental techniques for ultrasonic flaw detection and characterization in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1983-04-01

    Flaw detection and characterization by ultrasonic methods is particularly difficult for stainless steel. This paper focuses on two specific problem areas: (a) the inspection of centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) and (b) the differentiation of intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) from geometrical reflectors such as the weld root. To help identify optimal conditions for the ultrasonic inspection of CCSS, the effect of frequency on propagation of longitudinal and shear waves was examined in both isotropic and anisotropic samples. Good results were obtained with isotropic CCSS and 0.5-MHz angle beam shear waves. The use of beam-scattering patterns (i.e. signal amplitude vs skew angle) as a tool for discriminating IGSCC from geometrical reflectors is also discussed

  7. Development of a multi-beam laser ultrasonic inspection system and its application on flaw sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivavibul, Pornthep; Lin, Shan; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Sadao; Ogata, Takashi; Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic technique is a powerful tool for non-contact, nondestructive testing of materials. It is expected to apply to where the conventional ultrasonic technique is not applicable. However, this technique suffers from low sensitivity. In order to overcome this shortcoming, a multi-beam laser ultrasonic system was developed to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and steer beam direction. The system consisted of eight pulsed Nd:YAG lasers used for ultrasonic generation, and a two-wave mixing interferometer with a long-pulsed Nd:YAG used for ultrasonic detection. Spatial and temporal control of the firing of the individual lasers permitted the generation of both phased array single pulse and narrow-band ultrasonic signals. The performance of developed system was verified using aluminum specimens with the wave generation in a slight ablation mode. A significant increase in sensitivity was obtained, with an increase in signal amplitude with no change in noise level. In the narrow band case, tone bursts were successfully generated in both surface and bulk waves. Beam steering of bulk waves was also performed, and the directivity was confirmed by visualization using a conventional transducer. The developed system was applied to flaw sizing using two techniques: shadow and short-path of diffraction (SPOD), using aluminum specimens with 2-mm, 5-mm, 8-mm slit depths. The shadow technique accurately measured the 5- and 8-mm slits, but not the 2-mm slit. The SPOD technique, carried out using a 5-MHz normal longitudinal transducer as a detector instead of TWN interferometer, accurately measured slits in all specimens with an error less than 0.5 mm. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  9. Research on Automatic Positioning System of Ultrasonic Testing of Wind Turbine Blade Flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. X.; Wang, Z. H.; Long, S. G.; Cai, M.; Cai, M.; Wang, X.; Chen, X. Y.; Bu, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrasonic testing technology has been used essentially in non-destructive testing of wind turbine blades. However, it is fact that the ultrasonic flaw detection method has inefficiently employed in recent years. This is because the testing result will illustrate a small deviation due to the artificial, environmental and technical factors. Therefore, it is an urgent technical demand for engineers to test the various flaws efficiently and quickly. An automatic positioning system has been designed in this paper to record the moving coordinates and the target distance in real time. Simultaneously, it could launch and acquire the sonic wave automatically. The ADNS-3080 optoelectronic chip is manufactured by Agilent Technologies Inc, which is also utilized in the system. With the combination of the chip, the power conversion module and the USB transmission module, the collected data can be transmitted from the upper monitor to the hardware that could process and control the data through software programming. An experiment has been designed to prove the reliability of automotive positioning system. The result has been validated by comparing the result collected form LABVIEW and actual plots on Perspex plane, it concludes that the system possesses high accuracy and magnificent meanings in practical engineering.

  10. Characterization of type, position and dimension of flaws by transit time locus curves of ultrasonic inspections - ALOK. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohs, B.; Barbian, O.A.; Kappes, W.; Paul, H.

    1981-01-01

    With automatic ultrasonic testing, flaws can be detected and described and thus characterized according to their type, position and dimensions. During scanning of a test object, the flaws are registered by many different pathways and many different acoustic irradiation directions. The transit time locus curve represents the distance between the relfecting points of a flaw and the source in dependence of the probe position; hence, information on flaw position and dimensions can be derived from this curve. If the sound velocity is known, the transit path can then be calculated from the transit time. This requires, above all, a constant sound velocity along the whole transit path. Various methods are presented for reconstructing the flaw border in the plane of incidence. (orig./RW) [de

  11. A surface flaw sizing study by time-of-flight ultrasonic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, C.A.

    1990-07-01

    In this work, sizing of inclined slits and surface cracks in ferritic steel using the ultrasonic time-of-flight technique was studied. The surface cracks were vertical and inclined, nut the slits were only inclined. It was surface Rayleigh wave that was converted to shear wave mode in the material. The specimens with surface crack were submitted to a three four point loading fracture mechanics tests, so that the region of the crack tip became under an increasing tensile stress. Thus, the ultrasonic crack sizing could be compared to the material stress intensity factor (K) of the material for different loadings. Results show that the greater the slope and/or lenght of the slits the greater its subsizing. Vertical cracks int he parent metal are reliably and accuratly sized; in the weld the same remark held if one increases the gain of ultrasonic flaw detector to compensate for the weld attenuation phenomenon. Sizing of inclined cracks in the parent metal shows the same trends of the inclined slits, differing only in slopes over 30 sup(0) where the sizing in surface cracks is no longer reliable. A new appraisal procedure here proposed made reliable these results. The techniques employed in this work lead to reliable and accurate results for sizing of different slits and cracks. It should be noted however that good results are only obtained if a tensile stress state exists in the neighbourhood of the c rack tip. (author)

  12. Flaw location and characterization in anisotropic materials by ultrasonic spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; Simpson, W.A.; Lewis, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    A method of quantitatively determining size and location of flaws in anisotropic materials such as stainless steel welds is described. In previous work, it was shown that spectral analysis of a broad band ultrasonic pulse scattered from a defect can be used to determine size and orientation in isotropic materials if the velocity of sound in the material is known. In an anisotropic structural material (stainless steel weld, centrifugal cast pipe), the velocity (both shear and longitudinal) is direction-dependent. When anisotropy is not taken into account, defect location and defect size estimation is misjudged. It will be shown that the effect of this structural variation in materials must be considered to obtain the correct size and location of defects by frequency analysis. A theoretical calculation, including anisotropy, of the scattered field from defects will also be presented

  13. Ultrasonic TOFD method application for steel components and welds of 10 mm wall thickness using ultrasonic flaw detector and ULTRA7 TOFD software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasarov, R.; Tabakova, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pressure Vessels inspection is carried out using complex of NDT techniques. A relatively recent technique ultrasonic NDJ is the Time-of-Flight Diffraction (TOFD,) method as an effective method for detection and sizing of flaws. One of the way inspection heavy duty steel elements and welds is to use manual TOFD technique with longitudinal waves at refracted angles of 45 to 70 degrees. Typically inspections using this method have been on steel elements and welds varying from 12 mm to 300 mm wall thickness. In this paper is presented examples of using the TOFD techniques for 10 mm wall thickness using USM 35X5 and ULTRA-7 TOFD software. This software provides TOFD inspection design (PCS, sound path, beam coverage, dead zones) and validation services. The calculations of the two dead zones are derived from relatively trigonometric equation, graphically displayed on a PC-screen and weld frame form. Using ULTRA-7 TOFD the user must move the gate at which the flaw is located on PC-screen to determine the depth of defect. The diffraction points graphically displayed in a weld frame form and analyzed using geometry calculations. (authors)

  14. Investigation with automatic ultrasonic equipment to trace flaws in a large test piece, and experience gained in carrying out inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    Based on the FRG codes providing guide lines for the Reactor Safety Commission regarding the size and location of flaws to be detected during in-service inspections, investigations were carried out into the possibility of detecting defects in thick-walled reactor pressure vessel components with the aid of ultrasonic inspection systems. A large test rig was used and, in a similar manner to the in-service inspections on a reactor, the tests were carried out with remote-controlled, automatically guided inspection equipment. For this purpose, a test specimen weighing about 10 tons was produced and provided with two weld seams having a large number of artificial defects. Essential parameters for the various reflectors in the test specimen were the size, location, angle and roughness or structure of the reflecting surfaces. As it is known that austenitic cladding has a considerable influence on flaw detection, the tests were undertaken first without cladding and then with cladding. A manipulator was designed for automatic remote-controlled inspection with which the inspection system travels on a meandering route over the area to be inspected. The inspection system employed was of the same type as the one used for baseline tests during external inspections of reactor vessel walls with parallel surfaces. Digital data collection was by a magnetic tape recorder designed to store both the data of the ultrasonic inspection system as well as the allied position data. The data stored on the tape are evaluated with electronic data processing programmes especially developed for this purpose. These programmes allow locally coherent indication patterns to be prepared, thus simplifying the interpretation of the data obtained. The author initially describes the equipment with the aid of which the studies were undertaken. A detailed discussion is then presented on the design of the test specimen and the inspection systems employed. Following this, the results obtained are explained and

  15. Detection and assessment of flaws in friction stir welded joints using ultrasonic guided waves: experimental and finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohammad Ali; Mustapha, Samir; Tarraf, Jaafar; Ayoub, Georges; Hamade, Ramsey

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves (GWs), e.g. Lamb waves, have been proven effective in the detection of defects such as corrosion, cracking, delamination, and debonding in both composite and metallic structures. They are a significant tool employed in structural health monitoring. In this study, the ability of ultrasonic GWs to assess the quality of friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Four friction stir welded AZ31B magnesium plates processed with different welding parameters and a non-welded plate were used. The fundamental symmetric (S0) Lamb wave mode was excited using piezoelectric wafers (PZTs). Further, the S0 mode was separated using the "Improved complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with adaptive noise (Improved CEEMDAN)" technique. A damage index (DI) was defined based on the variation in the amplitude of the captured wave signals in order to detect the presence and asses the severity of damage resulting from the welding process. As well, computed tomography (CT) scanning was used as a non-destructive testing (NDT) technique to assess the actual weld quality and validate predictions based on the GW approach. The findings were further confirmed using finite element analysis (FEA). To model the actual damage profile in the welds, "Mimics" software was used for the 3D reconstruction of the CT scans. The built 3D models were later used for evaluation of damage volume and for FEA. The damage volumes were correlated to the damage indices computed from both experimental and numerical data. The proposed approach showed high sensitivity of the S0 mode to internal flaws within the friction stir welded joints. This methodology has great potential as a future classification method of FSW quality.

  16. Automated flaw detection scheme for cast austenitic stainless steel weld specimens using Hilbert-Huang transform of ultrasonic phased array data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Tariq; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, Lalita; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan; Diaz, Aaron; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize flaws using ultrasonic phased-array data. Data was collected on cast austenitic stainless stell (CASS) weld specimens onloan from the U.S. nuclear power industry' Pressurized Walter Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) traveling specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless stell (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cst(SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection singals from the weld and heat affected zone of the based materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The Accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI

  17. Flaw acceptance criteria taking into consideration the NDT: radiographic and ultrasonic testing. Analysis through the fracture mechanics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capurro, E.; Alicino, F.; Corvi, A.

    1993-01-01

    The present study compares and evaluates the flaw acceptance criteria of the non-destructive inspections meeting European Community standards, through the application of the fracture mechanics methods that were determined and verified by the previous activity. Some choices were made; these, however, do not change the general validity of the conclusions. Shaved full-penetration butt welds of Class 1 components making up the primary circuit were considered and the following parameters varied: standards: French, German, Italian (ASME III) and UK; material: AISI 316 and low alloy steel A 533; base material and weld metal; temperature: RT, 370 deg C for the austenitic and 260 deg C for the ferritic steel; ultrasonic and radiographic methods; defect position: surface and internal; stress condition: situations with different primary and secondary stresses. From a preliminary examination of this study it is evident that the large quantity of results available and the abundance of information contained therein make a simple and exhaustive synthesis difficult. In fact, different analyses are possible and we have, therefore, limited the research to activities to perform a comparison and a general evaluation of the acceptance criteria of the non-destructive testing. (authors). 57 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs

  18. Ultrasonic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong Jun; Kuk, Jeong Han

    2002-02-15

    This book introduces ultrasonic testing, which tells of outline of ultrasonic testing, principle of ultrasonic testing, prosperities of ultrasonic waves, radiographic test and ultrasonic test, basic theory on ultrasonic testing, mode conversion, transmission and diffraction, ultrasonic flaw detection and probe, standard test piece and reference test piece, like KS(JIS) ASME and ASTM, classification and properties of ultrasonic testing, straight beam method, angle beam method, ASME SEC.V.Art.5 ASTMA 388 and KS B 0817 Korean industrial standard.

  19. Final Assessment of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2014-03-24

    PNNL conducted a technical assessment of the NDE issues and protocols that led to missed detections of several axially oriented flaws in a steam generator primary inlet dissimilar metal weld at North Anna Power Station, Unit 1 (NAPS-1). This particular component design exhibits a significant outside-diameter (OD) taper that is not included as a blind performance demonstration mock-up within the industry’s Performance Demonstration Initiative, administered by EPRI. For this reason, the licensee engaged EPRI to assist in the development of a technical justification to support the basis for a site-specific qualification. The service-induced flaws at NAPS-1 were eventually detected as a result of OD surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the dissimilar metal weld. A total of five axially oriented flaws were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference. The field volumetric examination that was conducted at NAPS-1 was a non-encoded, real-time manual ultrasonic examination. PNNL conducted both an initial assessment, and subsequently, a more rigorous technical evaluation (reported here), which has identified an array of NDE issues that may have led to the subject missed detections. These evaluations were performed through technical reviews and discussions with NRC staff, EPRI NDE Center personnel, industry and ISI vendor personnel, and ultrasonic transducer manufacturers, and laboratory tests, to better understand the underlying issues at North Anna.

  20. Examination of Sandwich Materials Using Air-Coupled Ultrasonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borum, K.K.; Berggreen, Carl Christian

    2004-01-01

    The air-coupled ultrasonic techniques have been improved drastically in recent years. Better equipment has made this technique much more useful. This paper focuses on the examination of sandwich materials used in naval ships. It is more convenient to be able to make the measurements directly...

  1. Studies on the Influence of Various factors in Ultrasonic Flaw Detection in Ferrite Steel Butt Weld Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baby, Sony; Balasubramanian, T.; Pardikar, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Parametric studies have been conducted into the variability of the factors affecting the ultrasonic testing applied to weldments. The influence of ultrasonic equipment, transducer parameters, test technique, job parameters, defect type and characteristics on reliability far defect detection and sizing was investigated by experimentation. The investigation was able to build up substantial bank of information on the reliability of manual ultrasonic method for testing weldments. The major findings of the study separate into two parts, one dealing with correlation between ultrasonic techniques, equipment and defect parameters and inspection performance effectiveness and other with human factors. Defect detection abilities are dependent on the training, experience and proficiency of the UT operators, the equipment used, the effectiveness of procedures and techniques

  2. Ultrasonographic Detection of Tooth Flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.; Ghorayeb, S. R.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of our work is to adapt pulse-echo ultrasound into a high resolution imaging modality for early detection of oral diseases and for monitoring treatment outcome. In this talk we discuss our preliminary results in the detection of: demineralization of the enamel and dentin, demineralization or caries under and around existing restorations, caries on occlusal and interproximal surfaces, cracks of enamel and dentin, calculus, and periapical lesions. In vitro immersion tank experiments are compared to results from a handpiece which uses a compliant delay line to couple the ultrasound to the tooth surface. Because the waveform echoes are complex, and in order to make clinical interpretation of ultrasonic waveform data in real time, it is necessary to automatically interpret the signals. We apply the dynamic wavelet fingerprint algorithms to identify and delineate echographic features that correspond to the flaws of interest in teeth. The resulting features show a clear distinction between flawed and unflawed waveforms collected with an ultrasonic handpiece on both phantom and human cadaver teeth.

  3. Artificial Intelligence Assists Ultrasonic Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.; Willenberg, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Subtle indications of flaws extracted from ultrasonic waveforms. Ultrasonic-inspection system uses artificial intelligence to help in identification of hidden flaws in electron-beam-welded castings. System involves application of flaw-classification logic to analysis of ultrasonic waveforms.

  4. Statistical flaw detection: Application to flaws below curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsley, R.K.; Fertig, K.W.; Linebarger, R.S.; Richardson, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents a practical approach to the optimum detection of flaws in the presence of noise signals. A decision theoretic approach is used to derive a detection algorithm which is adapted to the noise environment in which a particular measurement is being made. An automatic procedure for characterizing the noises and developing the optimum detection algorithm is presented. The proposed method makes use of an explicit knowledge of the noise processes in order to design a flaw detection algorithm which optimally detects flaws in the presence of such noise. It is concluded that this approach will provide a number of advantages in practical testing situations, including the detection of smaller flaws, faster scanning due to the use of less highly focussed transducers, and less need for operator optimization of the measurement process. The described algorithms were implemented on the Digital Ultrasonic Instrument (DUI), which is a high speed all-digital instrument for performing sophisticated calculations on ultrasonic signals

  5. Air-Coupled Low Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers and Arrays with PMN-32%PT Piezoelectric Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas J. Kazys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Air-coupled ultrasonic techniques are being increasingly used for material characterization, non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using guided waves as well as for distance measurements. Application of those techniques is mainly limited by the big losses of ultrasonic signals due to attenuation and mismatch of the acoustic impedances of ultrasonic transducers and air. One of the ways to solve this problem is by application of novel more efficient piezoelectric materials like lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT type crystals. The objective of this research was the development and investigation of low frequency (<50 kHz wide band air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and arrays with an improved performance using PMN-32%PT crystals. Results of finite element modelling and experimental investigations of the developed transducers and arrays are presented. For improvement of the performance strip-like matching elements made of low acoustic impedance, materials such as polystyrene foams were applied. It allowed to achieve transduction losses for one single element transducer −11.4 dB, what is better than of commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the acoustic fields radiated by the eight element ultrasonic array demonstrated not only a good performance of the array in a pulse mode, but also very good possibilities to electronically focus and steer the ultrasonic beam in space.

  6. Optimization design of high power ultrasonic circular ring radiator in coupled vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long; Lin, Shuyu; Hu, Wenxu

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a new high power ultrasonic (HPU) radiator, which consists of a transducer, an ultrasonic horn, and a metal circular ring. Both the transducer and horn in longitudinal vibrations are used to drive a metal circular ring in a radial-axial coupled vibration. This coupled vibration cannot only generate ultrasound in both the radial and axial directions, but also focus the ultrasound inside the circular ring. Except for the radial-axial coupled vibration mode, the third longitudinal harmonic vibration mode with relative large vibration amplitude is also detected, which can be used as another operation mode. Overall, the HPU with these two vibration modes should have good potential to be applied in liquid processing, such as sonochemistry, ultrasonic cleaning, and Chinese herbal medicine extraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of Ultrasonic Vibrations on the Static Friction Characteristics of a Rubber/Aluminum Couple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Ting-Hai; Gao Han; Bao Gang

    2011-01-01

    A novel ultrasonic vibration approach is introduced into a chloroprene rubber/aluminum friction couple for improving the static friction properties between rubber and metal. Compared to the test results without vibrations, the static friction force of a chloroprene rubber/aluminum couple decreases observably, leading to the ultimate displacement of rubber. The values of the static friction force and ultimate displacement can be ultimately reduced to 23.1% and 50% of those without ultrasonic vibrations, respectively. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  8. ULTRASONIC NEBULIZATION AND ARSENIC VALENCE STATE CONSIDERATIONS PRIOR TO DETERMINATION VIA INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) was utilized as a sample introduction device for an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer in an attempt to increase the sensitivity for As. The USN produced a valence state response difference for As. The As response was suppressed approximate...

  9. Two-ion theory of energy coupling in ATP synthesis rectifies a fundamental flaw in the governing equations of the chemiosmotic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Sunil

    2017-11-01

    The vital coupled processes of oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthetic phosphorylation synthesize molecules of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), the universal biological energy currency, and sustain all life on our planet. The chemiosmotic theory of energy coupling in oxidative and photophosphorylation was proposed by Mitchell >50years ago. It has had a contentious history, with part of the accumulated body of experimental evidence supporting it, and part of it in conflict with the theory. Although the theory was strongly criticized by many prominent scientists, the controversy has never been resolved. Here, the mathematical steps of Mitchell's original derivation leading to the principal equation of the chemiosmotic theory are scrutinized, and a fundamental flaw in them has been identified. Surprisingly, this flaw had not been detected earlier. Discovery of such a defect negates, or at least considerably weakens, the theoretical foundations on which the chemiosmotic theory is based. Ad hoc or simplistic ways to remedy this defect are shown to be scientifically unproductive and sterile. A novel two-ion theory of biological energy coupling salvages the situation by rectifying the fundamental flaw in the chemiosmotic theory, and the governing equations of the new theory have been shown to accurately quantify and predict extensive recent experimental data on ATP synthesis by F 1 F O -ATP synthase without using adjustable parameters. Some major biological implications arising from the new thinking are discussed. The principles of energy transduction and coupling proposed in the new paradigm are shown to be of a very general and universal nature. It is concluded that the timely availability after a 25-year research struggle of Nath's torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis is a rational alternative that has the power to solve the problems arising from the past, and also meet present and future challenges in this important interdisciplinary field

  10. Noncontact ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation/inspection using laser generation and air coupled transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhang, Kyung Young; Kim, Hong Joon; Cemiglia, Donatella; Djordjevic, Boro

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic MDE/I methods have been demonstrated as very effective tool in characterization of cracks and structural defects such as bond-line failures. Most of the ultrasonic testing is performed using conventional contact ultrasonic transducers that cannot be readily adapted to automation and field application. However, for large area inspection contact type is time consuming and as a result, it is important to develop a rapid and more efficient ultrasonic technique. In this paper, laser generation and air-coupled detection of ultrasound is proposed as a solution of non-contact method with no requirement of a coupling medium, and the bond quality of adhesively bonded and riveted aluminum lap splice joints is investigated as an application. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and a periodic transmission mask are used to generate a selected Lamb mode. The experimental show that multi-line laser source produces significant directed ultrasound and that the presence of defects can be detected reliably from the attenuation of signal amplitude. These results demonstrate that the proposed technique is well suitable and flexible for non-contact NDE/I applications.

  11. Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Receivers with High Electromechanical Coupling PMN-32%PT Strip-Like Piezoelectric Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas J. Kazys

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For improvement of the efficiency of air-coupled ultrasonic transducers PMN-32%PT piezoelectric crystals which possess very high piezoelectric properties may be used. The electromechanical coupling factor of such crystals for all main vibration modes such as the thickness extension and transverse extension modes is more than 0.9. Operation of ultrasonic transducers with such piezoelectric elements in transmitting and receiving modes is rather different. Therefore, for transmission and reception of ultrasonic signals, separate piezoelectric elements with different dimensions must be used. The objective of this research was development of novel air-coupled ultrasonic receivers with PMN-32%PT strip-like piezoelectric elements vibrating in a transverse-extension mode with electromechanically controlled operation and suitable for applications in ultrasonic arrays. Performance of piezoelectric receivers made of the PMN-32%PT strip-like elements vibrating in this mode may be efficiently controlled by selecting geometry of the electrodes covering side surfaces of the piezoelectric element. It is equivalent to introduction of electromechanical damping which does not require any additional backing element. For this purpose; we have proposed the continuous electrodes to divide into two pairs of electrodes. The one pair is used to pick up the electric signal; another one is exploited for electromechanical damping. Two types of electrodes may be used—rectangular or non-rectangular—with a gap between them directed at some angle, usually 45°. The frequency bandwidth is wider (up to 9 kHz in the case of non-rectangular electrodes. The strip-like acoustic matching element bonded to the tip of the PMN-32%PT crystal may significantly enhance the performance of the ultrasonic receiver. It was proposed to use for this purpose AIREX T10.110 rigid polymer foam, the acoustic impedance of which is close to the optimal value necessary for matching with air. It was

  12. Flaw distribution development from vessel ISI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Basin, S.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for use in the structural integrity evaluation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ''generic'' distribution applicable to all vessels. In contrast, this paper describes the analysis of vessel-specific in-service inspection (ISI) data for the development of a flaw distribution reliably representative of the condition of the particular vessel inspected. The application of the methodology may be extended to other vessels, but has been primarily developed for PWR reactor vessels. For this study, the flaw data analyzed included data obtained from three recently performed PWR vessel ISIs and from laboratory inspection of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor vessel. The variability in both the character of the reviewed data (size range of flaws, number of flaws) and the UT (ultrasonic test) inspection system performance identified a need for analyzing the inspection results on a vessel-, or data set-specific basis. For this purpose, traditional histogram-based methods were inadequate, and a new methodology that can accept a very small number of flaws (typical of vessel-specific ISI results) and that includes consideration of inspection system flaw detection reliability, flaw sizing accuracy and flaw detection threshold, was developed. Results of the application of the methodology to each of the four PWR reactor vessel cases studied are presented and discussed

  13. Bi-directional ultrasonic wave coupling to FBGs in continuously bonded optical fiber sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2017-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are typically spot-bonded onto the surface of a structure to detect ultrasonic waves in laboratory demonstrations. However, to protect the rest of the optical fiber from any environmental damage during real applications, bonding the entire length of fiber, called continuous bonding, is commonly done. In this paper, we investigate the impact of continuously bonding FBGs on the measured Lamb wave signal. In theory, the ultrasonic wave signal can bi-directionally transfer between the optical fiber and the plate at any adhered location, which could potentially produce output signal distortion for the continuous bonding case. Therefore, an experiment is performed to investigate the plate-to-fiber and fiber-to-plate signal transfer, from which the signal coupling coefficient of each case is theoretically estimated based on the experimental data. We demonstrate that the two coupling coefficients are comparable, with the plate-to-fiber case approximately 19% larger than the fiber-to-plate case. Finally, the signal waveform and arrival time of the output FBG responses are compared between the continuous and spot bonding cases. The results indicate that the resulting Lamb wave signal output is only that directly detected at the FBG location; however, a slight difference in signal waveform is observed between the two bonding configurations. This paper demonstrates the practicality of using continuously bonded FBGs for ultrasonic wave detection in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications.

  14. Detection of plane, poorly oriented wide flaws using focused transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadder, D. de; Azou, P.; Bastien, P.; Saglio, R.

    1976-01-01

    The detection of plane, poorly oriented, wide flaws by ultrasonic non destructive testing is distinctly improved when using focused transducers. An increased echo can be obtained crossing the defect limit [fr

  15. Characterization of water absorption by CFRP using air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joo Min; Lee, Joo Sung; Park, Ik Keun; Kim, Yong Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites are increasingly being used in a variety of industry applications, such as aircraft, automobiles, and ships because of their high specific stiffness and high specific strength. Aircraft are exposed to high temperatures and high humidity for a long duration during flights. CFRP materials of the aircraft can absorb water, which could decrease the adhesion strength of these materials and cause their volumes to change with variation in internal stress. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate the characteristics of CFRP composites under actual conditions from the viewpoint of aircraft safety. In this study air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) was applied to the evaluation of water absorption properties of CFRP composites. CFRP specimens were fabricated and immersed in distilled water at 75 degree C for 30, 60, and 120 days, after which their ultrasonic images were obtained by ACUT. The water absorption properties were determined by quantitatively analyzing the changes in ultrasonic signals. Further, shear strength was applied to the specimens to verify the changes in their mechanical properties for water absorption.

  16. Characterization of water absorption by CFRP using air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Min; Lee, Joo Sung; Park, Ik Keun [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kwon [Technology Research and Development Institute, KEPCO Plant Service and Engineering Co., Ltd, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites are increasingly being used in a variety of industry applications, such as aircraft, automobiles, and ships because of their high specific stiffness and high specific strength. Aircraft are exposed to high temperatures and high humidity for a long duration during flights. CFRP materials of the aircraft can absorb water, which could decrease the adhesion strength of these materials and cause their volumes to change with variation in internal stress. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate the characteristics of CFRP composites under actual conditions from the viewpoint of aircraft safety. In this study air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) was applied to the evaluation of water absorption properties of CFRP composites. CFRP specimens were fabricated and immersed in distilled water at 75 degree C for 30, 60, and 120 days, after which their ultrasonic images were obtained by ACUT. The water absorption properties were determined by quantitatively analyzing the changes in ultrasonic signals. Further, shear strength was applied to the specimens to verify the changes in their mechanical properties for water absorption.

  17. Ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satittada, Gannaga

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection is one of the most widely used methods for nondestructive inspection. The beam of high-frequency sound wave, ultrasonic wave, is introduced into the material. It travels through the material with some attendant loss of energy and can be reflected at interfaces. The reflected beam is detected and analyzed. Ultrasonic inspection is used to detect flaws in metal parts as well as in welded, brazed and bonded joints during research work and developing production and service. It is also used to detect and locate porosity, pipe, and flakes. In addition, it can be used for the measurement of metal thickness. Ultrasonic inspection is therefore used for quality control and material inspection in all major industries

  18. Component flaw evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, K [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States). Nuclear Power Div.

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with flaw evaluation during in-service inspection. These flaws can be divided into two groups: defects originating from the manufacturing fabrication stage or service-induced flaws. These are mainly caused by high cycle thermal fatigue and are influenced by the presence of stress corrosion cracking mechanisms such as nozzles or pump shaft. (TEC).

  19. Ultrasonic wave propagation in viscoelastic cortical bone plate coupled with fluids: a spectral finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Naili, Salah

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the ultrasonic wave propagation in the cortical layer of long bones which is known as being a functionally graded anisotropic material coupled with fluids. The viscous effects are taken into account. The geometrical configuration mimics the one of axial transmission technique used for evaluating the bone quality. We present a numerical procedure adapted for this purpose which is based on the spectral finite element method (FEM). By using a combined Laplace-Fourier transform, the vibroacoustic problem may be transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain in which, as radiation conditions may be exactly introduced in the infinite fluid halfspaces, only the heterogeneous solid layer needs to be analysed using FEM. Several numerical tests are presented showing very good performance of the proposed approach. We present some results to study the influence of the frequency on the first arriving signal velocity in (visco)elastic bone plate.

  20. Currency flaw severity. [Banknotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.; Burnett, M.; Goodman, C.; Sherrod, R.; Schmoyer, R.; Harrison, C.; Uppuluri, R.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of currency flaw severity was carried out using 300 banknotes and 37 judges. Each judge assigned each note to one of five flaw severity categories. These categories correspond to severity grades of 1 to 5 with 1 equivalent to ''always accepted'' and 5 ''never accepted.'' An average flaw severity grade for each note was obtained by taking the mean of the severity grades assigned to that note by the 37 judges. Thus, each note has a single numerical real-number flaw grade between 1 and 5. Mathematical modeling of the currency flaw survey results is continuing with some very promising initial results. Our present model handles common excess ink and missing ink flaw types quite well. We plan to extend the model to ink level, mash, setoff and blanket impression flaw types.

  1. Air-coupled ultrasonic through-transmission thickness measurements of steel plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Grunde; Hoff, Lars; Norli, Petter

    2015-02-01

    Non-destructive ultrasonic testing of steel structures provide valuable information in e.g. inspection of pipes, ships and offshore structures. In many practical applications, contact measurements are cumbersome or not possible, and air-coupled ultrasound can provide a solution. This paper presents air-coupled ultrasonic through-transmission measurements on a steel plate with thicknesses 10.15 mm; 10.0 mm; 9.8 mm. Ultrasound pulses were transmitted from a piezoelectric transducer at normal incidence, through the steel plate, and were received at the opposite side. The S1, A2 and A3 modes of the plate are excited, with resonance frequencies that depend on the material properties and the thickness of the plate. The results show that the resonances could be clearly identified after transmission through the steel plate, and that the frequencies of the resonances could be used to distinguish between the three plate thicknesses. The S1-mode resonance was observed to be shifted 10% down compared to a simple plane wave half-wave resonance model, while the A2 and S2 modes were found approximately at the corresponding plane-wave resonance frequencies. A model based on the angular spectrum method was used to predict the response of the through-transmission setup. This model included the finite aperture of the transmitter and receiver, and compressional and shear waves in the solid. The model predicts the frequencies of the observed modes of the plate to within 1%, including the down-shift of the S1-mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center's (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions

  3. A transmission and reflection coupled ultrasonic process tomography based on cylindrical miniaturized transducers using PVDF films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, J.; Yang, H.; Fan, F.; Su, M.

    2017-12-01

    A transmission and reflection coupled ultrasonic process tomography has been developed, which is characterized by a proposed dual-mode (DM) reconstruction algorithm, as well as an adaptive search approach to determine an optimal image threshold during the image binarization. In respect of hardware, to improve the accuracy of time-of-flight (TOF) and extend the lowest detection limit of particle size, a cylindrical miniaturized transducer using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films is designed. Besides, the development of range-gating technique for the identification of transmission and reflection waves in scanning is discussed. A particle system with four iron particles is then investigated numerically and experimentally to evaluate these proposed methods. The sound pressure distribution in imaging area is predicted numerically, followed by the analysis of the relationship between the emitting surface width of transducer and particle size. After the processing of experimental data for effective waveform extraction and fusion, the comparison between reconstructed results from transmission-mode (TM), reflection-mode (RM), and dual-mode reconstructions is carried out and the latter manifests obvious improvements from the blurring reduction to the enhancement of particle boundary.

  4. Ultrasonic microdialysis coupled with capillary electrophoresis electrochemiluminescence study the interaction between trimetazidine dihydrochloride and human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuangjiao; Long, Chanjuan; Tao, Chunyao; Meng, Sa; Deng, Biyang

    2014-12-03

    The paper describes a homemade ultrasonic microdialysis device coupled with capillary electrophoresis electrochemiluminescence (CE-ECL) for studying the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and trimetazidine dihydrochloride (TMZ). The time required for equilibrium by ultrasonic microdialysis was 45min, which was far less than that by traditional dialysis (240min). It took 80min to achieve the required combination equilibrium by normal incubation and only 20min by ultrasonic. Compared with traditional dialysis, the use of ultrasonic microdialysis simplified experimental procedures, shortened experimental time and saved consumption of sample. A simple, sensitive and selective determination of TMZ was developed using CE-ECL and the parameters that affected ECL intensity were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of TMZ was from 0.075 to 80μmol/L (r(2)=0.9974). The detection limit was 26nmol/L with RSD of 2.8%. The number of binding sites and binding constant were 1.54 and 15.17L/mol, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reconstructing flaw image using dataset of full matrix capture technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    A conventional phased array ultrasonic system offers the ability to steer an ultrasonic beam by applying independent time delays of individual elements in the array and produce an ultrasonic image. In contrast, full matrix capture (FMC) is a data acquisition process that collects a complete matrix of A-scans from every possible independent transmit-receive combination in a phased array transducer and makes it possible to reconstruct various images that cannot be produced by conventional phased array with the post processing as well as images equivalent to a conventional phased array image. In this paper, a basic algorithm based on the LLL mode total focusing method (TFM) that can image crack type flaws is described. And this technique was applied to reconstruct flaw images from the FMC dataset obtained from the experiments and ultrasonic simulation.

  6. Development of an intelligent ultrasonic welding defect classification software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Jeong, Hee Don

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic pattern recognition is the most effective approach to the problem of discriminating types of flaws in weldments based on ultrasonic flaw signals. In spite of significant progress in the research on this methodology, it has not been widely used in many practical ultrasonic inspections of weldments in industry. Hence, for the convenient application of this approach in many practical situations, we develop an intelligent ultrasonic signature classification software which can discriminate types of flaws in weldments based on their ultrasonic signals using various tools in artificial intelligence such as neural networks. This software shows the excellent performance in an experimental problem where flaws in weldments are classified into two categories of cracks and non-cracks. This performance demonstrates the high possibility of this software as a practical tool for ultrasonic flaw classification in weldments.

  7. Flaw evaluation charts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korosec, D.; Vojvodic Tuma, J.

    1999-01-01

    The structural integrity of the primary components in pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant is very important in the respect of safe and efficient operation. These components have to be subjected to periodic controls. In the light of fracture mechanics concept, the acceptance criteria for defects (flaws) are developed. Flaw evaluation procedure is necessary, to evaluate the defects regarding their acceptability for further operation. The objective of the flaw evaluation charts is to provide a series of simple graphs as decision maps. that immediate decision may be taken regarding the acceptability of a detected defects, on the basis of ASME Code XI criteria.(author)

  8. Ultrasonic testing of large blocks for prestressed cast iron pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelling, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    Ultrasonic tests were made on plate specimen and large blocks of perlit cast iron with lamellar graphite. Aims of the investigations were the control of material porperties, the flaw detection and flaw classification. The material properties were classified by sound velocity and attenuation measurements. Flaw detection and flaw size estimation methods were modified with regard to the acoustic properties, the microstructure and the reflectivity of typical flaws in castings. Special localisation and flaw size estimation techniques are discussed. (orig.)

  9. A methodology for determining fabrication flaws in a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, G.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a program with the major objective of estimating the rate of occurrence of fabrication flaws in US light-water reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). In this study, RPV mate4rial was examined using the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT-UT) to detect and characterize flaws created during fabrication. The inspection data obtained in this program has been analyzed to address the rates of flaw occurrence

  10. Pipe Wall Thickness Monitoring Using Dry-Coupled Ultrasonic Waveguide Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Kim, Ha Nam; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2012-01-01

    In order to monitor a corrosion or FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion) in a pipe, there is a need to measure pipe wall thickness at high temperature. Ultrasonic thickness gauging is the most commonly used non-destructive testing technique for wall thickness measurement. However, current commonly available ultrasonic transducers cannot withstand high temperatures, such as above 200 .deg. C. It is therefore necessary to carry out manual measurements during plant shutdowns. The current method thus reveals several disadvantages: inspection have to be performed during shutdowns with the possible consequences of prolonging down time and increasing production losses, insulation has to be removed and replaced for each manual measurement, and scaffolding has to be installed to inaccessible areas, resulting in considerable cost for interventions. It has been suggested that a structural health monitoring approach with permanently installed ultrasonic thickness gauges could have substantial benefits over current practices. The main reasons why conventional piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers cannot be used at high temperatures are that the piezo-ceramic becomes depolarized at temperature above the Curie temperature and because differential thermal expansion of the substrate, couplant, and piezoelectric materials cause failure. In this paper, a shear horizontal waveguide technique for wall thickness monitoring at high temperature is investigated. Two different designs for contact to strip waveguide are shown and the quality of output signal is compared and reviewed. After a success of acquiring high quality ultrasonic signal, experiment on the wall thickness monitoring at high temperature is planned

  11. Ultrasonic testing of materials at level 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Ultrasonic inspection is a nondestructive method in which high frequency sound waves are introduced into the material being inspected. Ultrasonic testing has a superior penetrating power to radiography and can detect flaws deep in the test specimen (say up to about 6 to 7 meters of steel). It is quite sensitive to small flaws and allows the precise determination of the location and size of the flaws. Basic ultrasonic test methods such as the through transmission method and the resonance method, sensors and testing techniques are described. Pulse echo type flaw detectors and their applications for inspection of welds are surveyed. Ultrasonic standards, calibration of the equipment and evaluation methods are presented. Examples of practical applications in welding, casting and forging processes are given. Figs and tabs

  12. Detection of flaws below curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsley, R.K.; Addison, R.C.; Graham, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    A measurement model has been developed to describe ultrasonic measurements made with circular piston transducers in parts with flat or cylindrically curved surfaces. The model includes noise terms to describe electrical noise, scatterer noise and echo noise as well as effects of attenuation, diffraction and Fresnel loss. An experimental procedure for calibrating the noise terms of the model was developed. Experimental measurements were made on a set of known flaws located beneath a cylindrically curved surface. The model was verified by using it to correct the experimental measurements to obtain the absolute scattering amplitude of the flaws. For longitudinal wave propagation within the part, the derived scattering amplitudes were consistent with predictions at internal angles of less than 30 0 . At larger angles, focusing and aberrations caused a lack of agreement; the model needs further refinement in this case. For shear waves, it was found that the frequency for optimum flaw detection in the presence of material noise is lower than that for longitudinal waves; lower frequency measurements are currently in progress. The measurement model was then used to make preliminary predictions of the best experimental measurement technique for the detection of cracks located under cylindrically curved surfaces

  13. Detailed simulation of ultrasonic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, K.R.; Douglas, S.R.; Dunford, D.

    1997-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasonic inspection of engineering components have been performed at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL for over 10 years. The computer model, called EWE for Elastic Wave Equations, solves the Elastic Wave Equations using a novel finite difference scheme. It simulates the propagation of an ultrasonic wave from the transducer to a flaw, the scatter of waves from the flaw, and measurement of signals at a receive transducer. Regions of different materials, water and steel for example, can be simulated. In addition, regions with slightly different material properties from the parent material can be investigated. The two major types of output are displays of the ultrasonic waves inside the component and the corresponding A-scans. EPRI and other organizations have used ultrasonic models for: defining acceptable ultrasonic inspection procedures, designing and evaluating inspection techniques, and for quantifying inspection reliability. The EWE model has been applied to the inspection of large pipes in a nuclear plant, gas pipeline welds and steam generator tubes. Most recent work has dealt with the ultrasonic inspection of pressure tubes in CANDU reactors. Pressure tube inspections can reliably detect and size defects; however, there are improvements that can be made. For example, knowing the sharpness of a flaw-tip is crucial for fitness for service assessments. Computer modelling of the ultrasonic inspection of flaws with different root radius has suggested inspection techniques that provide flaw tip radius information. A preliminary investigation of these methods has been made in the laboratory. The basis for the model will be reviewed at the presentation. Then the results of computer simulations will be displayed on a PC using an interactive program that analyzes simulated A-scans. This software tool gives inspection staff direct access to the results of computer simulations. (author)

  14. Monitoring of pipeline hydrostatic testing with artificial flaws applying acoustic emission and ultra-sonic techniques; Monitoracao de teste hidrostatico de tubos com descontinuidades artificiais empregando as tecnicas de emissao acustica e ultra-som

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Sergio Damasceno [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2003-07-01

    Charts and parameters used to perform and analyzing the acoustic emission data collected during the hydrostatic test in pipe samples build in API XL 60 with 20 inches of diameter and 14 millimeters of thickness are shown. These pipes had internal and external artificial flaws done by electro-erosion process with aspect ratio 1 x 20. A relationship between acoustic emission results, ultrasound and J-Integral were established using the applied pressurization sequence. Characteristics values of acoustic emission signals were shown as a criteria of field tests. (author)

  15. Effect of material acoustic anisotropy on the shape of ultrasonic wave beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iotchev, B.; Pawlowski, Z.

    1976-01-01

    When ultrasonic waves propagate in some types of materials having a structural anisotropy, a distortion of the ultrasonic beam takes place. This phenomenon is the cause of errors in the determination of flaw location and size

  16. Research on Effective Electric-Mechanical Coupling Coefficient of Sandwich Type Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Transducer Using Bending Vibration Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model on electromechanical coupling coefficient and the length optimization of a bending piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer are proposed. The piezoelectric transducer consists of 8 PZT elements sandwiched between four thin electrodes, and the PZT elements are clamped by a screwed connection between fore beam and back beam. Firstly, bending vibration model of the piezoelectric transducer is built based on the Timoshenko beam theory. Secondly, the analytical model of effective electromechanical coupling coefficient is built based on the bending vibration model. Energy method and electromechanical equivalent circuit method are involved in the modelling process. To validate the analytical model, sandwich type piezoelectric transducer example in second order bending vibration mode is analysed. Effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of the transducer is optimized with simplex reflection technique, and the optimized ratio of length of the transducers is obtained. Finally, experimental prototypes of the sandwich type piezoelectric transducers are fabricated. Bending vibration mode and impedance of the experimental prototypes are tested, and electromechanical coupling coefficient is obtained according to the testing results. Results show that the analytical model is in good agreement with the experimental model.

  17. Aluminium sensitized spectrofluorimetric determination of fluoroquinolones in milk samples coupled with salting-out assisted liquid-liquid ultrasonic extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qinghai; Yang, Yaling; Liu, Mousheng

    2012-10-01

    An aluminium sensitized spectrofluorimetric method coupled with salting-out assisted liquid-liquid ultrasonic extraction for the determination of four widely used fluoroquinolones (FQs) namely norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and gatifloxacin (GAT) in bovine raw milk was described. The analytical procedure involves the fluorescence sensitization of aluminium (Al3+) by complexation with FQs, salting-out assisted liquid-liquid ultrasonic extraction (SALLUE), followed by spectrofluorometry. The influence of several parameters on the extraction (the salt species, the amount of salt, pH, temperature and phase volume ratio) was investigated. Under optimized experimental conditions, the detection limits of the method in milk varied from 0.009 μg/mL for NOR to 0.016 μg/mL for GAT (signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3). The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were found to be relatively low (0.54-2.48% for four compounds). The calibration graph was linear from 0.015 to 2.25 μg/mL with coefficient of determinations not less than 0.9974. The methodology developed was applied to the determination of FQs in bovine raw milk samples. The main advantage of this method is simple, accurate and green. The method showed promising applications for analyzing polar analytes especially polar drugs in various sample matrices.

  18. Novel Budesonide Particles for Dry Powder Inhalation Prepared Using a Microfluidic Reactor Coupled With Ultrasonic Spray Freeze Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboti, Denis; Maver, Uroš; Chan, Hak-Kim; Planinšek, Odon

    2017-07-01

    Budesonide (BDS) is a potent active pharmaceutical ingredient, often administered using respiratory devices such as metered dose inhalers, nebulizers, and dry powder inhalers. Inhalable drug particles are conventionally produced by crystallization followed by milling. This approach tends to generate partially amorphous materials that require post-processing to improve the formulations' stability. Other methods involve homogenization or precipitation and often require the use of stabilizers, mostly surfactants. The purpose of this study was therefore to develop a novel method for preparation of fine BDS particles using a microfluidic reactor coupled with ultrasonic spray freeze drying, and hence avoiding the need of additional homogenization or stabilizer use. A T-junction microfluidic reactor was employed to produce particle suspension (using an ethanol-water, methanol-water, and an acetone-water system), which was directly fed into an ultrasonic atomization probe, followed by direct feeding to liquid nitrogen. Freeze drying was the final preparation step. The result was fine crystalline BDS powders which, when blended with lactose and dispersed in an Aerolizer at 100 L/min, generated fine particle fraction in the range 47.6% ± 2.8% to 54.9% ± 1.8%, thus exhibiting a good aerosol performance. Subsequent sample analysis confirmed the suitability of the developed method to produce inhalable drug particles without additional homogenization or stabilizers. The developed method provides a viable solution for particle isolation in microfluidics in general. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer automation of ultrasonic testing. [inspection of ultrasonic welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, B. G. W.; Kerlin, E. E.; Gardner, A. H.; Dunmyer, D.; Wells, T. G.; Robinson, A. R.; Kunselman, J. S.; Walker, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    Report describes a prototype computer-automated ultrasonic system developed for the inspection of weldments. This system can be operated in three modes: manual, automatic, and computer-controlled. In the computer-controlled mode, the system will automatically acquire, process, analyze, store, and display ultrasonic inspection data in real-time. Flaw size (in cross-section), location (depth), and type (porosity-like or crack-like) can be automatically discerned and displayed. The results and pertinent parameters are recorded.

  20. Improved criteria for the repair of fabrication flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Simonen, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear power plant components requires radiographic examinations (RT) of welds and requires repairs for RT indications that exceed code acceptable sizes. This paper describes research that has generated data on welding flaws, which indicated that the largest flaws occur in repaired welds. The fabrication flaws were detected in material removed from cancelled nuclear power plants using high sensitivity Nondestructive Examination (NDE) and validated by complementary NDE and destructive testing. Evidence suggests that repairs are often for small and benign RT indications at locations buried within the vessel or pipe wall. Probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations are described in this paper to predict the increases in vessel failure probabilities caused by the repair-induced flaws. Calculations address failures of embrittled vessel welds for pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients. In this case small flaws, which are relatively common, can cause brittle fracture, such that the rarely encountered repair flaws of large sizes gave only modestly increased failure probabilities. The paper recommends the use of more discriminating ultrasonic examinations in place of RT examinations along with repair criteria based on a fitness-for-purpose approach that minimize the number of unjustified repairs. (author)

  1. A study on the dimensioning of flaws by acoustical holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Enami, Koji; Yajima, Minoru; Fukui, Shigetaka.

    1978-01-01

    As a means of evaluating the safety of flawed pressure vessels and other structures against fracture, fracture mechanics has come to be applied. For the application of fracture mechanics it is necessary to get information concerning the sizes and shapes of flaws. The ultrasonic flaw detection method that is widely used as a nondestructive inspection method cannot measure the sizes and shapes of flaws accurately. Considering that acoustical holography is an useful means for the dimensioning of flaws, we performed basic tests on this method and obtained the following results: (1) The measured values of artificial flaws (flat bottom drilled holes: 5 - 36 mm) made on a steel plate of 150 mm thick showed a good linear relation with their actual sizes and scatter in the measured values was +-3 - 6 mm. (2) The measured values of fatigue cracks (length: 5 - 57 mm) introduced into a steel plate of 150 mm thick also showed a good linear relation with their actual sizes and scatter in the measured values was +-3 mm. (3) It was found that acoustical holography can also be applied to heavy section cast steels. (4) The method of correcting distortion caused by curved surface was investigated by computer-aided simulation and it was considered that such distortion can be corrected by radial scanning of a transducer. (author)

  2. Detecting flaws in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  3. Ultrasonic, microwave, and millimeter wave inspection techniques for adhesively bonded stacked open honeycomb core composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Clint D.; Cox, Ian; Ghasr, Mohammad Tayeb Ahmed; Ying, Kuang P.; Zoughi, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich composites are used extensively in the aerospace industry to provide stiffness and thickness to lightweight structures. A common fabrication method for thick, curved sandwich structures is to stack and bond multiple honeycomb layers prior to machining core curvatures. Once bonded, each adhesive layer must be inspected for delaminations and the presence of unwanted foreign materials. From a manufacturing and cost standpoint, it can be advantageous to inspect the open core prior to face sheet closeout in order to reduce end-article scrap rates. However, by nature, these honeycomb sandwich composite structures are primarily manufactured from low permittivity and low loss materials making detection of delamination and some of the foreign materials (which also are low permittivity and low loss) quite challenging in the microwave and millimeter wave regime. Likewise, foreign materials such as release film in adhesive layers can be sufficiently thin as to not cause significant attenuation in through-transmission ultrasonic signals, making them difficult to detect. This paper presents a collaborative effort intended to explore the efficacy of different non-contact NDI techniques for detecting flaws in a stacked open fiberglass honeycomb core panel. These techniques primarily included air-coupled through-transmission ultrasonics, single-sided wideband synthetic aperture microwave and millimeter-wave imaging, and lens-focused technique. The goal of this investigation has been to not only evaluate the efficacy of these techniques, but also to determine their unique advantages and limitations for evaluating parameters such as flaw type, flaw size, and flaw depth.

  4. Triple degree-of-freedom piezoelectric ultrasonic micromotor via flexural-axial coupled vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Ter Fong; Dang, Dinh Huy; Friend, James; Oetomo, Denny; Yeo, Leslie

    2009-08-01

    Actuators remain a limiting factor in robotics, especially in microrobotics where the power density of actuators is a problem. A 3 x 3 x 8.7 mm 3-axis piezoelectric ultrasonic micromotor system is described here in an effort to help solve this problem. Formed from 4 bulk lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thickness-polarized elements placed around the periphery of a rectangular rod, the stator is designed to combine axial and flexural vibrations in a way that permits rotation of a hardened steel ball as a rotor about an arbitrary axis. A simple prototype of the micromotor was found to produce at least a rotation speed of 10.4 rad/s with 4 microN-m torque about all 3 orthogonal directions at an excitation frequency of about 221 kHz, demonstrating the feasibility of a 3 degree-of-freedom millimeter-scale piezoelectric motor.

  5. Flaw detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasahara, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for detecting welded portions of a reactor pressure vessel. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a casing to be disposed on the surface to be detected, (2) a probe driving means loaded to the casing, (3) a probe driven along the surface to be detected and (4) a pressure reduction means for keeping the hollow portion in the casing to an evacuated atmosphere. The casing comprises a flexible suction edge to be tightly in contact with the surface to be tested for maintaining the air tight state, (6) a guide wheel for moving the casing along the surface to be tested and (7) a handle for performing transferring operation. The flaw detection device thus constituted has following features. The working efficiency upon conducting detection is improved. The influence of the weight of the device on the detection is small. The device can be applied on the surface of a nonmagnetic material. The efficiency for the flaw detection can be improved. (I.S.)

  6. Multielement detection limits and sample nebulization efficiencies of an improved ultrasonic nebulizer and a conventional pneumatic nebulizer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.W.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Fassel, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Two important aspects of the analytical performance of a newly developed ultrasonic nebulizer and a specially designed pneumatic nebulizer have been compared for use in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The ultrasonic nebulizer, when combined with a conventional aerosol desolvation apparatus, provided an order of magnitude or more improvement in simultaneous multielement detection limits as compared to those obtained when the pneumatic nebulizer was used either with or without desolvation. Application of a novel method for direct measurement of the overall efficiency of nebulization to the two systems showed that an approximately tenfold greater rate of sample delivery to the plasma torch was primarily responsible for the superior detection limits afforded by the ultrasonic nebulizer. A unique feature of the ultrasonic nebulizer described is the protection against chemical attack which is achieved by completely enclosing the transducer in an acoustically coupled borosilicate glass cylinder. Direct sample introduction, convenient sample change, and rapid cleanout are other important characteristics of the system which make it an attractive alternate to pneumatic nebulizer systems

  7. Flaws in Commercial Reading Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Jerome

    Three flaws found in commercial reading materials, such as workbooks and kits, are discussed in this paper, and examples of the flaws are taken from specific materials. The first problem noted is that illustrations frequently provide the information that the learner is supposed to supply through phonetic or structural analysis; the illustrations…

  8. An interim report on shallow-flaw fracture technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVS) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT NDT ) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) a strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness

  9. Determination of low cadmium concentrations in wine by on-line preconcentration in a knotted reactor coupled to an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer with ultrasonic nebulization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, R.F. [Inst. de Investigaciones Mineras, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Wuilloud, R.G.; Salonia, J.A. [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, National University of San Luis (Argentina); Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D. [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, National University of San Luis (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2001-12-01

    An on-line cadmium preconcentration and determination system implemented with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) associated to flow injection (FI) with ultrasonic nebulization system (USN) was studied. The cadmium was retained as the cadmium-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol, Cd-(5-Br-PADAP), complex, at pH 9.5. The cadmium complex was removed from the knotted reactor (KR) with 3.0 mol/L nitric acid. A total enhancement factor of 216 was obtained with respect to ICP-OES using pneumatic nebulization (12 for USN and 18 for KR) with a preconcentration time of 60 s. The value of the detection limit for the preconcentration of 5 mL of sample solution was 5 ng/L. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 5 {mu}g/L Cd level was 2.9% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for cadmium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 1000 {mu}g/L. The method was successfully applied to the determination of cadmium in wine samples. (orig.)

  10. Ultrasonic examination of JBK-75 strip material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Lewis, J.C.; McClung, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    An ultrasonic inspection system was assembled to inspect the JBK-75 stainless steel sheath material (for the Large Coil Project) for the Westinghouse-Airco superconducting magnet program. The mechanical system provided for handling the 180-kg (400-lb) coils of strip material [1.6 mm thick by 78 mm wide by 90 to 120 m long (0.064 by 3.07 in. by 300 to 400 ft)], feeding the strip through the ultrasonic inspection and cleaning stations, and respooling the coils. We inspected 54 coils of strip for both longitudinal and laminar flaws. Simulated flaws were used to calibrate both inspections. Saw-cut notches [0.28 mm deep (0.011 in., about 17% of the strip thickness)] were used to calibrate the longitudinal flaw inspections; 1.59-mm-diam (0.063-in.) flat-bottom holes drilled halfway through a calibration strip were used to calibrate the laminar flaw tests

  11. System for ultrasonic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, S.A.; Kristensen, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    A computerized system for the recording of flaw images by ultrasonic examination according to the pulse-echo method includes at least one ultrasonic probe which can be moved in steps over the surface of an object along a rectilinear scanning path. Digital signals containing information on the successive positions of the sound beam, on echo amplitudes, and on the lengths of sound paths to reflectors inside the object, are processed and used for the accumulated storage of circular patterns of echo amplitude data in a matrix memory associated with a sectional plane through the object. A video screen terminal controls the system and transforms the accumulated data into displays of sectional flaw images of greatly improved precision and sharpness of definition. A gradual transfer of filtered data from a number of parallel sectional planes to three further matrix memories associated with projection planes at right angles to each other permits presentation in three dimensions of equally improved projection flaw images. (author) 2 figs

  12. Determination of Flaw Size from Thermographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of delaminations tend to overestimate the size of the flaw. Since the heat diffuses in the plane parallel to the surface, the resulting temperature profile over the flaw is larger than the flaw. A variational method is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for the flaw that is much closer to the true size of the flaw. The size is determined from the spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above the flaw and a constraint on the length of the contour surrounding the flaw. The technique is applied to experimental data acquired on a flat bottom hole composite specimen.

  13. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1997-01-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes

  14. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1996-10-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes

  15. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel [nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)]. This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected

  16. PWR vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Kinsman, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on PWR pressure vessels which operate under NRC rules and regulatory guides intended to prevent failure of the vessels. Plants failing to meet the operating criteria specified under these rules and regulations are required to analytically demonstrate fitness for service in order to continue operation. The initial flaw size or distribution of initial vessel flaws is a key input to the required vessel integrity analyses. However, the flaw distribution assumed in the development of the NRC Regulations and recommended for the plant specific analyses is potentially over-conservative. This is because the distribution is based on the limited amount of vessel inspection data available at the time the criteria were being developed and does not take full advantage of the more recent and reliable domestic vessel inspection results. The U.S. Department of Energy is funding an effort through Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of developing a new flaw distribution based on the increased amount and improved reliability of domestic vessel inspection data. Results of Phase I of the program indicate that state-of-the-art NDE systems' capabilities are sufficient for development of a new flaw distribution that could ultimately provide life extension benefits over the presently required operating practice

  17. Flaw identification using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, B.; McDonald, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic emission 'signatures' contain information about the fine structure of metallurgical source events and their interpretation may provide a means of assessing the severity of internal flaws as well as surface flaws. The ultimate aim of this research on signature analysis is to develop a real time non-destructive testing technique having the capability of flaw recognition as well as flaw location in nuclear reactor components and structures under stress. Thus the requisite, unlike that in most acoustic emission work to date, is for a technique which affords discrimination between acoustic emission from different types of flaws propagating simultaneously. The approach described here requires detailed analysis of the emission signatures in terms of a specific statistical parameter, energy spectral density. In order to realise the full inspection potential of acoustic emission monitoring data obtained from zirconium and steel testpieces have been correlated with metallurgical condition and mechanical behaviour, since the nature of emission signatures is strongly affected by the physical characteristics and internal structure of the material. (Auth.)

  18. A Reference-Free and Non-Contact Method for Detecting and Imaging Damage in Adhesive-Bonded Structures Using Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timotius Yonathan Sunarsa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive bonded structures have been widely used in aerospace, automobile, and marine industries. Due to the complex nature of the failure mechanisms of bonded structures, cost-effective and reliable damage detection is crucial for these industries. Most of the common damage detection methods are not adequately sensitive to the presence of weakened bonding. This paper presents an experimental and analytical method for the in-situ detection of damage in adhesive-bonded structures. The method is fully non-contact, using air-coupled ultrasonic transducers (ACT for ultrasonic wave generation and sensing. The uniqueness of the proposed method relies on accurate detection and localization of weakened bonding in complex adhesive bonded structures. The specimens tested in this study are parts of real-world structures with critical and complex damage types, provided by Hyundai Heavy Industries® and IKTS Fraunhofer®. Various transmitter and receiver configurations, including through transmission, pitch-catch scanning, and probe holder angles, were attempted, and the obtained results were analyzed. The method examines the time-of-flight of the ultrasonic waves over a target inspection area, and the spatial variation of the time-of-flight information was examined to visualize and locate damage. The proposed method works without relying on reference data obtained from the pristine condition of the target specimen. Aluminum bonded plates and triplex adhesive layers with debonding and weakened bonding were used to examine the effectiveness of the method.

  19. Ultrasonic defect sizing using decibel drop methods. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, C.; Goszczynski, J.; Mitchell, A.B.

    1988-03-01

    An earlier study on the use of ultrasonic decibel drop sizing methods for determining the length and vertical extent of flaws in welded steel sections was based on the scanning of machined flaws and fabrication flaws. The present study utilized the techniques developed to perform a similar study of the type of flaws expected to develop during service (e.g. fatigue cracks). The general findings are that: a) the use of decibel drops of less than 14 dB generally undersize the length of fatigue cracks; and b) the use of decibel drop methods to determine vertical extent is questionable

  20. Methods to establish flaw tolerances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, T.

    1978-01-01

    Three conventional methods used to establish flaw tolerances are compared with new approaches using fracture mechanics. The conventional methods are those based on (a) non-destructive testing methods; (b) fabrication and quality assurance experience; and (c) service and damage experience. Pre-requisites of fracture mechanics methods are outlined, and summaries given of linear elastic mechanics (LEFM) and elastoplastic fracture mechanics (EPFM). The latter includes discussion of C.O.D.(crack opening displacement), the J-integral and equivalent energy. Proposals are made for establishing flaw tolerances. (U.K.)

  1. Quality assurance of brazed copper plates through advanced ultrasonic NDE

    OpenAIRE

    Segreto, T.; Caggiano, A.; Teti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic non-destructive methods have demonstrated great potential for the detection of flaws in a material under examination. In particular, discontinuities produced by welding, brazing, and soldering are regularly inspected through ultrasonic techniques. In this paper, an advanced ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation technique is applied for the quality control of brazed copper cells in order to realize an accelerometer prototype for cancer proton therapy. The cells are composed of two h...

  2. Determination of mercury species in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry combined with solvent extraction and ultrasonication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.; Li, Y.F.; Wang, J.X.; Chen, C.Y.; Li, B.; Gao, Y.X.; Chai, Z.F.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a well-known toxic element. The toxic effects of Hg depend on its chemical forms. The most important chemical forms are elemental Hg (Hg 0 ), inorganic Hg (Hg 2+ ) and methylmercury (CH 3 Hg + ). In the biogeochemical cycle of Hg, these species may interchange in atmospheric, aquatic and terrestrial environments. Among them, methylmercury is considerably higher toxic than elemental mercury and inorganic mercury because it is recognized as one of major health hazards for human due to its teratogenic, immunotoxic, and neurotoxic effects. Therefore, determinations of not only total mercury, but also methylmercury content in biological samples is necessary. In large numbers of analytical methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) using conventional sample introduction with a peristaltic pump is widely used for the determination of trace metals in a wide variety of different sample matrices. ICP-MS can offer high sensitivity, low detection limit, reasonable accuracy and precision, and can easily be automated. However, mercury is considered as an element with analytical problems. One problem is well known in Hg analysis that the memory effect increases the blank counts and worsens the analytical performance of ICP-MS. The possibility of Hg losses during sample decomposition procedure due to its volatility is another important issue. Additionally, its high first ionization potential and numerous isotopes have limited its sensitivity in ICP-MS analysis. In order to solve the above questions, the present work was carried out to develop a method based on ICP-MS coupled with solvent extraction for determination of mercury species in biological samples. At first step, we investigated different solvent extraction methods including acid leaching, CuSO 4 extraction, alkaline-methanol extraction, and surfactant extraction with ultrasonication for methylmercury determination using the certified reference materials GBW07601 (Human Hair). Next, we

  3. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  4. An inverse method for crack characterization from ultrasonic B-Scan images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faur, M.; Roy, O.; Benoist, PH.; Morisseau, PH.

    1996-01-01

    Concern has been expressed about the capabilities of performing non destructive evaluation (NDE) of flaws located near to the outer surface in nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels. The ultrasonic examination of PWR is accomplished from the inside with ultrasonic focused transducers working in the pulse echo mode. By recording the echoes as a function of time, the Ascan representation may be obtained. Many ultrasonic flaw detectors used for NDE are based on the simple Ascan concept involving measuring a time interval called 'time of flight'. By combining the Ascan concept synchronized transducer scanning, one can produce Bscan images that are two dimensional descriptions of the flaw interaction with the ultrasonic field. In the following, the flaw is assumed to be an axially oriented crack (the most serious flaw to be found in a pressurized component). In the case of the outer surface cracks (OSC's), analyzing and interpreting ultrasonic Ascan images become difficult because of the various reflections of the ultrasonic beam on the crack and on the outer surface (the so-called corner effect). Methods for automatic interpretation of ultrasonic experimental data are currently under investigation. In this paper, we present an inverse method for determining the geometrical characteristics of OSC's from ultrasonic Bscan images. The direct model used for the inversion procedure predicts synthetic Bscan images of ultrasonic examination of blocks containing planar defects interrogated by focused probes. (authors)

  5. Ultrasonic-testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Paul.

    1973-01-01

    Description is given of a device adapted to the detection, by means of ultrasonic waves, of all the flaws and defects included in workpieces when only one face of the latter is accessible. A beam is directed towards the rear-face of the workpiece (e.g. a plate) on which it is reflected. The image thus reflected is fed into a receiver. The latter is under the control of the displacement of that image; simultaneously a transducer checks the condition of the mirror at the places where the beam is reflected. Whenever a flow or defect comes between, a silent zone is formed. By recording the silent zones with respect to the positions of several emitters, it is possible to locates a flaw and to define the outline thereof. The apparatus comprises several ''emitter-receiver'' groups intersecting over the emitter used in order to check the good conditions of the mirror. The invention can be used for searching and identifying flaws and defects in buildings which have to be of top quality (e.g., cofferdams, nuclear devices, shipbuilding yards, aeronautics) [fr

  6. Gating techniques for ultrasonic thickness testing using flaw detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, P., E-mail: paul@hollowayndt.com [Holloway NDT & Engineering Inc., Georgetown, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidance on settings and methods, in particular the careful use of gating, to ensure accuracy of thickness testing on corroded steel and other metallic components. Specific applications include boiler tubes, tank floors, piping and vessels where the testing is performed from the OD or top surfaces, inspecting for metal loss due to corrosion on the opposite side. (author)

  7. A time-domain synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging method for material flaw quantification with validations on small-scale artificial and natural flaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xuefei; He, Jingjing; Rasselkorde, El Mahjoub

    2015-02-01

    A direct time-domain reconstruction and sizing method of synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is developed to improve the spatial resolution and sizing accuracy for phased-array ultrasonic inspections. The basic idea of the reconstruction algorithm is to coherently superimpose multiple A-scan measurements, incorporating the phase information of the sampling points. The algorithm involves data mapping and in-phase summation according to time-of-flight (TOF). Data mapping refers to the process of placing each of the sampling points to a two-/three-dimensional grid that represents the geometry model of the object being inspected. The value for each of the cells of the grid is a summation of all sampling points mapped into the cell. A sizing method based on the concept of 6 dB-drop is proposed to characterize the flaw boundary. The extents, orientation and the shape of the flaw can then be inferred to provide more information for life assessment calculations. Lab experiments are performed using a 10 MHz phased-array ultrasonic transducer to collect data from a cylinder material block with closely spaced artificial flaws and from a material block with a natural flaw. The developed method is used to process the experimental data to characterize the flaws. Using the developed method, the improvement of spatial resolution is observed. Results indicate that four closely spaced 0.794 mm-diameter flat-bottomed holes are clearly identified, and the quantification of size and orientation of the natural flaw is very close to the actual measurement made from digital microscopy after cutting the testing piece apart. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the samples injection systems with ultrasonic nebulizer and with pneumatic nebulizer for the metal determination in water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Sergio R; Pismante, Paola A

    2005-01-01

    The natural waters, depending on their use, must fulfill the exigencies and requirements that fix national and international norms. These establish conditions with respect to the concentration levels that must be some metals. In this work the development of inductively coupled plasma emission optical spectrometry with ultrasonic injection system is presented. The determination of aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, zinc, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, strontium and vanadium, at levels of ultra-trace in water samples is studied by this technique. The wavelengths that represented better sensitivity and minors spectral interferences, were selected from the Literature specialized in the analysis of this type of material. Also the conditions of work for the ultrasonic nebulization: temperature, pressure, flow speed of argon, and flow speed of sample was determined. The greater sensitivity of the injection system by ultrasonic nebulization forehead to the injection system by pneumatic nebulization, is verified when comparing the spectral intensity of the selected wavelengths. Also the limits of detection and quantification was obtained by both systems. The validity of the results obtained in this method is verified applying the test of Fisher, who determines the degree of homogeneity of the variances, and the test of Student, to determine the trazability obtained with these values. For these studies, the certified material of reference TM-24.2 of National Water Research Institute Environment Canada (NWRI), was used. The positive answer to the criteria of evaluation E and Z-Score, obtained by this technique, allows to verify that it fulfills the exigencies to be used in the determination of metals at the required levels (au)

  9. RID-41 gamma flaw detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, V.N.; Zubkov, V.S.; Majorov, A.N.; Murashev, A.I.; Firstov, V.G.; Yampol'skij, V.V.; Goncharov, V.I.; Sakhanov, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    The design is described and the main characteristics are given of a universal stationary hose-type gamma flow detector with a 60 Co source from 3O to 4g0 Ci for high-productive control of thick-walled products from steel and other materials. The principal units of the instrument are a radiation head, a control panel, and a charge-exchange container. The flaw detector may be used both in shield chambers and in shop or mounting conditions on complying with due requirements of radiation protection. The high activity of the source at relatively small dimensions of its active part ensures good detection of defects. The high radioscopy rate permits to use the flaw detector in conditions of increased background radiation, e.g. during routine repairs and inspections at nuclear power plants. The instrument may also be used in radiometric complexes, and produces a considerable economic effect. This flaw-detector corresponds to ISO and IAEA requirements and may be delivered for export

  10. Ultrasonic signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borloo, E.; Crutzen, S.

    1974-12-01

    The unique and tamperproof identification technique developed at Ispra is based on ultrasonic Non-Destructive-Techniques. Reading fingerprints with ultrasonic requires high reproducibility of standard apparatus and transducers. The present report gives an exhaustive description of the ultrasonic technique developed for identification purposes. Different applications of the method are described

  11. Flaw shape reconstruction – an experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena STANCULESCU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Flaws can be classified as acceptable and unacceptable flaws. As a result of nondestructive testing, one takes de decision Admit/Reject regarding the tested product related to some acceptability criteria. In order to take the right decision, one should know the shape and the dimension of the flaw. On the other hand, the flaws considered to be acceptable, develop in time, such that they can become unacceptable. In this case, the knowledge of the shape and dimension of the flaw allows determining the product time life. For interior flaw shape reconstruction the best procedure is the use of difference static magnetic field. We have a stationary magnetic field problem, but we face the problem given by the nonlinear media. This paper presents the results of the experimental work for control specimen with and without flaw.

  12. Development of high-sensitivity ultrasonic techniques for in-service inspection of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linzer, M.

    1977-01-01

    The principal objective of the program is to develop techniques to enhance the sensitivity of ultrasonic signals which are below the random noise of the system. A secondary objective is to develop instrumentation for improved discrimination of flaw signals from background ''clutter'' and for characterization of failure-related material properties through measurements of ultrasonic parameters such as velocity and attenuation. The improved techniques will be applied to detect flaws in nuclear reactor materials and components

  13. A study on the measurement of flaw sizes by acoustical holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Ando, T.; Enami, K.; Yajima, M.; Fukui, S.

    1978-01-01

    As a means of evaluating the safety of flawed pressure vessels and other structures against fracture, fracture mechanics has come to be applied. For the application of fracture mechanics it is necessary to get information concerning the sizes and shapes of flaws. The ultrasonic flaw detection method which is widely used as a nondestructive inspection method cannot measure the sizes and shapes of flaws accurately. Considering that acoustical holography is an useful means for the measurement of flaws, we performed basic tests on this method and obtained the following results: (1) The measured values of artificial flaws (flat bottom drilled holes: 5 -- 36 mm) made on a steel plate with a thickness of 150 mm showed a good linear relation with their actual sizes and scatter in the measured values was +-3 -- 6 mm. (2) The measured values of fatigue cracks (length: 5 -- 57 mm) introduced into a steel plate with thickness of 150 mm also showed a good linear relation with their actual sizes and scatter in the measured values was +-3 mm. (3) It was found that acoustical holography can also be applied to heavy section cast steels. (4) The method of correcting distortion caused by curved surface was investigated by computer-aided simulation and it was considered that such distortion can be corrected by radial scanning of a transducer. (auth.)

  14. Ultrasonic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sung Jin [Sungkwunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyun Jo [Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    For the proper performance of ultrasonic testing of steel welded joints, and anisotropic material it is necessary to have sound understanding on the underlying physics. To provide such an understanding, it is beneficial to have simulation tools for ultrasonic testing. In order to address such a need, we develop effective approaches to simulate angle beam ultrasonic testing with a personal computer. The simulation is performed using ultrasonic measurement models based on the computationally efficient multi-Gaussian beams. This reach will describe the developed ultrasonic testing models together with the experimental verification of their accuracy.

  15. Analysis of Defective Pipings in Nuclear Power Plants and Applications of Guided Ultrasonic Wave Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Park, Chi Seung; Park, Jae Suck; Choi, H. R.; Jung, S. S.

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the guided ultrasonic techniques to the pipes in nuclear power plants, the cases of defective pipes of nuclear power plants, were investigated. It was confirmed that geometric factors of pipes, such as location, shape, and allowable space were impertinent for the application of guided ultrasonic techniques to pipes of nuclear power plants. The quality of pipes, supports, signals analysis of weldment/defects, acquisition of accurate defects signals also make difficult to apply the guided ultrasonic techniques to pipes of nuclear power plants. Thus, a piping mock-up representing the pipes in the nuclear power plants were designed and fabricated. The artificial flaws will be fabricated on the piping mock-up. The signals of guided ultrasonic waves from the artificial flaws will be analyzed. The guided ultrasonic techniques will be applied to the inspection of pipes of nuclear power plants according to the basis of signals analysis of artificial flaws in the piping mock-up

  16. Eddy Current Flaw Characterization Using Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S. J.; Park, H. J.; Shin, Y. K.

    1998-01-01

    Determination of location, shape and size of a flaw from its eddy current testing signal is one of the fundamental issues in eddy current nondestructive evaluation of steam generator tubes. Here, we propose an approach to this problem; an inversion of eddy current flaw signal using neural networks trained by finite element model-based synthetic signatures. Total 216 eddy current signals from four different types of axisymmetric flaws in tubes are generated by finite element models of which the accuracy is experimentally validated. From each simulated signature, total 24 eddy current features are extracted and among them 13 features are finally selected for flaw characterization. Based on these features, probabilistic neural networks discriminate flaws into four different types according to the location and the shape, and successively back propagation neural networks determine the size parameters of the discriminated flaw

  17. Procedure for the creation of reproducible acoustic coupling using the ultrasonic contact method for nondestructive testing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomilov, B.V.

    1979-01-01

    The transducer is pressed to the specimen, a lubricating coating being applied as an intermediate layer. By means of a vibrator belonging to the transducer there are generated vibrations, the growth rate of the amplitude of the reflected signal picked up being observed. This growth rate is monotonously decreasing. If the growth rate is abruptly decreasing or if the amplitude of the measured signal remains constant the vibrator is turned off, because now good acoustic contact is established. After a short time of waiting for the residual stress of the transducer to decay, recording of the ultrasonic parameters may then be taken up. The method can be applied to thickness measurements and inhomogeneous materials with low surface quality. (RW) [de

  18. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor )LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (H SST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication [with a through-wall dimension of ∼6 mm (∼0.24 in.)] was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications [i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m 2 (72 ft 2 ) of cladding surface]. (author)

  19. Advanced Signal Processing for Thermal Flaw Detection; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VALLEY, MICHAEL T.; HANSCHE, BRUCE D.; PAEZ, THOMAS L.; URBINA, ANGEL; ASHBAUGH, DENNIS M.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic thermography is a promising technology for inspecting metallic and composite structures used in high-consequence industries. However, the reliability and inspection sensitivity of this technology has historically been limited by the need for extensive operator experience and the use of human judgment and visual acuity to detect flaws in the large volume of infrared image data collected. To overcome these limitations new automated data analysis algorithms and software is needed. The primary objectives of this research effort were to develop a data processing methodology that is tied to the underlying physics, which reduces or removes the data interpretation requirements, and which eliminates the need to look at significant numbers of data frames to determine if a flaw is present. Considering the strengths and weakness of previous research efforts, this research elected to couple both the temporal and spatial attributes of the surface temperature. Of the possible algorithms investigated, the best performing was a radiance weighted root mean square Laplacian metric that included a multiplicative surface effect correction factor and a novel spatio-temporal parametric model for data smoothing. This metric demonstrated the potential for detecting flaws smaller than 0.075 inch in inspection areas on the order of one square foot. Included in this report is the development of a thermal imaging model, a weighted least squares thermal data smoothing algorithm, simulation and experimental flaw detection results, and an overview of the ATAC (Automated Thermal Analysis Code) software that was developed to analyze thermal inspection data

  20. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Basin, S.L.

    1991-12-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ''generic'' distribution applicable to all PWR vessels. In contrast, this report describes (1) a new flaw distribution development analytic methodology that can be applied to the analysis of vessel-specific inservice inspection (ISI) data, and (2) results of the application of the methodology to the analysis of flaw data for each vessel case (ISI data on three PWR vessels and laboratory inspection data on sections of the Midland reactor vessel). Results of this study show significant variation among the flaw distributions derived from the various data sets analyzed, strongly suggesting than a vessel-specific flaw distribution (for vessel integrity prediction under pressurized thermal shock) is preferred over a ''generic'' distribution. In addition, quantitative inspection system flaw sizing accuracy requirements have been identified for developing a flaw distribution from vessel ISI data. The new flaw data analysis methodology also permits quantifying the reliability of the flaw distribution estimate. Included in the report are identified needs for further development of several aspects of ISI data acquisition and vessel integrity prediction practice

  1. Determination of crack size around rivet hole through neural network using ultrasonic Lamb wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Woo; Lee, Joon Hyun

    1998-01-01

    Rivets are typical structural features that are potential initiation sites for fatigue crack due to combination of local stress concentration around rivet hole and moisture trapping. For the viewpoint of structural assurance, it is crucial to evaluate the size of crack around rivets by appropriate nondestructive techniques. Guided waves, which direct wave energy along the plate, carry information about the material in their path and offer a potentially more efficient tool for nondestructive inspection of structural material. Neural network that is considered to be the most suitable for pattern recognition and has been used by researchers in NDE field to classify different types of flaws and flaw size. In this study, crack size determination around rivet through a neural network based on the back-propagation algorithm has been done by extracting some feature from time-domain waveforms of ultrasonic Lamb wave for Al 2024-T3 skin panel of aircraft. Special attention was paid to reduce the coupling effect between transducer and specimen by extracting some features related to only time component data in ultrasonic waveform. It was demonstrated clearly that features extraction based on time component data of the time-domain waveform of Lamb wave was very useful to determine crack size initiated from rivet hole through neural network.

  2. Ultrasonic defect-sizing using decibel drop methods. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, R.V.

    1987-03-01

    Results are reported of a study performed to investigate the accuracy and repeatability of various ultrasonic decibel (dB) drop sizing methods in determining the length, vertical extent and orientation of artificial and real weld flaws in thin steel sections. Seven artificial flaws and nine real weld flaws were examined; over 200 data plots were produced. The general findings are: a) length and vertical extent are assessed most accurately when using a 14 dB drop from the maximum indication amplitude; b) decibel drops less that 14 dB generally undersize flaws while decibel drops greater than 14 dB generally oversize flaws; c) flaws which are smaller than the width of the sound beam cannot be assessed accurately using dB drop methods; d) large flaws are assessed most accurately when the sound beam strikes the flaws at near normal incidence; e) the vertical extent and orientation of large flaws are plotted most accurately using the beam centre line method as opposed to the beam profile method; and, f) the limitations of dB-drop-sizing methods have considerable ramifications for CAN3-N285.4-M83 and ASME XI evaluation criteria

  3. Ultrasonic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, E G

    1962-01-01

    Ultrasonic Physics, Second Edition, provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of ultrasonic physics. The book opens with a discussion of the sources of ultrasound. This is followed by separate chapters on the properties and detection of ultrasonic radiation; measurement of propagation constants, i.e., the velocity and absorption, of ultrasound; ultrasound propagation in gases, liquids, and solids; and ultrasound propagation in aerosols, suspensions, and emulsions. The final chapter covers miscellaneous physical and physico-chemical actions, including dispersion and coagulation of

  4. Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shih-Yi [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiuh-Jen, E-mail: sjjiang@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Sahayam, A.C. [National Centre for Compositional Characterisation of Materials (CCCM), Hyderabad (India)

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to determine Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in several cereal samples. Thioacetamide was used as the modifier to enhance the ion signals. The background ions at the masses of interest were reduced in intensity significantly by using 1.0 mL min{sup −1} methane (CH{sub 4}) as reaction cell gas in the dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Since the sensitivities of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in different matrices were quite different, standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in these cereal samples. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 1, 10, 4, 12 and 2 ng g{sup −1} for Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se, respectively, in original cereal samples. This procedure has been applied to the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se whose concentrations are in μg g{sup −1} (except Cr and Se) in standard reference materials (SRM) of National institute of standards and technology (NIST), NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and two cereal samples purchased from a local market. The analysis results of reference materials agreed with certified values at 95% confidence level according to Student's T-test. The results for the real world cereal samples were also found to be in good agreement with the pneumatic nebulization DRC ICP-MS results of the sample solutions. - Highlights: • Determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereal samples • Ultrasonic slurry sampling in combination with DRC-ICP-MS • Better sensitivity with thioacetamide modifier in ETV • Decreased sample preparation time with solid sampling • Validation with NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour.

  5. Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shih-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to determine Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in several cereal samples. Thioacetamide was used as the modifier to enhance the ion signals. The background ions at the masses of interest were reduced in intensity significantly by using 1.0 mL min −1 methane (CH 4 ) as reaction cell gas in the dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Since the sensitivities of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in different matrices were quite different, standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in these cereal samples. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 1, 10, 4, 12 and 2 ng g −1 for Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se, respectively, in original cereal samples. This procedure has been applied to the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se whose concentrations are in μg g −1 (except Cr and Se) in standard reference materials (SRM) of National institute of standards and technology (NIST), NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and two cereal samples purchased from a local market. The analysis results of reference materials agreed with certified values at 95% confidence level according to Student's T-test. The results for the real world cereal samples were also found to be in good agreement with the pneumatic nebulization DRC ICP-MS results of the sample solutions. - Highlights: • Determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereal samples • Ultrasonic slurry sampling in combination with DRC-ICP-MS • Better sensitivity with thioacetamide modifier in ETV • Decreased sample preparation time with solid sampling • Validation with NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour

  6. New Analysis Scheme of Flow-Acoustic Coupling for Gas Ultrasonic Flowmeter with Vortex near the Transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhao Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic flowmeters with a small or medium diameter are widely used in process industries. The flow field disturbance on acoustic propagation caused by a vortex near the transducer inside the sensor as well as the mechanism and details of flow-acoustic interaction are needed to strengthen research. For that reason, a new hybrid scheme is proposed; the theories of computational fluid dynamics (CFD, wave acoustics, and ray acoustics are used comprehensively by a new step-by-step method. The flow field with a vortex near the transducer, and its influence on sound propagation, receiving, and flowmeter performance are analyzed in depth. It was found that, firstly, the velocity and vortex intensity distribution were asymmetric on the sensor cross-section and acoustic path. Secondly, when passing through the vortex zone, the central ray trajectory was deflected significantly. The sound pressure on the central line of the sound path also changed. Thirdly, the pressure deviation becomes larger with as the flow velocity increases. The deviation was up to 17% for different velocity profiles in a range of 0.6 m/s to 53 m/s. Lastly, in comparison to the theoretical value, the relative deviation of the instrument coefficient for the velocity profile with a vortex near the transducer reached up to −17%. In addition, the rationality of the simulation was proved by experiments.

  7. New Analysis Scheme of Flow-Acoustic Coupling for Gas Ultrasonic Flowmeter with Vortex near the Transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanzhao; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Dandan

    2018-04-10

    Ultrasonic flowmeters with a small or medium diameter are widely used in process industries. The flow field disturbance on acoustic propagation caused by a vortex near the transducer inside the sensor as well as the mechanism and details of flow-acoustic interaction are needed to strengthen research. For that reason, a new hybrid scheme is proposed; the theories of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), wave acoustics, and ray acoustics are used comprehensively by a new step-by-step method. The flow field with a vortex near the transducer, and its influence on sound propagation, receiving, and flowmeter performance are analyzed in depth. It was found that, firstly, the velocity and vortex intensity distribution were asymmetric on the sensor cross-section and acoustic path. Secondly, when passing through the vortex zone, the central ray trajectory was deflected significantly. The sound pressure on the central line of the sound path also changed. Thirdly, the pressure deviation becomes larger with as the flow velocity increases. The deviation was up to 17% for different velocity profiles in a range of 0.6 m/s to 53 m/s. Lastly, in comparison to the theoretical value, the relative deviation of the instrument coefficient for the velocity profile with a vortex near the transducer reached up to -17%. In addition, the rationality of the simulation was proved by experiments.

  8. New Analysis Scheme of Flow-Acoustic Coupling for Gas Ultrasonic Flowmeter with Vortex near the Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Dandan

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonic flowmeters with a small or medium diameter are widely used in process industries. The flow field disturbance on acoustic propagation caused by a vortex near the transducer inside the sensor as well as the mechanism and details of flow-acoustic interaction are needed to strengthen research. For that reason, a new hybrid scheme is proposed; the theories of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), wave acoustics, and ray acoustics are used comprehensively by a new step-by-step method. The flow field with a vortex near the transducer, and its influence on sound propagation, receiving, and flowmeter performance are analyzed in depth. It was found that, firstly, the velocity and vortex intensity distribution were asymmetric on the sensor cross-section and acoustic path. Secondly, when passing through the vortex zone, the central ray trajectory was deflected significantly. The sound pressure on the central line of the sound path also changed. Thirdly, the pressure deviation becomes larger with as the flow velocity increases. The deviation was up to 17% for different velocity profiles in a range of 0.6 m/s to 53 m/s. Lastly, in comparison to the theoretical value, the relative deviation of the instrument coefficient for the velocity profile with a vortex near the transducer reached up to −17%. In addition, the rationality of the simulation was proved by experiments. PMID:29642577

  9. A study on ultrasonic inspection of long steel pipes using lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ho

    1996-02-01

    An ultrasonic inspection technique with use of Lamb waves was evaluated to detect and determine the exact location of flaws present in long steel pipes. Since multiple modes of Lamb waves are generated in the inspected pipes due to their dispersive characteristics, selection of a specific Lamb wave mode is very important for inspection of flaws. Experimental studies of flaw detectability with use of each Lamb wave mode, namely, A 0 , S 0 , A 1 , and S 1 mode and their ultrasonic attenuation characteristics were conducted. Experimental results showed that A 0 mode is the most effective for detection and exact determination of the location of flaws. A lucite wedge containing water column that generates the A 0 Lamb wave mode was developed and used in the present inspection study. It was found that the ultrasonic beam divergence after its wrapping around once the inspected pipe interferes with exact determination of the location of flaws and that maximum reflection signals are obtained when the transducer is located axially offset from the straight line with the position of the flaw. The present study showed feasibility of ultrasonic inspection with use of Lamb waves for detection of flaws in several meters long insulated or inaccessible steel pipes

  10. Flaw evolution monitoring by acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghia, S.; Sala, A.; Lucia, A.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw evolution monitoring during mechanical fatigue test has been performed by acoustic emission (AE) technique. Testing on 1:5 reduced scale vessel containing fabrication defects was carried out in the frame of an European program for pressure component residual life evaluation. Characteristics of AE signals associated to flaw evolution are discussed

  11. Stepped frequency imaging for flaw monitoring: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, B.P.

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of research into the usefulness of stepped frequency imaging (SFI) to nuclear power plant inspection. SFI is a method for producing ultrasonic holographic images without the need to sweep a two-dimensional aperture with the transducer. Instead, the transducer may be translated along a line. At each position of the transducer the frequency is stepped over a finite preselected bandwidth. The frequency stepped data is then processed to synthesize the second dimension. In this way it is possible to generate images in regions that are relatively inaccessible to two-dimensional scanners. This report reviews the theory and experimental work verifying the technique, and then explores its possible applications in the nuclear power industry. It also outlines how this new capability can be incorporated into the SDL-1000 Imaging System previously developed for EPRI. The report concludes with five suggestions for uses for the SFI method. These are: monitoring suspect or repaired regions of feedwater nozzles; monitoring pipe cracks repaired by weld overlay; monitoring crack depth during test block production; imaging flaws where access is difficult; and imaging flaws through cladding without distortion

  12. Advanced ultrasonic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghia, S.

    1990-08-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) continuous monitoring and periodical inspections by advanced ultrasonic have been applied to evaluate defect evolution within a PWR reduced scale (1:5) pressure vessel subjected to cyclic mechanical fatigue test. This experimental activity has been carried out in the frame of the Primary Circuit Component Life Prediction programme. In the time period covered by this report actions were performed as following: (1) Ultrasonic examination by multifrequency acoustic holography to evaluate defect evolution subsequently repair and heat treatment of the R2 vessel carried out in March 1988. For the purpose, measurements were performed both at 0 and 200 bar of internal pressure. As uniformity of the procedures adopted, for calibration and testing, made the results comparable with the previous ones no evidence for significant growing of the examined defects has been found. (2) Acoustic emission monitoring has then been carried out during fatigue test from 416000 to 565000 fatigue cycles. Analysis of a large amount of data has been performed paying particular attention to the distinction between friction phenomena and crack growth in order to obtain a correct diagnosis of flaw evolution. The signal duration distribution and the correlation of AE appearance time versus load cycle phase were considered to characterise stick-slip processes. A general intensification of AE activity has been recorded during this last period of monitoring and previous known AE sources were confirmed together with the appearance of new AE sources some of them correlable with real defects

  13. Limited aperture effects on ultrasonic image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogan, V.G.; Rose, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the inverse Born approximation the shape of a weak scatterer can be determined from a knowledge of the backscattered ultrasonic amplitude for all directions of incidence and all frequencies. Two questions are considered. First, what information on the scatterer shape is preserved and what is degraded if the scattering data are available only within a limited set of incident directions (limited aperture). This problem is addressed for a spherical weakly scattering uniform flaw. It is shown that the problem of a general uniform ellipsoidal flaw can be reduced to the spherical case by a scale transformation; however, the apertures in these two cases must be related by the same transformation. Second, limited aperture and finite bandwidth Born inversions were performed for strongly scattering flaws (voids and cracks) using numerically generated scattering amplitudes. These inversions were then compared with the weak scattering analytic results, which show many common features

  14. Nondestructive evaluation of a cermet coating using ultrasonic and eddy current techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roge, B.; Fahr, A.; Giguere, J.S.R.; McRae, K.I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments conducted to characterize cermet coatings using conventional ultrasonic and eddy current techniques as well as an ultrasonic leaky surface wave method. The results demonstrate the ability of these techniques to detect the presence of artificial defects on the surface or beneath the surface of the coating. In addition, ultrasonic tests in particular ultrasonic leaky surface waves demonstrate the ability to detect the presence of manufacturing flaws. Ultrasonic time-of-flight and eddy current quadrature measurements also show sensitivity to variations in coating thickness

  15. Research on ultrasonic flow detection techniques for LWR facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Katsumi; Fukuhara, Hiroaki; Hoshimoto, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Shojiro; Yamawaki, Hisashi; Ito, Hideyuki; Uetake, Ichizo

    1986-01-01

    Aiming at establishing the techniques for inspecting the inside of LWR pressure vessels by ultrasonic flaw detection from the outside of the vessels, the development of a probe suitable to the flaw detection in the thick steel plates with stainless steel overlay and the method of its driving, the examination of the ultrasonic characteristics of austenitic stainless steel welded metal used for overlay, and the improvement of the detectability of defects and the accuracy of measuring dimensions by the application of signal processing techniques to ultrasonic flaw detection were attempted. In order to cope with the impedance lowering accompanying the increase of oscillator size, the oscillator was divided into the rings with equal area, and the driving and signal receiving were carried out individually, in this way, the good results were obtained by summing the signals. It was theoretically proved that it is rational to use longitudinal waves for the flaw detection in overlay. It was found that by displaying the results of flaw detection as pictures using a microcomputer, the capability of defect detection was increased. Also by the signal processing combining Fourier transformation and filtering, noise removal and the heightening of the accuracy of measuring dimensions were able to be attained. (Kako, I.)

  16. Probabilistic analysis of flaw distribution on structure under cyclic load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Sang Log; Choi, Young Hwan; Kim, Hho Jung

    2003-01-01

    Flaw geometries, applied stress, and material properties are major input variables for the fracture mechanics analysis. Probabilistic approach can be applied for the consideration of uncertainties within these input variables. But probabilistic analysis requires many assumptions due to the lack of initial flaw distributions data. In this study correlations are examined between initial flaw distributions and in-service flaw distributions on structures under cyclic load. For the analysis, LEFM theories and Monte Carlo simulation are applied. Result shows that in-service flaw distributions are determined by initial flaw distributions rather than fatigue crack growth rate. So initial flaw distribution can be derived from in-service flaw distributions

  17. Labor security in radiation flaw detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, U.Ya.; Chistov, E.D.; Partolin, O.F.; Pertsov, V.A.; Momzhiev, B.N.; Sprygaev, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    Problems of ensuring safe labour conditions in radiation flaw detection are considered. Methods for ionizing radiation protection are given calculating techniques for shielding flaw detectors and stationary structures are presented as well. Safe methods of nondestructive testing of items under field conditions, in a shop and special laboratories using gamma- and X-ray flaw detectors, betatrons, electron accelerators are described. Attention is paid to the principles of radiation factor stantardization as well as radiation monitoring. Analysis of accidents and recommendations on their prevention and liquidation of accidental consequences are given

  18. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  19. Ultrasonic mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueneke, B.

    1982-01-01

    608 women are examined by means of ultrasonic mammography during the period of 1 year. 432 patients were examined with the compound method with the U.I. Octoson, a water tank scanner, and 176 patients with the real time method with a directly connected linear-array-scanner. The following results were obtained at the end of the examination period: In the ultrasonic and also in the X-ray mammogram tumour diameters can be determined with an error rate of +- 30%. In the diagnosing of carcinomas, a significant dependence of the exactness on the sice of the tumour is found for the combination of the five methods tested (clinical examination, X-ray mammography, ultrasonic mammography, thermography, cytology). Classifying the individual methods with regard to their exactness, X-ray mammography ranks in front of ultrasonic mammography. Mastopathic changes in the breast can be screened by means of ultrasonic mammography. The structure of the changes can be determined more exactly than with an X-ray picture which is due to the possibility of differentiating solid and cystic structures. In diagnosing fibro-adenomas and establishing diagnoses on young women with dense gland bodies, ultrasonic mammography is superior to radiology both in the ability of screening a finding of a fibro-adenoma (US=88%, X-ray=75%) and in the possibility of classifying it as ''more benign than malignant''. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Fundamentally Flawed: Extension Administrative Practice (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Thomas F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Extension's current administrative techniques are based on the assumptions of classical management from the early 20th century. They are fundamentally flawed and inappropriate for the contemporary workplace. (SK)

  1. Development of ultrasonic instrument 'UT1000 Series'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Yukio; Ikeda, Toshimichi

    1984-01-01

    The ultrasonic flaw detectors with 'A-scope indication' have been frequently used as the means for confirming the soundness of structures and equipments, but there are problems in their operational, quantifying and recording capabilities. Recently, the digital ultrasonic measuring instrument of touch panel type ''UT 1000 Series'' has been developed, which resolves these problems by a single effort. This measuring instrument is that of portable type, which gives the digital output of measured results in real time only by lightly touching the peak point of an echo on the Brown tube. This instrument contains the rich software for measurement, and can measure the positions and dimensions of defects and the pressure on contact surfaces with high accuracy. 'A-scope indication' is the indication with an oscilloscope taking the intensity of echo and the propagation time of ultrasonic waves on the ordinate and abscissa, respectively. There are three types of the instrument, that is, for detecting defects, for measuring contact surface pressure and for both purposes. The size of the instrument is 240 mm width, 350 mm length and 175 mm height, and the weight is 8.5 kgf. The specification, function and features of the ultrasonic flaw detector, touch panel, gain setter, key board, microcomputer and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Computer-aided ultrasonic inspection of steam turbine rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K.H.; Weber, M.; Weiss, M. [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    As the output and economic value of power plants increase, the detection and sizing of the type of flaws liable to occur in the rotors of turbines using ultrasonic methods assumes increasing importance. An ultrasonic inspection carried out at considerable expense is expected to bring to light all safety-relevant flaws and to enable their size to be determined so as to permit a fracture-mechanics analysis to assess the reliability of the rotor under all possible stresses arising in operation with a high degree of accuracy. The advanced computer-aided ultrasonic inspection of steam turbine rotors have improved reliability, accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasonic inspection. Further, there has been an improvement in the resolution of resolvable group indications by applying reconstruction and imagine methods. In general, it is also true for the advanced computer-aided ultrasonic inspection methods that, in the case of flaw-affected forgings, automated data acquisition provides a substantial rationalization and a significant documentation of the results for the fracture mechanics assessment compared to manual inspection. (orig.) 8 refs.

  3. Computer-aided ultrasonic inspection of steam turbine rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K H; Weber, M; Weiss, M [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    As the output and economic value of power plants increase, the detection and sizing of the type of flaws liable to occur in the rotors of turbines using ultrasonic methods assumes increasing importance. An ultrasonic inspection carried out at considerable expense is expected to bring to light all safety-relevant flaws and to enable their size to be determined so as to permit a fracture-mechanics analysis to assess the reliability of the rotor under all possible stresses arising in operation with a high degree of accuracy. The advanced computer-aided ultrasonic inspection of steam turbine rotors have improved reliability, accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasonic inspection. Further, there has been an improvement in the resolution of resolvable group indications by applying reconstruction and imagine methods. In general, it is also true for the advanced computer-aided ultrasonic inspection methods that, in the case of flaw-affected forgings, automated data acquisition provides a substantial rationalization and a significant documentation of the results for the fracture mechanics assessment compared to manual inspection. (orig.) 8 refs.

  4. An Ultrasonic Pattern Recognition Approach to Welding Defect Classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Jin

    1995-01-01

    Classification of flaws in weldments from their ultrasonic scattering signals is very important in quantitative nondestructive evaluation. This problem is ideally suited to a modern ultrasonic pattern recognition technique. Here brief discussion on systematic approach to this methodology is presented including ultrasonic feature extraction, feature selection and classification. A stronger emphasis is placed on probabilistic neural networks as efficient classifiers for many practical classification problems. In an example probabilistic neural networks are applied to classify flaws in weldments into 3 classes such as cracks, porosity and slag inclusions. Probabilistic nets are shown to be able to exhibit high performance of other classifiers without any training time overhead. In addition, forward selection scheme for sensitive features is addressed to enhance network performance

  5. Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to determine Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in several cereal samples. Thioacetamide was used as the modifier to enhance the ion signals. The background ions at the masses of interest were reduced in intensity significantly by using 1.0 mL min- 1 methane (CH4) as reaction cell gas in the dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Since the sensitivities of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in different matrices were quite different, standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in these cereal samples. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 1, 10, 4, 12 and 2 ng g- 1 for Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se, respectively, in original cereal samples. This procedure has been applied to the determination of Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se whose concentrations are in μg g- 1 (except Cr and Se) in standard reference materials (SRM) of National institute of standards and technology (NIST), NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and two cereal samples purchased from a local market. The analysis results of reference materials agreed with certified values at 95% confidence level according to Student's T-test. The results for the real world cereal samples were also found to be in good agreement with the pneumatic nebulization DRC ICP-MS results of the sample solutions.

  6. Ultrasonic neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Omer; Krupa, Steve; Shoham, Shy

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves can be non-invasively steered and focused into mm-scale regions across the human body and brain, and their application in generating controlled artificial modulation of neuronal activity could therefore potentially have profound implications for neural science and engineering. Ultrasonic neuro-modulation phenomena were experimentally observed and studied for nearly a century, with recent discoveries on direct neural excitation and suppression sparking a new wave of investigations in models ranging from rodents to humans. In this paper we review the physics, engineering and scientific aspects of ultrasonic fields, their control in both space and time, and their effect on neuronal activity, including a survey of both the field’s foundational history and of recent findings. We describe key constraints encountered in this field, as well as key engineering systems developed to surmount them. In closing, the state of the art is discussed, with an emphasis on emerging research and clinical directions.

  7. Ultrasonic flowmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype ultrasonic flowmeter was assembled and tested. The theoretical basis of this prototype ultrasonic flowmeter is reviewed; the equipment requirements for a portable unit are discussed; the individual electronic modules contained in the prototype are described; the operating procedures and configuration are explained; and the data from preliminary calibrations are presented. The calibration data confirm that the prototype operates according to theoretical predictions and can indeed provide nonintrusive flow measurements to predicted accuracies for pipes larger than two inches, under single phase stable flow conditions

  8. Supersonic flaw detection device for nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Moriki.

    1996-01-01

    In a supersonic flaw detection device to be attached to a body surface of a reactor pressure vessel for automatically detecting flaws of a welded portion of a horizontally connected nozzle by using supersonic waves, a running vehicle automatically running along a circumferential direction of the nozzle comprises a supersonic flaw detection means for detecting flaws of the welded portion of the nozzle by using supersonic waves, and an inclination angle sensor for detecting the inclination angle of the running vehicle relative to the central axis of the nozzle. The running distance of the vehicle running along the circumference of the nozzle, namely, the position of the running vehicle from a reference point of the nozzle can be detected accurately by dividing the distance around the nozzle by the inclination angle detected by the inclination angle sensor. Accordingly, disadvantages in the prior art, for example, that the detected values obtained by using an encoder are changed by slipping or idle running of the magnet wheels are eliminated, and accurate flaw detection can be conducted. In addition, an operation of visually adjusting the reference point for the device can be eliminated. An operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (N.H.)

  9. Methodology for inferring initial flaw distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouris, G.M.; Shaffer, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    It has been common practice in both deterministic and probabilistic assessment of the integrity of a pressure vessel to assume the presence of a rather large flaw (usually 1/4 the thickness of the vessel wall) in the belt-line region. Although it is highly unlikely that such a large flaw would be present, the assumption is adopted in order to be conservative. A more realistic approach, which can be incorporated in the probabilistic analysis of integrity, is to characterize the depth of a flaw as a random variable and thus allow the probabilities associated with the presence of various size flaws to be reflected in the final estimated probability of vessel failure. This is precisely the motivation for developing the methodology to obtain the distribution of initial flaw depth, which is presented in this paper. It should be mentioned that the methodology developed here is not an end in itself but rather provides an input distribution to be used in a comprehensive integrity assessment. (orig.)

  10. Performance demonstration experience for reactor pressure vessel shell ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zado, V.

    1998-01-01

    The most ultrasonic testing techniques used by many vendors for pressurized water reactor (PWR) examinations were based on American Society of Mechanical Engineers 'Boiler and Pressurized Vessel Code' (ASME B and PV Code) Sections XI and V. The Addenda of ASME B and PV Code Section XI, Edition 1989 introduced Appendix VIII - 'Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems'. In an effort to increase confidence in performance of ultrasonic testing of the operating nuclear power plants in United States, the ultrasonic testing performance demonstration examination of reactor vessel welds is performed in accordance with Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) program which is based on ASME Code Section XI, Appendix VIII requirements. This article provides information regarding extensive qualification preparation works performed prior EPRI guided performance demonstration exam of reactor vessel shell welds accomplished in January 1997 for the scope of Appendix VIII, Supplements IV and VI. Additionally, an overview of the procedures based on requirements of ASME Code Section XI and V in comparison to procedure prepared for Appendix VIII examination is given and discussed. The samples of ultrasonic signals obtained from artificial flaws implanted in vessel material are presented and results of ultrasonic testing are compared to actual flaw sizes. (author)

  11. Ultrasonic inspection development at HEDL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, C.K.; Mech, S.J.; Michaels, T.E.; Dixon, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing methods and equipment are being developed to support preservice and in-service inspection of selected FFTF welds. A digital computer system is employed in the analysis of both simulated FFTF pipe sections and plate specimens containing fatigue cracks. It is anticipated that test evaluation standards containing fatigue cracks will partially eliminate questions formerly associated with weld test calibration producers by providing natural cracks which follow grain boundaries and stress patterns resembling piping situ conditions. Studies have revealed that commercial transducers may satisfy LMFBR ultrasonic pipe inspection applications: The test system evaluation included transducers and wedge coupling and fluid coupling materials which exhibited acceptable performance at temperatures to 2300C. Results are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of ultrasonic inspection of components immersed in sodium at temperatures to 2600C. (UK)

  12. Eco-friendly ionic liquid based ultrasonic assisted selective extraction coupled with a simple liquid chromatography for the reliable determination of acrylamide in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albishri, Hassan M; El-Hady, Deia Abd

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide in food has drawn worldwide attention since 2002 due to its neurotoxic and carcinogenic effects. These influences brought out the dual polar and non-polar characters of acrylamide as they enabled it to dissolve in aqueous blood medium or penetrate the non-polar plasma membrane. In the current work, a simple HPLC/UV system was used to reveal that the penetration of acrylamide in non-polar phase was stronger than its dissolution in polar phase. The presence of phosphate salts in the polar phase reduced the acrylamide interaction with the non-polar phase. Furthermore, an eco-friendly and costless coupling of the HPLC/UV with ionic liquid based ultrasonic assisted extraction (ILUAE) was developed to determine the acrylamide content in food samples. ILUAE was proposed for the efficient extraction of acrylamide from bread and potato chips samples. The extracts were obtained by soaking of potato chips and bread samples in 1.5 mol L(-1) 1-butyl-3-methylimmidazolium bromide (BMIMBr) for 30.0 and 60.0 min, respectively and subsequent chromatographic separation within 12.0 min using Luna C18 column and 100% water mobile phase with 0.5 mL min(-1) under 25 °C column temperature at 250 nm. The extraction and analysis of acrylamide could be achieved within 2h. The mean extraction efficiency of acrylamide showed adequate repeatability with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.5%. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 25.0 and 80.0 ng mL(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was tested by recovery in seven food samples giving values ranged between 90.6% and 109.8%. Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated by official guidelines, indicating its reliability to be applied to analysis of real samples, proven to be useful for its intended purpose. Moreover, it served as a simple, eco-friendly and costless alternative method over hitherto reported ones. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress-induced light scattering method for the detection of latent flaws on fine polished glass substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Y; Sakai, K; Nonaka, K

    2014-08-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as the chemical mechanical polishing treatment, are one of the most important technique to glass substrate manufacturing. Mechanical interaction in the form of friction occurs between the abrasive and the substrate surface during polishing, which may cause formation of latent flaws on the glass substrate surface. Fine polishing-induced latent flaws may become obvious during a subsequent cleaning process if glass surfaces are corroded away by chemical interaction with the cleaning liquid. Latent flaws thus reduce product yield. In general, non-destructive inspection techniques, such as the light-scattering methods, used to detect foreign matters on the glass substrate surface. However, it is difficult to detect latent flaws by these methods because the flaws remain closed. Authors propose a novel inspection technique for fine polishing-induced latent flaws by combining the light scattering method with stress effects, referred to as the stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM). SILSM is able to distinguish between latent flaws and particles on the surface. In this method, samples are deformed by an actuator and stress effects are induced around the tips of latent flaws. Due to the photoelastic effect, the refractive index of the material around the tip of a latent flaw is changed. This changed refractive index is in turn detected by a cooled charge-coupled device camera as variations in light scattering intensity. In this report, surface latent flaws are detected non-destructively by applying SILSM to glass substrates, and the utility of SILSM evaluated as a novel inspection technique.

  14. Irradiation effects and the duplication of detected flaws in service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    ASME Code procedure for evaluating the acceptability of flaws detected during in-service inspection is revised. Critical crack size for instability is proposed as criteria for detected flaws in operating plants

  15. Reliably detectable flaw size for NDE methods that use calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2017-04-01

    Probability of detection (POD) analysis is used in assessing reliably detectable flaw size in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). MIL-HDBK-1823 and associated mh18232 POD software gives most common methods of POD analysis. In this paper, POD analysis is applied to an NDE method, such as eddy current testing, where calibration is used. NDE calibration standards have known size artificial flaws such as electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches and flat bottom hole (FBH) reflectors which are used to set instrument sensitivity for detection of real flaws. Real flaws such as cracks and crack-like flaws are desired to be detected using these NDE methods. A reliably detectable crack size is required for safe life analysis of fracture critical parts. Therefore, it is important to correlate signal responses from real flaws with signal responses form artificial flaws used in calibration process to determine reliably detectable flaw size.

  16. Under sodium ultrasonic imaging system for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, V.H.; Lalwani, S.K.; Agashe, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Under Sodium UltraSonic Scanner (USUSS) has been developed to detect the growth and protrusion of fuel sub-assemblies of PFBR, submerged in liquid sodium by using the ultrasonic imaging technique during reactor shut-down when liquid sodium is at 180 ℃. The imaging is carried out prior to every Fuel handling operation. Electronics Division, BARC has designed and developed an 8-Channel Ultrasonic Imaging System (UIS) which consists of 4 downward viewing and 4 side viewing ultrasonic transducers alongwith pulser-receiver, signal processing electronics hardware and software. An automated mechanical scanner developed by IGCAR houses sodium immersible transducers to image the fuel sub assemblies. The system has been successfully tested with dummy protruding and grown FSAs, submerged under liquid sodium. Such ultrasonic imaging systems are not available to India from international market. The USUSS developed indigenously has all the features available in similar systems developed by other countries. After every imaging campaign, the mechanical scanner containing ultrasonic transducers is stored in the Argon filled storage-pit. Before every campaign of USUSS, it is necessary to check the healthiness of the sodium immersible and contaminated ultrasonic transducers, as the under-sodium scanner is decontaminated once in five years. For this purpose, a novel Non Contact Ultrasonic Inspection System (NCUIS) has been designed and developed by Electronics Division, BARC to check the functionality of the high-temperature and contaminated transducers of USUSS, using air-coupled ultrasonic technique. (author)

  17. High-Yield Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Few-Layer MoS2 Nanosheets by Exfoliating Natural Molybdenite Powders Directly via a Coupled Ultrasonication-Milling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huina; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Cost-effective and scalable preparation of two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been the bottleneck that limits their applications. This paper reports a novel coupled ultrasonication-milling (CUM) process to exfoliate natural molybdenite powders to achieve few-layer MoS2 (FL-MoS2) nanosheets in the solvent of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules. The synergistic effect of ultrasonication and sand milling highly enhanced the exfoliation efficiency, and the precursor of natural molybdenite powders minimizes the synthetic cost of FL-MoS2 nanosheets. The exfoliation of natural molybdenite powders was conducted in a home-made CUM system, mainly consisting of an ultrasonic cell disruptor and a ceramic sand mill. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectra, Raman spectra, FT-IR, SEM, TEM, AFM, and N2 adsorption-desorption. The factors that influence the exfoliation in the CUM process, including the initial concentration of natural molybdenite powders ( C in, 15-55 g L-1), ultrasonic power ( P u, 200-350 W), rotation speed of sand mill ( ω s, 1500-2250 r.p.m), exfoliation time ( t ex, 0.5-6 h), and the molar ratio of PVP unit to MoS2 ( R pm, 0-1), were systematically investigated. Under the optimal CUM conditions (i.e., C in = 45 g L-1, P u = 280 W, ω s = 2250 r.p.m and R pm = 0.5), the yield at t ex = 6 h reaches 21.6 %, and the corresponding exfoliation rate is as high as 1.42 g L-1 h-1. The exfoliation efficiency of the CUM mode is much higher than that of either the ultrasonication (U) mode or the milling (M) mode. The synergistic mechanism and influencing rules of the CUM process in exfoliating natural molybdenite powders were elaborated. The as-obtained FL-MoS2 nanosheets have a high specific surface area of 924 m2 g-1 and show highly enhanced electrocatalytic performance in hydrogen evolution reaction and good electrochemical sensing property in detecting ascorbic acid. The CUM process

  18. The state of the art in non destructive testing of nuclear fuel cladding tubes using ultrasonic rotary systems; on line computer and statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, Rudolf

    Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear fuel cladding by ultrasonic tests is described. Ultrasonic transducers for detection of flaws and dimensions are built in a rotary system with a speed of 8000 rpm. The testing system is adapted to a configuration consisting of two microcomputers connected to each other

  19. Numerical processing of ultrasonic holographic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberg, K.J.; Kiefer, R.; Wosnitza, M.; Schmitz, V.; Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Foerderung der Angewandten Forschung e.V., Saarbruecken

    1980-01-01

    Reconstructing ultrasonic holographic data numerically, the well-known Fresnel approximation is a first step in evaluating the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula, that is to say, a one- or two-dimensional Fourier-transform of the holographic data multiplied by a complex phase factor has to be computed. The present contribution investigates the relation between flaw depth and aperture size yielding the more advantageous use of the spatial frequency approach where the advantage is in terms of the number of samples and hence computation time in evaluating Fourier transforms numerically. (orig.) [de

  20. Flaw evaluation of Nd:YAG laser welding based plume shape by infrared thermal camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yeol; Yoo, Young Tae; Yang, Dong Jo; Song, Kyung Seol; Ro, Kyoung Bo

    2003-01-01

    In Nd:YAG laser welding evaluation methods of welding flaw are various. But, the method due to plume shape is difficult to classification od welding flaw. The Nd:YAG laser process is known to have high speed and deep penetration capability to become one of the most advanced welding technologies. At the present time, some methods are studied for measurement of plume shape by using high-speed camera and photo diode. This paper describes the machining characteristics of SM45C carbon steel welding by use of an Nd:YAG laser. In spite of its good mechanical characteristics, SM45C carbon steel has a high carbon contents and suffers a limitation in the industrial application due to the poor welding properties. In this study, plume shape was measured by infrared thermal camera that is non-contact/non-destructive thermal measurement equipment through change of laser generating power, speed, focus. Weld was performed on bead-on method. Measurement results are compared as two equipment. Here, two results are composed of measurement results of plume quantities due to plume shape by infrared thermal camera and inspection results of weld bead include weld flaws by ultrasonic inspector.

  1. Stress intensities in flawed pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.; Jolles, M.; Peters, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for determining the stess intensity factor (SIF) near pressure vessel flaws or cracks experimentally from photoelastic data for use in two-dimensional problems was developed in the 1950's. This technique was modified and extended to a variety of two-dimensional problems. The technique has been refined further and what has evolved may be regarded as a hybrid technique which affects a marriage between ''frozen stress'' photoelastic results and a simple least-squares digital computer program for estimating SIF values in three-dimensional problems. This technique, in its original modified form, has been shown to be applicable to a study of surface flaws and the applicability of the method to complex crack body geometries of current technological importance are discussed. The analytical foundations of the method are reviewed

  2. A new digital correlation flaw detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.B.; Furgason, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    A new portable digital random signal flaw detection system is described which uses a digital delay line to replace the acoustic delay line of the original random signal system. Using this new system, a comparison was made between the two types of transmit signals which have been used in previous systems--m-sequences and random signals. This comparison has not been possible with these previous correlation flaw detection systems. Results indicated that for high-speed short code operation, the m-sequences produced slightly lower range sidelobes than typical samples of a clipped random signal. For normal long code operation, results indicated that system performance is essentially equivalent in resolution and signal-to-noise ratio using either m-sequences or clipped and sampled random signals. Further results also showed that for normal long code operation, the system produces outputs equivalent in resolution to pulse-echo systems, but with the added benefit of signal-to-noise ratio enhancement

  3. Nondestructive evaluation ultrasonic methods for construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilibon, I.; Zisu, T.; Raetchi, V.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents some ultrasonic methods for evaluation of physical-mechanical properties of construction materials (bricks, concrete, BCA), such as: pulse method, examination methods, and direct measurement of the propagation velocity and impact-echo method. Utilizing these nondestructive evaluation ultrasonic methods it can be determined the main material parameters and material characteristics (elasticity coefficients, density, propagation velocity, ultrasound attenuation, etc.) of construction materials. These method are suitable for construction materials because the defectoscopy methods for metallic materials cannot be utilized, due to its rugged and non-homogeneous structures and grate attenuation coefficients of ultrasound propagation through materials. Also, the impact-echo method is a technique for flaw detection in concrete based on stress wave propagation. Studies have shown that the impact-echo method is effective for locating voids, honeycombing, delaminating, depth of surface opening cracks, and measuring member thickness

  4. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  5. Common methodological flaws in economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Michael; Sculpher, Mark

    2005-07-01

    Economic evaluations are increasingly being used by those bodies such as government agencies and managed care groups that make decisions about the reimbursement of health technologies. However, several reviews of economic evaluations point to numerous deficiencies in the methodology of studies or the failure to follow published methodological guidelines. This article, written for healthcare decision-makers and other users of economic evaluations, outlines the common methodological flaws in studies, focussing on those issues that are likely to be most important when deciding on the reimbursement, or guidance for use, of health technologies. The main flaws discussed are: (i) omission of important costs or benefits; (ii) inappropriate selection of alternatives for comparison; (iii) problems in making indirect comparisons; (iv) inadequate representation of the effectiveness data; (v) inappropriate extrapolation beyond the period observed in clinical studies; (vi) excessive use of assumptions rather than data; (vii) inadequate characterization of uncertainty; (viii) problems in aggregation of results; (ix) reporting of average cost-effectiveness ratios; (x) lack of consideration of generalizability issues; and (xi) selective reporting of findings. In each case examples are given from the literature and guidance is offered on how to detect flaws in economic evaluations.

  6. Ultrasonic inspection of inpile tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.M.; Bossi, H.

    1985-01-01

    The in-service inspection (ISI) of inpile tubes can be performed accurately and safely with a semiautomatic ultrasonic inspection system. The ultrasonic technique uses a set of multiple transducers to detect and size cracks, voids, and laminations radially and circumferentially. Welds are also inspected for defects. The system is designed to inspect stainless steel and Inconel tubes ranging from 53.8 mm (2.12 in.) to 101.6 mm (4 in.) inner diameter with wall thickness on the order of 5 mm. The inspection head contains seven transducers mounted in a surface-following device. Six angle-beam transducers generate shear waves in the tubes. Two of the six are oriented to detect circumferential cracks, and two detect axial cracks. Although each of these four transducers is used in the pulse-echo mode, they are oriented in aligned sets so pitch-catch operation is possible if desired. The remaining angle-beam transducers are angulated to detect flaws that are off axial or circumferential orientation. The seventh transducer is used for longitudinal inspection and detects and sizes laminar-type defects

  7. Ultrasonic hydrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Carl A.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time "t" between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance "d" between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time "t", the sonic velocity "V" is calculated with the equation "V=2d/t". The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0.degree. and 40.degree. C. and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation. The disclosed modified battery has a hollow spacer nub on the battery side wall, the sonic surfaces being on the inside of the nub and the electrolyte filling between the surfaces to the exclusion of intervening structure. An accessible pad exposed on the nub wall opposite one sonic surface allows the reliable placement thereagainst of the transducer.

  8. Quadrature demodulation based circuit implementation of pulse stream for ultrasonic signal FRI sparse sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoupeng, Song; Zhou, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Converting ultrasonic signal to ultrasonic pulse stream is the key step of finite rate of innovation (FRI) sparse sampling. At present, ultrasonic pulse-stream-forming techniques are mainly based on digital algorithms. No hardware circuit that can achieve it has been reported. This paper proposes a new quadrature demodulation (QD) based circuit implementation method for forming an ultrasonic pulse stream. Elaborating on FRI sparse sampling theory, the process of ultrasonic signal is explained, followed by a discussion and analysis of ultrasonic pulse-stream-forming methods. In contrast to ultrasonic signal envelope extracting techniques, a quadrature demodulation method (QDM) is proposed. Simulation experiments were performed to determine its performance at various signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The circuit was then designed, with mixing module, oscillator, low pass filter (LPF), and root of square sum module. Finally, application experiments were carried out on pipeline sample ultrasonic flaw testing. The experimental results indicate that the QDM can accurately convert ultrasonic signal to ultrasonic pulse stream, and reverse the original signal information, such as pulse width, amplitude, and time of arrival. This technique lays the foundation for ultrasonic signal FRI sparse sampling directly with hardware circuitry. (paper)

  9. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  10. RNL automated ultrasonic inspection of the PISC II PWR inlet nozzle (Plate 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerson, A.; Poulter, L.N.J.; Clough, P.; Cooper, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    In June 1984, Risley Nuclear Laboratories (RNL) performed an automated ultrasonic inspection of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) inlet nozzle (plate 3) from the international Programme of Inspection of Steel Components (PISC II) round-robin inspection programme. High-sensitivity pulse-echo detection and predominantly time-of-flight diffraction sizing techniques were employed from the clad inner surface of the nozzle using digital data collection, analysis, and display facilities developed at RNL. RNL detected 30 out of 31 intended weld flaws, achieved one hundred per cent correct acceptance of all acceptable flaws and had a correct rejection frequency on all rejectable flaws of 0.86. The results confirm that well-conceived automated inspection procedures, similar to those used by RNL in this nozzle inspection, could form the basis of a PSI/ISI procedure for reactor pressure vessel nozzle regions. Analysis of the RNL results with regard to the influence of flaw characteristics on inspection performance lends strong support to the general conclusions drawn by the PISC Data Analysis Group. In particular, the most difficult flaws to accurately size were circular smooth and rough flaws. Examination of the RNL results on individual flaws reveals valuable information on the strengths and weaknesses of the adopted procedures and points towards procedural changes that would improve inspection performance. This report describes the procedures adopted by RNL, in the inspection, and reviews the results in the light of definitive flaw information. (author)

  11. Ultrasonic assessment of additive manufactured Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schehl, Norman; Kramb, Vicki; Dierken, Josiah; Aldrin, John; Schwalbach, Edwin; John, Reji

    2018-04-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes offer the potential for manufacturing cost savings and rapid insertion into service through production of near net shape components for complicated structures. Use of these parts in high reliability applications such as those in the aerospace industry will require nondestructive characterization methods to ensure post-process material quality in as-built condition. Ultrasonic methods can be used for this quality verification. Depending on the application, the service life of AM components can be sensitive to the part surface condition. The surface roughness and layered structure inherent to the electron-beam powder-bed fusion process necessitates new approaches to evaluate subsurface material integrity in its presence. Experimental methods and data analytics may improve the evaluation of as-built additively manufactured materials. This paper discusses the assessment of additively manufactured EBM Ti-6Al-4V panels using ultrasonic methods and the data analytics applied to evaluate material integrity. The assessment was done as an exploratory study as the discontinuities of interest in these test samples were not known when the measurements were performed. Water immersion ultrasonic techniques, including pulse-echo and through transmission with 10 MHz focused transducers, were used to explore the material integrity of as-built plates. Subsequent destructive mechanical tests of specimens extracted from the plates provided fracture locations indicating critical flaws. To further understand the effect of surface-roughness, an evaluation of ultrasonic response in the presence of as-built surfaces and with the surface removed was performed. The assessment of additive manufactured EBM Ti-6Al-4V panels with ultrasonic techniques indicated that ultrasonic energy was attenuated by the as-built surface roughness. In addition, feature detection was shown to be sensitive to experimental ultrasonic parameters and flaw morphology.

  12. A study on Computer-controlled Ultrasonic Scanning Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, H.; Park, C. S.; Hong, S. S.; Park, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    Since the nuclear power plants in Korea have been operated in 1979, the nondestructive testing (NDT) of pressure vessels and/or piping welds plays an important role for maintaining the safety and integrity of the plants. Ultrasonic method is superior to the other NDT method in the viewpoint of the detectability of small flaw and accuracy to determine the locations, sizes, orientations, and shapes. As the service time of the nuclear power plants is increased, the radiation level from the components is getting higher. In order to get more quantitative and reliable results and secure the inspector from the exposure to high radiation level, automation of the ultrasonic equipment has been one of the important research and development(R and D) subject. In this research, it was attempted to visualize the shape of flaws presented inside the specimen using a Modified C-Scan technique. In order to develop Modified C-Scan technique, an automatic ultrasonic scanner and a module to control the scanner were designed and fabricated. IBM-PC/XT was interfaced to the module to control the scanner. Analog signals from the SONIC MARK II were digitized by Analog-Digital Converter(ADC 0800) for Modified C-Scan display. A computer program has been developed and has capability of automatic data acquisition and processing from the digital data, which consist of maximum amplitudes in each gate range and locations. The data from Modified C-Scan results was compared with shape from artificial defects using the developed system. Focal length of focused transducer was measured. The automatic ultrasonic equipment developed through this study is essential for more accurate, reliable, and repeatable ultrasonic experiments. If the scanner are modified to meet to appropriate purposes, it can be applied to automation of ultrasonic examination of nuclear power plants and helpful to the research on ultrasonic characterization of the materials

  13. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks - FY 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities, plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities. Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria are found

  14. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) FY2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities (individual responsibilities), plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities (tank inspection). Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance of the work and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria be discovered

  15. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  16. Evaluation of flaws in carbon steel piping. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Gamble, R.M.; Mehta, H.S.; Yukawa, S.; Ranganath, S.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this program was to develop flaw evaluation procedures and allowable flaw sizes for ferritic piping used in light water reactor (LWR) power generation facilities. The program results provide relevant ASME Code groups with the information necessary to define flaw evaluation procedures, allowable flaw sizes, and their associated bases for Section XI of the code. Because there are several possible flaw-related failure modes for ferritic piping over the LWR operating temperature range, three analysis methods were employed to develop the evaluation procedures. These include limit load analysis for plastic collapse, elastic plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) analysis for ductile tearing, and linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis for non ductile crack extension. To ensure the appropriate analysis method is used in an evaluation, a step by step procedure also is provided to identify the relevant acceptance standard or procedure on a case by case basis. The tensile strength and toughness properties required to complete the flaw evaluation for any of the three analysis methods are included in the evaluation procedure. The flaw evaluation standards are provided in tabular form for the plastic collapse and ductile tearing modes, where the allowable part through flaw depth is defined as a function of load and flaw length. For non ductile crack extension, linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis methods, similar to those in Appendix A of Section XI, are defined. Evaluation flaw sizes and procedures are developed for both longitudinal and circumferential flaw orientations and normal/upset and emergency/faulted operating conditions. The tables are based on margins on load of 2.77 and 1.39 for circumferential flaws and 3.0 and 1.5 for longitudinal flaws for normal/upset and emergency/faulted conditions, respectively.

  17. Evaluation of flaws in carbon steel piping. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Gamble, R.M.; Mehta, H.S.; Yukawa, S.; Ranganath, S.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this program was to develop flaw evaluation procedures and allowable flaw sizes for ferritic piping used in light water reactor (LWR) power generation facilities. The program results provide relevant ASME Code groups with the information necessary to define flaw evaluation procedures, allowable flaw sizes, and their associated bases for Section XI of the code. Because there are several possible flaw-related failure modes for ferritic piping over the LWR operating temperature range, three analysis methods were employed to develop the evaluation procedures. These include limit load analysis for plastic collapse, elastic plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) analysis for ductile tearing, and linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis for non ductile crack extension. To ensure the appropriate analysis method is used in an evaluation, a step by step procedure also is provided to identify the relevant acceptance standard or procedure on a case by case basis. The tensile strength and toughness properties required to complete the flaw evaluation for any of the three analysis methods are included in the evaluation procedure. The flaw evaluation standards are provided in tabular form for the plastic collapse and ductile tearing modes, where the allowable part through flaw depth is defined as a function of load and flaw length. For non ductile crack extension, linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis methods, similar to those in Appendix A of Section XI, are defined. Evaluation flaw sizes and procedures are developed for both longitudinal and circumferential flaw orientations and normal/upset and emergency/faulted operating conditions. The tables are based on margins on load of 2.77 and 1.39 for circumferential flaws and 3.0 and 1.5 for longitudinal flaws for normal/upset and emergency/faulted conditions, respectively

  18. Automatic ultrasonic testing and the LOFT in-service inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic ultrasonic testing system has been developed which significantly improves the flaw indication detection and characterization capability over the capability of conventional volumetric examination techniques. The system utilizes an accurately located ultrasonic sensor to generate the examination data. A small computer performs and integrates control and data input/output functions. Computer software has been developed to provide a rigorous method for data analysis and ultrasonic image interpretation. The system has been used as part of an in-service inspection program to examine welds in thich austenitic stainless steel pipes in a small experimental nuclear reactor

  19. Ultrasonic inspection experience of steam generator tubes at Ontario Hydro and the TRUSTIE inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.I.; Jansen, D.

    1998-01-01

    Ontario Hydro have been using ultrasonic test (UT) technique to inspect steam generator (SG) tubes since 1993. The UT technique has higher sensitivity in detecting flaws in SG tubes and can characterize the flaws with higher accuracy. Although an outside contractor was used initially, Ontario Hydro has been using a self-developed system since 1995. The TRUSTIE system (Tiny Rotating UltraSonic Tube Inspection Equipment) was developed by Ontario Hydro Technologies specifically for 12.7 mm outside diameter (OD) tubes, and later expanded to larger tubes. To date TRUSTIE has been used in all of Ontario Hydro's nuclear generating stations inspecting for flaws such as pitting, denting, and cracks at top-of-tubesheet to the U-bend region. (author)

  20. Ultrasonic Examination of Jet Pump Diffuser Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, M.; Levesque, M.; Whitman, G.

    1998-01-01

    In October 1997 the Boiling Water REactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) issued the BWR Jet Pump Assembly Inspection and Flaw Evaluation Guidelines (BWRVIP-41). This document identified several welds on the jet pump diffuser assembly that are susceptible to Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) or fatigue, and whose failure could result in jet pump disassembly. Based on the potential for failures, the document recommends inspection of 50% of the high priority welds at the next refueling outage for each BWR, with 100% expansion if flaws are identified. Because each diffuser assembly contains as many as six high priority welds, and access to these welds from the annulus is very restricted, implementing these recommendations can have a significant impact on outage critical path. In an effort to minimize the impact of implementing these recommendations, Framatome Technologies, Inc (FTI) developed a method to perform ultrasonic examinations of the jet pump diffuser assembly welds utilizing remotely operated equipment from the inner diameter (ID) of the diffuser assembly. This paper will discuss the tooling, ultrasonic methods, and delivery techniques used to perform the examinations, as well as the results obtained from a spring 1998 deployment of the system at a U.S. Nuclear Generating Plant. (Author)

  1. Couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stošić, Dušan; Auroux, Aline

    Basic principles of calorimetry coupled with other techniques are introduced. These methods are used in heterogeneous catalysis for characterization of acidic, basic and red-ox properties of solid catalysts. Estimation of these features is achieved by monitoring the interaction of various probe molecules with the surface of such materials. Overview of gas phase, as well as liquid phase techniques is given. Special attention is devoted to coupled calorimetry-volumetry method. Furthermore, the influence of different experimental parameters on the results of these techniques is discussed, since it is known that they can significantly influence the evaluation of catalytic properties of investigated materials.

  2. Nondestructive detection of surface flaws in materials by infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Toshimitsu; Ooka, Norikazu; Eto, Motokuni; Hoshiya, Taiji; Okamoto, Yoshizo

    1999-01-01

    Infrared thermography is one of the useful remote sensing techniques applied to the nondestructive detection of surface flaws in materials. Radiation temperatures of the specimen surface and surrounding walls as well as the difference in them are crucial factors to detect surface flaws from thermal images, and it is essential that these factors be properly evaluated beforehand in order to detect the flaws by infrared thermography. In this study, the radiation temperature of nuclear graphite specimens heated uniformly was measured by infrared thermography to evaluate the radiation characteristics such as emissivity, radiosity coefficient and variation of radiation temperature. The influence of the temperature difference between the test specimen and its surroundings on the limit of detection of pinhole flaws was discussed on the basis of the thermal images of graphite specimen with surface flaws. It was found that the thermal image of a small flaw was clearly visible with increase in the temperature difference. (author)

  3. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Described is the background work performed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom with the purpose of developing a high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for reactor components. Existing creep-fatigue crack-growth models are reviewed, and the most promising methods are identified. Sources of material data are outlined, and results of the fundamental deformation and crack-growth tests are discussed. Results of subcritical crack-growth exploratory tests, creep-fatigue crack-growth tests under repeated thermal transient conditions, and exploratory failure tests are presented and contrasted with the analytical modeling. Crack-growth assessment methods are presented and applied to a typical liquid-metal reactor component. The research activities presented herein served as a foundation for the Flaw Assessment Guide for High-Temperature Reactor Components Subjected to Creep-Fatigue Loading published separately. 30 refs., 108 figs., 13 tabs

  4. Preclinical animal anxiety research - flaws and prejudices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaceur, Abdelkader; Chazot, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    The current tests of anxiety in mice and rats used in preclinical research include the elevated plus-maze (EPM) or zero-maze (EZM), the light/dark box (LDB), and the open-field (OF). They are currently very popular, and despite their poor achievements, they continue to exert considerable constraints on the development of novel approaches. Hence, a novel anxiety test needs to be compared with these traditional tests, and assessed against various factors that were identified as a source of their inconsistent and contradictory results. These constraints are very costly, and they are in most cases useless as they originate from flawed methodologies. In the present report, we argue that the EPM or EZM, LDB, and OF do not provide unequivocal measures of anxiety; that there is no evidence of motivation conflict involved in these tests. They can be considered at best, tests of natural preference for unlit and/or enclosed spaces. We also argued that pharmacological validation of a behavioral test is an inappropriate approach; it stems from the confusion of animal models of human behavior with animal models of pathophysiology. A behavioral test is developed to detect not to produce symptoms, and a drug is used to validate an identified physiological target. In order to overcome the major methodological flaws in animal anxiety studies, we proposed an open space anxiety test, a 3D maze, which is described here with highlights of its various advantages over to the traditional tests.

  5. Wavelet Analysis of Ultrasonic Echo Waveform and Application to Nondestructive Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ik Keun; Park, Un Su; Ahn, Hyung Keun; Kwun, Sook In; Byeon, Jai Won

    2000-01-01

    Recently, advanced signal analysis which is called 'time-frequency analysis' has been used widely in nondestructive evaluation applications. Wavelet transform(WT) and Wigner Distribution are the most advanced techniques for processing signals with time-varying spectra. Wavelet analysis method is an attractive technique for evaluation of material characterization nondestructively. Wavelet transform is applied to the time-frequency analysis of ultrasonic echo waveform obtained by an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. In this study, the feasibility of noise suppression of ultrasonic flaw signal and frequency-dependent ultrasonic group velocity and attenuation coefficient using wavelet analysis of ultrasonic echo waveform have been verified experimentally. The Gabor function is adopted the analyzing wavelet. The wavelet analysis shows that the variations of ultrasonic group velocity and attenuation coefficient due to the change of material characterization can be evaluated at each frequency. Furthermore, to assure the enhancement of detectability and new sizing performance, both computer simulated results and experimental measurements using wavelet signal processing are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the noise suppression of ultrasonic flaw signal obtained from austenitic stainless steel weld including EDM notch

  6. An implementation of signal processing algorithms for ultrasonic NDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, L.; Stepinski, T.

    1994-01-01

    Probability of detection flaws during ultrasonic pulse-echo inspection is often limited by the presence of backscattered echoes from the material structure. A digital signal processing technique for removal of this material noise, referred to as split spectrum processing (SSP), has been developed and verified using laboratory experiments during the last decade. The authors have performed recently a limited scale evaluation of various SSP techniques for ultrasonic signals acquired during the inspection of welds in austenitic steel. They have obtained very encouraging results that indicate promising capabilities of the SSP for inspection of nuclear power plants. Thus, a more extensive investigation of the technique using large amounts of ultrasonic data is motivated. This analysis should employ different combinations of materials, flaws and transducers. Due to the considerable number of ultrasonic signals required to verify the technique for future practical use, a custom-made computer software is necessary. At the request of the Swedish nuclear power industry the authors have developed such a program package. The program provides a user-friendly graphical interface and is intended for processing of B-scan data in a flexible way. Assembled in the program are a number of signal processing algorithms including traditional Split Spectrum Processing and the more recent Cut Spectrum Processing algorithm developed by them. The program and some results obtained using the various algorithms are presented in the paper

  7. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Weld Repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in the U. S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different cancelled reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs which are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. Construction records where available were reviewed. It is difficult to make conclusions due to the limited number of construction records reviewed. However, the records reviewed to date show a significant change in repair frequency over the years when the components in this study were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance.

  8. A study on the couplant effects in contact ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kim, H. C.; Lee, S. S.; Kim, Young H.

    1997-01-01

    The amplitude of the back-wall echoes depend on the reflection coefficient on the interface between transducer and test material in the contact pulse-echo ultrasonic testing. The couplant is used to transmit the ultrasonic energy through the interface, and has an influence on the amplitude of the pulse-echo signal. To investigate the couplant effect on the pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, the back-wall echoes are measured by using various couplants made of water and glycerine in a carbon and an austenitic stainless steel specimens. The amplitude of the first back-wall echo and the apparent attenuation coefficient increase with the acoustic impedance of couplant. The couplant having higher value of transmission coefficient is more effective for flaws detection, and the reflection coefficient should be known to measure the attenuation coefficient of test material.

  9. Preconcentration and determination of vanadium and molybdenum in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs by ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkan, Ramazan; Korkmaz, Sema; Altunay, Nail

    2016-08-01

    A new ultrasonic-thermostatic-assisted cloud point extraction procedure (UTA-CPE) was developed for preconcentration at the trace levels of vanadium (V) and molybdenum (Mo) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs prior to determination via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the ion-association of stable anionic oxalate complexes of V(V) and Mo(VI) with [9-(diethylamino)benzo[a]phenoxazin-5-ylidene]azanium; sulfate (Nile blue A) at pH 4.5, and then extraction of the formed ion-association complexes into micellar phase of polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenyl ether (PONPE 7.5). The UTA-CPE is greatly simplified and accelerated compared to traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). The analytical parameters optimized are solution pH, the concentrations of complexing reagents (oxalate and Nile blue A), the PONPE 7.5 concentration, electrolyte concentration, sample volume, temperature and ultrasonic power. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curves for Mo(VI) and V(V) are obtained in the concentration range of 3-340µgL(-1) and 5-250µgL(-1) with high sensitivity enhancement factors (EFs) of 145 and 115, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for Mo(VI) and V(V) are 0.86 and 1.55µgL(-1), respectively. The proposed method demonstrated good performances such as relative standard deviations (as RSD %) (≤3.5%) and spiked recoveries (95.7-102.3%). The accuracy of the method was assessed by analysis of two standard reference materials (SRMs) and recoveries of spiked solutions. The method was successfully applied into the determination of trace amounts of Mo(VI) and V(V) in milk, vegetables and foodstuffs with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Apparatus for ultrasonic nebulization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.W.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Fassel, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved apparatus is described for ultrasonic nebulization of liquid samples or suspensions in which the piezoelectric transducer is protected from chemical attack and erosion. The transducer is protected by being bonded to the inner surface of a glass plate which forms one end wall of a first hollow body provided with apparatus for circulating a fluid for cooling and stabilizing the transducer. The glass plate, which is one-half wavelength in thickness to provide an acoustically coupled outer nebulizing surface, seals an opening in a second hollow body which encloses an aerosol mixing chamber. The second body includes apparatus for delivering the sample solution to the nebulizing surface, a gas inlet for providing a flow of carrier gas for transporting the aerosol of the nebulized sample and an aerosol outlet

  11. Flaw behavior in mechanically loaded clad plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Robinson, G.C.; Oland, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Four-point bend tests on large plate specimens, conforming to ASTM specification for pressure vessel plates, alloy steels, quenched and tempered, Mn-Mo and Mn-Mo-Ni (A533) grade B six clad and two unclad with stainless steels 308, 309 and 312 weld wires, were performed to determine the effect of cladding upon the propagation of small surface cracks subjected to stress states. Results indicated that the tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has enhanced the load-bearing capacity of plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured. The results are interpreted in terms of fracture mechanics. The behavior of flaws in clad reactor pressure vessels is examined in the light of the test results. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. The Flaws of Fragmented Financial Standard Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mügge, Daniel; Perry, James

    2014-01-01

    rating, accounting, and derivatives trading, this article demonstrates why the appropriateness of the organizational architecture of global financial governance is necessarily contingent upon one’s understanding of how financial markets work. In particular, if financial markets are not anchored......In the half decade following the 2007 financial crisis, the reform of global financial governance was driven by two separate policy debates: one on the substantive content of regulations, the other on the organizational architecture of their governance. The separation of the two debates among...... policymakers has been mirrored in academia, where postcrisis analyses of financial governance have remained detached from reinvigorated discussions about the nature of financial markets. We argue that this separation is deeply flawed. Presenting an analysis of interactions between standards for banking, credit...

  13. Ultrasonic sectional imaging for crack identification. Part 1. Confirmation test of essential factors for ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasahara, Toshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Since the first reports of inter-granular stress corrosion crack (IGSCC) in boiling water reactor (BWR) pipe in the 1970s, nuclear power industry has focused considerable attention on service induced crack detection and sizing using ultrasonic examination. In recent years, phased array systems, those reconstruct high quality flaw images at real time are getting to apply for crack detection and sizing. But because the price of phased array systems are expensive for inspection vendors, field application of phased array systems are limited and reliable ultrasonic imaging systems with reasonable price are expected. This paper will discuss cost effective ultrasonic equipment with sectional image (B-scan) presentation as the simplified imaging system for assisting ultrasonic examination personnel. To develop the simplified B-scan imaging system, the frequency characteristics of IGSCC echoes and neighboring geometry echoes such as base-metal to weld interface and inner surface of a pipe are studied. The experimental study confirmed the reflectors have different frequency characteristics and 2MHz is suitable to visualize IGSCC and 5MHz and higher frequency are suitable to reconstruct geometry images. The other study is the amplifier selection for the imaging system. To reconstruct images of IGSCC and geometry echoes, the ultrasonic imaging instrument with linear amplifier has to adjust gain setting to the target. On the other hand, the ultrasonic imaging instrument with logarithmic amplifier can collect and display wider dynamic range on a screen and this wider dynamic range are effective to visualize IGSCC and geometry echoes on a B-scan presentation at a time. (author)

  14. Ultrasonic unit for line-by-line ultrasonic scanning of bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldner, R.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic unit for medical diagnostics operates by the sectorial scanning principle, which avoids direct coupling of the transducer head to the surface of the body. For this purpose, several transmitter/receiver units (approx. 100) are arranged on a partial ring of a circular arc and the ultrasonic beams, which can be triggered sequentially in time, are directed at a common intersection behind the ultrasonic window of the unit, i.e., outside the unit. A mechanical system is employed to set and adjust the partial ring carrying the transmitter/receiver units. (DG) [de

  15. Flaw preparations for HSST program vessel fracture mechanics testing: mechanical-cyclic pumping and electron-beam weld-hydrogen-charge cracking schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, P.P.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the document is to present schemes for flaw preparations in heavy section steel. The ability of investigators to grow representative sharp cracks of known size, location, and orientation is basic to representative field testing to determine data for potential flaw propagation, fracture behavior, and margin against fracture for high-pressure-, high-temperature-service steel vessels subjected to increasing pressurization and/or thermal shock. Gaging for analytical stress and strain procedures and ultrasonic and acoustic emission instrumentation can then be applied to monitor the vessel during testing and to study crack growth. This report presents flaw preparations for HSST fracture mechanics testing. Cracks were grown by two techniques: (1) a mechanical method wherein a premachined notch was sharpened by pressurization and (2) a method combining electron-beam welds and hydrogen charging to crack the chill zone of a rapidly placed autogenous weld. The mechanical method produces a naturally occurring growth shape controlled primarily by the shape of the machined notch; the welding-electrochemical method produces flaws of uniform depth from the surface of a wall or machined notch. Theories, details, discussions, and procedures are covered for both of the flaw-growing schemes

  16. Elastodynamic models for extending GTD to penumbra and finite size flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djakou, A Kamta; Darmon, M; Potel, C

    2016-01-01

    The scattering of elastic waves from an obstacle is of great interest in ultrasonic Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). There exist two main scattering phenomena: specular reflection and diffraction. This paper is especially focused on possible improvements of the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), one classical method used for modelling diffraction from scatterer edges. GTD notably presents two important drawbacks: it is theoretically valid for a canonical infinite edge and not for a finite one and presents discontinuities around the direction of specular reflection. In order to address the first drawback, a 3D hybrid method using both GTD and Huygens secondary sources has been developed to deal with finite flaws. ITD (Incremental Theory of Diffraction), a method developed in electromagnetism, has also been developed in elastodynamics to deal with small flaws. Experimental validation of these methods has been performed. As to the second drawback, a GTD uniform correction, the UTD (Uniform Theory of Diffraction) has been developed in the view of designing a generic model able to correctly simulate both specular reflection and diffraction. A comparison has been done between UTD numerical results and UAT (Uniform Asymptotic Theory of Diffraction) which is another uniform solution of GTD. (paper)

  17. Evaluation of canister weld flaw depth for concrete storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Tae Chul; Cho, Chun Hyung [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sung Hun; Lee, Young Oh; Jung, In Su [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Corp, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Domestically developed concrete storage casks include an internal canister to maintain the confinement integrity of radioactive materials. In this study, we analyzed the depth of flaws caused by loads that propagate canister weld cracks under normal, off-normal and accident conditions, and evaluated the maximum allowable weld flaw depth needed to secure the structural integrity of the canister weld and to reduce the welding time of the internal canister lid of the concrete storage cask. Structural analyses for normal, off-normal and accident conditions were performed using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ABAQUS; the allowable flaw depth was assessed according to ASME B and PV Code Section XI. Evaluation results revealed an allowable canister weld flaw depth of 18.75 mm for the concrete storage cask, which satisfies the critical flaw depth recommended in NUREG-1536.

  18. Comparison of evaluation method for planar flaw in pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Nam; Kim, Hyung Nam; Yoo, Hyun Joo; Hwang, Won Gul

    2009-01-01

    CSA N285.4-94 requires the periodic inservice inspection and surveillance of pressure tubes in operating CANDU nuclear power reactors. If the inspection results reveal a flaw exceeding the acceptance criteria of the Code, the flaw must be evaluated to determine if the pressure is acceptable for continued service. Currently, the flaw evaluation methodology and acceptance criteria specified in CSA N285.8-05, 'Technical requirements for in-service evaluation of zirconium alloy pressure tubes in CANDU reactors'. The Code is applicable to zirconium alloy pressure tubes. The evaluation methodology for a crack-like flaw is similar to that of FFSG(Fitness For Service Guideline for Zirconium alloy pressure in operation CANDU) used now. The object of this paper is to address the fracture initiation and plastic collapse evaluation for the planar flaw as it applies to the pressure tube on Wolsong NPP.

  19. Looking Below the Surface with Ultrasonic Phased Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    This article is a brief tutorial on the benefits of volumetric ultrasonic phased array line scanning. The article describes the need, the approach, and the methods/practices used to analyze the data for flaw detection and characterization in the nuclear power plant component arena. If you are inspecting the integrity of nuclear power plant components during a scheduled outage, time is likely against you. Time is a luxury that most inspectors do not possess in their daily jobs. They are required to quickly and efficiently perform nondestructive testing (NDT) on various components within the nuclear power plant facility. In addition to the obvious financial impacts ($1M+ per day) of prolonging planned outages, time constraints also are put in place for the safety and health of the inspectors. For instance, while working in highly radioactive or contaminated environments of the plant, inspectors have a limited window of time to volumetrically inspect components for flaws, such as cracks, defects or other anomalies that might lead to leakage or failure during operation. In the interest of simplicity, flaws are limited to cracks for our purposes. Ultrasonic phased array volumetric line scanning is emerging as a powerful tool that allows for quick inspections of components that had been very time-consuming using earlier technologies.

  20. Thermal-shock experiments with flawed clad cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Alexander, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The life expectancy of LWR pressure vessels is influenced by a reduction in fracture toughness that is the result of radiation damage. As the fracture toughness decreases, the probability of propagation of preexisting flaws (sharp, crack-like defects) in the wall of the vessel increases. The probability of propagation is also influenced by the type of loading condition and the type of flaws that might exist. A loading condition of particular concern is referred to as pressurized thermal shock (PTS), and a flaw of particular concern for PTS loading conditions is a shallow surface flaw. A sudden cooling (thermal shock) of the inner surface of the vessel results in relatively high tensile stresses and relatively low fracture toughness at the inner surface. In addition, the attenuation of the fast-neutron fluence also results in relatively low fracture toughness at the inner surface. Under some circumstances, this combination of high stress and low toughness at the inner surface makes it possible for very shallow surface flaws to propagate. The PTS issue has been under investigation for quite some time, but thus far possible beneficial effects, other than thermal resistance, of the cladding on the inner surface of the vessel have not been included in the analysis of flaw behavior. This document discusses this effect of cladding on surface flaws and crack propagation

  1. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel-specific flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Vessel integrity predictions performed through fracture mechanics analysis of a pressurized thermal shock event have been shown to be significantly sensitive to the overall flaw distribution input. It has also been shown that modem vessel in-service inspection (ISI) results can be used for development of vessel flaw distribution(s) that are more representative of US vessels. This paper describes the development and application of a methodology to analyze ISI data for the purpose of flaw distribution determination. The resultant methodology considers detection reliability, flaw sizing accuracy, and flaw detection threshold in its application. Application of the methodology was then demonstrated using four recently acquired US PWR vessel inspection data sets. Throughout the program, new insight was obtained into several key inspection performance and vessel integrity prediction practice issues that will impact future vessel integrity evaluation. For example, the potential application of a vessel-specific flaw distribution now provides at least one method by which a vessel-specific reference flaw size applicable to pressure-temperature limit curves determination can be estimated. This paper will discuss the development and application of the methodology and the impact to future vessel integrity analyses

  2. Verification of split spectrum technique for ultrasonic inspection of welded structures in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, L.; Stepinski, T.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive inspection of materials is often limited by the presence of backscattered echoes from the material structure. A digital signal processing technique for removal of this material noise, referred to as split spectrum processing (SSP), has been developed and verified using simple laboratory experiments during the last decade. However, application of the split spectrum processing algorithm to industrial conditions has been rarely reported. In the paper the results of the practical evaluation of the SSP technique are presented. A number of different ultrasonic transducers were used for acquiring echoes from artificial flaws as well as natural cracks. The flaws were located in test blocks employed by the Swedish Nuclear Power Companies as reference during ultrasonic inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. The acquired ultrasonic A-scan signals were processed off-line using specially developed algorithms on a personal computer (PC). The experiments show evidence that properly tuned SSP algorithms result in a considerable improvement of the signal to material noise ratio. The enhancements were similar irrespective of the features of the transducer used or the nature of the inspected flaw. The problems related to the development of self-tuning SSP algorithms for on-line processing of B-scans are discussed. (author)

  3. Model-assisted probability of detection of flaws in aluminum blocks using polynomial chaos expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaosong; Leifsson, Leifur; Grandin, Robert; Meeker, William; Roberts, Ronald; Song, Jiming

    2018-04-01

    Probability of detection (POD) is widely used for measuring reliability of nondestructive testing (NDT) systems. Typically, POD is determined experimentally, while it can be enhanced by utilizing physics-based computational models in combination with model-assisted POD (MAPOD) methods. With the development of advanced physics-based methods, such as ultrasonic NDT testing, the empirical information, needed for POD methods, can be reduced. However, performing accurate numerical simulations can be prohibitively time-consuming, especially as part of stochastic analysis. In this work, stochastic surrogate models for computational physics-based measurement simulations are developed for cost savings of MAPOD methods while simultaneously ensuring sufficient accuracy. The stochastic surrogate is used to propagate the random input variables through the physics-based simulation model to obtain the joint probability distribution of the output. The POD curves are then generated based on those results. Here, the stochastic surrogates are constructed using non-intrusive polynomial chaos (NIPC) expansions. In particular, the NIPC methods used are the quadrature, ordinary least-squares (OLS), and least-angle regression sparse (LARS) techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated on the ultrasonic testing simulation of a flat bottom hole flaw in an aluminum block. The results show that the stochastic surrogates have at least two orders of magnitude faster convergence on the statistics than direct Monte Carlo sampling (MCS). Moreover, the evaluation of the stochastic surrogate models is over three orders of magnitude faster than the underlying simulation model for this case, which is the UTSim2 model.

  4. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    1989-08-01

    The current program represents a joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the USA, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan, and the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) in the UK. The goal is to develop an interim high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for high-temperature reactor components. This is to be accomplished through exploratory experimental and analytical studies of high-temperature crack growth. The state-of-the-art assessment and the fracture mechanics database for both types 304 and 316 stainless steels, completed in 1988, serve as a foundation for the present work. Work in the three participating organizations is progressing roughly on schedule. Results to-date are presented in this document. Fundamental tests results are discussed in Section 2. Section 3 focuses on results of exploratory subcritical crack growth tests. Progress in subcritical crack growth modeling is reported in Section 4. Exploratory failure tests are outlined in Section 5. 21 refs., 70 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Flaws in the Concept of Nuclear Deterrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Scales Avery

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of nuclear deterrence is seriously flawed, and it violates the fundamental ethical principles of all major religions. Besides being morally unacceptable, nuclear weapons are also illegal according to a historic 1996 decision of the International Court of Justice, a ruling that reflects the opinion of the vast majority of the worldʼs peoples. Even a small nuclear war would be an ecological catastrophe, not only killing civilian populations indiscriminately in both belligerent and neutral countries, but also severely damaging global agriculture and making large areas of the earth permanently uninhabitable through radioactive contamination. The danger of accidental nuclear war continues to be very great today, and the danger of nuclear terrorism is increasing. In this perilous situation, it is necessary for the nuclear nations to acknowledge that the concept of deterrence has been a mistake, which is threatening the lives of all human beings as well as threatening devastation of the biosphere. Acknowledging that the policy of nuclear deterrence has been a grave error can reduce risk of nuclear weapons proliferation.

  6. The behavior of shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolfe, S.T.

    1991-11-01

    Both analytical and experimental studies have shown that the effect of crack length, a, on the elastic-plastic toughness of structural steels is significant. The objective of this report is to recommend those research investigations that are necessary to understand the phenomenon of shallow behavior as it affects fracture toughness so that the results can be used properly in the structural margin assessment of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with flaws. Preliminary test results of A 533 B steel show an elevated crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) toughness similar to that observed for structural steels tested at the University of Kansas. Thus, the inherent resistance to fracture initiation of A 533 B steel with shallow flaws appears to be higher than that used in the current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) design curves based on testing fracture mechanics specimens with deep flaws. If this higher toughness of laboratory specimens with shallow flaws can be transferred to a higher resistance to failure in RPV design or analysis, then the actual margin of safety in nuclear vessels with shallow flaws would be greater than is currently assumed on the basis of deep-flaw test results. This elevation in toughness and greater resistance to fracture would be a very desirable situation, particularly for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) analysis in which shallow flaws are assumed to exist. Before any advantage can be taken of this possible increase in initiation toughness, numerous factors must be analyzed to ensure the transferability of the data. This report reviews those factors and makes recommendations of studies that are needed to assess the transferability of shallow-flaw toughness test results to the structural margin assessment of RPV with shallow flaws. 14 refs., 8 figs

  7. Long-Range Piping Inspection by Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Young Sang; Lim, Sa Hoe; Eom, Heung Seop; Kim, Jae Hee

    2005-01-01

    The ultrasonic guided waves are very promising for the long-range inspection of large structures because they can propagate a long distance along the structures such as plates, shells and pipes. The guided wave inspection could be utilized for an on-line monitoring technique when the transmitting and receiving transducers are positioned at a remote point on the structure. The received signal has the information about the integrity of the monitoring area between the transmitting and receiving transducers. On-line monitoring of a pipe line using an ultrasonic guided wave can detect flaws such as corrosion, erosion and fatigue cracking at an early stage and collect useful information on the flaws. However the guided wave inspection is complicated by the dispersive characteristics for guided waves. The phase and group velocities are a function of the frequency-thickness product. Therefore, the different frequency components of the guided waves will travel at different speeds and the shape of the received signal will changed as it propagates along the pipe. In this study, we analyze the propagation characteristics of guided wave modes in a small diameter pipe of nuclear power plant and select the suitable mode for a long-range inspection. And experiments will be carried out for the practical application of a long-range inspection in a 26m long pipe by using a high-power ultrasonic inspection system

  8. Ultrasonic horn design for ultrasonic machining technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naď M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of industrial applications and production technologies are based on the application of ultrasound. In many cases, the phenomenon of ultrasound is also applied in technological processes of the machining of materials. The main element of equipments that use the effects of ultrasound for machining technology is the ultrasonic horn – so called sonotrode. The performance of ultrasonic equipment, respectively ultrasonic machining technologies depends on properly designed of sonotrode shape. The dynamical properties of different geometrical shapes of ultrasonic horns are presented in this paper. Dependence of fundamental modal properties (natural frequencies, mode shapes of various sonotrode shapes for various geometrical parameters is analyzed. Modal analyses of the models are determined by the numerical simulation using finite element method (FEM design procedures. The mutual comparisons of the comparable parameters of the various sonotrode shapes are presented.

  9. Analysis of portable gamma flaw detectors concerning radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarova, T.V.

    1982-01-01

    Design and shields of gamma flaw detectors as one of the main factors responsible for personnel dose were studied. The analysis was conducted using the results of radiation hygienic surveys of gamma flaw detection laboratories functioning constantly in Estonia. It is shown that recently the replacement of GUP apparatuses by flaw detectors of RID and ''Gamma-RID'' (types which have design and shielding advantages is observed. However personnel doses have not reduced considerably for the last 10 years. This fact is attributed to design disadvantages of the RID and ''Gamma-RID'' apparatuses the removing of which will give the decreasing of annual personnel dose by 80 %

  10. Estimating probable flaw distributions in PWR steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, J.A.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes methods for estimating the number and size distributions of flaws of various types in PWR steam generator tubes. These estimates are needed when calculating the probable primary to secondary leakage through steam generator tubes under postulated accidents such as severe core accidents and steam line breaks. The paper describes methods for two types of predictions: (1) the numbers of tubes with detectable flaws of various types as a function of time, and (2) the distributions in size of these flaws. Results are provided for hypothetical severely affected, moderately affected and lightly affected units. Discussion is provided regarding uncertainties and assumptions in the data and analyses

  11. Ceria nanocubic-ultrasonication assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for pathogenic bacteria analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Bhaisare, Mukesh L; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-03-01

    A new ceria (CeO2) nanocubic modified surfactant is used as the basis of a novel nano-based microextraction technique for highly sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus). The technique uses ultrasound enhanced surfactant-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UESA-DLLME) with and without ceria (CeO2) followed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). In order to achieve high separation efficiency, we investigated the influential parameters, including extraction time of ultrasonication, type and volume of the extraction solvent and surfactant. Among various surfactants, the cationic surfactants can selectively offer better extraction efficiency on bacteria analysis than that of the anionic surfactants due to the negative charges of bacteria cell membranes. Extractions of the bacteria lysate from aqueous samples via UESA-DLLME-MALDI-MS were successfully achieved by using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB, 10.0 µL, 1.0×10(-3) M) as surfactants in chlorobenzene (10.0 µL) and chloroform (10.0 µL) as the optimal extracting solvent for P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, respectively. Ceria nanocubic was synthesized, and functionalized with CTAB (CeO2@CTAB) and then characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical spectroscopy (UV and FTIR). CeO2@CTAB demonstrates high extraction efficiency, improve peaks ionization, and enhance resolution. The prime reasons for these improvements are due to the large surface area of nanoparticles, and its absorption that coincides with the wavelength of MALDI laser (337 nm, N2 laser). CeO2@CTAB-based microextraction offers lowest detectable concentrations tenfold lower than that of without nanoceria. The present approach has been successfully applied to detect pathogenic bacteria at low concentrations of 10(4)-10(5) cfu/mL (without ceria) and at 10(3)-10(4) cfu/mL (with ceria) from bacteria suspensions. Finally, the

  12. Scanning Ultrasonic Spectroscopy System Developed for the Inspection of Composite Flywheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    Composite flywheels are being considered as replacements for chemical batteries aboard the International Space Station. A flywheel stores energy in a spinning mass that can turn a generator to meet power demands. Because of the high rotational speeds of the spinning mass, extensive testing of the flywheel system must be performed prior to flight certification. With this goal in mind, a new scanning system has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for the nondestructive inspection of composite flywheels and flywheel subcomponents. The system uses ultrasonic waves to excite a material and examines the response to detect and locate flaws and material variations. The ultrasonic spectroscopy system uses a transducer to send swept-frequency ultrasonic waves into a test material and then receives the returning signal with a second transducer. The received signal is then analyzed in the frequency domain using a fast Fourier transform. A second fast Fourier transform is performed to examine the spacing of the peaks in the frequency domain. The spacing of the peaks is related to the standing wave resonances that are present in the material because of the constructive and destructive interferences of the waves in the full material thickness as well as in individual layers within the material. Material variations and flaws are then identified by changes in the amplitudes and positions of the peaks in both the frequency and resonance spacing domains. This work, conducted under a grant through the Cleveland State University, extends the capabilities of an existing point-by-point ultrasonic spectroscopy system, thus allowing full-field automated inspection. Results of an ultrasonic spectroscopy scan of a plastic cylinder with intentionally seeded flaws. The result of an ultrasonic spectroscopy scan of a plastic cylinder used as a proof-of-concept specimen is shown. The cylinder contains a number of flat bottomed holes of various sizes and shapes. The scanning system

  13. Reinforcement of poly(amide-imide) containing N-trimellitylimido-L-phenylalanine by using nano α-Al2O3 surface-coupled with bromo-flame retardant under ultrasonic irradiation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Khadem, Elham

    2014-10-01

    By the uniform dispersion of nanoparticles into a polymer matrix, a substantial improvement of physicochemical properties can be attained. In this study, a series of poly(amide-imide)/Al2O3 nanocomposites (PANC)s based on various amounts of modified α-Al2O3 nanoparticles (ANP)s were prepared using the ultrasonic irradiation method. In the process of manufacturing the nanocomposites (NC)s, severe agglomeration of ANPs into the polymer matrix can be reduced using 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-6-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)carbamoyl]benzoic acid as novel coupling agent. The effects of modified ANPs on the morphology and properties of the polymer matrix were studied by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The results obtained by TGA showed that the thermal stability of the NCs was improved with the addition of the small amounts of ANPs as effective thermal degradation resistant reinforcement.

  14. Dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization for simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xian-En; Lv, Tao; Zhu, Shuyun; Qu, Fei; Chen, Guang; He, Yongrui; Wei, Na; Li, Guoliang; Xia, Lian; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shijuan; You, Jinmao; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shuying

    2016-03-11

    This paper, for the first time, reported a speedy hyphenated technique of low toxic dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (dual-UADLLME) coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization (MAD) for the simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT). The developed method was based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. A mass spectrometry sensitizing reagent, 4'-carboxy-substituted rosamine (CSR) with high reaction activity and ionization efficiency was synthesized and firstly used as derivatization reagent. Parameters of dual-UADLLME, MAD and UHPLC-MS/MS conditions were all optimized in detail. Low toxic brominated solvents were used as extractant instead of traditional chlorinated solvents. Satisfactory linearity, recovery, repeatability, accuracy and precision, absence of matrix effect and extremely low limits of detection (LODs, 0.010 and 0.015ng/mL for PPD and PPT, respectively) were achieved. The main advantages were rapid, sensitive and environmentally friendly, and exhibited high selectivity, accuracy and good matrix effect results. The proposed method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetics of PPD and PPT in rat plasma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Songling; Li, Weibin; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamental theory of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves, together with its applications. It includes the dispersion characteristics and matching theory of guided waves; the mechanism of production and theoretical model of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves; the effect mechanism between guided waves and defects; the simulation method for the entire process of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave propagation; electromagnetic ultrasonic thickness measurement; pipeline axial guided wave defect detection; and electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave detection of gas pipeline cracks. This theory and findings on applications draw on the author’s intensive research over the past eight years. The book can be used for nondestructive testing technology and as an engineering reference work. The specific implementation of the electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave system presented here will also be of value for other nondestructive test developers.

  16. Ultrasonic testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic transmitter made of polarized ferroelectric ceramic material (lead zirconate titanate) is arranged in a strip carrier which allows it to be introduced between the fuel elements of a fuel subassembly in a water cooled nuclear reactor. The ultrasonic transmitter is insulated relative to the carrier. The echo of the ra dal ultrasonic pulse is recorded which changes as faulty water filled fuel elements are detected. (RW) [de

  17. A simple one-step ultrasonic-assisted extraction and derivatization method coupling to high-performance liquid chromatographyfor the determination of ε-aminocaproic acid and amino acids in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuanqi; Xia, Ling; Xiao, Xiaohua; Li, Gongke; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2018-06-15

    Nowadays, the safety of cosmetics is a widespread concern. Amines are common cosmetic additives. Some of them such as amino acids are beneficial. Another kind of amines, however, ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA) is prohibited to add into cosmetics for its adverse reactions. In this study, a simple, rapid, sensitive and eco-friendly one-step ultrasonic-assisted extraction and derivatization (UAE-D) method was developed for determination of EACA and amino acids in cosmetics by coupling with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). By using this sample preparation method, extraction and derivatization of EACA and amino acids were finished in one step in ultrasound field. During this procedure, 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NBD-F)was applied as derivatization reagent. The extraction conditions including the amount of NBD-F, extraction and derivatization temperature, the ultrasonic vibration time and pH value of the aqueous phase were evaluated. Meanwhile, the extraction mechanism was investigated. Under optimized conditions, the method detection limits were 0.086-0.15 μg/L, and method quantitation limits were 0.29-0.47 μg/L with RSDs less than 3.7% (n = 3). The recoveries of EACA and amino acids obtained from cosmetic samples were in range from 76.9% to 122.3%. Amino acids were found in all selected samples and quantified in range from 1.9 ± 0.9 to 677.2 ± 17.9 μg/kg. And EACA was found and quantified with the contents of 1284.3 ± 22.1 μg/kg in a toner sample. This UAE-D-HPLC method shortened and simplified the sample pretreatment as well as enhanced the sensitivity of analytical method. In our record, only 10 min was needed for the total sample preparation process. And the method detection limits were two orders of magnitude less than literature reports. Furthermore, we reduced the consumption of solvent and minimized the usage of organic solvents, which made our method moving towards green analytical chemistry. In brief, our UAE

  18. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-01-01

    Described is a manual, portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary cooling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification

  19. Ductile fracture of cylindrical vessels containing a large flaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Irwin, G. R.; Ratwani, M.

    1976-01-01

    The fracture process in pressurized cylindrical vessels containing a relatively large flaw is considered. The flaw is assumed to be a part-through or through meridional crack. The flaw geometry, the yield behavior of the material, and the internal pressure are assumed to be such that in the neighborhood of the flaw the cylinder wall undergoes large-scale plastic deformations. Thus, the problem falls outside the range of applicability of conventional brittle fracture theories. To study the problem, plasticity considerations are introduced into the shell theory through the assumptions of fully-yielded net ligaments using a plastic strip model. Then a ductile fracture criterion is developed which is based on the concept of net ligament plastic instability. A limited verification is attempted by comparing the theoretical predictions with some existing experimental results.

  20. Flaw evaluation of pressure vessel in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Sung; Kim, Min Geol; Jeon, Chae Hong; Rhim, Soon Hyung; Kim, Seung Tae

    1999-01-01

    Flaw evaluation should be performed to determine the acceptance of a surface or a subsurface flaw detected during the in-service inspection without any repair or replacement. In this paper, the evaluation methodology and procedure were established according to ASME code Sec. XI and the evaluation program was coded. Using this program, a field engineer who doesn't have enough knowledge on fracture mechanics may be able to perform prompt and accurate flaw evaluation on site and decide whether a detected flaw be allowable or not. Analysis results were compared with those obtained from Westinghouse program called KCAL and FCG. Both results made good agreement and accuracy of the program developed in this paper was verified.=20

  1. Ultrasonic inspection of nodular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersh, S.; Zhang, Yingda

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of experimental results collected from several nodular cast iron (NCI) specimens, Amdata, Inc., has developed a tentative procedure for performing ultrasonic testing (UT) preservice inspection of NCI casks and qualifying personnel and equipment. The authors anticipate that this procedure will be a component in a comprehensive program to certify that casks are free from critical flaws prior to their introduction into service, with testing being performed on a production line basis by UT inspection personnel. The tentative procedure was applied to inspection of NCI block SGR-483-001 manufactured by Siempelkamp Giesserei GmbH and Co. of West Germany. This block is 59 by 39.5 by 13.8 inches and weighs 5.2 tons. Several indications were detected with the I/98, in accordance with the tentative procedure, and they were analyzed using two-dimensional synthetic aperture technique (Line-SAFT). When compared with conventional sizing methods that may confound the effects of beam spread with flaw size, Line-SAFT significantly improved sizing accuracy. SAFT is an electronic simulation of a lens and has the property of reducing the effect of beam spread on the resultant indication sizes. Although a higher-precision 3-D SAFT option was also available, it would necessitate data transfer to a separate VAX computer and lengthy calculations. As an alternative, Line-SAFT, a faster but less precise 2-D simplification, was implemented on the I/98 data acquisition system

  2. Automated phased array ultrasonic inspection system for rail wheel sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, Paul; Weiland, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper covers the design, system automation, calibration and validation of an automated ultrasonic system for the inspection of new and in service wheel set assemblies from diesel-electric locomotives and gondola cars. This system uses Phased Array (PA) transducers for flaw detection and Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMAT) for the measurement of residual stress. The system collects, analyses, evaluates and categorizes the wheel sets automatically. This data is archived for future comparison and trending. It is also available for export to a portal lathe for increased efficiency and accuracy of machining, therefore allowing prolonged wheel life.

  3. Ultrasonic monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLain, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The ultrasonic monitoring system is used in LMFBR's, BWR's or PWR's. A remotely controlled, movable instrument carrier may be used which contains the piezo-electric transducer and is connected to the main control console by a transmission cable. An excitation pulse coming from a pulse generator is used to excite the transducer with a maximum of energy, independent of the length of the transmission line. Pulse width and pulse amplitude can be set without any direct interference into the transducer. For this purpose, a resistor whose impedance has been matched to that of the transmission line is connected to the input of the transmission line. Moreover, a capacitor for generation of the excitation pulse is coupled with the transmission line by means of a four-layer switching diode and is discharged. For termination of the excitation and the control pulses, respectively, another four-layer switching diode connected parallel to the capacitor quickly discharges the capacitor. The capacitor and the capacitance of the line constitute a voltage divider. In this way it is possible to change the length of the transmission line and, to safeguard the generation of a pulse of the desired amplitude, only vary the capacitance of the capacitor. (DG/RF) [de

  4. Ultrasonic examination for safe end to nozzle dissimilar metal welds of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuowei; Yu Jingsheng; Wang Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The safe-end weld of steam generator is narrow seam weld with dissimilar metal, the filling material is nickel alloy 152/182 (material 690). The interior structure is of great anisotropic, and fake signal may occur during the defect detection by ultrasonic wave and the error for defect location may be increased. Stratified inspection by ultrasonic transducers with different angle and focus is a practical method which is verified by the real inspection while the linear indication in the inside surface besides the interior flaws are detected. (authors)

  5. Pulse-echo phased array ultrasonic inspection of pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure (PRSEUS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2011-01-01

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading.

  6. The Ontario hydro low pressure turbine disc inspection program automated ultrasonic inspection systems - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, J.W.; Chopcian, M.; Grabish, M.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the Ontario Hydro Low Pressure Turbine Disc Inspection Program is presented. The ultrasonic inspection systems developed in-house to inspect low pressure turbine discs at Pickering and Bruce Nuclear Generating stations are described. Three aspects of the program are covered: PART I - Background to inspection program, disc cracking experience, and development of an in-house inspection capability: PART II - System development requirements; ultrasonic equipment, electromechanical subsystems and instrumentation console: PART III - Customized software for flaw detection, sizing, data acquisition/storage, advanced signal processing, reports, documentation and software based diagnostics

  7. Proceedings of a specialist meeting on the ultrasonic inspection of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Beside synthesis of two conferences on nondestructive testing and on inspection, the contributions of this conference are reporting experimental observations and research works on ultrasonic techniques, methods, procedures (pre-service or in-service) and equipment for the inspection of nuclear reactor components (pressure vessels, tubing and piping), generally in stainless steel (often austenitic or ferritic) material or in zirconium alloy. Some contributions are also dealing with the relationship between material microstructure and ultrasonic inspection method and equipment, or with the detection and sizing precision of flaws (cracks)

  8. Ultrasonic flow meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lötters, Joost Conrad; Snijders, G.J.; Volker, A.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to an ultrasonic flow meter comprising a flow tube for the fluid whose flow rate is to be determined. The flow meter comprises a transmitting element for emitting ultrasonic waves, which is provided on the outer jacket of the flow tube. A receiving element, which is provided on

  9. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patenaude, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  10. Enhancement of crack detection in stud bolts of nuclear reactor by ultrasonic signal processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oh, W.D.; Choi, S.W.; Park, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    'Full-text:' The stud bolts is one of the most critical parts for safety of reactor vessels in the nuclear power plants. However, in the application of ultrasonic technique for crack detection in stud bolt, some difficulties encountered are classification of crack signal from the signals reflected from threads part in stud bolt. In this study, shadow effect technique combined with new signal processing method is Investigated to enhance the detectability of small crack initiated from root of thread in stud bolt. The key idea of signal processing is based on the fact that the shape of waveforms from the threads is uniform since the shape of the threads in a bolt is same. If some cracks exist in the thread, the flaw signals are different to the reference signals. It is demonstrated that the small flaws are efficiently detected by novel ultrasonic technique combined with this new signal processing concept. (author)

  11. Italian developments in the ultrasonic examination of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regis, V.

    1987-01-01

    A review of developments being pursued in Italy in ultrasonics for application to pressure vessels is presented. Although nuclear construction in Italy has suffered heavy delays, R and D activities promoted by the Italian Electricity Board in the mid 1970s on advanced UT for non-destructive inspection of thick welded sections made it possible to obtain significant results scored by CISE Laboratories, mainly through the design, construction and qualification of the manual UT spectroscopy and signal processing computerized ARICE system and of the mechanized multifrequency acoustic holography HADIS system. Meanwhile theoretical ultrasonic modelling is actively studied in order to implement software applications and the overall reliability of UT inspections with regard to flaw detection, location and sizing. Selected contributions from manufacturers and service companies with a view to improving UT practice are acknowledged, and still wider technology transfers may be expected in the future, also under ENEA industrial promotion programmes. (author)

  12. Acoustic leak detection and ultrasonic crack detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Groenwald, R.

    1983-10-01

    A program is under way to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. An ALD facility has been constructed and tests have begun on five laboratory-grown cracks (three fatigue and two thermal-fatigue and two field-induced IGSCC specimens. After ultrasonic testing revealed cracks in the Georgia Power Co. HATCH-1 BWR recirculation header, the utility installed an ALD system. Data from HATCH-1 have given an indication of the background noise level at a BWR recirculation header sweepolet weld. The HATCH leak detection system was tested to determine the sensitivity and dynamic range. Other background data have been acquired at the Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor in Tennessee. An ANL waveguide system, including transducer and electronics, was installed and tested on an accumulator safety injection pipe. The possibility of using ultrasonic wave scattering patterns to discriminate between IGSCCs and geometric reflectors has been explored. Thirteen reflectors (field IGSCCs, graphite wool IGSCCs, weld roots, and slits) were examined. Work with cast stainless steel (SS) included sound velocity and attenuation in isotropic and anisotropic cast SS. Reducing anisotropy does not help reduce attenuation in large-grained material. Large artificial flaws (e.g., a 1-cm-deep notch with a 4-cm path) could not be detected in isotropic centrifugally cast SS (1 to 2-mm grains) by longitudinal or shear waves at frequencies of 1 MHz or greater, but could be detected with 0.5-MHz shear waves. 13 figures

  13. Selenium speciation in radix puerariae using ultrasonic assisted extraction combined with reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after magnetic solid-phase extraction with 5-sulfosalicylic acid functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yupin; Yan, Lizhen; Huang, Hongli; Deng, Biyang

    2016-08-01

    A new method for determination of selenium species in radix puerariae was described. The method consists of sample enrichment with 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA)-functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SMNPs), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation, and online detection using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The selenium species were extracted using ultrasonic extraction system with a mixture of protease K and lipase. The SSA-SMNPs were used to enrich trace amounts of selenite [Se(IV)], selenate [Se(VI)], selenomethionine (SeMet), and selenocystine (SeCys2) from lower selenium containing samples. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection (3σ) for SeCys2, Se(IV), SeMet and Se(VI) were observed as 0.0023, 0.0015, 0.0043, and 0.0016 ng mL- 1, respectively. The RSD values (n = 6) of method for intraday were observed between 0.5% and 0.9%. The RSD values of method for interday were less than 1.3%. The linear concentration ranges for SeCys2, Se(IV), SeMet and Se(VI) were 0.008-1000, 0.005-200, 0.015-500 and 0.006-200 ng mL- 1, respectively. The detection limits of this method were improved by 10 times due to the enrichment with the SSA-SMNP extraction. The contents of SeCys2, Se(IV), SeMet, and Se(VI) in radix puerariae were determined as 0.0140, 0.171, 0.0178, and 0.0344 μg g- 1, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 95.6%-99.4% and the RSDs (n = 6) of recoveries were less than 1.5%.

  14. Degradation of amaranth dye in alkaline medium by ultrasonic cavitation coupled with electrochemical oxidation using a boron-doped diamond anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Willyam R.P.; Steter, Juliana R.; Lanza, Marcos R.V.; Motheo, Artur J.

    2014-01-01

    Amaranth dye is used widely in the processing of paper, textiles, foods, cosmetics, beverages and medicines, and effluents contaminated with this compound are discharged daily into the environment. Recent studies have shown that azo dyes, especially those such as amaranth dye that have been classified as endocrine disruptors, may cause adverse effects to animal and human health. This paper describes the application of electrochemical oxidation (with a boron-doped diamond BDD thin-film anode) coupled with ultrasound sonolysis (20 kHz and 523 W cm −2 ) to the removal of amaranth dye from dilute alkaline solution. The electrochemical and sonoelectrochemical processes (ECh and SECh, respectively) were carried out at constant current density (10 to 50 mA cm −2 ) in a single compartment cylindrical cell. Sonolysis was virtually less useful for the decolorization and degradation of amaranth dye, whilst ECh and SECh were more effective in degrading the dye with almost complete removal (90 - 95%) attained after 90 min of experiment at an applied current density of 50 mA cm −2 . Degradation of the dye followed pseudo first-order kinetics in both processes, but the rate of reaction was faster with the SECh treatment confirming a synergistic effect between the cavitation process and the electrochemical system. Additionally, at low applied current densities (10 and 25 mA cm −2 ), SECh was considerably more effective than ECh for the amaranth dye mineralization. Although at 35 and 50 mA cm −2 , the two processes showed the respective removal of total organic carbon values: (i) 85% for the ECh and 90% for the SECh at 35 mA cm −2 ; (ii) 96% for the ECh and 98% for the SECh at 50 mA cm −2 . It is concluded that SECh presented the most favorable results for the decontamination of wastewaters containing azo dye compounds

  15. Effect of combined loading on pipe flaw evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki; Chung Yeonki

    1999-01-01

    Considering a rational maintenance rule of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential to determine how a detected flaw is detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes to be considered for carbon steel piping, and can be analyzed by the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Currently the analytical results are provided as flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors such like the Z-factor in ASME Code Section 6. The present correction factors were conventionally determined taken a conservatism and a simplicity into account, however, the effect of internal pressure which would be an important factor under an actual plant condition was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, 'LBB.ENGC' for ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected to combined loading was newly developed to have a better prediction with more realistic manner. This method is explicitly incorporated the contribution of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of the scheme compatible with an arbitrary combined loading history. In this paper, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. A correction factor based on the new J-estimation scheme was compared with the present correction factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of internal pressure. (author)

  16. Evaluation of flawed-pipe experiments: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Gamble, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform elastic plastic fracture mechanics evaluations of experimental data that have become available from the NRC Degraded Pipe Program, Phase II (DPII) and other NRC and EPRI sponsored programs. These evaluations were used to assess flaw evaluation procedures for austenitic and ferritic steel piping. The results also have application to leak before break fracture mechanics analysis. An improved relationship was developed for computing the J-Integral for pipes containing throughwall flaws and loaded in pure bending. The results from several DPII experiments were compared to predictions based on new J estimation scheme solutions for circumferential, finite length part-throughwall flaws in pipes with bending loading. Comparisons of experimental maximum loads with those predicted using procedures in Paragraph IWB-3640, Section XI of the ASME Code indicate that the Code flaw evaluation procedures and allowables for austenitic steel pipe are appropriate and conservative. However, the comparisons also indicate that the base metal Code allowable loads may be about 15 to 20% high for small diameter piping (less than 8-inch diameter) at allowable a/t larger than about 0.5. The work further indicates that there is justification for reducing the conservatism in IWB-3640 allowable flaw sizes and loads for austenitic steel pipe with submerged or shielded metal arc welds.

  17. A fractional Fourier transform analysis of the scattering of ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Katherine M.M.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Langer, Matthias; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Many safety critical structures, such as those found in nuclear plants, oil pipelines and in the aerospace industry, rely on key components that are constructed from heterogeneous materials. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) uses high-frequency mechanical waves to inspect these parts, ensuring they operate reliably without compromising their integrity. It is possible to employ mathematical models to develop a deeper understanding of the acquired ultrasonic data and enhance defect imaging algorithms. In this paper, a model for the scattering of ultrasonic waves by a crack is derived in the time–frequency domain. The fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) is applied to an inhomogeneous wave equation where the forcing function is prescribed as a linear chirp, modulated by a Gaussian envelope. The homogeneous solution is found via the Born approximation which encapsulates information regarding the flaw geometry. The inhomogeneous solution is obtained via the inverse Fourier transform of a Gaussian-windowed linear chirp excitation. It is observed that, although the scattering profile of the flaw does not change, it is amplified. Thus, the theory demonstrates the enhanced signal-to-noise ratio permitted by the use of coded excitation, as well as establishing a time–frequency domain framework to assist in flaw identification and classification. PMID:25792967

  18. Effects of microstructure on ultrasonic examination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel components or stainless steel welds is difficult, and the results obtained are hard to interpret. The present study describes the effects of stainless steel microstructure on ultrasonic test results. Welded coupons, 2.5 and 5.0 cm thick, were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel, with Type 308 stainless steel as the weld material. Metallography of the base material shows grain sizes of 15 and 80 μm, and dendrites aligned from the top to the bottom surface in cast material. X-ray diffraction and ultrasonic velocity measurements indicate a random crystal orientation in the base material, but the cast sample had aligned dendrites. The weld material exhibits a dendritic structure with a preferred (100) direction perpendicular to the weld pass. Spectral analysis of ultrasonic broad-band signals through the base materials shows drastic attenuation of higher frequencies with increasing grain size (Rayleigh scattering). Annealing and recrystallization increases the ultrasonic attenuation and produces carbide precipitation at grain boundaries. The microstructural differences of the base metal, heat-affected zone, and weld metal affect the amplitude of ultrasonic reflections from artificial flaws in these zones. Data obtained from two samples of different grain sizes indicate that grain size has little effect when a 1-MHz transducer is used. When going from a 15 to an 80-μm crystalline structure, a 5-MHz unit suffers a 30-dB attenuation in the detection of a 1.2 mm deep notch. The anisotropy of the dendritic structure in stainless steel renewed the interest in the effect of shear-wave polarization. In the (110) crystallographic orientation of stainless steel, two modes of shear waves can be generated, which have velocities differing by a factor of two. This effect may be helpful in ''tuning'' of shear waves by polarization to obtain better penetration in large grain materials such as welds

  19. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David H; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue...... anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been...

  20. Ultrasonic Transducer Peak-to-Peak Optical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skarvada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible optical setups for measurement of the peak-to-peak value of an ultrasonic transducer are described in this work. The Michelson interferometer with the calibrated nanopositioner in reference path and laser Doppler vibrometer were used for the basic measurement of vibration displacement. Langevin type of ultrasonic transducer is used for the purposes of Electro-Ultrasonic Nonlinear Spectroscopy (EUNS. Parameters of produced mechanical vibration have to been well known for EUNS. Moreover, a monitoring of mechanical vibration frequency shift with a mass load and sample-transducer coupling is important for EUNS measurement.

  1. Probabilistic assessment of critically flawed LMFBR PHTS piping elbows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkey, K.R.; Wallace, I.T.; Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    One of the important functions of the Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) of a large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) plant is to contain the circulating radioactive sodium in components and piping routed through inerted areas within the containment building. A significant possible failure mode of this vital system is the development of cracks in the piping components. This paper presents results from the probabilistic assessment of postulated flaws in the most-critical piping elbow of each piping leg. The criticality of calculated maximum sized flaws is assessed against an estimated material fracture toughness to determine safety factors and failure probability estimates using stress-strength interference theory. Subsequently, a different approach is also employed in which the randomness of the initial flaw size and loading are more-rigorously taken into account. This latter approach yields much smaller probability of failure values when compared to the stress-strength interference analysis results

  2. Finite-element analysis of flawed and unflawed pipe tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.J.; Nickell, R.E.; Sullaway, M.F.

    1989-12-01

    Contemporary versions of the general purpose, nonlinear finite element program ABAQUS have been used in structural response verification exercises on flawed and unflawed austenitic stainless steel and ferritic steel piping. Among the topics examined, through comparison between ABAQUS calculations and test results, were: (1) the effect of using variations in the stress-strain relationship from the test article material on the calculated response; (2) the convergence properties of various finite element representations of the pipe geometry, using shell, beam and continuum models; (3) the effect of test system compliance; and (4) the validity of ABAQUS J-integral routines for flawed pipe evaluations. The study was culminated by the development and demonstration of a ''macroelement'' representation for the flawed pipe section. The macroelement can be inserted into an existing piping system model, in order to accurately treat the crack-opening and crack-closing static and dynamic response. 11 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab

  3. Improved flaw detection and characterization with difference thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2011-05-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites is often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, variations in fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These variations result in a noise floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. The paper investigates comparing thermographic responses taken before and after a change in state in a composite to improve the detection of subsurface flaws. A method is presented for registration of the responses before finding the difference. A significant improvement in the detectability is achieved by comparing the differences in response. Examples of changes in state due to application of a load and impact are presented.

  4. Ultrasonic testing X gammagraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Campos, A.M. de

    1989-01-01

    The experience of 10 years for substituting gammagraphy tests by ultrasonic tests is related. A comparative evaluation of data obtained from both techniques applied to welded butt joints is presented. (author)

  5. Ultrasonic grinding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Shuji.

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasonic generator and a liquid supply nozzle are opposed to an object to be ground and a pump is started in this state to supply an organic solvent. Matters to be decontaminated which adheres to the surface of the object to be ground and are difficult to be removed by a mere mechanical removing method can be eliminated previously by the surface active effect of the organic solvent such as ethanol prior to the oscillation of the ultrasonic generator. Subsequently, when the ultrasonic generator is oscillated, scales in the floated state can be removed simply. Further, since the organic solvent can penetrate to provide the surface active effect even in such a narrow portion that the top end of the ultrasonic generator is difficult to the intruded at the surface of the object to be ground, the decontaminating treatment can be applied also to such a narrow portion. (T.M.)

  6. Fundamentals of Medical Ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Postema, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    This book sets out the physical and engineering principles of acoustics and ultrasound as used for medical applications. It covers the basics of linear acoustics, wave propagation, non-linear acoustics, acoustic properties of tissue, transducer components, and ultrasonic imaging modes, as well as the most common diagnostic and therapeutic applications. It offers students and professionals in medical physics and engineering a detailed overview of the technical aspects of medical ultrasonic imaging, whilst serving as a reference for clinical and research staff.

  7. Assessing ultrasonic examination results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, V.; Vogt, M.

    1977-01-01

    Amongst nondestructive examination methods, the ultrasonic examination plays an important role. The reason why its scope of application is so wide is because the sound conducting capacity is the only property the material of a test specimen has to have. As the fields are so manifold, only main aspects can be described briefly. The list of references, however, is very extensive and gives plenty of information of all the problems concerning the assessment of ultrasonic examination results. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Statistical flaw strength distributions for glass fibres: Correlation between bundle test and AFM-derived flaw size density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foray, G.; Descamps-Mandine, A.; R’Mili, M.; Lamon, J.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper investigates glass fibre flaw size distributions. Two commercial fibre grades (HP and HD) mainly used in cement-based composite reinforcement were studied. Glass fibre fractography is a difficult and time consuming exercise, and thus is seldom carried out. An approach based on tensile tests on multifilament bundles and examination of the fibre surface by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used. Bundles of more than 500 single filaments each were tested. Thus a statistically significant database of failure data was built up for the HP and HD glass fibres. Gaussian flaw distributions were derived from the filament tensile strength data or extracted from the AFM images. The two distributions were compared. Defect sizes computed from raw AFM images agreed reasonably well with those derived from tensile strength data. Finally, the pertinence of a Gaussian distribution was discussed. The alternative Pareto distribution provided a fair approximation when dealing with AFM flaw size.

  9. Ultrasonic viewing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Juro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety of reactor operation by enabling to detect the states and positions of fuel assemblies over a wide range with a set of ultrasonic viewing device comprising a rotatable ultrasonic transmitter-receiver and a reflector mounted with an adjustable angle. Constitution: A driving portion for a ultrasonic viewing device is provided to a rotary plug closing the opening of a reactor vessel and a guide pipe suspending below the coolant level is provided to the driving portion. An ultrasonic transmitter-receiver is provided at the end of the holder tube in the guide pipe. A reflector is provided at the upper position of the reactor core so as to correspond to the ultrasonic transmitter-receiver. The ultrasonic transmitter-receiver, positioned by the driving portion, performs horizontal movement for scanning the entire surface of the top of the reactor core, as well as vertical movement covering the gap between the upper mechanism on the reactor and the reactor core, whereby the confirmation for the separation of the control rod and the detection for the states of the reactor core can be conducted by the reflection waves from the reflector. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  11. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, S. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, A. D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, M. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  12. Dynamics of ultrasonic additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state technology for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils near room temperature by scrubbing them together with ultrasonic vibrations under pressure. Structural dynamics of the welding assembly and work piece influence how energy is transferred during the process and ultimately, part quality. To understand the effect of structural dynamics during UAM, a linear time-invariant model is proposed to relate the inputs of shear force and electric current to resultant welder velocity and voltage. Measured frequency response and operating performance of the welder under no load is used to identify model parameters. Using this model and in-situ measurements, shear force and welder efficiency are estimated to be near 2000N and 80% when welding Al 6061-H18 weld foil, respectively. Shear force and welder efficiency have never been estimated before in UAM. The influence of processing conditions, i.e., welder amplitude, normal force, and weld speed, on shear force and welder efficiency are investigated. Welder velocity was found to strongly influence the shear force magnitude and efficiency while normal force and weld speed showed little to no influence. The proposed model is used to describe high frequency harmonic content in the velocity response of the welder during welding operations and coupling of the UAM build with the welder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Classification of Ultrasonic NDE Signals Using the Expectation Maximization (EM) and Least Mean Square (LMS) Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Won

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection methods are widely used for detecting flaws in materials. The signal analysis step plays a crucial part in the data interpretation process. A number of signal processing methods have been proposed to classify ultrasonic flaw signals. One of the more popular methods involves the extraction of an appropriate set of features followed by the use of a neural network for the classification of the signals in the feature spare. This paper describes an alternative approach which uses the least mean square (LMS) method and exportation maximization (EM) algorithm with the model based deconvolution which is employed for classifying nondestructive evaluation (NDE) signals from steam generator tubes in a nuclear power plant. The signals due to cracks and deposits are not significantly different. These signals must be discriminated to prevent from happening a huge disaster such as contamination of water or explosion. A model based deconvolution has been described to facilitate comparison of classification results. The method uses the space alternating generalized expectation maximiBation (SAGE) algorithm ill conjunction with the Newton-Raphson method which uses the Hessian parameter resulting in fast convergence to estimate the time of flight and the distance between the tube wall and the ultrasonic sensor. Results using these schemes for the classification of ultrasonic signals from cracks and deposits within steam generator tubes are presented and showed a reasonable performances

  14. Method and system having ultrasonic sensor movable by translation device for ultrasonic profiling of weld samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyard, James; Potter, Timothy; Charron, William; Hopkins, Deborah; Reverdy, Frederic

    2010-04-06

    A system for ultrasonic profiling of a weld sample includes a carriage movable in opposite first and second directions. An ultrasonic sensor is coupled to the carriage to move over the sample as the carriage moves. An encoder determines the position of the carriage to determine the position of the sensor. A spring is connected at one end of the carriage. Upon the carriage being moved in the first direction toward the spring such that the carriage and the sensor are at a beginning position and the spring is compressed the spring decompresses to push the carriage back along the second direction to move the carriage and the sensor from the beginning position to an ending position. The encoder triggers the sensor to take the ultrasonic measurements of the sample when the sensor is at predetermined positions while the sensor moves over the sample between the beginning and positions.

  15. Detecting and revising flaws in OWL object property expressions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Keet, CM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available to the ontologist's intention. However, the more one can do, the higher the chance modelling flaws are introduced; hence, an unexpected or undesired classification or inconsistency may actually be due to a mistake in the object property box, not the class axioms. We...

  16. According to Jim: The Flawed Normal Curve of Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, James J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the normal curve of intelligence which he thinks is flawed and contends that wrong conclusions have been drawn based on this spurious normal curve. An example is that of racial and ethnic differences wherein some authors maintain that some ethnic and racial groups are clearly superior to others based on…

  17. Detecting and Preventing Type flaws at Static Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodei, Chiara; Brodo, Linda; Degano, Pierpaolo

    2010-01-01

    A type flaw attack on a security protocol is an attack where an honest principal is cheated on interpreting a field in a message as the one with a type other than the intended one. In this paper, we shall present an extension of the LYSA calculus to cope with types, by using tags to represent...

  18. Feasibility study of flexible phased array ultrasonic technology using irregular surface specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Pyo; Moon, Yong Sik; Jung, Nam Du

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power plant contain many dissimilar metal welds that connect carbon steel components with stainless steel pipes using alloy 600 welding materials. Primary water stress corrosion cracks at dissimilar metal welds have been continuously reported around the world. In periodic integrity evaluations, dissimilar metal welds are examined using a generic ultrasonic testing procedure, KPD-UT-10. In this procedure, the gap between the probe and examination surface is limited to 1/32 inch (0.8 mm). It is not easy to test some dissimilar metal welds in Korean plants applying ordinary technology because of their tapered shapes and irregular surface conditions. This paper introduces a method for applying a flexible phased array technology to improve the reliability of ultrasonic testing results for various shapes and surface conditions. The artificial flaws in specimens with irregular surfaces were completely detected using the flexible phased array ultrasonic technology. Therefore, it can be said that the technology is applicable to field examination.

  19. Feasibility study of flexible phased array ultrasonic technology using irregular surface specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Pyo; Moon, Yong Sik; Jung, Nam Du [NDE Performance Demonstration Team, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Nuclear power plant contain many dissimilar metal welds that connect carbon steel components with stainless steel pipes using alloy 600 welding materials. Primary water stress corrosion cracks at dissimilar metal welds have been continuously reported around the world. In periodic integrity evaluations, dissimilar metal welds are examined using a generic ultrasonic testing procedure, KPD-UT-10. In this procedure, the gap between the probe and examination surface is limited to 1/32 inch (0.8 mm). It is not easy to test some dissimilar metal welds in Korean plants applying ordinary technology because of their tapered shapes and irregular surface conditions. This paper introduces a method for applying a flexible phased array technology to improve the reliability of ultrasonic testing results for various shapes and surface conditions. The artificial flaws in specimens with irregular surfaces were completely detected using the flexible phased array ultrasonic technology. Therefore, it can be said that the technology is applicable to field examination.

  20. A novel ultrasonic clutch using near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo-Tsi

    2004-10-01

    This paper investigates design, fabrication and drive of an ultrasonic clutch with two transducers. For the two transducers, one serving as a driving element of the clutch is connected to a driving shaft via a coupling, and the other serving as a slave element of the clutch is connected to a slave shaft via another coupling. The principle of ultrasonic levitation is first expressed. Then, a series-resonant inverter is used to generate AC voltages at input terminals of each transducer, and a speed measuring system with optic sensors is used to find the relationship between rotational speed of the slave shaft and applied voltage of each transducer. Moreover, contact surfaces of the two transducers are coupled by the frictional force when both the two transducers are not energized, and separated using the ultrasonic levitation when at least one of the two transducers is energized at high voltages at resonance.

  1. Ultrasonic thermometry for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravana Kumar, S.; Arunraj, A.L.R.; Swaminathan, K.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducer provides a method of measurement of temperature in industrial tanks and boilers containing different liquids with varied salt content. This method is used to measure the average temperature continuously where other traditional methods available do not offer. Traditional methods used for temperature measurement like infrared thermometers, thermocouples, measures temperature at a single location. Numerous thermocouples are to be fixed at various part of the boiler in order to measure the temperature of the entire boiler, which incurs high cost. Reliability of the system decreases, with increasing number of thermocouples. When they fail at a point, the time incurred in finding the faulty part or faulty thermocouple is high. Ultrasonic transducer provides continuous measurement for all different characteristic liquids with higher accuracy and lesser response time. Fault location and clearance time is also less in ultrasonic measurement method, since only a couple of transducers used for the entire boiler structure. Additionally ultrasonic thermometry along support measuring electronic system can be built of low cost. (author)

  2. Applicability of Alignment and Combination Rules to Burst Pressure Prediction of Multiple-flawed Steam Generator Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myeong Woo; Kim, Ji Seok; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jun Young [Doosan Heavy Industries and Consruction, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Min [Korea Plant Service and Engineering, Technical Research and Development Institute, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Alignment and combination rules are provided by various codes and standards. These rules are used to determine whether multiple flaws should be treated as non-aligned or as coplanar, and independent or combined flaws. Experimental results on steam generator (SG) tube specimens containing multiple axial part-through-wall (PTW) flaws at room temperature (RT) are compared with assessment results based on the alignment and combination rules of the codes and standards. In case of axial collinear flaws, ASME, JSME, and BS7910 treated multiple flaws as independent flaws and API 579, A16, and FKM treated multiple flaws as combined single flaw. Assessment results of combined flaws were conservative. In case of axial non-aligned flaws, almost flaws were aligned and assessment results well correlate with experimental data. In case of axial parallel flaws, both effective flaw lengths of aligned flaws and separated flaws was are same because of each flaw length were same. This study investigates the applicability of alignment and combination rules for multiple flaws on the failure behavior of Alloy 690TT steam generator (SG) tubes that widely used in the nuclear power plan. Experimental data of burst tests on Alloy 690TT tubes with single and multiple flaws that conducted at room temperature (RT) by Kim el al. compared with the alignment rules of these codes and standards. Burst pressure of SG tubes with flaws are predicted using limit load solutions that provide by EPRI Handbook.

  3. Determination of K-factors for arbitrarily shaped flaws at pressure vessel nozzle corners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryson, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Photoelastic and finite element studies are being conducted to determine Mode I stress intensity factor distributions along arbitrarily shaped flaw fronts at pressure vessel nozzle corners. Comparisons of results from NOZ-FLAW, BIGIF, and the photoelastic studies showed that (1) good agreement was obtained between NOZ-FLAW and the photoelastically determined K 1 's for the deep flaw in an ITV model, (2) good agreement was obtained between NOZ-FLAW BIGIF for shallow and moderately deep flaws in a BWR model, and (3) less satisfactory agreement was obtained between NOZ- FLAW and the photoelastic results for the BWR models, particularly for moderately deep to deep flaws. Attempts are presently being made at understanding and explaining the discrepancies between the two

  4. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poindexter, A.M.; Ricks, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and for wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities

  5. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  6. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  7. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue...... anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been...... vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new...

  8. Ultrasonic tests. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebbels, K.

    1980-01-01

    After a basic treatment of ultrasonic wave propagation, of the state-of-the-art methods and the technical background in the preceeding part, advanced ultrasonic NDT techniques are presented here. The discussion of new development includes - manipulation systems, - automation of ultrasonic testing methods, documentation and evaluation. In the middle of this part the main problem areas will be discussed: - detection of defects (e.g. in coarse grained structures and welds), - classification of defects (e.g. discrimination between crack-like and volumetric faults), - sizing of defects. Research in the field of acoustical holography, development of probes and phased arrays, electromagnetic acoustic transducers and signal enhancement are the main contributing parts to the report. (orig./RW)

  9. SNR in ultrasonic pluse compression using Golay codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Young Gil; Jeong, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The conventional ultrasonic flaw detection system uses a large amplitude narrow pulse to excite a transducer, however, these systems are limited in average transmit power. An excessively large amplitude causes a dielectric breakage of the transducer, and an excessively long pulse cuases decrease of the resolution. Using the pulse compression, a long pulse of psudorandom signal can be used without sacrificing resolution by signal correlation. In the present work, the pulse compression technique was utilized to the ultrasonic system. Golay code was used as a psudorandom signal in this system, since pair sum of auto-correlations has not sidelobe. The equivalent input pulse of the Golay code was proposed to analyze the pulse compression system. In experiment, the material type, material thickness and code length were considered. As results, pulse compression system considerably reduced system's white noise, and approximately 30 dB improvement in SNR was obtained over the conventional ultrasonic system. The technique seems to perform particularly well with highly energy-absorbent materials such as polymers, plastics and rubbers.

  10. Micromachined capacitive ultrasonic immersion transducer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuecheng

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (cMUTs) have emerged as an attractive alternative to conventional piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers. They offer performance advantages of wide bandwidth and sensitivity that have heretofore been attainable. In addition, micromachining technology, which has benefited from the fast-growing microelectronics industry, enables cMUT array fabrication and electronics integration. This thesis describes the design and fabrication of micromachined capacitive ultrasonic immersion transducer arrays. The basic transducer electrical equivalent circuit is derived from Mason's theory. The effects of Lamb waves and Stoneley waves on cross coupling and acoustic losses are discussed. Electrical parasitics such as series resistance and shunt capacitance are also included in the model of the transducer. Transducer fabrication technology is systematically studied. Device dimension control in both vertical and horizontal directions, process alternatives and variations in membrane formation, via etch and cavity sealing, and metalization as well as their impact on transducer performance are summarized. Both 64 and 128 element 1-D array transducers are fabricated. Transducers are characterized in terms of electrical input impedance, bandwidth, sensitivity, dynamic range, impulse response and angular response, and their performance is compared with theoretical simulation. Various schemes for cross coupling reduction is analyzed, implemented, and verified with both experiments and theory. Preliminary results of immersion imaging are presented using 64 elements 1-D array transducers for active source imaging.

  11. Detector-device-independent quantum secret sharing with source flaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenqiang; Cao, Zhu; Wu, Lingan

    2018-04-10

    Measurement-device-independent entanglement witness (MDI-EW) plays an important role for detecting entanglement with untrusted measurement device. We present a double blinding-attack on a quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocol based on GHZ state. Using the MDI-EW method, we propose a QSS protocol against all detector side-channels. We allow source flaws in practical QSS system, so that Charlie can securely distribute a key between the two agents Alice and Bob over long distances. Our protocol provides condition on the extracted key rate for the secret against both external eavesdropper and arbitrary dishonest participants. A tight bound for collective attacks can provide good bounds on the practical QSS with source flaws. Then we show through numerical simulations that using single-photon source a secure QSS over 136 km can be achieved.

  12. On flaw tolerance of nacre: a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    As a natural composite, nacre has an elegant staggered ‘brick-and-mortar’ microstructure consisting of mineral platelets glued by organic macromolecules, which endows the material with superior mechanical properties to achieve its biological functions. In this paper, a microstructure-based crack-bridging model is employed to investigate how the strength of nacre is affected by pre-existing structural defects. Our analysis demonstrates that owing to its special microstructure and the toughening effect of platelets, nacre has a superior flaw-tolerance feature. The maximal crack size that does not evidently reduce the tensile strength of nacre is up to tens of micrometres, about three orders higher than that of pure aragonite. Through dimensional analysis, a non-dimensional parameter is proposed to quantify the flaw-tolerance ability of nacreous materials in a wide range of structural parameters. This study provides us some inspirations for optimal design of advanced biomimetic composites. PMID:24402917

  13. Acoustic emission/flaw relationships for inservice monitoring of LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Friesel, M.A.; Skorpik, J.R.; Dawson, J.F.

    1991-10-01

    The program concerning Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of LWRs was initiated in FY76 with the objective of validating the application of acoustic emission (AE) to monitor nuclear reactor pressure-containing components during operation to detect cracking. The program has been supported by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Research and development has been performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. The program has shown the feasibility of continuous, on-line AE monitoring to detect crack growth and produced validated methods for applying the technology. Included are relationships for estimating flaw severity from AE data and field applications at Watts Bar Unit 1 Reactor, Limerick Unit 1 Reactor, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor. This report discusses the program scope and organization, the three program phases and the results obtained, standard and code activities, and instrumentation and software developed under this program

  14. AE/flaw characterization for nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the use of acoustic emission (AE) detected during continuous monitoring to identify and evaluate growing flaws in pressure vessels. Off-reactor testing and on-reactor testing are considered. Relationships for identifying acoustic emission (AE) from crack growth and using the AE data to estimate flaw severity have been developed experimentally by laboratory testing. The purpose of the off-reactor vessel test is to evaluate AE monitoring/interpretation methodology on a heavy section steel vessel under simulated reactor operating conditions. The purpose of on-reactor testing is to evaluate the capability of a monitor system to function in the reactor environment, calibrate the ability to detect AE signals, and to demonstrate that a meaningful criteria can be established to prevent false alarms. An expanded data base is needed from application testing and methodology standardization

  15. Advanced ultrasonic techniques for nondestructive testing of austenitic and dissimilar welds in nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengert, Anne; Dugan, Sandra; Homann, Tobias; Mitzscherling, Steffen; Prager, Jens; Pudovikov, Sergey; Schwender, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steel welds as well as dissimilar metal welds with nickel alloy filler material, used in safety relevant parts of nuclear power plants, still challenge the ultrasonic inspection. The weld material forms large oriented grains that lead, on the one hand, to high sound scattering and, on the other hand, to inhomogeneity and to the acoustic anisotropy of the weld structure. The ultrasonic wave fronts do not propagate linearly, as in ferritic weld joints, but along the curves, which depend on the specific grain structure of the weld. Due to the influence of these phenomena, it is difficult to analyze the inspection results and to classify the ultrasonic indications, which could be both from the weld geometry and from the material defects. A correct flaw sizing is not possible. In an ongoing research project, different techniques to improve the reliability of ultrasonic testing at these kinds of welds are investigated. In a first step (in the previous research project) two ultrasonic inspection techniques were developed and validated on plane test specimens with artificial and realistic flaws. In the ongoing project, these techniques are applied to circumferential pipe welds with longitudinal and transverse flaws. The technique developed at the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) in Germany uses a combination of ray tracing and synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). To investigate the unknown grain structure, the velocity distribution of weld-transmitting ultrasound waves is measured and used to model the weld by ray tracing. The second technique, developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing (IZFP) in Germany, uses Sampling Phased Array (Full Matrix Capture) combined with the reverse phase matching (RPM) and the gradient elastic constant descent algorithm (GECDM). This inspection method is able to estimate the elastic constants of the columnar grains in the weld and offers an improvement of the

  16. Probabilistic assessment of flaw evaluation procedures for pressure vessel integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, D.H.; Bamford, W.H.; Jouris, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Prudent design procedures, in order to err in the direction of conservative over-strength rather than risky under-strength, have taken bounding values rather than best estimates for material parameters, and wherever possible, used conservative input for the calculations. The growing data base for this work is now beginning to allow an assessment of the conservatism that has been incorporated into the design procedure. Quantitative estimates of the variability associated with crack growth rates and fracture toughness have been generated in connection with other studies, and it would be useful to incorporate such information into an overall assessment of the design margins that are prescribed. In addition to getting an estimate of the conservatism in the current procedure, this study should provide a useful insight into the relative degree of margin that is introduced at each stage of the flaw evaluation process. Identification of the step by step margins should lead to more effective data collection programs from which information for adequately controlling the design conservatism can be obtained. The study will also provide valuable guidance in fixing revised design reference curves and safety factors so that adequate overall margins can be maintained without excess conservatism. This study is limited to vessel rupture in a brittle mode, and examples for illustration are particularly related to the beltline region of a reactor pressure vessel. The methodology, however, is applicable to all regions for which the required stress analyses, operating history, and material parameters are available. The work being carried out here is in consonance with ASME Section XI on Flaw Evaluation Procedures. It is concerned both with flaws under normal operating conditions and flaws under faulted conditions. (author)

  17. Recent changes in French flaw evaluation procedures: RSE-M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faidy, C. [Electricite de France (EDF-SEPTEN), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    After a general presentation of the RSE-M, the French Code which describes the rules for in-service inspection of nuclear power plant components, this paper will be focused on the major new developments of the flaw evaluation procedure: critical crack size evaluation, material properties, safety factors and the major validation tasks done to support the RSE-M, edition 2000. The paper will conclude on on-going development in this area. (author)

  18. Recent changes in French flaw evaluation procedures: RSE-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, C.

    2001-01-01

    After a general presentation of the RSE-M, the French Code which describes the rules for in-service inspection of nuclear power plant components, this paper will be focused on the major new developments of the flaw evaluation procedure: critical crack size evaluation, material properties, safety factors and the major validation tasks done to support the RSE-M, edition 2000. The paper will conclude on on-going development in this area. (author)

  19. Development of automatic flaw detection systems for magnetic particle examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, T.; Kimura, J.; Amako, T.

    1988-01-01

    Utilizing a video camera and an image processor, development was carried out on automatic flaw detection and discrimination techniques for the purpose of achieving automated magnetic particle examination. Following this, fluorescent wet magnetic particle examination systems for blade roots and rotor grooves of turbine rotors and the non-fluorescent dry magnetic particle examination system for butt welds, were developed. This paper describes these automatic magnetic particle examination (MT) systems and the functional test results

  20. Ultrasonic Communication Project, Phase 1, FY1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, H.D.; Akerman, M.A.; Baylor, V.M.

    2000-06-01

    This Phase 1 project has been successful in identifying, exploring, and demonstrating methods for ultrasonic-based communication with an emphasis on the application of digital signal processing techniques. During the project, at the direction of the agency project monitor, particular attention was directed at sending and receiving ultrasonic data through air and through pipes that would be commonly found in buildings. Efforts were also focused on development of a method for transmitting computer files ultrasonically. New methods were identified and evaluated for ultrasonic communication. These methods are based on a technique called DFS. With DFS, individual alphanumeric characters are broken down into a sequence of bits, and each bit is used to generate a discrete ultrasonic frequency. Characters are then transmitted one-bit-at-a-time, and reconstructed by the receiver. This technique was put into practice through the development of LabVIEW{trademark}VIs. These VIs were integrated with specially developed electronic circuits to provide a system for demonstrating the transmission and reception/reconstruction of typed messages and computer files. Tests were performed to determine the envelope for ultrasound transmission through pipes (with and without water) versus through air. The practical aspects of connections, efficient electronics, impedance matching, and the effect of damping mechanisms were all investigated. These tests resulted in a considerable number of reference charts that illustrate the absorption of ultrasound through different pipe materials, both with and without water, as a function of distance. Ultrasound was found to be least attenuated by copper pipe and most attenuated by PVC pipe. Water in the pipe provides additional damping and attenuation of ultrasonic signals. Dramatic improvements are observed, however, in ultrasound signal strength if the transducers are directly coupled to the water, rather than simply attaching them to the outside of

  1. Estimation of Back-Surface Flaw Depth by Laminated Piezoelectric Highpolymer Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinobu YAMAMOTO

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric thin films have been used to visualize back surface flaws in plates. If the plate with a surface flaw is deformed, the strain distribution appears on the other surface reflecting the location and the shape of the flaw. Such surface strain distribution can be transformed into the electric potential distribution on the piezoelectric film mounted on the plate surface. This paper deals with a NDE technique to estimate the depth of a back-surface flaw from the electric potential distribution on a laminated piezoelectric thin film. It is experimentally verified that the flaw depth can be exactly estimated by the peak height of the electric potential distribution.

  2. Ultrasonic weld testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-12-01

    The study was broken down into two phases. Phase I consisted of a laboratory investigation of test specimens to determine the reliability of the ultrasonic equipment and testing procedure. Phase II was a field study where the knowledge, skills and ab...

  3. Ultrasonic leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, R.V.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning ultrasonic microphone was used to detect the presence and locate the sources of hydraulic noises in piping systems in a reactor environment. The intensity changes of the noises correspond to changes of flow conditions within the system caused by throttled valves, flow rate changes, and leaks. (author)

  4. Ultrasonic Bat Deterrent Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzie, Kevin; Rominger, Kathryn M.

    2017-12-14

    The project objective was to advance the development and testing of an Near commercial bat-deterrent system with a goal to increase the current GE deterrent system effectiveness to over 50% with broad species applicability. Additionally, the research supported by this program has provided insights into bat behavior and ultrasonic deterrent design that had not previously been explored. Prior research and development had demonstrated the effectiveness of a commercial-grade, air-powered, ultrasonic bat deterrent to be between 30-50% depending upon the species of bat. However, the previous research provided limited insight into the behavioral responses of bats in the presence of ultrasonic deterrent sound fields that could be utilized to improve effectiveness. A unique bat flight room was utilized to observe the behavioral characteristics of bats in the presence of ultrasonic sound fields. Behavioral testing in the bat flight facility demonstrated that ultrasonic sounds similar to those produced by the GE deterrent influenced the activities and behaviors, primarily those associated with foraging, of the species exposed. The study also indicated that continuous and pulsing ultrasonic signals had a similar effect on the bats, and confirmed that as ultrasonic sounds attenuate, their influence on the bats’ activities and behavior decreases. Ground testing at Wolf Ridge Wind, LLC and Shawnee National Forest assessed both continuous and pulsing deterrent signals emitted from the GE deterrent system and further enhanced the behavioral understanding of bats in the presence of the deterrent. With these data and observations, the existing 4-nozzle continuous, or steady, emission ultrasonic system was redesigned to a 6-nozzle system that could emit a pulsing signal covering a larger air space around a turbine. Twelve GE 1.6-100 turbines were outfitted with the deterrent system and a formal three-month field study was performed using daily carcass searches beneath the 12

  5. Modeling the X-ray Process, and X-ray Flaw Size Parameter for POD Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2014-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method reliability can be determined by a statistical flaw detection study called probability of detection (POD) study. In many instances, the NDE flaw detectability is given as a flaw size such as crack length. The flaw is either a crack or behaving like a crack in terms of affecting the structural integrity of the material. An alternate approach is to use a more complex flaw size parameter. The X-ray flaw size parameter, given here, takes into account many setup and geometric factors. The flaw size parameter relates to X-ray image contrast and is intended to have a monotonic correlation with the POD. Some factors such as set-up parameters, including X-ray energy, exposure, detector sensitivity, and material type that are not accounted for in the flaw size parameter may be accounted for in the technique calibration and controlled to meet certain quality requirements. The proposed flaw size parameter and the computer application described here give an alternate approach to conduct the POD studies. Results of the POD study can be applied to reliably detect small flaws through better assessment of effect of interaction between various geometric parameters on the flaw detectability. Moreover, a contrast simulation algorithm for a simple part-source-detector geometry using calibration data is also provided for the POD estimation.

  6. Non-contact feature detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-06-28

    Apparatus and method for non-contact ultrasonic detection of features on or within the walls of hollow pipes are described. An air-coupled, high-power ultrasonic transducer for generating guided waves in the pipe wall, and a high-sensitivity, air-coupled transducer for detecting these waves, are disposed at a distance apart and at chosen angle with respect to the surface of the pipe, either inside of or outside of the pipe. Measurements may be made in reflection or transmission modes depending on the relative position of the transducers and the pipe. Data are taken by sweeping the frequency of the incident ultrasonic waves, using a tracking narrow-band filter to reduce detected noise, and transforming the frequency domain data into the time domain using fast Fourier transformation, if required.

  7. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahk, K. J.; Dhar, D. K.; Malago, M.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  8. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahk, K J; Saffari, N; Dhar, D K; Malago, M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  9. The influence of finite-length flaw effects on PTS analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney-Walker, J.; Dickson, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Current licensing issues within the nuclear industry dictate a need to investigate the effects of cladding on the extension of small finite-length cracks near the inside surface of a vessel. Because flaws having depths of the order of the combined clad and heat affected zone thickness dominate the frequency distribution of flaws, their initiation probabilities can govern calculated vessel failure probabilities. Current pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) analysis computer programs recognize the influence of the inner-surface cladding layer in the heat transfer and stress analysis models, but assume the cladding fracture toughness is the same as that for the base material. The programs do not recognize the influence cladding may have in inhibiting crack initiation and propagation of shallow finite-length surface flaws. Limited experimental data and analyses indicate the cladding can inhibit the propagation of certain shallow flaws. This paper describes an analytical study which was carried out to determine (1) the minimum flaw depth for crack initiation under PTS loading for semicircular surface flaws in a clad reactor pressure vessel and (2) the impact, in terms of the conditional probability of vessel failure, of using a semicircular surface flaw as the initial flaw and assuming that the flaw cannot propagate in the cladding. The analytical results indicate that for initiation a much deeper critical crack depth is required for the finite-length flaw than for the infinite-length flaw, except for the least severe transient. The minimum flaw depths required for crack initiation from the finite-length flaw analyses were incorporated into a modified version of the OCA-P code. The modified code was applied to the analysis of selected PTS transients, and the results produced a substantial decrease in the conditional probability of failure. This initial study indicates a significant effect on probabilistic fracture analyses by incorporating finite-length flaw results

  10. Piezoelectric Nanotube Array for Broadband High-Frequency Ultrasonic Transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Weng Heng; Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2018-03-01

    Piezoelectric materials are vital in determining ultrasonic transducer and imaging performance as they offer the function for conversion between mechanical and electrical energy. Ultrasonic transducers with high-frequency operation suffer from performance degradation and fabrication difficulty of the demanded piezoelectric materials. Hence, we propose 1-D polymeric piezoelectric nanostructure with controlled nanoscale features to overcome the technical limitations of high-frequency ultrasonic transducers. For the first time, we demonstrate the integration of a well-aligned piezoelectric nanotube array to produce a high-frequency ultrasonic transducer with outstanding performance. We find that nanoconfinement-induced polarization orientation and unique nanotube structure lead to significantly improved piezoelectric and ultrasonic transducing performance over the conventional piezoelectric thin film. A large bandwidth, 126% (-6 dB), is achieved at high center frequency, 108 MHz. Transmission sensitivity of nanotube array is found to be 46% higher than that of the monolithic thin film transducer attributed to the improved electromechanical coupling effectiveness and impedance match. We further demonstrate high-resolution scanning, ultrasonic imaging, and photoacoustic imaging using the obtained nanotube array transducers, which is valuable for biomedical imaging applications in the future.

  11. Flaw detection of welded joints in NPP equipment assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesler, N.A.; Polevik, V.A.; Orlov, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    State of the art and prospects of development of ultrasonic and radiography testing of welded joints for quality used in NPP equipment assembly are considered. Recommendations are given on reducing the labour content with the use of these methods. Specifications for the developed facilities intended for automation and mechanization of the described quality control methods are presented

  12. 3D Modeling of Ultrasonic Wave Interaction with Disbonds and Weak Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, C.; Hinders, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques, such as the use of guided waves, can be ideal for finding damage in the plate and pipe-like structures used in aerospace applications. However, the interaction of waves with real flaw types and geometries can lead to experimental signals that are difficult to interpret. 3-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be a powerful tool in understanding the complicated wave scattering involved in flaw detection and for optimizing experimental techniques. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate Lamb wave scattering from realistic flaws. This paper discusses simulation results for an aluminum-aluminum diffusion disbond and an aluminum-epoxy disbond and compares results from the disbond case to the common artificial flaw type of a flat-bottom hole. The paper also discusses the potential for extending the 3D EFIT equations to incorporate physics-based weak bond models for simulating wave scattering from weak adhesive bonds.

  13. Breakdown pressures and characteristic flaw sizes during fluid injection experiments in shale at elevated confining pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Rutter, E. H.; Taylor, R.; Fauchille, A. L.; Ma, L.; Lee, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    Fracture propagation trajectories in gas-bearing shales depend on the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the shale and the anisotropic in-situ stress field. However, there is a general paucity of available experimental data on their anisotropic mechanical, physical and fluid-flow properties, especially at elevated confining pressures. A suite of mechanical, flow and elastic measurements have been made on two shale materials, the Whitby mudrock and the Mancos shale (an interbedded silt and mudstone), as well as Pennant sandstone, an isotropic baseline and tight-gas sandstone analogue. Mechanical characterization includes standard triaxial experiments, pressure-dependent permeability, brazilian disk tensile strength, and fracture toughness determined using double-torsion experiments. Elastic characterisation was performed through ultrasonic velocities determined using a cross-correlation method. Additionally, we report the results of laboratory-scale fluid injection experiments for the same materials. Injection experiments involved the pressurisation of a blind-ending central hole in a dry cylindrical sample. Pressurisation is conducted under constant volume-rate control, using silicon oils of varying viscosities. Breakdown pressure is not seen to exhibit a strong dependence on rock type or orientation, and increases linearly with confining pressure. In most experiments, a small drop in the injection pressure record is observed at what is taken to be fracture initiation, and in the Pennant sandstone this is accompanied by a small burst of acoustic energy. The shale materials were acoustically quiet. Breakdown is found to be rapid and uncontrollable after initiation if injection is continued. A simplified 2-dimensional model for explaining this is presented in terms of the stress intensities at the tip of a pressurised crack, and is used alongside the triaxial data to derive a characteristic flaw size from which the fractures have initiated

  14. Ultrasonic calibration assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for in-service inspection of nuclear reactor vessels have several problems associated with them which this invention seeks to overcome. The first is that of calibration or referencing a zero start point for the vertical axis of transducer movement to locate a weld defect. The second is that of verifying the positioning (vertically or at a predetermined angle). Thirdly there is the problem of ascertaining the speed per unit distance in the operating medium of the transducer beam prior to the actual inspection. The apparatus described is a calibration assembly which includes a fixed, generally spherical body having a surface for reflecting an ultrasonic beam from one of the transducers which can be moved until the reflection from the spherical body is the highest amplitude return signal indicating radial alignment from the body. (U.K.)

  15. Flaw distributions and use of ISI data in RPV integrity evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, V.; Ammirato, F.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic method for developing post-inspection flaw distributions has been developed that explicitly accounts for the capability of the inspection procedure to detect and size flaws. This methodology has been used to develop flaw distributions for calculating reactor vessel failure probability under postulated pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. Realistic flaw distributions are important because plant-specific PTS safety assessments are very sensitive to assumptions made about major flaw parameters such as density, size, shape, and location. PTS analysis made in the past do not consider ISI. Two main reasons are (1) lack of a general and approved methodology which provides directions for involvement of ISI results in developing new flaw parameters and (2) lack of confidence in the capability of ISI procedures to detect critical flaws that may be present near the clad-to-base metal interface of the vessel, the location of most concern for PTS conditions. Recent developments in ISI practice, however, have led to substantial improvement in ISI capability and provide a basis for using ISI data to develop plant-specific post-inspection flaw distributions for vessel integrity evaluations. The key components of this evaluation are (1) the generic (preinspection) flaw distribution, (2) a probabilistic flaw detection model, and (3) Bayesian updating of the prior flaw distribution with the detection model to develop a post-inspection flaw distribution. Destructive analysis of RPV weld material was performed to develop data to support the pre-inspection flaw distributions. Since the probability of detection (POD) plays such an important role in the analysis and a high POD is needed to make significant reductions in probability of failure, a procedure was developed to achieve and demonstrate POD greater than 0.9 by using a combination of independent inspection techniques

  16. Standard Guide for Acousto-Ultrasonic Assessment of Composites, Laminates, and Bonded Joints

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This guide explains the rationale and basic technology for the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) method. Guidelines are given for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of flaws and physical characteristics that influence the mechanical properties and relative strength of composite structures (for example, filament-wound pressure vessels), adhesive bonds (for example, joints between metal plates), and interlaminar and fiber/matrix bonds in man-made composites and natural composites (for example, wood products). 1.2 This guide covers technical details and rules that must be observed to ensure reliable and reproducible quantitative AU assessments of laminates, composites, and bonded structures. The underlying principles, prototype apparatus, instrumentation, standardization, examination methods, and data analysis for such assessments are covered. Limitations of the AU method and guidelines for taking advantage of its capabilities are cited. 1.3 The objective of AU is to assess subtle flaws and associated strength variations...

  17. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  18. Evaluation of flaws or service induced cracks in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardella, P.C.; Copeland, J.F.; Gilman, J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the ASME flaw evaluation procedures for nuclear pressure vessels is presented, with emphasis on fatigue crack growth evaluations. Environmental and load-rate effects are further considered with respect to new crack growth data and a time-dependent crack growth model. This new crack growth model is applied to evaluate feedwater nozzle cracking in boiling water reactors and is compared to current and past ASME crack growth curves. The time-dependent model bounds the observed cracking and indicates that more detailed consideration of material susceptibility, in terms of sulfur content and product form, is needed

  19. Windows Vista Kernel-Mode: Functions, Security Enhancements and Flaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed D. ABDULMALIK

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Microsoft has made substantial enhancements to the kernel of the Microsoft Windows Vista operating system. Kernel improvements are significant because the kernel provides low-level operating system functions, including thread scheduling, interrupt and exception dispatching, multiprocessor synchronization, and a set of routines and basic objects.This paper describes some of the kernel security enhancements for 64-bit edition of Windows Vista. We also point out some weakness areas (flaws that can be attacked by malicious leading to compromising the kernel.

  20. MILITARY RESEARCH: Researchers Target Flaws in Ballistic Missile Defense Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakoff, D; Cho, A

    2000-06-16

    More than three dozen scientists journeyed to Washington, D.C., this week to warn lawmakers that a proposed $60 billion U.S. missile defense system, designed to knock incoming warheads out of the sky, is technically flawed because it can't pick out real warheads from decoys. Pentagon officials heatedly deny a new report by one scientist that contractors have rigged trials to hide the problem, although they admit that some tests were simplified to save time. In the wake of these events, a leading Democrat is urging President Bill Clinton to delay a pending decision on building the system.

  1. Multipoint fiber-optic laser-ultrasonic actuator based on fiber core-opened tapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiajun; Dong, Xiaolong; Gao, Shimin; Yao, Yong

    2017-11-27

    In this study, a novel fiber-optic, multipoint, laser-ultrasonic actuator based on fiber core-opened tapers (COTs) is proposed and demonstrated. The COTs were fabricated by splicing single-mode fibers using a standard fiber splicer. A COT can effectively couple part of a core mode into cladding modes, and the coupling ratio can be controlled by adjusting the taper length. Such characteristics are used to obtain a multipoint, laser-ultrasonic actuator with balanced signal strength by reasonably controlling the taper lengths of the COTs. As a prototype, we constructed an actuator that generated ultrasound at four points with a balanced ultrasonic strength by connecting four COTs with coupling ratios of 24.5%, 33.01%, 49.51%, and 87.8% in a fiber link. This simple-to-fabricate, multipoint, laser-ultrasonic actuator with balanced ultrasound signal strength has potential applications in fiber-optic ultrasound testing technology.

  2. Mechanized ultrasonic examination of piping systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, X.; Pfister, O.; Allidi, F.

    1988-01-01

    The success of mechanized ultrasonic examination applied on welds in piping systems in nuclear power plants is highly dependent on its careful preparation. From the development of an adequate examination technique to its implementation on site, many problems are to be solved. This is especially the case when dealing with austenitic welds or dissimilar metal welds. In addition to the specific needs for examination technique based on material properties and requirements for minimum flaw size detection, accessibility and radiation aspects have to be considered. A crew of skilled and highly trained examination personnel is required. Experience in various nuclear power plants, - BWR's and PWR's of different designs - has shown, that even difficult examination problems can be successfully solved, provided that there is a good preparation. The necessary step by step proceeding is illustrated by examples concerning mechanized examination. Preservice inspections and in-service inspections with specific requirements, due to the types of flaws to be found or the type of material concerned, are discussed

  3. Automated ultrasonic scanning of flat plate nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in Non-Destructive Testing lies in making the inspection as rapid, precise, cost effective and operator independent as possible. Only by optimizing these four factors can a technology take full advantage of the quality control possible with NDT. This paper describes a highly complex application of high frequency ultrasonics to image extremely small and difficult to detect flaws in a production line environment. The objects of interest are flat plate nuclear fuel used in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The plates are fabricated by hot rolling a sandwich of alloyed uranium fuel and aluminum cladding. After rolling, the block is flattened to a long thin plate approximately 1.27 m (55 inches) long, 102 mm (4 inches) wide and 1.25 mm (0.050 inches) thick. The core, or fuel area is nominally 0.75 mm (0.030 inches) thick with 0.25 mm (0.010 inches) of aluminum bonded to both sides. As might be expected the fabrication is a sensitive process which can introduce several flaws detrimental to the reactor operation if they are undetected. Two of the characteristics that must be examined are the cladding thickness of the aluminum left over the fuel and the quality of bond between the cladding and the fuel. If either the cladding is too thin or the bonding inadequate thermal and/or corrosive activity can crack the protective cladding

  4. Design and development of an ultrasonic pulser-receiver unit for non-destructive testing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, V.H.; Joshi, V.M.

    2002-11-01

    The pulser/receiver constitutes the most vital part of an ultrasonic flaw detector or an ultrasonic imaging system used for inspection of materials. The ultrasonic properties of the material and resolution requirements govern the choice of the frequency of ultrasound that can be optimally used. The pulser/receiver in turn decides the efficiency of excitation of the transducer and the overall signal to noise ratio of the system for best sensitivity and resolution. A variety of pulsers are used in the ultrasonic instruments employed for materials inspection. This report describes a square wave type of an ultrasonic pulser-receiver unit developed at Ultrasonic Instrumentation Section, Electronics Division, BARC. It has been primarily designed for excitation of the transducer that is used with a multi-channel ultrasonic imaging system ULTIMA 100M targeted for inspection of SS403 billets, which are in turn used as the base material for fabrication of end fittings for coolant channels of pressurized heavy water nuclear reactors (PHWRs). The design of the pulser is based upon very fast MOSFETs, configured as electronic switches. The pulser is operated with a linear bipolar H.V. supply (+/- 500V max.). The receiver provides a 60 dB gain with a -3 dB BW of 40 MHz. This pulser/receiver unit has been successfully interfaced with a 4 channel ULTIMA 100 M4 multichannel ultrasonic C-scan imaging system, also designed and developed by the authors at Ultrasonic Instrumentation Section (Electronics Division, BARC) and supplied to Centre for Design and Manufacturer - CDM, BARC. This system is being regularly used in C-scan imaging mode for volumetric inspection of SS403 billets for end fittings of 500 MWe PHWRs. (author)

  5. Rotating flux-focusing eddy current probe for flaw detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil, The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  6. Gun bore flaw image matching based on improved SIFT descriptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Luan; Xiong, Wei; Zhai, You

    2013-01-01

    In order to increase the operation speed and matching ability of SIFT algorithm, the SIFT descriptor and matching strategy are improved. First, a method of constructing feature descriptor based on sector area is proposed. By computing the gradients histogram of location bins which are parted into 6 sector areas, a descriptor with 48 dimensions is constituted. It can reduce the dimension of feature vector and decrease the complexity of structuring descriptor. Second, it introduce a strategy that partitions the circular region into 6 identical sector areas starting from the dominate orientation. Consequently, the computational complexity is reduced due to cancellation of rotation operation for the area. The experimental results indicate that comparing with the OpenCV SIFT arithmetic, the average matching speed of the new method increase by about 55.86%. The matching veracity can be increased even under some variation of view point, illumination, rotation, scale and out of focus. The new method got satisfied results in gun bore flaw image matching. Keywords: Metrology, Flaw image matching, Gun bore, Feature descriptor

  7. Eddy current probe and method for flaw detection in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watjen, John P.

    1987-06-23

    A flaw detecting system is shown which includes a probe having a pair of ferrite cores with in-line gaps in close proximity to each other. An insulating, non-magnetic, non-conducting holder fills the gaps and supports the ferrite cores in a manner such that the cores form a generally V-shape. Each core is provided with an excitation winding and a detection winding. The excitation windings are connected in series or parallel with an rf port for connection thereof to a radio frequency source. The detection windings, which are differentially wound, are connected in series circuit to a detector port for connection to a voltage measuring instrument. The ferrite cores at the in-line gaps directly engage the metal surface of a test piece, and the probe is scanned along the test piece. In the presence of a flaw in the metal surface the detection winding voltages are unbalanced, and the unbalance is detected by the voltage measuring instrument. The insulating holder is provided with a profile which conforms to that of a prominent feature of the test piece to facilitate movement of the probe along the feature, typically an edge or a corner.

  8. Amplitude-independent flaw length determination using differential eddy current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, E.

    2013-01-01

    Military engine component manufacturers typically specify the eddy current (EC) inspection requirements as a crack length or depth with the assumption that the cracks in both the test specimens and inspected component are of a similar fixed aspect ratio. However, differential EC response amplitude is dependent on the area of the crack face, not the length or depth. Additionally, due to complex stresses, in-service cracks do not always grow in the assumed manner. It would be advantageous to use more of the information contained in the EC data to better determine the full profile of cracks independent of the fixed aspect ratio amplitude response curve. A specimen with narrow width notches is used to mimic cracks of varying aspect ratios in a controllable manner. The specimen notches have aspect ratios that vary from 1:1 to 10:1. Analysis routines have been developed using the shape of the EC response signals that can determine the length of a surface flaw of common orientations without use of the amplitude of the signal or any supporting traditional probability of detection basis. Combined with the relationship between signal amplitude and area, the depth of the flaw can also be calculated.

  9. Radiation flaw detector for testing non-uniform surface bodies of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valevich, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation flaw detector for testing bodies of revolution with non-uniform surface, welded joints, etc., based on spatial filtration and differentiation of ionizing radiation flux has been described. The calculation of the most important unit of flaw detector - integrators - is made. Experimental studies of the sensitivity have shown, that the radiation flaw detector can be used for rapid testing of products with the sensitivity comparable with the sensitivity of radiographic testing of steel

  10. Optical Production and Detection of Ultrasonic Waves in Metals for Nondestructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves were produced by striking the surface of a metal with the focused one-joule pulse of a Q-switched ruby laser. Rayleigh (surface) waves and longitudinal waves were detected with conventional transducers. Optical methods of detection were tested and developed. Rayleigh waves were produced with an oscillator and transducer. They were optically detected on curved polished surfaces, and on unpolished surfaces. The technique uses a knife edge to detect small angle changes of the surface as the wave pulse passes the illuminated spot. Optical flaw detection using pulse echo and attenuation is demonstrated.

  11. Method for the detection of flaws in a tube proximate a contiguous member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, A.E.; Wehrmeister, A.E.; Whaley, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    A method for deriving the eddy current signature of a flaw in a tube proximate a contiguous member which is obscured in a composite signature of the flaw and contiguous member comprises subtracting from the composite signature a reference eddy current signature generated by scanning a reference or facsimile tube and contiguous member. The method is particularly applicable to detecting flaws in the tubes of heat exchangers of fossil fuel and nuclear power plants to enable the detection of flaws which would otherwise be obscured by contiguous members such as support plates supporting the tubes. (U.K.)

  12. Bounding the conservatism in flaw-related variables for pressure vessel integrity analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.

    1993-01-01

    The fracture mechanics-based integrity analysis of a pressure vessel, whether performed deterministically or probabilistically, requires use of one or more flaw-related input variables, such as flaw size, number of flaws, flaw location, and flaw type. The specific values of these variables are generally selected with the intent to ensure conservative predictions of vessel integrity. These selected values, however, are largely independent of vessel-specific inspection results, or are, at best, deduced by ''conservative'' interpretation of vessel-specific inspection results without adequate consideration of the pertinent inspection system performance (reliability). In either case, the conservatism associated with the flaw-related variables chosen for analysis remains examination (NDE) technology and the recently formulated ASME Code procedures for qualifying NDE system capability and performance (as applied to selected nuclear power plant components) now provides a systematic means of bounding the conservatism in flaw-related input variables for pressure vessel integrity analyses. This is essentially achieved by establishing probabilistic (risk)-based limits on the assigned variable values, dependent upon the vessel inspection results and on the inspection system unreliability. Described herein is this probabilistic method and its potential application to: (i) defining a vessel-specific ''reference'' flaw for calculating pressure-temperature limit curves in the deterministic evaluation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor vessels, and (ii) limiting the flaw distribution input to a PWR reactor vessel-specific, probabilistic integrity analysis for pressurized thermal shock loads

  13. Experimental verification on limit load estimation method for pipes with an arbitrary shaped circumferential surface flaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Hasegawa, Kunio; Miura, Naoki; Hoshino, Katsuaki

    2010-01-01

    When a flaw is detected in stainless steel pipes during in-service inspection, the limit load criterion given in the codes such as JSME Rules on Fitness-for-Service for Nuclear Power Plants or ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI can be applied to evaluate the integrity of the pipe. However, in these codes, the limit load criterion is only provided for pipes containing a flaw with uniform depth, although many flaws with complicated shape such as stress corrosion cracking have been actually detected in pipes. In order to evaluate the integrity of the flawed pipes for general case, a limit load estimation method has been proposed by authors considering a circumferential surface flaw with arbitrary shape. The plastic collapse bending moment and corresponding stress are obtained by dividing the surface flaw into several segmented sub-flaws. In this paper, the proposed method was verified by comparing with experimental results. Four-point bending experiments were carried out for full scale stainless steel pipes with a symmetrical or non-symmetrical circumferential flaw. Estimated failure bending moments by the proposed method were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, and the proposed method was confirmed to be effective for evaluating bending failure of pipes with flaw. (author)

  14. Ultrasonic attenuation in superconducting zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S.

    1978-01-01

    The differences in the Zn ultrasonic attenuation data of different workers are analyzed. The superconducting energy gaps deduced from our analysis of the ultrasonic-attenuation data of Cleavelin and Marshall are consistent with the gaps deduced from the knowledge of the Fermi surface and the electron-phonon mass enhancement factor

  15. Lumber defect detection by ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. A. McDonald

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonics, the technology of high-frequency sound, has been developed as a viable means for locating most defects In lumber for use in digital form in decision-making computers. Ultrasonics has the potential for locating surface and internal defects in lumber of all species, green or dry, and rough sawn or surfaced.

  16. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  17. Toward smart aerospace structures: design of a piezoelectric sensor and its analog interface for flaw detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-31

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  18. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Boukabache

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures’ reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure’s integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  19. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  20. Modification of the grain structure of austenitic welds for improved ultrasonic inspectability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.; Dugan, S.; Stubenrauch, S.; Jacobs, O.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel welds, which are widely used for example in nuclear power plants and chemical installations, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure of the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. The aim of this project is to influence grain growth in the weld during the welding process to produce smaller grains, in order to improve sound propagation through the weld, thus improving inspectability. Metallographic sections of the first test welds have shown that a modification of the grain structure can be achieved by influencing the grain growth with magnetic fields. For further optimization, test blocks for ultrasonic testing were manufactured to study sound propagation through the weld and detectability of test flaws.

  1. Quantitative ultrasonic evaluation of concrete structures using one-sided access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanovich, Lev; Hoegh, Kyle

    2016-02-01

    Nondestructive diagnostics of concrete structures is an important and challenging problem. A recent introduction of array ultrasonic dry point contact transducer systems offers opportunities for quantitative assessment of the subsurface condition of concrete structures, including detection of defects and inclusions. The methods described in this paper are developed for signal interpretation of shear wave impulse response time histories from multiple fixed distance transducer pairs in a self-contained ultrasonic linear array. This included generalizing Kirchoff migration-based synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) reconstruction methods to handle the spatially diverse transducer pair locations, creating expanded virtual arrays with associated reconstruction methods, and creating automated reconstruction interpretation methods for reinforcement detection and stochastic flaw detection. Interpretation of the reconstruction techniques developed in this study were validated using the results of laboratory and field forensic studies. Applicability of the developed methods for solving practical engineering problems was demonstrated.

  2. Implementation of efficient trajectories for an ultrasonic scanner using chaotic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeda, A.; Baltazar, A.; Treesatayapun, C.; Mijarez, R.

    2012-05-01

    Typical ultrasonic methodology for nondestructive scanning evaluation uses systematic scanning paths. In many cases, this approach is time inefficient and also energy and computational power consuming. Here, a methodology for the scanning of defects using an ultrasonic echo-pulse scanning technique combined with chaotic trajectory generation is proposed. This is implemented in a Cartesian coordinate robotic system developed in our lab. To cover the entire search area, a chaotic function and a proposed mirror mapping were incorporated. To improve detection probability, our proposed scanning methodology is complemented with a probabilistic approach of discontinuity detection. The developed methodology was found to be more efficient than traditional ones used to localize and characterize hidden flaws.

  3. Guided ultrasonic waves for determining effective orthotropic material parameters of continuous-fiber reinforced thermoplastic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webersen, Manuel; Johannesmann, Sarah; Düchting, Julia; Claes, Leander; Henning, Bernd

    2018-03-01

    Ultrasonic methods are widely established in the NDE/NDT community, where they are mostly used for the detection of flaws and structural damage in various components. A different goal, despite the similar technological approach, is non-destructive material characterization, i.e. the determination of parameters like Young's modulus. Only few works on this topic have considered materials with high damping and strong anisotropy, such as continuous-fiber reinforced plastics, but due to the increasing demand in the industry, appropriate methods are needed. In this contribution, we demonstrate the application of laser-induced ultrasonic Lamb waves for the characterization of fiber-reinforced plastic plates, providing effective parameters for a homogeneous, orthotropic material model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasonic variables affecting inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenheiser, C.E.; Whiting, A.R.; McElroy, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    There are many variables which affect the detection of the effects and reproducibility of results when utilizing ultrasonic techniques. The most important variable is the procedure, as this document specifies, to a great extent, the controls that are exercised over the other variables. The most important variable is personnel with regards to training, qualification, integrity, data recording, and data analysis. Although the data is very limited, these data indicate that, if the procedure is carefully controlled, reliability of defect detection and reproducibility of results are both approximately 90 percent for reliability of detection, this applies to relatively small defects as reliability increases substantially as defect size increases above the recording limit. (author)

  5. Development of Ultrasonic Pulse Compression Using Golay Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young H.; Kim, Young Gil; Jeong, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic flaw detection system uses a large amplitude narrow pulse to excite a transducer. However, these systems are limited in pulse energy. An excessively large amplitude causes a dielectric breakage of the transducer, and an excessively long pulse causes decrease of the resolution. Using the pulse compression, a long pulse of pseudorandom signal can be used without sacrificing resolution by signal correlation. In the present work, the pulse compression technique was implemented into an ultrasonic system. Golay code was used as a pseudorandom signal in this system, since pair sum of autocorrelations has no sidelobe. The equivalent input pulse of the Golay code was derived to analyze the pulse compression system. Throughout the experiment, the pulse compression technique has demonstrated for its improved SNR(signal to noise ratio) by reducing the system's white noise. And the experimental data also indicated that the SNR enhancement was proportional to the square root of the code length used. The technique seems to perform particularly well with highly energy-absorbent materials such as polymers, plastics and rubbers

  6. Inspection of austenitic welds with ultrasonic phased array technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.; Fernandez, F. [Tecnatom (Spain); Dutruc, R.; Ferriere, R. [Metalscan (France)

    2011-07-01

    This series of slides presents the use of ultrasonic phased array technology in the inspection of austenitic welds. The inspection from outside surface (the inspection is performed in contact using wedges to couple the probe to the outer surface of the component) shows that longitudinal wave is the most adequate for perpendicular scans and transversal ultrasonic wave is the most adequate for parallel scans. Detection and length sizing are performed optimally in perpendicular scans. The inspection from inside surface shows: -) Good results in the detection of defects (Sizing has met the requirements imposed by the Authority of the Russian Federation); -) The new design of the mechanical equipment and of the numerous ultrasonic beams refracted by the array probes has increased the volume inspected. The design of the mechanical equipment has also allowed new areas to be inspected (example a piping weld that was not accessible from the outer surface; -) The ultrasonic procedure and Inspection System developed have been validated by the Authority of the Russian Federation. Phase array technique supplies solutions to solve accessibility concerns and improve the ultrasonic inspections of nuclear components

  7. A Monte Carlo approach applied to ultrasonic non-destructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, I.; Bilgili, F.; Meier, T.; Sigloch, K.

    2012-04-01

    Non-destructive testing based on ultrasound allows us to detect, characterize and size discrete flaws in geotechnical and architectural structures and materials. This information is needed to determine whether such flaws can be tolerated in future service. In typical ultrasonic experiments, only the first-arriving P-wave is interpreted, and the remainder of the recorded waveform is neglected. Our work aims at understanding surface waves, which are strong signals in the later wave train, with the ultimate goal of full waveform tomography. At present, even the structural estimation of layered media is still challenging because material properties of the samples can vary widely, and good initial models for inversion do not often exist. The aim of the present study is to combine non-destructive testing with a theoretical data analysis and hence to contribute to conservation strategies of archaeological and architectural structures. We analyze ultrasonic waveforms measured at the surface of a variety of samples, and define the behaviour of surface waves in structures of increasing complexity. The tremendous potential of ultrasonic surface waves becomes an advantage only if numerical forward modelling tools are available to describe the waveforms accurately. We compute synthetic full seismograms as well as group and phase velocities for the data. We invert them for the elastic properties of the sample via a global search of the parameter space, using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. Such a Monte Carlo approach allows us to perform a complete uncertainty and resolution analysis, but the computational cost is high and increases quickly with the number of model parameters. Therefore it is practical only for defining the seismic properties of media with a limited number of degrees of freedom, such as layered structures. We have applied this approach to both synthetic layered structures and real samples. The former contributed to benchmark the propagation of ultrasonic surface

  8. Accomplishments: AE characterization program for remote flaw evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop an experimental/analytical evaluation of the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundaries by means of continuously monitoring acoustic emission (AE). The investigation is devoted exclusively to ASTM Type A533, Grade B, Class 1 material. The basic approach to interpretive model development is through laboratory testing of 1 to 1 1 / 2 inch (25.4 to 38 mm) thick fracture mechanics specimens in both fatigue and fracture at both room temperature and 550 0 F (288 0 C). Seven parameters are measured for each AE signal and related to fracture mechanics functions. AE data from fracture testing of 6 inch (152 mm) wall pressure vessels are also incorporated in analysis

  9. Design Flaws and Service System Breakdowns: Learning from Systems Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ing

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In what ways might systems thinking be helpful to designers?  In the 21st century, the types of project with which designers have become engaged has expanded to include service systems.  Service systems are typically composites of mechanisms, organisms, human beings and ecologies.  Systems thinking is a perspective with theories, methods and practices that enables transcending disciplinary boundaries.  Application of systems thinking in designing a service system can aid in surfacing potential flaws and/or anticipating future breakdowns in functions, structures and/or processes. Designers and systems thinkers should work together to improve the nature of service systems.  As a starter set into these conversations, seven conditions are proposed as a starting context.  These conditions are presented neither as rigourously defined nor as exhaustive, but as an entry point into future joint engagement.

  10. 'Moral distress'--time to abandon a flawed nursing construct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Hutchinson, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Moral distress has been characterised in the nursing literature as a major problem affecting nurses in all healthcare systems. It has been portrayed as threatening the integrity of nurses and ultimately the quality of patient care. However, nursing discourse on moral distress is not without controversy. The notion itself is conceptually flawed and suffers from both theoretical and practical difficulties. Nursing research investigating moral distress is also problematic on account of being methodologically weak and disparate. Moreover, the ultimate purpose and significance of the research is unclear. In light of these considerations, it is contended that the notion of moral distress ought to be abandoned and that concerted attention be given to advancing inquiries that are more conducive to improving the quality and safety of moral decision-making, moral conduct and moral outcomes in nursing and healthcare domains. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. China’s Flawed Banking Market Structure Must be Rectified

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于永臻

    2007-01-01

    There is great disparity between China’s banking management efficiency and the top international standard,with relatively low efficiency in credit monetary allocation.In this paper,Yu Yongzhen sets out the hypothesis that"medium-sized banks promote competition".He believes that an important reason for the low efficiency of Chinese banking is the seriously flawed banking market structure.Namely,credit market shares are highly concentrated in the hands of the four major state-owned banks,with very few shares held by medium-sized banks or the badly undeveloped small banks.Full development of medium-sized banks plays a key role in the promotion of competition and efficiency in banking.

  12. Profitable failure: antidepressant drugs and the triumph of flawed experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoey, Linsey

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on an analysis of Irving Kirsch and colleagues' controversial 2008 article in "PLoS [Public Library of Science] Magazine" on the efficacy of SSRI antidepressant drugs such as Prozac, I examine flaws within the methodologies of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have made it difficult for regulators, clinicians and patients to determine the therapeutic value of this class of drug. I then argue, drawing analogies to work by Pierre Bourdieu and Michael Power, that it is the very limitations of RCTs -- their inadequacies in producing reliable evidence of clinical effects -- that help to strengthen assumptions of their superiority as methodological tools. Finally, I suggest that the case of RCTs helps to explore the question of why failure is often useful in consolidating the authority of those who have presided over that failure, and why systems widely recognized to be ineffective tend to assume greater authority at the very moment when people speak of their malfunction.

  13. Methods for sorting out the defects according to size in automated ultrasonic testing of large-diameter thin-walled tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovkin, A.M.; Matveev, A.S

    1977-01-01

    Two methods have been considered of identifying defects according to their size in the course of an automated ultrasonic testing, namely, according to the echo-signal amplitude, and according to the conventional depth of a defect. The peculiar features of the second method are analyzed, and its equivalence to the first one is proved. For the purpose of identifying defects according to their conventional width, a technique is suggested of standartizing flaw detectors according to the control reflectors of two sizes

  14. An corrective method to correct of the inherent flaw of the asynchronization direct counting circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Renfei; Liu Congzhan; Jin Yongjie; Zhang Zhi; Li Yanguo

    2003-01-01

    As a inherent flaw of the Asynchronization Direct Counting Circuit, the crosstalk, which is resulted from the randomicity of the time-signal always exists between two adjacent channels. In order to reduce the counting error derived from the crosstalk, the author propose an effective method to correct the flaw after analysing the mechanism of the crosstalk

  15. Advances in flaw evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    During the past several years, intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) have been detected in stainless steel piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and have resulted in an increased number of flaw evaluations. To reduce the outage time associated with evaluating IGSCC, various research and ASME code groups have spent significant effort to provide utility personnel with efficient means to detect, classify, and size flaws, and to determine suitability for return to service for flawed stainless steel piping. One of the several nondestructive evaluation technologies that has received considerable attention is fracture mechanics, the discipline that considers the failure of flawed material. Fracture mechanics can be used to answer two key questions concerning return to service of flawed pipe: (a) what is the largest flaw size that can be returned to service and still maintain adequate safety margins at the applied loads, and (b) how much operating time remains before the crack reaches the largest allowable size? The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recently developed ASME code Section XI flaw size evaluation procedure and acceptance criteria for stainless steel piping and their application by BWR owners to efficiently determine if flaws found by nondestructive examination are acceptable for continued service

  16. Advances in flaw evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for reactor piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    During the past several years, intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) have been detected in stainless steel piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and have resulted in an increased number of flaw evaluations. To reduce the outage time associated with evaluating IGSCC, various research and ASME code groups have spent significant effort to provide utility personnel with efficient means to detect, classify, and size flaws, and to determine suitability for return to service for flawed stainless steel piping. One of the several nondestructive evaluation technologies that has received considerable attention is fracture mechanics, the discipline that considers the failure of flawed material. Fracture mechanics can be used to answer two key questions concerning return to service of flawed pipe: (a) what is the largest flaw size that can be returned to service and still maintain adequate safety margins at the applied loads, and (b) how much operating time remains before the crack reaches the largest allowable size. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recently developed ASME code Section XI flaw size evaluation procedure and acceptance criteria for stainless steel piping and their application by BWR owners to efficiently determine if flaws found by nondestructive examination are acceptable for continued service.

  17. Imaging techniques for ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    These seminar proceedings contain 16 lectures on the following topics: 1. From imaging to quantification - ultrasound methods in medical diagnostics; 2. SAFT, TOFD, Phased Array - classical applications and recent developments in ultrasonic imaging; 3. Innovative ultrasonic imaging methods in research and application; 4. Industrial ultrasonic testing of fibre-reinforced structures of complex geometry; 5. Visualisation of crack tips in the inspection of wheel set shafts with longitudinal boreholes as a means of avoiding unnecessary wheel set changes; 6. Areal analysis of the propagation of Lamb waves on curved, anisotropic structures; 7. High-resolution representation in immersion technique testing; 8. Variants in generating images from phased array measurement data - practical examples involving copper, carbon-fibre reinforced plastic and other materials; 9. GIUM - an unconventional method of microstructure imaging using ultrasonic stimulation and laser vibrometry scanning; 10. Innovative air-ultrasonic testing concepts for improved imaging; 11. Use of imaging methods for improving the quality of test results from nondestructive testing; 12. Modelling and visualisation of EMUS stimulation for transducer optimisation; 13. Use of SAFT in the manufacture of energy conversion machines; 14. Ultrasonic imaging tests for improved defect characterisation during weld seam inspection on longitudinally welded large-diameter pipes; 15. SAFT reconstruction for testing austenitic weld seams and dissimilar metal weld seams for transverse cracks; 16. Imaging-based optimisation method for quantitative ultrasonic testing of anisotropic inhomogeneous austenitic welded joints with determination and utilisation of their elastic properties. One contribution has been abstracted separately. [de

  18. Study on the Thick-Walled Pipe Ultrasonic Signal Enhancement of Modified S-Transform and Singular Value Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichao Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When detecting the ultrasonic flaw of thick-walled pipe, the flaw echo signals are often interrupted by scanning system frequency and background noise. In particular when the thick-walled pipe defect is small, echo signal amplitude is often drowned in noise signal and affects the extraction of defect signal and the position determination accuracy. This paper presents the modified S-transform domain singular value decomposition method for the analysis of ultrasonic flaw echo signals. By changing the scale rule of Gaussian window functions with S-transform to improve the time-frequency resolution. And the paper tries to decompose the singular value decomposition of time-frequency matrix after the S-transform to determine the singular entropy of effective echo signal and realize the adaptive filter. Experiments show that, using this method can not only remove high frequency noise but also remove the low frequency noise and improve the signal-to-noise ratio of echo signal.

  19. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  20. Optimization and verification of ultrasonic testability of acoustically anisotropic materials on austenitic and dissimilar welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudovikov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds with respect to the ultrasonic testing (UT) methods are considered normally as ''difficult-to-test'' objects. During the solidification process in such welds a distinct dendrite microstructure evolves, which is coarse-grained, anisotropic and inhomogeneous simultaneously. The reliability of available ultrasonic methods on austenitic welds depends significantly on the selected UT-parameters as well as on the inspection personnel experience. In the present dissertation, an ultrasonic testing method was developed, which allows the flaw detection and evaluation in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous materials, especially in austenitic and dissimilar welds with a quantitative statement to the defect size, type, and location. The principle of synthetic focusing with taking into account the material anisotropy and inhomogeneity along with two- and three-dimensional visualization provides a reliable and quantitative assessment of the inspection results in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous test objects. Among others, an iterative algorithm for the determination of unknown elastic properties of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials has been developed. It allows practical application of the developed UT method, since the anisotropy of most of austenitic and dissimilar welds (especially of hand-welded joints) in practice is usually unknown. The functionality of the developed inspection technique has been validated by many experiments on welded austenitic specimens having artificial and natural defects. For the practical application of the new ultrasonic technique different testing strategies are proposed, which can be used depending on the current inspection task.

  1. Ultrasonic inspection of the strength member weld of transit and pioneer heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudley, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    A nondestructive technique was developed which allows ultrasonic inspection of the closure weld for the strength member component in plutonium-238 radioisotopic heat sources. The advantage of the ultrasonic approach, over that of the more commonly used radiographic one, is the recognized superiority of ultrasonic testing for identifying lack-of-weld penetration (LOP) when accompanied by incomplete diffusion bonding. The ultrasonic technique, a transverse mode scan of the weld for detection of LOP, is primarily accomplished by use of a holding fixture which permits the vented heat source to be immersed into an inspection tank. The mechanical portion of the scanning system is a lathe modified with an inspection tank and a manipulator. This scanning system has been used in the past to inspect SNAP-27 heat sources. The analyzer-transducer combination used in the inspection is capable of detecting a channel type flaw with a side wall depth of 0.076 mm (0.003 in.) in a weld standard. (U.S.)

  2. Real-time measurement of relative sensor position changes using ultrasonic signal evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yastrebova, O.; Bulavinov, A.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer Institute Nondestructive Testing IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Ultrasonic testing is considered to be one of the most commonly applied nondestructive testing techniques for flaw detection and material characterization. Traditional Nondestructive Testing (NDT) provides detection of material discontinuities that may cause failure within the designed lifetime of a part or component. In addition, Quantitative Nondestructive Testing (QNDT) provides means to obtain required information about type, size and location of deficiencies to the integrity of the inspected structure and further use under specific, given load conditions. The ''Acoustic Mouse'' technique has been developed as a tool for manual ultrasonic inspection to provide test results that can be evaluated quantitatively. The ultrasonic data are processed by real-time variation methods to extract position information from backscattered acoustic noise and geometric scatter signals in the inspection volume. The position and positional changes of the ''Acoustic Mouse'' sensor (transducer) are determined by the sequential analysis of ultrasonic data (highresolution sector-scans), which are acquired and reconstructed using the Sampling Phased Array technique. The results of first experiments conducted with linear scanning and intentional lift-offs demonstrate sufficient accuracy in position measurements. (orig.)

  3. Babcock experience of automated ultrasonic non-destructive testing of PWR pressure vessels during manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikstra, B.J.; Farley, J.M.; Scruton, G.

    1990-01-01

    Major developments in ultrasonic techniques, equipment and systems for automated inspection have lead, over a period of about ten years, to the regular application of sophisticated computer-controlled systems during the manufacture of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Ten years ago the use of procedures defined in a code such as ASME XI might have been considered sufficient, but it is now necessary, as was demonstrated by the results of the UKAEA defect detection trials and the PISC II trials, to apply more comprehensive arrays of probes and higher test sensitivities. The ultrasonic techniques selected are demonstrated to be adequate by modelling or test-block exercises, the automated systems applied are subject to stringent quality assurance testing, and very rigorous inspection procedures are used in conjunction with a high degree of automation to ensure reproducibility of inspection quality. The state-of-the-art in automated ultrasonic testing of pressure vessels by Babcock is described. Current developments by the company, including automated flaw recognition, integrated modelling of inspection capability, and the use of electronically scanned variable-angle probes are reviewed. Examples quoted include the automated ultrasonic inspections of the Sizewell B pressurized water reactor vessel. (author)

  4. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daw, J.; Rempe, J.; Palmer, J.; Tittmann, B.; Reinhardt, B.; Kohse, G.; Ramuhalli, P.; Montgomery, R.; Chien, H.T.; Villard, J.F.

    2013-06-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of numerous parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 10 21 n/cm 2 (E> 0.1 MeV). This test will be an instrumented lead test; and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. By characterizing magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, test results will enable the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. (authors)

  5. Review of piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joontaek; Lee, Wonjun; Kang, Woojin; Shin, Eunjung; Choi, Hongsoo; Ryu, Jungho

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, micromachined ultrasonic transducers (MUTs) have been investigated as an alternative to conventional piezocomposite ultrasonic transducers, primarily due to the advantages that microelectromechanical systems provide. Miniaturized ultrasonic systems require ultrasonic transducers integrated with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Hence, piezoelectric MUTs (pMUTs) and capacitive MUTs (cMUTs) have been developed as the most favorable solutions. This paper reviews the basic equations to understand the characteristics of thin-film-based piezoelectric devices and presents recent research on pMUTs, including current approaches and limitations. Methods to improve the coupling coefficient of pMUTs are also investigated, such as device structure, materials, and fabrication techniques. The device structure improvements include multielectrode pMUTs, partially clamped boundary conditions, and 3D pMUTs (curved and domed types), where the latter can provide an electromechanical coupling coefficient of up to 45%. The piezoelectric coefficient ( e 31 ) can be increased by controlling the crystal texture (seed layer of γ -Al 2 O 3 ), using single-crystal (PMN-PT) materials, or control of residual stresses (using SiO 2 layer). Arrays of pMUTs can be implemented for various applications including intravascular ultrasound, fingerprint sensors, rangefinders in air, and wireless power supply systems. pMUTs are expected to be an ideal solution for applications such as mobile biometric security (fingerprint sensors) and rangefinders due to their superior power efficiency and compact size. (topical review)

  6. Review of piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joontaek; Lee, Wonjun; Kang, Woojin; Shin, Eunjung; Ryu, Jungho; Choi, Hongsoo

    2017-11-01

    In recent decades, micromachined ultrasonic transducers (MUTs) have been investigated as an alternative to conventional piezocomposite ultrasonic transducers, primarily due to the advantages that microelectromechanical systems provide. Miniaturized ultrasonic systems require ultrasonic transducers integrated with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Hence, piezoelectric MUTs (pMUTs) and capacitive MUTs (cMUTs) have been developed as the most favorable solutions. This paper reviews the basic equations to understand the characteristics of thin-film-based piezoelectric devices and presents recent research on pMUTs, including current approaches and limitations. Methods to improve the coupling coefficient of pMUTs are also investigated, such as device structure, materials, and fabrication techniques. The device structure improvements include multielectrode pMUTs, partially clamped boundary conditions, and 3D pMUTs (curved and domed types), where the latter can provide an electromechanical coupling coefficient of up to 45%. The piezoelectric coefficient (e 31) can be increased by controlling the crystal texture (seed layer of γ-Al2O3), using single-crystal (PMN-PT) materials, or control of residual stresses (using SiO2 layer). Arrays of pMUTs can be implemented for various applications including intravascular ultrasound, fingerprint sensors, rangefinders in air, and wireless power supply systems. pMUTs are expected to be an ideal solution for applications such as mobile biometric security (fingerprint sensors) and rangefinders due to their superior power efficiency and compact size.

  7. Development of technology on natural flaw fabrication and precise diagnosis for the major components in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jung Ho; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Doek Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a fabrication technology of natural flaw specimen of major components in NPPs and a technology of precise diagnosis for failure and degradation of components using natural flaw specimen. 1) Successful development of the natural flaw fabrication technology of SG tube 2) Evaluation of ECT signal and development of precise diagnosis using natural flaws. - Determination of length, depth, width, and multiplicity of fabricated natural flaws. - Informations about detectability and accuracy of ECT evaluation on various kinds of defects are collected when the combination of probe and frequency is changed. - An advanced technology for precise ECT evaluation is established. 3) Application of precise ECT diagnosis to failure analysis of SG tube in operation. - Fretting wear of KSNP SG. - ODSCC at tube expanded region of KSNP SG. - Determination of through/non-through wall of axial crack

  8. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  9. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  10. Estimation of the number of physical flaws from periodic ISI data of SG tubes using effective POD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Bong; Park, Jai Hak; Kim, Hong Deok; Chung, Han Sub

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to know the number of flaws and their size distribution in order to calculate the probability of failure or to estimate the amount of leakage through the tube wall of steam generators. But In-Service Inspection (ISI) flaw data is different from the physical flaw data. In case of a single inspection, it is easy to estimate the number of physical flaws using the POD curve. However, we may be faced with some difficulties in obtaining the number of physical flaws from the periodic in-service inspection data. In this study a method for estimating the number of physical flaws from periodic in-service inspection data is proposed. In order to calculate the number of physical flaws with periodic ISI data, both probabilities of detecting and missing flaws should be considered. And flaw initiation and growth history must be known also. The flaw initiation and growth history can be inferred from appropriate probabilistic flaw growth rate. Two inference methods are proposed and compared. One is Monte Carlo simulation method and the other is transition (stochastic) matrix method. The effective POD, the total possibility of detection considering both probabilities of detecting and missing flaws for each flaw size, can be calculated using above two inference methods. And two methods are compared and the usefulness and convenience are evaluated from several applications

  11. A multi-purpose ultrasonic streaming mixer for integrated magnetic bead ELISAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandhoff, Lukas; Lang, Walter; Vellekoop, Michael J; Zirath, Helene; Peham, Johannes; Wiesinger-Mayr, Herbert; Salas, Mariugenia; Haller, Anna; Spittler, Andreas; Schnetz, Guntram

    2015-01-01

    We present an ultrasonic streaming mixer for disposable and on-chip magnetic bead ELISAs. The ultrasonic transducer is placed at system-level to keep cost per chip as low as possible, and is coupled to the chip by means of a solid ultrasonic horn. The system provides mixing of liquids, as well as dispersion of the superparamagnetic beads in the ELISA. Additionally it can be used clean the chamber surface from nonspecifically bound proteins during the washing steps in the ELISA protocol. Using our system the time for the ELISA protocol has been greatly reduced down to 30 min. (paper)

  12. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  13. Ultrasonic/Sonic Rotary-Hammer Drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kassab, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic/sonic rotary-hammer drill (USRoHD) is a recent addition to the collection of apparatuses based on ultrasonic/sonic drill corer (USDC). As described below, the USRoHD has several features, not present in a basic USDC, that increase efficiency and provide some redundancy against partial failure. USDCs and related apparatuses were conceived for boring into, and/or acquiring samples of, rock or other hard, brittle materials of geological interest. They have been described in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. To recapitulate: A USDC can be characterized as a lightweight, lowpower, piezoelectrically driven jackhammer in which ultrasonic and sonic vibrations are generated and coupled to a tool bit. A basic USDC includes a piezoelectric stack, an ultrasonic transducer horn connected to the stack, a free mass ( free in the sense that it can bounce axially a short distance between hard stops on the horn and the bit), and a tool bit. The piezoelectric stack creates ultrasonic vibrations that are mechanically amplified by the horn. The bouncing of the free mass between the hard stops generates the sonic vibrations. The combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibrations gives rise to a hammering action (and a resulting chiseling action at the tip of the tool bit) that is more effective for drilling than is the microhammering action of ultrasonic vibrations alone. The hammering and chiseling actions are so effective that unlike in conventional twist drilling, little applied axial force is needed to make the apparatus advance into the material of interest. There are numerous potential applications for USDCs and related apparatuses in geological exploration on Earth and on remote planets. In early USDC experiments, it was observed that accumulation of cuttings in a drilled hole causes the rate of penetration of the USDC to decrease steeply with depth, and that the rate of penetration can be increased by removing the cuttings. The USRoHD concept provides for

  14. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks

  15. Ultrasonic imaging in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribay, G.; Paris, O.; Rambach, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The third and final protection barrier confining nuclear reactors is usually a concrete containment structure. Monitoring the structural integrity of these barriers is critical in ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in France in collaboration with the French Atomic commission (CEA/LIST) has developed an ultrasonic phased-array technique capable of inspecting thick concrete walls. The non-destructive method is dedicated to detect cracks and bulk defects. Given the thickness of the structure (1.2 m) undergoing inspection and the heterogeneity of the concrete, the optimal frequency lies in the 50-300 kHz range. At these frequencies, the ultrasonic beam profiles are widespread (non-directive) with poor signal-to-noise ratio. Previous studies have shown the potential of using phased-array techniques (i.e., beam focusing and beam steering) in order to improve detection resolution and sizing accuracy. In this paper we present experimental studies performed with array up to 16 transducers working at 200 kHz. Experiments are carried out on representative concrete blocks containing artificial defects. One is a reinforced mock-up representative of the first reinforcing mesh of wall containment. Experimental results show that in spite of the reinforcement, artificial defects deep as half a meter can be detected. Reconstructed images resulting from phased array acquisitions on an artificial crack embedded in a concrete block are also presented and discussed. The presented method allows detecting oriented defects in concrete with improved signal to noise ratio and sensibility. A simulation model of the interaction of ultrasound with a heterogeneous medium like concrete is briefly commented. (authors)

  16. Case studies in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, V.; Satheesh, C.; Varde, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is widely used Non Destructive Testing (NDT) method and forms the essential part of In-service inspection programme of nuclear reactors. Main application of ultrasonic testing is for volumetric scanning of weld joints followed by thickness gauging of pipelines and pressure vessels. Research reactor Dhruva has completed the first In Service Inspection programme in which about 325 weld joints have been volumetrically scanned, in addition to thickness gauging of 300 meters of pipe lines of various sizes and about 24 nos of pressure vessels. Ultrasonic testing is also used for level measurements, distance measurements and cleaning and decontamination of tools. Two case studies are brought out in this paper in which ultrasonic testing is used successfully for identification of butterfly valve opening status and extent of choking in pipe lines in Dhruva reactor systems

  17. Ultrasonic Technology in Duress Alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martha A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides the pros and cons of the most commonly used technologies in personal duress alarm systems in the school environment. Discussed are radio frequency devices, infrared systems, and ultrasonic technology. (GR)

  18. Ultrasonic extensometer measures bolt preload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Extensometer using ultrasonic pulse reflections to measure elongations in tightened belts and studs is much more accurate than conventional torque wrenches in application of specified preload to bolts and other threaded fasteners.

  19. Delamination evaluation of thermal barrier coating on turbine blade owing to isothermal degradation using ultrasonic C-scan image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Girl; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) is an essential element consisting of a super-alloy base and ceramic coating designed to achieve long operational time under a high temperature and pressure environment. However, the top coat of TBC can be delaminated at certain temperatures with long operation time. As the delamination of TBC is directly related to the blade damage, the coupling status of the TBC should be assured for reliable operation. Conventional studies of nondestructive evaluation have been made for detecting generation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) or qualitatively evaluating delamination in TBC. In this study, the ultrasonic C-scan method was developed to obtain the damage map inside TBC by estimating the delamination in a quantitative way. All specimens were isothermally degraded at 1,100°C with different time, having different partial delamination area. To detect partial delamination in TBC, the C-scan was performed by a single transducer using pulse-echo method with normal incidence. Partial delamination coefficients of 1 mm to 6 mm were derived by the proportion of the surface reflection signal and flaw signal which were theoretical signals using Rogers-Van Buren and Kim's equations. Using the partial delamination coefficients, the partial delamination maps were obtained. Regardless of the partial delamination coefficient, partial delamination area was increased when degradation time was increased in TBC. In addition, a decrease in partial delamination area in each TBC specimen was observed when the partial delamination coefficient was increased. From the portion of the partial delamination maps, the criterion for delamination was derived.

  20. Delamination evaluation of thermal barrier coating on turbine blade owing to isothermal degradation using ultrasonic C-scan image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Girl; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung

    2016-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) is an essential element consisting of a super-alloy base and ceramic coating designed to achieve long operational time under a high temperature and pressure environment. However, the top coat of TBC can be delaminated at certain temperatures with long operation time. As the delamination of TBC is directly related to the blade damage, the coupling status of the TBC should be assured for reliable operation. Conventional studies of nondestructive evaluation have been made for detecting generation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) or qualitatively evaluating delamination in TBC. In this study, the ultrasonic C-scan method was developed to obtain the damage map inside TBC by estimating the delamination in a quantitative way. All specimens were isothermally degraded at 1,100°C with different time, having different partial delamination area. To detect partial delamination in TBC, the C-scan was performed by a single transducer using pulse-echo method with normal incidence. Partial delamination coefficients of 1 mm to 6 mm were derived by the proportion of the surface reflection signal and flaw signal which were theoretical signals using Rogers-Van Buren and Kim's equations. Using the partial delamination coefficients, the partial delamination maps were obtained. Regardless of the partial delamination coefficient, partial delamination area was increased when degradation time was increased in TBC. In addition, a decrease in partial delamination area in each TBC specimen was observed when the partial delamination coefficient was increased. From the portion of the partial delamination maps, the criterion for delamination was derived

  1. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing on CFC monoblock divertor mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, K.; Taniguchi, M.; Sato, K.; Araki, M.; Akiba, M.

    2001-01-01

    Non-destructive ultrasonic testing has been applied for the characterization of joints by means of a polymer transducer. One of the advantages of the polymer transducer is flexibility in its shape and the possibility to install multiple transducers in one probe, which can reduce the time for inspection. As a first step, the size effect of the transducer on the resolution and sensitivity was examined to detect the joint flaw. Transducers with circumferential angles of 5 , 10 and 30 were tested. For this test a small divertor element with a driller hole was prepared, which simulates a joint defect. The transducers with angles of 30 could not characterize the size of the artificial joint flaw. On the contrary, the size of the artificial defect was successfully detected with an accuracy of 90% by means of the transducers with angles of 5 and 10 . From the viewpoint of the sensitivity of the detection of the joint flaw, the transducer with the angle of 10 is appropriate because it could detect the largest intensity of the reflected signal caused by the same artificial defect of the joint interface. (orig.)

  2. Microstructure, flaw tolerance, and reliability of Ce-TZP and Y-TZP ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Readey, M.J.; McCallen, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Ce-TZP and Y-TZP ceramics were heat-treated for various times and temperatures in order to vary the microstructure. Flaw tolerance was investigated using the indentation-strength test. Reliability was quantified using conventional two-parameter Weibull statistics. Some Ce-TZP specimens were indented at slightly elevated temperatures where no transformation was observed. Results indicated that the Ce-TZP specimens were extremely flaw tolerant, and showed a relatively high Weibull modulus that scaled with both R-curve behavior and flaw tolerance. Y-TZP, on the other hand, with very little if any R-curve behavior or flaw tolerance, had a low Weibull modulus. The results also show that flaw history, i.e., whether or not a transformation zone exists along the wake of the crack, has a significant influence on strength. Strength was much less dependent on initial crack size when the crack had an associated transformation zone, whereas strength was highly dependent on cracks typical of natural processing defects. It is argued that the improvement in reliability, flaw tolerance, and dependence on flaw history are all ramifications of pronounced R-curve behavior

  3. Detection and Characterization of Flaws in Sprayed on Foam Insulation with Pulsed Terahertz Frequency Electromagnetic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    The detection and repair of flaws such as voids and delaminations in the sprayed on foam insulation of the external tank reduces the probability of foam debris during shuttle ascent. The low density of sprayed on foam insulation along with it other physical properties makes detection of flaws difficult with conventional techniques. An emerging technology that has application for quantitative evaluation of flaws in the foam is pulsed electromagnetic waves at terahertz frequencies. The short wavelengths of these terahertz pulses make them ideal for imaging flaws in the foam. This paper examines the application of terahertz pulses for flaw detection in foam characteristic of the foam insulation of the external tank. Of particular interest is the detection of voids and delaminations, encapsulated in the foam or at the interface between the foam and a metal backing. The technique is shown to be capable of imaging small voids and delaminations through as much as 20 cm of foam. Methods for reducing the temporal responses of the terahertz pulses to improve flaw detection and yield quantitative characterizations of the size and location of the flaws are discussed.

  4. Variable flaw shape analysis for a reactor vessel under pressurized thermal shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.Y.; Bamford, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    A study has been conducted to characterize the response of semi-elliptic surface flaws to thermal shock conditions which can result from safety injection actuation in nuclear reactor vessels. A methodology was developed to predict the behavior of a flaw during sample pressurized thermal shock events. The effects of a number of key variables on the flaw propagation were studied, including fracture toughness of the material and its gradient through the thickness, irradiation effects, effects of warm prestressing, and effects of the stainless steel cladding. The results of these studies show that under thermal shock loading conditions the flaw always tends to elongate along the vessel inside surface from the initial aspect ratio. However, the flaw shape always remains finite rather than becoming continuously long, as has often been assumed in earlier analyses. The final shape and size of the flaws were found to be rather strongly dependent on the effects of warm prestressing and the distribution of neutron flux. The improved methodology results in a more accurate and more realistic treatment of flaw shape changes during thermal shock events and provides the potential for quantifying additional margins for reactor vessel integrity analyses

  5. Assessing performance of flaw characterization methods through uncertainty propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miorelli, R.; Le Bourdais, F.; Artusi, X.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we assess the inversion performance in terms of crack characterization and localization based on synthetic signals associated to ultrasonic and eddy current physics. More precisely, two different standard iterative inversion algorithms are used to minimize the discrepancy between measurements (i.e., the tested data) and simulations. Furthermore, in order to speed up the computational time and get rid of the computational burden often associated to iterative inversion algorithms, we replace the standard forward solver by a suitable metamodel fit on a database built offline. In a second step, we assess the inversion performance by adding uncertainties on a subset of the database parameters and then, through the metamodel, we propagate these uncertainties within the inversion procedure. The fast propagation of uncertainties enables efficiently evaluating the impact due to the lack of knowledge on some parameters employed to describe the inspection scenarios, which is a situation commonly encountered in the industrial NDE context.

  6. Self-propelled x-ray flaw detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, L.S.; Krasilnikov, S.B.; Lozovoi, L.N.; Losev, J.F.; Morgovsky, L.Y.; Pelix, E.A.; Khakimyanov, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    A self-propelled X-ray flaw detector for radiographic inspection of welded joints in pipelines comprises a carriage mounting a motor, a detector having two Geiger counters, a pulsed X-ray generator, and an exposure and carriage electronic control system. A memory unit in the control system has four storage elements containing information about the motion of the carriage. As the carriage moves in direction A, first one and then the other of the Geiger counters receives radiation from an isotope source positioned near a joint, and by means of logic circuitry in the control system, the information in the storage elements is modified to stop the carriage and to operate a timer to expose the weld. During exposure the X-rays may interfere with the information in the storage elements, but by means of a square-wave generator and the logic circuitry, the stored information is correctly reset in order to eliminate false operation of the memory unit. (author)

  7. Enron Flaws In Organizational Architecture And Its Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of corporate scandals at the beginning of last decade has given rise to the doubt on the efficiency of corporate governance practice in the United States. Of these scandals the collapse of Enron has exceptionally captured the public concern. It was the once seventh-largest company in the United States 1. It was rated the most innovative large company in America in Fortunes Most Admired Companies survey 2. In August 2000 its stock reached a peak of nearly 70 billion 3. However within a year its stock had become almost useless papers 2. It just was unbelievable for many people. What went wrong Was it due to the failure of corporate governance in general Actually the central factor leading to the collapse of Enron was the failure in its organizational architecture. This paper starts by providing an overview of corporate governance system with an emphasis on the corporate organizational architecture as its important facet. Then it discusses flaws in the organizational architecture of Enron and argues that these eventually led to the breakdown of the whole corporate governance system at Enron. Finally some implications and lessons for the practice of corporate governance are presented.

  8. Flaw assessment procedure for high temperature reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Takahashi, Y.

    1990-01-01

    An interim high-temperature flaw assessment procedure is described. This is a result of a collaborative effort between Electric Power Research Institute in the USA, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan, and Nuclear Electric plc in the UK. The procedure addresses preexisting defects subject to creep-fatigue loading conditions. Laws employed to calculate the crack growth per cycle are defined in terms of fracture mechanics parameters and constants related to the component material. The crack growth laws may be integrated to calculate the remaining life of a component or to predict the amount of crack extension in a given period. Fatigue and creep crack growth per cycle are calculated separately, and the total crack extension is taken as the simple sum of the two contributions. An interaction between the two propagation modes is accounted for in the material properties in the separate calculations. In producing the procedure, limitations of the approach have been identified. Some of these limitations are to be addressed in an extension of the current collaborative program. 20 refs

  9. Design of Friction Stir Welding Tool for Avoiding Root Flaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shude; Xing, Jingwei; Yue, Yumei; Ma, Yinan; Zhang, Liguo; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2013-12-12

    In order to improve material flow behavior during friction stir welding and avoid root flaws of weld, a tool with a half-screw pin and a tool with a tapered-flute pin are suggested. The effect of flute geometry in tool pins on material flow velocity is investigated by the software ANSYS FLUENT. Numerical simulation results show that high material flow velocity appears near the rotational tool and material flow velocity rapidly decreases with the increase of distance away from the axis of the tool. Maximum material flow velocity by the tool with the tapered-flute pin appears at the beginning position of flute and the velocity decreases with the increase of flow length in flute. From the view of increasing the flow velocity of material near the bottom of the workpiece or in the middle of workpiece, the tool with the half-screw pin and the tool with the tapered-flute pin are both better than the conventional tool.

  10. Cracking and Failure in Rock Specimen Containing Combined Flaw and Hole under Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flaw is a key factor influencing failure behavior of a fractured specimen. In the present study, rectangular-flawed specimens were prepared using sandstone to investigate the effect of flaw on failure behavior of rock. Open flaw and cylindrical hole were simultaneously precut within rock specimens using high-pressure water jet cutting technology. Five series of specimens including intact, single-hole-alone, two-hole-alone, single-hole and two-flaw, and two-hole and single-flaw blocks were prepared. Uniaxial compressive tests using a rigid servo control instrument were carried out to investigate the fracture processes of these flawed specimens. It is observed that during loading, internal stress always intensively distributed at both sidewalls of open hole, especially at midpoint of sidewalls, so rock crumb flaking was firstly observed among all sandstone specimens containing single hole or two holes. Cracking around open hole is associated with the flaw inclination angle which was observed in Series III and V. Crack easily initiated at the tips of flaw with inclination angles of 0°, 30°, and 60° but hard for 90° in Series III and V. Rock burst was the major failure mode among most tested specimens, which generally induced new cracks and finally created crater shape. Additionally, due to extrusion between blocks, new shear or tensile cracks were generated and the rock specimen surface spalled. Eventually, four typical failure processes including rock crumb flaking, crack initiation and propagation, rock burst, and second rupture, were summarized.

  11. Non-contact fluid characterization in containers using ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-15

    Apparatus and method for non-contact (stand-off) ultrasonic determination of certain characteristics of fluids in containers or pipes are described. A combination of swept frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), wide-bandwidth, air-coupled acoustic transducers, narrowband frequency data acquisition, and data conversion from the frequency domain to the time domain, if required, permits meaningful information to be extracted from such fluids.

  12. Nonlinear ultrasonics for material state awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    Predictive health monitoring of structural components will require the development of advanced sensing techniques capable of providing quantitative information on the damage state of structural materials. By focusing on nonlinear acoustic techniques, it is possible to measure absolute, strength based material parameters that can then be coupled with uncertainty models to enable accurate and quantitative life prediction. Starting at the material level, this review will present current research that involves a combination of sensing techniques and physics-based models to characterize damage in metallic materials. In metals, these nonlinear ultrasonic measurements can sense material state, before the formation of micro- and macro-cracks. Typically, cracks of a measurable size appear quite late in a component's total life, while the material's integrity in terms of toughness and strength gradually decreases due to the microplasticity (dislocations) and associated change in the material's microstructure. This review focuses on second harmonic generation techniques. Since these nonlinear acoustic techniques are acoustic wave based, component interrogation can be performed with bulk, surface and guided waves using the same underlying material physics; these nonlinear ultrasonic techniques provide results which are independent of the wave type used. Recent physics-based models consider the evolution of damage due to dislocations, slip bands, interstitials, and precipitates in the lattice structure, which can lead to localized damage.

  13. Ultrasonic level, temperature, and density sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.C.; Miller, G.N.

    1982-01-01

    A sensor has been developed to measure simultaneously the level, temperature, and density of the fluid in which it is immersed. The sensor is a thin, rectangular stainless steel ribbon which acts as a waveguide and is housed in a perforated tube. The waveguide is coupled to a section of magnetostrictive magnetic-coil transducers. These tranducers are excited in an alternating sequence to interrogate the sensor with both torsional ultrasonic waves, utilizing the Wiedemann effect, and extensional ultrasonic waves, using the Joule effect. The measured torsional wave transit time is a function of the density, level, and temperature of the fluid surrounding the waveguide. The measured extensional wave transit time is a function of the temperature of the waveguide only. The sensor is divided into zones by the introduction of reflecting surfaces at measured intervals along its length. Consequently, the transit times from each reflecting surface can be analyzed to yield a temperature profile and a density profile along the length of the sensor. Improvements in acoustic wave dampener and pressure seal designs enhance the compatibility of the probe with high-temperature, high-radiation, water-steam environments and increase the likelihood of survival in such environments. Utilization of a microcomputer to automate data sampling and processing has resulted in improved resolution of the sensor

  14. Behavior of deep flaws in a thick-wall cylinder under thermal shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Behavior of inner-surface flaws in thick-walled vessels was studied in a 991-mm OD x 152 mm wall x 1220 mm length cylinder with toughness properties similar to those for HSST Plate. The initial temperature of 93 0 C and a thermal shock medium of liquid nitrogen (-197 0 C) were employed. The initial flaw selected was a sharp, 16 mm deep, long (1220 mm) axial crack. Crack arrest methodology was shown to be valid for deep flaws under severe thermal shock

  15. Association schemes perspective of microbubble cluster in ultrasonic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnia, S; Yahyavi, M; Habibpourbisafar, R

    2018-06-01

    Dynamics of a cluster of chaotic oscillators on a network are studied using coupled maps. By introducing the association schemes, we obtain coupling strength in the adjacency matrices form, which satisfies Markov matrices property. We remark that in general, the stability region of the cluster of oscillators at the synchronization state is characterized by Lyapunov exponent which can be defined based on the N-coupled map. As a detailed physical example, dynamics of microbubble cluster in an ultrasonic field are studied using coupled maps. Microbubble cluster dynamics have an indicative highly active nonlinear phenomenon, were not easy to be explained. In this paper, a cluster of microbubbles with a thin elastic shell based on the modified Keller-Herring equation in an ultrasonic field is demonstrated in the framework of the globally coupled map. On the other hand, a relation between the microbubble elements is replaced by a relation between the vertices. Based on this method, the stability region of microbubbles pulsations at complete synchronization state has been obtained analytically. In this way, distances between microbubbles as coupling strength play the crucial role. In the stability region, we thus observe that the problem of study of dynamics of N-microbubble oscillators reduce to that of a single microbubble. Therefore, the important parameters of the isolated microbubble such as applied pressure, driving frequency and the initial radius have effective behavior on the synchronization state. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Classification Technique for Ultrasonic Weld Inspection Signals using a Neural Network based on 2-dimensional fourier Transform and Principle Component Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Joon

    2004-01-01

    Neural network-based signal classification systems are increasingly used in the analysis of large volumes of data obtained in NDE applications. Ultrasonic inspection methods on the other hand are commonly used in the nondestructive evaluation of welds to detect flaws. An important characteristic of ultrasonic inspection is the ability to identify the type of discontinuity that gives rise to a peculiar signal. Standard techniques rely on differences in individual A-scans to classify the signals. This paper proposes an ultrasonic signal classification technique based on the information tying in the neighboring signals. The approach is based on a 2-dimensional Fourier transform and the principal component analysis to generate a reduced dimensional feature vector for classification. Results of applying the technique to data obtained from the inspection of actual steel welds are presented

  17. Ultrasonic measurements and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Kočiš, Štefan

    1996-01-01

    An impulse for writing this book has originated from the effort to sum­ marize and publicise the acquired results of a research team at the De­ partment of Automation of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and In­ formatics, Slovak Technical University in Bratislava. The research team has been involved for a long time with control problems for machine production mechanisms and, in recent (approximately 15) years, its effort was aimed mostly at the control of electrical servosystems of robots. Within this scope, the members of the authors' staff solved the State Re­ search Task Ultrasonic sensing of the position of a robot hand, which was coordinated by the Institute of Technical Cybernetics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. The problem was solved in a complex way, i.e. from a conceptual de­ sign of the measurement, through the measurement and evaluation sys­ tem, up to connection to the control system of a robot. Compensation of the atmospheric influence on the precision of measurement,...

  18. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Praseodymium Monopnictides: AN Ultrasonic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Kumar, Raj; Tripathy, Chinmayee; Singh, Devraj

    2013-09-01

    We have computed ultrasonic attenuation, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic velocities of praseodymium monopnictides PrX(X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) along the , , in the temperature range 100-500 K using higher order elastic constants. The higher order elastic constants are evaluated using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential with two basic parameters viz. nearest-neighbor distance and hardness parameter in the temperature range of 0-500 K. Several other mechanical and thermal parameters like bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, anisotropic ratio, tetragonal moduli, Breazeale's nonlinearity parameter and Debye temperature are also calculated. In the present study, the fracture/toughness (B/G) ratio is less than 1.75 which implies that PrX compounds are brittle in nature at room temperature. The chosen material fulfilled Born criterion of mechanical stability. We also found the deviation of Cauchy's relation at higher temperatures. PrN is most stable material as it has highest valued higher order elastic constants as well as the ultrasonic velocity. Further, the lattice thermal conductivity using modified approach of Slack and Berman is determined at room temperature. The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction and thermoelastic relaxation mechanisms have been computed using modified Mason's approach. The results with other well-known physical properties are useful for industrial applications.

  19. Modeling of ultrasonic processes utilizing a generic software framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, P.; Twiefel, J.; Wallaschek, J.

    2017-06-01

    Modeling of ultrasonic processes is typically characterized by a high degree of complexity. Different domains and size scales must be regarded, so that it is rather difficult to build up a single detailed overall model. Developing partial models is a common approach to overcome this difficulty. In this paper a generic but simple software framework is presented which allows to coupe arbitrary partial models by slave modules with well-defined interfaces and a master module for coordination. Two examples are given to present the developed framework. The first one is the parameterization of a load model for ultrasonically-induced cavitation. The piezoelectric oscillator, its mounting, and the process load are described individually by partial models. These partial models then are coupled using the framework. The load model is composed of spring-damper-elements which are parameterized by experimental results. In the second example, the ideal mounting position for an oscillator utilized in ultrasonic assisted machining of stone is determined. Partial models for the ultrasonic oscillator, its mounting, the simplified contact process, and the workpiece’s material characteristics are presented. For both applications input and output variables are defined to meet the requirements of the framework’s interface.

  20. An Ultrasonic Wheel-Array Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, B. W.; Brotherhood, C. J.; Freemantle, R. J.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the development and modeling of an ultrasonic array wheel probe scanning system. The system operates at 10 MHz using a 64 element array transducer which is 50 mm in length and located in a fluid filled wheel. The wheel is coupled to the test structure dry, or with a small amount of liquid couplant. When the wheel is rolled over the surface of the test structure a defect map (C-Scan) is generated in real-time. The tyre is made from a soft, durable polymer which has very little acoustic loss. Two application studies are presented; the inspection of sealant layers in an aluminum aircraft wing structure and the detection of embedded defects in a thick section carbon composite sample.

  1. Ultrasonic study of elastic creep in piezoceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaplev, V M; Konovalov, R S

    2017-11-01

    Ultrasonic method and experimental setup for study the elastic creep of piezoelectric materials are described. The results of experimental studies of time behavior of the Young's modulus and the internal friction are presented as well as the longitudinal and transversal piezomoduli and the electromechanical coupling factor. Four compositions of piezoelectric ceramics both soft and hard, based on BaTiO 3 and PZT, were compressed for a long time (0÷10 7 s) by significant static loads (0÷120MPa). The possible physical mechanisms that cause the creep are briefly considered. The concept of a spectrum of activation energies of the corresponding processes is introduced. The upper and the lower boundaries of the relaxation times spectrum were measured and corresponding activation energies were found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A model-based approach to crack sizing with ultrasonic arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Katherine M M; Mulholland, Anthony J; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic phased array systems have become increasingly popular in the last 10 years as tools for flaw detection and characterization within the nondestructive testing industry. The existence and location of flaws can often be deduced via images generated from the data captured by these arrays. A factor common to these imaging techniques is the subjective thresholding required to estimate the size of the flaw. This paper puts forward an objective approach which employs a mathematical model. By exploiting the relationship between the width of the central lobe of the scattering matrix and the crack size, an analytical expression for the crack length is reached via the Born approximation. Conclusions are then drawn on the minimum resolvable crack length of the method and it is thus shown that the formula holds for subwavelength defects. An analytical expression for the error that arises from the discrete nature of the array is then derived and it is observed that the method becomes less sensitive to the discretization of the array as the distance between the flaw and array increases. The methodology is then extended and tested on experimental data collected from welded austenitic plates containing a lack-of-fusion crack of 6 mm length. An objective sizing matrix (OSM) is produced by assessing the similarity between the scattering matrices arising from experimentally collected data with those arising from the Born approximation over a range of crack lengths and frequencies. Initially, the global minimum of the OSM is taken as the objective estimation of the crack size, giving a measurement of 7 mm. This is improved upon by the adoption of a multifrequency averaging approach, with which an improved crack size estimation of 6.4 mm is obtained.

  3. The use of fracture mechanics for the evaluation of NDE flaw acceptance standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alicino, A; Capurro, E; Ansaldo, Sp; Corvi, A [Ansaldo SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the use of fracture mechanics criteria to evaluate the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) flaw acceptance standards. The communication discusses the general schemes and the guidelines of the activity carried out. (TEC).

  4. Fracture behaviour assessment of a flawed pressure vessel in the hydro-test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkimo, M; Rintamac, R

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the fracture properties of a flawed pressure vessel. The experiment was carried out within the Nordic Countries on a vessel in a Finnish refinery. The instrumentation used included acoustic emission. Some results are provided. (TEC).

  5. Calculation and evaluation methodology of the flawed pipe and the compute program development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang; Qian Hao; Yao Weida; Liang Xingyun

    2013-01-01

    Background: The crack will grow gradually under alternating load for a pressurized pipe, whereas the load is less than the fatigue strength limit. Purpose: Both calculation and evaluation methodology for a flawed pipe that have been detected during in-service inspection is elaborated here base on the Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) criteria. Methods: In the compute, the depth and length interaction of a flaw has been considered and a compute program is developed per Visual C++. Results: The fluctuating load of the Reactor Coolant System transients, the initial flaw shape, the initial flaw orientation are all accounted here. Conclusions: The calculation and evaluation methodology here is an important basis for continue working or not. (authors)

  6. Development of a shallow-flaw fracture assessment methodology for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Pennell, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed within the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing postulated shallow flaws. Cleavage fracture in shallow-flaw cruciform beam specimens tested under biaxial loading at temperatures in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain-controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture. A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that includes both the properties of the inner-surface stainless-steel cladding and a biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness correlation gave a reduction in probability of cleavage initiation of more than two orders of magnitude from an ASME-based reference case

  7. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Philip C; Bailey, Michael R; Harper, Jonathan D

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonic propulsion is a novel technique that uses short bursts of focused ultrasonic pulses to reposition stones transcutaneously within the renal collecting system and ureter. The purpose of this review is to discuss the initial testing of effectiveness and safety, directions for refinement of technique and technology, and opinions on clinical application. Preclinical studies with a range of probes, interfaces, and outputs have demonstrated feasibility and consistent safety of ultrasonic propulsion with room for increased outputs and refinement toward specific applications. Ultrasonic propulsion was used painlessly and without adverse events to reposition stones in 14 of 15 human study participants without restrictions on patient size, stone size, or stone location. The initial feasibility study showed applicability in a range of clinically relevant situations, including facilitating passage of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, moving a large stone at the ureteropelvic junction with relief of pain, and differentiating large stones from a collection of small fragments. Ultrasonic propulsion shows promise as an office-based system for transcutaneously repositioning kidney stones. Potential applications include facilitating expulsion of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, repositioning stones prior to treatment, and repositioning obstructing ureteropelvic junction stones into the kidney to alleviate acute renal colic.

  8. Ultrasonic stir welding process and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding device provides a method and apparatus for elevating the temperature of a work piece utilizing at least one ultrasonic heater. Instead of relying on a rotating shoulder to provide heat to a workpiece an ultrasonic heater is utilized to provide ultrasonic energy to the workpiece. A rotating pin driven by a motor assembly performs the weld on the workpiece. A handheld version can be constructed as well as a fixedly mounted embodiment.

  9. The effects of ultrasonic solidification on aluminum

    OpenAIRE

    Đorđević Slavko 1

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound on characteristics of solidified aluminum was shown. An ultrasonic head and ultrasonic system for modification was designed and applied to the crystallizing aluminum melt. The ultrasonic generator allows power of 50-500 W, amplitude of oscillations 10-100 um.m and the operating frequency of 25 kHz. Ultrasonic modification was done by ultrasound introduced from above into the melt. Microstructure photographs show decreasing of the grain size more than five times.

  10. The effects of ultrasonic solidification on aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Slavko 1

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ultrasound on characteristics of solidified aluminum was shown. An ultrasonic head and ultrasonic system for modification was designed and applied to the crystallizing aluminum melt. The ultrasonic generator allows power of 50-500 W, amplitude of oscillations 10-100 um.m and the operating frequency of 25 kHz. Ultrasonic modification was done by ultrasound introduced from above into the melt. Microstructure photographs show decreasing of the grain size more than five times.

  11. Evaluation of flaws in ferritic piping: ASME Code Appendix J, Deformation Plasticity Failure Assessment Diagram (DPFAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This report summarizes the methods and bases used by an ASME Code procedure for the evaluation of flaws in ferritic piping. The procedure is currently under consideration by the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee of Section 11. The procedure was initially proposed in 1985 for the evaluation of the acceptability of flaws detected in piping during in-service inspection for certain materials, identified in Article IWB-3640 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section 11 ''Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components.'' for which the fracture toughness is not sufficiently high to justify acceptance based solely on the plastic limit load evaluation methodology of Appendix C and IWB-3641. The procedure, referred to as Appendix J, originally included two approaches: a J-integral based tearing instability (J-T) analysis and the deformation plasticity failure assessment diagram (DPFAD) methodology. In Appendix J, a general DPFAD approach was simplified for application to part-through wall flows in ferritic piping through the use of a single DPFAD curve for circumferential flaws. Axial flaws are handled using two DPFAD curves where the ratio of flaw depth to wall thickness is used to determine the appropriate DPFAD curve. Flaws are evaluated in Appendix J by comparing the actual pipe applied stress with the allowable stress with the appropriate safety factors for the flaw size at the end of the evaluation period. Assessment points for circumferential and axial flaws are plotted on the appropriate failure assessment diagram. In addition, this report summarizes the experimental test predictions of the results of the Battelle Columbus Laboratory experiments, the Eiber experiments, and the JAERI tests using the Appendix J DPFAD methodology. Lastly, this report also provides guidelines for handling residual stresses in the evaluation procedure. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Hydrogen-isotope motion in scandium studied by ultrasonic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisure, R.G.; Schwarz, R.B.; Migliori, A.; Torgeson, D.R.; Svare, I.

    1993-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy has been used to investigate ultrasonic attenuation in single crystals of Sc, ScH 0.25 , and ScD 0.18 over the temperature range of 10--300 K for frequencies near 1 MHz. Ultrasonic-attenuation peaks were observed in the samples containing H or D with the maximum attenuation occurring near 25 K for ScH 0.25 and near 50 K for ScD 0.18 . The general features of the data suggest that the motion reflected in the ultrasonic attenuation is closely related to the low-temperature motion seen in nulcear-magnetic-resonance spin-lattice-relaxation measurements. The ultrasonic results were fit with a two-level-system (TLS) model involving tunneling between highly asymmetric sites. The relaxation of the TLS was found to consist of two parts: a weakly temperature-dependent part, probably due to coupling to electrons; and a much more strongly temperature-dependent part, attributed to multiple-phonon processes. The strongly temperature-dependent part was almost two orders of magnitude faster in ScH 0.25 than in ScD 0.18 , in accordance with the idea that tunneling is involved in the motion. Surprisingly, the weakly temperature-dependent part was found to be about the same for the two isotopes. The asymmetries primarily responsible for coupling the TLS to the ultrasound are attributed to interactions between hydrogen ions that lie on adjacent c axes. The results are consistent with an isotope-independent strength for the coupling of the TLS to the ultrasound

  13. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scaler is a device intended for use during dental cleaning and periodontal (gum) therapy to remove calculus deposits from teeth by application of an ultrasonic vibrating scaler tip to the teeth. (b...

  14. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, M.S.; Harris, R.V.

    1999-03-23

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  15. Fracture evaluation of an in-service piping flaw caused by microbiologically induced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudland, D.L.; Scott, P.M.; Wilkowski, G.M.; Rahman, S.

    1996-01-01

    A pipe fracture experiment was conducted on a section of 6-inch nominal diameter pipe which was degraded by microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) at a circumferential girth weld. The pipe was a section of one of the service water piping systems to one of the emergency diesel generators at the Haddam Neck (Connecticut Yankee) plant. The experimental results will help validate future ASME Section XI pipe flaw evaluation criteria for other than Class 1 piping. A critical aspect of this experiment was an assessment of the degree of conservatism embodied in the ASME definition of flaw size. The ASME flaw size definition assumes a rectangular shaped, constant depth flaw with a depth equal to its maximum depth for its entire length. Since most service flaws are irregular in shape, this definition may be overly conservative. Results from several fracture prediction models are compared with the experimental results. These results show that, for this case, the ASME Appendix H criteria significantly underpredicted the experimental maximum moment, while other fracture prediction models provided good predictions when accurate pipe, weld and flaw dimensions were used

  16. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.)

  17. Magnetite Core-Shell Nanoparticles in Nondestructive Flaw Detection of Polymeric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetti, Mimi; Wei, Qiang; Pohl, Rainer; Casperson, Ralf; Bartusch, Matthias; Neu, Volker; Pospiech, Doris; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-10-04

    Nondestructive flaw detection in polymeric materials is important but difficult to achieve. In this research, the application of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) in nondestructive flaw detection is studied and realized, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Superparamagnetic and highly magnetic (up to 63 emu/g) magnetite core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by grafting bromo-end-group-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (Br-PGMA) onto surface-modified Fe 3 O 4 NPs. These Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs are blended into bisphenol A diglycidylether (BADGE)-based epoxy to form homogeneously distributed magnetic epoxy nanocomposites (MENCs) after curing. The core Fe 3 O 4 of the Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs endows the MENCs with magnetic property, which is crucial for nondestructive flaw detection of the materials, while the shell PGMA promotes colloidal stability and prevents NP aggregation during curing. The eddy current testing (ET) technique is first applied to detect flaws in the MENCs. Through the brightness contrast of the ET image, surficial and subsurficial flaws in MENCs can be detected, even for MENCs with low content of Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs (1 wt %). The incorporation of Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs can be easily extended to other polymer and polymer-based composite systems and opens a new and very promising pathway toward MNP-based nondestructive flaw detection in polymeric materials.

  18. Analytical solution for stress, strain and plastic instability of pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Sérgio B.; Netto, Theodoro A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of internally pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws is analyzed. The two possible modes of circumferentially straining the pipe wall are identified and associated to hypothesized geometries. The radial deformation that takes place by bending the pipe wall is studied by means of axisymmetric flaws and the membrane strain developed by unequal hoop deformation is analyzed with the help of narrow axial flaws. Linear elastic shell solutions for stress and strain are developed, the plastic behavior is studied and the maximum hoop stress at the flaw is related to the undamaged pipe hoop stress by means of stress concentration factors. The stress concentration factors are employed to obtain equations predicting the pressure at which the pipe fails by plastic instability for both types of flaw. These analytical solutions are validated by comparison with burst tests on 3″ diameter pipes and finite element simulations. Forty-one burst tests were carried out and two materials with very dissimilar plastic behavior, carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel, were used in the experiments. Both the analytical and the numerical predictions showed good correlation with the experimentally observed burst pressures. - Highlights: ► An analytical model for the burst of a pipe with a volumetric flaw is developed. ► Deformation, strain and stress are modeled in the elastic and plastic domains. ► The model is comprehensively validated by experiments and numerical simulations. ► The burst pressure model’s accuracy is equivalent to finite element simulations.

  19. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B. (NOVETECH Corp., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.).

  20. Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Initiation for Volumetric Flaw in Pressure Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Nam; Yoo, Hyun Joo

    2005-01-01

    CAN/CSA.N285.4-94 requires the periodic inservice inspection and surveillance of pressure tubes in operating CANDU nuclear power reactors. If the inspection results reveal a flaw exceeding the acceptance criteria of the Code, the flaw must be evaluated to determine if the pressure is acceptable for continued service. Currently, the flaw evaluation methodology and acceptance criteria specified in CSA-N285.05-2005, 'Technical requirements for in-service evaluation of zirconium alloy pressure tubes in CANDU reactors'. The Code is applicable to zirconium alloy pressure tubes. The evaluation methodology for a crack-like flaw is similar to that of ASME B and PV Sec. XI, 'Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components'. However, the evaluation methodology for a blunt volumetric flaw is described in CSA-N285.05-2005 code. The object of this paper is to address the fatigue crack initiation evaluation for the blunt volumetric flaw as it applies to the pressure tube at Wolsong NPP

  1. Flaw evaluation methodology for class 2, 3 components in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki; Kashima, Koichi; Miyazaki, Katsumasa; Hasegawa, Kunio; Oritani, Naohiko

    2006-01-01

    It is quite important to validate the structural integrity of operating plant components as aged LWR plants are gradually increasing in Japan. The rules on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants constituted by the JSME provides flaw evaluation methodology. They are mainly focused on Class 1 components, while flaw evaluation criteria for Class 2, 3 components are not consolidated. As such, they also required from the viewpoints of in-service inspection request, reduction of operating cost and systematization of consistent code/standard. In this study, basic concept of flaw evaluation for Class 2, 3 piping was considered, and it is concluded that the same evaluation procedure as Class 1 piping in the current rules is applicable. Some technical issues on practical flaw evaluation for Class 2, 3 piping were listed up, and a countermeasure for each issue was devised. Especially, both allowable flaw sizes in acceptance standards and critical flaw sizes in acceptance criteria have to be determined in consideration of degraded fracture toughness. (author)

  2. Ultrasonic techniques for fluids characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Povey, Malcolm J W

    1997-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of ultrasonic techniques for the characterization of fluids. Focusing on ultrasonic velocimetry, the author covers the basic topics and techniques necessaryfor successful ultrasound measurements on emulsions, dispersions, multiphase media, and viscoelastic/viscoplastic materials. Advanced techniques such as scattering, particle sizing, and automation are also presented. As a handbook for industrial and scientific use, Ultrasonic Techniques for Fluids Characterization is an indispensable guide to chemists and chemical engineers using ultrasound for research or process monitoring in the chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, biotechnology,and fuels industries. Key Features * Appeals to anyone using ultrasound to study fluids * Provides the first detailed description of the ultrasound profiling technique for dispersions * Describes new techniques for measuring phase transitions and nucleation, such as water/ice and oil/fat * Presents the l...

  3. Ultrasonic wave propagation in powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lashi, R. S.; Povey, M. J. W.; Watson, N. J.

    2018-05-01

    Powder clumps (cakes) has a significant effect on the flowability and stability of powders. Powder caking is mainly caused by moisture migration due to wetting and environmental (temperature and humidity) changes. The process of moisture migration caking involves creating liquid bridges between the particles during condensation which subsequently harden to form solid bridges. Therefore, an effective and reliable technique is required to quantitatively and non-invasively monitor caking kinetics and effective stiffness. This paper describes two ultrasonic instruments (ultrasonic velocity pulse and airborne ultrasound systems) that have been used to monitor the caking phenomenon. Also, it discusses the relationship between the ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements and tracking caking kinetics and the effective stiffness of powders.

  4. Procedure Development and Qualification of the Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing for the Nuclear Power Plant Piping Weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byung Sik; Yang, Seung Han; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Hee Jong

    2010-01-01

    The manual ultrasonic examination for the nuclear power plant piping welds has been demonstrated by using KPD(Korean Performance Demonstration) generic procedure. For automated ultrasonic examination, there is no generic procedure and it should be qualified by using applicable automated equipment. Until now, most of qualified procedures used pulse-echo technique and there is no qualified procedure using phased array technique. In this study, data acquisition and analysis software were developed and phased-array transducer and wedge were designed to implement phased array technique for nuclear power plant in-service inspection. The developed procedure are qualified for performance demonstration for the flaw detection, length sizing and depth sizing. The qualified procedure will be applied for the field examination in the nuclear power plant piping weld inspection

  5. Design and Manufacture an Ultrasonic Dispersion System with Automatic Frequency Adjusting Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlina ABDUL RAHIM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper a novel ultrasonic dispersion system for the cleaning application or dispersing of particles which are mixed in liquid has been proposed. The frequency band of designed system is 30 kHz so that the frequency of ultrasonic wave sweeps from 30 kHz to 60 kHz with 100 Hz steps. One of the superiority of manufactured system in compare with the other similar systems which are available in markets is that this system can transfer the maximum and optimum energy of ultrasonic wave inside the liquid tank with the high efficiency in the whole of the usage time of the system. The used ultrasonic transducers in this system as the generator of ultrasonic wave is the type of air coupled ceramic ultrasonic piezoelectric with the nominal maximum power 50 Watt. The frequency characteristic of applied piezoelectric is that it produces the maximum amplitude of ultrasonic wave on the resonance frequency, so this system is designed to work on resonance frequency of piezoelectric, continuously. This is done by the use of control system which is consisted of two major parts, sensing part and controlling part. The manufactured ultrasonic dispersion system is consisted of 9 piezoelectrics so that it can produce 450 watt ultrasonic energy, totally. The main purpose of this project is to produce a safety system especially for fatigue car driver so as to prevent from accidents. The statistic on road fatality shows that human error constitute of 64.84 % road accidents fatality and 17.4 % due to technical factors. These systems encompassed the approach of hand pressure applied on the steering wheel. The steering will be installed with pressure sensors. At the same time these sensors can be used to measure gripping force while driving.

  6. On line ultrasonic integrated backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landini, L.; Picano, E.; Mazzarisi, A.; Santarelli, F.; Benassi, A.; De Pieri, G.

    1988-01-01

    A new equipment for on-line evaluation of index based on two-dimensional integrated backscatter from ultrasonic images is described. The new equipment is fully integrated into a B-mode ultrasonic apparatus which provides a simultaneous display of conventional information together with parameters of tissue characterization. The system has been tested with a backscattering model of microbubbles in polysaccharide solution, characterized by a physiological exponential time decay. An exponential fitting to the experimental data was performed which yielded r=0.95

  7. Ultrasonically assisted drilling of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, N. V.; Onawumi, P. Y.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2018-05-01

    Conventional drilling of rocks can generate significant damage in the drilled material; a material layer is often split off a back surface of a sample during drilling, negatively affecting its strength. To improve finish quality, ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) was employed in two rocks - sandstone and marble. Damage areas in both materials were reduced in UAD when compared to conventional drilling. Reductions in a thrust force and a torque reduction were observed only for UAD in marble; ultrasonic assistance in sandstone drilling did not result in improvements in this regard.

  8. Very high temperature ultrasonic thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorzik, E.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic thermometer comprises an electric pulse transducer head, a pulse transmission line, a notched sensor wire attached to and extending along the axis of said transmission line and a sheath enclosing the transmission line and the sensor wire, a portion of the interior face of the sheath being covered by a stuffing material along at least the length of the notched part of the sensor wire, such that contact between the sensor wire and the stuffing material does not substantially give rise to reflection of an ultrasonic pulse at the point of contact. (author)

  9. Application of Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) on Single V-Butt Weld Integrity Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amry Amin Abas; Mohd Kamal Shah Shamsudin; Norhazleena Azaman

    2015-01-01

    Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) utilizes arrays of piezoelectric elements that are embedded in an epoxy base. The benefit of having such kind of array is that beam forming such as steering and focusing the beam front possible. This enables scanning patterns such as linear scan, sectorial scan and depth focusing scan to be performed. Ultrasonic phased array systems can potentially be employed in almost any test where conventional ultrasonic flaw detectors have traditionally been used. Weld inspection and crack detection are the most important applications, and these tests are done across a wide range of industries including aerospace, power generation, petrochemical, metal billet and tubular goods suppliers, pipeline construction and maintenance, structural metals, and general manufacturing. Phased arrays can also be effectively used to profile remaining wall thickness in corrosion survey applications. The benefits of PAUT are simplifying inspection of components of complex geometry, inspection of components with limited access, testing of welds with multiple angles from a single probe and increasing the probability of detection while improving signal-to-noise ratio. This paper compares the result of inspection on several specimens using PAUT as to digital radiography. The specimens are welded plates with single V-butt weld made of carbon steel. Digital radiography is done using blue imaging plate with x-ray source. PAUT is done using Olympus MX2 with 5 MHz probe consisting of 64 elements. The location, size and length of defect is compared. (author)

  10. On Limitations of the Ultrasonic Characterization of Pieces Manufactured with Highly Attenuating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A.; Moreno, E.; Rubio, B.; Calas, H.; Galarza, N.; Rubio, J.; Diez, L.; Castellanos, L.; Gómez, T.

    Some technical aspects of two Spanish cooperation projects, funded by DPI and Innpacto Programs of the R&D National Plan, are discussed. The objective is to analyze the common belief about than the ultrasonic testing in MHz range is not a tool utilizable to detect internal flaws in highly attenuating pieces made of coarse-grained steel. In fact high-strength steels, used in some safe industrial infrastructures of energy & transport sectors, are difficult to be inspected using the conventional "state of the art" in ultrasonic technology, due to their internal microstructures are very attenuating and coarse-grained. It is studied if this inspection difficulty could be overcome by finding intense interrogating pulses and advanced signal processing of the acquired echoes. A possible solution would depend on drastically improving signal-to-noise-ratios, by applying new advances on: ultrasonic transduction, HV electronics for intense pulsed driving of the testing probes, and an "ad-hoc" digital processing or focusing of the received noisy signals, in function of each material to be inspected. To attain this challenging aim on robust steel pieces would open the possibility of obtaining improvements in inspecting critical industrial components made of highly attenuating & dispersive materials, as new composites in aeronautic and motorway bridges, or new metallic alloys in nuclear area, where additional testing limitations often appear.

  11. Estimation of in-situ stresses in concrete members using polarized ultrasonic shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew; Schumacher, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic testing is commonly used to detect flaws, estimate geometries, and characterize properties of materials and structures. Acoustoelasticity refers to the dependency of stress wave velocity with applied stresses and is a phenomenon that has been known by geophysicists since the 1960s. A way to capitalize on this effect for concrete applications is by using ultrasonic shear waves which are particularly sensitive to applied stresses when polarized in the direction of the applied stress. The authors conducted an experiment on a 150 mm (6 in.) diameter concrete cylinder specimen with a length of 305 mm (12 in.) that was loaded in discrete load steps to failure. At each load step two ultrasonic shear waves were transmitted through the specimen, one with the polarization perpendicular and the other transverse to the applied stress. The velocity difference between the two sets of polarized shear waves was found to correlate with the applied stress in the specimen. Two potential applications for this methodology include estimation of stresses in pre-stressed concrete bridge girders and investigation of load redistribution in structural support elements after extreme events. This paper introduces the background of the methodology, presents an analysis of the collected data, and discusses the relationship between the recorded signals and the applied stress.

  12. Under sodium ultrasonic viewing for Fast Breeder Reactors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarpara, Eaglekumar G.; Patankar, V.H.; Vijayan Varier, N.

    2016-09-01

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR/FBR) are of two types: Loop type and Pool type. Many countries like USA, Japan, UK, Russia, China, France, Lithuania, Belgium, Korea, and India have worked extensively on these types of FBRs. FBRs are capable of breeding more fissionable fuel than it consumes like breeding of Plutonium-239 from non-fissionable Uranium-238. In FBR, heat is released by fission process and it must be captured and transferred to the electric generator by the liquid metal coolant (i.e. Sodium). Due to continuous operation and for safety and licensing reasons, periodic inspection and maintenance is required for reactor fuel assemblies which carry nuclear fuels. For this reason, under sodium ultrasonic imaging technique is adopted as in-service inspection activity for viewing of core of FBRs. Since liquid sodium is optically opaque, ultrasonic technique is the only method which can be employed for imaging in liquid sodium. In harsh conditions like high temperature and high radiation, there is a restriction on the development of possible ultrasonic visualization systems and selection of the transducer materials which can operate in the core region of reactor at around 200 °C during shutdown of reactor. This report provides a review of works related to ultrasonic imaging in sodium, different materials used in high temperature transducer assemblies and their different coupling/bonding techniques to achieve maximum transmission efficiency in high temperature sodium environment. The report also provides the overview of different architectures and imaging methods of transducer array elements which were used in LMFBRs for inspection and visualization of the reactor core sub-assemblies. The report is focused on a review of some possible beam forming techniques which may be used for nuclear applications for high temperature environment. Published information of the different simulation models are also reviewed which can be adopted to simulate the

  13. Measurement of a 3D Ultrasonic Wavefield Using Pulsed Laser Holographic Microscopy for Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In ultrasonic array imaging, 3D ultrasonic wavefields are normally recorded by an ultrasonic piezo array transducer. Its performance is limited by the configuration and size of the array transducer. In this paper, a method based on digital holographic interferometry is proposed to record the 3D ultrasonic wavefields instead of the array transducer, and the measurement system consisting of a pulsed laser, ultrasonic excitation, and synchronization and control circuit is designed. A consecutive sequence of holograms of ultrasonic wavefields are recorded by the system. The interferograms are calculated from the recorded holograms at different time sequence. The amplitudes and phases of the transient ultrasonic wavefields are recovered from the interferograms by phase unwrapping. The consecutive sequence of transient ultrasonic wavefields are stacked together to generate 3D ultrasonic wavefields. Simulation and experiments are carried out to verify the proposed technique, and preliminary results are presented.

  14. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers noncontacting ultrasonic measurements using EMATS

    CERN Document Server

    Hirao, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    This second edition provides comprehensive information on electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs), from the theory and physical principles of EMATs to the construction of systems and their applications to scientific and industrial ultrasonic measurements on materials. The original version has been complemented with selected ideas on ultrasonic measurement that have emerged since the first edition was released. The book is divided into four parts: PART I offers a self-contained description of the basic elements of coupling mechanisms along with the practical designing of EMATs for various purposes. Several implementations to compensate for EMATs’ low transfer efficiency are provided, along with useful tips on how to make an EMAT. PART II describes the principle of electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR), which makes the most of EMATs’ contactless nature and is the most successful amplification mechanism for precise measurements of velocity and attenuation. PART III applies EMAR to studying physical ...

  15. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  16. Atmospheric contamination during ultrasonic scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, MF; Menso, L; Steinfort, J; van Winkelhoff, AJ; van der Weijden, GA

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the microbial atmospheric contamination during initial periodontal treatment using a piezoelectric ultrasonic scaler in combination with either high-volume evacuation (HVE) or conventional dental suction (CDS). Methods: The study included 17

  17. Automated evaluation of ultrasonic indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, M.K.T.; Stegemann, D.

    1994-01-01

    Future requirements of reliability and reproducibility in quality assurance demand computer evaluation of defect indications. The ultrasonic method with its large field of applications and a high potential for automation provides all preconditions for fully automated inspection. The survey proposes several desirable hardware improvements, data acquisition requirements and software configurations. (orig.) [de

  18. Ultrasonic flowmeters. Progress report II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This progress report presents results of in-plant testing of the prototype ultrasonic flowmeter and describes modifications to the prototype as a result of these tests. The modified prototype, designated MOD-I, is described in detail including the principle of operation, equipment used and the results of both laboratory and in-plant demonstrations

  19. Calculations for Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers implies a solution of a boundary value problem, for a boay which consists of different materials, including a piezoelectric part. The problem is dynamic at frequencies, where a typical wavelength is somewhat less than the size of the body. Radiation...

  20. Piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers for fingerprint sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yipeng

    Fingerprint identification is the most prevalent biometric technology due to its uniqueness, universality and convenience. Over the past two decades, a variety of physical mechanisms have been exploited to capture an electronic image of a human fingerprint. Among these, capacitive fingerprint sensors are the ones most widely used in consumer electronics because they are fabricated using conventional complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit technology. However, capacitive fingerprint sensors are extremely sensitive to finger contamination and moisture. This thesis will introduce an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor using a PMUT array, which offers a potential solution to this problem. In addition, it has the potential to increase security, as it allows images to be collected at various depths beneath the epidermis, providing images of the sub-surface dermis layer and blood vessels. Firstly, PMUT sensitivity is maximized by optimizing the layer stack and electrode design, and the coupling coefficient is doubled via series transduction. Moreover, a broadband PMUT with 97% fractional bandwidth is achieved by utilizing a thinner structure excited at two adjacent mechanical vibration modes with overlapping bandwidth. In addition, we proposed waveguide PMUTs, which function to direct acoustic waves, confine acoustic energy, and provide mechanical protection for the PMUT array. Furthermore, PMUT arrays were fabricated with different processes to form the membrane, including front-side etching with a patterned sacrificial layer, front-side etching with additional anchor, cavity SOI wafers and eutectic bonding. Additionally, eutectic bonding allows the PMUT to be integrated with CMOS circuits. PMUTs were characterized in the mechanical, electrical and acoustic domains. Using transmit beamforming, a narrow acoustic beam was achieved, and high-resolution (sub-100 microm) and short-range (~1 mm) pulse-echo ultrasonic imaging was demonstrated using a steel

  1. Derivation of Elastic Stress Concentration Factor Equations for Debris Fretting Flaws in Pressure Tubes of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Oh, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    If volumetric flaws such as bearing pad fretting flaws and debris fretting flaws are detected in the pressure tubes of pressurized heavy water reactors during in-service inspection, the initiation of fatigue cracks and delayed hydrogen cracking from the detected volumetric flaws shall be assessed by using elastic stress concentration factors in accordance with CSA N285.8-05. The CSA N285.8-05 presents only an approximate formula based on linear elastic fracture mechanics for the debris fretting flaw. In this study, an engineering formula considering the geometric characteristics of the debris fretting flaw in detail was derived using two-dimensional finite element analysis and Kinectrics, Inc.'s engineering procedure with slight modifications. Comparing the application results obtained using the derived formula with the three-dimensional finite element analysis results, it is found that the results obtained using the derived formula agree well with the results of the finite element analysis

  2. Improved techniques for the ultrasonic characterization of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Simpson, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Near-conventional pulse-echo flaw detection techniques can be successfully applied to graphite material. If the specimen configuration (i.e., length-to-diameter ratio) is conducive to the choice of ultrasonic test parameters dictated by the material screening tests, then only the test sensitivity needs to be established. Conventional test block approaches to calibration work well; however, uniform homogeneity of the specimens to be tested must be assumed (depending on the graphite, this may be an invalid assumption). Sensitivities that we have demonstrated typically detect 0.5- to 0.75-mm (0.020 to 0.030-in.) reflectors at depths up to 102 mm (4 in.) for GRAPHNOL (drilled holes, not flat bottom). Other materials may dictate inspection for much larger discontinuities. The least sensitive tests performed to date (using the storage oscilloscope approach) required flat-bottom holes of 6.35 mm (0.250 in.) in diameter for calibration. This relatively insensitive test was necessary because of the billet length and material characteristics

  3. Double-shell tank ultrasonic inspection plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The waste tank systems managed by the Tank Waste Remediation System Division of Westinghouse Hanford Company includes 28 large underground double-shell tanks (DST) used for storing hazardous radioactive waste. The ultrasonic (UT) inspection of these tanks is part of their required integrity assessment (WAC 1993) as described in the tank systems integrity assessment program plan (IAPP) (Pfluger 1994a) submitted to the Ecology Department of the State of Washington. Because these tanks hold radioactive waste and are located underground examinations and inspections must be done remotely from the tank annuli with specially designed equipment. This document describes the UT inspection system (DSTI system), the qualification of the equipment and procedures, field inspection readiness, DST inspections, and post-inspection activities. Although some of the equipment required development, the UT inspection technology itself is the commercially proven and available projection image scanning technique (P-scan). The final design verification of the DSTI system will be a performance test in the Hanford DST annulus mockup that includes the demonstration of detecting and sizing corrosion-induced flaws

  4. Crack path in aeronautical titanium alloy under ultrasonic torsion loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses features of fatigue crack initiation and growth in aeronautical VT3-1 titanium alloy under pure torsion loading in gigacycle regime. Two materials: extruded and forged VT3-1 titanium alloys were studied. Torsion fatigue tests were performed up to fatigue life of 109 cycles. The results of the torsion tests were compared with previously obtained results under fully reversed axial loading on the same alloys. It has been shown that independently on production process as surface as well subsurface crack initiation may appear under ultrasonic torsion loading despite the maximum stress amplitude located at the specimen surface. In the case of surface crack initiation, a scenario of crack initiation and growth is similar to HCF regime except an additional possibility for internal crack branching. In the case of subsurface crack, the initiation site is located below the specimen surface (about 200 μm and is not clearly related to any material flaw. Internal crack initiation is produced by shear stress in maximum shear plane and early crack growth is in Mode II. Crack branching is limited in the case of internal crack initiation compared to surface one. A typical ‘fish-eye’ crack can be observed at the torsion fracture surface, but mechanism of crack initiation seems not to be the same than under axial fatigue loading.

  5. Development and application of an LWR reactor pressure vessel-specific flaw distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Previous efforts by the US Department of Energy have shown that the PWR reactor vessel integrity predictions performed through probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for a pressurized thermal shock event are significantly sensitive to the overall flaw distribution input. It has also been shown that modern vessel in-service inspection (ISI) results can be used for development of vessel flaw distribution(s) that are more representative of US vessels. This paper describes the development and application of a methodology to analyze ISI data for the purpose of flaw distribution determination. The resultant methodology considers detection reliability, flaw sizing accuracy, and flaw detection threshold in its application. Application of the methodology was then demonstrated using four recently acquired US PWR vessel inspection data sets. The methodology helped provide original insight into several key inspection performance and vessel integrity prediction practice issues that will impact future vessel integrity evaluation. This paper briefly discusses the development and application of the methodology and the impact to future vessel integrity analyses

  6. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  7. Effect of combined loading due to bending and internal pressure on pipe flaw evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    2006-01-01

    Considering a rational maintenance rule of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential to determine how a detected flaw is detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes to be considered for carbon steel piping, and can be analyzed by the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Some analytical efforts have been provided as flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors such like the Z-factors in the JSME codes on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants or the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code section XI. The present correction factors were conventionally determined taken conservatism and simplicity into account, however, the effect of internal pressure which would be an important factor under an actual plant condition was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, 'LBB. ENGC' for ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected combined loading was newly developed to have a better prediction with more realistic manner. This method is explicitly incorporated the contribution of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of the scheme compatible with an arbitrary combined loading history. In this paper, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. A correction factor based on the new J-estimation scheme was compared with the present correction factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of internal pressure. (author)

  8. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture-toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Uniaxial tests of single-edged notched bend (SENB) specimens with both deep- and shallow-flaws have shown elevated fracture-toughness for the shallow flaws. The elevation in fracture-toughness for shallow flaws has been shown to be the result of reduced constraint at the crack-tip. Biaxial loading has the potential to increase constraint at the crack-tip and thereby reduce some of the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation. Biaxial fracture-toughness tests have shown that the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation is reduced but not eliminated by biaxial loading. Dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations have been proposed to reflect the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture-toughness. Test results from the uniaxial and biaxial tests were analyzed using the dual-parameter technology. Discrepancies between analysis results and cleavage initiation site data from fractographic examinations indicate that the analysis models are in need of further refinement. Addition of a precleavage, ductile-tearing element to the analysis model has the potential to resolve the noted discrepancies

  9. Regulation No. 0-31 on handling of radiation flaw-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The regulation contains mandatory design, commissioning, and operational requirements for laboratories using flaw-detectors emitting ionizing radiation; also, design, manufacturing, and operational requirements for the production of any type of X-ray or gamma-ray flaw-detectors. Laboratories carrying out non-destructive testing are either stationary or mobile. Conceptual and operating designs are elaborated, including the building and the laboratory lay-outs, the mains, water supply, and sewerage system technological lay-out, explanatory comments, and a lay-out of the shielding equipment. Approbated designs are implemented, and the laboratories commissioned to representatives of the State Sanitary Inspectorate. Licences are issued by the Ministry of Public Health (MPH) and the Committee on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy (CPUAE). Any flaw-detector has to conform to the Bulgarian State Standards and be coordinated with the MPH, the CPUAE, and the Central Laboratory for Nuclear Flaw-Detection (CLNFD). The laboratories are required to have operational instructions, an emergency plan, and to keep technological and dosimetric records. The latter are provided and processed by the relevant service at the Research Institute of Radiobiology and Radiation Hygiene. For operations involving of flaw-detectors, presence of at least two workers is required. (G.G.)

  10. Simulating the x-ray image contrast to setup techniques with desired flaw detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2015-04-01

    The paper provides simulation data of previous work by the author in developing a model for estimating detectability of crack-like flaws in radiography. The methodology is developed to help in implementation of NASA Special x-ray radiography qualification, but is generically applicable to radiography. The paper describes a method for characterizing the detector resolution. Applicability of ASTM E 2737 resolution requirements to the model are also discussed. The paper describes a model for simulating the detector resolution. A computer calculator application, discussed here, also performs predicted contrast and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. Results of various simulation runs in calculating x-ray flaw size parameter and image contrast for varying input parameters such as crack depth, crack width, part thickness, x-ray angle, part-to-detector distance, part-to-source distance, source sizes, and detector sensitivity and resolution are given as 3D surfaces. These results demonstrate effect of the input parameters on the flaw size parameter and the simulated image contrast of the crack. These simulations demonstrate utility of the flaw size parameter model in setting up x-ray techniques that provide desired flaw detectability in radiography. The method is applicable to film radiography, computed radiography, and digital radiography.

  11. Laser-Ultrasonic Testing and its Applications to Nuclear Reactor Internals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, M.; Miura, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-02-01

    A new nondestructive testing technique for surface-breaking microcracks in nuclear reactor components based on laser-ultrasonics is developed. Surface acoustic wave generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and detected by frequency-stabilized long pulse laser coupled with confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to detect and size the cracks. A frequency-domain signal processing is developed to realize accurate sizing capability. The laser-ultrasonic testing allows the detection of surface-breaking microcrack having a depth of less than 0.1 mm, and the measurement of their depth with an accuracy of 0.2 mm when the depth exceeds 0.5 mm including stress corrosion cracking. The laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with laser peening system, which is another laser-based maintenance technology to improve surface stress, for inner surface of small diameter tube is developed. The generation laser in the laser-ultrasonic testing system can be identical to the laser source of the laser peening. As an example operation of the system, the system firstly works as the laser-ultrasonic testing mode and tests the inner surface of the tube. If no cracks are detected, the system then changes its work mode to the laser peening and improves surface stress to prevent crack initiation. The first nuclear industrial application of the laser-ultrasonic testing system combined with the laser peening was completed in Japanese nuclear power plant in December 2004.

  12. A Critical Assessment of Child Custody Evaluations: Limited Science and a Flawed System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Robert E; Otto, Randy K; O'Donohue, William T

    2005-07-01

    further scientific investigation. We see the system for resolving custody disputes as deeply flawed, for reasons that go beyond the problem of limited science. The coupling of the vague "best interests of the child" test with the American adversary system of justice puts judges in the position of trying to perform an impossible task, and it exacerbates parental conflict and problems in parenting and coparenting, which psychological science clearly shows to be key factors predicting children's psychological difficulties in response to their parents' separation and divorce. Our analysis of the flawed system, together with our desire to sharply limit custody disputes and custody evaluations, leads us to propose three reforms. First, we urge continued efforts to encourage parents to reach custody agreements on their own-in divorce mediation, through collaborative law, in good-faith attorney negotiations, in therapy, and in other forums. Some such efforts have been demonstrated to improve parent-parent and parent-child relationships long after divorce, and they embrace the philosophical position that, in the absence of abuse or neglect, parents themselves should determine their children's best interests after separation, just as they do in marriage. Second, we urge state legislatures to move toward adopting more clear and determinative custody rules, a step that would greatly clarify the terms of the marriage contract, limit the need for custody evaluations, and sharply narrow the scope of the evaluation process. We find particular merit in the proposed "approximation rule" (recently embraced by the American Law Institute), in which postdivorce parenting arrangements would approximate parenting involvement in marriage. Third and finally, we recommend that custody evaluators follow the law and only offer opinions for which there is an adequate scientific basis. Related to this, we urge professional bodies to enact more specific standards of practice on this and related issues

  13. Visualization and quantitative research of stress corrosion cracking using the three-dimensional phased array ultrasonic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, So; Kono, Naoyuki; Kudo, Takeshi; Isaka, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional phased-array (3D-PA) ultrasonic technique has been applied to a stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in base metal, and its results for sizing have been quantitatively evaluated. The 3D-PA allows operators to scan objects volumetrically and to display results as 3D images facilitating evaluation processes considerably. The scanning pattern used is called the moving rotational sectorial-scan (MRS-scan) and it is composed of many sectors of different azimuth angles as moving the probe linearly. The MRS-scan significantly improves the inspection of flaws without skillful searching motion of the probe, because the flaws are stereoscopically insonified by a number of ultrasonic beams coming from various directions. The SCC was evaluated by the MRS-scan with a matrix array probe. Not only the deepest tip but also all parts of the crack were able to be successfully visualized and sized with an accuracy of the root mean square error of 0.9 mm. (author)

  14. Flaw evaluation of thermally aged cast stainless steel in light-water reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.; Wichman, K.; Chopra, O.

    1997-01-01

    Cast stainless steel may be used in the fabrication of the primary loop piping, fittings, valve bodies, and pump casings in light-water reactors. However, this material is subject to embrittlement due to thermal aging at the reactor temperature, that is 290 o C (550 o F). The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently completed a research program and the results indicate that the lower-bound fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel is similar to that of submerged arc welds (SAWs). Thus, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has accepted the use of SAW flaw evaluation procedures in IWB-3640 of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code to evaluate flaws in thermally aged cast stainless steel for a license renewal evaluation. Alternatively, utilities may estimate component-specific fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel using procedures developed at ANL for a case-by-case flaw evaluation. (Author)

  15. Determination of Flaw Size and Depth From Temporal Evolution of Thermal Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Cramer, Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of flaws have tended to be based on either the spatial or temporal response. This independent assessment limits the accuracy of characterization. A variational approach is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for a flaw that incorporates both the temporal and spatial response to improve the characterization. The size and depth are determined from both the temporal and spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above a flaw and constraints on the length of the contour surrounding the delamination. Examples of the application of the technique to simulation and experimental data acquired are presented to investigate the limitations of the technique.

  16. Experimental study on flaw detectability of remote field eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, T.; Fukui, S.; Iwahashi, Y.; Yamada, H.

    1988-01-01

    For the purpose of comprehending the effect in practical use of the remote field eddy current (RFEC) testing that becomes noticeable for the ISI technique of steel tubes, its flaw detectability was clarified through a model test. This study used straight and bending tubes of 3.8 mm in wall thickness and 31.8 mm in outside diameter. These tubes were inspected from their inside. After relations among the pickup coil output, coil distance, testing frequency, etc. were measured, a probe of the practical use type was manufactured to investigate its flaw detectability by means of simulated flaws. The authors discuss how it has been found that light local wall thinning on the outside surfaces can be detected by this technique and its effect in practical use can be expected with small influences due to magnetic permeability variations of tube materials, bending of tubes, etc

  17. Origin and type of flaws in heat engine ceramic materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govila, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    A number of ceramic materials such as Silicon Nitrides and Carbides, Sialons, Whisker-Reinforced Ceramic Composites and Partially-Stabilized Zirconias (PSZs) have been developed for use as structural components in heat engine applications. The reliability and durability of a structural engine component is critically dependent on the size, density of distribution and location of flaws. This information is critical for the processing and design engineers in order to design structural components using suitable materials and thus minimize stress intensity. In general, the failure initiating flaws are associated or produced due to material impurity, processing methods and parameters, and fabrication techniques (machining and grinding). Examples of each type of flaws associated with material impurity, processing methods and fabrication techniques are illustrated

  18. Development of ultrasonic inspection technique for crack detection in retaining rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of retaining rings which are currently in service, are composed of a material which is susceptible to stress corrosion when exposed to moisture. Due to the inherent stress levels in the shrunk-on areas, they are particularly susceptible to stress corrosion attack. Therefore, retaining rings require non-destructive examination to avert catastrophic failure. Guidelines for retaining ring inspection issued by EPRI recommend ultrasonic manual and automated methods of inspection for rings in place. Application of the conventional manual method, using S-waves is difficult, and yields unreliable results. Due to the unreliability factor, utilities have been forced to depend upon surface examination methods, such as visual and penetrant techniques. In most instances, a surface exam will necessitate the costly and potentially damaging removal of the rings from the rotor to provide full access to areas of interest. Due to the various complexities of conventional ultrasonic retaining ring inspections, it is essential that the front end ultrasonics (i.e., transducers and techniques) be optimized to produce the best possible examination. For this reason, AMDATA has developed custom transducers and techniques to enhance automated detection capability of flaws in the various suspect areas of retaining rings. When the optimized techniques are applied to generate the best possible raw data, the Intraspect /98 trademark is then used to reliably apply technique, acquire the data and perform post processing evaluations. One of the most promising ultrasonic techniques for retaining ring inspection is creeping waves. This paper investigates the use of creeping waves for retaining ring inspection

  19. Immersion apparatus and process for an ultrasonic transducer in a liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Baud, P.

    1987-01-01

    The ultrasonic transducer is introduced in a casing. The coupling zone of the transducer is covered by a layer of liquid metal. This layer is solidified and then the transducer with his coating layer is introduced in the liquid metal under an inert atmosphere. The device for immersing the transducer is claimed [fr

  20. Enhanced electromechanical response of ferroelectret ultrasonic transducers under high voltage excitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bovtun, Viktor; Döring, J.; Bartusch, J.; Gaal, M.; Erhard, A.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Yakymenko, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 2 (2013), s. 97-102 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0616 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : air coupled ultrasonics * non-contact transducers * ferroelectrets * piezoelectric effect * electrostriction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.107, year: 2013

  1. Analytical solution for stress, strain and plastic instability of pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Sergio B., E-mail: sbcunha@petrobras.com.br [PETROBRAS/TRANSPETRO, Av. Pres. Vargas 328 - 7th floor, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20091-060 (Brazil); Netto, Theodoro A., E-mail: tanetto@lts.coppe.ufrj.br [COPPE, Federal University ot Rio de Janeiro, Ocean Engineering Department, PO BOX 68508, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    The mechanical behavior of internally pressurized pipes with volumetric flaws is analyzed. The two possible modes of circumferentially straining the pipe wall are identified and associated to hypothesized geometries. The radial deformation that takes place by bending the pipe wall is studied by means of axisymmetric flaws and the membrane strain developed by unequal hoop deformation is analyzed with the help of narrow axial flaws. Linear elastic shell solutions for stress and strain are developed, the plastic behavior is studied and the maximum hoop stress at the flaw is related to the undamaged pipe hoop stress by means of stress concentration factors. The stress concentration factors are employed to obtain equations predicting the pressure at which the pipe fails by plastic instability for both types of flaw. These analytical solutions are validated by comparison with burst tests on 3 Double-Prime diameter pipes and finite element simulations. Forty-one burst tests were carried out and two materials with very dissimilar plastic behavior, carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel, were used in the experiments. Both the analytical and the numerical predictions showed good correlation with the experimentally observed burst pressures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytical model for the burst of a pipe with a volumetric flaw is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deformation, strain and stress are modeled in the elastic and plastic domains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is comprehensively validated by experiments and numerical simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The burst pressure model's accuracy is equivalent to finite element simulations.

  2. Potential change in flaw geometry of an initially shallow finite-length surface flaw during a pressurized-thermal-shock transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, D.K.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1993-09-01

    This study presents preliminary estimates on whether an shallow, axially oriented, inner-surface finite-length flaw in a PWR-RPV would tend to elongate in the axial direction and/or deepen into the wall of the vessel during a postulated PTS transient. Analysis results obtained based on the assumptions of (1) linear-elastic material response, and (2) cladding with same toughness as the base metal, indicate that a nearly semicircular flaw would likely propagate in the axial direction followed by propagation into the wall of the vessel. Note that these results correspond to initiation within the lower-shelf fracture toughness temperature range, and that their general validity within the lower-transition temperature range remains to be determined. The sensitivity of the numerical results aid conclusions to the following analysis assumptions are evaluated: (1) reference flaw geometry along the entire crack front and especially within the cladding region; (2) linear-elastic vs elastic-plastic description of material response; and (3) base-material-only vs bimaterial cladding-base vessel-model assumption. The sensitivity evaluation indicates that the analysis results are very sensitive to the above assumptions

  3. Ultrasonic Linear Motor with Two Independent Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneishi, Takeshi; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2004-09-01

    We propose a new structure of an ultrasonic linear motor in order to solve the problems of high-power ultrasonic linear motors that drive the XY-stage for electron beam equipment and to expand the application fields of the motor. We pay special attention to the following three points: (1) the vibration in two directions of the ultrasonic linear motor should not influence mutually each other, (2) the vibration in two directions should be divided into the stage traveling direction and the pressing direction of the ultrasonic linear motor, and (3) the rigidity of the stage traveling direction of the ultrasonic linear motor should be increased. As a result, the supporting method of ultrasonic linear motors is simplified. The efficiency of the motor is improved and temperature rise is reduced. The stage position drift is also improved.

  4. Effect of Ultrasonic Frequency on Lactic Acid Fermentation Promotion by Ultrasonic Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tadayuki; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi

    2004-05-01

    The authors have been researching the promotion of lactic acid fermentation by ultrasonic irradiation. In the past research, it was proven that ultrasonic irradiation is effective in the process of fermentation, and the production of yoghurt and kefir was promoted. In this study, the effect of the ultrasonic frequency in this fermentation process was examined. In the frequency range of this study, it was found that the action of fermentation promotion was exponentially proportionate to the irradiated ultrasonic frequency.

  5. High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buckin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy (HR-US is an analytical technique for direct and non-destructive monitoring of molecular and micro-structural transformations in liquids and semi-solid materials. It is based on precision measurements of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in analysed samples. The application areas of HR-US in research, product development, and quality and process control include analysis of conformational transitions of polymers, ligand binding, molecular self-assembly and aggregation, crystallisation, gelation, characterisation of phase transitions and phase diagrams, and monitoring of chemical and biochemical reactions. The technique does not require optical markers or optical transparency. The HR-US measurements can be performed in small sample volumes (down to droplet size, over broad temperature range, at ambient and elevated pressures, and in various measuring regimes such as automatic temperature ramps, titrations and measurements in flow.

  6. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J R; Wagg, A R; Whittle, M J [N.D.T. Applications Centre, CEGB, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    The metallurgical structure of austenitic welds is described and contrasted with that found in ferritic welds. It is shown that this structure imparts a marked elastic anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation parameters. Measurements of variations in the apparent attenuation of sound and deviations in the beam direction are described. The measurements are interpreted in terms of the measured velocity anisotropy. Two applications of the fundamental work are described. In the first it is shown how, by using short pulse compression wave probes, and with major modification of the welding procedure, a stainless steel fillet weld in an AGR boiler can be inspected. In the second application, alternative designs of a transition butt weld have been compared for ease of ultrasonic inspection. The effects of two different welding processes on such an inspection are described. Finally, the paper examines the prospects for future development of inspection and defect-sizing techniques for austenitic welds. (author)

  7. Influence of circumferential flaw length on internal burst pressure of a wall-thinned pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Masataka, E-mail: tsuji-m@u-fukui.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Meshii, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► The effect of θ on p{sub f} was examined by experimental analysis and FEA. ► Here θ is the circumferential angle of a flaw, p{sub f} is the internal burst pressure. ► p{sub f} decreased as θ increased in some cases. ► The effect of θ on p{sub f} should be taken into consideration in evaluating p{sub f}. -- Abstract: This paper examines the effect of the circumferential angle of a flaw θ on the internal burst pressure p{sub f} of pipes with artificial wall-thinned flaws. The effect of θ has conventionally been regarded as unimportant in the evaluation of the p{sub f} of wall-thinned straight pipes. Therefore, a burst pressure equation for an axial crack inside a cylinder (Fig. 1, left), such as Kiefner's equation (Kiefner et al., 1973), has been widely applied (ANSI/ASME B31.G., 1991; Hasegawa et al., 2011). However, the following implicit assumptions notably exist when applying the equation to planar flaws in situations with non-planar flaws. 1)The fracture mode of the non-planar flaw under consideration is identical to that of the crack. 2)The effect of θ on p{sub f}, which is not considered for an axial crack, is small or negligible. However, the experimental results from the systematic burst tests for carbon steel pipes with artificial wall-thinned flaws examined in this paper showed that these implicit assumptions may be incorrect. In this paper the experimental results are evaluated in further detail. The purpose of the evaluation was to clarify the effect of θ on p{sub f}. Specifically, the significance of the flaw configuration (axial length δ{sub z} and wall-thinning ratio t{sub 1}/t) was studied for its effects on θ and p{sub f}. In addition, a simulation of this effect was conducted using a large strain elastic-plastic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model. As observed from the experimental results, θ tended to affect p{sub f} in cases with large δ{sub z}, and t{sub 1}/t was also correlated with a decrease in p{sub f

  8. Evaluating empirical/analytical techniques to predict structural integrity of pipe containing surface flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, W.G.; Server, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    Data from flat-plate specimens containing either triangular-, ellipsoidal- or rectangular-shaped surface flaws were evaluated by several potential analytical techniques. These techniques were modified as needed to predict conditions for initiation of subcritical crack growth, for the defect to penetrate the 6.4 mm (0.25 in.) wall thickness, and for instability (plastic or unstable). The modified analytical techniques developed from the plate specimens were then used to make predictions which are compared with test results obtained from pipe specimens containing triangular-shaped surface flaws

  9. Probabilistic calibration of safety coefficients for flawed components in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardillon, E.; Pitner, P.; Barthelet, B.; Remond, A.

    1996-01-01

    The rules that are currently under application to verify the acceptance of flaws in nuclear components rely on deterministic criteria supposed to ensure the safe operating of plants. The interest of having a precise and reliable method to evaluate the safety margins and the integrity of components led Electricite de France to launch an approach to link directly safety coefficients with safety levels. This paper presents a probabilistic methodology to calibrate safety coefficients in relation to reliability target values. The proposed calibration procedure applies to the case of a ferritic flawed pipe using the R6 procedure for assessing the integrity of the structure. (authors). 5 refs., 5 figs

  10. Internal Rot Detection with the Use of Low-Frequency Flaw Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskórnicki, Marek; Ligus, Grzegorz

    2014-12-01

    The issue of rot detection in standing timber or stocked wood is very important in forest management. Rot flaw detection used for that purpose is represented by invasive and non-invasive devices. Non-invasive devices are very accurate, but due to the cost and complicated operation they have not been applied on a large scale in forest management. Taking into account the practical needs of foresters a prototype of low-frequency flaw was developed. The principle of its operation is based on the difference in acoustic wave propagation in sound wood and wood with rot.

  11. Imaging flaws in thin metal plates using a magneto-optic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, B.; Prabhu, D. R.; Namkung, M.; Birt, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the capabilities of the magnetooptic/eddy-current imager (MEI) apparatus in the case of aging aircraft structure-type flaws in 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. Attention is given to images of cyclically grown fatigue cracks from rivetted joints in fabricated lap-joint structures, electrical discharge machining notches, and corrosion spots. Although conventional eddy-current methods could have been used, the speed and ease of MEI's use in these tests is unmatched by such means. Results are displayed in real time as a test piece is scanned, furnishing easily interpreted flaw images.

  12. Probabilistic calibration of safety coefficients for flawed components in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardillon, E.; Pitner, P.; Barthelet, B.; Remond, A.

    1995-01-01

    The current rules applied to verify the flaws acceptance in nuclear components rely on deterministic criteria supposed to ensure the plant safe operation. The interest in have a precise and reliable method to evaluate the safety margins and the integrity of components led Electricite de France to launch an approach to link directly safety coefficients with safety levels. This paper presents a probabilistic methodology to calibrate safety coefficients in relation do reliability target values. The proposed calibration procedure applies to the case of a ferritic flawed pipe using the R 6 procedure for assessing the structure integrity. (author). 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Twenty years of fracture mechanics and flaw evaluation applications in the ASME Nuclear Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardella, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a retrospective on the development and applications of fracture mechanics-based toughness requirements and flaw evaluation methodology in Sections III and XI of the ASME Code. Section III developments range from the rules and requirements for thick section Class 1 pressure vessels to thinner section components in other Classes. Section XI applications include flaw acceptance standards and evaluation methodology for various components ranging from pressure vessels to thins section piping of carbon and austenitic steels. The experience gained in operating plant applications of these rules and procedures are also discussed

  14. MLFMA-accelerated Nyström method for ultrasonic scattering - Numerical results and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrala, Praveen; Downs, Andrew; Chen, Kun; Song, Jiming; Roberts, Ron

    2018-04-01

    Full wave scattering models for ultrasonic waves are necessary for the accurate prediction of voltage signals received from complex defects/flaws in practical nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurements. We propose the high-order Nyström method accelerated by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) as an improvement to the state-of-the-art full-wave scattering models that are based on boundary integral equations. We present numerical results demonstrating improvements in simulation time and memory requirement. Particularly, we demonstrate the need for higher order geom-etry and field approximation in modeling NDE measurements. Also, we illustrate the importance of full-wave scattering models using experimental pulse-echo data from a spherical inclusion in a solid, which cannot be modeled accurately by approximation-based scattering models such as the Kirchhoff approximation.

  15. Proposed new ultrasonic test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxfield, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    Within the last four or five years, a great deal of progress has been made both here and in a number of other laboratories in developing techniques that will enable considerably more information to be obtained from the ultrasonic examination of an object. Some of these recent developments relate to information contained within the diffracted beam which does not return along the incident path. An ultrasonic examination based upon an evaluation of diffracted energy must use at least two transducers, one for transmission and the other for reception. Current indications are that even more reliable test results will be achieved using a receiving transducer that can scan a significant portion of the diffracted field including that portion which is back-reflected. In general, this scan can be interpreted most accurately if it follows a path related to the surface shape. If more than one region within the object is to be interrogated, then the transmitting transducer must also be scanned, again along a path related to the surface shape. The large quantity of information obtained as the result of such an examination must be subjected to sophisticated computer analysis in order to be displayed in a meaningful and intelligible manner. Although one motivation for building such an instrument is to explore new ultrasonic test procedures that are evolving from current laboratory research, this is neither the sole motivation nor the only use for this instrument. Such a mechanical and electronic device would permit conventional ultrasonic tests to be performed on parts of complex geometry without the expensive and time-consuming special fixturing that is currently required. May possible test geometries could be explored in practice prior to the construction of a specialized test apparatus. Hence, it would be necessary to design much, if any, flexibility into the special test apparatus

  16. Ultrasonic sizing of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    Surface and buried fatigue cracks in steel plates have been sized using immersion probes as transmitters-receivers, angled to produce shear waves in the steel. Sizes have been estimated by identifying the ultrasonic waves diffracted from the crack tip and by measuring the time taken for a signal to travel to and from the crack tip. The effects of compression normal to a fatigue crack and of crack front curvature are discussed. Another diffraction technique, developed by UKAEA, Harwell, is reviewed

  17. Ultrasonic characterization of yogurt fermentation process

    OpenAIRE

    IZBAIM , DRIS; FAIZ , BOUAZZA; MOUDDEN , ALI; MALAININE , MOHAMED; ABOUDAOUD , Idriss

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The objective of this work is to characterize the fermentation of yogurt based on an ultrasonic technique. Conventionally, the acidity of the yogurt is measured by a pH meter to determine the progress of fermentation. However, the pH meter should be cleaned and calibrated for each measurement and, therefore, this method is not practical. In this regard, ultrasonic techniques are fast, non-invasive and inexpensive. The measurement of ultrasonic parameters such as amplit...

  18. Experimental investigation of ultrasonic velocity anisotropy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/077/02/0345-0355. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; ultrasonic wave; sound velocity; anisotropy. Abstract. Magnetic field-induced dispersion of ultrasonic velocity in a Mn0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 fluid (applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the ultrasonic propagation vector) is ...

  19. Automated ultrasonic inspection using PULSDAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naybour, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    PULSDAT (Portable Ultrasonic Data Acquisition Tool) is a system for recording the data from single probe automated ultrasonic inspections. It is one of a range of instruments and software developed by Nuclear Electric to carry out a wide variety of high quality ultrasonic inspections. These vary from simple semi-automated inspections through to multi-probe, highly automated ones. PULSDAT runs under the control of MIPS software, and collects data which is compatible with the GUIDE data display system. PULSDAT is therefore fully compatible with Nuclear Electric's multi-probe inspection systems and utilises all the reliability and quality assurance of the software. It is a rugged, portable system that can be used in areas of difficult access. The paper discusses the benefits of automated inspection and gives an outline of the main features of PULSDAT. Since April 1990 PULSDAT has been used in several applications within Nuclear Electric and this paper presents two examples: the first is a ferritic set-through nozzle and the second is an austenitic fillet weld. (Author)

  20. Indoor Airborne Ultrasonic Wireless Communication Using OFDM Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2017-09-01

    Concerns still exist over the safety of prolonged exposure to radio frequency (RF) wireless transmissions and there are also potential data security issues due to remote signal interception techniques such as Bluesniping. Airborne ultrasound may be used as an alternative to RF for indoor wireless communication systems for securely transmitting data over short ranges, as signals are difficult to intercept from outside the room. Two types of air-coupled capacitive ultrasonic transducer were used in the implementation of an indoor airborne wireless communication system. One was a commercially available SensComp series 600 ultrasonic transducer with a nominal frequency of 50 kHz, and the other was a prototype transducer with a high- k dielectric layer operating at higher frequencies from 200 to 400 kHz. Binary phase-shift keying (BPSK), quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK), and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing modulation methods were successfully implemented using multiple orthogonal subchannels. The modulated ultrasonic signal packets were synchronized using a wireless link, and a least-squares channel estimation algorithm was used to compensate the phase and amplitude distortion introduced by the air channel. By sending and receiving the ultrasonic signals using the SensComp transducers, the achieved maximum system data rate was up to 180 kb/s using 16-QAM with ultrasonic channels from 55 to 99 kHz, over a line-of-sight transmission distance of 6 m with no detectable errors. The transmission range could be extended to 9 and 11 m using QPSK and BPSK modulation schemes, respectively. The achieved data rates for the QPSK and BPSK schemes were 90 and 45 kb/s using the same bandwidth. For the high- k ultrasonic transducers, a maximum data rate up to 800 kb/s with no measurable errors was achieved up to a range of 0.7 m. The attainable transmission ranges were increased to 1.1 and 1.2 m with data rates of 400 and 200 kb

  1. A Brazing Defect Detection Using an Ultrasonic Infrared Imaging Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jung, Seung Ho; Jung, Hyun Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    When a high-energy ultrasound propagates through a solid body that contains a crack or a delamination, the two faces of the defect do not ordinarily vibrate in unison, and dissipative phenomena such as friction, rubbing and clapping between the faces will convert some of the vibrational energy to heat. By combining this heating effect with infrared imaging, one can detect a subsurface defect in material in real time. In this paper a realtime detection of the brazing defect of thin Inconel plates using the UIR (ultrasonic infrared imaging) technology is described. A low frequency (23 kHz) ultrasonic transducer was used to infuse the welded Inconel plates with a short pulse of sound for 280 ms. The ultrasonic source has a maximum power of 2 kW. The surface temperature of the area under inspection is imaged by an infrared camera that is coupled to a fast frame grabber in a computer. The hot spots, which are a small area around the bound between the two faces of the Inconel plates near the defective brazing point and heated up highly, are observed. And the weak thermal signal is observed at the defect position of brazed plate also. Using the image processing technology such as background subtraction average and image enhancement using histogram equalization, the position of defective brazing regions in the thin Inconel plates can be located certainly

  2. Ultrasonic investigations on polonides of Ba, Ca, and Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Devraj; Bhalla, Vyoma [Amity School of Engineering and Technology, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Applied Physics; Bala, Jyoti [Amity School of Engineering and Technology, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Applied Physics; Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha Univ., New Delhi (India). USICT; Wadhwa, Shikha [Amity Univ., Noida (India). Amity Inst. of Nanotechnology

    2017-07-01

    The temperature-dependent mechanical and ultrasonic properties of barium, calcium, and lead polonides (BaPo, CaPo, and PbPo) were investigated in the temperature range 100-300 K. The second- and third-order elastic constants (SOECs and TOECs) were computed using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential and these in turn have been used to estimate other secondary elastic properties such as strength, anisotropy, microhardness, etc. The theoretical approach followed the prediction that BaPo, CaPo, and PbPo are brittle in nature. PbPo is found to be the hardest amongst the chosen compounds. Further the SOECs and TOECs are applied to determine ultrasonic velocities, Debye temperature, and acoustic coupling constants along left angle 100 right angle, left angle 110 right angle, and left angle 111 right angle orientations at room temperature. Additionally thermal conductivity has been computed using Morelli and Slack's approach along different crystallographic directions at room temperature. Finally ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction and thermoelastic relaxation mechanisms has been computed for BaPo, CaPo, and PbPo. The behaviour of these compounds is similar to that of semi-metals with thermal relaxation time of the order 10{sup -11} s. The present computation study is reasonably in agreement with the available theoretical data for the similar type of materials.

  3. Ultrasonic Investigations on Polonides of Ba, Ca, and Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devraj; Bhalla, Vyoma; Bala, Jyoti; Wadhwa, Shikha

    2017-10-01

    The temperature-dependent mechanical and ultrasonic properties of barium, calcium, and lead polonides (BaPo, CaPo, and PbPo) were investigated in the temperature range 100-300 K. The second- and third-order elastic constants (SOECs and TOECs) were computed using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential and these in turn have been used to estimate other secondary elastic properties such as strength, anisotropy, microhardness, etc. The theoretical approach followed the prediction that BaPo, CaPo, and PbPo are brittle in nature. PbPo is found to be the hardest amongst the chosen compounds. Further the SOECs and TOECs are applied to determine ultrasonic velocities, Debye temperature, and acoustic coupling constants along , , and orientations at room temperature. Additionally thermal conductivity has been computed using Morelli and Slack's approach along different crystallographic directions at room temperature. Finally ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction and thermoelastic relaxation mechanisms has been computed for BaPo, CaPo, and PbPo. The behaviour of these compounds is similar to that of semi-metals with thermal relaxation time of the order 10-11 s. The present computation study is reasonably in agreement with the available theoretical data for the similar type of materials.

  4. Recent progress in online ultrasonic process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Szu-Sheng L.; Chen, Tzu-Fang; Ramos-Franca, Demartonne; Nguyen, Ky T.; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Ihara, Ikuo; Derdouri, A.; Garcia-Rejon, Andres

    1998-03-01

    On-line ultrasonic monitoring of polymer co-extrusion and gas-assisted injection molding are presented. During the co- extrusion of high density polyethylene and Santoprene ultrasonic sensors consisting of piezoelectric transducers and clad ultrasonic buffer rods are used to detect the interface between these two polymers and the stability of the extrusion. The same ultrasonic sensor also measures the surface temperature of the extruded polymer. The results indicate that temperature measurements using ultrasound have a faster response time than those obtained by conventional thermocouple. In gas-assisted injection molding the polymer and gas flow front positions are monitored simultaneously. This information may be used to control the plunger movement.

  5. Internal ultrasonic inspection of flexible pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltzersen, O. (IKU Petroleumsforskning A/S, Trondheim (Norway) Norwegian Inst. of Tech., Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics); Waag, T.I. (IKU Petroleumsforskning A/S, Trondheim (Norway))

    1993-10-01

    Methods for internal ultrasonic inspection of flexible pipe have been investigated through experiments with a short sample of Coflexip pipe. Ultrasonic backscatter methods using normal and non-normal incidence have been used for qualitative high contrast ultrasonic imaging of the inner surface of the pipe. Analysis of the internal cross-section has been performed based on the use of a non-contact ultrasonic caliper, and processing procedures which enable calculation of, and compensation for, eccentricity of the tool in the pipe. The methods developed can be used to quantitatively estimate the thickness of the internal carcass, and perform high resolution topographic mapping of the inner surface. (Author)

  6. Stresses in ultrasonically assisted bone cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, K; Mitrofanov, A V; Silberschmidt, V V; Baeker, M

    2009-01-01

    Bone cutting is a frequently used procedure in the orthopaedic surgery. Modern cutting techniques, such as ultrasonic assisted drilling, enable surgeons to perform precision operations in facial and spinal surgeries. Advanced understanding of the mechanics of bone cutting assisted by ultrasonic vibration is required to minimise bone fractures and to optimise the technique performance. The paper presents results of finite element simulations on ultrasonic and conventional bone cutting analysing the effects of ultrasonic vibration on cutting forces and stress distribution. The developed model is used to study the effects of cutting and vibration parameters (e.g. amplitude and frequency) on the stress distributions in the cutting region.

  7. Ultrasonic testing technique for users in practical application. Pt. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsepius, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    In the present, eighth part of ultrasonic testing technique for users in practical application, the two methods 1) testing by gap coupling and 2) testing by the dipping technique are treated. By the first method the probe is clamped in a holding device in such manner that a water-filled gap remains between probe and surface. Through this gap the sonic signal gets into the specimen without mechanical contact between probe and specimen taking place. By the dipping technique testing is performed in a tank filled with water, the probe being guided over the specimen under water. (RW) [de

  8. Ultrasonic inspection of steam generator tubing for cracks, wall thinning and cross-sectional deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.A.; Carodiskey, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Periodic inspection of steam generator tubing is an important consideration in the efficient operation of a power generating facility. Since the operating life of these generators is finite, failures will occur. Due to the chemistry of the environment, thermal cycling, and other factors, flaws may develop that can cause rapid deterioration of the tubing while the overall performance of the unit may appear normal. In earlier presentation, the authors presented an ultrasonic bore-side array transducer which can be used with a conventional flaw detector instrument for the location of circumferential crack type defects on the outside tube surface. since that time, much additional experience has been gained on the performance of these probes. Probe performance has been characterized using fatigue crack samples and these results are reviewed. Probes have also been developed having 16 elements for use in larger diameter (25 mm) tubes. The bore-side array concept has been expanded to normal incidence tube well inspection allowing simultaneous wall thickness and eccentricity measurement which is very useful in the assessment of tube wastage and deformation. Preliminary data obtained in this area is presented

  9. A study on the extraction of feature variables for the pattern recognition for welding flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, B. H.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, the researches classifying the artificial and natural flaws in welding parts are performed using the pattern recognition technology. For this purpose the signal pattern recognition package including the user defined function was developed and the total procedure including the digital signal processing, feature extraction, feature selection and classifier selection is treated by bulk. Specially it is composed with and discussed using the statistical classifier such as the linear discriminant function classifier, the empirical Bayesian classifier. Also, the pattern recognition technology is applied to classification problem of natural flaw(i.e multiple classification problem-crack, lack of penetration, lack of fusion, porosity, and slag inclusion, the planar and volumetric flaw classification problem). According to this results, if appropriately teamed the neural network classifier is better than stastical classifier in the classification problem of natural flaw. And it is possible to acquire the recognition rate of 80% above through it is different a little according to domain extracting the feature and the classifier.

  10. Modeling validation to structural flaws in the foundations of oil tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Larissa Goncalves; Leite, Sandro Passos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling of an experiment used to study the application of backscattered neutrons in the identification of structural flaws in the foundations of oil tanks. This modeling was a preliminary validation procedure of the method of calculation, performed with the radiation transport code MCNP, to study the application of backscattered neutrons as inspection tool. (author)

  11. Flawed Implementation or Inconsistent Logics? Lessons from Higher Education Reform in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marta A.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates two competing explanations of why reforms associated with the Bologna process brought disappointing results in Ukraine. The lack of anticipated benefits from the reforms may stem either from a flawed implementation of the Bologna process, or from more fundamental differences between the models of higher education…

  12. Acoustic emission and estimation of flaw significance in reactor pressure boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The work discussed is intended to establish the feasibility of using acoustic emission (AE) to detect and evaluate growing flaws in nuclear reactor pressure boundaries. Basic AE identification and interpretation methods have grown out of Phase 1. Phases 2 and 3 to test and demonstrate developed methodology on a vessel test and on a reactor are in progress

  13. Stabilized transistor transformer for self-moving Sirena-1 X-ray flaw detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasil'nikov, S.B.; Kristalinskij, A.L.; Lozovoj, L.N.; Markov, S.N.; Sindalovskij, E.I.

    1986-01-01

    Electric circuit of stabilized transistor transformer for self-moving ''Sirena'' type X-ray flaw detector is described. Specifications of the transformer and results of the experimental studies, which can be used when tuning and adjusting the transformer under industrial conditions

  14. Crack propagation from a filled flaw in rocks considering the infill influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xu; Deng, Yan; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Shuren; Tang, C. A.

    2018-05-01

    This study presents a numerical and experimental study of the cracking behaviour of rock specimen containing a single filled flaw under compression. The primary aim is to investigate the influences of infill on crack patterns, load-displacement response and specimen strength. The numerical code RFPA2D (Rock Failure Process Analysis) featured by the capability of modeling heterogeneous materials is employed to develop the numerical model, which is further calibrated by physical tests. The results indicate that there exists a critical infill strength which controls crack patterns for a given flaw inclination angle. For case of infill strength lower than the critical value, the secondary or anti-cracks are disappeared by increasing the infill strength. If the infill strength is greater than the critical value, the filled flaw has little influence on the cracking path and the specimen fails by an inclined crack, as if there is no flaw. The load-displacement responses show specimen stiffness increases by increasing infill strength until the infill strength reaches its critical value. The specimen strength increases by increasing the infill strength and almost keeps constant as the infill strength exceeds its critical value.

  15. Intentionally Flawed Manuscripts as Means for Teaching Students to Critically Evaluate Scientific Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Jaroslav; Cervenák, Filip; Bircák, Erik; Juríková, Katarína; Goffová, Ivana; Gorilák, Peter; Huraiová, Barbora; Plavá, Jana; Demecsová, Loriana; Duríková, Nikola; Galisová, Veronika; Gazdarica, Matej; Puškár, Marek; Nagy, Tibor; Nagyová, Sona; Mentelová, Lucia; Slaninová, Miroslava; Ševcovicová, Andrea; Tomáška, Lubomír

    2018-01-01

    As future scientists, university students need to learn how to avoid making errors in their own manuscripts, as well as how to identify flaws in papers published by their peers. Here we describe a novel approach on how to promote students' ability to critically evaluate scientific articles. The exercise is based on instructing teams of students to…

  16. CLEAVAGE FRACTURE ANALYSIS OF CLADDED BEAMS WITH AN EMBEDDED FLAW UNDER FOUR-POINT BENDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Shengjun; Williams, Paul T; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2008-01-01

    Semi-large scale embedded flaw beams were tested at Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) Rez in the Czech Republic for the 6th Network for Evaluating Structural Components (NESC-VI) project. The experiments included, among others, a series of semi-large scale tests on cladded beam specimens containing simulated sub-clad flaws. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted numerical studies to analyze the constraint issues associated with embedded flaws using various fracture mechanics methods, including T-Stress, hydrostatic stress based QH stress, and the Weibull stress model. The recently developed local approach using the modified Weibull stress model combined with the Master Curve methodology was also utilized to predict the failure probability (Pf) of semi-large scale beams. For this study, the Weibull statistical model associated with the Master Curve methodology was employed to stochastically simulate the fracture toughness data using the available Master Curve reference temperature T0 for the tested base material from the 'aged' WWER-440 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The study was also conducted to investigate the sensitivity of predicated probability of failure of semi-large scale beams with embedded flaw with different Weibull shape parameters, m

  17. Advantages of using 192Ir γ-ray flaw detector for some products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Xiqi

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages of 192 Ir γ-ray flaw detector made in China in welding seam testings. The authors made a comparison between 192 Ir γ-ray and X-ray machine. 192 Ir γ-ray machine showed many advantages, such as shorter working hours and less labour intensity

  18. Applying a nonlinear, pitch-catch, ultrasonic technique for the detection of kissing bonds in friction stir welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Steven; Tabatabaeipour, Morteza; Hettler, Jan; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2016-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technology for the joining of aluminum alloys and other metallic admixtures that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Although FSW generally provides better fatigue properties than traditional fusion welding methods, fatigue properties are still significantly lower than for the base material. Apart from voids, kissing bonds for instance, in the form of closed cracks propagating along the interface of the stirred and heat affected zone, are inherent features of the weld and can be considered as one of the main causes of a reduced fatigue life of FSW in comparison to the base material. The main problem with kissing bond defects in FSW, is that they currently are very difficult to detect using existing NDT methods. Besides, in most cases, the defects are not directly accessible from the exposed surface. Therefore, new techniques capable of detecting small kissing bond flaws need to be introduced. In the present paper, a novel and practical approach is introduced based on a nonlinear, single-sided, ultrasonic technique. The proposed inspection technique uses two single element transducers, with the first transducer transmitting an ultrasonic signal that focuses the ultrasonic waves at the bottom side of the sample where cracks are most likely to occur. The large amount of energy at the focus activates the kissing bond, resulting in the generation of nonlinear features in the wave propagation. These nonlinear features are then captured by the second transducer operating in pitch-catch mode, and are analyzed, using pulse inversion, to reveal the presence of a defect. The performance of the proposed nonlinear, pitch-catch technique, is first illustrated using a numerical study of an aluminum sample containing simple, vertically oriented, incipient cracks. Later, the proposed technique is also applied experimentally on a real-life friction stir welded butt joint containing a kissing bond flaw. Copyright © 2016

  19. Mechanized radiation testing of austenitic pipe welds. Testing of media filled pipes and determination of the flaw depth by tomosynthesis; Mechanisierte Durchstrahlungspruefung von Rundschweissnaehten. Pruefung mediengefuellter Rohrleitungen und Tiefenlagenbestimmung durch Tomosynthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewert, U.; Redmer, B. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Mueller, J. [COMPRA GmbH, Frechen (Germany); Trobitz, M. [Kernkraftwerke Gundremmingen Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Gundremmingen (Germany); Baranov, V.A. [Institute for Introscopy, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    A compact detection system was built for multi-angle inspection of pipes, consisting of a high-sensitivity radiometric line scanner and an ultrasonic manipulator. Improved flaw imaging quality is achieved with this system as compared to film radiography. Measurements have been carried out on site in a nuclear power plant and in a laboratory. Better flaw imaging quality was also achieved in the testing of water-filled pipes. Non-linear tomosynthesis was applied for processing and interpretation of measured data. The system delivers considerably better images of planary materials inhomogeneitites, (such as cracks and lack-of-bond defects). (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Eine hoch empfindliche radiometrische Zeilenkamera wurde mit einem Ultraschall-Manipulator zu einem Gesamtsystem aufgebaut und fuer Mehrwinkel-Inspektionen von Rohrleitungen angewandt. Bei der Inspektion von Rundschweissnaehten an Rohren mit ca. 8... 20 mm Wanddicke wurde eine Verbesserung der Bildqualitaet im Vergleich zur Filmradiographie erreicht. Diese Messungen wurden in einem Kernkraftwerk unter Vor-Ort-Bedingungen sowie im Labor ausgefuehrt. Ein signifikantes Ansteigen der Bildqualitaet wurde auch bei der Pruefung von wassergefuellten Rohren erzielt. Methoden der nicht-linearen Tomosynthese wurden fuer die Verarbeitung und Interpretation der gemessenen Projektionsdaten genutzt. Das entwickelte System gestattet eine erhebliche Verbesserung der Anzeige von planaren Materialinhomogenitaeten (z.B. Risse und Bindefehler). (orig./DGE)

  20. Methods and means of the radioisotope flaw detection of the nuclear power reactors components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekopov, A.S.; Majorov, A.N.; Firsov, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    Methods and means are considered for the radioisotopic flaw detection of the nuclear reactors pressure vessels and structural components of the reactor circuit. Methods of control are described as in the technological process of fabrication of the power reactors assemblies as during the systematic-preventive repair of the nuclear power station equipment during exploitation. Methodological base is given of the technology of radiation control of welded joints of the pressure vessel branch piper of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors in the process of assembling and exploitation and joining pipes with the pipe-plate of the steamgenerator in the process of fabrication. Methods of the radioisotope flaw detection in the process of exploitation take into consideration the influence of the radioisotope background, and ensure obtaining of the demanded by the rules of control, sensitivity. Methods of control of welded joints of the steamgenerator of nuclear power plants are based on the simultaneous examination of all joints with application of the shaped radiographic plate-holders. Special gamma-flaw-detection equipment is developed for control of the welded joints of the main branch-pipes. Design peculiarities are given of the installation for flaw detection. These installations are equipped with the system for emergency return of the radiation source into the storage position from the position for exposure. They have automatic exposure-meters for determination of the exposure time. Successfull exploitation of such installations in the Finland during assembling equipment for the nuclear reactor of the nuclear power plant ''Loviisa-1'' and in the USSR on the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant has shown possibility for detection of flaws having dimensions about 1% of the equipment used. For control of welded joints of pipes with pipe-plates at the steam generators, portable flaw-detectors are used. Sensitivity of these flaw-detectors towards detection of the wire standards has

  1. Proposal of limit moment equation applicable to planar/non-planar flaw in wall thinned pipes under bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masataka; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A limit moment equation applicable to planar/non-planar flaw of 0 ≤ θ ≤ π found in wall thinned straight pipes was proposed. → An idea to rationally classify planar/non-planar flaw in wall thinned pipes was proposed. → The equation based on the experimental observation focused on the fracture mode. - Abstract: In this paper, a limit bending moment equation applicable to all types of planar and non-planar flaws in wall-thinned straight pipes under bending was proposed. A system to rationally classify the planar/non-planar flaws in wall-thinned pipes was suggested based on experimental observations focused on the fracture mode. The results demonstrate the importance of distinguishing between axial and circumferential long flaws in wall-thinned pipes.

  2. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Backman, Marie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Williams, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, B. Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klasky, Hilda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  3. Effect of combined loading due to bending and internal pressure on pipe flaw evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    Considering a rule for the rationalization of maintenance of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential for determining how a detected flaw will be detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes that must be considered for carbon steel piping and can be analyzed by elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Some analytical efforts have provided various flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors, such as the Z-factors in the JSME codes on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants and the section XI of the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code. The present Z-factors were conventionally determined, taking conservativity and simplicity into account; however, the effect of internal pressure, which is an important factor under actual plant conditions, was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, LBB.ENGC for the ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected to combined loading was developed for more accurate prediction under more realistic conditions. This method explicitly incorporates the contributions of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of a scheme that is compatible with an arbitrary combined-loading history. In this study, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. The Z-factor obtained in this study was compared with the presently used Z-factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of the internal pressure. (author)

  4. Fracture assessment of shallow-flaw cruciform beams tested under uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow, surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a far-field, out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for an RPV material. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies, namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness; the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect. A three-parameter Weibull model based on the hydrostatic stress criterion is shown to correlate with the experimentally observed biaxial effect on cleavage fracture toughness by providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasonically triggered ignition at liquid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lars Hendrik; Meyer, Lennart; Wilkens, Volker; Beyer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is considered to be an ignition source according to international standards, setting a threshold value of 1mW/mm(2) [1] which is based on theoretical estimations but which lacks experimental verification. Therefore, it is assumed that this threshold includes a large safety margin. At the same time, ultrasound is used in a variety of industrial applications where it can come into contact with explosive atmospheres. However, until now, no explosion accidents have been reported in connection with ultrasound, so it has been unclear if the current threshold value is reasonable. Within this paper, it is shown that focused ultrasound coupled into a liquid can in fact ignite explosive atmospheres if a specific target positioned at a liquid's surface converts the acoustic energy into a hot spot. Based on ignition tests, conditions could be derived that are necessary for an ultrasonically triggered explosion. These conditions show that the current threshold value can be significantly augmented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  7. Defect detection and sizing in ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moysan, J.; Benoist, P.; Chapuis, N.; Magnin, I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces imaging processing developed with the SPARTACUS system in the field of ultrasonic testing. The aim of the imaging processing is to detect and to separate defects echoes from background noise. Image segmentation and particularities of ultrasonic images are the base of studied methods. 4 figs.; 6 refs [fr

  8. Reproducibility of the results in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalaye, M.; Launay, J.P.; Thomas, A.

    1980-12-01

    This memorandum reports on the conclusions of the tests carried out in order to evaluate the reproducibility of ultrasonic tests made on welded joints. FRAMATOME have started a study to assess the dispersion of results afforded by the test line and to characterize its behaviour. The tests covered sensors and ultrasonic generators said to be identical to each other (same commercial batch) [fr

  9. Backward ray tracing for ultrasonic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, R.

    1990-01-01

    Focused ultrasonic beams frequently pass one or more media interfaces, strongly affecting the ultrasonic beamshape and focusing. A computer program, based on backward ray tracing was developed to compute the shape of a corrected focusing mirror. This shape is verified with another program; then the

  10. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Characterization of a Composite Secondary Bonded Adhesive Lap Joint Using the Ultrasonics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. R.; Ghosh, A.; Karuppannan, D.

    2018-05-01

    The construction of aircraft using advanced composites have become very popular during the past two decades, in which many innovative manufacturing processes, such as cocuring, cobonding, and secondary bonding processes, have been adopted. The secondary bonding process has become less popular than the other two ones because of nonavailability of process database and certification issues. In this article, an attempt is made to classify the quality of bonding using nondestructive ultrasonic inspection methods. Specimens were prepared and tested using the nondestructive ultrasonic Through Transmission (TT), Pulse Echo (PE), and air coupled guided wave techniques. It is concluded that the ultrasonic pulse echo technique is the best one for inspecting composite secondary bonded adhesive joints.

  12. Compact and air-transportable ultrasonic turbine disc bore inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.E.; Leon-Salamanca, T.

    1990-01-01

    A compact, lightweight, air-transportable ultrasonic inspection system for bore and keyway regions of shrunk-on turbine discs has been developed. The system utilizes a proprietary ultrasound liquid coupling technique in conjunction with a single pair of gimballed search units to achieve rapid and thorough coverage of bores and keyways in both heavy nuclear and standard fossil discs of nearly any size and having any conceivable web surface contour. Search unit positioning and angulation parameter settings are established in near real-time through a computation algorithm based on a compact vector ray tracing protocol. Modular construction and the use of lightweight, stiff materials throughout facilitates air shipment of the system and its rapid deployment at continental and overseas field sites. Mechanical and ultrasonic features of the system are described. Development and application of the computation algorithm to the ultrasonic inspection of heavy discs at an overseas power station is discussed

  13. The Dynamic Performance of Flexural Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Feeney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexural ultrasonic transducers are principally used as proximity sensors and for industrial metrology. Their operation relies on a piezoelectric ceramic to generate a flexing of a metallic membrane, which delivers the ultrasound signal. The performance of flexural ultrasonic transducers has been largely limited to excitation through a short voltage burst signal at a designated mechanical resonance frequency. However, a steady-state amplitude response is not generated instantaneously in a flexural ultrasonic transducer from a drive excitation signal, and differences in the drive characteristics between transmitting and receiving transducers can affect the measured response. This research investigates the dynamic performance of flexural ultrasonic transducers using acoustic microphone measurements and laser Doppler vibrometry, supported by a detailed mechanical analog model, in a process which has not before been applied to the flexural ultrasonic transducer. These techniques are employed to gain insights into the physics of their vibration behaviour, vital for the optimisation of industrial ultrasound systems.

  14. Experimental investigation by laser ultrasonics for high speed train axle diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuto, A; Martarelli, M; Pandarese, G; Revel, G M; Tomasini, E P

    2015-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates the applicability of a laser-ultrasonic procedure to improve the performances of train axle ultrasonic inspection. The method exploits an air-coupled ultrasonic probe that detects the ultrasonic waves generated by a high-power pulsed laser. As a result, the measurement chain is completely non-contact, from generation to detection, this making it possible to considerably speed up inspection time and make the set-up more flexible. The main advantage of the technique developed is that it works in thermo-elastic regime and it therefore can be considered as a non-destructive method. The laser-ultrasonic procedure investigated has been applied for the inspection of a real high speed train axle provided by the Italian railway company (Trenitalia), on which typical fatigue defects have been expressly created according to standard specifications. A dedicated test bench has been developed so as to rotate the axle with the angle control and to speed up the inspection of the axle surface. The laser-ultrasonic procedure proposed can be automated and is potentially suitable for regular inspection of train axles. The main achievements of the activity described in this paper are: – the study of the effective applicability of laser-ultrasonics for the diagnostic of train hollow axles with variable sections by means of a numerical FE model, – the carrying out of an automated experiment on a real train axle, – the analysis of the sensitivity to experimental parameters, like laser source – receiving probe distance and receiving probe angular position, – the demonstration that the technique is suitable for the detection of surface defects purposely created on the train axle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasma Sterilizer with Ultrasonic Cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnyj, V.V.; Klosovsky, A.V.; Panasko, T.A.; Shvets, O.M.; Semenova, O.T.; Taran, V.S.; Tereshin, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    A sterilizer consists of ozone generator based on a barrier glow discharge with the flat electrodes covered with dielectric with a high-voltage pulsed power supply of up to 250 W (1). The sterilization camera is equipped with ultrasonic source with the power of 100 W. The experiments on the inactivation of bacteria of the Bacillus Cereus type were carried out in the distilled water saturated by ozone. Ozone concentration in the aqueous solution was 6 mg/liter with ozone concentration at the output of ozone generator 30 mg/liter. The complete inactivation of spores took 15 min

  16. Modeling and Design of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers Based-on Database Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, M W; Gwo, T J; Deng, T M; Chang, H C

    2006-01-01

    A Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers simulation database, based on electromechanical coupling theory, has been fully developed for versatile capacitive microtransducer design and analysis. Both arithmetic and graphic configurations are used to find optimal parameters based on serial coupling simulations. The key modeling parameters identified can improve microtransducer's character and reliability effectively. This method could be used to reduce design time and fabrication cost, eliminating trial-and-error procedures. Various microtransducers, with optimized characteristics, can be developed economically using the developed database. A simulation to design an ultrasonic microtransducer is completed as an executed example. The dependent relationship between membrane geometry, vibration displacement and output response is demonstrated. The electromechanical coupling effects, mechanical impedance and frequency response are also taken into consideration for optimal microstructures. The microdevice parameters with the best output signal response are predicted, and microfabrication processing constraints and realities are also taken into consideration

  17. Ultrasonic imaging of projected components of PFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvia, J.I., E-mail: sylvia@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeyan, M.R.; Anbucheliyan, M.; Asokane, C.; Babu, V. Rajan; Babu, B.; Rajan, K.K.; Velusamy, K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Under sodium ultrasonic scanner in PFBR is for detecting protruding objects. ► Feasibility study for detecting Absorber rods and its drive mechanisms. ► Developed in-house PC based ultrasonic imaging system. ► Different case studies were carried out on simulated ARDM's. ► Implemented the experimental results to PFBR application. -- Abstract: The 500 MWe, sodium cooled, Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is under advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam in India. Opacity of sodium restricts visual inspection of components immersed in sodium by optical means. Ultrasonic wave passes through sodium hence ultrasonic techniques using under sodium ultrasonic scanners are developed to obtain under sodium images. The main objective of such an Under Sodium Ultrasonic Scanner (USUSS) for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is to detect and ensure that no core Sub Assembly (SA) or Absorber Rod or its Drive Mechanism is protruded in the above core plenum before starting the fuel handling operation. Hence, it is necessary to detect and locate the object, if it is protruding the above core plenum. To study the feasibility of detecting the absorber rods and their drive mechanisms using direct ultrasonic imaging technique, experiments were carried out for different orientations and profiles of the projected components in a 5 m diameter water tank. The in-house developed PC based ultrasonic scanning system is used for acquisition and analysis of data. The pseudo three dimensional color images obtained are discussed and the results are applicable for PFBR. This paper gives the details of the features of the absorber rods and their drive mechanisms, their orientation in the reactor core, experimental setup, PC based ultrasonic scanning system, ultrasonic images and the discussion on the results.

  18. Algorithms exploiting ultrasonic sensors for subject classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sachi; Quoraishee, Shafik

    2009-09-01

    space. The algorithm developed and described will provide utility to an underused sensor modality for human intrusion detection because of the current high-rate of generated false alarms. The active ultrasonic sensor coupled in a multi-modal sensor suite with binary, less descriptive sensors like seismic devices realizing a greater accuracy rate for detection of persons of interest for homeland purposes.

  19. Evaluation of Early-Age Concrete Compressive Strength with Ultrasonic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Seok; Kang, Jun Won; Koh, Hyun-Moo

    2017-08-07

    Surface wave velocity measurement of concrete using ultrasonic sensors requires testing on only one side of a member. Thus, it is applicable to concrete cast inside a form and is often used to detect flaws and evaluate the compressive strength of hardened concrete. Predicting the in situ concrete strength at a very early stage inside the form helps with determining the appropriate form removal time and reducing construction time and costs. In this paper, the feasibility of using surface wave velocities to predict the strength of in situ concrete inside the form at a very early stage was evaluated. Ultrasonic sensors were used to measure a series of surface waves for concrete inside a form in the first 24 h after placement. A continuous wavelet transform was used to compute the travel time of the propagating surface waves. The cylindrical compressive strength and penetration resistance tests were also performed during the test period. Four mixtures and five curing temperatures were used for the specimens. The surface wave velocity was confirmed to be applicable to estimating the concrete strength at a very early age in wall-like elements. An empirical formula is proposed for evaluating the early-age compressive strength of concrete considering the 95% prediction intervals.

  20. Ultrasonic immersion probes characterization for use in nondestructive testing according to EN 12668-2:2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C E R; Alvarenga, A V; Costa-Felix, R P B

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound is often used as a Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) technique to analyze components and structures to detect internal and surface flaws. To guarantee reliable measurements, it is necessary to calibrate instruments and properly assess related uncertainties. An important device of an ultrasonic instrument system is its probe, which characterization should be performed according to EN 12668-2. Concerning immersion probes beam profile, the parameters to be assessed are beam divergence, focal distance, width, and zone length. Such parameters are determined by scanning a reflector or a hydrophone throughout the transducer beam. Within the present work, a methodology developed at Inmetro's Laboratory of Ultrasound to evaluate relevant beam parameters is presented, based on hydrophone scan. Water bath and positioning system to move the hydrophone were used to perform the scan. Studied probes were excited by a signal generator, and the waterborne signals were detected by the hydrophone and acquired using an oscilloscope. A user-friendly virtual instrument was developed in LabVIEW to automate the system. The initial tests were performed using 1 and 2.25 MHz-ultrasonic unfocused probes (Oe 1.27 cm), and results were consistent with the manufacturer's specifications. Moreover, expanded uncertainties were lower than 6% for all parameters under consideration.