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Sample records for coupled rf discharges

  1. The RF voltage dependence of the electron sheath heating in low pressure capacitively coupled rf discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buddemeier, U.; Kortshagen, U.; Pukropski, I.

    1995-01-01

    In low pressure capacitively coupled RF discharges two competitive electron heating mechanisms have been discussed for some time now. At low pressures the stochastic sheath heating and for somewhat higher pressures the Joule heating in the bulk plasma have been proposed. When the pressure is increased at constant RF current density a transition from concave electron distribution functions (EDF) with a pronounced cold electron group to convex EDFs with a missing strong population of cold electrons is found. This transition was interpreted as the transition from dominant stochastic to dominant Joule heating. However, a different interpretation has been given by Kaganovich and Tsendin, who attributed the concave shaped EDFs to the spatially inhomogeneous RF field in combination with the nonlocality of the EDF

  2. Application of capacitively coupled rf discharge plasma for sterilization of polymer materials used in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullin, I.Sh.; Avetisov, S.E.; Lipatov, D.V.; Rybakova, E.G.; Bragin, V.E.; Bykanov, A.N.; Kamarentsev, E.N.

    1996-01-01

    The sterilization effect of capacitively coupled rf discharge plasma treatment of contact lenses was investigated. There were used two types of polymer: highly hydrophilic polymer with water content 76% (Navelen-76) and poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA). There was demonstrated the possibility of effective sterilization by RF discharge plasma of a set of polymer materials used in ophthalmology. The best results were obtained for hard contact lenses. There was perfect sterilization in this case. There were not perfect sterilization in some cases of soft contact lenses treatment. It may be caused by porous structure of the external layers of this material and limited thickness of the sterilization layer. (author)

  3. Ion energy and angular distributions in inductively coupled Argon RF discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodworth, J.R.; Riley, M.E.; Meister, D.C.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements of the energies and angular distributions of positive ions in an inductively coupled argon plasma in a GEC reference cell. Use of two separate ion detectors allowed measurement of ion energies and fluxes as a function of position as well as ion angular distributions on the discharge centerline. The inductive drive on our system produced high plasma densities (up to 10 12 /cm 3 electron densities) and relatively stable plasma potentials. As a result, ion energy distributions typically consisted of a single feature well separated from zero energy. Mean ion energy was independent of rf power and varied inversely with pressure, decreasing from 29 eV to 12 eV as pressure increased form 2.4 m Torr to 50 mTorr. Half-widths of the ion angular distributions in these experiments varied from 5 degrees to 12.5 degrees, or equivalently, transverse temperatures varied form 0.2 to 0.5 eV with the distributions broadening as either pressure or RF power were increased

  4. Diagnostics of ballistic electrons in a dc/rf hybrid capacitively coupled discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lin; Chen, Lee; Funk, Merritt; Ranjan, Alok; Hummel, Mike; Bravenec, Ron; Sundararajan, Radha; Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2008-01-01

    The energy distribution of ballistic electrons in a dc/rf hybrid parallel-plate capacitively coupled plasma reactor was measured. Ballistic electrons originated as secondaries produced by ion and electron bombardment of the electrodes. The energy distribution of ballistic electrons peaked at the value of the negative bias applied to the dc electrode. As that bias became more negative, the ballistic electron current on the rf substrate electrode increased dramatically. The ion current on the dc electrode also increased

  5. Rotating dust ring in an RF discharge coupled with a dc-magnetron sputter source. Experiment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyash, K; Froehlich, M; Kersten, H; Thieme, G; Schneider, R; Hannemann, M; Hippler, R

    2004-01-01

    During an experiment involving coating of dust grains trapped in an RF discharge using a sputtering dc-magnetron source, a rotating dust ring was observed and investigated. After the magnetron was switched on, the dust cloud levitating above the RF electrode formed a ring rotating as a rigid body. Langmuir probe diagnostics were used for the measurement of plasma density and potential. It was discovered that the coupling of the dc-magnetron source to the RF discharge causes steep radial gradients in electron density and plasma potential. The rotation of the dust ring is attributed to the azimuthal component of the ion drag force, which appears due to the azimuthal drift of the ions caused by crossed radial electric and axial magnetic fields. In order to get more insight into the mechanism of dust ring rotation, a Particle-in-Cell simulation of a rotating dust cloud was performed. The results of the experiment and simulation are presented and discussed

  6. Rotating dust ring in an RF discharge coupled with a dc-magnetron sputter source. Experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyash, K [Institut fuer Niedertemperaturplasmaphysik Greifswald, Fr.-L.-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Froehlich, M [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Kersten, H [Institut fuer Niedertemperaturplasmaphysik Greifswald, Fr.-L.-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Thieme, G [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Schneider, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Hannemann, M [Institut fuer Niedertemperaturplasmaphysik Greifswald, Fr.-L.-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Hippler, R [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2004-10-07

    During an experiment involving coating of dust grains trapped in an RF discharge using a sputtering dc-magnetron source, a rotating dust ring was observed and investigated. After the magnetron was switched on, the dust cloud levitating above the RF electrode formed a ring rotating as a rigid body. Langmuir probe diagnostics were used for the measurement of plasma density and potential. It was discovered that the coupling of the dc-magnetron source to the RF discharge causes steep radial gradients in electron density and plasma potential. The rotation of the dust ring is attributed to the azimuthal component of the ion drag force, which appears due to the azimuthal drift of the ions caused by crossed radial electric and axial magnetic fields. In order to get more insight into the mechanism of dust ring rotation, a Particle-in-Cell simulation of a rotating dust cloud was performed. The results of the experiment and simulation are presented and discussed.

  7. Formation Of Carbon Oxides In CH4/O2 Plasmas Produced By Inductively Coupled RF Discharges At Low Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Ivonne; Soltwisch, Henning

    2003-01-01

    The formation of CO and CO2 has been studied in inductively coupled rf (13.56 MHz) discharges with varied mixtures of CH4 and O2 as feed gases at a total pressure of 10 Pa, flow rates of <10 sccm, and input powers of <500 W. The primary diagnostic tool has been TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) to measure absolute concentrations of molecular species as well as their kinetic and rovibrational temperatures. Of particular interest is the sudden transition between different modes of power coupling (capacitive and inductive mode, resp.) and the related changes of the plasma composition. We have found that the power threshold for this transition exhibits a clear hysteresis and depends on the oxygen content. Comparing the ratio of the CO- and CO2-concentrations in capacitive mode with corresponding data from a parallel-plate discharge, clear differences have been observed. The findings can partly be explained on the basis of plasma-chemical reaction chains using tabulated cross-sections in combination with estimations of the electron energy distribution function. Some observations (as, e.g. the presence of CO in inductively coupled plasmas that are fed by pure oxygen) cannot be understood from volume reactions only but point to an important role of surface processes, which depend on the materials of the discharge chamber and on its history and cleaning method

  8. Paschen like behavior in argon RF discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jwaady, Y. I.

    2011-01-01

    A 13.56 MHz radio frequency inductively coupled discharge system is used in this work to study the relation between Argon gas pressure in the discharge chamber and the threshold breakdown RF power needed to create the discharge. Experimental results indicated that although the data involve some features related to the traditional Paschen relation used in Dc discharge, this relation cannot provide a quantitative description of experimental data. For such reason, a modified from Paschen relation is suggested. The modified relation provides good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, it seems that the Paschen relation will have significant reflections on the behavior of the transit process from capacitive to inductive discharge. This is demonstrated by studying the transit region. (author)

  9. Electron runaway in rf discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1992-10-01

    The critical electric field is computed as a function of pressure and starting energy for electrons to run away to high energies in moderate pressure discharges. The runaway conditions depend critically on the shape of the elastic cross section vs. energy curve. Computations are made for H, H 2 , and He gases, and it is shown that runaway occurs much more readily in atomic hydrogen than in the other gases. The values of the runaway fields are larger than would normally occur in dc discharges, where large voltages would lead to arc formation. However, in rf discharges such electric fields can be sustained over times long compared to electron transit times but short compared to ion transit times. (author)

  10. The Bohm criterion for rf discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, P.M.; Goedheer, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The well-known dc Bohm criterion is extended to rf discharges. Both low- (ω rf much-lt ω pi ) and high-(ω pi much-lt ω rf ) frequency regimes are considered. For low frequencies, the dc Bohm criterion holds. This criterion states that the initial energy of the ions entering the sheath must exceed a limit in order to obtain a stable sheath. For high frequencies, a modified limit is derived, which is somewhat lower than that of the dc Bohm criterion. The resulting ion current density in a high-frequency sheath is only a few percent lower than that for the dc case

  11. Alternative RF coupling configurations for H− ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.; Gutmann, P.

    2015-01-01

    RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions both for fusion and accelerators require very high RF powers in order to achieve the required H − current what poses high demands on the RF generators and the RF circuit. Therefore it is highly desirable to improve the RF efficiency of the sources. This could be achieved by applying different RF coupling concepts than the currently used inductive coupling via a helical antenna, namely Helicon coupling or coupling via a planar ICP antenna enhanced with ferrites. In order to investigate the feasibility of these concepts, two small laboratory experiments have been set up. The PlanICE experiment, where the enhanced inductive coupling is going to be investigated, is currently under assembly. At the CHARLIE experiment systematic measurements concerning Helicon coupling in hydrogen and deuterium are carried out. The investigations show that a prominent feature of Helicon discharges occurs: the so-called low-field peak. This is a local improvement of the coupling efficiency at a magnetic field strength of a few mT which results in an increased electron density and dissociation degree. The full Helicon mode has not been achieved yet due to the limited available RF power and magnetic field strength but it might be sufficient for the application of the coupling concept to ion sources to operate the discharge in the low-field-peak region

  12. Determination of electron density and temperature in a capacitively coupled RF discharge in neon by OES complemented with a CR model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, Z; Dvorak, P; Trunec, D [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Brzobohaty, O, E-mail: zdenek@physics.muni.c [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR, v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 147, 612 64 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-12-22

    A method of determination of electron temperature and electron density in plasmas based on optical emission spectroscopy complemented with collisional-radiative modelling (OES/CRM) was studied in this work. A radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) capacitively coupled discharge in neon at 10 Pa was investigated by intensity calibrated optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute intensities of neon transitions between 3p and 3s states were fitted with a collisional-radiative (CR) model in order to determine the electron temperature and electron density. Measuring techniques such as imaging with an ICCD camera were adopted for supplementary diagnostics. The obtained results were compared with the results of compensated Langmuir probe measurement and one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) simulation. The results of OES/CRM and PIC/MC method were in close agreement in the case of electron temperature in the vicinity of a driven electrode. The determined value of electron temperature was about 8 eV. In bulk plasma, the measured spectra were not satisfactorily fitted. In the case of electron density only relative agreement was obtained between OES/CRM and Langmuir probe measurement; the absolute values differed by a factor of 5. The axial dependence of electron density calculated by PIC/MC was distinct from them, reaching the maximum values between the results of the other two methods. The investigation of power dependence of plasma parameters close to the driven electrode showed a decrease in electron temperature and an increase in electron density together with increasing incoming RF power. The calculated spectra fitted very well the measured spectra in this discharge region.

  13. RF torch discharge combined with conventional burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janca, J.; Tesar, C.

    1996-01-01

    The design of the combined flame-rf-plasma reactor and experimental examination of this reactor are presented. For the determination of the temperature in different parts of the combined burner plasma the methods of emission spectroscopy were used. The temperatures measured in the conventional burner reach the maximum temperature 1900 K but in the burner with the superimposed rf discharge the neutral gas temperature substantially increased up to 2600 K but also the plasma volume increases substantially. Consequently, the resident time of reactants in the reaction zone increases

  14. Equiintensities of RF plasma discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaculik, R.; Brablec, A.; Kapicka, V.; St'astny, F.

    1998-01-01

    The presented diagnostic tool can provide information of temperature distribution in the plasma. The main advantage of the method is relatively simple, low cost and quick procedure. On the other hand the individual isoline corresponds to some mean values for the wide bandwidth of interference filter. However, in real plasma sources is usually difficult to find isolated intensive line which is characterized by excitation temperature. Nevertheless, we believe that application is useful and fulfills other diagnostics methods. The visualisation of temperature field can help to understand conditions in plasmas and processes occurring there. However, the fast procedure (in real time) will be useful only. It has to be done during each experiment and carefully coupled with other diagnostic methods. It means that the device must be the low cost one. (author)

  15. A new equilibrium theory for rf discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2011-10-01

    Two problems often encountered in RF discharges are 1) anomalous skin depth and 2) anomalous electron diffusion across magnetic fields B. Both effects can be explained if the discharges are not unusually long or short. The Simon short-circuit effect then allows the electrons to follow the Boltzmann relation even across B. Once Maxwellian electrons are assumed, a remarkable result can be obtained for radial profiles of density, potential, and ion drift velocity toward the cylindrical wall. In suitably normalized units, these profiles take on a universal shape for all discharges, regardless of B. The velocity profile naturally reaches the Bohm velocity at the wall (= sheath edge). Our code EQM solves for the radial profiles of plasma and neutral density including neutral depletion. All radial dependences are taken into account exactly, and no assumption of a presheath is necessary. To get the profile of Te requires energy balance in the specific discharge. We have done this for helicon discharges described by the HELIC code. Iteration between EQM and HELIC yields all profiles and also the absolute density for given RF power. Now at Univ. of Padua, Padua, Italy.

  16. Investigations of electropositive and electronegative RF discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    Electronegative RF discharges are extensively used in the semi-conductor industry for material processing. Despite this the subject of electronegative RF discharges has been largely neglected. The aim of this thesis is to investigate a RF oxygen discharge by mass/energy spectrometry, a retarding field analyser and an actively compensated Langmuir probe. Measurements are also obtained in argon for comparison. In this thesis pure oxygen will be used as this has relatively simple discharge chemistry with most of the rate constants well known. Ion energy analysis (Chapter 3) show the discharge to contract into the centre of the chamber at low pressures in both gases. The expected thinner peak of the oxygen ion energy distribution was not observed, this is shown to be due to RF modulation of the positive ions with collisions playing a role. The dominant positive ion in the discharge bulk and colliding in the sheath in oxygen was found to be O 2 + with less than 10% O + over the range of pressure investigated (Chapter 4). Various minor ions such as O 3 + and O 4 + were also observed. By actively compensating a Langmuir probe for the first three plasma harmonics it is shown that it is unnecessary to compensate when the amplitude of a given harmonic is comparable to the electron temperature (Chapter 5). A study of Langmuir probe measurements in argon (Chapter 7) has shown that the use of the collisionless Alien, Boyd and Reynolds theory leads to discrepancies in the measured electron densities. The correct density can be obtained by using the perturbation method of Shih and Levi, this corrects for ion-neutral collisions in electropositive plasmas only. This theory is extended to electronegative plasmas (Chapter 6) so that measurements of the negative ion density obtained from the collisionless theory of Arnemiya, Annaratone and Alien can be corrected. Langmuir probe measurements in oxygen indicate a peak in the negative ion density at around 3Pa and are found to be in good

  17. On the distribution of plasma parameters in RF glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Cheng; Liu Zuli; Liu Donghui; Han Caiyuan.

    1993-01-01

    A self-consistent numerical model based on the two-fluid equations for describing the transport of charged particles in the RF glow discharge is presented. For a plasma generator filled with low-pressure air and parallel-plate electrodes, the model is numerical solved. The space-time distribution of parameters and the spatial distribution of some time-averaged parameters in plasma, which show the physical picture of the RF glow discharge, are obtained

  18. RF and microwave coupled-line circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Mongia, R K; Bhartia, P; Hong, J; Gupta, K C

    2007-01-01

    This extensively revised edition of the 1999 Artech House classic, RF and Microwave Coupled-Line Circuits, offers you a thoroughly up-to-date understanding of coupled line fundamentals, explaining their applications in designing microwave and millimeter-wave components used in today's communications, microwave, and radar systems. The Second Edition includes a wealth of new material, particularly relating to applications. You find brand new discussions on a novel simple design technique for multilayer coupled circuits, high pass filters using coupled lines, software packages used for filter des

  19. Plasma diagnosis of RF discharge by using impedance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jianjun; Teuner, D.

    2001-01-01

    It is presented that the method known from network analysis with home-made probe and experimental setup to measure current, voltage and phase angle of RF discharge in He gas more accurately. The sheath thickness and the real and imaginary parts of the plasma impedance were obtained by using the equivalent circuit model and taking account stray capacitances of the set-up. In addition, making use of Godyak's RF discharge simple model, the electron density in the discharge was calculated at different pressure and current density

  20. Multi-step capacitor discharges as an RF generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Eiki; Yamamoto, Shunji; Ishii, Shozo; Hayashi, Izumi

    1979-01-01

    A variety of methods have been developed for large output radio frequency (RF) generators to heat and stabilize high temperature plasma. As the generators for this purpose, capacitor discharge, cable discharge, and oscillation with electronic tubes are considered. Here, a new RF generator is reported, which utilizes capacitor discharge to extract heavy current, and solves the difficulty of short duration by employing multistep discharges. The authors solved the problem of frequency decrease in capacitor discharge by cutting off the unnecessary capacitors reasonably from the load circuit, using the additional circuit for shunting current and vacuum gap switches. The vacuum gap switches and the trigger system are described together with the RF generator manufactured. The generator was fabricated to be rather compact for its large output and simple in circuitry as compared with conventional oscillator systems. The shortcomings are frequency variation and the improper phase of switching the next step in to cause instability, when the load change occurs. It would be difficult to operate the generator in a RF range of more than about 10 MHz due to jitter of the vacuum gap switches and others. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. Optical signatures of discharges in parallel coupled DC accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Rehim N.; Banerjee, Srutarshi; Acharya, S.N., E-mail: rehim@barc.gov.in [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); and others

    2014-07-01

    Parallel coupled voltage multiplier based accelerator topologies offer advantages of better regulation and ripple compared to their series coupled counterparts for Industrial electron beam accelerators. During conditioning and operation these systems undergoes various types of electrical discharges. The discharge can be a direct spark over from the high voltage terminal to ground through SF{sub 6} insulation, vacuum breakdown in the accelerating tube maintained in the order of 10{sup -7} mbar pressure, or local discharge between corona guards which are used to couple RF power to the multiplier. There could be discharges in between dynodes of the accelerating tube. As the inter electrode discharges do not reflect in load current, detection of these conditions becomes very difficult. Optical discharge detection methods can be used effectively in this situation. Photo multiplier based optical discharge detection has been deployed in a 3 MeV DC accelerator. Characteristics of the optical signal received during conditioning phase have been presented in this paper. (author)

  2. Determination of electron density and temperature in a capacitively coupled RF discharge in neon by OES complemented with a CR model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Z.; Dvořák, P.; Brzobohatý, Oto; Trunec, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, Nov 3 (2010), 505203:1-11 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/1669 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : electron temperature * electron density * optical emission spectroscopy * collisional–radiative model Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.105, year: 2010

  3. The effect of discharge chamber geometry on the characteristics of low-pressure RF capacitive discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisovskiy, V.A. [Ecole Polytech, Lab Phys and Technol Plasmas, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France); Booth, J.P. [Lam Res Corp, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Landry, K. [Unaxis, F-38100 Grenoble, (France); Douai, D. [CEA Cadarache, Dept Rech Fus Controlee, EURATOM Assoc, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France); Cassagne, V. [Riber, F-95873 Bezons, (France); Yegorenkov, V.D. [Kharkov Natl Univ, Dept Phys, UA-61077 Kharkov, (Ukraine)

    2007-07-01

    We report the measured extinction curves and current voltage characteristics (CVCs) in several gases of RF capacitive discharges excited at 13.56 MHz in chambers of three different geometries: 1) parallel plates surrounded by a dielectric cylinder ('symmetric parallel plate'); 2) parallel plates surrounded by a metallic cylinder ('asymmetric confined'); and 3) parallel plates inside a much larger metallic chamber ('asymmetric unconfined'), similar to the gaseous electronics conference reference cell. The extinction curves and the CVCs show differences between the symmetric, asymmetric confined, and asymmetric unconfined chamber configurations. In particular, the discharges exist over a much broader range of RF voltages and gas pressures for the asymmetric unconfined chamber. For symmetric and asymmetric confined discharges, the extinction curves are close to each other in the regions near the minima and at lower pressure, but at higher pressure, the extinction curve of the asymmetric confined discharge runs at a lower voltage than the one for the discharge in a symmetric chamber. In the particular cases of an 'asymmetric unconfined chamber' discharge or 'asymmetric confined' one, the RF discharge experiences the transition from a 'weak-current' mode to a 'strong-current' one at lower RF voltages than is the case for a 'symmetric parallel-plate' discharge. (authors)

  4. Redefinition of the self-bias voltage in a dielectrically shielded thin sheath RF discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Teck Seng; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2018-05-01

    In a geometrically asymmetric capacitively coupled discharge where the powered electrode is shielded from the plasma by a layer of dielectric material, the self-bias manifests as a nonuniform negative charging in the dielectric rather than on the blocking capacitor. In the thin sheath regime where the ion transit time across the powered sheath is on the order of or less than the Radiofrequency (RF) period, the plasma potential is observed to respond asymmetrically to extraneous impedances in the RF circuit. Consequently, the RF waveform on the plasma-facing surface of the dielectric is unknown, and the behaviour of the powered sheath is not easily predictable. Sheath circuit models become inadequate for describing this class of discharges, and a comprehensive fluid, electrical, and plasma numerical model is employed to accurately quantify this behaviour. The traditional definition of the self-bias voltage as the mean of the RF waveform is shown to be erroneous in this regime. Instead, using the maxima of the RF waveform provides a more rigorous definition given its correlation with the ion dynamics in the powered sheath. This is supported by a RF circuit model derived from the computational fluid dynamics and plasma simulations.

  5. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-01-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012 © . RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance

  6. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimjaem, S., E-mail: sakhorn.rimjaem@cmu.ac.th [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012{sup ©}. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  7. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  8. Titanium oxidation by rf inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia-Alvarado, R; López-Callejas, R; Barocio, S R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Muñoz-Castro, A E; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G; De la Piedad-Beneitez, A; De la Rosa-Vázquez, J M

    2014-01-01

    The development of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) films in the rutile and anatase phases is reported. The films have been obtained from an implantation/diffusion and sputtering process of commercially pure titanium targets, carried out in up to 500 W plasmas. The experimental outcome is of particular interest, in the case of anatase, for atmospheric pollution degradation by photocatalysis and, as to the rutile phase, for the production of biomaterials required by prosthesis and implants. The reactor employed consists in a cylindrical pyrex-like glass vessel inductively coupled to a 13.56 MHz RF source. The process takes place at a 5×10 −2 mbar pressure with the target samples being biased from 0 to -3000 V DC. The anatase phase films were obtained from sputtering the titanium targets over glass and silicon electrically floated substrates placed 2 cm away from the target. The rutile phase was obtained by implantation/diffusion on targets at about 700 °C. The plasma was developed from a 4:1 argon/oxygen mixture for ∼5 hour processing periods. The target temperature was controlled by means of the bias voltage and the plasma source power. The obtained anatase phases did not require annealing after the plasma oxidation process. The characterization of the film samples was conducted by means of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy

  9. Simulation of spatially dependent excitation rates and power deposition in RF discharges for plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Anderson, H.M.; Hargis, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    In low pressure, radio frequency (RF) discharges of the type used in plasma processing of semiconductor materials, the rate of electron impact excitation and energy transfer processes depends upon both the phase of the RF excitation and position in the discharge. Electron impact collisions create radicals that diffuse or drift to the surfaces of interest where they are adsorbed or otherwise react. To the extent that these radicals have a finite lifetime, their transport time from point of creation to surface of interest is an important parameter. The spatial dependence of the rate of the initial electron impact collisions is therefore also an important parameter. The power that sustains the discharge is coupled into the system by two mechanisms: a high energy e-beam component of the electron distribution resulting from electrons falling through or being accelerated by the sheaths, and by joule heating in the body of the plasma. In this paper, the authors discuss the spatial dependence of excitation rates and the method of power deposition iin RF discharges of the type used for plasma processing

  10. Plasma breakdown in a capacitively-coupled radiofrequency argon discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. B.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    1998-10-01

    Low pressure, capacitively-coupled rf discharges are widely used in research and commercial ventures. Understanding of the non-equilibrium processes which occur in these discharges during breakdown is of interest, both for industrial applications and for a deeper understanding of fundamental plasma behaviour. The voltage required to breakdown the discharge V_brk has long been known to be a strong function of the product of the neutral gas pressure and the electrode seperation (pd). This paper investigates the dependence of V_brk on pd in rf systems using experimental, computational and analytic techniques. Experimental measurements of V_brk are made for pressures in the range 1 -- 500 mTorr and electrode separations of 2 -- 20 cm. A Paschen-style curve for breakdown in rf systems is developed which has the minimum breakdown voltage at a much smaller pd value, and breakdown voltages which are significantly lower overall, than for Paschen curves obtained from dc discharges. The differences between the two systems are explained using a simple analytic model. A Particle-in-Cell simulation is used to investigate a similar pd range and examine the effect of the secondary emission coefficient on the rf breakdown curve, particularly at low pd values. Analytic curves are fitted to both experimental and simulation results.

  11. Numerical design of an rf-coupling Iris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaki, H.

    1991-07-01

    For an rf coupler of an rf system in high-quality transmission an analytical method may be applied to treat the design problem, if a coupling hole between cavities or waveguides is small enough. However, in most cases of accelerator engineering the dimensions of the coupling slots are not so small compared with the size of a cavity and a waveguide. Numerical design of rf coupling slots for a few cases is tried basically according to Henke's method using an equivalent circuit to treat the matching of microwave components, but taking account of beam loading expressed by the coupling coefficient β. The MAFIA code has been applied for the design. (R.P.) 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Influences of the RF power ratio on the optical and electrical properties of GZO thin films by DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Shou [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu 233018 (China); Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233018 (China); Yao, Tingting, E-mail: yaott0815@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu 233018 (China); Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233018 (China); Yang, Yong; Zhang, Kuanxiang; Jiang, Jiwen; Jin, Kewu; Li, Gang; Cao, Xin; Xu, Genbao; Wang, Yun [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu 233018 (China); Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233018 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Ga-doped zinc oxide (GZO) thin films were deposited by closed field unbalanced DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering system at room temperature. The RF sputtering power ratio was adjusted from 0% to 100%. The crystal structure, surface morphology, transmittance and electrical resistivity of GZO films mainly influenced by RF sputtering power ratio were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electronic microscope, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer and Hall effect measurement. The research results indicate that the increasing RF power ratio can effectively reduce the discharge voltage of system and increase the ionizing rate of particles. Meanwhile, the higher RF power ratio can increase the carrier mobility in GZO thin film and improve the optical and electrical properties of GZO thin film significantly. Within the optimal discharge voltage window, the film deposits at 80% RF power ratio exhibits the lowest resistivity of 2.6×10{sup −4} Ω cm. We obtain the GZO film with the best average optical transmittance is approximately 84% in the visible wavelength. With the increasing RF power ratio, the densification of GZO film is enhanced. The densification of GZO film is decrease when the RF power ratio is 100%.

  13. Effects of electron inertia in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Nong

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the electron inertia on the plasma and sheath dynamics in capacitively coupled rf discharges with frequency ωω pi are investigated (here, ω and ω pi are the rf frequency and bulk ion plasma frequency, respectively). It is found that the effects of the electron inertia on the plasma density and ion velocity in the quasi-neutral region depend on the ratio of the amplitudes of the discharge current I rf and ion current I B =en 0 C s (here, e is the unit charge, n 0 is the plasma density at center, and C s is the ion sound speed). If the ratio is small so that I rf /I B √(m i /m e ) (here, m i and m e are ion and electron masses, respectively), the ion and time-averaged electron densities, ion velocity, and electric fields are little affected by the electron inertia. Otherwise, the effects of the electron inertia are significant. It is also shown that the assumption that the electrons obey the Boltzmann distribution in the sheath is invalid when the electron flux flowing to the electrode is significant

  14. A Tightly Coupled Non-Equilibrium Magneto-Hydrodynamic Model for Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    development a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for Inductively Coupled Radio- Frequency (RF) Plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE...for Inductively Coupled Radio-Frequency (RF) Plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State...Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torches have wide range of possible applications which include deposition of metal coatings, synthesis of ultra-fine powders

  15. Electrical Characterization of an RF Glow Discharge at Room Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Martinez, J. A.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Valencia A, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.; Benitez-Read, J. S.; Pacheco-Sotelo, J. O.

    2006-01-01

    A non-thermal atmospheric-like plasma source able to operate at room temperature represents, by its physical nature, a considerable potential for biological applications, given its highly accurate action and extremely controllable penetration on the surface of biological tissue. As we start up a research line into this technology, we report the electrical characterization of a room pressure plasma discharge by means of a coupling network model. The discharge is produced by a 13.56MHz commercial generator. As it is impossible to measure directly its state variables (voltage and current intensity) due to the considerable perturbation created by introducing a low impedance at the system output, then an indirect estimation of such variables is achieved from experimental diagnostics at the input, so to validate the proposed electrical model

  16. Capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in nitrogen at low pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Alves, Luí s Lemos; Marques, Luí s S A; Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Wattieaux, Gaë tan; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Berndt, Johannes; Kovačević, Eva; Carrasco, Nathalie; Boufendi, Laï fa; Cernogora, Guy

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses experiments and modelling to study capacitively coupled radio-frequency (rf) discharges in pure nitrogen, at 13.56MHz frequency, 0.11 mbar pressures and 230W coupled powers. Experiments performed on two similar (not twin) setups

  17. RF control studies for moderate beamtime coupling between SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, L.R.; Wang, D.X.

    1998-01-01

    When an SRF accelerator is designed, there is motivation to move the cavities close together on the beamline. Assuming the beamline apertures are not shrunk as well, this compaction (which will increase the overall accelerating gradient and/or lower the dynamic cryogenic heat load) increases the inter-cavity coupling. Within certain limits, the control system can compensate for this coupling by retuning each of the cavities. This paper describes constraints on the RF system, tuners, couplers, and control systems that are required to provide stable operation of cavities in the presence of inter-cavity coupling that exceeds the loaded bandwidth of an individual cavity

  18. Hybrid Simulation of Duty Cycle Influences on Pulse Modulated RF SiH4/Ar Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xifeng; Song, Yuanhong; Zhao, Shuxia; Dai, Zhongling; Wang, Younian

    2016-04-01

    A one-dimensional fluid/Monte-Carlo (MC) hybrid model is developed to describe capacitively coupled SiH4/Ar discharge, in which the lower electrode is applied by a RF source and pulse modulated by a square-wave, to investigate the modulation effects of the pulse duty cycle on the discharge mechanism. An electron Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the electron energy distribution as a function of position and time phase. Rate coefficients in chemical reactions can then be obtained and transferred to the fluid model for the calculation of electron temperature and densities of different species, such as electrons, ions, and radicals. The simulation results show that, the electron energy distribution f(ɛ) is modulated evidently within a pulse cycle, with its tail extending to higher energies during the power-on period, while shrinking back promptly in the afterglow period. Thus, the rate coefficients could be controlled during the discharge, resulting in modulation of the species composition on the substrate compared with continuous excitation. Meanwhile, more negative ions, like SiH-3 and SiH-2, may escape to the electrodes owing to the collapse of ambipolar electric fields, which is beneficial to films deposition. Pulse modulation is thus expected to provide additional methods to customize the plasma densities and components. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275038)

  19. Plasma flow around and charge distribution of a dust cluster in a rf discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleede, J.; Lewerentz, L.; Bronold, F. X.; Schneider, R.; Fehske, H.

    2018-04-01

    We employ a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision/particle-particle particle-mesh simulation to study the plasma flow around and the charge distribution of a three-dimensional dust cluster in the sheath of a low-pressure rf argon discharge. The geometry of the cluster and its position in the sheath are fixed to the experimental values, prohibiting a mechanical response of the cluster. Electrically, however, the cluster and the plasma environment, mimicking also the experimental situation, are coupled self-consistently. We find a broad distribution of the charges collected by the grains. The ion flux shows on the scale of the Debye length strong focusing and shadowing inside and outside the cluster due to the attraction of the ions to the negatively charged grains, whereas the electron flux is characterized on this scale only by a weak spatial modulation of its magnitude depending on the rf phase. On the scale of the individual dust potentials, however, the electron flux deviates in the vicinity of the cluster strongly from the laminar flow associated with the plasma sheath. It develops convection patterns to compensate for the depletion of electrons inside the dust cluster.

  20. Effect of power modulation on properties of pulsed capacitively coupled radiofrequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samara, V; Bowden, M D; Braithwaite, N St J

    2010-01-01

    We describe measurements of plasma properties of pulsed, low pressure, capacitively coupled discharges operated in argon. The study aims to determine the effect of modulating the radiofrequency power during the discharge part of the pulse cycle. Measurements of local electron density and optical emission were made in capacitively coupled rf discharges generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference reactor. Gas pressure was in the range 7-70 Pa, rf power in the range 1-100 W and pulse durations in the range 10 μs-100 ms. The results indicate that the ignition and afterglow decay processes in pulsed discharges can be controlled by modulating the shape of applied radiofrequency pulse.

  1. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  2. Modelling of pulsed RF corona discharges in high-pressure air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzas, F; Makarov, M; Naidis, G V

    2012-01-01

    An approach to description of pulsed RF corona discharges in high-pressure air is developed, based on the model of a filamentary discharge sustained by an electromagnetic wave guided along the plasma filament. Results of numerical simulation of spatial-temporal discharge dynamics at the quasi-stationary stage are obtained for various values of gas pressure and wave frequency. Experimental data on the discharge length versus the power absorbed by the discharge are presented. Their comparison with simulation results is given. (paper)

  3. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and Te fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-01-01

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  4. Deposition of protective coatings in rf organosilicon discharges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajíčková, L.; Buršíková, V.; Kučerová, Z.; Franta, D.; Dvořák, P.; Šmíd, R.; Peřina, Vratislav; Macková, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2007), s. 123-132 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : organosilicon discharges, hardness and elastic modulus, protectove coating s Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.120, year: 2007

  5. The experience with JET's combined dc/Rf glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, R.J.H.; Andrew, P.; Bryan, S.

    1996-01-01

    The JET Tokamak was fitted with four new electrodes of novel design, each powered from individual computer controlled dc and RF supplies. Details of enhancements and problems from 15 months experience with the system are outlined. Experiments were performed to assess the effect of RF on the glow discharge characteristics, and to establish stable glow at low pressure and high voltage. JET combined RF/dc glow discharge cleaning (GDC) had no significant advantages over pure dc GDC, provided highly stable dc current control was obtained. In fact, the mechanically weak electrode inductor spiral required to allow RF posed a distinct disadvantage. The electrodes were converted to simple plates, following damage caused by halo currents during Tokamak plasma disruptions. The performance of these electrodes was assessed. Future developments in the JET GDC system are outlined. (Author)

  6. A current driven capacitively coupled chlorine discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shuo; Gudmundsson, J T

    2014-01-01

    The effect of driving current, driving frequency and secondary electrons on capacitively coupled chlorine discharge is systematically investigated using a hybrid approach consisting of a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation and a volume-averaged global model. The driving current is varied from 20 to 80 A m −2 , the driving frequency is varied from 13.56 to 60 MHz and the secondary electron emission coefficient is varied from 0.0 to 0.4. Key plasma parameters including electron energy probability function, electron heating rate, ion energy and angular distributions are explored and their variations with control parameters are analyzed and compared with other discharges. Furthermore, we extend our study to dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled chlorine discharge by adding a low-frequency current source and explore the effect of the low-frequency source on the discharge. The low-frequency current density is increased from 0 to 4 A m −2 . The flux of Cl 2 + ions to the surface increases only slightly while the average energy of Cl 2 + ions to the surface increases almost linearly with increasing low-frequency current, which shows possible independent control of the flux and energy of Cl 2 + ions by varying the low-frequency current in a DF capacitively coupled chlorine discharge. However, the increase in the flux of Cl + ions with increasing low-frequency current, which is mainly due to the increased dissociation fraction of the background gas caused by extra power supplied by the low-frequency source, is undesirable. (paper)

  7. Review of laser-induced fluorescence methods for measuring rf- and microwave electric fields in discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilenko, V.; Oks, E.

    1994-01-01

    Development of methods for measuring rf- or μ-wave electric fields E(t) = E 0 cosωt in discharge plasmas is of a great practical importance. First, these are fields used for producing rf- or μ-wave discharges. Second, the fields E(t) may represent electromagnetic waves penetrating into a plasma from the outside. This paper reviews methods for diagnostics of the fields E(t) in low temperature plasmas based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Compared to emission (passive) methods, LIF-methods have a higher sensitivity as well as higher spatial and temporal resolutions. Underlying physical effects may be highlighted by an example of LIF of hydrogen atoms in a plasma. After a presentation of the underlying physical principles, the review focuses on key experiments where these principles were implemented for measurements of rf- and μ-wave electric fields in various discharges

  8. Time effectiveness of capillary effect improvement of ramie fabrics processed by RF glow discharging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiwen; Wei Weixing; He Yanhe; Zhao Yuanqing; Pan Liyiji; Li Xuemei; Shi Shaodui; Li Guangxin

    2010-01-01

    The time effectiveness of capillary effect improvement of ramie fabrics processed by RF glow discharging was studied. The ramie fabrics were processed in fulfilling with different gas (O 2 , N 2 , Ar) by different parameters (such as pressure,power and time) plasma. The capillary effect of the ramie fabrics processed by RF glow discharging was tested at different time. The results indicate that the capillary effect of ramie fabrics processed by RF glow discharging has been improved, the improvement of the capillary effect firstly decrease rapidly, then slowly, and become stable after 15 day, it indicate that improvement of the ramie fabrics capillary has good time effectiveness, and the plasma parameter for the best capillary effect improvement of ramie fabric is 100 W and 40 Pa processed 20 min by oxygen plasma. (authors)

  9. Coupling of RF antennas to large volume helicon plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Large volume helicon plasma sources are of particular interest for large scale semiconductor processing, high power plasma propulsion and recently plasma-material interaction under fusion conditions. This work is devoted to studying the coupling of four typical RF antennas to helicon plasma with infinite length and diameter of 0.5 m, and exploring its frequency dependence in the range of 13.56-70 MHz for coupling optimization. It is found that loop antenna is more efficient than half helix, Boswell and Nagoya III antennas for power absorption; radially parabolic density profile overwhelms Gaussian density profile in terms of antenna coupling for low-density plasma, but the superiority reverses for high-density plasma. Increasing the driving frequency results in power absorption more near plasma edge, but the overall power absorption increases with frequency. Perpendicular stream plots of wave magnetic field, wave electric field and perturbed current are also presented. This work can serve as an important reference for the experimental design of large volume helicon plasma source with high RF power.

  10. Gas and plasma dynamics of RF discharge jet of low pressure in a vacuum chamber with flat electrodes and inside tube, influence of RF discharge on the steel surface parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristoliubova, V. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Shaekhov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Researches results of the characteristics of the RF discharge jet of low pressure and the discharge influence on the surface modification of high speed and structural steels are introduced in the article. Gas dynamics, power and energy parameters of the RF low pressure discharge flow in the discharge chamber and the electrode gap are studied in the presence of the materials. Plasma flow rate, discharge power, the concentration of electrons, the density of RF power, the ion current density, and the energy of the ions bombarding the surface materials are considered for the definition of basic properties crucial for the process of surface modification of materials as they were put in the plasma jet. The influence of the workpiece and effect of products complex configuration on the RF discharge jet of low pressure is defined. The correlation of the input parameters of the plasma unit on the characteristics of the discharge is established.

  11. Investigation of the helicon discharge plasma parameters in a hybrid RF plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A. F.; Petrov, A. K.; Vavilin, K. V.; Kralkina, E. A.; Neklyudova, P. A.; Nikonov, A. M.; Pavlov, V. B.; Ayrapetov, A. A.; Odinokov, V. V.; Sologub, V. A.; Pavlov, G. Ya.

    2016-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the helicon discharge plasma parameters in a prototype of a hybrid RF plasma system equipped with a solenoidal antenna are described. It is shown that an increase in the external magnetic field leads to the formation of a plasma column and a shift of the maximum ion current along the discharge axis toward the bottom flange of the system. The shape of the plasma column can be controlled via varying the configuration of the magnetic field.

  12. Investigation of the helicon discharge plasma parameters in a hybrid RF plasma system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, A. F.; Petrov, A. K., E-mail: alpetrov57@gmail.com; Vavilin, K. V.; Kralkina, E. A.; Neklyudova, P. A.; Nikonov, A. M.; Pavlov, V. B. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Ayrapetov, A. A.; Odinokov, V. V.; Sologub, V. A.; Pavlov, G. Ya. [Research Institute of Precision Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    Results of an experimental study of the helicon discharge plasma parameters in a prototype of a hybrid RF plasma system equipped with a solenoidal antenna are described. It is shown that an increase in the external magnetic field leads to the formation of a plasma column and a shift of the maximum ion current along the discharge axis toward the bottom flange of the system. The shape of the plasma column can be controlled via varying the configuration of the magnetic field.

  13. Dimensionally similar discharges with central rf heating on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-04-01

    The scaling of L-mode heat transport with normalized gyroradius is investigated on the DIII-D tokamak using central rf heating. A toroidal field scan of dimensionally similar discharges with central ECH and/or fast wave heating show gyro-Bohm-like scaling both globally and locally. The main difference between these restats and those using NBI heating on DIII-D is that with rf heating the deposition profile is not very sensitive to the plasma density. Therefore central heating can be utilized for both the low-B and high-B discharges, whereas for NBI the power deposition is decidedly off-axis for the high-B discharge (i.e., high density)

  14. DC plasma ion implantation in an inductively coupled RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silawatshananai, C.; Matan, N.; Pakpum, C.; Pussadee, N.; Srisantitam, P.; Davynov, S.; Vilaithong, T.

    2004-01-01

    Various modes of plasma ion implantation have been investigated in a small inductively coupled 13.6 MHz RF plasma source. Plasma ion implantation with HVDC(up to -10 kV bias) has been investigated in order to incorporate with the conventional implantation of diamond like carbon. In this preliminary work, nitrogen ions are implanted into the stainless steel sample with a dose of 5.5 x 10 -2 cm for a short implanting time of 7 minutes without target cooling. Surface properties such as microhardness, wear rate and the friction coefficient have been improved. X-ray and SEM analyses show distinct structural changes on the surface. A combination of sheath assisted implantation and thermal diffusion may be responsible for improvement in surface properties. (orig.)

  15. High-power CO laser with RF discharge for isotope separation employing condensation repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, I. Ya.; Koptev, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    High-power CO laser can be the effective tool in such applications as isotope separation using the free-jet CRISLA method. The way of transfer from CO small-scale experimental installation to industrial high-power CO lasers is proposed through the use of a low-current radio-frequency (RF) electric discharge in a supersonic stream without an electron gun. The calculation model of scaling CO laser with RF discharge in supersonic stream was developed. The developed model allows to calculate parameters of laser installation and optimize them with the purpose of reception of high efficiency and low cost of installation as a whole. The technical decision of industrial CO laser for isotope separation employing condensation repression is considered. The estimated cost of laser is some hundred thousand dollars USA and small sizes of laser head give possibility to install it in any place.

  16. Effects of rf power on chemical composition and surface roughness of glow discharge polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ling; He, Xiaoshan; Chen, Guo; Wang, Tao; Tang, Yongjian; He, Zhibing, E-mail: hezhibing802@163.com

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The growth mechanism of defects in GDP films was studied upon plasma diagnosis. • Increasing rf power enhanced the etching effects of smaller-mass species. • The “void” defect was caused by high energy hydrocarbons bombardment on the surface. • The surface roughness was only 12.76 nm, and no “void” defect was observed at 30 W. - Abstract: The glow discharge polymer (GDP) films for laser fusion targets were successfully fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at different radio frequency (rf) powers. The films were deposited using trans-2-butene (T{sub 2}B) mixed with hydrogen as gas sources. The composition and state of plasma were diagnosed by quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and Langmuir probe during the deposition process. The composition, surface morphology and roughness were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and white-light interferometer (WLI), respectively. Based on these observation and analyses, the growth mechanism of defects in GDP films were studied. The results show that, at low rf power, there is a larger probability for secondary polymerization and formation of multi-carbon C-H species in the plasma. In this case, the surface of GDP film turns to be cauliflower-like. With the increase of rf power, the degree of ionization is high, the relative concentration of smaller-mass hydrocarbon species increases, while the relative concentration of larger-mass hydrocarbon species decreases. At higher rf power, the energy of smaller-mass species are high and the etching effects are strong correspondingly. The GDP film's surface roughness shows a trend of decrease firstly and then increase with the increasing rf power. At rf power of 30 W, the surface root-mean-square roughness (Rq) drops to the lowest value of 12.8 nm, and no “void” defect was observed.

  17. Dissociation of molecular iodine in RF discharge for oxygen-iodine laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásek, Vít; Schmiedberger, Josef; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 4 (2012), 1-6 ISSN 1434-6060 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0310 Grant - others:European Office for Aerospace R&D(XE) FA8655-09-1-3092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : molecular iodine * RF discharge * dissociation * oxygen-iodine laser * COIL Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.513, year: 2012

  18. Ion irradiation effects on ionic liquids interfaced with rf discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Kaneko, T.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of plasma ion irradiation toward a gas-liquid interface is investigated in a rf discharge system incorporating an ionic liquid. The introduction of the ionic liquid to the plasma causes the formation of a sheath electric field on the ionic liquid surface, resulting in the acceleration of the ions to the ionic liquid and the generation of secondary electrons from the ionic liquid by the ion irradiation. These effects are found to advance the discharge process and enhance the plasma production

  19. Control of hydrocarbon radicals and film deposition by using an RF Whistler wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, Tetsu; Shoji, Tatsuo; Kadota, Kiyoshi.

    1991-10-01

    Production of hydrocarbon radicals is controlled by using an RF Whistler wave discharge in a low pressure region (∼0.1 Pa). Plasma density of 10 10 - 10 13 cm -3 , electron temperature of 2-20 eV is obtained for the discharge of admixture of Ar and small content of source gases (CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , CO). Spectroscopic measurement indicates that densities of CH and H radicals and deposition rate of amorphous carbon:H film increase with electron density, electron temperature and source gas pressure. The etching effect of H atoms influences on the deposition rate and a high deposition rate (90 μm/hr for CO/Ar discharge) is obtained even in a low neutral pressure discharge. (author)

  20. Singlet oxygen generation in O2 flow excited by RF discharge: I. Homogeneous discharge mode: α-mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginskiy, O V; Vasilieva, A N; Klopovskiy, K S; Kovalev, A S; Lopaev, D V; Proshina, O V; Rakhimova, T V; Rakhimov, A T

    2005-01-01

    The production and transport dynamics of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) molecules as well as O( 3 P) atoms has been studied in an O 2 flow excited by a 13.56 MHz RF discharge in a quartz tube at pressures of 1-20 Torr. It has been shown that the densities of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O( 3 P) are saturated with increasing energy input into the discharge. The maximum yield of singlet oxygen (SO) and the O 2 dissociation degree drops with pressure. It is demonstrated that depending on the energy input the RF discharge can exist in three modes: I-in the spatially homogeneous mode or α-mode; III-in the substantially inhomogeneous mode, when plasma jets are present outside the discharge; and II-in the transient mode between modes I and III. In this paper only the homogeneous mode of RF discharge in the O 2 flow is considered in detail. A self-consistent model of the α-mode is developed, that allows us to analyse elementary processes responsible for the production and loss of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) molecules as well as O( 3 P) atoms in detail. To verify both the kinetic scheme of the model and the conclusions, some experiments have been carried out at lower flow velocities and higher pressures (≥10 Torr), when the stationary densities of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ), O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) and O( 3 P) in the discharge area were established not by the escape of particles but by the losses due to the volumetric and surface reactions. The O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) density under these conditions is determined by the balance of O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ) production by both direct electron impact and electronic excitation transfer from metastable O( 1 D) atoms and deactivation by oxygen atoms and tube walls, including quenching by ozone in the afterglow. The O( 3 P) density is determined by the balance between the production through O 2 dissociation by electron impact and heterogeneous loss at the wall recombination. The stationary density of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) is provided by the processes of O

  1. Study of the electron energy distribution function in plasma produced by a rf discharge in a mixture of inert gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagner, S.D.; Ignat'ev, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) are recorded in an rf discharge in a mixture of neon and argon. The rates of different ionization processes and the energy losses of the electrons in the bulk of the discharge are calculated. The experimentally recorded electron energy distribution functions are compared with distributions calculated using a nonlocal theory. The effect of an rf voltage in the probe circuit on the recorded electron energy distribution functions is investigated experimentally

  2. Excitation of RF oscillations in a discharge with negative differential conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Kovpik, O.F.; Kornilov, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    The excitation of oscillations in a discharge with negative differential conductivity is studied experimentally. The possibility is demonstrated of amplifying oscillations in the cathode dark space at frequencies close to the electron plasma frequency of the positive-column plasma. The phase velocities of waves at these frequencies are determined. When the waves pass from the cathode dark space to the discharge positive column, their phase velocities decrease; the closer the frequency is to the electron plasma frequency, the more pronounced the decrease in the phase velocity. As the intensity of oscillations increases, the discharge becomes non-steady-state. This is confirmed by the time evolution of the current-voltage characteristic. The shape of the current-voltage characteristic, its splitting, and the rate at which it varies depend on the input RF power. The decrease in the cathode dark space indicates that the ionization processes in the discharge are strongly influenced by electron plasma oscillations excited due to the collective interaction of the electron beam formed at the cathode with the discharge plasma. It is these processes that determine the maximum values of both the frequency of the excited oscillations and the power that can be withdrawn from the discharge

  3. Oxygen functionalization of MWCNTs in RF-dielectric barrier discharge Ar/O2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, E.; Ogawa, D.; Nakamura, K.

    2017-07-01

    The oxygenation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was performed via a radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge (RF-DBD) in an Ar/{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} plasma mixture. The relative intensity of the Ar/{{\\text{O}}2} plasma species was characterized by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The effects of treatment time, RF power and oxygen gas percentage on the chemical composition and surface morphology of MWCNTs were investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The results of FTIR and XPS revealed the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups on the MWCNTs treated in an Ar/{{\\text{O}}2} plasma at an RF power of 50 W and pressure of 400 Pa. The amount of oxygen functional groups (C=O, C-O, and O-COO) also increased by increasing treatment time up to 6 min, but slightly decreased when treatment time was increased by 10 min. The increase of oxygen gas percentage in the plasma mixture does not affect the oxygen content in the treated MWCNTs. Meanwhile, MWCNTs treated at high power (80 W) showed a reduction in oxygen functional groups in comparison with low RF power conditions. The Raman analysis was consistent with the XPS and FTIR results. The integrity of the nanotube patterns also remained damaged as observed by FE-SEM images. The MWCNTs treated in RF-DBD using the Ar/{{\\text{O}}2} plasma mixture showed improved dispersibility in deionized water. A correlation between the OES data and the observed surface characterization for an improved understanding of the functionalization of MWCNTs in Ar/{{\\text{O}}2} plasma was presented.

  4. Mechanism for heating of nitrogen plasmas in an electrodeless rf capacitive discharge at medium pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdichevskii, M.G.; Marusin, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    The possible contributions of several processes to the experimentally observed heating of nitrogen plasmas in an electarodeless rf capacitive discharge at pressures of p=2.7-67 kPa are discussed. These processes are electron-rotational, vibrational--translational (V--T), and nonresonance vibrational--vibrational (V--V) energy exchange and effects due to O 2 , H 2 O, and NO impurities in the gas. It is shown that as the pressure is decreased the heating mechanism changes from quasiequilibrium to nonequilibrium V--T heating caused by overpopulation of high vibrational levels in the ground state of the nitrogen molecule

  5. The Efficiency of Quartz Particles Evaporation in the Argon Plasma Flow of the RF Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Grishin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to high-power density and high-purity plasma, a RF inductively coupled plasma torch (ICPT is widely used both in research laboratory and in industry. The potential RF ICPT application areas are powders spheroidisation, waste treatment, thermal spraying, etc.In the last decade the investigation was focused on the treatment processes of quartz into polycrystalline silicon. An analysis of these results has shown that the increasing productivity and producing high-purity silicon can be achieved only when using the electrodeless radio-frequency induction plasma torches and in case the optimum conditions for evaporation of SiO2solid particles are realized.Optimization of the RF ICPT design and power parameters calls for a wide range of computational studies. In spite of the fact that to date a large number of efforts to calculate the evaporation efficiency of powder materials have been made, a number of issues, as applied to the problem of obtaining silicon, require further research.In this paper, we present the results of a two-dimensional numerical simulation of the heating and evaporation of quartz particles in the RF ICPT channel with axial flow of gases. The main aim is to determine how the axial position of the central tube (through which the particles are injected into the discharge zone, the dispersion of the quartz powder, the amplitude of the discharge current (and, respectively, flow regimes impact on the evaporation efficiency of quartz particles.The paper presented the numerical modeling results of heating and evaporation processes of quartz particles supplied by transporting gas to the RF ICPT channel with axial gas flow (argon. Defined the impact of the axial position of the central tube, the plasma flow regime, the discharge current, the flow rate of transporting gas, and other parameters on the evaporation efficiency of quartz particles.It is shown that the evaporation efficiency of particles reaches its maximum when their

  6. Evaluation of a new method of RF power coupling to acceleration cavity of charged particles accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Poursaleh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the feasibility studty of a new method of RF power coupling to acceleration cavity of charged particles accelerator will be evaluated. In this method a slit is created around the accelerator cavity, and RF power amplifier modules is connected directly to the acceleration cavity. In fact, in this design, the cavity in addition to acting as an acceleration cavity, acts as a RF power combiner. The benefits of this method are avoiding the use of RF vacuum tubes, transmission lines, high power combiner and coupler. In this research, cylindrical and coaxial cavities were studied, and a small sample coaxial cavity is build by this method. The results of the resarch showed that compact, economical and safe RF accelerators can be achieved by the proposed method

  7. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday’s law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  8. Rf Discharge Impedance Measurements Using a New Method to Determine the Stray Impedances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Hoog, de F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The impedance of a capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge in a tubular fluorescent lamp filled with neon and mercury is measured. The stray impedances in the electrical network are determined using a new method that requires no extra instruments. The reflection of power is used to determine

  9. Low-frequency RF Coupling To Unconventional (Fat Unbalanced) Dipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Perkins, M P; Speer, R D; Javedani, J B

    2010-12-07

    The report explains radio frequency (RF) coupling to unconventional dipole antennas. Normal dipoles have thin equal length arms that operate at maximum efficiency around resonance frequencies. In some applications like high-explosive (HE) safety analysis, structures similar to dipoles with ''fat'' unequal length arms must be evaluated for indirect-lightning effects. An example is shown where a metal drum-shaped container with HE forms one arm and the detonator cable acts as the other. Even if the HE is in a facility converted into a ''Faraday cage'', a lightning strike to the facility could still produce electric fields inside. The detonator cable concentrates the electric field and carries the energy into the detonator, potentially creating a hazard. This electromagnetic (EM) field coupling of lightning energy is the indirect effect of a lightning strike. In practice, ''Faraday cages'' are formed by the rebar of the concrete facilities. The individual rebar rods in the roof, walls and floor are normally electrically connected because of the construction technique of using metal wire to tie the pieces together. There are two additional requirements for a good cage. (1) The roof-wall joint and the wall-floor joint must be electrically attached. (2) All metallic penetrations into the facility must also be electrically connected to the rebar. In this report, it is assumed that these conditions have been met, and there is no arcing in the facility structure. Many types of detonators have metal ''cups'' that contain the explosives and thin electrical initiating wires, called bridge wires mounted between two pins. The pins are connected to the detonator cable. The area of concern is between the pins supporting the bridge wire and the metal cup forming the outside of the detonator. Detonator cables usually have two wires, and in this example, both wires generated the same voltage at the

  10. Conversion from carbon dioxide to organic materials by RF impulse discharges with hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, G.; Kano, M.; Iizuka, S. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is among the most serious greenhouse gases emitted from the burning of fossil fuels. The objective of this study was to investigate the fundamental process of reducing CO{sub 2} to generate beneficial and reusable organic materials like methane (CH{sub 4}) and alcohol (CH{sub 3}OH) by using RF impulse discharges in a low gas pressure regime. A low-pressure glow discharge was used to investigate the fundamental processes without catalysts. The discharge took place inside a glass tube by changing the discharge parameters such as voltage, gas flow rate and gas residence time, where the CO{sub 2} was reduced by hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze the gas species. Several organic materials were observed, including methane and methanol. The study focused primarily on the reduction of CO{sub 2} by using only H{sub 2}. Carbon monoxide (CO) was clearly a major product from CO{sub 2}, but CH{sub 4} was the most dominant organic species in this experiment. The density of CH{sub 4} increased with the discharge power, and eventually its volume ratio was about 20 percent among the gas species containing carbon via decomposition of CO{sub 2}. This ratio was dependent on the mixing ratio of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. It was concluded that the total pressure is an important factor for efficient production. CH{sub 3}OH formation was observed, but its concentration was low in comparison to CH{sub 4}. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in nitrogen at low pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Alves, Luís Lemos

    2012-07-06

    This paper uses experiments and modelling to study capacitively coupled radio-frequency (rf) discharges in pure nitrogen, at 13.56MHz frequency, 0.11 mbar pressures and 230W coupled powers. Experiments performed on two similar (not twin) setups, existing in the LATMOS and the GREMI laboratories, include electrical and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements. Electrical measurements give the rf-applied and the direct-current-self-bias voltages, the effective power coupled to the plasma and the average electron density. OES diagnostics measure the intensities of radiative transitions with the nitrogen second-positive and first-negative systems, and with the 811.5 nm atomic line of argon (present as an actinometer). Simulations use a hybrid code that couples a two-dimensional time-dependent fluid module, describing the dynamics of the charged particles (electrons and positive ions N 2 + and N 4 + ), and a zero-dimensional kinetic module, describing the production and destruction of nitrogen (atomic and molecular) neutral species. The coupling between these modules adopts the local mean energy approximation to define spacetime-dependent electron parameters for the fluid module and to work out spacetime-averaged rates for the kinetic module. The model gives general good predictions for the self-bias voltage and for the intensities of radiative transitions (both average and spatially resolved), underestimating the electron density by a factor of 34. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

    2006-06-26

    Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within {approx} 10% and {approx} 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from {approx} 100 to {approx} 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities.

  13. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Coupling between a Waveguide and an RF Cavity Using CST Microwave Studio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Shi; H. Chen; S. Zheng; D. Li; R.A. Rimmer; H. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Accurate predications of RF coupling between an RF cavity and ports attached to it have been an important study subject for years for RF coupler and higher order modes (HOM) damping design. We report recent progress and a method on the RF coupling simulations between waveguide ports and RF cavities using CST Microwave Studio in time domain (Transit Solver). Comparisons of the measured and calculated couplings are presented. The simulated couplings and frequencies agree within ∼ 10% and ∼ 0.1% with the measurements, respectively. We have simulated couplings with external Qs ranging from ∼ 100 to ∼ 100,000, and confirmed with measurements. The method should also work well for higher Qs, and can be easily applied in RF power coupler designs and HOM damping for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities

  14. Electric field measurements in the sheath of an argon RF discharge by probing with microparticles under varying gravity conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H.

    2010-01-01

    The electric field profile in the plasma sheath of an argon rf plasma has been determined by measuring the equilibrium height and the resonance frequency of plasma-confined microparticles. In order to determine the electric field structure at any position in the plasma sheath without the discharge

  15. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    wall can be approximated with the expression for an infinite solenoid , B(r = R) = µ0NIc, where quan- tities N and Ic are the number of turns per unit...Modeling of non-equilibrium plasmas in an induc- tively coupled plasma facility. AIAA Paper 2014– 2235, 2014. 45th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers ...1993. 24th Plas- madynamics and Laser Conference, Orlando, FL. [22] M. Capitelli, I. Armenise, D. Bruno, M. Caccia- tore, R. Celiberto, G. Colonna, O

  17. Diagnostic of capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma from electrical discharge characteristics: comparison with optical emission spectroscopy and fluid model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, HE; Chong, LIU; Yachun, ZHANG; Jianping, CHEN; Yudong, CHEN; Xiaojun, ZENG; Bingyan, CHEN; Jiaxin, PANG; Yibing, WANG

    2018-02-01

    The capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) plasma has been widely used in various fields. In some cases, it requires us to estimate the range of key plasma parameters simpler and quicker in order to understand the behavior in plasma. In this paper, a glass vacuum chamber and a pair of plate electrodes were designed and fabricated, using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge technology to ionize the working gas of Ar. This discharge was mathematically described with equivalent circuit model. The discharge voltage and current of the plasma were measured at different pressures and different powers. Based on the capacitively coupled homogeneous discharge model, the equivalent circuit and the analytical formula were established. The plasma density and temperature were calculated by using the equivalent impedance principle and energy balance equation. The experimental results show that when RF discharge power is 50-300 W and pressure is 25-250 Pa, the average electron temperature is about 1.7-2.1 eV and the average electron density is about 0.5 × 1017-3.6 × 1017 m-3. Agreement was found when the results were compared to those given by optical emission spectroscopy and COMSOL simulation.

  18. Determination of the spatial characteristics of an RF electrodeless discharge by the method of emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, N. V.; Revalde, G.; Skudra, A.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the density of mercury atoms in the 7 3 S state in a spherical RF electrode-less gas-discharge lamp is reconstructed by the method of emission tomography. The local values of the corresponding emission coefficients, which are proportional to the density of mercury atoms in the 7 3 S state, are determined from integral (over the plasma volume) measurements of the lamp radiation at a wavelength of 546.1 nm with the help of an algorithm based on the maximum entropy method. The results obtained show that, for all of the operating modes under study, the profile of the density of mercury atoms in the 7 3 S state has a minimum in the center of the lamp and a maximum near its wall. At a generator current of 100 mA and cold-spot temperature of 41 deg. C, the density of mercury atoms in the 7 3 S state is observed to drop substantially both in the center of the lamp and near its wall, the density in the center being reduced to almost zero. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed

  19. Electron beam gun with kinematic coupling for high power RF vacuum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchard, Philipp

    2016-11-22

    An electron beam gun for a high power RF vacuum device has components joined by a fixed kinematic coupling to provide both precise alignment and high voltage electrical insulation of the components. The kinematic coupling has high strength ceramic elements directly bonded to one or more non-ductile rigid metal components using a high temperature active metal brazing alloy. The ceramic elements have a convex surface that mates with concave grooves in another one of the components. The kinematic coupling, for example, may join a cathode assembly and/or a beam shaping focus electrode to a gun stem, which is preferably composed of ceramic. The electron beam gun may be part of a high power RF vacuum device such as, for example, a gyrotron, klystron, or magnetron.

  20. Calculation of wake field and couple impedance of upgraded and old RF cavity in Hefei electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hongliang; Wang Lin; Sun Baogen; Li Weimin; Liu Jinying; He Duohui

    2003-01-01

    The phase II upgrading project of Hefei 800 MeV electron storage ring is being done, and the important component of the project, the RF cavity, will be finished soon. The old RF cavity with many disadvantages will be replaced by the new one. To estimate the effect of RF cavity coupling impedance to storing bunch intensity fully, the wake potential and the broad band couple impedance of RF cavity were calculated with MAFIA program. And the calculation results were compared between new and old cavity, it is found that the impedance of the new is bigger than that of the old

  1. Experiments on toroidal inductively coupled alternating-current gas discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lok, J.

    1976-01-01

    This report is on an experimental study of a toroidal, inductively coupled a.c. gas discharge sustained at pressures roughly between one tenth of a Torr and some tens of Torrs. After breakdown is obtained at low pressure, additional gas is let in. The energy is inductively coupled into the electrodeless discharge by means of an iron core transformer of which the toroidal plasma column is the secondary winding. The power dissipated in the plasma is between 80 and 260 kW and is delivered by a motor-generator system at a frequency of 8 kHz for times up to 2 seconds. A toroidal magnetic field of 0.5 T maximum can be supplied in a short pulse. Five different gases (hydrogen, deuterium, helium, argon, and nitrogen) are used. The pressure range in which the discharges are sustained is specified, and the dynamic current-voltage characteristics are given for different pressures. Some typical streak pictures with simultaneously obtained recordings of the time behaviour of the discharge current and of the loop voltage are presented for the initial phase - at low pressure - of the discharge. The shape and the position of fully developed discharges at various pressures are discussed on the basis of photographic observations. The temperature of hydrogen plasmas is derived both from the electrical conductivity and from the emission of line radiation. The values of the temperature obtained in these ways differ in magnitude and in time behaviour. A possible explanation of the discrepancy can be obtained in terms of expansion and contraction of electron density and temperature profiles during a period of the discharge current, if it is taken into account that the main part of the light emission always originates from the outer colder regions of the plasma. In a somewhat different pressure regime, this picture is confirmed by microwave measurements

  2. Modelling of inductively coupled discharges excited by internal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    Modelling of inductively coupled discharges provides a method for computing parameters such as current, electrical conductivity and electromagnetic field strengths which are difficult to measure experimentally. The models reported in the literature to date deal with discharges which are surrounded by an induction coil where the plasma is considered as a one-turn secondary winding of a transformer. Eckert derived expressions for electromagnetic fields and impedance in discharges assuming Bessel function solutions to the wave and electron density equations, while more recently Denneman solved the non-linear problem, including the effects of a radial conductivity profile on the electromagnetic fields in a Ar-Hg discharge. Modelling of an ICD in which the coil is in the centre of the discharge presents an additional difficulty, since the coil does not provide a natural external boundary condition. In this paper, we compare numerical results from the approaches of Eckert and Denneman applied to discharges with internal coils, with a view to identifying relevant parameters applicable to interpretation of experiments. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Progress on the RF Coupling Coil Module Design for the MICE Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Green, M.A.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S.; Lau, W.; White, A.E.; Yang, S.Q.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the progress on the design of the RF coupling coil (RFCC) module for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The MICE cooling channel design consists of one SFOFO cell that is similar to that of the US Study-II of a neutrino factory. The MICE RFCC module comprises a superconducting solenoid, mounted around four normal conducting 201.25-MHz RF cavities. Each cavity has a pair of thin curved beryllium windows to close the conventional open beam irises, which allows for independent control of the phase in each cavity and for the RF power to be fed separately. The coil package that surrounds the RF cavities is mounted on a vacuum vessel. The RF vacuum is shared between the cavities and the vacuum vessel around the cavities such that there is no differential pressure on the thin beryllium windows. This paper discusses the design progress of the RFCC module and the fabrication progress of a prototype 201.25-MHz cavity

  4. Etching of UO2 in NF3 RF Plasma Glow Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John M. Veilleux

    1999-01-01

    A series of room temperature, low pressure (10.8 to 40 Pa), low power (25 to 210 W) RF plasma glow discharge experiments with UO 2 were conducted to demonstrate that plasma treatment is a viable method for decontaminating UO 2 from stainless steel substrates. Experiments were conducted using NF 3 gas to decontaminate depleted uranium dioxide from stainless-steel substrates. Depleted UO 2 samples each containing 129.4 Bq were prepared from 100 microliter solutions of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate solution. The amorphous UO 2 in the samples had a relatively low density of 4.8 gm/cm 3 . Counting of the depleted UO 2 on the substrate following plasma immersion was performed using liquid scintillation counting with alpha/beta discrimination due to the presence of confounding beta emitting daughter products, 234 Th and 234 Pa. The alpha emission peak from each sample was integrated using a gaussian and first order polynomial fit to improve quantification. The uncertainties in the experimental measurement of the etched material were estimated at about ± 2%. Results demonstrated that UO 2 can be completely removed from stainless-steel substrates after several minutes processing at under 200 W. At 180 W and 32.7 Pa gas pressure, over 99% of all UO 2 in the samples was removed in just 17 minutes. The initial etch rate in the experiments ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 microm/min. Etching increased with the plasma absorbed power and feed gas pressure in the range of 10.8 to 40 Pa. A different pressure effect on UO 2 etching was also noted below 50 W in which etching increased up to a maximum pressure, approximately23 Pa, then decreased with further increases in pressure

  5. Environmentally-induced discharge transient coupling to spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, R.; Barbay, G.; Stevens, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Hughes SCREENS (Space Craft Response to Environments of Space) technique was applied to generic spin and 3-axis stabilized spacecraft models. It involved the NASCAP modeling for surface charging and lumped element modeling for transients coupling into a spacecraft. A differential voltage between antenna and spun shelf of approx. 400 V and current of 12 A resulted from discharge at antenna for the spinner and approx. 3 kv and 0.3 A from a discharge at solar panels for the 3-axis stabilized Spacecraft. A typical interface circuit response was analyzed to show that the transients would couple into the Spacecraft System through ground points, which are most vulnerable. A compilation and review was performed on 15 years of available data from electron and ion current collection phenomena. Empirical models were developed to match data and compared with flight data of Pix-1 and Pix-2 mission. It was found that large space power systems would float negative and discharge if operated at or above 300 V. Several recommendations are given to improve the models and to apply them to large space systems.

  6. An optically coupled system for quantitative monitoring of MRI-induced RF currents into long conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Marta G; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio-frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed light-emitting-diode transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions.

  7. Pyrolysis treatment of waste tire powder in a capacitively coupled RF plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, L. [Department of Civil Engineering, Guangzhou University, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2009-03-15

    A capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) plasma reactor was tested mainly for the purpose of solid waste treatment. It was found that using a RF input power between 1600 and 2000 W and a reactor pressure between 3000 and 8000 Pa (absolute pressure), a reactive plasma environment with a gas temperature between 1200 and 1800 K can be reached in this lab scale reactor. Under these conditions, pyrolysis of tire powder gave two product streams: a combustible gas and a pyrolytic char. The major components of the gas product are H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} The physical properties (surface area, porosity, and particle morphology) as well as chemical properties (elemental composition, heating value, and surface functional groups) of the pyrolytic char has also been examined. (author)

  8. RF Coupling into the Fuel Tank of a Large Transport Aircraft from Intentionally Transmitting Peds in the Passenger Cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Scearce, Stephen A.; Ely, Jay J.; Richardson, Robert E.; Hatfield, Michael O.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study the potential for radio frequency (RF) power radiated from Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) to create an arcing/sparking event within the fuel tank of a large transport aircraft. This paper describes the experimental methods used for measuring RF coupling to the fuel tank and Fuel Quantity Indication System (FQIS) wiring from PED sources located in the passenger cabin. To allow comparison of voltage/current data obtained in a laboratory chamber FQIS installation to an actual aircraft FQIS installation, aircraft fuel tank RF reverberation characteristics were also measured. Results from the measurements, along with a survey of threats from typical intentional transmitting PEDs are presented. The resulting worst-case power coupled onto fuel tank FQIS wiring is derived. The same approach can be applied to measure RF coupling into various other aircraft systems.

  9. Hybrid simulation of electron energy distributions and plasma characteristics in pulsed RF CCP sustained in Ar and SiH4/Ar discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-Feng; Jia, Wen-Zhu; Song, Yuan-Hong; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Dai, Zhong-Ling; Wang, You-Nian

    2017-11-01

    Pulsed-discharge plasmas offer great advantages in deposition of silicon-based films due to the fact that they can suppress cluster agglomeration, moderate the energy of bombarding ions, and prolong the species' diffusion time on the substrate. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid/Monte-Carlo hybrid model is applied to study pulse modulated radio-frequency (RF) plasmas sustained in capacitively coupled Ar and SiH4/Ar discharges. First, the electron energy distributions in pulsed Ar and SiH4/Ar plasmas have been investigated and compared under identical discharge-circuit conditions. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in Ar discharge exhibits a familiar bi-Maxwellian shape during the power-on phase of the pulse, while a more complex (resembling a multi-Maxwellian) distribution with extra inflection points at lower energies is observed in the case of the SiH4/Ar mixture. These features become more prominent with the increasing fraction of SiH4 in the gas mixture. The difference in the shape of the EEDF (which is pronounced inside the plasma but not in the RF sheath where electron heating occurs) is mainly attributed to the electron-impact excitations of SiH4. During the power-off phase of the pulse, the EEDFs in both Ar and SiH4/Ar discharges evolve into bi-Maxwellian shapes, with shrinking high energy tails. Furthermore, the parameter of ion species in the case of SiH4/Ar discharge is strongly modulated by pulsing. For positive ions, such as SiH3+ and Si2H4+ , the particle fluxes overshoot at the beginning of the power-on interval. Meanwhile, for negative ions such as SiH2- and SiH3- , density profiles observed between the electrodes are saddle-shaped due to the repulsion by the self-bias electric field as it builds up. During the power-off phase, the wall fluxes of SiH2- and SiH3- gradually increase, leading to a significant decrease in the net surface charge density on the driven electrode. Compared with ions, the density of SiH3 is poorly modulated

  10. Design of traveling wave windows for the PEP-II RF coupling network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroll, N.M.; Ng, C.K.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, M.

    1995-05-01

    The waveguide windows in the PEP-II RF coupling network have to withstand high power of 500 kW. Traveling wave windows have lower power dissipation than conventional self-matched windows, thus rendering the possibility of less stringent mechanical design. The traveling wave behavior is achieved by providing a reflecting iris on each side of the window, and depending on the configuration of the irises, traveling wave windows are characterized as inductive or capacitive types. A numerical design procedure using MAFIA has been developed for traveling wave windows. The relative advantages of inductive and capacitive windows are discussed. Furthermore, the issues of bandwidth and multipactoring are also addressed

  11. Etching of uranium dioxide in nitrogen trifluoride RF plasma glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, John Mark

    1999-10-01

    A series of room temperature, low pressure (10.8 to 40 Pa), low power (25 to 210 W) RF plasma glow discharge experiments with UO2 were conducted to demonstrate that plasma treatment is a viable method for decontaminating UO2 from stainless steel substrates. Experiments were conducted using NF3 gas to decontaminate depleted uranium dioxide from stainless-steel substrates. Results demonstrated that UO2 can be completely removed from stainless-steel substrates after several minutes processing at under 200 W. At 180 W and 32.7 Pa gas pressure, over 99% of all UO2 in the samples was removed in just 17 minutes. The initial etch rate in the experiments ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 mum/min. Etching increased with the plasma absorbed power and feed gas pressure in the range of 10.8 to 40 Pa. A different pressure effect on UO2 etching was also noted below 50 W in which etching increased up to a maximum pressure, ˜23 Pa, then decreased with further increases in pressure. A computer simulation, CHEMKIN, was applied to predict the NF3 plasma species in the experiments. The code was validated first by comparing its predictions of the NF3 plasma species with mass spectroscopy etching experiments of silicon. The code predictions were within +/-5% of the measured species concentrations. The F atom radicals were identified as the primary etchant species, diffusing from the bulk plasma to the UO2 surface and reacting to form a volatile UF6, which desorbed into the gas phase to be pumped away. Ions created in the plasma were too low in concentration to have a major effect on etching, but can enhance the etch rate by removing non-volatile reaction products blocking the reaction of F with UO2. The composition of these non-volatile products were determined based on thermodynamic analysis and the electronic structure of uranium. Analysis identified possible non-volatile products as the uranium fluorides, UF2-5, and certain uranium oxyfluorides UO2F, UO2F2, UOF3, and UOF 4 which form over the

  12. RF power absorption by plasma of low pressure low power inductive discharge located in the external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralkina, E. A.; Rukhadze, A. A.; Nekliudova, P. A.; Pavlov, V. B.; Petrov, A. K.; Vavilin, K. V.

    2018-03-01

    Present paper is aimed to reveal experimentally and theoretically the influence of magnetic field strength, antenna shape, pressure, operating frequency and geometrical size of plasma sources on the ability of plasma to absorb the RF power characterized by the equivalent plasma resistance for the case of low pressure RF inductive discharge located in the external magnetic field. The distinguishing feature of the present paper is the consideration of the antennas that generate not only current but charge on the external surface of plasma sources. It is shown that in the limited plasma source two linked waves can be excited. In case of antennas generating only azimuthal current the waves can be attributed as helicon and TG waves. In the case of an antenna with the longitudinal current there is a surface charge on the side surface of the plasma source, which gives rise to a significant increase of the longitudinal and radial components of the RF electric field as compared with the case of the azimuthal antenna current.

  13. Experimental measurements of the ion cyclotron antennas' coupling and rf characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Becraft, W.R.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Owens, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    The rf coupling capabilities and characteristics of various antennas have been measured. The tested antenna configurations include the simple loop antenna operated at resonant lengths as used on Alcator-C, the cavity antenna proposed for Doublet III-D and the resonant double loop, asymmetric resonant double loop, and U-slot antennas. Models of the voltage, magnetic fields outside the structure, and current have been correlated with the measurements made on these antennas. From these measurements and from typical observations of ICRH coupling in tokamaks, we are studying power and frequency limitations on each antenna and the causes of the limitations. A comparison of the technology, performance, and power limitations of each type of antenna is presented

  14. Rf transfer in the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A significant technical problem associated with the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator is the transfer of RF energy from the drive accelerator to the high-gradient accelerator. Several concepts have been advanced to solve this problem. This paper examines one possible solution in which the drive and high-gradient cavities are directly coupled to one another by means of holes in the cavity walls or coupled indirectly through a third intermediate transfer cavity. Energy cascades through the cavities on a beat frequency time scale which must be made small compared to the cavity skin time but large compared to the FEL pulse length. The transfer is complicated by the fact that each of the cavities in the system can support many resonant modes near the chosen frequency of operation. A generalized set of coupled-cavity equations has been developed to model the energy transfer between the various modes in each of the cavities. For a two cavity case transfer efficiencies in excess of 95% can be achieved. 3 refs., 2 figs

  15. Suitability of miniature inductively coupled RF coils as MR-visible markers for clinical purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnov, Nikita; Thormer, Gregor; Trampel, Robert; Grunder, Wilfried; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald

    2011-11-01

    MR-visible markers have already been used for various purposes such as image registration, motion detection, and device tracking. Inductively coupled RF (ICRF) coils, in particular, provide a high contrast and do not require connecting wires to the scanner, which makes their application highly flexible and safe. This work aims to thoroughly characterize the MR signals of such ICRF markers under various conditions with a special emphasis on fully automatic detection. The small markers consisted of a solenoid coil that was wound around a glass tube containing the MR signal source and tuned to the resonance frequency of a 1.5 T MRI. Marker imaging was performed with a spoiled gradient echo sequence (FLASH) and a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence (TrueFISP) in three standard projections. The signal intensities of the markers were recorded for both pulse sequences, three source materials (tap water, distilled water, and contrast agent solution), different flip angles and coil alignments with respect to the B(0) direction as well as for different marker positions in the entire imaging volume (field of view, FOV). Heating of the ICRF coils was measured during 10-min RF expositions to three conventional pulse sequences. Clinical utility of the markers was assessed from their performance in computer-aided detection and in defining double oblique scan planes. For almost the entire FOV (±215 mm) and an estimated 82% of all possible RF coil alignments with respect to B(0), the ICRF markers generated clearly visible MR signals and could be reliably localized over a large range of flip angles, in particular with the TrueFISP sequence (0.3°-4.0°). Generally, TrueFISP provided a higher marker contrast than FLASH. RF exposition caused a moderate heating (≤5 °C) of the ICRF coils only. Small ICRF coils, imaged at low flip angles with a balanced SSFP sequence showed an excellent performance under a variety of experimental conditions and therefore make for a

  16. Styrene and methyl methacrylate copolymer synthesized by RF inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z; Gillon, X; Diallo, M; Houssiau, L; Pireaux, J-J, E-mail: zhiling.li@fundp.ac.be [University of Namur (FUNDP) Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), 61, Rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2011-01-01

    A series of random copolymers of styrene and methyl methacrylate was prepared on a silicon substrate by RF pulsed inductively coupled plasma. The plasma gas phase was investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The physico-chemical characteristics of the deposited copolymer films were analyzed by several surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform infrared absorption (FT-IR), Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), etc. OES of the plasma and FT-IR spectra of the films are predictive: plasma emitting a higher relative benzyl radical signal results in the deposition of a more aromatic plasma polymer. The functional thin films can be deposited by selection of the co-monomers.

  17. Possible effects of RF field near ICRF antenna on density control during long pulse discharge in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Seki, T.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Noda, N.; Watanabe, T.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Torii, Y.; Takeuchi, N.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the large helical device (LHD), the plasma duration time was extended up to 150 s by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating. Time-integrated total input power reached 71 MJ. However, this discharge terminated due to radiation collapse accompanied by an increase of electron density. The temperature of the divertor plates and the intensity of H α were locally increased in the same toroidal section, near the ICRF antenna. One of the possible causes of the increase of radiation power is an outgassing from the divertor plates that were heated by particles accelerated in the cyclotron resonance layer near the antenna. Another possible cause is the outgassing from the ICRF antenna itself due to a temperature increase of the ICRF antenna owing to high-energy particles, or the formation of an RF (radio frequency) sheath

  18. A Coupled Field Multiphysics Modeling Approach to Investigate RF MEMS Switch Failure Modes under Various Operational Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Sadek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the reliability of capacitive shunt RF MEMS switches have been investigated using three dimensional (3D coupled multiphysics finite element (FE analysis. The coupled field analysis involved three consecutive multiphysics interactions. The first interaction is characterized as a two-way sequential electromagnetic (EM-thermal field coupling. The second interaction represented a one-way sequential thermal-structural field coupling. The third interaction portrayed a two-way sequential structural-electrostatic field coupling. An automated substructuring algorithm was utilized to reduce the computational cost of the complicated coupled multiphysics FE analysis. The results of the substructured FE model with coupled field analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the outcome of previously published experimental and numerical studies. The current numerical results indicate that the pull-in voltage and the buckling temperature of the RF switch are functions of the microfabrication residual stress state, the switch operational frequency and the surrounding packaging temperature. Furthermore, the current results point out that by introducing proper mechanical approaches such as corrugated switches and through-holes in the switch membrane, it is possible to achieve reliable pull-in voltages, at various operating temperatures. The performed analysis also shows that by controlling the mean and gradient residual stresses, generated during microfabrication, in conjunction with the proposed mechanical approaches, the power handling capability of RF MEMS switches can be increased, at a wide range of operational frequencies. These design features of RF MEMS switches are of particular importance in applications where a high RF power (frequencies above 10 GHz and large temperature variations are expected, such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring.

  19. Modeling of magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasma sources: Ar discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasma sources use transverse static magnetic fields to modify the performance of low pressure radio frequency discharges. Magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE) sources typically use magnetic fields of tens to hundreds of Gauss parallel to the substrate to increase the plasma density at a given pressure or to lower the operating pressure. In this article results from a two-dimensional hybrid-fluid computational investigation of MERIE reactors with plasmas sustained in argon are discussed for an industrially relevant geometry. The reduction in electron cross field mobility as the magnetic field increases produces a systematic decrease in the dc bias (becoming more positive). This decrease is accompanied by a decrease in the energy and increase in angular spread of the ion flux to the substrate. Similar trends are observed when decreasing pressure for a constant magnetic field. Although for constant power the magnitudes of ion fluxes to the substrate increase with moderate magnetic fields, the fluxes decreased at larger magnetic fields. These trends are due, in part, to a reduction in the contributions of more efficient multistep ionization

  20. Laser diagnostics of atomic hydrogen and oxygen production in rf and microwave plasma discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preppernau, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    The research for this thesis involved the application of two-photon allowed laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) to the study of atomic hydrogen and oxygen production in industrial scale radio-frequency and microwave plasma discharge apparatus. Absolute atomic hydrogen concentration profiles were measured in a Gaseous Electronics Conference Reference Cell installed at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio operating with a simple H 2 discharge. Two-dimensional atomic hydrogen concentration profiles were also measured in an ASTEX HPMM microwave plasma diamond deposition reactor during actual diamond growth. In addition absolute atomic oxygen concentrations were measured in the ASTEX system. Particular attention as paid to refining the concentration calibration technique and in determining a correction to account for the collisional quenching of excited state fluorescence in high pressure gases

  1. Characterization and modelling of low-pressure rf discharges at 2-500 MHz for miniature alkali vapour dielectric barrier discharge lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Shea, Herbert; Pétremand, Yves; Rooij, Nico de

    2012-01-01

    Low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) alkali vapour lamps are of particular interest for portable atomic clocks because they (1) could enable low-power operation, (2) generate the precise required wavelength, (3) are planar simplifying chip-level integration and (4) use external electrodes, which increases the lifetime. Given the stringent requirements on lamps for atomic clocks, it is important to identify the parameters that can be optimized to meet these performance requirements (size, power consumption, stability, reliability). We report on the electrical and optical characteristics of dielectric barrier plasma discharges observed in two configurations: (1) in a vacuum chamber over a wide low-pressure range (2-100 mbar) for three different buffer gases (He, Ar, N 2 ) driven at different frequencies between 2 and 500 MHz and (2) on microfabricated hermetically sealed Rb vapour cells filled with 30 and 70 mbar of Ar. We discuss the optimum conditions for a low-power and stable operation of a Rb vapour DBD lamp, aimed at chip-scale atomic clocks. We also present the electrical modelling of the discharge parameters to understand the power distribution mechanisms and the input power to discharge power coupling efficiency.

  2. Characterization of injected aluminum oxide nanoparticle clouds in an rf discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Harald; Killer, Carsten; Schütt, Stefan; Melzer, André

    2018-02-01

    An experimental setup to deagglomerate and insert nanoparticles into a radio frequency discharge has been developed to confine defined aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a dusty plasma. For the confined particle clouds we have measured the spatially resolved in situ size and density distributions. Implementing the whole plasma chamber into the sample volume of an FTIR spectrometer the infrared spectrum of the confined aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been obtained. We have investigated the dependency of the absorbance of the nanoparticles in terms of plasma power, pressure and cloud shape. The particles’ infrared phonon resonance has been identified.

  3. Generation of ion-acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves in an RF helicon discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A. S.; Markov, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    A study is made of the generation of ion-acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves in a discharge excited in an external magnetic field by an electromagnetic wave in the whistler frequency range (ω LH He , where ω LH = √(ω He ω Hi ) and ω He and ω Hi are the electron and ion gyrofrequencies, respectively). The excitation of acoustic waves is attributed to the decay of a high-frequency hybrid mode forming a plasma waveguide into low-frequency acoustic waves and new high-frequency waves that satisfy both the decay conditions and the waveguide dispersion relations. The excitation of acoustic waves is resonant in character because the conditions for the generation of waveguide modes and for the occurrence of the corresponding nonlinear wave processes should be satisfied simultaneously. An unexpected effect is the generation of magnetoacoustic waves by whistlers. A diagnostic technique is proposed that allows one to determine the thermal electron velocity by analyzing decay conditions and dispersion relations for waves in the discharge channel

  4. Sperm, nuclear, phospholipid, and red blood cell antibodies and isotype RF in infertile couples and patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichorova, R; Nakov, L; Baleva, M; Nikolov, K; Gegova, I

    1996-12-01

    To determine if measuring of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies is useful for better understanding and management of unexplained infertility. Sera were obtained from 70 infertile couples, 57 rheumatic patients, and 76 fertile donors. Sperm antibodies (SA) were detected by the tests of Kibrick and Friberg, anti-histones, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, and RF isotypes by ELISA, antinuclear antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence, and anti-red blood cell antibodies by Capture-R. Multiple autoimmune reactivity (both partners positive and/or more than one type of autoantibody involved), higher than naturally occurring in fertile individuals, was found in 55% of the idiopathically infertile couples. IgA-RF was the dominant autoimmune marker. SA revealed similar rates in patients with rheumatic diseases and in infertiles with or without other autoantibodies. Although no single autoimmunity marker could predict occurrence of SA, the coincidence of enhanced polyclonal autoimmunity in both partners of infertile couples might potentiate their negative effect on reproduction.

  5. Depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers on Si wafers by pulsed r.f. glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsberg, K.-G.; Schumacher, C.; Tempez, A.; Nielsch, K.; Broekaert, J.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers deposited on Au and Cr covered Si wafers with the aid of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pulsed RF-GD-TOFMS also called plasma profiling TOFMS (PP-TOFMS™)) is described. For thermoelectric materials the depth resolutions obtained with both PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are shown to be well comparable and in the order of the roughness of the corresponding layers (between 20 and 3700 nm). With both methods a direct solid analysis without any preparation steps is possible. In addition, the analysis of the samples with PP-TOFMS proved to be faster by a factor of 26 compared to SIMS, as sputtering rates were found to be 80 nm s −1 and 3 nm s −1 , respectively. For the analyzed samples the results of PP-TOFMS and SIMS show that a homogeneous deposition was obtained. Quantitative results for all samples could also be obtained directly by PP-TOFMS when the stoichiometry of one sample was determined beforehand for instance by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SEM-EDX). For Bi 2 Te 3 the standard deviation for the main component concentrations within one sample then is found to be between 1.1% and 1.9% and it is 3.6% from sample to sample. For Sb 2 Te 3 the values within one sample are from 1.7% to 4.2% and from sample to sample 5.3%, respectively. - Highlights: ► Depth resolution in sub micrometer size by glow discharge mass spectrometry. ► Bi and Sb telluride layers composition with GD-TOF-MS, ICP-OES and SEM-EDX agree. ► Homogeneities of layers measured with GD-TOF-MS and SIMS agree.

  6. Thin TiO2 films deposited by implantation and sputtering in RF inductively coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia-Alvarado, R; López-Callejas, R; Barocio, S R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Muñoz-Castro, A E; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G; De la Piedad-Beneitez, A; De la Rosa-Vázquez, J M

    2012-01-01

    The achievement of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) thin films in the rutile crystalline phase is reported. The samples result from the implantation of oxygen ions of Ti in argon/oxygen plasma generated by inductively coupled RF at a commercial 13.56 MHz frequency. Simultaneously, a sputtering process is conducted on the titanium target in order to produce TiO 2 thin films in the anatase phase over silicon and glass substrates. Both implantation and sputtering processes shared the same 500 W plasma with the target, polarized between 0 and -3 kV. The substrates were placed between 2 and 3 cm from the target, this distance being found to be determinant of the TiO 2 deposition rate. The rutile phase in the target was obtained at temperatures in the order of 680 degrees C and the anatase (unbiased) one at about 300 degrees C without any auxiliary heating. The crystalline phases were characterized by x ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The morphology and average roughness were established by means of scanning electronic and atomic force microscopy, whereas the reaction products generated during the oxidation process were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Finally, the stoichiometric composition was measured by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  7. Multi-species counter-current diffusion model for etching depleted uranium oxide in NF3, RF glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, H.H.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Results of recent experiments investigating the decontamination of depleted UO 2 using NF 3 gas, RF gloss discharge, showed that etching rate decreased monotonically with immersion time to the end point. In addition to the formation of non-volatile reaction products on UO 2 surface, the accumulation of UF 6 in the sheath contributed to the decrease in etch rate with immersion time. To investigate the latter, a transient, multi-species, counter-current diffusion model for UO 2 etching is developed. Model results indicated that, depending on gas pressure and absorbed power, the diffusion coefficient of F in the sheath decreased at the end point by ∼15%. At 17.0 Pa and 200 W, the mole fraction of F at UO 2 surface decreased rapidly with immersion time to 61% and 86% of its initial value, after one and two characteristic etch time, respectively, it became almost zero at the end point, reached after 4--5 characteristic etch times

  8. Dynamics of directional coupling underlying spike-wave discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sysoeva, M.V.; Luttjohann, A.K.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Sysoev, I.V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Spike and wave discharges (SWDs), generated within cortico-thalamo-cortical networks, are the electroencephalographic biomarker of absence epilepsy. The current work aims to identify mechanisms of SWD initiation, maintenance and termination by the analyses of dynamics and directionality of

  9. A prototype of an electric-discharge gas flow oxygen−iodine laser: I. Modeling of the processes of singlet oxygen generation in a transverse cryogenic slab RF discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, N. P.; Ionin, A. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Yuryshev, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    The existing kinetic model describing self-sustained and electroionization discharges in mixtures enriched with singlet oxygen has been modified to calculate the characteristics of a flow RF discharge in molecular oxygen and its mixtures with helium. The simulations were performed in the gas plug-flow approximation, i.e., the evolution of the plasma components during their motion along the channel was represented as their evolution in time. The calculations were carried out for the O 2 : He = 1: 0, 1: 1, 1: 2, and 1: 3 mixtures at an oxygen partial pressure of 7.5 Torr. It is shown that, under these conditions, volumetric gas heating in a discharge in pure molecular oxygen prevails over gas cooling via heat conduction even at an electrode temperature as low as ~100 K. When molecular oxygen is diluted with helium, the behavior of the gas temperature changes substantially: heat removal begins to prevail over volumetric gas heating, and the gas temperature at the outlet of the discharge zone drops to ~220–230 K at room gas temperature at the inlet, which is very important in the context of achieving the generation threshold in an electric-discharge oxygen−iodine laser based on a slab cryogenic RF discharge.

  10. A prototype of an electric-discharge gas flow oxygen−iodine laser: I. Modeling of the processes of singlet oxygen generation in a transverse cryogenic slab RF discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagin, N. P.; Ionin, A. A., E-mail: aion@sci.lebedev.ru; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Sinitsyn, D. V., E-mail: dsinit@sci.lebedev.ru; Yuryshev, N. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The existing kinetic model describing self-sustained and electroionization discharges in mixtures enriched with singlet oxygen has been modified to calculate the characteristics of a flow RF discharge in molecular oxygen and its mixtures with helium. The simulations were performed in the gas plug-flow approximation, i.e., the evolution of the plasma components during their motion along the channel was represented as their evolution in time. The calculations were carried out for the O{sub 2}: He = 1: 0, 1: 1, 1: 2, and 1: 3 mixtures at an oxygen partial pressure of 7.5 Torr. It is shown that, under these conditions, volumetric gas heating in a discharge in pure molecular oxygen prevails over gas cooling via heat conduction even at an electrode temperature as low as ~100 K. When molecular oxygen is diluted with helium, the behavior of the gas temperature changes substantially: heat removal begins to prevail over volumetric gas heating, and the gas temperature at the outlet of the discharge zone drops to ~220–230 K at room gas temperature at the inlet, which is very important in the context of achieving the generation threshold in an electric-discharge oxygen−iodine laser based on a slab cryogenic RF discharge.

  11. Multiband carbon monoxide laser (2.5 -- 4.0 and 5.0 -- 6.5 micron) pumped by capacitive slab RF discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionin, Andrey; Kozlov, Andrey; Seleznev, Leonid; Sinitsyn, Dmitry

    2008-10-01

    Overtone lasing and fundamental band tuning was for the first time obtained in a carbon monoxide laser excited by repetitively pulsed capacitive slab RF discharge (81.36 MHz). RF discharge pulse repetition rate was 100--500 Hz. The active volume was 3x30x250 cubic mm. Laser electrodes were cooled down to 120 K. Gas mixture CO:air:He at gas pressure 15 Torr was used. The optical scheme ``frequency selective master oscillator - laser amplifier'' was applied for getting fundamental band tuning. Single line lasing with average power up to several tens of mW was observed on about 100 rotational-vibrational transitions of CO molecule within the spectral range 5.0--6.5 micron. Multiline overtone lasing was observed on about 80 spectral lines within the spectral range 2.5-4.0 micron, with maximum single line average output power 12 mW. The total output power of the slab overtone CO laser came up to 0.35 W, with laser efficiency 0.5 percent. The results of parametric studies of capacitive slab RF discharge in carbon monoxide mixtures, and overtone and fundamental band CO laser characteristics are discussed.

  12. Generation of ion-acoustic waves in an inductively coupled, low-pressure discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, J. C.; Klimcak, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    For a number of years it has been known that the alkali rf-discharge lamps used in atomic clocks can exhibit large amplitude intensity oscillations. These oscillations arise from ion-acoustic plasma waves and have typically been associated with erratic clock behavior. Though large amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves are clearly deleterious for atomic clock operation, it does not follow that small amplitude oscillations have no utility. Here, we demonstrate two easily implemented methods for generating small amplitude ion-acoustic plasma waves in alkali rf-discharge lamps. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequency of these waves is proportional to the square root of the rf power driving the lamp and therefore that their examination can provide an easily accessible parameter for monitoring and controlling the lamp's plasma conditions. This has important consequences for precise timekeeping, since the atomic ground-state hyperfine transition, which is the heart of the atomic clock signal, can be significantly perturbed by changes in the lamp's output via the ac-Stark shift

  13. An Optically-Coupled System for Quantitative Monitoring of MRI-Induced RF Currents into Long Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically-coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed LED transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions. PMID:19758855

  14. Self-excited nonlinear plasma series resonance oscillations in geometrically symmetric capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donko, Z.; Schulze, J.; Czarnetzki, U.; Luggenhoelscher, D.

    2009-01-01

    At low pressures, nonlinear self-excited plasma series resonance (PSR) oscillations are known to drastically enhance electron heating in geometrically asymmetric capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges by nonlinear electron resonance heating (NERH). Here we demonstrate via particle-in-cell simulations that high-frequency PSR oscillations can also be excited in geometrically symmetric discharges if the driving voltage waveform makes the discharge electrically asymmetric. This can be achieved by a dual-frequency (f+2f) excitation, when PSR oscillations and NERH are turned on and off depending on the electrical discharge asymmetry, controlled by the phase difference of the driving frequencies

  15. Etching of UO2 in NF3 RF Plasma Glow Discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veilleux, John M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-08-01

    A series of room temperature, low pressure (10.8 to 40 Pa), low power (25 to 210 W) RF plasma glow discharge experiments with UO2 were conducted to demonstrate that plasma treatment is a viable method for decontaminating UO2 from stainless steel substrates. Experiments were conducted using NF3 gas to decontaminate depleted uranium dioxide from stainless-steel substrates. Depleted UO2 samples each containing 129.4 Bq were prepared from 100 microliter solutions of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate solution. The amorphous UO2 in the samples had a relatively low density of 4.8 gm/cm3. Counting of the depleted UO2 on the substrate following plasma immersion was performed using liquid scintillation counting with alpha/beta discrimination due to the presence of confounding beta emitting daughter products, 234Th and 234Pa. The alpha emission peak from each sample was integrated using a gaussian and first order polynomial fit to improve quantification. The uncertainties in the experimental measurement of the etched material were estimated at about ± 2%. Results demonstrated that UO2 can be completely removed from stainless-steel substrates after several minutes processing at under 200 W. At 180 W and 32.7 Pa gas pressure, over 99% of all UO2 in the samples was removed in just 17 minutes. The initial etch rate in the experiments ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 μm/min. Etching increased with the plasma absorbed power and feed gas pressure in the range of 10.8 to 40 Pa. A different pressure effect on UO2 etching was also noted below 50 W in which etching increased up to a maximum pressure, ~23 Pa, then decreased with further increases in pressure.

  16. Structure and trapping of three-dimensional dust clouds in a capacitively coupled rf-discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, O.; Block, D.; Piel, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this survey the recently found 'Coulomb balls' are discussed, which show an unusual kind of crystalline order. These three-dimensional dust clouds consisting of hundreds or thousands of micrometer-sized dust particles have a spherical shape and exist in a wide range of plasma conditions. Coulomb balls are optically highly transparent and have macroscopic dimensions of several millimeters in diameter. The clouds allow for the observation of each single particle and thus the complete reconstruction of the crystal structure by means of video microscopy techniques. The particles are arranged in distinct nested shells in which they form patterns with mostly five and six neighbors. The confinement of Coulomb balls by dielectric walls involves electric forces, surface charges, ion drag forces, and thermophoretic levitation. The thermophoretic force field is measured with tracer particles and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The electric forces are derived from simulations with the two-dimensional SIGLO-2D code. It is shown the the sum of all confining forces results in a stable potential well that describes levitation and spherical confinement of the Coulomb ball

  17. Depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers on Si wafers by pulsed r.f. glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinsberg, K.-G. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Schumacher, C. [Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Tempez, A. [HORIBA Jobin Yvon, 16-18 rue du Canal, F-91160 Longjumeau (France); Nielsch, K. [Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Broekaert, J.A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    In this work the depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers deposited on Au and Cr covered Si wafers with the aid of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pulsed RF-GD-TOFMS also called plasma profiling TOFMS (PP-TOFMS Trade-Mark-Sign )) is described. For thermoelectric materials the depth resolutions obtained with both PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are shown to be well comparable and in the order of the roughness of the corresponding layers (between 20 and 3700 nm). With both methods a direct solid analysis without any preparation steps is possible. In addition, the analysis of the samples with PP-TOFMS proved to be faster by a factor of 26 compared to SIMS, as sputtering rates were found to be 80 nm s{sup -1} and 3 nm s{sup -1}, respectively. For the analyzed samples the results of PP-TOFMS and SIMS show that a homogeneous deposition was obtained. Quantitative results for all samples could also be obtained directly by PP-TOFMS when the stoichiometry of one sample was determined beforehand for instance by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SEM-EDX). For Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} the standard deviation for the main component concentrations within one sample then is found to be between 1.1% and 1.9% and it is 3.6% from sample to sample. For Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} the values within one sample are from 1.7% to 4.2% and from sample to sample 5.3%, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depth resolution in sub micrometer size by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi and Sb telluride layers composition with GD-TOF-MS, ICP-OES and SEM-EDX agree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogeneities of layers measured with GD-TOF-MS and SIMS agree.

  18. FEM Analysis of Beam-coupling Impedance and RF Contacts Criticality on the LHC UA9 Piezo Goniometer

    CERN Document Server

    Danisi, A; Passarelli, A; Masi, A; Losito, R; Salvant, B

    2014-01-01

    The UA9 piezo-goniometer has been designed to guarantee micro-radians-accuracy angular positioning of a silicon crystal for a crystal collimation experiment in the LHC, and to minimize the impact on the LHC beam coupling impedance. This paper presents a Finite Element Method (FEM) study of the device, in both parking and operational positions, to evaluate its impact on the LHC impedance budget. In addition, the shielding contribution of the RF gaskets has been carefully evaluated, with the objective to assess the consequences for operation in case of their failure. A final word is drawn on the overall device impedance criticality.

  19. Mass spectrometric characterizations of ions generated in RF magnetron discharges during sputtering of silver in Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, D.; Novotný, Michal; Musil, Jindřich; Fitl, Přemysl; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 7 (2013), s. 593-602 ISSN 1612-8850 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1298; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0958 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101271 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : double charge ions * mass spectrometry * noble gas * RF magnetron discharges * silver * single charge ions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.964, year: 2013

  20. Study on the RF inductively coupled plasma spheroidization of refractory W and W-Ta alloy powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenfan, YU; Xin, ZHOU; Dianzheng, WANG; Neuyen VAN, LINH; Wei, LIU

    2018-01-01

    Spherical powders with good flowability and high stacking density are mandatory for powder bed additive manufacturing. Nevertheless, the preparation of spherical refractory tungsten and tungsten alloy powders is a formidable task. In this paper, spherical refractory metal powders processed by high-energy stir ball milling and RF inductively coupled plasma were investigated. By utilizing the technical route, pure spherical tungsten powders were prepared successfully, the flowability increased from 10.7 s/50 g to 5.5 s/50 g and apparent density increased from 6.916 g cm-3 to 11.041 g cm-3. Alloying element tantalum can reduce the tendency to micro-crack during tungsten laser melting and rapid solidification process. Spherical W-6Ta (%wt) powders were prepared in this way, homogeneous dispersion of tantalum in a tungsten matrix occurred but a small amount of flake-like shape particles appeared after high-energy stir ball milling. The flake-like shape particles can hardly be spheroidized in subsequent RF inductively coupled plasma process, might result from the unique suspended state of flaky particles under complex electric and magnetic fields as well as plasma-particle heat exchange was different under various turbulence models. As a result, the flake-like shape particles cannot pass through the high-temperature area of thermal plasma torch and cannot be spheroidized properly.

  1. Simulation study of wave phenomena from the sheath region in single frequency capacitively coupled plasma discharges; field reversals and ion reflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.; Turner, M. M. [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2013-07-15

    Capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) discharges have great significance for industrial applications. Collisionless electron heating in such discharges is important, and sometimes is the dominant mechanism. This heating is usually understood to originate in a stochastic interaction between electrons and the electric fields. However, other mechanisms may also be important. There is evidence of wave emission with a frequency near the electron plasma frequency, i.e., ω{sub pe}, from the sheath region in collisionless capacitive RF discharges. This is the result of a progressive breakdown of quasi-neutrality close to the electron sheath edge. These waves are damped in a few centimeters during their propagation from the sheath towards the bulk plasma. The damping occurs because of the Landau damping or some related mechanism. This research work reports that the emission of waves is associated with a field reversal during the expanding phase of the sheath. Trapping of electrons near to this field reversal region is observed. The amplitude of the wave increases with increasing RF current density amplitude J(tilde sign){sub 0} until some maximum is reached, beyond which the wave diminishes and a new regime appears. In this new regime, the density of the bulk plasma suddenly increases because of ion reflection, which occurs due to the presence of strong field reversal near sheath region. Our calculation shows that these waves are electron plasma waves. These phenomena occur under extreme conditions (i.e., higher J(tilde sign){sub 0} than in typical experiments) for sinusoidal current waveforms, but similar effects may occur with non-sinusoidal pulsed waveforms for conditions of experimental interest, because the rate of change of current is a relevant parameter. The effect of electron elastic collisions on plasma waves is also investigated.

  2. A study on improvement of discharge characteristic by using a transformer in a capacitively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Cheol [Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In a plasma discharge system, the power loss at powered line, matching network, and other transmission line can affect the discharge characteristics such as the power transfer efficiency, voltage and current at powered electrode, and plasma density. In this paper, we propose a method to reduce power loss by using a step down transformer mounted between the matching network and the powered electrode in a capacitively coupled argon plasma. This step down transformer decreases the power loss by reducing the current flowing through the matching network and transmission line. As a result, the power transfer efficiency was increased about 5%–10% by using a step down transformer. However, the plasma density was dramatically increased compared to no transformer. This can be understood by the increase in ohmic heating and the decrease in dc-self bias. By simply mounting a transformer, improvement of discharge efficiency can be achieved in capacitively coupled plasmas.

  3. Optical constants of silicon-like (Si:Ox:Cy:Hz) thin films deposited on quartz using hexamethyldisiloxane in a remote RF hollow cathode discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Naddaf, M.

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of amorphous silicon-like (Si:O x :C y :H z ) thin films in a remote RF hollow cathode discharge plasma using Hexamethyldisoloxane as monomer and Ar as feed gas; has been investigated for films optical constants and plasma diagnostic as a function of RF power (100-300 W) and precursor flow rate (1-10 sccm). Plasma diagnostic has been performed using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The optical constants (refractive index, extinction coefficient and dielectric constant) have been obtained by reflection/transmission measurements in the range 300-700 nm. It is found that the refractive index increases from 1.92 to 1.97 with increasing power from 100 to 300 W, and from 1.70 to 1.92 with increasing precursor flow rate from 1 to 10 sccm. The optical energy-band gap E g and the optical-absorption tail ΔE have been estimated from optical absorption spectra, it is found that E g decreases from 3.28 eV to 3.14 eV with power increase from 100 to 300 W, and from 3.54 eV to 3.28 eV with precursor flow rate increase from 1 to 10 sccm. ΔE is found to increase with applied RF power and precursor flow rate increase. The dependence of optical constants on deposition parameters has been correlated to plasma OES. (author)

  4. A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiajing; Yang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model was proposed in this study to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining (EDM). The temperature distribution of workpiece materials was included, and the crater formation process was explained from the perspective of hydrodynamic characteristics of the molten region. To better track the morphology of the crater and the movement of debris, the level-set method was introduced in this study. Simulation results showed that the crater appears shortly after the ignition of the discharge, and the molten material is removed by vaporizing in the initial stage, then by splashing at the following time. The driving force for the detachment of debris in the splashing removal stage comes from the extremely large pressure difference in the upper part of the molten region, and the morphology of the crater is also influenced by the shearing flow of molten material. It was found that the removal ratio of molten material is only about 7.63% under the studied conditions, leaving most to form the re-solidification layer on the surface of the crater. The size of the crater reaches the maximum at the end of discharge duration then experiences a slight reduction because of the reflux of molten material after the discharge. The results of single pulse discharge experiments showed that the morphologies and sizes between the simulation crater and actual crater are good at agreement, verifying the feasibility of the proposed thermo-hydraulic coupling model in explaining the mechanisms of crater formation in EDM.

  5. Theoretical investigation of phase-controlled bias effect in capacitively coupled plasma discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigated the effect of phase difference between powered electrodes in capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharges. Previous experimental result has shown that the plasma potential could be controlled by using a phase-shift controller in CCP discharges. In this work, based on the previously developed radio frequency sheath models, we developed a circuit model to self-consistently determine the bias voltage from the plasma parameters. Results show that the present theoretical model explains the experimental results quite well and there is an optimum value of the phase difference for which the V dc /V pp ratio becomes a minimum.

  6. Production of low-density plasma by coaxially segmented rf discharge for void-free dusty cloud in microgravity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzukawa, Wataru; Ikada, Reijiro; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Iizuka, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    A technique is presented for producing a low density plasma by introducing a coaxially segmented parallel-plate radio-frequency discharge for void-free dusty-cloud formation. Main plasma for the dusty plasma experiment is produced in a central core part of the parallel-plate discharge, while a plasma for igniting the core plasma discharge is produced in the periphery region surrounding the core plasma. The core plasma density can be markedly decreased to reduce the ion drag force, which is important for a formation of void-free dusty cloud under microgravity

  7. Simulation of dust particles in dual-frequency capacitively coupled silane discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiangmei; Song Yuanhong; Xu Xiang; Wang Younian

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of nanoparticles in dual-frequency capacitively coupled silane discharges is investigated by employing a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model. The numerical simulation tries to trace the formation, charging, growth, and transport of dust particles during the discharge, under the influences of the high- and low-frequency electric sources, as well as the gas pressure. The effects of the presence of the nanoparticles and larger anions on the plasma properties are also discussed, especially, for the bulk potential, electron temperature, and densities of various particles. The calculation results show that the nanoparticle density and charge distribution are mainly influenced by the voltage and frequency of the high-frequency source, while the voltage of the low-frequency source can also exert an effect on the nanoparticle formation, compared with the frequency. As the discharge lasts, the electric potential and electron density keep decreasing, while the electron temperature gets increasing after a sudden drop.

  8. Measurements of time average series resonance effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.; Kakati, M.

    2011-01-01

    Self-excited plasma series resonance is observed in low pressure capacitvely coupled radio frequency discharges as high-frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal radio frequency current. This high-frequency contribution to the radio frequency current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitive sheath and the inductive and resistive bulk plasma. In this report, we present an experimental method to measure the plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon plasma by modifying the homogeneous discharge model. The homogeneous discharge model is modified by introducing a correction factor to the plasma resistance. Plasma parameters are also calculated by considering the plasma series resonances effect. Experimental measurements show that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance, which arises in capacitive discharge due to the nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath, significantly enhances both the Ohmic and stochastic heating. The experimentally measured total dissipation, which is the sum of the Ohmic and stochastic heating, is found to increase significantly with decreasing pressure.

  9. Calculation of the self-consistent current distribution and coupling of an RF antenna array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballico, M.; Puri, S.

    1993-10-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the antenna current distribution and fields in an axisymmetric cylindrical geometry for the ICRH antenna-plasma coupling problem is presented. Several features distinguish this calculation from other codes presently available. 1. Variational form: The formulation of the self consistent antenna current problem in a variational form allows good convergence and stability of the algorithm. 2. Multiple straps: Allows modelling of (a) the current distribution across the width of the strap (by dividing it up into sub straps) (b) side limiters and septum (c) antenna cross-coupling. 3. Analytic calculation of the antenna field and calculation of the antenna self-consistent current distribution, (given the surface impedance matrix) gives rapid calculation. 4. Framed for parallel computation on several different parallel architectures (as well as serial) gives a large speed improvement to the user. Results are presented for both Alfven wave heating and current drive antenna arrays, showing the optimal coupling to be achieved for toroidal mode numbers 8< n<10 for typical ASDEX upgrade plasmas. Simulations of the ASDEX upgrade antenna show the importance of the current distribution across the antenna and of image currents flowing in the side limiters, and an analysis of a proposed asymmetric ITER antenna is presented. (orig.)

  10. Novel high-frequency energy-efficient pulsed-dc generator for capacitively coupled plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah Al; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2018-03-01

    The circuit design, assembly, and operating tests of a high-frequency and high-voltage (HV) pulsed dc generator (PDG) for capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharge inside a vacuum chamber are reported. For capacitive loads, it is challenging to obtain sharp rectangular pulses with fast rising and falling edges, requiring intense current for quick charging and discharging. The requirement of intense current generally limits the pulse operation frequency. In this study, we present a new type of PDG consisting of a pair of half-resonant converters and a constant current-controller circuit connected with HV solid-state power switches that can deliver almost rectangular high voltage pulses with fast rising and falling edges for CCP discharge. A prototype of the PDG is assembled to modulate from a high-voltage direct current (HVdc) input into a pulsed HVdc output, while following an input pulse signal and a set current level. The pulse rise time and fall time are less than 500 ns and 800 ns, respectively, and the minimum pulse width is 1 µs. The maximum voltage for a negative pulse is 1000 V, and the maximum repetition frequency is 500 kHz. During the pulse on time, the plasma discharge current is controlled steadily at the set value. The half-resonant converters in the PDG perform recovery of the remaining energy from the capacitive load at every termination of pulse discharge. The PDG performed with a high energy efficiency of 85% from the HVdc input to the pulsed dc output at a repetition rate of 1 kHz and with stable plasma operation in various discharge conditions. The results suggest that the developed PDG can be considered to be more efficient for plasma processing by CCP.

  11. Estimating stream discharge from a Himalayan Glacier using coupled satellite sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, S. F.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.; Haritashya, U. K.; Tarpanelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 4th IPCC report highlighted our limited understanding of Himalayan glacier behavior and contribution to the region's hydrology. Seasonal snow and glacier melt in the Himalayas are important sources of water, but estimates greatly differ about the actual contribution of melted glacier ice to stream discharge. A more comprehensive understanding of the contribution of glaciers to stream discharge is needed because streams being fed by glaciers affect the livelihoods of a large part of the world's population. Most of the streams in the Himalayas are unmonitored because in situ measurements are logistically difficult and costly. This necessitates the use of remote sensing platforms to obtain estimates of river discharge for validating hydrological models. In this study, we estimate stream discharge using cost-effective methods via repeat satellite imagery from Landsat-8 and SENTINEL-1A sensors. The methodology is based on previous studies, which show that ratio values from optical satellite bands correlate well with measured stream discharge. While similar, our methodology relies on significantly higher resolution imagery (30 m) and utilizes bands that are in the blue and near-infrared spectrum as opposed to previous studies using 250 m resolution imagery and spectral bands only in the near-infrared. Higher resolution imagery is necessary for streams where the source is a glacier's terminus because the width of the stream is often only 10s of meters. We validate our methodology using two rivers in the state of Kansas, where stream gauges are plentiful. We then apply our method to the Bhagirathi River, in the North-Central Himalayas, which is fed by the Gangotri Glacier and has a well monitored stream gauge. The analysis will later be used to couple river discharge and glacier flow and mass balance through an integrated hydrologic model in the Bhagirathi Basin.

  12. Novel high-frequency energy-efficient pulsed-dc generator for capacitively coupled plasma discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah Al; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2018-03-01

    The circuit design, assembly, and operating tests of a high-frequency and high-voltage (HV) pulsed dc generator (PDG) for capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharge inside a vacuum chamber are reported. For capacitive loads, it is challenging to obtain sharp rectangular pulses with fast rising and falling edges, requiring intense current for quick charging and discharging. The requirement of intense current generally limits the pulse operation frequency. In this study, we present a new type of PDG consisting of a pair of half-resonant converters and a constant current-controller circuit connected with HV solid-state power switches that can deliver almost rectangular high voltage pulses with fast rising and falling edges for CCP discharge. A prototype of the PDG is assembled to modulate from a high-voltage direct current (HVdc) input into a pulsed HVdc output, while following an input pulse signal and a set current level. The pulse rise time and fall time are less than 500 ns and 800 ns, respectively, and the minimum pulse width is 1 µs. The maximum voltage for a negative pulse is 1000 V, and the maximum repetition frequency is 500 kHz. During the pulse on time, the plasma discharge current is controlled steadily at the set value. The half-resonant converters in the PDG perform recovery of the remaining energy from the capacitive load at every termination of pulse discharge. The PDG performed with a high energy efficiency of 85% from the HVdc input to the pulsed dc output at a repetition rate of 1 kHz and with stable plasma operation in various discharge conditions. The results suggest that the developed PDG can be considered to be more efficient for plasma processing by CCP.

  13. Computational simulation of coupled nonequilibrium discharge and compressible flow phenomena in a microplasma thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, Thomas; Mahadevan, Shankar; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2009-01-01

    The microplasma thruster (MPT) concept is a simple extension of a cold gas micronozzle propulsion device, where a direct-current microdischarge is used to preheat the gas stream to improve the specific impulse of the device. Here we study a prototypical MPT device using a detailed, self-consistently coupled plasma and flow computational model. The model describes the microdischarge power deposition, plasma dynamics, gas-phase chemical kinetics, coupling of the plasma phenomena with high-speed flow, and overall propulsion system performance. Compared to a cold gas micronozzle, a significant increase in specific impulse is obtained from the power deposition in the diverging section of the MPT nozzle. For a discharge voltage of 750 V, a power input of 650 mW, and an argon mass flow rate of 5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), the specific impulse of the device is increased by a factor of ∼1.5 to about 74 s. The microdischarge remains mostly confined inside the micronozzle and operates in an abnormal glow discharge regime. Gas heating, primarily due to ion Joule heating, is found to have a strong influence on the overall discharge behavior. The study provides a validation of the MPT concept as a simple and effective approach to improve the performance of micronozzle cold gas propulsion devices.

  14. Magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic heterostructure of rf-sputtered Ni–Mn–Ga thin film on PMN–PT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teferi, M.Y.; Amaral, V.S.; Lounrenco, A.C.; Das, S.; Amaral, J.S.; Karpinsky, D.V.; Soares, N.; Sobolev, N.A.; Kholkin, A.L.; Tavares, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report a preparation of multiferroic heterostructure from thin film of Ni–Mn–Ga (NMG) alloy and lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate (PMN–PT) with effective magnetoelectric (ME) coupling between the film as ferromagnetic material and PMN–PT as piezoelectric material. The heterostructure was prepared by relatively low temperature (400 °C) deposition of the film on single crystal of piezoelectric PMN–PT substrate using rf magnetron co-sputtering of Ni 50 Mn 50 and Ni 50 Ga 50 targets. Magnetic measurements by Superconducting Quantum Interference Design (SQIUD) Magnetometer and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) on the film revealed that the film is in ferromagnetically ordered martensitic state at room temperature with saturation magnetization of ∼240 emu/cm 3 and Curie temperature of ∼337 K. Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurement done at room temperature on the substrate showed the presence of expected hysteresis loop confirming the stability of the piezoelectric state of the substrate after deposition. Room temperature ME voltage coefficient (α ME ) of the heterostructure was measured as a function of applied bias dc magnetic field in Longitudinal–Transverse (L–T) ME coupling mode by lock-in technique. A maximum ME coefficient α ME of 3.02 mV/cm Oe was measured for multiferroic NMG/PMN–PT heterostructure which demonstrates that there is ME coupling between the film as ferromagnetic material and PMN–PT as piezoelectric material. - Highlights: ► Multiferroic NMG/PMN–PT heterostructure prepared by depositing NMG alloy thin film on PMN–PT substrate. ► The film is in ferromagnetically ordered martensite state at room temperature. ► The substrate maintains its piezoelectric state after deposition. ► The heterostructure exhibits ME effect with maximum of α ME of 3.02 mV/cm Oe.

  15. Removal of model proteins by means of low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kylian, O; Rauscher, H; Gilliland, D; Bretagnol, F; Rossi, F

    2008-01-01

    Surgical instruments are intended to come into direct contact with the patients' tissues and thus interact with their first immune defence system. Therefore they have to be cleaned, sterilized and decontaminated, in order to prevent any kind of infections and inflammations or to exclude the possibility of transmission of diseases. From this perspective, the removal of protein residues from their surfaces constitutes new challenges, since certain proteins exhibit high resistance to commonly used sterilization and decontamination techniques and hence are difficult to remove without inducing major damages to the object treated. Therefore new approaches must be developed for that purpose and the application of non-equilibrium plasma discharges represents an interesting option. The possibility to effectively remove model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and ubiquitin) from surfaces of different materials (Si wafer, glass, polystyrene and gold) by means of inductively coupled plasma discharges sustained in different argon containing mixtures is demonstrated and discussed in this paper

  16. Removal of model proteins by means of low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylian, O; Rauscher, H; Gilliland, D; Bretagnol, F; Rossi, F [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Via E Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy)], E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.it

    2008-05-07

    Surgical instruments are intended to come into direct contact with the patients' tissues and thus interact with their first immune defence system. Therefore they have to be cleaned, sterilized and decontaminated, in order to prevent any kind of infections and inflammations or to exclude the possibility of transmission of diseases. From this perspective, the removal of protein residues from their surfaces constitutes new challenges, since certain proteins exhibit high resistance to commonly used sterilization and decontamination techniques and hence are difficult to remove without inducing major damages to the object treated. Therefore new approaches must be developed for that purpose and the application of non-equilibrium plasma discharges represents an interesting option. The possibility to effectively remove model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and ubiquitin) from surfaces of different materials (Si wafer, glass, polystyrene and gold) by means of inductively coupled plasma discharges sustained in different argon containing mixtures is demonstrated and discussed in this paper.

  17. The determination of transition probabilities with an inductively-coupled plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieuwoudt, G.

    1984-03-01

    The 27 MHz inductively-coupled plasma discharge (ICP) is used for the determination of relative transition probabilities of the 451, 459 and 470 nm argon spectral lines. The temperature of the argon plasma is determined with hydrogen as thermometric specie, because of the accurate transition probabilities ( approximately 1% uncertainty) there of. The relative transition probabilities of the specific argon spectral lines were determined by substitution of the measured spectral radiances thereof, together with the hydrogen temperature, in the two-line equation of temperature measurement

  18. Some Temperature Effects on AISI-304 Nitriding in an Inductively Coupled RF Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Rosa-Vazquez, J. de la; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.

    2006-01-01

    Some recent results obtained from nitriding AISI 304 stainless steel samples, 1.2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick are reported here in the case of an 85% hydrogen and 15% nitrogen mixture work gas. The process was carried out from 300 to 400 W for (13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma within a 60 cm long pyrex glass tube 3.5 cm in diameter where the samples were biased up to -300 V with respect to earth. The resulting hardness appears to be a function of the substrate temperature which varied from 200 deg. C at a 0 V bias to 550 deg. C at -300 V. The plasma density at 400 W reached 3x1010 cm-3 with a 4 eV electron temperature. Prior to nitriding, all the samples were polished with 0.05 μm diamond paste, leading to a 30 nm average roughness (Ra). After nitriding at -300 V, the Ra rose until ∼400 nm while hardness values of 1500 HV under 300 g loads were measured. X ray diffraction indicates that the extended phase amplitude (γN), Fe and Cr nitride depends on the substrate temperature

  19. Investigations on the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the inductive coupled RF-plasma and the deposited pyrocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisgruber, H.; Mazurkiewicz, M.; Nickel, H.

    1979-08-01

    The pyrocarbon coatings of the nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Reactor (HTR) are produced by pyrolysis of hydrocarbons under high temperatures. The investigations of the inductive coupled argon or argon/hydrocarbon-plasma performed in the frame of this work deliver a contribution for the clarification of pyrolysis processes and the production of pyrolytic carbons in the plasma of an electric discharge. The argon-plasma, as high-temperature source, is diagnosed theoretically and emission-spectroscopically. To the pure argon-plasma the various hydrocarbons are added. Due to the thermal decomposition the carbon is separated in solid form. The structure of the deposited pyrocarbon is composed of different components. The depositions are characterised with the principles in use at the IRW and are assigned to the fluidized bed pyrocarbons as fas as possible. (orig.) [de

  20. RF discharge slab carbon monoxide laser: overtone lasing (2.5-4.0 micron) and fundamental band tuning (5.0-6.5 micron)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionin, Andrey A.; Kozlov, Andrey Yu.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry V.

    2008-10-01

    Overtone lasing and fundamental band tuning was for the first time obtained in a slab carbon monoxide laser. The compact slab CO laser with active volume 3×30×250 mm3 was excited by a repetitively pulsed capacitive RF discharge (81.36 MHz) with pulse repetition rate 100-500 Hz. The laser electrodes were cooled down to 120 K. Gas mixture CO:Air:He at gas pressures 15-22 Torr was used. An optical scheme "frequency selective master oscillator - laser amplifier" was applied for getting fundamental band tuning. Single line lasing with average power up to several tens of mW was observed on ~100 rotational-vibrational transitions of CO molecule within the spectral range ~5.0 - 6.5 micron. Multiline overtone lasing was observed on ~80 spectral lines within the spectral range ~2.5 -4.0 micron, with maximum single line average output power 12 mW. Total output power of the slab overtone CO laser came up to 0.3 W, with maximum laser efficiency 0.5%. Results of parametric studies of the overtone CO laser including complicated time behavior for laser pulses on different overtone vibrational-rotational transitions are discussed.

  1. Thomson scattering on a low-pressure, inductively-coupled gas discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sande, M.J. van de; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    Excitation and light production processes in gas discharge lamps are the result of inelastic collisions between atoms and free electrons in the plasma. Therefore, knowledge of the electron density n e and temperature T e is essential for a proper understanding of such plasmas. In this paper, an experimental system for laser Thomson scattering on a low-pressure, inductively-coupled gas discharge lamp and measurements of n e and T e in this lamp are presented. The experimental system is suitable for low electron temperatures (down to below 0.2 eV) and employs a triple grating spectrograph for a high stray light rejection, or equivalently a low stray light redistribution (R eff approximately 7x10 -9 nm -1 at 0.5 nm from the laser wavelength). The electron density detection limit of the system is n e approximately 10 16 m -3 . The modifications to the lamp that were necessary for the measurements are described, and results are presented and compared to previous work and trends expected from the electron particle and energy balances. The electron density and temperature are about n e approximately 10 19 m -3 and T e approximately 1 eV in the most active part of the plasma; the exact values depend on the argon filling pressure, the mercury pressure and the position in the lamp. (author)

  2. Influence of the configuration of the magnetic filter field on the discharge structure in the RF driven negative ion source prototype for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    The study provides results for the influence of the filter field topology on the plasma parameters in the RF prototype negative ion source for ITER NBI. A previously developed 2D fluid plasma model of the prototype source was extended towards accounting for the particles and energy losses along the magnetic field lines and the presence of a magnetic field in the driver which is the case at the BATMAN and ELISE test-beds. The effect of the magnetic field in the driver is shown for the magnetic field configuration of the prototype source (i.e. a magnetic field produced by an external magnet frame) by comparison of plasma parameters without and with the magnetic field in the driver and for different axial positions of the filter. Since the ELISE-like magnetic field (i.e. a magnetic field produced by a current flowing through the plasma grid) is a new feature planned to be installed at the BATMAN test-bed, its effect on the discharge structure was studied for different strengths of the magnetic field. The obtained results show for both configurations of the magnetic filter the same main features in the patterns of the plasma parameters in the expansion chamber: a strong axial drop of the electron temperature and the formation of a groove accompanied with accumulation of electrons in front of the plasma grid. The presence of a magnetic field in the driver has a local impact on the plasma parameters: the formation of a second groove of the electron temperature in the case of BATMAN (due to the reversed direction of the filter field in the driver) and a strong asymmetry of the electron density. Accounting for the additional losses in the third dimension suppresses the drifts across the magnetic field and, thus, the variations of the electron density in the expansion chamber are less pronounced.

  3. Influence of operating parameters on surface properties of RF glow discharge oxygen plasma treated TiO{sub 2}/PET film for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha, E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L and T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Mahendiran, R. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L and T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Su, Pi-G [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Yassitepe, Emre; Shah, Ismat [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 208 Dupont Hall, Newark (United States); Perni, Stefano [School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Prokopovich, Polina [School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Institute of Medical Engineering and Medical Physics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N., E-mail: Nadagouda.Mallikarjuna@epamail.epa.gov [The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NRMRL, WSWRD, 26W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a thin transparent titania (TiO{sub 2}) film was coated on the surface of flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using the sol–gel method. The surface properties of the obtained TiO{sub 2}/PET film were further improved by RF glow discharge oxygen plasma as a function of exposure time and discharge power. The changes in hydrophilicity of TiO{sub 2}/PET films were analyzed by contact angle measurements and surface energy. The influence of plasma on the surface of the TiO{sub 2}/PET films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as the change in chemical state and composition that were investigated by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). The cytotoxicity of the TiO{sub 2}/PET films was analyzed using human osteoblast cells and the bacterial eradication behaviors of TiO{sub 2}/PET films were also evaluated against Staphylococcus bacteria. It was found that the surface roughness and incorporation of oxygen containing polar functional groups of the plasma treated TiO{sub 2}/PET films increased substantially as compared to the untreated one. Moreover the increased concentration of Ti{sup 3+} on the surface of plasma treated TiO{sub 2}/PET films was due to the transformation of chemical states (Ti{sup 4+} → Ti{sup 3+}). These morphological and chemical changes are responsible for enhanced hydrophilicity of the TiO{sub 2}/PET films. Furthermore, the plasma treated TiO{sub 2}/PET film exhibited no citotoxicity against osteoblast cells and antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus bacteria which can find application in manufacturing of biomedical devices. - Graphical abstract: Mechanism of plasma treatment on the surface of TiO{sub 2}/PET films. - Highlights: • Investigated the surface properties of TiO{sub 2}/PET films modified by O{sub 2} plasma • Studied the effect of operating parameters on surface properties of TiO{sub 2}/PET films • Mechanism of the plasma treatment on TiO{sub 2}/PET was clearly investigated.

  4. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In Tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2-dimensional (2D) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r 0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In Tore-supra conditions near antenna corners, potential structures that are shorter than 1 centimeter are

  5. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2D (2-dimensional) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In typical Tore Supra conditions near antenna corners potential structures less than centimetric are

  6. Plasma Discharge in Toroidal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usada, Widdi; Suryadi; Purwadi, Agus; Kasiyo

    1996-01-01

    A toroidal discharge apparatus has been made as an initial research in magnetic confinement system. This system consists of a capacitor, a RF source, an igniter system, a primary coil, a torus, and completed by Rogowski probe as a current detector. In this system, the discharge occurs when the minimum voltage is operated at 5 kV. The experiment result shows that the coupling factor is 0.35, it is proved that there is an equality between estimated and measurement results of the primary inductance i.e 8.5 μH

  7. Simulations of electromagnetic effects in high-frequency capacitively coupled discharges using the Darwin approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, Denis; Hemke, Torben; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Darwin approximation is investigated for its possible use in simulation of electromagnetic effects in large size, high-frequency capacitively coupled discharges. The approximation is utilized within the framework of two different fluid models which are applied to typical cases showing pronounced standing wave and skin effects. With the first model it is demonstrated that the Darwin approximation is valid for treatment of such effects in the range of parameters under consideration. The second approach, a reduced nonlinear Darwin approximation-based model, shows that the electromagnetic phenomena persist in a more realistic setting. The Darwin approximation offers a simple and efficient way of carrying out electromagnetic simulations as it removes the Courant condition plaguing explicit electromagnetic algorithms and can be implemented as a straightforward modification of electrostatic algorithms. The algorithm described here avoids iterative schemes needed for the divergence cleaning and represents a fast and efficient solver, which can be used in fluid and kinetic models for self-consistent description of technical plasmas exhibiting certain electromagnetic activity. (paper)

  8. Numerical simulation of the RF ion source RIG-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzt, T.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional model for the numerical simulation of the inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) ion source RIG-10 is presented. Due to the ambipolar characteristics of a discharge operating with hydrogen gas, the model consists of an equation for the space charge imbalance, Poisson's equation for the self-consistent presheath potential and the ion momentum transport equation. For a relatively broad range of operation and design parameters, the model allows the reproduction and prediction of the RF discharge behaviour in a systematic way and, hence, computes the 2D distribution of the ion current density within the source. By implementing relevant discharge physics, the model can provide an appropriate tool for ion source design with respect to an application in the field of neutral beam injection. (author)

  9. Investigation of coupling between chemistry and discharge dynamics in radio frequency hydrogen plasmas in the Torr regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalache, B; Novikova, T; Morral, A Fontcuberta i; Cabarrocas, P Roca i; Morscheidt, W; Hassouni, K

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a study of a capacitively coupled hydrogen discharge by means of a one-dimensional numerical fluid model and experiments. The model includes a detailed description of the gas-phase chemistry taking into account the production of H - ions by dissociative attachment of H 2 vibrational levels. The population of these levels is described by a Boltzmann vibrational distribution function characterized by a vibrational temperature T V . The effect of the dissociative-attachment reaction on the discharge dynamics was investigated by varying the vibrational temperature, which was used as a model input parameter. Increasing the vibrational temperature from 1000 to 6000 K affects both the chemistry and the dynamics of the electrical discharge. Because of dissociative attachment, the H - ion density increases by seven orders of magnitude and the H - ion density to electron density ratio varies from 10 -7 to 6, while the positive ion density increases slightly. As a consequence, the atomic hydrogen density increases by a factor of three, and the sheath voltage drops from 95 to 75 V. Therefore, clear evidence of a strong coupling between chemistry and electrical dynamics through the production of H - ions is demonstrated. Moreover, satisfactory agreement between computed and measured values of atomic hydrogen and H - ion densities gives further support to the requirement of a detailed description of the hydrogen vibrational kinetics for capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge models in the Torr regime

  10. Effect of N{sub 2} flow rate on the properties of N doped TiO{sub 2} films deposited by DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Shou [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233000 (China); Yang, Yong, E-mail: 88087113@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233000 (China); Li, Gang; Jiang, Jiwen; Jin, Kewu; Yao, TingTing; Zhang, Kuanxiang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233000 (China); Cao, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233000 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116000 (China); Wang, Yun; Xu, Genbao [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Float Glass, Bengbu Design & Research Institute for Glass Industry, Bengbu 233000 (China)

    2016-09-05

    N doped TiO{sub 2} films were deposited on glass substrates at room temperature using DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering with a TiO{sub 2} ceramic target. The influences of N{sub 2} flow rate on the deposition rate, crystal structure, chemical composition and band gap of the deposited films were investigated by Optical profiler, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The film growth rate gradually decreased with increasing N{sub 2} flow rate. As N{sub 2} flow rate increased, the crystallization of the films deteriorated, and the films tended to form amorphous structure. XPS analysis revealed that N dopant atoms were added at the substitutional sites into TiO{sub 2} lattice structure. FE-SEM results showed that the grain size of the film decreased and the crystallinity degraded as N{sub 2} flow rate increases. In addition, N doping caused an obvious red shift in the optical absorption edge. - Highlights: • N doped TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by DC coupled RF magnetron reactive sputtering. • As N{sub 2} flow rate increases, the crystallization of the deposited films degrades. • The higher N{sub 2} flow rate is beneficial to form more substituted N in the film. • N doping causes an obvious red shift in the absorption wavelength.

  11. Effect of N_2 flow rate on the properties of N doped TiO_2 films deposited by DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Shou; Yang, Yong; Li, Gang; Jiang, Jiwen; Jin, Kewu; Yao, TingTing; Zhang, Kuanxiang; Cao, Xin; Wang, Yun; Xu, Genbao

    2016-01-01

    N doped TiO_2 films were deposited on glass substrates at room temperature using DC coupled RF magnetron sputtering with a TiO_2 ceramic target. The influences of N_2 flow rate on the deposition rate, crystal structure, chemical composition and band gap of the deposited films were investigated by Optical profiler, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The film growth rate gradually decreased with increasing N_2 flow rate. As N_2 flow rate increased, the crystallization of the films deteriorated, and the films tended to form amorphous structure. XPS analysis revealed that N dopant atoms were added at the substitutional sites into TiO_2 lattice structure. FE-SEM results showed that the grain size of the film decreased and the crystallinity degraded as N_2 flow rate increases. In addition, N doping caused an obvious red shift in the optical absorption edge. - Highlights: • N doped TiO_2 films were deposited by DC coupled RF magnetron reactive sputtering. • As N_2 flow rate increases, the crystallization of the deposited films degrades. • The higher N_2 flow rate is beneficial to form more substituted N in the film. • N doping causes an obvious red shift in the absorption wavelength.

  12. Experimental study on the impedance of linear discharge R.F. ion sources - modifications on the 'MOAK' type source; Etude experimentale de l'impedance des sources d'ions H. F. a decharge lineaire - modifications au modele de source du types 'MOAK'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fremiot, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-15

    A method of measuring the ion R.F. source impedance is described, and the influence of the working parameters on that impedance is studied. The origin of some working anomalies is deduced with a new coupling method. The gas flow is decreased by modifying the geometry of the discharge vessel. (author) [French] On decrit une methode de mesure de l'impedance d'une source d'ions H.F. et on etudie l'influence des parametres de fonctionnement sur cette Impedance. On en deduit l'origine de quelques anomalies de fonctionnement ainsi qu'une nouvelle methode de couplage. On reduit le debit gazeux en modifiant la geometrie de l'ampoule. (auteur)

  13. LIF-measurements on a low prassure RF-driven InBr lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, H.C.J.; Stoffels, W.W.

    2007-01-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiment has been carried out on a low pressure, capacitively coupled RF driven. Ar discharge with InBr as an additive. The intention is to find the density of the different states of InBr and the metastable states in particular. We measured the density profile

  14. WDL-RF: Predicting Bioactivities of Ligand Molecules Acting with G Protein-coupled Receptors by Combining Weighted Deep Learning and Random Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Qiuming; Wu, Weijian; Pang, Tao; Hu, Haifeng; Chan, Wallace K B; Ke, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yang; Wren, Jonathan

    2018-02-08

    Precise assessment of ligand bioactivities (including IC50, EC50, Ki, Kd, etc.) is essential for virtual screening and lead compound identification. However, not all ligands have experimentally-determined activities. In particular, many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the largest integral membrane protein family and represent targets of nearly 40% drugs on the market, lack published experimental data about ligand interactions. Computational methods with the ability to accurately predict the bioactivity of ligands can help efficiently address this problem. We proposed a new method, WDL-RF, using weighted deep learning and random forest, to model the bioactivity of GPCR-associated ligand molecules. The pipeline of our algorithm consists of two consecutive stages: 1) molecular fingerprint generation through a new weighted deep learning method, and 2) bioactivity calculations with a random forest model; where one uniqueness of the approach is that the model allows end-to-end learning of prediction pipelines with input ligands being of arbitrary size. The method was tested on a set of twenty-six non-redundant GPCRs that have a high number of active ligands, each with 200∼4000 ligand associations. The results from our benchmark show that WDL-RF can generate bioactivity predictions with an average root-mean square error 1.33 and correlation coefficient (r2) 0.80 compared to the experimental measurements, which are significantly more accurate than the control predictors with different molecular fingerprints and descriptors. In particular, data-driven molecular fingerprint features, as extracted from the weighted deep learning models, can help solve deficiencies stemming from the use of traditional hand-crafted features and significantly increase the efficiency of short molecular fingerprints in virtual screening. The WDL-RF web server, as well as source codes and datasets of WDL-RF, is freely available at https://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/WDL-RF/ for

  15. Adaptation of a radiofrequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometer (RF-GD-OES) to the analysis of light elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen) in solids: glove box integration for the analysis of nuclear samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubinois, J.-C.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to use the radiofrequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry in order to quantitatively determine carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen at low concentration (in the ppm range) in nuclear materials. In this study, and before the definitive contamination of the system, works are carried out on non radioactive materials (steel, pure iron, copper and titanium). As the initial apparatus could not deliver a RF power inducing a reproducible discharge and was not adapted to the analysis of light elements: 1- The radiofrequency system had to be changed, 2- The systems controlling gaseous atmospheres had to be improved in order to obtain analytical signals stemming strictly from the sample, 3- Three discharge lamps had to be tested and compared in terms of performances, 4- The system of collection of light had to be optimized. The modifications that were brought to the initial system improved intensities and stabilities of signals which allowed lower detection limits (1000 times lower for carbon). These latter are in the ppm range for carbon and about a few tens of ppm for nitrogen and oxygen in pure irons. Calibration curves were plotted in materials presenting very different sputtering rates in order to check the existence of a 'function of analytical transfer' with the purpose of palliating the lack of reference materials certified in light elements at low concentration. Transposition of this type of function to other matrices remains to be checked. Concerning hydrogen, since no usable reference material with our technique is available, certified materials in deuterium (chosen as a surrogate for hydrogen) were studied in order to exhibit the feasibility the analysis of hydrogen. Parallel to these works, results obtained by modeling a RF discharge show that the performances of the lamp can be improved and that the optical system must be strictly adapted to the glow discharge. (author) [fr

  16. Passive inference of collision frequency in magnetized capacitive argon discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binwal, S.; Joshi, J. K.; Karkari, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.; Nair, L.

    2018-03-01

    A non-invasive method of determining the collision frequency νm by measuring the net plasma impendence in a magnetized, capacitive-coupled, radio-frequency (rf) discharge circuit is developed. The collision frequency has been analytically expressed in terms of bulk plasma reactance, wherein standard sheath models have been used to estimate the reactance offered due to the capacitive rf sheaths at the discharge plates. The experimental observations suggest that in the un-magnetized case, νm remains constant over a range of rf current but steadily increases as the background pressure reduces. In the magnetized case, the collision frequency has been observed to decay with the increase in rf current while it remains unaffected by the background pressure. A qualitative discussion has been presented to explain these characteristics.

  17. Response of the rf-extraction-wing balcony and floor, and the storage ring to forced and ambient vibration excitation and coupling to tunnel/basemat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.; Rosas-Velez, P.

    1993-08-01

    To ensure successful operation of the APS, vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets must be limited to very low levels for frequencies >10 Hz. There will be many sources of vibration, such as pumps, fans, compressors, generators, and other rotating and reciprocating machinery when the APS is operational. In general, such vibration sources are isolated from the structural components and base foundations by vibration dampers and isolators. Pumps are typically mounted on seismic isolators, which are massive bases with response frequencies of <10 Hz, and fans are mounted with elastic-type isolators to minimize vibration coupling. The attenuation of expansion/isolation joints is a very important factor in predicting the response of the storage ring basemat to the various excitation sources. Several 75-hp pumps are located on the balcony of the rf extraction wing, which is close to the storage ring basemat. The pumps per se may prove to be a vibration excitation source of concern. Additional pumps will be placed in the RF extraction building and could add to the vibration levels. If the dynamic unbalance force of the pump motor, and the efficiency of the associated expansion joints were known, one could predict the response of the storage ring basemat. This information would also be useful in determining the placement of additional pumps. This report discusses vibration tests and measurements that were performed on July 28, 1993, in the rf extraction building. The purpose of the investigation was to study the efficiency of two specific expansion joints: (1) the joint that separates a structural column pad from the extraction wing floor, and (2) the joint that separates the extraction wing floor from the roof of the storage ring tunnel. A small electrodynamic exciter, with a maximum RMS force output of ∼0.5 lb at the frequencies of interest, was used

  18. ICRF plasma production in Tore Supra: analysis of antenna coupling and plasma properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, B.; Becoulet, A.; Lyssoivan, A.

    1999-01-01

    A study of RF plasma production frequency range ω. 2ω ci has been undertaken on Tore Supra taking into account antenna coupling predictions of theory and the TEXTOR-94 database. Two scenarios for RF discharges have been tested (fixed frequency of the RF generator): operation with pure toroidal magnetic field, at standard and lower B T and operation in the magnetic configuration with a small vertical (B V ) field superimposed on B T (B V T ). (authors)

  19. Coupling hydrologic and hydraulic models to take into consideration retention effects on extreme peak discharges in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Guido; Zischg, Andreas; Weingartner, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Estimating peak discharges with very low probabilities is still accompanied by large uncertainties. Common estimation methods are usually based on extreme value statistics applied to observed time series or to hydrological model outputs. However, such methods assume the system to be stationary and do not specifically consider non-stationary effects. Observed time series may exclude events where peak discharge is damped by retention effects, as this process does not occur until specific thresholds, possibly beyond those of the highest measured event, are exceeded. Hydrological models can be complemented and parameterized with non-linear functions. However, in such cases calibration depends on observed data and non-stationary behaviour is not deterministically calculated. Our study discusses the option of considering retention effects on extreme peak discharges by coupling hydrological and hydraulic models. This possibility is tested by forcing the semi-distributed deterministic hydrological model PREVAH with randomly generated, physically plausible extreme precipitation patterns. The resulting hydrographs are then used to force the hydraulic model BASEMENT-ETH (riverbed in 1D, potential inundation areas in 2D). The procedure ensures that the estimated extreme peak discharge does not exceed the physical limit given by the riverbed capacity and that the dampening effect of inundation processes on peak discharge is considered.

  20. RF transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  1. RF MEMS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the bare die level the insertion loss, return loss and the isolation ... ing and packaging of a silicon on glass based RF MEMS switch fabricated using DRIE. ..... follows the power law based on the asperity deformation model given by Pattona & ... Surface mount style RF packages (SMX series 580465) from Startedge Corp.

  2. The discharge characteristics in nitrogen helicon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gao; Wang, Huihui; Si, Xinlu; Ouyang, Jiting; Chen, Qiang; Tan, Chang

    2017-12-01

    Discharge characteristics of helicon plasma in nitrogen and argon-nitrogen mixtures were investigated experimentally by using a Langmuir probe, a B-dot probe, and an optical emission spectrum. Helicon wave discharge is confirmed by the changes of electron density and electromagnetic signal amplitude with the increasing RF power, which shows three discharge stages in nitrogen, corresponding to E-mode, H-mode, and W-mode discharges in helicon plasma, respectively. Discharge images in the radial cross section at different discharge modes through an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) show a rapid increase in luminous intensity along with the RF power. When the nitrogen discharge is in the W-mode, the images show that the strongest luminance locates near the plasma boundary and no blue core appears in the axial center of tube, which is always observed in argon W-mode discharge. The "big blue" or blue core is a special character in helicon plasma, but it has not been observed in nitrogen helicon plasma. In nitrogen-argon mixtures, a weak blue core is observed in ICCD images since the nitrogen content is increased. The electric field turns to the periphery in the distribution of the radial field and the electron temperature decreases with the increasing nitrogen content, especially when the blue core disappears. The different behaviors of the electron impact and the energy consumption in nitrogen helicon plasma are suggested to be responsible for the decrease in electron energy and the change in the electric field distribution.

  3. Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, James E.

    1999-01-01

    An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

  4. Theoretical characterization of electron energy distribution function in RF plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitelli, M.; Capriati, G.; Dilonardo, M.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.

    1993-01-01

    Different methods for the modeling of low-temperature plasmas of both technological and fundamental interest are discussed. The main concept of all these models is the electron energy distribution function (eedf) which is necessary to calculate the rate coefficients for any chemical reaction involving electrons. Results of eedf calculations in homogeneous SF 6 and SiH 4 plasmas are discussed based on solution of the time-dependent Boltzmann equation. The space-dependent eedf in an RF discharge in He is calculated taking into account the sheath oscillations by a Monte Carlo model assuming the plasma heating mechanism and the electric field determined by using a fluid model. The need to take into account the ambipolar diffusion of electrons in RF discharge modeling is stressed. A self-consistent model based on coupling the equations of the fluid model and the chemical kinetics ones is presented. (orig.)

  5. Plasma inhomogeneities near the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge containing dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawidian, H; Mikikian, M.; Couedel, L.; Lecas, T.

    2011-01-01

    Dusty plasmas can be found in fusion devices. In this paper we analyse a new phenomenon occurring during dust particle growth instabilities and consisting of the appearance of small plasma spheroids in the vicinity of discharge electrodes. Small plasma spheroids are evidenced and analyzed in front of the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge in which dust particles are growing. These regions are characterized by a spherical shape, a slightly enhanced luminosity and are related to instabilities induced by the presence of dust particles. Several types of behaviors are identified and particularly their chaotic appearance or disappearance and their rotational motion along the electrode periphery. Correlations with the unstable behavior of the global plasma glow are performed. These analyses are obtained thanks to high-speed imaging which is the only diagnostics able to evidence these plasma spheroids

  6. Thomson scattering on a low-pressure, inductively-coupled gas discharge lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, van de M.J.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Excitation and light production processes in gas discharge lamps are the result of inelastic collisions between atoms and free electrons in the plasma. Therefore, knowledge of the electron density ne and temperature Te is essential for a proper understanding of such plasmas. In this paper, an

  7. Plasma inhomogeneities near the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge containing dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawidian, H.; Mikikian, M.; Couëdel, L.; Lecas, T.

    2011-11-01

    Small plasma spheroids are evidenced and analyzed in front of the electrodes of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency discharge in which dust particles are growing. These regions are characterized by a spherical shape, a slightly enhanced luminosity and are related to instabilities induced by the presence of dust particles. Several types of behaviors are identified and particularly their chaotic appearance or disappearance and their rotational motion along the electrode periphery. Correlations with the unstable behavior of the global plasma glow are performed. These analyses are obtained thanks to high-speed imaging which is the only diagnostics able to evidence these plasma spheroids.

  8. Modeling of Perpendicularly Driven Dual-Frequency Capacitively Coupled Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongyu; Sun Peng; Zhao Shuangyun; Li Yang; Jiang Wei

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed perpendicularly configured dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled plasmas (CCP). In this configuration, two pairs of electrodes are arranged oppositely, and the discharging is perpendicularly driven by two radio frequency (RF) sources. Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) simulation showed that the configuration had some advantages as this configuration eliminated some dual frequency coupling effects. Some variation and potential application of the discharging configuration is discussed briefly. (paper)

  9. Measurement of plasma-surface energy fluxes in an argon rf-discharge by means of calorimetric probes and fluorescent microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, H. R.; Kersten, H.; Hannemann, M.; Basner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Measured energy influx densities toward a tungsten dummy substrate in an argon rf-plasma are presented and a model for the description of the energy influx density based on plasma parameters, which have been obtained by Langmuir probe measurements, is applied. Furthermore, temperature measurements of microparticles are presented, which are confined in the plasma sheath. An extension of the model is developed for the description of the energy influx density to the particles. The comparison of model and experimental results offer the possibility to obtain an improved understanding of plasma-surface interactions.

  10. Electron and Negative Ion Densities in C2F6 and CHF3 Containing Inductively Coupled Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEBNER, GREGORY A.; MILLER, PAUL A.

    1999-01-01

    Electron and negative ion densities have been measured in inductively coupled discharges containing C 2 F 6 and CHF 3 . Line integrated electron density was determined using a microwave interferometer, negative ion densities were inferred using laser photodetachment spectroscopy, and electron temperature was determined using a Langmuir probe. For the range of induction powers, pressures and bias power investigated, the electron density peaked at 9 x 10 12 cm -2 (line-integrated) or approximately 9 x 10 11 cm -3 . The negative ion density peaked at approximately 1.3 x 10 11 cm -3 . A maximum in the negative ion density as a function of induction coil power was observed. The maximum is attributed to a power dependent change in the density of one or more of the potential negative ion precursor species since the electron temperature did not depend strongly on power. The variation of photodetachment with laser wavelength indicated that the dominant negative ion was F - . Measurement of the decay of the negative ion density in the afterglow of a pulse modulated discharge was used to determine the ion-ion recombination rate for CF 4 , C 2 F 6 and CHF 3 discharges

  11. Radio-frequency glow discharge spectrometry: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winchester, Michael R.; Payling, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a critical review of analytical radio frequency glow discharge spectrometry (rf-GDS). The historical foundations of rf-GDS are described, and current knowledge of the fundamental physics of analytical rf glow discharges is discussed. Additionally, instrumentation, methodologies, and applications of rf glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (rf-GDOES) and mass spectrometry (rf-GDMS) are reviewed. Although other rf-GDS techniques have appeared [e.g. rf glow discharge atomic absorption spectrophotometry (rf-GDAAS)], the emphasis is placed upon rf-GDOES and rf-GDMS, because they have received by far the most interest from analytical chemical metrologists. This review also provides explanations of some developments that are needed for further progress in the field of analytical rf-GDS

  12. Experimental investigation of standing wave effect in dual-frequency capacitively coupled argon discharges: role of a low-frequency source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Liu, Yong-Xin; Kawamura, E.; Wen, De-Qi; Lieberman, M. A.; Wang, You-Nian

    2018-05-01

    It is well known that the plasma non-uniformity caused by the standing wave effect has brought about great challenges for plasma material processing. To improve the plasma uniformity, a low-frequency (LF) power source is introduced into a 100 MHz very-high-frequency (VHF) capacitively coupled argon plasma reactor. The effect of the LF parameters (LF voltage amplitude ϕ L and LF source f L) on the radial profile of plasma density has been investigated by utilizing a hairpin probe. The result at a low pressure (1 Pa) is compared to the one obtained by a 2D fluid-analytical capacitively coupled plasma model, showing good agreement in the plasma density radial profile. The experimental results show that the plasma density profile exhibits different dependences on ϕ L and f L at different gas pressures/electrode driven types (i.e., the two rf sources are applied on one electrode (case I) and separate electrodes (case II)). At low pressures (e.g., 8 Pa), the pronounced standing wave effect revealed in a VHF discharge can be suppressed at a relatively high ϕ L or a low f L in case I, because the HF sheath heating is largely weakened due to strong modulation by the LF source. By contrast, ϕ L and f L play insignificant roles in suppressing the standing wave effect in case II. At high pressures (e.g., 20 Pa), the opposite is true. The plasma density radial profile is more sensitive to ϕ L and f L in case II than in case I. In case II, the standing wave effect is surprisingly enhanced with increasing ϕ L at higher pressures; however, the center-high density profile caused by the standing wave effect can be compensated by increasing f L due to the enhanced electrostatic edge effect dominated by the LF source. In contrast, the density radial profile shows a much weaker dependence on ϕ L and f L in case I at higher pressures. To understand the different roles of ϕ L and f L, the electron excitation dynamics in each case are analyzed based on the measured spatio

  13. Importance of including small-scale tile drain discharge in the calibration of a coupled groundwater-surface water catchment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Lausten; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun

    2013-01-01

    the catchment. In this study, a coupled groundwater-surface water model based on the MIKE SHE code was developed for the 4.7 km2 Lillebæk catchment in Denmark, where tile drain flow is a major contributor to the stream discharge. The catchment model was calibrated in several steps by incrementally including...... the observation data into the calibration to see the effect on model performance of including diverse data types, especially tile drain discharge. For the Lillebæk catchment, measurements of hydraulic head, daily stream discharge, and daily tile drain discharge from five small (1–4 ha) drainage areas exist....... The results showed that including tile drain data in the calibration of the catchment model improved its general performance for hydraulic heads and stream discharges. However, the model failed to correctly describe the local-scale dynamics of the tile drain discharges, and, furthermore, including the drain...

  14. Effect of the quasiparticle-pair interference current on thermal fluctuations in weakly coupled superconductors and on the operation of rf-biased SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falco, C.M.

    1974-01-01

    Careful studies of the effect of thermal fluctuations on the I-V characteristics of two different types of weakly coupled superconductors were made. Measurements on externally shunted, oxide-barrier tunnel junctions were found to be in complete quantitative agreement with a theory due to Ambegaokar and Halperin in the limit of β/sub c/ identical with 2eI/sub c/C/sigma 0 2 h much less than 1 where the theory is valid. Similar measurements in the region of β/sub c/ approximately equal to 1 were found to be in qualitative agreement with a theory due to Kurkijarvi and Ambegaokar. Assuming the Ambegaokar and Halperin theory is applicable, measurements on Notarys-Nercereau normal metal underlay weak links indicate the presence of a phase-dependent conductivity predicted by B. D. Josephson in 1962. The magnitude of this conductivity was found to be in agreement with that predicted by theory, however, the sign of the conductivity was found to be in disagreement. A study of the operating characteristics of rf-biased thin-film superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) has also been made and a set of performance parameters developed to optimize the behavior of these devices. The behavior of these SQUIDs has been compared with a theory due to Hansma in order to look for the effect of the phase-dependent quasiparticle-pair interference current. The me []surements were found to be qualitatively different than predicted by Hansma's theory. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  15. Analytical–numerical global model of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzaroni, C; Chabert, P; Lieberman, M A; Lichtenberg, A J; Leblanc, A

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid analytical–numerical global model of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency (rf) driven capacitive discharges is developed. The feed gas is assumed to be helium with small admixtures of oxygen or nitrogen. The electrical characteristics are modeled analytically as a current-driven homogeneous discharge. The electron power balance is solved analytically to determine a time-varying Maxwellian electron temperature, which oscillates on the rf timescale. Averaging over the rf period yields effective rate coefficients for gas phase activated processes. The particle balance relations for all species are then integrated numerically to determine the equilibrium discharge parameters. The coupling of analytical solutions of the time-varying discharge and electron temperature dynamics, and numerical solutions of the discharge chemistry, allows for a fast solution of the discharge equilibrium. Variations of discharge parameters with discharge composition and rf power are determined. Comparisons are made to more accurate but numerically costly fluid models, with space and time variations, but with the range of parameters limited by computational time. (paper)

  16. Evaluation of oxygen species during E-H transition in inductively coupled RF plasmas: combination of experimental results with global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meichsner, Jürgen; Wegner, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Inductively coupled RF plasmas (ICP) in oxygen at low pressure have been intensively studied as a molecular and electronegative model system in the last funding period of the Collaborative Research Centre 24 "Fundamentals of Complex Plasmas". The ICP configuration consists of a planar coil inside a quartz cylinder as dielectric barrier which is immersed in a large stainless steel vacuum chamber. In particular, the E-H mode transition has been investigated, combining experimental results from comprehensive plasma diagnostics as input for analytical rate equation calculation of a volume averaged global model. The averaged density was determined for electrons, negative ions O-, molecular oxygen ground state O2(X3 Σg-) and singlet metastable state O2(a1 Δg) from line-integrated measurements using 160 GHz Gaussian beam microwave interferometry coupled with laser photodetachment experiment and VUV absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Taking into account the relevant elementary processes and rate coefficients from literature together with the measured temperatures and averaged density of electrons, O2(X3 Σg-) and O2(a1 Δg) the steady state density was calculated for O(3P), O2(b1 Σg+), O(1D), O(1S), O3, O-, O2-, and O3-, respectively. The averaged density of negative ions O- from the rate equation calculation is compared with the measured one. The normalized source and loss rates are discussed for O(3P), O2(b1 Σg+) and O-. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Fundamentals of Complex Plasmas", edited by Jürgen Meichsner, Michael Bonitz, Holger Fehske, Alexander Piel.

  17. Increasing the magnetic-field capability of the magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system using an inductively coupled coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Zabir, E.; Betti, R.

    2018-03-01

    Magnetized high energy density physics (HEDP) is a very active and relatively unexplored field that has applications in inertial confinement fusion, astrophysical plasma science, and basic plasma physics. A self-contained device, the Magneto-Inertial Fusion Electrical Discharge System, MIFEDS [G. Fiksel et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 016105 (2015)], was developed at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics to conduct magnetized HEDP experiments on both the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495-506 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [J. H. Kelly et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 75 (2006) and L. J. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)] laser systems. Extremely high magnetic fields are a necessity for magnetized HEDP, and the need for stronger magnetic fields continues to drive the redevelopment of the MIFEDS device. It is proposed in this paper that a magnetic coil that is inductively coupled rather than directly connecting to the MIFEDS device can increase the overall strength of the magnetic field for HEDP experiments by increasing the efficiency of energy transfer while decreasing the effective magnetized volume. A brief explanation of the energy delivery of the MIFEDS device illustrates the benefit of inductive coupling and is compared to that of direct connection for varying coil size and geometry. A prototype was then constructed to demonstrate a 7-fold increase in energy delivery using inductive coupling.

  18. Plasma edge cooling during RF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckewer, S.; Hawryluk, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A new approach to prevent the influx of high-Z impurities into the core of a tokamak discharge by using RF power to modify the edge plasma temperature profile is presented. This concept is based on spectroscopic measurements on PLT during ohmic heating and ATC during RF heating. A one dimensional impurity transport model is used to interpret the ATC results

  19. Pulsed rf operation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.; Cornacchia, M.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a very low final amplifier output impedance, always associated with class A operation, requires a very large power waste in the final tube. The recently suggested pulsed rf operation, while saving a large amount of power, increases the inherent final amplifier non linearity. A method is presented for avoiding the large signal non linear analysis and it is shown how each component of the beam induced voltage depends upon all the beam harmonics via some coupling coefficients which are evaluated

  20. RF pulse compression development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Properties and etching rates of negative ions in inductively coupled plasmas and dc discharges produced in Ar/SF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draghici, M.; Stamate, E.

    2010-01-01

    Negative ion production is investigated in a chamber with transversal magnetic filter operated in dc or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) modes in Ar/SF 6 gas mixtures. Plasma parameters are evaluated by mass spectrometry and Langmuir probe for different discharge conditions. The density ratio of negative ion to electron exceeded 300 in dc mode while it was below 100 in the ICP mode. The possibility to apply a large positive bias to an electrode without affecting the plasma potential and the transition from a negative sheath to anodic glow are also investigated. The etching rates by positive and negative ions are evaluated on silicon substrate for different Ar/SF 6 gas ratios. The etching rate by negative ions was with less than 5% smaller than that by positive ions.

  2. Properties and etching rates of negative ions in inductively coupled plasmas and dc discharges produced in Ar/SF6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draghici, Mihai; Stamate, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    of negative ion to electron exceeded 300 in dc mode while it was below 100 in the ICP mode. The possibility to apply a large positive bias to an electrode without affecting the plasma potential and the transition from a negative sheath to anodic glow are also investigated. The etching rates by positive...... and negative ions are evaluated on silicon substrate for different Ar/SF6 gas ratios. The etching rate by negative ions was with less than 5% smaller than that by positive ions.......Negative ion production is investigated in a chamber with transversal magnetic filter operated in dc or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) modes in Ar/SF6 gas mixtures. Plasma parameters are evaluated by mass spectrometry and Langmuir probe for different discharge conditions. The density ratio...

  3. Simulation of the electric potential and plasma generation coupling in magnetron sputtering discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Krueger, Dennis; Schmidt, Frederik; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Magnetron sputtering typically operated at low pressures below 1 Pa is a widely applied deposition technique. For both, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) as well as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS) the phenomenon of rotating ionization zones (also referred to as spokes) has been observed. A distinct spatial profile of the electric potential has been associated with the latter, giving rise to low, mid, and high energy groups of ions observed at the substrate. The adherent question of which mechanism drives this process is still not fully understood. This query is approached using Monte Carlo simulations of the heavy particle (i.e., ions and neutrals) transport consistently coupled to a pre-specified electron density profile via the intrinsic electric field. The coupling between the plasma generation and the electric potential, which establishes correspondingly, is investigated. While the system is observed to strive towards quasi-neutrality, distinct mechanisms governing the shape of the electric potential profile are identified. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the transregional collaborative research centre TRR 87.

  4. Determination of excitation temperature and vibrational temperature of the N2(C 3Πu, ν') state in Ne-N2 RF discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, N U; Naveed, M A; Zakaullah, M; Khan, F U

    2008-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of neon mixing on the excitation and vibrational temperatures of the second positive system in nitrogen plasma generated by a 13.56 MHz RF generator. The excitation temperature is determined from Ne I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot. The overpopulation of the levels of the N 2 (C 3 Π u , ν') states with neon mixing are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of the second positive system of nitrogen molecules. The vibrational temperature is calculated for the sequence Δν = -2, with the assumption that it follows Boltzmann's distribution. But due to overpopulation of levels, e.g. 1, 4, a linearization process was employed for such distributions allowing us to calculate the vibrational temperature of the N 2 (C 3 Π u , ν') state. It is found that the excitation temperature as well as the vibrational temperature of the second positive system can be raised significantly by mixing neon with nitrogen plasma. It is also found that the vibrational temperature increases with power and pressure up to 0.5 mbar.

  5. SPEAR 2 RF SYSTEM LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The design and performance of higher order mode (HOM) dampers for the SPEAR 2 RF system is presented. The SPEAR beam had experienced occasional periods of instability due to transverse oscillations which were driven by HOMs in the RF cavities. A substantial fraction of this RF energy was coupled out of the cavity into the waveguide connecting the cavity to the klystron. This waveguide was modified by adding a stub of smaller cross section, terminated by a ferrite tile load, to the system. Design considerations of the load, and its effect on HOMs and beam stability will be discussed

  6. Angina - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest pain - discharge; Stable angina - discharge; Chronic angina - discharge; Variant angina - discharge; Angina pectoris - discharge; Accelerating angina - discharge; New-onset angina - discharge; Angina-unstable - discharge; ...

  7. Coupled decadal variability of the North Atlantic Oscillation, regional rainfall and karst spring discharges in the Campania region (southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Vita

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Thus far, studies on climate change have focused mainly on the variability of the atmospheric and surface components of the hydrologic cycle, investigating the impact of this variability on the environment, especially with respect to the risks of desertification, droughts and floods. Conversely, the impacts of climate change on the recharge of aquifers and on the variability of groundwater flow have been less investigated, especially in Mediterranean karst areas whose water supply systems depend heavily upon groundwater exploitation.

    In this paper, long-term climatic variability and its influence on groundwater recharge were analysed by examining decadal patterns of precipitation, air temperature and spring discharges in the Campania region (southern Italy, coupled with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO.

    The time series of precipitation and air temperature were gathered over 90 yr, from 1921 to 2010, using 18 rain gauges and 9 air temperature stations with the most continuous functioning. The time series of the winter NAO index and of the discharges of 3 karst springs, selected from those feeding the major aqueducts systems, were collected for the same period.

    Regional normalised indexes of the precipitation, air temperature and karst spring discharges were calculated, and different methods were applied to analyse the related time series, including long-term trend analysis using smoothing numerical techniques, cross-correlation and Fourier analysis.

    The investigation of the normalised indexes highlighted the existence of long-term complex periodicities, from 2 to more than 30 yr, with differences in average values of up to approximately ±30% for precipitation and karst spring discharges, which were both strongly correlated with the winter NAO index.

    Although the effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO had already been demonstrated in the long-term precipitation and streamflow patterns of

  8. Radio frequency discharge with dust particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chutov, Y. I.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kravchenko, O. Y.; Zuz, V. M.; Yan, M.; Martins, R.; Ferreira, I.; Fortunato, E.; Kroesen, G.

    2000-01-01

    A 1D PIC/MCC method has been developed for computer simulations of low-pressure RF discharges with dust particles using the method for dust-free discharges. A RF discharge in argon with dust particles distributed uniformly in the interelectrode gap is simulated at parameters providing a possibility

  9. Ion energy distributions in a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled discharge of Ar/CF4 and effect of duty ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Anurag; Seo, Jin Seok; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2015-01-01

    Controlling time averaged ion energy distribution (IED) is becoming increasingly important in many plasma material processing applications for plasma etching and deposition. The present study reports the evolution of ion energy distributions with radio frequency (RF) powers in a pulsed dual frequency inductively discharge and also investigates the effect of duty ratio. The discharge has been sustained using two radio frequency, low (P 2 MHz  = 2 MHz) and high (P 13.56 MHz  = 13.56 MHz) at a pressure of 10 mTorr in argon (90%) and CF 4 (10%) environment. The low frequency RF powers have been varied from 100 to 600 W, whereas the high frequency powers from 200 to 1200 W. Typically, IEDs show bimodal structure and energy width (energy separation between the high and low energy peaks) increases with increasing P 13.56 MHz ; however, it shows opposite trends with P 2 MHz . It has been observed that IEDs bimodal structure tends to mono-modal structure and energy peaks shift towards low energy side as duty ratio increases, keeping pulse power owing to mode transition (capacitive to inductive) constant

  10. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  11. Discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation: Application to H{sub 2}{sup −} photodetachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnev, V.; Ureña, A. González [Unidad de Láseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense, Juan XXIII-1, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    A cathode discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation is described. The discharge source, made of stainless steel or duralumin electrodes and Macor insulators, is attached to the exit nozzle valve plate at one end, and to an Einzel lens to the other end. Subsequently, a cylindrical retardation unit is attached to the Einzel lens to decelerate the ions in order to optimize the laser beam interaction time required for spectroscopic investigations. The compact device is able to produce beam intensities of the order of 2 × 10{sup 12} anions/cm{sup 2} s and 20 μrad of angular divergence with kinetic energies ranging from 30 to 120 eV. Using distinct gas mixtures for the supersonic expansion together with a linear time-of-flight spectrometer, anions of great relevance in molecular astrophysics like, for example, H{sub 2}{sup −}, C{sub 3}H{sup −}, C{sub 2}{sup −}, C{sub 2}H{sup −}, HCN{sub 2}{sup −}, CO{sub 2}{sup −}, CO{sub 2}H{sup −}, C{sub 4}{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sup −}, C{sub 5}H{sub 4}{sup −}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup −}, C{sub 7}N{sup −}, and C{sub 10}N{sup −} were produced. Finally, in order to demonstrate the capability of the experimental technique the photodetachment cross-section of the metastable H{sub 2}{sup −}, predominantly in the (v = 0, J = 26) state, was measured following laser excitation at λ{sub exc}= 565 nm obtaining a value of σ{sub ph}= 0.04 Å. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that this anion cross-section has been measured.

  12. RF-MEMS capacitive switches with high reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Charles L.; Auciello, Orlando H.; Carlisle, John A.; Sampath, Suresh; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Carpick, Robert W.; Hwang, James; Mancini, Derrick C.; Gudeman, Chris

    2013-09-03

    A reliable long life RF-MEMS capacitive switch is provided with a dielectric layer comprising a "fast discharge diamond dielectric layer" and enabling rapid switch recovery, dielectric layer charging and discharging that is efficient and effective to enable RF-MEMS switch operation to greater than or equal to 100 billion cycles.

  13. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Franzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate TE_{114} modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q_{0} of 9.4×10^{4} and coupling factor (β of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor Q_{L} of 1.06×10^{4} with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05  dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40  dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  14. Pulsed glow discharge mass spectrometry for molecular depth profiling of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, L.; Pereiro, R.; Sanz-Medel, A.; Bordel, N.; Pisonero, J.; Licciardello, A.; Tuccitto, N.; Tempez, A.; Chapon, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nowadays thin films of polymeric materials involve a wide range of industrial applications, so techniques capable of providing in-depth profile information are required. Most of the techniques available for this purpose are based on the use of energetic particle beams which interact with polymers producing undesirable physicochemical modifications. Radiofrequency pulsed glow discharge (rf-pulsed-GD) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) could afford the possibility of acquiring both elemental and molecular information creating minimal damage to surfaces and thereby obtaining depth profiles. This work will evaluate rf-GDs coupled to an orthogonal TOFMS for direct analysis of polymers. (author)

  15. Metal carbonyl vapor generation coupled with dielectric barrier discharge to avoid plasma quench for optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Li, Shao-Hua; Dou, Shuai; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-20

    The scope of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) microplasma as a radiation source for optical emission spectrometry (OES) is extended by nickel carbonyl vapor generation. We proved that metal carbonyl completely avoids the extinguishing of plasma, and it is much more suitable for matching the DBD excitation and OES detection with respect to significant DBD quenching by concomitant hydrogen when hydride generation is used. A concentric quartz UV reactor allows sample solution to flow through the central channel wherein to efficiently receive the uniformly distributed UV irradiation in the confined cylindrical space between the concentric tubes, which facilitates effective carbonyl generation in a nickel solution. The carbonyl is transferred into the DBD excitation chamber by an argon stream for nickel excitation, and the characteristic emission of nickel at 232.0 nm is detected by a charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. A 1.0 mL sample solution results in a linear range of 5-100 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.3 μg L(-1) and a precision of 2.4% RSD at 50 μg L(-1). The present DBD-OES system is validated by nickel in certified reference materials.

  16. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R ampersand D effort here at SLAC

  17. Analysis of Multipactor Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Y. Y.

    2005-01-01

    Several comprehensive studies of radio frequency (rf) breakdown and rf heating are reported. They are of general interest to magnetic confinement fusion, rf linac, and high power microwave source development. The major results include: (1) a ground-breaking theory of multipactor discharge on dielectric, including a successful proof-of-principle experiment that verified the newly developed scaling laws, (2) an in depth investigation of the failure mechanisms of diamond windows and ceramic windows, and of the roles of graphitization, thin films of coating and contaminants, and (3) a most comprehensive theory, to date, on the heating of particulates by an electromagnetic pulse, and on the roles of rf magnetic field heating and of rf electric field heating, including the construction of new scaling laws that govern them. The above form a valuable knowledge base for the general problem of heating phenomenology

  18. RF impedance measurement calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references

  19. TiO2 thin and thick films grown on Si/glass by sputtering of titanium targets in an RF inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia-Alvarado, R; López-Callejas, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Muñoz-Castro, A E; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G; De la Piedad-Beneitez, A; De la Rosa-Vázquez, J M

    2015-01-01

    TiO 2 thin and thick films were deposited on silicon/glass substrates using RF inductive plasma in continuous wave. The films thickness, as well as phases control, is achieved with a gradual increase in temperature substrates varying supplied RF power or working gas pressure besides deposition time as well. The deposition conditions were: argon 80%/oxygen 20% carefully calibrated mixture of 2 to 7×10 −2 mbar as working gas pressure range. Deposition time 0.5 to 5 hours, 500 or 600 W RF power at 13.56 MHz frequency and 242-345 °C substrates temperature range. The titanium dioxide deposited on the substrates is grown by sputtering of a titanium target negatively polarized at 3-5 kV DC situated 14 mm in front of such substrates. The plasma reactor is a simple Pyrex-like glass cylindrical vessel of 50 cm long and 20 cm in diameter. Using the before describe plasma parameters we obtained films only anatase and both anatase/rutile phases with stoichiometric different. The films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), stylus profilometer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. (paper)

  20. Three dimensional complex plasma structures in a combined radio frequency and direct current discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitic, S.; Morfill, G. E.; Klumov, B. A.; Khrapak, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first detailed analysis of large three dimensional (3D) complex plasma structures in experiments performed in pure rf and combined rf+dc discharge modes. Inductively coupled plasma is generated by an rf coil wrapped around the vertically positioned cylindrical glass tube at a pressure of 0.3 mbar. In addition, dc plasma can be generated by applying voltage to the electrodes at the ends of the tube far from the rf coil. The injected monodisperse particles are levitated in the plasma below the coil. A scanning laser sheet and a high resolution camera are used to determine the 3D positions of about 10 5 particles. The observed bowl-shaped particle clouds reveal coexistence of various structures, including well-distinguished solid-like, less ordered liquid-like, and pronounced string-like phases. New criteria to identify string-like structures are proposed.

  1. rf coupler technology for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) oscillations at critical frequencies have successfully provided a means to convey power to fusion plasmas due to the electrical-magnetic properties of the plasma. While large rf systems to couple power to the plasma have been designed, built, and tested, the main link to the plasma, the coupler, is still in an evolutionary stage of development. Design and fabrication of optimal antennas for fusion applications are complicated by incomplete characterizations of the harsh plasma environment and of coupling mechanisms. A brief description of rf coupler technology required for plasma conditions is presented along with an assessment of the status and goals of coupler development

  2. Deactivation of Escherichia coli in a post-discharge chamber coupled to an atmospheric pressure multi-electrode DBD plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Ruiz, V H; López-Callejas, R; De la Piedad Beneitez, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Muñoz-Castro, A E; Barocio, S R; Valencia-Alvarado, R; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G

    2012-01-01

    Experimental results from applying a room pressure RF multi-electrode DBD plasma source to the inhibition of the population growth of Gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) within a post-discharge reactor are reported. The sample to be treated is deposited in the post-discharge chamber at about 50 mm from the plasma source outlet. Thus, the active species generated by the source are conveyed toward the chamber by the working gas flow. The plasma characterization included the measurement of the axial temperature at different distances from the reactor outlet by means of a K-type thermocouple. The resulting 294 K to 322 K temperature interval corresponded to distances between 10 mm to 1 mm respectively. As the material under treatment is placed further away, any thermal damage of the sample by the plasma is prevented. The measurement and optimization of the ozone O 3 concentration has also been carried out, provided that this is an active specie with particularly high germicide power. The effectiveness treatment of the E. coli bacteria growth inhibition by the proposed plasma source reached 99% when a 10 3 CFU/mL concentration on an agar plate had been exposed during ten minutes.

  3. Reliability impact of RF tube technology for the NPB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueck, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Two reliability options, redundancy and operating margin, are examined to determine their effect on power system configurations using RF tube technology (klystron and klystrode) powered Neutral Particle Beam weapons. Redundance is addressed by providing an additional identical RF tube to the tubes required to power an accelerator RF element (DTL section, RFQ, or CCL). RF elements do not share RF power with other RF elements. Operating margin provides increased reliability by sizing the RF tubes such that tube operating levels may be increased compensate for the loss of a tube. It is shown that power system mass is affected by the choice of reliability measures, that higher power tubes coupled with higher power RF elements may mitigate mass increases, and that redundancy appears preferable to operating margin as a method of improving RF system reliability

  4. About the EDF formation in a capacitively coupled argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatanova, M; Thieme, G; Basner, R; Hannemann, M; Golubovskii, Yu B; Kersten, H

    2006-01-01

    The formation of the electron distribution function (EDF) in the bulk plasma of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency (rf) discharge in argon generated in the plasma-chemical reactor PULVA-INP is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements of the EDF and internal plasma parameters were performed by means of a Langmuir probe at pressures of 0.5-100 Pa and discharge powers of 5-100 W. The observed EDFs have revealed a two-temperature behaviour at low pressures and evolved into a Maxwellian distribution at high gas pressures and large discharge powers. Theoretical determination of the EDF is based on the numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation in the local and non-local approaches under experimental conditions. The model includes elastic and inelastic electron-atom collisions and electron-electron interactions. Low electron temperatures and relatively high ionization degrees are the features of the PULVA-INP rf discharge. This leads to significant influence of the electron-electron collisions on the EDF formation. The modelled and measured distributions show good agreement in a wide range of discharge parameters, except for a range of low gas pressures, where the stochastic electron heating is intense. Additionally, mechanisms of the EDF formation in the dc and rf discharge were compared under similar discharge conditions

  5. About the EDF formation in a capacitively coupled argon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatanova, M [Institute of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, ul. Ulianovskaja 1, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Thieme, G [Institut fur Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Basner, R [Institut fur Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Hannemann, M [Institut fur Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Golubovskii, Yu B [Institute of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, ul. Ulianovskaja 1, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kersten, H [Institut fur Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-08-01

    The formation of the electron distribution function (EDF) in the bulk plasma of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency (rf) discharge in argon generated in the plasma-chemical reactor PULVA-INP is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements of the EDF and internal plasma parameters were performed by means of a Langmuir probe at pressures of 0.5-100 Pa and discharge powers of 5-100 W. The observed EDFs have revealed a two-temperature behaviour at low pressures and evolved into a Maxwellian distribution at high gas pressures and large discharge powers. Theoretical determination of the EDF is based on the numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation in the local and non-local approaches under experimental conditions. The model includes elastic and inelastic electron-atom collisions and electron-electron interactions. Low electron temperatures and relatively high ionization degrees are the features of the PULVA-INP rf discharge. This leads to significant influence of the electron-electron collisions on the EDF formation. The modelled and measured distributions show good agreement in a wide range of discharge parameters, except for a range of low gas pressures, where the stochastic electron heating is intense. Additionally, mechanisms of the EDF formation in the dc and rf discharge were compared under similar discharge conditions.

  6. The effect of phase difference between powered electrodes on RF plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proschek, M; Yin, Y; Charles, C; Aanesland, A; McKenzie, D R; Bilek, M M; Boswell, R W

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements carried out on plasmas created in five different RF discharge systems. These systems all have two separately powered RF (13.56 MHz) electrodes, but differ in overall size and in the geometry of both vacuum chambers and RF electrodes or antennae. The two power supplies were synchronized with a phase-shift controller. We investigated the influence of the phase difference between the two RF electrodes on plasma parameters and compared the different system geometries. Single Langmuir probes were used to measure the plasma parameters in a region between the electrodes. Floating potential and ion density were affected by the phase difference and we found a strong influence of the system geometry on the observed phase difference dependence. Both ion density and floating potential curves show asymmetries around maxima and minima. These asymmetries can be explained by a phase dependence of the time evolution of the electrode-wall coupling within an RF-cycle resulting from the asymmetric system geometry

  7. Numerical studies of independent control of electron density and gas temperature via nonlinear coupling in dual-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Nie, Q. Y.; Wang, Z. B.; Gao, X. T.; Kong, F. R.; Sun, Y. F.; Jiang, B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) provide a promising technology of generating non-equilibrium cold plasmas in atmospheric pressure gases. For both application-focused and fundamental studies, it is important to explore the strategy and the mechanism for enabling effective independent tuning of key plasma parameters in a DBD system. In this paper, we report numerical studies of effects of dual-frequency excitation on atmospheric DBDs, and modulation as well as separate tuning mechanism, with emphasis on dual-frequency coupling to the key plasma parameters and discharge evolution. With an appropriately applied low frequency to the original high frequency, the numerical calculation demonstrates that a strong nonlinear coupling between two frequencies governs the process of ionization and energy deposition into plasma, and thus raises the electron density significantly (e.g., three times in this case) in comparisons with a single frequency driven DBD system. Nevertheless, the gas temperature, which is mainly determined by the high frequency discharge, barely changes. This method then enables a possible approach of controlling both averaged electron density and gas temperature independently.

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies of a planar inductive coupled rf plasma source as the driver in simulator facility (ISTAPHM) of interactions of waves with the edge plasma on tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanei, V.; Nasrabadi, M. N.; Chin, O.-H.; Jayapalan, K. K.

    2017-11-01

    This research aims to design and build a planar inductive coupled RF plasma source device which is the driver of the simulator project (ISTAPHM) of the interactions between ICRF Antenna and Plasma on tokamak by using the AMPICP model. For this purpose, a theoretical derivation of the distribution of the RF magnetic field in the plasma-filled reactor chamber is presented. An experimental investigation of the field distributions is described and Langmuir measurements are developed numerically. A comparison of theory and experiment provides an evaluation of plasma parameters in the planar ICP reactor. The objective of this study is to characterize the plasma produced by the source alone. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature, electron-ion collision frequency, particle fluxes and their velocities, stochastic frequency, skin depth and electron energy distribution functions) as function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is currently produced only by the planar ICP. The exact goal of these experiments is that the produced plasma by external source can exist as a plasma representative of the edge of tokamaks.

  9. Refurbishments of RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baelde, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the activities of the R.F. System group during the years 1995-1996 in the frame of the refurbishment of the control system at GANIL accelerator. Modifications concerning the following sub-assemblies are mentioned: 1. voltage standards; 2. link card between the step by step motor control and the local control systems; 3. polarization system; 4. computer software for different operations. Also reported is the installation of ECR 4 source for the CO2. In this period the R2 Regrouping system has been installed, tested and put into operation. Several problems concerning the mechanical installation of the coupling loop and other problems related to the electronics operation were solved. The results obtained with the THI machine are presented

  10. Numerical solution of the model problem of CCRF-discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheltukhin Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a 1D mathematical model of capacitive coupled RF discharge between symmetrical electrodes in argon at atmospheric pressure in a local approximation. Electrons, atomic and molecular ions, metastable atoms and argon dimmers as well as ground-state atoms are considered. A simplified diagram of argon excited states when two metastable and two resonance states are replaced with the uniform level. Such diagram is frequently used to simulate argon plasma due to efficient mixing of these layers at electron impacts. Velocity factors of electron impact processes were calculated using Boltzmann equation with a glance to electron-electron collisions. This work describes numerical algorithm of mathematical model implementation, which is based on finite-dimensional approximation of the problem using difference schemes together with iteration process. The software was developed to implement iterative processes using MatLab. Characteristics of atmospheric pressure capacitive coupled RF discharge at interelectrod distance 20 mm are calculated.

  11. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm 2 . Probe measurements reveal that within 30 μs an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column

  12. Modelling of an RF plasma shower

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atanasova, M.; Carbone, E.A.D.; Mihailova, D.B.; Benova, E.; Degrez, G.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    A capacitive radiofrequency (RF) discharge at atmospheric pressure is studied by means of a time-dependent, two-dimensional fluid model. The plasma is created in a stationary argon gas flow guided through two perforated electrodes, hence resembling a shower. The inner electrode, the electrode facing

  13. Determination of trace cadmium in rice by liquid spray dielectric barrier discharge induced plasma - chemical vapor generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Zhu, Zhenli; Bao, Zhengyu; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong

    2018-03-01

    Cadmium contamination in rice has become an increasing concern in many countries including China. A simple, cost-effective, and highly sensitive method was developed for the determination of trace cadmium in rice samples based on a new high-efficient liquid spray dielectric barrier discharge induced plasma (LSDBD) vapor generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The analytical procedure involves the efficient formation of Cd volatile species by LSDBD plasma induced chemical processes without the use of any reducing reagents (Na/KBH4 in conventional hydride generation). The effects of the addition of organic substances, different discharge parameters such as discharge voltage and discharge gap, as well as the foreign ion interferences were investigated. Under optimized conditions, a detection limit of 0.01 μg L- 1 and a precision of 0.8% (RSD, n = 5, 1 μg L- 1 Cd) was readily achieved. The calibration curve was linear in the range between 0.1 and 10 μg L- 1, with a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.9995. Compared with the conventional acid-BH4- vapor generation, the proposed method not only eliminates the use of unstable and expensive reagents, but also offers high tolerance for coexisting ions, which is well suited to the direct analysis of environmental samples. The validation of the proposed method was demonstrated by the analysis of Cd in reference material of rice (GBW080684). It was also successfully applied to the determination of trace cadmium in locally collected 11 rice samples, and the obtained Cd concentrations are ranged from 7.2 to 517.7 μg kg- 1.

  14. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrassie, J.S.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

    1999-05-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current

  15. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassie, J. S. de; Baker, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Rice, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  17. Spectral Analysis and Metastable Absorption Measurements of High Pressure Capacitively and Inductively Coupled Radio-Frequency Argon-Helium Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    absorbance. 8 Flow Rates The flow rate of the gas through the cell can be calculated using the incompressible Bernoulli equation as it relates to...Kinetics Racah and Paschen Notation Angular momentum coupling schemes are used to describe and organize the energy level spacings of an atom. For most...momenta of the electron, ~l and their spins ~s are combined sepa- rately. The two are then summed to give a total angular momentum , ~L+ ~S = ~J . For

  18. Effects of assistant anode on planar inductively coupled magnetized argon plasma in plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Deli; Chu, Paul K.

    2003-01-01

    The enhancement of planar radio frequency (RF) inductively coupled argon plasma is studied in the presence of an assistant anode and an external magnetic field at low pressure. The influence of the assistant anode and magnetic field on the efficiency of RF power absorption and plasma parameters is investigated. An external axial magnetic field is coupled into the plasma discharge region by an external electromagnetic coil outside the discharge chamber and an assistant cylindrical anode is inserted into the discharge chamber to enhance the plasma discharge. The plasma parameters and density profile are measured by an electrostatic Langmuir probe at different magnetic fields and anode voltages. The RF power absorption by the plasma can be effectively enhanced by the external magnetic field compared with the nonmagnetized discharge. The plasma density can be further increased by the application of a voltage to the assistant anode. Owing to the effective power absorption and enhanced plasma discharge by the assistant anode in a longitudinal magnetic field, the plasma density can be enhanced by more than a factor of two. Meanwhile, the nonuniformity of the plasma density is less than 10% and it can be achieved in a process chamber with a diameter of 600 mm

  19. Couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stošić, Dušan; Auroux, Aline

    Basic principles of calorimetry coupled with other techniques are introduced. These methods are used in heterogeneous catalysis for characterization of acidic, basic and red-ox properties of solid catalysts. Estimation of these features is achieved by monitoring the interaction of various probe molecules with the surface of such materials. Overview of gas phase, as well as liquid phase techniques is given. Special attention is devoted to coupled calorimetry-volumetry method. Furthermore, the influence of different experimental parameters on the results of these techniques is discussed, since it is known that they can significantly influence the evaluation of catalytic properties of investigated materials.

  20. RF characterization and testing of ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jose, Mentes; Singh, G.N. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Girish [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076,India (India); Bhagwat, P.V. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-01

    RF characterization of rectangular to ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers has been carried out by connecting them back to back. Rectangular waveguide to N type adapters are first calibrated by TRL method and then used for RF measurements. Detailed information is obtained about their RF behavior by measurements and full wave simulations. It is shown that the two transitions can be characterized and tuned for required return loss at design frequency of 352.2 MHz. This opens the possibility of testing and conditioning two transitions together on a test bench. Finally, a RF coupler based on these transitions is coupled to an accelerator cavity. The power coupler is successfully tested up to 200 kW, 352.2 MHz with 0.2% duty cycle.

  1. Study of RF-excited Diethylene Glycol Dimethyl Ether Plasmas by Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algatti, M A; Mota, R P; Júnior, P W P Moreira; Honda, R Y; Kayama, M E; Kostov, K G

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the fragmentation process of diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (CH 3 O(CH 2 CH 2 O) 2 CH 3 ) (diglyme here in) molecule in low pressure RF excited plasma discharges. The study was carried out using mass spectrometry. The results showed that for a fixed pressure, the increase of the RF power coupled to the plasma chamber from 1 to 35 W produced a plasma environment much more reactive which increases the population of the ionized species like CH 2 + (15 amu), C 2 H 4 + (28 amu), CH 3 O + (31 amu), C 2 H 4 O + (44 amu), CH 3 OCH 2 CH 2 + (59 amu) and CH 3 OCH 2 CH 2 O + (75 amu). This fact may be attributed to the increase of the electronic temperature that makes predominant the occurrence of inelastic processes that promotes molecular fragmentation. For a fixed value of RF power the increase of pressure from 50 mTorr to 100 mTorr produces the decreasing of the above mentioned chemical species due the lower electronic mean free path. These results suggest that if one wants to keep the monomer's functionality within the plasma deposited films resulting from such kind of discharges one must operate in low power conditions.

  2. Low reflectance high power RF load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.

    2016-02-02

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  3. “Virtual IED sensor” at an rf-biased electrode in low-pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanova, M. A.; Zyryanov, S. M. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, SINP MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lopaev, D. V.; Rakhimov, A. T. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, SINP MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Energy distribution and the flux of the ions coming on a surface are considered as the key-parameters in anisotropic plasma etching. Since direct ion energy distribution (IED) measurements at the treated surface during plasma processing are often hardly possible, there is an opportunity for virtual ones. This work is devoted to the possibility of such indirect IED and ion flux measurements at an rf-biased electrode in low-pressure rf plasma by using a “virtual IED sensor” which represents “in-situ” IED calculations on the absolute scale in accordance with a plasma sheath model containing a set of measurable external parameters. The “virtual IED sensor” should also involve some external calibration procedure. Applicability and accuracy of the “virtual IED sensor” are validated for a dual-frequency reactive ion etching (RIE) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with a capacitively coupled rf-biased electrode. The validation is carried out for heavy (Ar) and light (H{sub 2}) gases under different discharge conditions (different ICP powers, rf-bias frequencies, and voltages). An EQP mass-spectrometer and an rf-compensated Langmuir probe (LP) are used to characterize plasma, while an rf-compensated retarded field energy analyzer (RFEA) is applied to measure IED and ion flux at the rf-biased electrode. Besides, the pulsed selfbias method is used as an external calibration procedure for ion flux estimating at the rf-biased electrode. It is shown that pulsed selfbias method allows calibrating the IED absolute scale quite accurately. It is also shown that the “virtual IED sensor” based on the simplest collisionless sheath model allows reproducing well enough the experimental IEDs at the pressures when the sheath thickness s is less than the ion mean free path λ{sub i} (s < λ{sub i}). At higher pressure (when s > λ{sub i}), the difference between calculated and experimental IEDs due to ion collisions in the sheath is observed in the low

  4. Synthesis of sheath voltage drops in asymmetric radio-frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemura, Shigeru; Nanbu, Kenichi; Iwata, Naoaki

    2004-01-01

    A sheath voltage drop in asymmetric discharges is one of the most important parameters of radio-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas because it determines the kinetic energy of the ions incident on the target or substrate. In this study, we developed a numerical simulation code to estimate the sheath voltage drops and, consequently, the self-bias voltage. We roughly approximated general asymmetric rf discharges to one-dimensional spherical ones. The results obtained by using our simulation code are consistent with measurements and Lieberman's theory

  5. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  6. RF guns: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travier, C.

    1990-06-01

    Free Electron Lasers and future linear colliders require very bright electron beams. Conventional injectors made of DC guns and RF bunchers have intrinsic limitations. The recently proposed RF guns have already proven their capability to produce bright beams. The necessary effort to improve further these performances and to gain reliability is now undertaken by many laboratories. More than twenty RF gun projects both thermionic and laser-driven are reviewed. Their specific characteristics are outlined and their nominal performances are given

  7. Inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy: an evaluation of the use of nitrogen--argon admixtures as plasma discharge atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalewski, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the use of nitrogen in either the plasma coolant or aerosol carrier gas flows on the physical and spectrochemical properties of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were examined. While the plasma operated with nitrogen in the coolant flow exhibited a stability comparable to that of the argon plasma, the use of nitrogen in the aerosol carrier gas flow resulted in a plasma that was less stable. The detection limits obtained for the three plasmas exhibited a similar trend. In addition, the use of nitrogen--argon admixtures in the plasma coolant gas flow yielded an increase in both the net analyte and the background emission intensities when the corresponding argon and nitrogen--argon plasmas were operated under various conditions. Furthermore, the effect of aluminum on the Ca II (393.4 nm) spectral line was reported for the 1000/1 Al/Ca molar ratio. At an observation height of 15 mm, the signal depressions were 4 and 14% for the nitrogen--argon and the argon plasmas, respectively. The above experimental evidence suggested that the operation of the ICP with an Ar--N 2 coolant gas might be hotter than the argon plasma currently in use in this laboratory. The demountable plasma torch designed in collaboration with K. Olson yielded detection limits for 15 elements and 19 spectral lines that were approximately within a factor of two of those obtained with the torch of fused quartz design. The design also appeared to offer a more readily initiated plasma discharge. The experimental evidence presented supports the utilization of nitrogen--argon admixtures in the plasma coolant gas flow as alternate discharge atmospheres for inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy. In contrast, the experimental evidence shows that there is a deterioration in both physical and spectrochemical properties of plasmas operated with a nitrogen aerosol carrier gas

  8. Discharge dynamics of self-oriented microplasma coupling between cross adjacent cavities in micro-structure device driven by a bipolar pulse waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaogong; Zhang, Xiaoning; Liu, Lingguang; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Chunliang; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2018-04-01

    The excitation dynamics and self-oriented plasma coupling of a micro-structure plasma device with a rectangular cross-section are investigated. The device consists of 7 × 7 microcavity arrays, which are blended into a unity by a 50 μm-thick bulk area above them. The device is operated in argon with a pressure of 200 Torr, driven by a bipolar pulse waveform of 20 kHz. The discharge evolution is characterized by means of electrical measurements and optical emission profiles. It has been found that different emission patterns are observed within microcavities. The formation of these patterns induced by the combined action between the applied electric field and surface deactivation is discussed. The microplasma distribution in some specific regions along the diagonal direction of cavities in the bulk area is observed, and self-oriented microplasma coupling is explored, while the plasma interaction occurred between cross adjacent cavities, contributed by the ionization wave propagation. The velocity of ionization wave propagation is measured to be 1.2 km/s to 3.5 km/s. The exploration of this plasma interaction in the bulk area is of value to applications in electromagnetics and signal processing.

  9. Thermally coupled moving boundary model for charge-discharge of LiFePO4/C cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Ashish; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Gambhire, Priya; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Yeo, Taejung; Doo, Seokgwang

    2015-04-01

    Optimal thermal management is a key requirement in commercial utilization of lithium ion battery comprising of phase change electrodes. In order to facilitate design of battery packs, thermal management systems and fast charging profiles, a thermally coupled electrochemical model that takes into account the phase change phenomenon is required. In the present work, an electrochemical thermal model is proposed which includes the biphasic nature of phase change electrodes, such as lithium iron phosphate (LFP), via a generalized moving boundary model. The contribution of phase change to the heat released during the cell operation is modeled using an equivalent enthalpy approach. The heat released due to phase transformation is analyzed in comparison with other sources of heat such as reversible, irreversible and ohmic. Detailed study of the thermal behavior of the individual cell components with changing ambient temperature, rate of operation and heat transfer coefficient is carried out. Analysis of heat generation in the various regimes is used to develop cell design and operating guidelines. Further, different charging protocols are analyzed and a model based methodology is suggested to design an efficient quick charging protocol.

  10. Rf power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports on RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach will be with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. The author pays close attention to electron- positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. Circular machines, cyclotrons, synchrotrons, etc. have usually not been limited by the RF power available and the machine builders have usually had their RF power source requirements met off the shelf. The main challenge for the RF scientist has been then in the areas of controls. An interesting example of this is in the Conceptual Design Report of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) where the RF system is described in six pages of text in a 700-page report. Also, the cost of that RF system is about one-third of a percent of the project's total cost. The RF system is well within the state of the art and no new power sources need to be developed. All the intellectual effort of the system designer would be devoted to the feedback systems necessary to stabilize beams during storage and acceleration, with the main engineering challenges (and costs) being in the superconducting magnet lattice

  11. RF Energy Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1980-02-01

    The RF Energy Compressor, REC described here, transforms cw rf into periodic pulses using an energy storage cavity, ESC, whose charging is controlled by 180 0 bi-phase modulation, PSK, and external Q switching, βs. Compression efficiency, C/sub e/, of 100% can be approached at any compression factor C/sub f/

  12. Practical RF system design

    CERN Document Server

    Egan, William F

    2003-01-01

    he ultimate practical resource for today's RF system design professionals Radio frequency components and circuits form the backbone of today's mobile and satellite communications networks. Consequently, both practicing and aspiring industry professionals need to be able to solve ever more complex problems of RF design. Blending theoretical rigor with a wealth of practical expertise, Practical RF System Design addresses a variety of complex, real-world problems that system engineers are likely to encounter in today's burgeoning communications industry with solutions that are not easily available in the existing literature. The author, an expert in the field of RF module and system design, provides powerful techniques for analyzing real RF systems, with emphasis on some that are currently not well understood. Combining theoretical results and models with examples, he challenges readers to address such practical issues as: * How standing wave ratio affects system gain * How noise on a local oscillator will affec...

  13. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  14. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodak, I.V.; Kushnir, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described

  15. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described.

  16. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac pacemaker implantation - discharge; Artificial pacemaker - discharge; Permanent pacemaker - discharge; Internal pacemaker - discharge; Cardiac resynchronization therapy - discharge; CRT - discharge; ...

  17. EM modeling of RF drive in DTL tank 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2012-01-01

    A 3-D MicroWave Studio model for the RF drive in the LANSCE DTL tank 4 has been built. Both eigensolver and time-domain modeling are used to evaluate maximal fields in the drive module and RF coupling. The LANSCE DTL tank 4 has recently been experiencing RF problems, which may or may not be related to its replaced RF coupler. This situation stimulated a request by Dan Rees to provide EM modeling of the RF drive in the DTL tank 4 (T4). Jim O'Hara provided a CAD model that was imported into the CST Microwave Studio (MWS) and after some modifications became a part of a simplified MWS model of the T4 RF drive. This technical note describes the model and presents simulation results.

  18. An Investigation of the Micro-Electrical Discharge Machining of Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy Using Grey Relations Coupled with Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustufa Haider Abidi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are advanced engineering materials which possess shape memory effects and super-elastic properties. Their high strength, high wear-resistance, pseudo plasticity, etc., makes the machining of Ni-Ti based SMAs difficult using traditional techniques. Among all non-conventional processes, micro-electric discharge machining (micro-EDM is considered one of the leading processes for micro-machining, owing to its high aspect ratio and capability to machine hard-to-cut materials with good surface finish.The selection of the most appropriate input parameter combination to provide the optimum values for various responses is very important in micro-EDM. This article demonstrates the methodology for optimizing multiple quality characteristics (overcut, taper angle and surface roughness to enhance the quality of micro-holes in Ni-Ti based alloy, using the Grey–Taguchi method. A Taguchi-based grey relational analysis coupled with principal component analysis (Grey-PCA methodology was implemented to investigate the effect of three important micro-EDM process parameters, namely capacitance, voltage and electrode material.The analysis of the individual responses established the importance of multi-response optimization. The main effects plots for the micro-EDM parameters and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA indicate that every parameter does not produce same effect on individual responses, and also that the percent contribution of each parameter to individual response is highly varied. As a result, multi-response optimization was implemented using Grey-PCA. Further, this study revealed that the electrode material had the strongest effect on the multi-response parameter, followed by the voltage and capacitance. The main effects plot for the Grey-PCA shows that the micro-EDM parameters “capacitance” at level-2 (i.e., 475 pF, “discharge voltage” at level-1 (i.e., 80 V and the “electrode material” Cu provided the best multi-response.

  19. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  20. Simulation of 6 1/8 inch rigid coaxial RF transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, Atul; Pande, M.M.; Rao, M.K.V.; Handu, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) transmission line has been designed based upon rigid coaxial 6 1/8 , 50-ohm line for coupling the RF power from its source to 400 KeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. Simulation and analysis have been carried out to evaluate various RF parameters of the line. (author)

  1. Versatile rf controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.

    1985-05-01

    The low level rf system developed for the new Bevatron local injector provides precise control and regulation of the rf phase and amplitude for three 200 MHz linac cavities. The main features of the system are: extensive use of inexpensive, off-the-shelf components, ease of maintenance, and adaptability to a wide range of operation frequencies. The system utilizes separate function, easily removed rf printed circuit cards interconnected via the edge connectors. Control and monitoring are available both locally and through the computer. This paper will describe these features as well as the few component changes that would be required to adapt the techniques to other operating frequencies. 2 refs

  2. Development of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of high power RF source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. O.; Shin, H. M.; Chung, I. Y. [KAPRA, Seoul (Korea); Kim, D. I. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea); Noh, S. J. [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Ko, S. K. [Ulsan University, Ulsan (Korea); Lee, H. J. [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea); Choi, W. H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    This study was performed with objective to design and develop the KOMAC proton accelerator RF system. For the development of the high power RF source for CCDTL(coupled cavity drift tube linac), the medium power RF system using the UHF klystron for broadcasting was integrated and with this RF system we obtained the basic design data, operation experience and code-validity test data. Based on the medium power RF system experimental data, the high power RF system for CCDTL was designed and its performed was analyzed. 16 refs., 64 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  3. Lage-area planar RF plasma productions by surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, S.

    1994-01-01

    Large-area rf plasmas are confirmed to be produced by means of RF discharges inside a large-area dielectric tube. The plasma space is 73 cm x 176 cm and 2.5 cm. The plasma is thought to be produced by an odd plasma-surface wave (PSW ο ) in case of using large-area electrodes and by an even plasma-surface wave (PSW ο ) in case of without the electrodes. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  4. rf driven multicusp H- ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H - beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H - current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm 2

  5. Spatio-temporal powder formation and trapping in RF silane plasmas using 2-D polarization-sensitive laser scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorier, J.L.; Hollenstein, C.; Howling, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    Powder formation studies in deposition plasmas are motivated by the need to reduce contamination in the plasma and films. Models for the force acting upon particles in rf discharges suffer from a lack of quantitative experimental data for comparison in the case of silane-containing plasmas. In this work, a cross-section of the parallel-plate capacitor discharge is illuminated with a polarized beam-expanded laser and global spatio-temporal scattered light and extinction are recorded by CCD cameras. Spatially-regular periodic bright/dark zones due to constructive/destructive Mie interference are visible over large regions of the powder layers, which shows the uniform nature of particle growth in silane plasmas. For particles trapped in an argon plasma, as for steady-state conditions in silane, spatial size segregation is demonstrated by fringes which reverse according to the polarisation of scattered light. The method allow a self-consistent estimation of particle size and number density throughout the discharge volume from which strong particle Coulomb coupling (Γ>40) is suggested to influence powder dynamics. Correction must be made to the plasma emission profile for the extinction by powder. In conclusion, this global diagnostics improves understanding of particle growth and dynamics in silane rf discharges and provides experimental input for testing the validity of models. (author) 6 figs., 43 refs

  6. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003548.htm Rheumatoid factor (RF) To use the sharing features on this ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  7. RF radiation safety handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, Ronald.

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency radiation can be dangerous in a number of ways. Hazards include electromagnetic compatibility and interference, electro-explosive vapours and devices, and direct effects on the human body. This book is a general introduction to the sources and nature of RF radiation. It describes the ways in which our current knowledge, based on relevant safety standards, can be used to safeguard people from any harmful effects of RF radiation. The book is designed for people responsible for, or concerned with, safety. This target audience will primarily be radio engineers, but includes those skilled in other disciplines including medicine, chemistry or mechanical engineering. The book covers the problems of RF safety management, including the use of measuring instruments and methods, and a review of current safety standards. The implications for RF design engineers are also examined. (Author)

  8. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  9. Rf power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs

  10. RF Measurement Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the radiofrequency (RF) and microwave ranges, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this article the fundamentals of the RF signal techniques are discussed. The key element in these front ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as a RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analyses has a ra ther complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown as well as a brief discussion of commonly used noise-measurement techniques. In a further part of this article the operating principles of n...

  11. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a π mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note (1).

  12. X-Band RF Gun Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  13. Rf-to-dc power converters for wireless powering

    KAUST Repository

    Ouda, Mahmoud Hamdy

    2016-12-01

    Various examples are provided related to radio frequency (RF) to direct current (DC) power conversion. In one example, a RF-to-DC converter includes a fully cross-coupled rectification circuit including a pair of forward rectifying transistors and a feedback circuit configured to provide feedback bias signals to gates of the pair of forward rectifying transistors via feedback branch elements. In another example, a method includes receiving a radio frequency (RF) signal; rectifying the RF signal via a fully cross-coupled rectification circuit including a pair of forward rectifying transistors; and providing a DC output voltage from an output connection of the fully cross-coupled rectification circuit, where gating of the pair of forward rectifying transistors is controlled by feedback bias signals provided to gates of the pair of forward rectifying transistors via feedback branch elements.

  14. Analysis of the electromagnetic radiation generated by a multipactor discharge occurring within a microwave passive component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, M; Quesada, F; Alvarez, A [Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Technical University of Cartagena, Cartagena (Murcia) (Spain); Gimeno, B [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada y Electromagnetismo-ICMUV, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Miquel-Espanya, C; Raboso, D [European Space Agency (ESA), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), Noordwijk (Netherlands); Anza, S; Vicente, C; Gil, J [Aurora Software and Testing S.L., Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Taroncher, M; Reglero, M; Boria, V E, E-mail: benito.gimeno@uv.e [Departamento de Comunicaciones-ITEAM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-06

    Multipactoring is a non-linear phenomenon that appears in high-power microwave equipment operating under vacuum conditions and causes several undesirable effects. In this paper, a theoretical and experimental study of the RF spectrum radiated by a multipactor discharge, occurring within a realistic microwave component based on rectangular waveguides, is reported. The electromagnetic coupling of a multipactor current to the fundamental propagative mode of a uniform waveguide has been analysed in the context of the microwave network theory. The discharge produced under a single-carrier RF voltage regime has been approached as a shunt current source exciting such a mode in a transmission-line gap region. By means of a simple equivalent circuit, this model allows prediction of the harmonics generated by the discharge occurring in a realistic passive waveguide component. Power spectrum radiated by a third-order multipactor discharge has been measured in an E-plane silver-plated waveguide transformer, thus validating qualitatively the presented theory to simulate the noise generated by a single-carrier multipactor discharge.

  15. Nipple Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any unexpected nipple discharge evaluated by a doctor. Nipple discharge in men under any circumstances could be a problem and needs further evaluation. One or both breasts may produce a nipple discharge, either spontaneously or when you squeeze your ...

  16. Verification of high voltage rf capacitive sheath models with particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Lieberman, Michael; Verboncoeur, John

    2009-10-01

    Collisionless and collisional high voltage rf capacitive sheath models were developed in the late 1980's [1]. Given the external parameters of a single-frequency capacitively coupled discharge, plasma parameters including sheath width, electron and ion temperature, plasma density, power, and ion bombarding energy can be estimated. One-dimensional electrostatic PIC codes XPDP1 [2] and OOPD1 [3] are used to investigate plasma behaviors within rf sheaths and bulk plasma. Electron-neutral collisions only are considered for collisionless sheaths, while ion-neutral collisions are taken into account for collisional sheaths. The collisionless sheath model is verified very well by PIC simulations for the rf current-driven and voltage-driven cases. Results will be reported for collisional sheaths also. [1] M. A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16 (1988) 638; 17 (1989) 338 [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, J. Comp. Phys. 104 (1993) 321 [3] J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 199

  17. Determination of excitation temperature and vibrational temperature of the N{sub 2}(C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') state in Ne-N{sub 2} RF discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, N U; Naveed, M A; Zakaullah, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, F U [Department of Physics, Gomal University D.I. Khan (Pakistan)

    2008-05-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of neon mixing on the excitation and vibrational temperatures of the second positive system in nitrogen plasma generated by a 13.56 MHz RF generator. The excitation temperature is determined from Ne I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot. The overpopulation of the levels of the N{sub 2} (C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') states with neon mixing are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of the second positive system of nitrogen molecules. The vibrational temperature is calculated for the sequence {delta}{nu} = -2, with the assumption that it follows Boltzmann's distribution. But due to overpopulation of levels, e.g. 1, 4, a linearization process was employed for such distributions allowing us to calculate the vibrational temperature of the N{sub 2} (C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') state. It is found that the excitation temperature as well as the vibrational temperature of the second positive system can be raised significantly by mixing neon with nitrogen plasma. It is also found that the vibrational temperature increases with power and pressure up to 0.5 mbar.

  18. New approach to exploit optimally the PV array output energy by maximizing the discharge rate of a directly-coupled photovoltaic water pumping system (DC/PVPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutelhig, Azzedine; Hadj Arab, Amar; Hanini, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mismatches on a designed d-c PV pumping system have been highlighted. • A new approach predicting the maximal discharge has been developed. • The approach has been discussed versus its linearity coefficient. • The approach effectiveness has been investigated and approved. • Theoretical and experimental obtained values have been compared and approved. - Abstract: A directly-coupled photovoltaic water pumping system (DC/PVPS) is generally designed by considering the worst month conditions on lowest daylight-hours, the maximum monthly daily required water volume and tank to store the excess water. In case of absence of hydraulic storage (water tank) or it is not enough dimensioned, the extra amount of pumped water is lost or is not reasonably used, when the system is operated on full daylight-hour. Beside that the extra amount of energy, which might be produced by the PV generator, is not exploited, when the system is operated only during a specified period-time needed to satisfy the demand. Beyond the accurate design that satisfying the end-user, a new approach has been developed as target to exploit maximally the PV array energy production, by maximizing the discharge rate of the system. The methodology consists of approaching maximally the demanded energy to the supplied energy on full operating day. Based on the demand/supply energy condition, the approach has been developed, upon the PV array and the pump performance models. The issued approach predicts the maximum delivery capacity of the system on monthly daily water volumes versus the monthly daily averages of solar irradiation, previously recorded. Its efficacy has been investigated and discussed according to the estimated and experimental values of its linearity coefficient, following the characterization tests of a designed system, carried out at our pumping test facility in Ghardaia (Algeria). The new theoretically and experimentally obtained flow-rates fit well, except

  19. Electron density modulation in a pulsed dual-frequency (2/13.56 MHz) dual-antenna inductively coupled plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirse, Nishant, E-mail: nishant.sirse@dcu.ie [Plasma Research Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Mishra, Anurag [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Geun Y. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea and SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeunggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ellingboe, Albert R. [Plasma Research Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The electron density, n{sub e}, modulation is measured experimentally using a resonance hairpin probe in a pulsed, dual-frequency (2/13.56 MHz), dual-antenna, inductively coupled plasma discharge produced in argon-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} (90–10) gas mixtures. The 2 MHz power is pulsed at a frequency of 1 kHz, whereas 13.56 MHz power is applied in continuous wave mode. The discharge is operated at a range of conditions covering 3–50 mTorr, 100–600 W 13.56 MHz power level, 300–600 W 2 MHz peak power level, and duty ratio of 10%–90%. The experimental results reveal that the quasisteady state n{sub e} is greatly affected by the 2 MHz power levels and slightly affected by 13.56 MHz power levels. It is observed that the electron density increases by a factor of 2–2.5 on increasing 2 MHz power level from 300 to 600 W, whereas n{sub e} increases by only ∼20% for 13.56 MHz power levels of 100–600 W. The rise time and decay time constant of n{sub e} monotonically decrease with an increase in either 2 or 13.56 MHz power level. This effect is stronger at low values of 2 MHz power level. For all the operating conditions, it is observed that the n{sub e} overshoots at the beginning of the on-phase before relaxing to a quasisteady state value. The relative overshoot density (in percent) depends on 2 and 13.56 MHz power levels. On increasing gas pressure, the n{sub e} at first increases, reaching to a maximum value, and then decreases with a further increase in gas pressure. The decay time constant of n{sub e} increases monotonically with pressure, increasing rapidly up to 10 mTorr gas pressure and at a slower rate of rise to 50 mTorr. At a fixed 2/13.56 MHz power level and 10 mTorr gas pressure, the quasisteady state n{sub e} shows maximum for 30%–40% duty ratio and decreases with a further increase in duty ratio.

  20. Temporal evolution of electron density in a low pressure pulsed two-frequency (60 MHz/2 MHz) capacitively coupled plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirse, N; Ellingboe, A R; Jeon, M H; Yeom, G Y

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved electron density, n e , is measured in a low pressure pulsed two-frequency capacitively coupled plasma discharge sustained in Ar and in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 (80 : 10 : 10) gas mixture using a floating resonance hairpin probe. The top electrode is powered by 60 MHz in pulse mode and the bottom electrode is powered by 2 MHz in continuous wave mode. The dependence of time-resolved n e on the low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) power levels, operating gas pressure, pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and duty cycle are investigated. It is found that the steady state n e in the long on-phase is greatly influenced by the HF power level and slightly affected by the LF power level in both Ar and Ar/CF 4 /O 2 plasma. The decay time of n e is slow (∼30–90 µs) in the case of Ar plasma and strongly depends on the LF power level, whereas in the case of Ar/CF 4 /O 2 gas mixture it is very fast (∼15 µs) and marginally dependent on LF power level. In Ar plasma the steady state n e is increasing with a rise in operating gas pressure, however, in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 plasma it first increases with gas pressure reaching to the maximum (at 20 mTorr) value and then decreases. The pressure dependence of decay time constant mimics the pressure variation of steady state n e . Furthermore, it is observed that the on-phase electron density is greatly affected by changing the PRF and duty cycle. This effect is more prominent in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 plasma when compared to Ar discharge. In addition, n e is observed to overshoot the steady state densities in the beginning of the on-phase in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 gas mixture, but this effect is either small or absent in the case of Ar plasma. (paper)

  1. Very low frequency oscillations of heat load and recycling flux in steady-state tokamak discharge in TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zushi, H.; Sakamoto, M.; Hanada, K.; Iyomasa, A.; Nakamura, K.; Sato, K.N.; Idei, H.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Hasegawa, M.; Matsuo, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Sugata, T.; Maezono, N.; Hoshika, H.; Sasaki, K.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma wall interaction (PWI) driven relaxation oscillations are investigated in the steady state discharge for 5 hours. The oscillation frequency was about 10 -3 Hz and each perturbation lasted for about 300 s. The heat load, recycling flux and impurity influx were varied from a few % to several tens of %. The largest variation of 70% was seen on the Mo XIII (molybdenum), although the influx of Mo I was only 20 %. Although the input rf power is kept constant during the discharge, the coupling between the rf and plasma was increased by about 10%. The current drive efficiency is decreased by 24 % in spite of current ramp. The toroidal and poloidal profiles of the recycling flux were also changed. During the last relaxation phase, the plasma was finally terminated. The current reduction (> 4 kA) was not recovered by intense local perturbation of the recycling superposed on the relaxation oscillation. (authors)

  2. Very low frequency oscillations of heat load and recycling flux in steady-state tokamak discharge in TRIAM-1M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zushi, H.; Sakamoto, M.; Hanada, K.; Iyomasa, A.; Nakamura, K.; Sato, K.N.; Idei, H.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Hasegawa, M. [Kyushu Univ., Research Institute for Applied Mechanics (Japan); Matsuo, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Sugata, T.; Maezono, N.; Hoshika, H.; Sasaki, K. [Kyushu Univ., Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Plasma wall interaction (PWI) driven relaxation oscillations are investigated in the steady state discharge for 5 hours. The oscillation frequency was about 10{sup -3} Hz and each perturbation lasted for about 300 s. The heat load, recycling flux and impurity influx were varied from a few % to several tens of %. The largest variation of 70% was seen on the Mo XIII (molybdenum), although the influx of Mo I was only 20 %. Although the input rf power is kept constant during the discharge, the coupling between the rf and plasma was increased by about 10%. The current drive efficiency is decreased by 24 % in spite of current ramp. The toroidal and poloidal profiles of the recycling flux were also changed. During the last relaxation phase, the plasma was finally terminated. The current reduction (> 4 kA) was not recovered by intense local perturbation of the recycling superposed on the relaxation oscillation. (authors)

  3. Flow Injection Photochemical Vapor Generation Coupled with Miniaturized Solution-Cathode Glow Discharge Atomic Emission Spectrometry for Determination and Speciation Analysis of Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jiamei; Li, Qing; Guo, Xiaohong; Zhang, Guoxia; Wang, Zheng

    2017-10-03

    A novel, compact, and green method was developed for the determination and speciation analysis of mercury, based on flow injection photochemical vapor generation (PVG) coupled with miniaturized solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectroscopy (SCGD-AES). The SCGD was generated between a miniature hollow titanium tube and a solution emerging from a glass capillary. Cold mercury vapor (Hg(0)) was generated by PVG and subsequently delivered to the SCGD for excitation, and finally the emission signals were recorded by a miniaturized spectrograph. The detection limits (DLs) of Hg(II) and methylmercury (MeHg) were both determined to be 0.2 μg L -1 . Moreover, mercury speciation analysis could also be performed by using different wavelengths and powers from the UV lamp and irradiation times. Both Hg(II) and MeHg can be converted to Hg(0) for the determination of total mercury (T-Hg) with 8 W/254 nm UV lamp and 60 s irradiation time; while only Hg(II) can be reduced to Hg(0) and determined selectively with 4 W/365 nm UV lamp and 20 s irradiation time. Then, the concentration of MeHg can be calculated by subtracting the Hg(II) from the T-Hg. Because of its similar sensitivity and DL at 8 W/254 nm, the simpler and less toxic Hg(II) was used successfully as a primary standard for the quantification of T-Hg. The novel PVG-SCGD-AES system provides not only a 365-fold improvement in the DL for Hg(II) but also a nonchromatographic method for the speciation analysis of mercury. After validating its accuracy, this method was successfully used for mercury speciation analysis of water and biological samples.

  4. Numerical simulation of the sustaining discharge in radio frequency hollow cathode discharge in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xin-Xian; He, Feng, E-mail: hefeng@bit.edu.cn; Ouyang, Ji-Ting [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen, Qiang, E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com; Ge, Teng [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Materials, Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, Beijing 10081 (China)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the radio frequency (RF) hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in argon at 1 Torr. The evolutions of the particle density distribution and the ionization rate distribution in RF HCD at 13.56 MHz indicate that the discharge mainly occurs inside the hollow cathode. The spatio-temporal distributions of the ionization rate and the power deposition within the hollow cathode imply that sheath oscillation heating is the primary mechanism to sustain the RF HCD, whereas secondary electron emission plays a negligible role. However, as driving frequency decreases, secondary electron heating becomes a dominant mechanism to sustain the discharge in RF hollow cathode.

  5. Modelling of DC electric fields induced by RF sheath in front of ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2003-01-01

    Reducing the ICRF (ion cyclotron range frequency) antenna-plasma interaction is one of the key points for reaching very long tokamak discharges. One problem which limits such discharges, is the appearance of hot spots on the surface of the antenna: Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths modify the properties of the edge plasma by rectifying the RF potential along open magnetic field lines and can induce hot spots. This paper investigates the corrections to sheath potentials introduced by the interactions between adjacent flux tubes. Our theoretical study started from an oscillating double Langmuir probe model, in which a transverse influx of current was included. This model was confronted with 1D PIC simulations along a magnetic field line, and demonstrated that current exchanges can decrease mean potentials. A 2D electrostatic fluid code was then developed, which couples adjacent flux tubes in a poloidal cross section with collisional conductivity or polarization currents. It showed that transverse currents are able to smooth structures smaller than a characteristic size in the sheath potential maps (results for Tore Supra). These computed rectified potentials can be used to obtain the DC electric fields in front of the antenna. And then, it gives an estimate of the particle drift and the energy flux on the antenna structure, which can explain hot spots. (author)

  6. The FELIX RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manintveld, P.; Delmee, P.F.M.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meddens, B.J.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the RF system for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX) is discussed. The RF system provides the input power for a triode gun (1 GHz, 100 W), a prebuncher (1 GHz, 10 kW), a buncher (3 GHz, 20 MW), and two linacs (3 GHz, 8 MW each). The pulse length in the system is 20 μs. The required electron beam stability imposes the following demands on the RF system: a phase stability better than 0.3 deg for the 1 GHz signals and better than 1 deg for the 3 GHz signals; the amplitude stability has to be better than 1% for the 1 GHz and better than 0.2% for the 3 GHz signals. (author) 3 refs.; 6 figs

  7. RF and feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, D.

    1994-01-01

    The radiofrequency system of the Tau Charm Factory accelerating 10 11 particles per bunch and a circulating current of 0.5 A is presented. In order to produce the very short bunches required, the RF system of TCF must provide a large RF voltage (8 MV) at a frequency in the neighbourhood of 400-500 MHz. It appears very attractive to produce the high voltage required with superconducting cavities, for which wall losses are negligible. A comparison between the sc RF system proposed and a possible copper system run at an average 1 MV/m, shows the clear advantage of sc cavities for TCF. (R.P.). 2 figs,. 1 tab

  8. Coincident ion acceleration and electron extraction for space propulsion using the self-bias formed on a set of RF biased grids bounding a plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafalskyi, D; Aanesland, A

    2014-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to accelerate ions in classical gridded ion thrusters and ion sources such that co-extracted electrons from the source may provide beam space charge neutralization. In this way there is no need for an additional electron neutralizer. The method consists of applying RF voltage to a two-grid acceleration system via a blocking capacitor. Due to the unequal effective area of the two grids in contact with the plasma, a dc self-bias is formed, rectifying the applied RF voltage. As a result, ions are continuously accelerated within the grid system while electrons are emitted in brief instants within the RF period when the RF space charge sheath collapses. This paper presents the first experimental results and a proof-of-principle. Experiments are carried out using the Neptune thruster prototype which is a gridded Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) source operated at 4 MHz, attached to a larger beam propagation chamber. The RF power supply is used both for the ICP discharge (plasma generation) and powering the acceleration grids via a capacitor for ion acceleration and electron extraction without any dc power supplies. The ion and electron energies, particle flux and densities are measured using retarding field energy analyzers (RFEA), Langmuir probes and a large beam target. The system operates in Argon and N 2 . The dc self-bias is found to be generated within the gridded extraction system in all the range of operating conditions. Broad quasi-neutral ion-electron beams are measured in the downstream chamber with energies up to 400 eV. The beams from the RF acceleration method are compared with classical dc acceleration with an additional external electron neutralizer. It is found that the two acceleration techniques provide similar performance, but the ion energy distribution function from RF acceleration is broader, while the floating potential of the beam is lower than for the dc accelerated beam. (paper)

  9. PASTA - An RF Phase and Amplitude Scan and Tuning Application

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, J; Deibele, C; Henderson, S

    2005-01-01

    To assist the beam commissioning in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac, a general purpose RF tuning application has been written to help set RF phase and amplitude. It follows the signature matching procedure described in Ref.* The method involves varying an upstream Rf cavity amplitude and phase settings and comparing the measured downstream beam phase responses to model predictions. The model input for cavity phase and amplitude calibration and for the beam energy are varied to best match observations. This scheme has advantages over other RF tuning techniques of not requiring intercepting devices (e.g. Faraday Cups), and not being restricted to a small linear response regime near the design values. The application developed here is general and can be applied to different RF structure types in the SNS linac. Example applications in the SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures will be shown.

  10. RF tuning system for superconducting cyclotron at VECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Aditya; Som, S.; Pal, Saikat; Seth, S.; Mukherjee, A.K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Prasad, J.S.; Raj, P.R.; Manna, S.K.; Banerjee, M.; Krishnaiah, K.V.; Maskawade, S.; Saha, M.S.; Biswas, S.; Panda, Umashakar

    2009-01-01

    The RF system of Superconducting cyclotron at VECC has operational frequency 9-27 MHz. It has three numbers of tunable rf amplifier cavities as well as six numbers of tunable Main resonant cavities. RF tuning system takes care of movement of nine stepper motor based sliding short movement and hydraulic driven three coupling capacitors and three trimmer capacitors. The PC-based stepper motor controlled sliding short movement system has positional accuracy of around 20 micron and PC-based hydraulically driven couplers and trimmers system has 10 micron positional accuracy. The RF power is capacitively coupled to the dee (accelerating electrode) of the main resonant cavity through Coupler (Coupling capacitor). The coupling capacitor is used to match the impedance of the main resonant cavity to the 50 Ohm output impedance of final RF power amplifier. Trimmer capacitor operates in closed loop for the adjustment of cavity phase variation arising due to temperature variation and beam loading of the cavity. Coupler can travel 100 mm. and trimmer has 20 mm. travels. A PLC based PID control system has been developed for positional control of the coupler and trimmer. One position control mode of trimmer is same as coupling capacitor and another is velocity control mode. Velocity control mode operates in close-loop. The positional data of different frequencies of nine stepper motors and three coupling capacitors are stored in a database. (author)

  11. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  12. Conventional RF system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a conventional RF system is always complex and must fit the needs of the particular machine for which it is planned. It follows that many different design criteria should be considered and analyzed, thus exceeding the narrow limits of a lecture. For this reason only the fundamental components of an RF system, including the generators, are considered in this short seminar. The most common formulas are simply presented in the text, while their derivations are shown in the appendices to facilitate, if desired, a more advanced level of understanding. (orig.)

  13. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM 210 mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities

  14. Energy confinement in the torsatron URAGAN-3M during the rf-heating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashnev, V.K.; Burchenko, P.Ya.; Lozin, A.V. and others

    2008-01-01

    Energy confinement time of plasma in torsatron U-3M was measured both during quasi-stationary study of RF-discharge and after RF-power cut-off. Power absorbed by plasma in the confinement region was estimated. A mechanism which explain the plasma density behavior in the confinement region is proposed

  15. Observation of Ω mode electron heating in dusty argon radio frequency discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killer, Carsten; Bandelow, Gunnar; Schneider, Ralf; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Matyash, Konstantin [Universitätsrechenzentrum, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    The time-resolved emission of argon atoms in a dusty plasma has been measured with phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy using an intensified charge-coupled device camera. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a capacitively coupled rf argon discharge with the help of thermophoretic levitation. While electrons are exclusively heated by the expanding sheath (α mode) in the dust-free case, electron heating takes place in the entire plasma bulk when the discharge volume is filled with dust particles. Such a behavior is known as Ω mode, first observed in electronegative plasmas. Furthermore, particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out, which reproduce the trends of the experimental findings. These simulations support previous numerical models showing that the enhanced atomic emission in the plasma can be attributed to a bulk electric field, which is mainly caused by the reduced electrical conductivity due to electron depletion.

  16. Development and analytical characterization of a Grimm-type glow discharge ion source operated with high gas flow rates and coupled to a mass spectrometer with high mass resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, Claus; Feldmann, Ingo; Gilmour, Dave; Hoffmann, Volker; Jakubowski, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    A Grimm-type glow discharge ion source has been developed and was coupled to a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) with high mass resolution (Axiom, ThermoElemental, Winsford, UK) by exchanging the front plate of the ICP-MS interface system only. In addition to high discharge powers of up to 70 W, which are typical for a Grimm-type design, this source could be operated with relative high gas flow rates of up to 240 ml min -1 . In combination with a high discharge voltage the signal intensities are reaching a constant level within the first 20 s after the discharge has started. An analytical characterization of this source is given utilizing a calibration using the steel standard reference material NIST 1261A-1265A. The sensitivity for the investigated elements measured with a resolution of 4000 is in the range of 500-6000 cps μg -1 g -1 , and a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the measured isotope relative to Fe of less than 8% for the major and minor components of the sample has been achieved. Limits of detection at ng g -1 levels could be obtained

  17. The TESLA RF System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-01-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ∼600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components

  18. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system

  19. Beyond the RF photogun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, O.J.; Rozenzweig, J.; Travish, G.

    2003-01-01

    Laser-triggered switching of MV DC voltages enables acceleration gradients an order of magnitude higher than in state-of-the-art RF photoguns. In this way ultra-short, high-brightness electron bunches may be generated without the use of magnetic compression. The evolution of the bunch during the

  20. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, G [Jefferson Lab (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  1. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  2. Simplified RF power system for Wideroe-type linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fugitt, J.; Howard, D.; Crosby, F.; Johnson, R.; Nolan, M.; Yuen, G.

    1981-03-01

    The RF system for the SuperHILAC injector linac was designed and constructed for minimum system complexity, wide dynamic range, and ease of maintenance. The final amplifier is close coupled to the linac and operates in an efficient semilinear mode, eliminating troublesome transmission lines, modulators, and high level regulators. The system has been operated at over 250 kW, 23 MHz with good regulation. The low level RF electronics are contained in a single chassis adjacent to the RF control computer, which monitors all important operating parameters. A unique 360 0 phase and amplitude modular is used for precise control and regulation of the accelerating voltage

  3. Active high-power RF pulse compression using optically switched resonant delay lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantawi, S.G.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1996-11-01

    The authors present the design and a proof of principle experimental results of an optically controlled high power rf pulse compression system. The design should, in principle, handle few hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band. The system is based on the switched resonant delay line theory. It employs resonant delay lines as a means of storing rf energy. The coupling to the lines is optimized for maximum energy storage during the charging phase. To discharge the lines, a high power microwave switch increases the coupling to the lines just before the start of the output pulse. The high power microwave switch, required for this system, is realized using optical excitation of an electron-hole plasma layer on the surface of a pure silicon wafer. The switch is designed to operate in the TE 01 mode in a circular waveguide to avoid the edge effects present at the interface between the silicon wafer and the supporting waveguide; thus, enhancing its power handling capability

  4. rf coaxial couplers for high-intensity linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, J.J.; Knapp, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Two rf coaxial couplers that are particularly suitable for intertank connection of the disk-and-washer accelerating structure for use in high-intensity linear accelerators have been developed. These devices have very high coupling to the accelerating structure and very low rf power loss at the operating frequency, and they can be designed for any relative particle velocity β > 0.4. Focusing and monitoring devices can be located inside these couplers

  5. Spectroscopic investigation of indium halides as substitudes of mercury in low pressure discharges for lighting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briefi, Stefan

    2012-05-22

    Low pressure discharges with indium halides as radiator are discussed as substitutes for hazardous mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps. In this work, the applicability of InBr and InCl in a low pressure discharge light source is investigated. The aim is to identify and understand the physical processes which determine the discharge characteristics and the efficiency of the generated near-UV emission of the indium halide molecule and of the indium atom which is created due to dissociation processes in the plasma. As discharge vessels sealed cylindrical quartz glass tubes which contain a defined amount of indium halide and a rare gas are used. Preliminary investigations showed that for a controlled variation of the indium halide density a well-defined cold spot setup is mandatory. This was realized in the utilized experimental setup. The use of metal halides raises the issue, that power coupling by internal electrodes is not possible as the electrodes would quickly be eroded by the halides. The comparison of inductive and capacitive RF-coupling with external electrodes revealed that inductively coupled discharges provide higher light output and much better long term stability. Therefore, all investigations are carried out using inductive RF-coupling. The diagnostic methods optical emission and white light absorption spectroscopy are applied. As the effects of absorption-signal saturation and reabsorption of emitted radiation within the plasma volume could lead to an underestimation of the determined population densities by orders of magnitude, these effects are considered in the data evaluation. In order to determine the electron temperature and the electron density from spectroscopic measurements, an extended corona model as population model of the indium atom has been set up. A simulation of the molecular emission spectra has been implemented to investigate the rovibrational population processes of the indium halide molecules. The impact of the cold spot

  6. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; Arthroplasty - shoulder - discharge

  7. Development of new S-band RF window for stable high-power operation in linear accelerator RF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Youngdo; Lee, Byung-Joon; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Kong, Hyung-Sup; Hwang, Woonha; Roh, Sungjoo; Ryu, Jiwan

    2017-09-01

    For stable high-power operation, a new RF window is developed in the S-band linear accelerator (Linac) RF systems of the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) and the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free-Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL). The new RF window is designed to mitigate the strength of the electric field at the ceramic disk and also at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the conventional RF window. By replacing the pill-box type cavity in the conventional RF window with an overmoded cavity, the electric field component perpendicular to the ceramic disk that caused most of the multipacting breakdowns in the ceramic disk was reduced by an order of magnitude. The reduced electric field at the ceramic disk eliminated the Ti-N coating process on the ceramic surface in the fabrication procedure of the new RF window, preventing the incomplete coating from spoiling the RF transmission and lowering the fabrication cost. The overmoded cavity was coupled with input and output waveguides through dual side-wall coupling irises to reduce the electric field strength at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure and the possibility of mode competitions in the overmoded cavity. A prototype of the new RF window was fabricated and fully tested with the Klystron peak input power, pulse duration and pulse repetition rate of 75 MW, 4.5 μs and 10 Hz, respectively, at the high-power test stand. The first mass-produced new RF window installed in the PLS-II Linac is running in normal operation mode. No fault is reported to date. Plans are being made to install the new RF window to all S-band accelerator RF modules of the PLS-II and PAL-XFEL Linacs. This new RF window may be applied to the output windows of S-band power sources like Klystron as wells as the waveguide windows of accelerator facilities which operate in S-band.

  8. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-01-01

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun (1), referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee (2). Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  9. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, Chandra M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications

  10. RF current distribution and topology of RF sheath potentials in front of ICRF antennae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.; Bremond, S.; Bosia, G.

    2005-01-01

    The 2D (radial/poloidal) spatial topology of RF-induced convective cells developing radially in front of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennae is investigated, in relation to the spatial distribution of RF currents over the metallic structure of the antenna. This is done via a Green's function, determined from the ICRF wave coupling equations, and well-suited to open field lines extending toroidally far away on both sides of the antenna. Using such formalism, combined with a full-wave calculation using the 3D antenna code ICANT (Pecoul S. et al 2000 Comput. Phys. Commun. 146 166-87), two classes of convective cells are analysed. The first one appears in front of phased arrays of straps, and depending on the strap phasing, its topology is interpreted using the poloidal profiles of either the RF current or the RF voltage of the strip line theory. The other class of convective cells is specific to antenna box corners and is evidenced for the first time. Based on such analysis, general design rules are worked out in order to reduce the RF-sheath potentials, which generalize those proposed in the earlier literature, and concrete antenna design options are tested numerically. The merits of aligning all strap centres on the same (tilted) flux tube, and of reducing the antenna box toroidal conductivity in its lower and upper parts, are discussed

  11. Racetrack microtron rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs

  12. RF Gun Optimization Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-01-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation

  13. Characterization of In-Flight Processing of Alumina Powder Using a DC-RF Hybrid Plasma Flow System at Constant Low Operating Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, H.; Onodera, M.; Igawa, J.; Nakajima, T.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to provide the optimum operating conditions for enhancing in-flight alumina particle heating as much as possible for particle spheroidization and aggregation of melted particles using a DC-RF hybrid plasma flow system even at constant low operating power based on the thermofluid considerations. It is clarified that the swirl flow and higher operating pressure enhance the particle melting and aggregation of melted particles coupled with increasing gas temperature downstream of a plasma uniformly in the radial direction at constant electrical discharge conditions.

  14. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  15. Microwave and RF engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sorrentino, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    An essential text for both students and professionals, combining detailed theory with clear practical guidance This outstanding book explores a large spectrum of topics within microwave and radio frequency (RF) engineering, encompassing electromagnetic theory, microwave circuits and components. It provides thorough descriptions of the most common microwave test instruments and advises on semiconductor device modelling. With examples taken from the authors' own experience, this book also covers:network and signal theory;electronic technology with guided electromagnetic pr

  16. Magnetic fields and uniformity of radio frequency power deposition in low-frequency inductively coupled plasmas with crossed internal oscillating currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakadze, Erekle; Ostrikov, K.N.; Tsakadze, Z.L.

    2004-01-01

    ) discharge modes using two miniature magnetic probes. It is shown that the radial uniformity and depth of the rf power deposition can be improved as compared with conventional sources of inductively coupled plasmas with external flat spiral ("pancake") antennas. Relatively deeper rf power deposition...... in the plasma source results in more uniform profiles of the optical emission intensity, which indicates on the improvement of the plasma uniformity over large chamber volumes. The results of the numerical modeling of the radial magnetic field profiles are found in a reasonable agreement with the experimental...

  17. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q 0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons

  18. Storage of RF photons in minimal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromières, J.-P.; Chanelière, T.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the minimal conditions to store coherently a RF pulse in a material medium. We choose a commercial quartz as a memory support because it is a widely available component with a high Q-factor. Pulse storage is obtained by varying dynamically the light-matter coupling with an analog switch. This parametric driving of the quartz dynamics can be alternatively interpreted as a stopped-light experiment. We obtain an efficiency of 26%, a storage time of 209 μs and a time-to-bandwidth product of 98 by optimizing the pulse temporal shape. The coherent character of the storage is demonstrated. Our goal is to connect different types of memories in the RF and optical domain for quantum information processing. Our motivation is essentially fundamental.

  19. B factory rf system design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss the issues of relevance to the design of a B factory RF system. First, the general parameter regime is outlined, and the reasons behind certain commonly made choices are indicated. This regime involves high beam currents, and many relatively short bunches. Next, the physics difficulties associated with coupled-bunch instabilities are described briefly. We then describe in general terms the alternative approaches taken by various B factory designers, the motivation for these choices, and the technical issues raised by them. Technical solutions have been proposed for both the room-temperature and the superconducting RF scenarios, and considerable R ampersand D is being carried out worldwide to confirm and optimize these solutions

  20. B factory RF system design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the issues of relevance to the design of a B factory RF system. First, the general parameter regime is outlined, and the reasons behind certain commonly made choices are indicated. This regime involves high beam currents, and many relatively short bunches. Next, the physics difficulties associated with coupled-bunch instabilities are described briefly. We then describe in general terms the alternative approaches taken by various B factory designers, the motivation for these choices, and the technical issues raised by them. Technical solutions have been proposed for both the room-temperature and the superconducting RF scenarios, and considerable R ampersand D is being carried out worldwide to confirm and optimize these solutions

  1. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  2. Investigation of RF-enhanced plasma potentials on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoukov, R., E-mail: ochoukov@psfc.mit.edu [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Whyte, D.G.; Brunner, D. [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cziegler, I. [Center for Energy Research, UCSD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B. [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Myra, J. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue P-5, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Terry, J.; Wukitch, S. [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Radio frequency (RF) sheath rectification is a leading mechanism suspected of causing anomalously high erosion of plasma facing materials in RF-heated plasmas on Alcator C-Mod. An extensive experimental survey of the plasma potential (Φ{sub P}) in RF-heated discharges on C-Mod reveals that significant Φ{sub P} enhancement (>100 V) is found on outboard limiter surfaces, both mapped and not mapped to active RF antennas. Surfaces that magnetically map to active RF antennas show Φ{sub P} enhancement that is, in part, consistent with the recently proposed slow wave rectification mechanism. Surfaces that do not map to active RF antennas also experience significant Φ{sub P} enhancement, which strongly correlates with the local fast wave intensity. In this case, fast wave rectification is a leading candidate mechanism responsible for the observed enhancement.

  3. Investigation of RF-enhanced plasma potentials on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D.G.; Brunner, D.; Cziegler, I.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Myra, J.; Terry, J.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) sheath rectification is a leading mechanism suspected of causing anomalously high erosion of plasma facing materials in RF-heated plasmas on Alcator C-Mod. An extensive experimental survey of the plasma potential (Φ P ) in RF-heated discharges on C-Mod reveals that significant Φ P enhancement (>100 V) is found on outboard limiter surfaces, both mapped and not mapped to active RF antennas. Surfaces that magnetically map to active RF antennas show Φ P enhancement that is, in part, consistent with the recently proposed slow wave rectification mechanism. Surfaces that do not map to active RF antennas also experience significant Φ P enhancement, which strongly correlates with the local fast wave intensity. In this case, fast wave rectification is a leading candidate mechanism responsible for the observed enhancement

  4. Determination of bismuth by dielectric barrier discharge atomic absorption spectrometry coupled with hydride generation: Method optimization and evaluation of analytical performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratzer, Jan; Boušek, J.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Mester, Z.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 19 (2014), s. 9620-9625 ISSN 0003-2700 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * hydride generation * atomic absorption spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  5. ICH antenna development on the ORNL RF Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Haste, G.R.; Hoffman, D.J.; Livesey, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A compact resonant loop antenna is installed on the ORNL Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF). Facility characteristics include a steady-state magnetic field of ∼ 0.5 T at the antenna, microwave-generated plasmas with n e ∼ 10 12 cm -3 and T e ∼ 8 eV, and 100 kW of 25-MHz rf power. The antenna is tunable from ∼22--75 MHz, is designed to handle ≥1 MW of rf power, and can be moved 5 cm with respect to the port flange. Antenna characteristics reported and discussed include the effect of magnetic field on rf voltage breakdown at the capacitor, the effects of magnetic field and plasma on rf voltage breakdown between the radiating element and the Faraday shield, the effects of graphite on Faraday shield losses, and the efficiency of coupling to the plasma. 2 refs., 4 figs

  6. RF linacs for FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are twenty rf linac-driven Free Electron Lasers (FELs) existing or under construction throughout the world and proposals for several more. A number of these FELs have recently been established as facilities to produce coherent optical beams for materials and biomedical research. Both short pulse low duty factor and long pulse high duty factor linac-driven FELs will be discussed. Accelerator issues that influence the performance of an FEL as a scientific instrument will be indicated. (Author) 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Low frequency rf current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-01-01

    An unshielded antenna for rf heating has been developed and tested during this report period. In addition to design specifications being given, some experimental results are presented utilizing: (1) an unprotected Faraday shield, (2) insulating guard limiters, (3) unshielded antenna experiments, (4) method for detecting small rf driven currents, (5) rf fast wave current drive experiments, (6) alfven wave interactions with electrons, and (7) machine conditioning, impurity generation and density control

  8. Sheath heating in low-pressure capacitive radio frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    Capacitively coupled, parallel plate, r.f. discharges are commonly used for materials processing. The electrons in such a discharge gain and lose energy by reflection from the oscillating sheaths which form at the electrodes. Previous models of the electron heating by this mechanism have assumed that the sheath motion is slow compared to the electron thermal velocity, so that the electron energy change from each reflection is small. Here, the heating rate, density, and sheath width relations are derived analytically in the limit of very fast sheath motion. Numerical results are presented spanning the slow and fast limits. Results from particle-in-cell simulations show that in the large-energy-change regime, an electron beam is produced on each sheath expansion. At low pressure, this beam can traverse the plasma and interact with the sheath at the opposite electrode, producing a beam energy and density dependence on the length of the discharge. The beam produces a time and space varying warm tail on the electron energy distribution. Two revised heating models are derived, assuming power-law and two-temperature electron energy distributions, with temporal variation in electron temperature. These revised models yield new predictions for the variation of the power, density, and sheath thickness with applied r.f. voltage. These predictions are compared with simulation results and laboratory experiment. The electron sheath motion is investigated experimentally by observing the signal on a floating probe in the sheath region. This is compared to the signal product by a non-linear circuit model which accounts for the perturbation of the sheath potential by the probe and includes various forms of sheath motion. The experimental observations are consistent with the analytical predictions. Experimental observations of plasma-sheath resonance oscillations are presented which agree with analytical predictions

  9. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  10. Pressure dependence of electron temperature using rf-floated electrostatic probes in rf plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantin, A.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A new technique, which eliminates ac between probe and plasma by means of a ''follower'', permits electrostatic probes to be used in rf plasmas with a degree of confidence and accuracy which is equal, if not better, to that for a dc discharge. Measurements in argon, using this technique, have shown that electron temperature (T/sub e/) in an rf discharge is not higher than in dc discharge. Moreover the values of T/sub e/ do not agree with von Engel's law, but are in close agreement with a theory based on free diffusion and extrapolated up to values of pR=20 Torr cm (pressure times tube radius). These results are in contradiction with published electrostatic probe results for a positive column, but agree with published results as determined by microwave radiometry and optical spectroscopy. The hypothesis is made that the supporting evidence in favor of von Engel's law, afforded by published electrostatic probe results, could be due to an artifact

  11. Hydrogen and helium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by RF plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazunari Katayama; Kazumi Imaoka; Takayuki Okamura; Masabumi Nishikawa

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of tritium behavior in plasma facing materials is an important issue for fusion reactor from viewpoints of fuel control and radiation safety. Tungsten is used as a plasma facing material in the divertor region of ITER. However, investigation of hydrogen isotope behavior in tungsten deposition layer is not sufficient so far. It is also necessary to evaluate an effect of helium on a formation of deposition layer and an accumulation of hydrogen isotopes because helium generated by fusion reaction exists in fusion plasma. In this study, tungsten deposition layers were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen and helium RF plasma. An erosion rate and a deposition rate of tungsten were estimated by weight measurement. Hydrogen and helium retention were investigated by thermal desorption method. Tungsten deposition was performed using a capacitively-coupled RF plasma device equipped with parallel-plate electrodes. A tungsten target was mounted on one electrode which is supplied with RF power at 200 W. Tungsten substrates were mounted on the other electrode which is at ground potential. The plasma discharge was continued for 120 hours where pressure of hydrogen or helium was controlled to be 10 Pa. The amounts of hydrogen and helium released from deposition layers was quantified by a gas chromatograph. The erosion rate of target tungsten under helium plasma was estimated to be 1.8 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. The deposition rate on tungsten substrate under helium plasma was estimated to be 4.1 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. Atomic ratio of hydrogen to tungsten in a deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma was estimated to be 0.17 by heating to 600 o C. From a deposition layer formed by helium plasma, not only helium but also hydrogen was released by heating to 500 o C. Atomic ratios of helium and hydrogen to tungsten were estimated to be 0.080 and 0.075, respectively. The trapped hydrogen is probably impurity hydrogen

  12. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  13. rf experiments on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Hooke, W.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of rf experiments are being conducted on PLT in order to explore rf techniques which could improve tokamak performance parameters. Of special importance are the studies of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating, lower hybrid MHD stabilization and electron heating, down-shifted electron cyclotron heating, and fast wave current drive. Ion Bernstein wave heating results at modest power indicate that the particle confinement time could be enhanced relative to that for fast wave heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and neutral beam heating. At these power levels a conclusive determination of energy confinement scaling with power cannot yet be given. Central sawtooth and m = 1 MHD stabilization is being obtained with centrally peaked lower hybrid (LH) current drive and the central electron temperature is peaking to values (approx.5 keV) well outside the bounds of ''profile consistency.'' In this case the electron energy confinement is apparently increased relative to the ohmic value. The production of relativistic electrons via heating at the down-shifted electron cyclotron (EC) frequency is found to be consistent with theoretical predictions and lends support to the use of this method for heating in relatively high magnetic field devices

  14. Space structure of the glow discharge with free side boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatsenko, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to reveal physical reasons, which are responsible for the formation of space structure of glow type discharge with free side boundary, both in DC and in RF electric fields. By now extensive experimental material have been accumulated in discharge physics. Also many theoretical models have been proposed for describing separate parts of discharge with the cold electrodes (cathode and anode regions, positive column and transition zones - glow luminescence and Farraday's dark space of DC-discharge, electrode regions and plasma column of RF capacitive discharge). As this takes place, the majority of known works are devoted to some one part of gas discharge - positive column, electrode regions, transition zones and so on. At the same time just now we don't know anything about space structure of free, steady-state gas discharge of glow type, as a whole, especially when the pressure p much-gt 1 Torr

  15. NIPPLE DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Bukharova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the data available in the literature, as high as 50% of women have benign breast tumors frequently accompanied by nip- ple discharge. Nipple discharge may be serous, bloody, purulent, and colostric. The most common causes are breast abscess, injury, drugs, prolactinoma, intraductal pappiloma, ductal ectasia, intraductal cancer (not more than 10%.

  16. Accurate modeling of complete functional RF blocks: CHAMELEON RF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H.H.J.M.; Niehof, J.; Schilders, W.H.A.; Ciuprina, G.; Ioan, D.

    2007-01-01

    Next-generation nano-scale RF-IC designs have an unprecedented complexity and performance that will inevitably lead to costly re-spins and loss of market opportunities. In order to cope with this, the aim of the European Framework 6 CHAMELEON RF project is to develop methodologies and prototype

  17. Application of Distributed Temperature Sensing for coupled mapping of sedimentation processes and spatio-temporal variability of groundwater discharge in soft-bedded streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebok, Eva; Duque, C; Engesgaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , maximum and mean streambed temperatures as well as the daily amplitude and standard deviation of temperatures. The identified potential high-discharge areas were mostly located near the channel banks, also showing temporal variability because of the scouring and redistribution of streambed sediments......The delineation of groundwater discharge areas based on Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) data of the streambed can be difficult in soft-bedded streams where sedimentation and scouring processes constantly change the position of the fibre optic cable relative to the streambed. Deposition...... variability in streambed temperatures between October 2011 and January 2012. Detailed monthly streambed elevation surveys were carried out to monitor the position of the fibre optic cable relative to the streambed and to quantify the effect of sedimentation processes on streambed temperatures. Based...

  18. The Spallation Neutron Source RF Reference System

    CERN Document Server

    Piller, Maurice; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Ma, Hengjie

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) RF Reference System includes the master oscillator (MO), local oscillator(LO) distribution, and Reference RF distribution systems. Coherent low noise Reference RF signals provide the ability to control the phase relationships between the fields in the front-end and linear accelerator (linac) RF cavity structures. The SNS RF Reference System requirements, implementation details, and performance are discussed.

  19. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, K.

    1995-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.)

  20. KSTAR RF heating system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, J. G.; Kim, S. K.; Hwang, C. K. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    Design, high-voltage test, and installation of 6 MW ICRF heating system for KSTAR is completed. The antenna demonstrated satisfactory standoff at high voltages up to 41 kV for 300 sec. The result indicates good power handling capabilities of the antenna as high as 10 MW/m2. This power density is equivalent to RF power coupling of 6 MW into a 4 {omega}/m target plasma, and is typical of advanced tokamak heating scenarios. In addition, vacuum feed through, DC break, and liquid stub developed for 300 sec operation are installed, as well as a 2 MW, 30-60MHz transmitter. The transmitter successfully produced output powers of 600 kW continuously, 1.5{approx}1.8 MW for 300 sec, and 2 MW for 100 msec or shorter pulses. A realtime control system based on DSP and EPICS is developed, installed, and tested on the ICRF system. Initial results from feasibility study indicate that the present antenna and the transmission lines could allow load-resilient operation on KSTAR. Until the KSTAR tokamak start to produce plasmas in 2008, however, hands-on operational experiences are obtained from participating in ICRF heating experiments at ASDEX and DIII-D tokamaks arranged through international cooperation.

  1. Some studies on the deformation of the membrane in an RF MEMS switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambati, Vijaya Raghav; Asheim, Andreas; van den Berg, Jan Bouwe; van Gennip, Yves; Gerasimov, Tymofiy; Hlod, Andriy; Planqué, Bob; van der Schans, Martin; van der Stelt, Sjors; Vargas Rivera, Michelangelo; Vondenhoff, Erwin; Bokhove, Onno; Hurink, Johann; Meinsma, Gjerrit; Stolk, Chris; Vellekoop, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) switches of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are appealing to the mobile industry because of their energy efficiency and ability to accommodate more frequency bands. However, the electromechanical coupling of the electrical circuit to the mechanical components in RF MEMS

  2. Higher order mode damping in Kaon factory RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enegren, T.; Poirier, R.; Griffin, J.; Walling, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-05-01

    Proposed designs for Kaon factory accelerators require that the rf cavities support beam currents on the order of several amperes. The beam current has Fourier components at all multiples of the rf frequency. Empty rf buckets produce additional components at all multiples of the revolution frequency. If a Fourier component of the beam coincides with the resonant frequency of a higher order mode of the cavity, which is inevitable if the cavity has a large frequency swing, significant excitation of this mode can occur. The induced voltage may then excite coupled bunch mode instabilities. Effective means are required to damp higher order modes without significantly affecting the fundamental mode. A mode damping scheme based on coupled transmission lines has been investigated and is report

  3. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, D.

    1997-01-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning

  4. Circuit design for RF transceivers

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaerts, Domine; Vaucher, Cicero S

    2007-01-01

    Second edition of this successful 2001 RF Circuit Design book, has been updated, latest technology reviews have been added as well as several actual case studies. Due to the authors being active in industry as well as academia, this should prove to be an essential guide on RF Transceiver Design for students and engineers.

  5. RF-Station control crate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzekom, M.G. van; Es, J.T. van.

    1992-01-01

    This report gives a description of the electronic control-system for the RF-station of AmPS. The electronics form the connection between the computer-system and the hardware of the RF-station. Only the elements of the systems which are not described in the other NIKHEF-reports are here discussed in detail. (author). 7 figs

  6. A 700 MHZ, 1 MW CW RF System for a FEL 100mA RF Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Roybal, William; Reass, William; Rees, Daniel; Tallerico, Paul J; Torrez, Phillip A

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a 700 MHz, 1 Megawatt CW, high efficiency klystron RF system utilized for a Free Electron Laser (FEL) high-brightness electron photoinjector (PI). The E2V klystron is mod-anode tube that operates with a beam voltage of 95 kV. This tube, operating with a 65% efficiency, requires ~96 watts of input power to produce in excess of 1 MW of output power. This output drives the 3rd cell of a 2½-cell, p-mode PI cavity through a pair of planar waveguide windows. Coupling is via a ridge-loaded tapered waveguide section and "dog-bone" iris. This paper will present the design of the RF, RF transport, coupling, and monitoring/protection systems that are required to support CW operations of the 100 mA cesiated, semi-porous SiC photoinjector.

  7. Surface modification by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation into new steel 460Li–21Cr in a capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, H.; Mändl, S.; Bora, B.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Maze, J.R.; Walczak, M.; Manova, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitriding of a novel steel has been done in a RF plasma by PIII technique. • Improved hardness and wear behavior have been observed. • Hardness was improved by a factor 4 and the wear by 2 orders of magnitude. • Fast, anomalous diffusion, similar to nitrogen in expanded austenite is observed. - Abstract: A novel steel 460Li–21Cr belonging to a new generation of superferritic grade steel has been implanted with nitrogen in a low power 13.56 MHz radio frequency plasma by the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique in order to study its physical and chemical properties under different experimental conditions. We observed improved hardness and wear behavior of 460Li–21Cr steel with a layer thickness between 1.5 and 4.0 μm after 60 min implantation in the temperature range from 350 to 550 °C. The modified surface layer containing nitrogen does not show CrN in X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compared to untreated substrates, the hardness can be increased by a factor of 4, depending on the experimental conditions, and the wear behavior was also improved by two orders of magnitude. The results are very similar to those for austenitic stainless steel with a similar pronounced increase in wear resistance and plateau-like nitrogen depth profiles

  8. New developments in glow discharge optical emission and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Volker; Dorka, Roland; Wilken, Ludger; Wetzig, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes new developments in flow discharge optical emission (GD-OES) and mass spectrometry (GD-MS) at IFW and presents corresponding new applications (analysis of microelectronic multi-layer system by radio frequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (RF-GD-OES) and analysis of pure iron by a new Grimm-type GD-MS source)

  9. Investigation of MIM Diodes for RF Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    zero bias condition as well as the possibility of realizing them through printing makes them attractive for (Radio Frequency) RF applications. However, MIM diodes have not been explored much for RF applications. One reason preventing their widespread RF

  10. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  11. R.F. cavity design for the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Galayda, J.; Hawrylak, R.

    1981-01-01

    The r.f cavity design for the Booster, vuv ring and x-ray ring of the NSLS is described together with the mechanical design of tuners, coupling and monitoring loops and the temperature control systems. The results of higher order mode measurements as compared with Superfish calculations are also presented

  12. Coupling End-Member Mixing Analysis and Isotope Mass Balancing (222-Rn) for Differentiation of Fresh and Recirculated Submarine Groundwater Discharge Into Knysna Estuary, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, E.; Knöller, K.; Rocha, C.; Scholten, J.; Stollberg, R.; Weiß, H.; Schubert, M.

    2018-02-01

    Quantification of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is essential for evaluating the vulnerability of coastal water bodies to groundwater pollution and for understanding water body material cycles response due to potential discharge of nutrients, organic compounds, or heavy metals. Here we present an environmental tracer-based methodology for quantifying SGD into Knysna Estuary, South Africa. Both components of SGD, (1) fresh, terrestrial (FSGD) and (2) saline, recirculated (RSGD), were differentiated. We conducted an end-member mixing analysis for radon (222Rn) and salinity time series of estuary water over two tidal cycles to determine fractions of seawater, riverwater, FSGD, and RSGD. The mixing analysis was treated as a constrained optimization problem for finding the end-member mixing ratio that is producing the best fit to observations at every time step. Results revealed highest FSGD and RSGD fractions in the estuary during peak low tide. Over a 24 h time series, the portions of FSGD and RSGD in the estuary water were 0.2% and 0.8% near the estuary mouth and the FSGD/RSGD ratio was 1:3.3. We determined a median FSGD of 41,000 m³ d-1 (1.4 m³ d-1 per m shoreline) and a median RSGD of 135,000 m³ d-1 (4.5 m³ d-1 per m shoreline) which suggests that SGD exceeds river discharge by a factor of 1.0-2.1. By comparison to other sources, this implies that SGD is responsible for 28-73% of total DIN fluxes into Knysna Estuary.

  13. RF control at transient beamloading for high-duty-factor linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernogubovsky, M.A.; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-08-01

    An effective RF control with the transient beamloading is the major issue in the operation of the high-duty-factor linacs to suppress the undesirable beam loss. The RF control method is considered to obtain the control principle and the state equation, under the analysis of electrodynamical properties of the excitation in the resonator of the linac due to the transient beamloading. The concept of the directional selective coupling is applied for the RF system to define the main characteristics and to optimize the RF control parameters. (author)

  14. Low-Level RF Control of Microphonics in Superconducting Spoke-Loaded Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, Z.A.; Kelly, M.P.; Sharamentov, S.I.; Shepard, K.W.; Davis, G.; Delayen, Jean; Doolittle, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cw RF frequency control and RF phase-stabilization experiments performed with a piezoelectric fast tuner mechanically coupled to a superconducting, 345 MHz, < = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity operating at 4.2K. The piezoelectric fast tuner damped low-frequency microphonic-noise by an order of magnitude. Two methods of RF phase-stabilization were characterized: overcoupling with negative phase feedback, and also fast mechanical tuner feedback. The = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity RF field amplitude and phase errors were controlled to ±0.5% and ±30 respectively.

  15. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation

  16. Ileostomy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dried fruits (such as raisins), mushrooms, chunky relishes, coconut, and some Chinese vegetables. Tips for when no ... ask your doctor Living with your ileostomy Low-fiber diet Small bowel resection - discharge Total colectomy or ...

  17. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori [Advanced Institute of Industrial Technology, 1-10-40 HigashiOhi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 140-0011 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  18. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vernon H; Bellan, Paul M

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 10(19) m(-3) in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible.

  19. Active gas discharge cleaning for superconducting lead-plated resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malev, M.D.; Weisser, D.C.

    1985-06-01

    Lead-plating for superconducting RF resonators historically has been directed toward reducing grain size and eliminating spikes on the surface. Investigations were made of degassing lead-plated surfaces under RF resonant electron discharge or multipacting. The mass-spectra of the residual atmosphere showed that decomposition of hydrocarbons on the surface took place. Discolouration of the lead surface, due to the formation of a carbon layer, was easily observed. A method of cleaning surfaces by ion bombardment employing chemically active gases, was proposed and tested. An RF discharge, initiated by multipacting at pressure 10 -2 - 10 -1 torr was used. The first step, discharge treatment in a CO 2 atmosphere, assures oxidation of carbon and hydrocarbons into gaseous compounds which are removed by pumping. During the second step, discharge treatment in a hydrogen atmosphere, lead oxides are reduced to metal

  20. SQIF Arrays as RF Sensors (Briefing Charts)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yukon, Stanford P

    2007-01-01

    ... (Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter) arrays may be employed as sensitive RF sensors. RF SQIF arrays fabricated with high Tc Josephson junctions can be cooled with small Sterling microcoolers...

  1. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K.; Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-01-01

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1x10 18 /m 3 , at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  2. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K.; Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-01

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1×1018/m3, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  3. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombé, K., E-mail: Kristel.Crombe@UGent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Moritz, J. [YIJL, UMR7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  4. Central peaking of magnetized gas discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Partially ionized gas discharges used in industry are often driven by radiofrequency (rf) power applied at the periphery of a cylinder. It is found that the plasma density n is usually flat or peaked on axis even if the skin depth of the rf field is thin compared with the chamber radius a. Previous attempts at explaining this did not account for the finite length of the discharge and the boundary conditions at the endplates. A simple 1D model is used to focus on the basic mechanism: the short-circuit effect. It is found that a strong electric field (E-field) scaled to electron temperature T e , drives the ions inward. The resulting density profile is peaked on axis and has a shape independent of pressure or discharge radius. This “universal” profile is not affected by a dc magnetic field (B-field) as long as the ion Larmor radius is larger than a

  5. Glycol-Substitute for High Power RF Water Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Ebert, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In water loads for high power rf applications, power is dissipated directly into the coolant. Loads for frequencies below approx. 1GHz are ordinarily using an ethylene glycol-water mixture as coolant. The rf systems at DESY utilize about 100 glycol water loads with powers ranging up to 600kW. Due to the increased ecological awareness, the use of glycol is now considered to be problematic. In EU it is forbidden to discharge glycol into the waste water system. In case of cooling system leakages one has to make sure that no glycol is lost. Since it is nearly impossible to avoid any glycol loss in large rf systems, a glycol-substitute was searched for and found. The found sodium-molybdate based substitute is actually a additive for corrosion protection in water systems. Sodium-molybdate is ecologically harmless; for instance, it is also used as fertilizer in agriculture. A homoeopathic dose of 0.4% mixed into deionised water gives better rf absorption characteristics than a 30% glycol mixture. The rf coolant feat...

  6. Photoemission starting of induction rf-driven multicusp ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, D.S.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Ponce, D.M.; Young, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that pulsed and continuous wave, rf-driven hydrogen discharges can be started with photoemission. The extracted H - current from a photoemission-started plasma has been investigated and does not differ significantly from that of a filament-started plasma. The minimum pressure for photoemissive starting was found to be higher than that of filament starting, 17 mTorr compared to 7 mTorr, respectively, in this particular configuration. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  7. Technology of discharge and laser resonators for high power CO2 lasers. Koshutsuryoku CO2 laser ni tsukawareru hoden reiki laser kyoshinki gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Y.; Kuzumoto, M. (Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-20

    This paper describes discharge excitation technology and resonator technology as basic technologies for high power CO2 lasers. As a result of progress in high-frequency power element techniques, the discharge excitation technology now generally uses laser excitation using AC discharge of capacity coupling type. Its representative example is silent discharge (SD) excitation. This is a system to excite laser by applying high voltages with as high frequency as 100 kHz to 1 MHz across a pair of electrodes covered with a dielectric material. The system maintains stability in discharge even if power supply voltage amplitude is modulated, and easily provides pulse outputs. Discharge excitation for diffusion cooled type CO2 laser generates a discharge in a gap with a gap length of about 2 mm, and can perform gas cooling by means of thermal conduction of gas, whereas a compact resonator can be fabricated. A resonator for the diffusion cooled type CO2 laser eliminates gas circulation and cooling systems, hence the device can be made more compact. A report has been given that several of these compact resonators were combined, from which a laser output of 85W was obtained by using RF discharge of 2kW. 43 refs., 21 figs.

  8. rf SQUID system as tunable flux qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, B. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)]. E-mail: b.ruggiero@cib.na.cnr.it; Granata, C. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Vettoliere, A. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Rombetto, S. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, R. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, M. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Corato, V. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa (Italy); Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Silvestrini, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa (Italy); Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2006-08-21

    We present a fully integrated rf SQUID-based system as flux qubit with a high control of the flux transfer function of the superconducting transformer modulating the coupling between the flux qubit and the readout system. The control of the system is possible by including into the superconducting flux transformer a vertical two-Josephson-junctions interferometer (VJI) in which the Josephson current is precisely modulated from a maximum to zero by a transversal magnetic field parallel to the flux transformer plane. The proposed system can be also used in a more general configuration to control the off-diagonal terms in the Hamiltonian of the flux qubit and to turn on and off the coupling between two or more qubits.

  9. Tha AGS Booster high frequency rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.; Cameron, P.; Damn, R.

    1988-01-01

    A high level rf system, including a power amplifier and cavity has been designed for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 Mhz and will be used to accelerate high intensity proton, and low intensity polarized proton beams to 1.5 GeV and heavy ions to 0.35 GeV per nucleon. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross-coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate the high beam intensity, up to 0.75 /times/ 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two paralleled cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid state amplifier

  10. RF feedback development for the PEP-II B Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corredoura, P.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Tighe, R.

    1994-06-01

    In PEP-II heavy beam loading along with a relatively long revolution period combine to strongly drive lower coupled-bunch modes through interaction with the fundamental cavity mode. Feedback techniques can be applied to reduce the cavity impedance seen by the beam. Several RF feedback loops are planned to reduce the growth rates down to a level which can be damped by the relatively low power bunch-by-bunch longitudinal feedback system. This paper describes the RF feedback loops as well as hardware tests using a 500 kW klystron, analog and digital feedback loops, and a low power test cavity.

  11. RF feedback development for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Tighe, R.

    1994-06-01

    In PEP-II heavy beam loading along with a relatively long revolution period combine to strongly drive lower coupled-bunch modes through interaction with the fundamental cavity mode. Feedback techniques can be applied to reduce the cavity impedance seen by the beam. Several RF feedback loops are planned to reduce the growth rates down to a level which can be damped by the relatively low power bunch-by-bunch longitudinal feedback system. This paper describes the RF feedback loops as well as hardware tests using a 500 kW klystron, analog and digital feedback loops, and a low power test cavity

  12. Approximate Integrals of rf-driven Particle Motion in Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin, I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    For a particle moving in nonuniform magnetic field under the action of an rf wave, ponderomotive effects result from rf-driven oscillations nonlinearly coupled with Larmor rotation. Using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism, we show how, despite this coupling, two independent integrals of the particle motion are approximately conserved. Those are the magnetic moment of free Larmor rotation and the quasi-energy of the guiding center motion parallel to the magnetic field. Under the assumption of non-resonant interaction of the particle with the rf field, these integrals represent adiabatic invariants of the particle motion

  13. RF superconductivity at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a 4 GeV continuous beam electron accelerator being constructed to perform nuclear physics research. Construction began in February 1987 and initial operation is scheduled for February 1994. The present report describes its prototyping, problems/solutions, further development, facilities, design status, production and upgrade potential. The accelerator is 1.4 km in circumference, and has a race-track shape. It is of the recirculated linear accelerator type, and employs a total of five passes. Two linacs on opposite sides of the race-track each provide 400 MeV per pass. Beams of various energies are transported by separated arcs at each end of the straight sections to provide the recirculation. There are 4 recirculation arcs at the injector end, and 5 arcs at the other end. The full energy beam is routed by an RF separator to between one and three end stations, as desired, on a bucket-by-bucket basis. The average output beam current is 200 microamperes. Acceleration is provided by 338 superconducting cavities, which are arranged in pairs, each of which is enclosed in a helium vessel and suspended inside a vacuum jacket without ends. (N.K.)

  14. Analysis of radiofrequency discharges in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1992-08-04

    Separation of laser optogalvanic signals in plasma into two components: (1) an ionization rate change component, and (2) a photoacoustic mediated component. This separation of components may be performed even when the two components overlap in time, by measuring time-resolved laser optogalvanic signals in an rf discharge plasma as the rf frequency is varied near the electrical resonance peak of the plasma and associated driving/detecting circuits. A novel spectrometer may be constructed to make these measurements. Such a spectrometer would be useful in better understanding and controlling such processes as plasma etching and plasma deposition. 15 figs.

  15. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Palczewski, A.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Im, Do; Phillips, H. L.; Vušković, L.

    2017-12-01

    An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity's inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  16. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity’s inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  17. Discharge Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders

    2012-01-01

    For several years, efforts have been made to strengthen collaboration between health professionals with different specializations and to improve patient transition from hospital to home (care). In the Danish health care system, these efforts have concentrated on cancer and heart diseases, whereas...... coordinator, employed at the hospital, is supposed to anticipate discharge and serve as mediator between the hospital and the municipal home care system. Drawing on methods from discourse and interaction analysis, the paper studies the practice of the discharge coordinator in two encounters between patients...... how the home context provides different resources for identification of patient needs and mutual decision making....

  18. Water cooling of RF structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battersby, G.; Zach, M.

    1994-06-01

    We present computer codes for heat transfer in water cooled rf cavities. RF parameters obtained by SUPERFISH or analytically are operated on by a set of codes using PLOTDATA, a command-driven program developed and distributed by TRIUMF [1]. Emphasis is on practical solutions with designer's interactive input during the computations. Results presented in summary printouts and graphs include the temperature, flow, and pressure data. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs

  19. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  20. Quasistationary Plasma Predator-Prey System of Coupled Turbulence, Drive, and Sheared E ×B Flow During High Performance DIII-D Tokamak Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Burrell, K. H.; Zeng, L.; Bardóczi, L.; Chen, Xi; Muscatello, C. M.; Peebles, W. A.

    2018-03-01

    A new, long-lived limit cycle oscillation (LCO) regime has been observed in the edge of near zero torque high performance DIII-D tokamak plasma discharges. These LCOs are localized and composed of density turbulence, gradient drives, and E ×B velocity shear damping (E and B are the local radial electric and total magnetic fields). Density turbulence sequentially acts as a predator (via turbulence transport) of profile gradients and a prey (via shear suppression) to the E ×B velocity shear. Reported here for the first time is a unique spatiotemporal variation of the local E ×B velocity, which is found to be essential for the existence of this system. The LCO system is quasistationary, existing from 3 to 12 plasma energy confinement times (˜30 - 900 LCO cycles) limited by hardware constraints. This plasma system appears to contribute strongly to the edge transport in these high performance and transient-free plasmas, as evident from oscillations in transport relevant edge parameters at LCO time scale.

  1. RF current generation near the ion cyclotron frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment has been conducted to measure unipolar currents driven by directional radio frequency waves in a cylindrical plasma mirror machine near the ion cyclotron frequency. The directional waves were launched using a four phase helical coupler which allowed the selection of both azimuthal mode number (m = +1) and direction of wave propagation. Plasma diagnostics include electron density measurements (4 mm microwave interferometer), electron temperature measurements (floating double probe), wave amplitude and coupling measurements (magnetic probes). RF power measurements (RF voltage and current probes) and RF driven plasma current measurements (Rogowski loops and current transformers). End electrodes provided a necessary external return path and an alternate method for measuring the current. Theoretical work includes an analytic approximation to the nonlinear problem of a particle in a traveling wave and computer simulations that extend this result. Nonlinear particle drifts other than trapping were found both with and without the presence of particle collisions

  2. Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-μs, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented

  3. Few atom chemistry of the trans actinide element rutherfordium (Rf)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagame, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of chemical properties of the trans actinide elements - starting with element 104 (Rf) - offer the unique opportunity to obtain information about trends in the Periodic Table at the limits of nuclear stability and to assess the magnitude of the influence of relativistic effects on chemical properties. To explore experimentally the influence of relativistic effects of electron shell structure, we study the chemical properties of the trans actinide elements. So far, we have developed some experimental apparatuses for the study of chemical properties of the trans actinide elements: a beam-line safety system for the usage of the gas-jet coupled radioactive 248 Cm target chamber for the production of trans actinides, a rotating wheel catcher apparatus for the measurement of α particles and spontaneous fission decay of trans actinides and an automated rapid chemical separation apparatus based on high performance liquid chromatography. The trans actinide nuclide, the element 104, 261 Rf (t 1/2 = 78 s) has been successfully produced via the reactions of 248 Cm( 18 O,5n) at the JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) tandem accelerator. The evaluated production cross section was about 10 nb, indicating that the production rate was approximately 2 atoms per min. Because of the short half-life and the low production rate of Rf, each atom produced decays before a new atom is synthesized. It means that any chemistry to be performed must be done on an 'atom-at-a-time' basis. Therefore rapid, very efficient and selective chemical procedures are indispensable to isolate the desired trans actinide 261 Rf. To perform fast and repetitive ion-exchange separation of Rf, we have developed the apparatus AIDA (Automated Ion exchange separation system coupled with the Detection apparatus for Alpha spectroscopy). Recently, ion-exchange behavior of Rf in acidic solutions has been studied with AIDA, and the results indicate that anion-exchange behavior of Rf is quite similar

  4. Double plasma system with inductively coupled source plasma and quasi-quiescent target plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massi, M.; Maciel, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    Cold plasmas have successfully been used in the plasma-assisted material processing industry. An understanding of the physicochemical mechanisms involved in the plasma-surface interaction is needed for a proper description of deposition and etching processes at material surfaces. Since these mechanisms are dependent on the plasma properties, the development of diagnostic techniques is strongly desirable for determination of the plasma parameters as well as the characterization of the electromagnetic behaviour of the discharge. In this work a dual discharge chamber, was specially designed to study the deposition of thin films via plasma polymerization process. In the Pyrex chamber an inductively coupled plasma can be excited either in the diffuse low density E-mode or in the high density H-mode. This plasma diffuses into the cylindrical stainless steel chamber which is covered with permanent magnets to produce a multidipole magnetic field configuration at the surface. By that means a double plasma is established consisting of a RF source plasma coupled to a quasi-quiescent target plasma. The preliminary results presented here refer to measurements of the profiles of plasma parameters along the central axis of the double plasma apparatus. Additionally a spectrum analysis performed by means of a Rogowski coil probe immersed into the source plasma is also presented. The discharge is made in argon with pressure varying from 10 -2 to 1 torr, and the rf from 10 to 150 W

  5. rf beam-current, -phase, and -position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype rf beam monitor has been tested on the Racetrack Microtron's (RTM) 100 kV injector beam line at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). This beam monitor is capable of measuring the current, the relative phase, and the position of the beam. The beam is bunched at 2380 MHz for acceleration by the linac in the injector beam line. This train of beam bunches passing through the beam monitor cavities excites the cavities at this resonance frequency of 2380 MHz. Probes in the cavities couple some of the beam-excited rf power out of the cavities. This rf power can be amplified if necessary and then analyzed by a double balanced mixer (DBM). The DBM can also be used as a phase detector. The effective shunt impedance of the cavities was measured with the CW beam. For the position monitor cavity, the shunt impedance is proportional to the displacement from the axis. The measured response of the prototype rf beam current monitor setup is a linear function of beam current. Response of the rf beam-position monitor is also shown

  6. RF Power Requirements for PEFP SRF Cavity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2011-01-01

    For the future extension of the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) Proton linac, preliminary study on the SRF (superconducting radio-frequency) cavity is going on including a five-cell prototype cavity development to confirm the design and fabrication procedures and to check the RF and mechanical properties of a low-beta elliptical cavity. The main parameters of the cavity are like followings. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m (1.21 Kilp.) - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m For the test of the cavity at low temperature of 4.2 K, many subsystems are required such as a cryogenic system, RF system, vacuum system and radiation shielding. RF power required to generate accelerating field inside cavity depends on the RF coupling parameters of the power coupler and quality factor of the SRF cavity and the quality factor itself is affected by several factors such as operating temperature, external magnetic field level and surface condition. Therefore, these factors should be considered to estimate the required RF power for the SRF cavity test

  7. Analytic analysis on asymmetrical micro arcing in high plasma potential RF plasma systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Y; McKenzie, D R; Bilek, M M M

    2006-01-01

    We report experimental and analytical results on asymmetrical micro arcing in a RF (radio frequency) plasma. Micro arcing, resulting from high plasma potential, in RF plasma was found to occur only on the grounded electrode for a variety of electrode and surface configurations. The analytic derivation was based on a simple RF time-dependent Child-Langmuir sheath model and electric current continuity. We found that the minimum potential difference in one RF period across the grounded electrode sheath depends on the area ratio of the grounded electrode to the powered electrode. As the area ratio increases, the minimum potential difference across a sheath increases for the grounded electrode but not for the RF powered electrode. We showed that discharge time in micro arcing is more than 100 RF periods; thus the presence of a continuous high electric field in one RF cycle results in micro arcing on the grounded electrode. However, the minimum potential difference in one RF period across the powered electrode sheath is always small so that it prevents micro arcing occurring even though the average sheath voltage can be large. This simple analytic model is consistent with particle-in-cell simulation results

  8. ICRH antenna S-matrix measurements and plasma coupling characterisation at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhov, I.; Jacquet, P.; Blackman, T.; Bobkov, V.; Dumortier, P.; Helou, W.; Lerche, E.; Kirov, K.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Noble, C.; Contributors, JET

    2018-04-01

    The paper is dedicated to the characterisation of multi-strap ICRH antenna coupling to plasma. Relevance of traditional concept of coupling resistance to antennas with mutually coupled straps is revised and the importance of antenna port excitation consistency for application of the concept is highlighted. A method of antenna S-matrix measurement in presence of plasma is discussed allowing deeper insight into the problem of antenna-plasma coupling. The method is based entirely on the RF plant hardware and control facilities available at JET and it involves application of variable phasing between the antenna straps during the RF plant operations at  >100 kW. Unlike traditional techniques relying on low-power (~10 mW) network analysers, the applied antenna voltage amplitudes are relevant to practical conditions of ICRH operations; crucially, they are high enough to minimise possible effects of antenna loading non-linearity due to the RF sheath effects and other phenomena which could affect low-power measurements. The method has been successfully applied at JET to conventional 4-port ICRH antennas energised at frequencies of 33 MHz, 42 MHz and 51 MHz during L-mode plasma discharges while different gas injection modules (GIMs) were used to maintain comparable plasma densities during the pulses. The S-matrix assessment and its subsequent processing yielding ‘global’ antenna coupling resistances in conditions of equalised port maximum voltages allowed consistent description of antenna coupling to plasma at different strap phasing, operational frequencies and applied GIMs. Comprehensive experimental characterisation of mutually coupled antenna straps in presence of plasma also provided a unique opportunity for in-depth verification of TOPICA computer simulations.

  9. Discharge regimes and density jumps in a helicon plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, S.; Yonekura, K.

    1999-01-01

    A high density plasma source using a helicon wave is becoming very attractive in plasma processing and confinement devices. In the previous work, the characteristics of this wave and plasma performance with diameters of 5 and 45 cm have been studied, and the helicon wave was only observed after the density jump. Recently, density jumps from the low to high electron densities with a level of 10 13 cm -3 were investigated by changing the antenna wavenumber spectrum, and the obtained results were compared with the inductively coupled plasma (ICP). However, the mechanisms of density jumps and plasma production are still open questions to be answered. Here, the authors try to investigate the discharge regimes and density jumps in a helicon plasma source, by changing the antenna wavenumber spectrum. For he case of the parallel current directions in the antenna, where the low wavenumber spectrum part is large, the density jump was observed with the low RF input power of P in < 300 W regardless of the magnetic field. On the other hand, for the case of the opposite directions, where the low wavenumber spectrum part is small, the threshold power to obtain the jump became high with the increase in the magnetic field. This can be understood from the dispersion relation of the helicon wave. The wave structures and the dispersion relations in the discharge modes will be also shown

  10. Influence of an additional ballast volume on a pulsed ICP discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, E A; Jr, C A DeJoseph; Demidov, V I; Kudryavtsev, A A; Serditov, K Yu

    2007-01-01

    A spatial and temporal numerical simulation has been carried out of a pulsed (100% modulated), rf inductively coupled plasma discharge in argon, connected to an additional (ballast) diffusion chamber of much larger volume. It is demonstrated that during the active phase, the presence of the large ballast volume has a small impact on the parameters of the plasma in the smaller discharge chamber. In this case the plasma parameters in the discharge chamber can be estimated separately from the diffusion chamber by a standard method using the characteristic ambipolar diffusion time (for example, using a global model). However, during the afterglow phase, the situation is changed significantly. In the afterglow, the densities of charged particles in the discharge chamber become lower than in the large ballast chamber due to more rapid diffusion loss. As a result, the reverse of the active phase situation occurs, namely, the plasma does not flow from the small to the large chamber, but in the opposite direction, from diffusive to discharge volume, and both the plasma density gradient and the self-consistent ambipolar electric field in the small chamber change directions. This phenomenon leads to new effects in the discharge volume, in particular a decreasing rate of decay of densities of charged particles and electron temperature. Thus, in the afterglow the presence of a large additional ballast volume has a significant impact on the plasma transport. In this case, a simple treatment of the plasma in the discharge chamber in the framework of a spatially averaged model (for example, the global model) is inadequate

  11. Angioplasty and stent - heart - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug-eluting stents - discharge; PCI - discharge; Percutaneous coronary intervention - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - discharge; Coronary angioplasty - discharge; Coronary artery angioplasty - discharge; Cardiac ...

  12. Radiological discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodliffe, J.

    1990-01-01

    Current practice of North Sea States on the discharge and disposal of liquid radioactive wastes to the North Sea are based on the declaration issued at the Second International Conference on the Protection of the North Sea, known as the London Declaration. This has three main points the first of which emphasises the application of the Best Available Technology to protect the North Sea, the second provides a framework on which future controls on radioactive discharges should be based. The third identifies two parts of the framework; to take into account the recommendations of international organizations and that any repositories of radioactive waste which are built should not pollute the North Sea. This chapter looks at how the concensus based on the London Declaration is working, gauges the progress made in the implementation of the policy goal, identifies existing and future areas for concern and proposes ways of strengthening the control of radioactive discharges. The emphasis is on the United Kingdom practice and regulations for liquid wastes, most of which comes from the Sellafield Reprocessing Plant. (author)

  13. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  14. RF Group Annual Report 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Betz, M; Brunner, O; Baudrenghien, P; Calaga, R; Caspers, F; Ciapala, E; Chambrillon, J; Damerau, H; Doebert, S; Federmann, S; Findlay, A; Gerigk, F; Hancock, S; Höfle, W; Jensen, E; Junginger, T; Liao, K; McMonagle, G; Montesinos, E; Mastoridis, T; Paoluzzi, M; Riddone, G; Rossi, C; Schirm, K; Schwerg, N; Shaposhnikova, E; Syratchev, I; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Völlinger, C; Vretenar, M; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    The highest priority for the RF group in 2011 was to contribute to a successful physics run of the LHC. This comprises operation of the superconducting 400 MHz accelerating system (ACS) and the transverse damper (ADT) of the LHC itself, but also all the individual links of the injector chain upstream of the LHC – Linac2, the PSB, the PS and the SPS – don’t forget that it is RF in all these accelerators that truly accelerates! A large variety of RF systems had to operate reliably, often near their limit. New tricks had to be found and implemented to go beyond limits; not to forget the equally demanding operation with Pb ions using in addition Linac3 and LEIR. But also other physics users required the full attention of the RF group: CNGS required in 2011 beams with very short, intense bunches, AD required reliable deceleration and cooling of anti-protons, Isolde the post-acceleration of radioactive isotopes in Rex, just to name a few. In addition to the supply of beams for physics, the RF group has a num...

  15. APS Storage Ring Monopulse RF BPM Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, R.; Pietryla, A.; Norum, E.; Lenkszus, F.

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation synchrotron light source in its ninth year of operation. The storage ring monopulse radio frequency (rf) beam position monitor (BPM) was designed to measure single-turn and multi-turn beam positions for operations and machine physics studies. Many of the components used in the original design are obsolete and costly to replace. In this paper we present a proposal to upgrade the monopulse rf BPMs in which the existing system hardware is repartitioned and the aging data acquisition system is replaced. By replacing only the data acquisition system, we will demonstrate a cost-effective approach to improved beam stability, reliability, and enhanced postmortem capabilities. An eight-channel ADC/digitizer VXI board with sampling rate of up to 105 MHz (per channel) and 14-bit resolution coupled with a field-programmable gate array and embedded central processing will provide the flexibility to revitalize this system for another decade of operation. We will discuss the upgrade system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  16. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Bruce R.; Shih, Kai-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 × 10-2 to 80 g kWh-1. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  17. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, Bruce R; Shih, Kai-Yuan [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 x 10{sup -2} to 80 g kWh{sup -1}. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  18. Rf system specifications for a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Eaton, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear accelerator contains many systems; however, the most complex and costly is the RF system. The goal of an RF system is usually simply stated as maintaining the phase and amplitude of the RF signal within a given tolerance to accelerate the charged particle beam. An RF system that drives a linear accelerator needs a complete system specification, which should contain specifications for all the subsystems (i.e., high-power RF, low-level RF, RF generation/distribution, and automation control). This paper defines a format for the specifications of these subsystems and discusses each RF subsystem independently to provide a comprehensive understanding of the function of each subsystem. This paper concludes with an example of a specification spreadsheet allowing one to input the specifications of a subsystem. Thus, some fundamental parameters (i.e., the cost and size) of the RF system can be determined

  19. Study on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma for the ICP test facility at HUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Haikun [School of Electronic Information and Communications, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Dong; Wang, Chenre; Li, Xiaofei; Chen, Dezhi; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhou, Chi; Pan, Ruimin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-10-15

    An Radio-Frequency (RF) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) ion source test facility has been successfully developed at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). As part of a study on hydrogen plasma, the influence of three main operation parameters on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma was investigated. At 6 Pa, the RF power necessary to ignite plasma influenced little by the filament heating current from 5 A to 9 A. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma increased rapidly with the operation pressure decreasing from 8 Pa to 4 Pa. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma decreased with the number of coil turns from 6 to 10. During the experiments, plasma was produced with the electron density of the order of 10{sup 16}m{sup -3} and the electron temperature of around 4 eV. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. RF Loads for Energy Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, S; Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Different conceptional designs for RF high power loads are presented. One concept implies the use of solid state rectifier modules for direct RF to DC conversion with efficiencies beyond 80%. In addition, robust metallic low-Q resonant structures, capable of operating at high temperatures (>150 ◦C) are discussed. Another design deals with a very high temperature (up to 800 ◦C) air cooled load using a ceramic foam block inside a metal enclosure. This porous ceramic block is the microwave absorber and is not brazed to the metallic enclosure.

  1. rf reference line for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1979-03-01

    A rf phase reference line in 6 segments around the 2200 meter circumference PEP storage ring is described. Each segment of the reference line is phase stabilized by its own independent feedback system, which uses an amplitude modulated reflection from the end of each line. The modulation is kept small and decoupled from the next segment to avoid crosstalk and significant modulation of the rf drive signal. An error evaluation of the system is made. The technical implementation and prototype performance are described. Prototype tests indicate that the phase error around the ring can be held below 1 degree with this relatively simple system

  2. rf reference line for PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1979-03-01

    A rf phase reference line in 6 segments around the 2200 meter circumference PEP storage ring is described. Each segment of the reference line is phase stabilized by its own independent feedback system, which uses an amplitude modulated reflection from the end of each line. The modulation is kept small and decoupled from the next segment to avoid crosstalk and significant modulation of the rf drive signal. An error evaluation of the system is made. The technical implementation and prototype performance are described. Prototype tests indicate that the phase error around the ring can be held below 1 degree with this relatively simple system.

  3. Flexible RF filter using a nonuniform SCISSOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Leimeng

    2016-03-15

    This work presents a flexible radiofrequency (RF) filter using an integrated microwave photonic circuit that comprises a nonuniform side-coupled integrated spaced sequence of resonators (N-SCISSOR). The filter passband can be reconfigured by varying the N-SCISSOR parameters. When employing a dual-parallel Mach-Zechnder modulator, the filter is also able to perform frequency down-conversion. In the experiment, various filter response shapes are shown, ranging from a flat-top band-pass filter to a total opposite high-rejection (>40  dB) notch filter, with a frequency coverage of greater than two octaves. The frequency down-conversion function is also demonstrated.

  4. Discharge cleaning of carbon deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozetic, M.; Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental results of discharge cleaning of carbon deposits are presented. Deposits were prepared by creating plasma in pure methane. The methane was cracked in RF discharge at the output power of 250 W. The resultant radicals were bonded to the wall of discharge vessel forming a thin film of hydrogenated black carbon with the thickness of about 200nm. The film was then cleaned in situ by oxygen plasma with the density of about 1x10 16 m -3 , electron temperature of 5 eV, neutral gas kinetic temperature of about 100 0 C and neutral atom density of 6x10 21 m -3 . The treatment time was 30 minutes. The efficiency of plasma cleaning was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. As long as the wall was contaminated with carbon deposit, substantial emission of the CO molecules was detected. As the cleaning was in progress, the CO emission was decreasing and vanished after 30 minutes when the discharge vessel became free of any carbon. The results are explained by interaction of plasma radicals with carbon deposits. (author)

  5. Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar

  6. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  7. RF Plasma modeling of the Linac4 H− ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Mattei, S; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J; Kawamura, Y; Yasumoto, M; Schmitzer, C

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the modelling of the ICP RF-plasma in the Linac4 H− ion source currently being constructed at CERN. A self-consistent model of the plasma dynamics with the RF electromagnetic field has been developed by a PIC-MCC method. In this paper, the model is applied to the analysis of a low density plasma discharge initiation, with particular interest on the effect of the external magnetic field on the plasma properties, such as wall loss, electron density and electron energy. The use of a multi-cusp magnetic field effectively limits the wall losses, particularly in the radial direction. Preliminary results however indicate that a reduced heating efficiency results in such a configuration. The effect is possibly due to trapping of electrons in the multi-cusp magnetic field, preventing their continuous acceleration in the azimuthal direction.

  8. Recent development on RF-driven multicusp H- ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; De Vries, G.J.; Kunkel, W.B.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Saadatmand, K.; Wengrow, A.B.; Williams, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. The source routinely provided 35 keV, 30 mA of beam at 0.1% duty factor. By using a new cesium dispensing system, beam current in excess of 100 mA and e/H - ∼1 have been observed. For pulse mode operation, the rf discharge can be started by means of a xenon flash lamp. Extracted electrons in the beam can be efficiently removed by employing a permanent magnet insert structure. Chopping of the H - beam can be accomplished by applying a pulsed positive voltage on the plasma electrode

  9. Role of secondary emission on discharge dynamics in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, W. H.; Kausik, S. S.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S., E-mail: cswong@um.edu.my [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-04-15

    The discharge dynamics in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is studied in a DBD reactor consisting of a pair of stainless steel parallel plate electrodes. The DBD discharge has been generated by a 50 Hz ac high voltage power source. The high-speed intensified charge coupled device camera is used to capture the images of filaments occurring in the discharge gap. It is observed that frequent synchronous breakdown of micro discharges occurs across the discharge gap in the case of negative current pulse. The experimental results reveal that secondary emissions from the dielectric surface play a key role in the synchronous breakdown of plasma filaments.

  10. Rf superconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, W.H.; Passow, C.

    1975-01-01

    Topics discussed include (1) the theory of superconductors in high-frequency fields (London surface impedance, anomalous normal surface resistance, pippard nonlocal theory, quantum mechanical model, superconductor parameters, quantum mechanical calculation techniques for the surface, impedance, and experimental verification of surface impedance theories); (2) residual resistance (separation of losses, magnetic field effects, surface resistance of imperfect and impure conductors, residual loss due to acoustic coupling, losses from nonideal surfaces, high magnetic field losses, field emission, and nonlinear effects); (3) design and performance of superconducting devices (design considerations, materials and fabrication techniques, measurement of performance, and frequency stability); (4) devices for particle acceleration and deflection (advantages and problems of using superconductors, accelerators for fast particles, accelerators for particles with slow velocities, beam optical devices separators, and applications and projects under way); (5) applications of low-power superconducting resonators (superconducting filters and tuners, oscillators and detectors, mixers and amplifiers, antennas and output tanks, superconducting resonators for materials research, and radiation detection with loaded superconducting resonators); and (6) transmission and delay lines

  11. Emittance growth in rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    As the space-charge limit is approached, the current that can be accelerated in an rf linac and the output emittance that can be expected are discussed. The role of the envelope equations to estimate limits is outlined. The results of numerical experiments to explore general properties of emittance growth are given

  12. Field emission in RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Electron field emission limits the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities. It is shown how and why it is an important problem. The phenomenology of field emission is then described, both in DC and RF regimes. Merits of a few plausible 'remedies' to field emission are discussed. (author)

  13. Modern technologies in rf superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The development and application of superconducting rf cavities in particle accelerators is a fine example of advanced technology and of close cooperation with industry. This contribution examines the theoretical and present-day practical limitations of sc cavities and describes some advanced technologies needed for their large scale applications. (orig.)

  14. Broadband direct RF digitization receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the trade-offs involved in designing direct RF digitization receivers for the radio frequency and digital signal processing domains.  A system-level framework is developed, quantifying the relevant impairments of the signal processing chain, through a comprehensive system-level analysis.  Special focus is given to noise analysis (thermal noise, quantization noise, saturation noise, signal-dependent noise), broadband non-linear distortion analysis, including the impact of the sampling strategy (low-pass, band-pass), analysis of time-interleaved ADC channel mismatches, sampling clock purity and digital channel selection. The system-level framework described is applied to the design of a cable multi-channel RF direct digitization receiver. An optimum RF signal conditioning, and some algorithms (automatic gain control loop, RF front-end amplitude equalization control loop) are used to relax the requirements of a 2.7GHz 11-bit ADC. A two-chip implementation is presented, using BiCMOS and 65nm...

  15. Introduction to RF linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.

    1994-01-01

    The basic features of RF linear accelerators are described. The concept of the 'loaded cavity', essential for the synchronism wave-particle, is introduced, and formulae describing the action of electromagnetic fields on the beam are given. The treatment of intense beams is mentioned, and various existing linear accelerators are presented as examples. (orig.)

  16. MOSFET Degradation Under RF Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the degradation of MOS transistors under RF stress. Hot-carrier degradation, negative-bias temperature instability, and gate dielectric breakdown are investigated. The findings are compared to established voltage- and field-driven models. The experimental results indicate that the

  17. The LHC Low Level RF

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  18. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking

  19. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Polomarov, Oleg V.; Theodosiou, Constantine E.

    2005-01-01

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma

  20. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  1. Method development and optimization for the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in water at trace levels by static headspace extraction coupled to gas chromatography-barrier ionization discharge detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Raffaella; Bianco, Giuliana; Calace, Stefania; Masi, Salvatore; Mancini, Ignazio M; Mazzone, Giuseppina; Caniani, Donatella

    2018-05-04

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, more commonly named BTEX, represent one of the most ubiquitous and hazardous groups of atmospheric pollutants. The goal of our research was the trace quantification of BTEX in water by using a new simple, low-cost, and accurate method, based on headspace (HS) extraction and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to barrier ionization discharge detector (BID). This water application dealt with simple matrices without protein, fat, or humic material that adsorb target analytes, thus the external standard calibration was suitable to quantify each compound. The validation steps included the study of linearity, detection and quantification limits, and accuracy. LODs and LOQs varied from 0.159 to 1.845 μg/L and from 0.202 to 2.452 μg/L, respectively. The recovery was between 0.74 ± 0.13 and 1.15 ± 0.09; relative standard deviations (% RDSs) were less than 12.81% (n = 5) and 14.84% (n = 10). Also, GC performance was evaluated in term of efficiency, peak tailing and resolution. Preliminary results from practical applications to analyses of real samples are presented. The results indicate that static HS coupled to GC-BID is a successful method for BTEX analysis in water samples at the μg/L levels, provided that hydrocarbons interference occur at similar concentration levels. GC-BID may become a routine reference method alongside the official analytical techniques for quality control purposes of contaminated waters. Moreover, the new method is amenable to automation by using commercial HS units. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Narrow gap electronegative capacitive discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Narrow gap electronegative (EN) capacitive discharges are widely used in industry and have unique features not found in conventional discharges. In this paper, plasma parameters are determined over a range of decreasing gap length L from values for which an electropositive (EP) edge exists (2-region case) to smaller L-values for which the EN region connects directly to the sheath (1-region case). Parametric studies are performed at applied voltage V{sub rf}=500 V for pressures of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mTorr, and additionally at 50 mTorr for 1000 and 2000 V. Numerical results are given for a parallel plate oxygen discharge using a planar 1D3v (1 spatial dimension, 3 velocity components) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. New interesting phenomena are found for the case in which an EP edge does not exist. This 1-region case has not previously been investigated in detail, either numerically or analytically. In particular, attachment in the sheaths is important, and the central electron density n{sub e0} is depressed below the density n{sub esh} at the sheath edge. The sheath oscillations also extend into the EN core, creating an edge region lying within the sheath and not characterized by the standard diffusion in an EN plasma. An analytical model is developed using minimal inputs from the PIC results, and compared to the PIC results for a base case at V{sub rf}=500 V and 50 mTorr, showing good agreement. Selected comparisons are made at the other voltages and pressures. A self-consistent model is also developed and compared to the PIC results, giving reasonable agreement.

  3. Metal doped fluorocarbon polymer films prepared by plasma polymerization using an RF planar magnetron target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederman, H.; Holland, L.

    1983-01-01

    Fluorocarbon films have been prepared by plasma polymerization of CF 4 using an RF planar magnetron with an aluminium target. More than one order of magnitude higher deposition rate has been achieved in comparison with an r.f. diode system operated under similar conditions of monomer pressure and flow rate and power input. A glow discharge in a CF 4 [25%]-argon[75%] mixture was used to incorporate aluminium from a target electrode into the polymer films. The foregoing mixture and another based on CF 4 [87%]-argon[13%] were used in the RF discharge with a copper target. Some experiments with a gold target and pure CF 4 as the inlet gas were also made. The film structure was examined by SEM and TEM and characteristic micrographs are presented here. The composition of the films was estimated from an EAS study. The sheet resistivity of the metal/polymer film complexes was determined. (orig.)

  4. Rf stability, control and bunch lengthening in electron synchrotron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtel, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    A self-consistent theory for nonlinear longitudinal particle motion and rf cavity excitation in a high energy electron storage ring is developed. Coupled first order equations for the motion of an arbitrary number of particles and for the field in several rf cavities are given in the form used in control system theory. Stochastic quantum excitation of synchrotron motion is included, as are the effects of rf control system corrections. Results of computations for double cavity bunch lengthening are given. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. RF atmospheric plasma jet surface treatment of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlat, Joanna; Terebun, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Michał; Diatczyk, Jaroslaw

    2016-09-01

    A radio frequency RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet was used to enhance the wettability of cellulose-based paper of 90 g m-2 and 160 g m-2 grammage as a perspective platform for antibiotic sensitivity tests. Helium and argon were the carrier gases for oxygen and nitrogen; pure water and rapeseed oil were used for goniometric tests. The influence of the flow rate and gas type, the power of the discharge, and distance from the nozzle was examined. The surface structure was observed using an optical microscope. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra were investigated in order to determine whether cellulose degradation processes occurred. The RF plasma jet allowed us to decrease the surface contact angle without drastic changes in other features of the tested material. Experiments confirmed the significant influence of the distance between the treated sample and reactor nozzle, especially for treatment times longer than 15 s due to the greater concentration of reactive species at the surface of the sample, which decreases with distance—and their accumulation effect with time. The increase of discharge power plays an important role in decreasing the surface contact angle for times longer than 10 s. Higher power had a positive effect on the amount of generated active particles and facilitated the ignition of discharge. However, a too high value can cause a rise in temperature of the material and heat-caused damage.

  6. Plasma properties of RF magnetron sputtering system using Zn target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nafarizal, N.; Andreas Albert, A. R.; Sharifah Amirah, A. S.; Salwa, O.; Riyaz Ahmad, M. A. [Microelectronic and Nanotechnology - Shamsuddin Research Centre (MiNT-SRC), Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    In the present work, we investigate the fundamental properties of magnetron sputtering plasma using Zn target and its deposited Zn thin film. The magnetron sputtering plasma was produced using radio frequency (RF) power supply and Argon (Ar) as ambient gas. A Langmuir probe was used to collect the current from the plasma and from the current intensity, we calculate the electron density and electron temperature. The properties of Zn sputtering plasma at various discharge conditions were studied. At the RF power ranging from 20 to 100 W and gas pressure 5 mTorr, we found that the electron temperature was almost unchanged between 2-2.5 eV. On the other hand, the electron temperature increased drastically from 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} when the discharge gas pressure increased from 5 to 10 mTorr. The electron microscope images show that the grain size of Zn thin film increase when the discharge power is increased. This may be due to the enhancement of plasma density and sputtered Zn density.

  7. RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, H.; Otake, Y.; Naito, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yoshioka, M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode has many advantages as an injector of the linear colliders since it can generate a low emittance and high current pulsed beam. The experimental facility for the RF gun, such as an RF system, a laser system and a photocathode have been fabricated to study the fundamental characteristics. The dynamics of the RF gun has also studied by the 1D sheet beam model. (author)

  8. RF-heating of plasma in the frequency domain of the ion cyclotron harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahnekamp, H.G.; Stampa, A.; Tuczek, H.; Laeuter, R.; Wulf, H.O.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on rf-heating of plasmas in the frequency domain of the ion cyclotron harmonics are reported. The rf-power is coupled to the magneto-acoustic wave for frequencies between ωsub(ci) and 5ωsub(ci). The measurements indicate that the damping of the pump wave is mainly due to the excitation of turbulence, whereas direct resonance at 2ωsub(ci) seems to be of minor importance

  9. An RF energy harvesting power management circuit for appropriate duty-cycled operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Noboru; Masu, Kazuya

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we present an RF energy harvesting power management unit (PMU) for battery-less wireless sensor devices (WSDs). The proposed PMU realizes a duty-cycled operation that is divided into the energy charging time and discharging time. The proposed PMU detects two types of timing, thus, the appropriate timing for the activation can be recognized. The activation of WSDs at the proper timing leads to energy efficient operation and stable wireless communication. The proposed PMU includes a hysteresis comparator (H-CMP) and an RF signal detector (RF-SD) to detect the timings. The proposed RF-SD can operate without the degradation of charge efficiency by reusing the RF energy harvester (RF-EH) and H-CMP. The PMU fabricated in a 180 nm Si CMOS demonstrated the charge operation using the RF signal at 915 MHz and the two types of timing detection with less than 124 nW in the charge phase. Furthermore, in the active phase, the PMU generates a 0.5 V regulated power supply from the charged energy.

  10. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  11. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  12. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies

  13. Discussion of high brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of high-brightness rf linacs are outlined, showing the breadth and complexity of the technology and indicating that synergism with advancements in other areas is important. Areas of technology reviewed include ion sources, injectors, rf accelerator structures, beam dynamics, rf power, and automatic control

  14. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines

  15. RF phase distribution systems at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, R.K.; Schwarz, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Modern large linear accelerators require RF distribution systems with minimal phase drifts and errors. Through the use of existing RF coaxial waveguides, and additional installation of phase reference cables and monitoring equipment, stable RF distribution for the SLC has been achieved. This paper discusses the design and performance of SLAC systems, and some design considerations for future colliders. 6 refs., 4 figs

  16. Linear collider RF: Introduction and summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    The relation of acceleration gradient with RF frequency is examined, and approximate general RF power requirements are derived. Considerations of efficiency and cost are discussed. RF Sources, presented at the conference, are reviewed. Overall efficiencies of the linear collider proposals are compared. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  17. RF phase focusing in portable x-band, linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.H.; Deruyter, H.; Fowkes, W.R.; Potter, J.M.; Schonberg, R.G.; Weaver, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    In order to minimize the size and weight of the x-ray or neutron source for a series of portable radiographic linear accelerators, the x-ray head was packaged separately from the rest of the system and consists of only the linac accelerating structure, electron gun, built-in target, collimator, ion pump and an RF window. All the driving electronics and cooling are connected to the x-ray head through flexible waveguide, cables, and waterlines. The x-ray head has been kept small and light weight by using the RF fields for radial focusing, as well as for longitudinal bunching and accelerating the beam. Thus, no external, bulky magnetic focusing devices are required. The RF focusing is accomplished by alternating the sign of the phase difference between the RF and the beam and by tapering from cavity to cavity the magnitude of the buncher field levels. The former requires choosing the right phase velocity taper (mix of less than vp = c cavities) and the latter requires the right sizing of the cavity to cavity coupling smiles (irises)

  18. RF phase focusing in portable X-band, linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.H.; Deruyter, H.; Fowkes, W.R.; Potter, J.W.; Schonberg, R.G.; Weaver, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    In order to minimize the size and weight of the x-ray or neutron source for a series of portable radiographic linear accelerators, the x-ray head was packaged separately from the rest of the system and consists of only the linac accelerating structure, electron gun, built-in target, collimator, ion pump and an RF window. All the driving electronics and cooling are connected to the x-ray head through flexible waveguide, cables, and waterlines. The x-ray head has been kept small and light weight by using the RF fields for radial focusing, as well as for longitudinal bunching and accelerating the beam. Thus, no external, bulky magnetic focusing devices are required. The RF focusing is accomplished by alternating the sign of the phase difference between the RF and the beam and by tapering from cavity to cavity the magnitude of the buncher field levels. The former requires choosing the right phase velocity taper (mix of less than vp=c cavities) and the latter requires the right sizing of the cavity to cavity coupling smiles (irises)

  19. rf impedance of the accelerating beam gap and its significance to the TRIUMF rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.

    1979-03-01

    The rf system at TRIUMF is now operating with the highest Q, the lowest rf leakage into the beam gap, the best voltage stability, and the lowest resonator strongback temperatures ever measured since it was first put into operation. This paper describes the calculation of the rf impedance of the beam gap and its correlation to the rf problems encountered, which eventually led to modifications to the flux guides and resonator tips to accomplish the improved operation of the rf system

  20. Spectral emission from the alkali inductively-coupled plasma: Theory and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bazurto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The weakly-ionized, alkali inductively-coupled plasma (ICP has a long history as the light source for optical pumping. Today, its most significant application is perhaps in the rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS, arguably the workhorse of atomic timekeeping in space, where it is crucial to the RAFS’ functioning and performance (and routinely referred to as the RAFS’ “rf-discharge lamp”. In particular, the photon flux from the lamp determines the signal-to-noise ratio of the device, and variations in ICP brightness define the long-term frequency stability of the atomic clock as a consequence of the ac-Stark shift (i.e., the light-shift. Given the importance of Rb atomic clocks to diverse satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS, Galileo, BeiDou – and thereby the importance of alkali ICPs to these systems – it is somewhat surprising to find that the physical processes occurring within the discharge are not well understood. As a consequence, researchers do not understand how to improve the spectral emission from the lamp except at a trial-and-error level, nor do they fully understand the nonlinear mechanisms that result in ICP light instability. Here, we take a first step in developing an intuitive, semi-quantitative model of the alkali rf-discharge lamp, and we perform a series of experiments to validate the theory’s predictions.

  1. Spectral emission from the alkali inductively-coupled plasma: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazurto, R.; Huang, M.; Camparo, J.

    2018-04-01

    The weakly-ionized, alkali inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) has a long history as the light source for optical pumping. Today, its most significant application is perhaps in the rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS), arguably the workhorse of atomic timekeeping in space, where it is crucial to the RAFS' functioning and performance (and routinely referred to as the RAFS' "rf-discharge lamp"). In particular, the photon flux from the lamp determines the signal-to-noise ratio of the device, and variations in ICP brightness define the long-term frequency stability of the atomic clock as a consequence of the ac-Stark shift (i.e., the light-shift). Given the importance of Rb atomic clocks to diverse satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS, Galileo, BeiDou) - and thereby the importance of alkali ICPs to these systems - it is somewhat surprising to find that the physical processes occurring within the discharge are not well understood. As a consequence, researchers do not understand how to improve the spectral emission from the lamp except at a trial-and-error level, nor do they fully understand the nonlinear mechanisms that result in ICP light instability. Here, we take a first step in developing an intuitive, semi-quantitative model of the alkali rf-discharge lamp, and we perform a series of experiments to validate the theory's predictions.

  2. RF compensation of single Langmuir probe in low density helicon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumen, E-mail: soumen@ipr.res.in; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.; Ghosh, Joydeep; Bora, Dhiraj

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Appropriate density and temperature measurement with Langmuir probe in RF Eenvironment. • Necessity of large auxiliary electrode for RF compensation at low densities (∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}). • Measured two temperature electrons in low pressure helicon antenna produced RF plasma. • Tail electrons are localized only at off-axis in our cylindrical plasma system. - Abstract: Interpretations of Single Langmuir probe measurements in electrode-less radio frequency (RF) plasmas are noteworthy tricky and require adequate compensation of RF. Conventional RF compensation technique is limited only at high density (>10{sup 17} m{sup −3}) RF plasmas. RF compensation of single Langmuir probe at low density RF plasmas (∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}) is presented in this paper. In RF driven plasmas, where the RF voltage is high (∼50 V) and density is in the range (∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}), the primary RF compensation condition (Z{sub ck} > >Z{sub sh}) is very difficult to fulfill, because of high sheath impedance (Z{sub sh}) at 13.56 MHz and the construction limitation of a self-resonant tiny chock (Z{sub ck}) with very high impedance. Introducing a large auxiliary electrode (A{sub x}), (A{sub x} >>> A{sub p}), close to the small Langmuir probe (A{sub p}) tip, connected in parallel with probe via a coupling capacitor (C{sub cp}), significantly reduces the effective sheath impedance (Z{sub sh}) and allows probe bias to follow the RF oscillation. Dimensional requirements of the auxiliary electrode and the role of suitable coupling capacitor are discussed in this paper. Observations show proper compensation leads to estimation of more positive floating potentials and lower electron temperatures compared to uncompensated probe. The electron energy probability function (EEPF) is also obtained by double differentiating the collected current with respect to the applied bias voltage using an active analog circuit.

  3. The AGS Booster high frequency rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.T.; Cameron, P.; Eng, W.; Goldman, M.A.; Jablonski, E.; Kasha, D.; Keane, J.; McNerney, A.; Meth, M.; Plotkin, M.; Puglisi, M.; Ratti, A.; Spitz, R.

    1991-01-01

    A high level rf system, including a power amplifier and cavity, has been designed and built for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 MHz and will be used to accelerate high intensity protons. Low intensity polarized protons and heavy ions, to the 1.5 GeV level. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90 kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate beam intensities up to 0.75 x 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two parallel cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid-state amplifier. It has been tested in the laboratory at full gap voltage with satisfactory results. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Stochastic cooling with a double rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie.

    1992-01-01

    Stochastic cooling for a bunched beam of hadrons stored in an accelerator with a double rf system of two different frequencies has been investigated. The double rf system broadens the spread in synchrotron-oscillation frequency of the particles when they mostly oscillate near the center of the rf bucket. Compared with the ease of a single rf system, the reduction rates of the bunch dimensions are significantly increased. When the rf voltage is raised, the reduction rate, instead of decreasing linearly, now is independent of the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. On the other hand, the spread in synchrotron-oscillation frequency becomes small with the double rf system, if the longitudinal oscillation amplitudes of the particles are comparable to the dimension of the rf bucket. Consequently, stochastic cooling is less effective when the bunch area is close to the bucket area

  5. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb 3 Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb 3 Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown

  6. Improving uniformity of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharges using dual frequency excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Peeters, F. J. J.; Starostin, S. A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; de Vries, H. W.

    2018-01-01

    This letter reports a novel approach to improve the uniformity of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharges using a dual-frequency excitation consisting of a low frequency (LF) at 200 kHz and a radio frequency (RF) at 13.56 MHz. It is shown that due to the periodic oscillation of the RF electric field, the electron acceleration and thus the gas ionization is temporally modulated, i.e. enhanced and suppressed during each RF cycle. As a result, the discharge development is slowed down with a lower amplitude and a longer duration of the LF discharge current. Hence, the RF electric field facilitates improved stability and uniformity simultaneously allowing a higher input power.

  7. Rf System for the NLCTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R.W.; Gold, S.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Hoag, H.A.; Holmes, S.G.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an X-Band RF system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator. The RF system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned and damped detuned accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLEDII energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. Correct phasing between the two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly aligning the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored with special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation of the sub-systems and their components are briefly presented.

  8. Low jitter RF distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  9. Oak Ridge rf Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; McCurdy, H.C.; McManamy, T.J.; Moeller, J.A.; Ryan, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rf Test Facility (RFTF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a national facility for the testing and evaluation of steady-state, high-power (approx.1.0-MW) ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components. The facility consists of a vacuum vessel and two fully tested superconducting development magnets from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program. These are arranged as a simple mirror with a mirror ratio of 4.8. The axial centerline distance between magnet throat centers is 112 cm. The vacuum vessel cavity has a large port (74 by 163 cm) and a test volume adequate for testing prototypic launchers for Doublet III-D (DIII-D), Tore Supra, and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Attached to the internal vessel walls are water-cooled panels for removing the injected rf power. The magnets are capable of generating a steady-state field of approx.3 T on axis in the magnet throats. Steady-state plasmas are generated in the facility by cyclotron resonance breakdown using a dedicated 200-kW, 28-GHz gyrotron. Available rf sources cover a frequency range of 2 to 200 MHz at 1.5 kW and 3 to 18 MHz at 200 kW, with several sources at intermediate parameters. Available in July 1986 will be a >1.0-MW, cw source spanning 40 to 80 MHz. 5 figs

  10. Langmuir probe study of a magnetically enhanced RF plasma source at pressures below 0.1 Pa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousal, Jaroslav; Tichý, Milan; Šebek, Ondřej; Čechvala, Juraj; Biederman, Hynek

    2011-08-01

    The majority of plasma polymerization sources operate at pressures higher than 1 Pa. At these pressures most common deposition methods do not show significant directionality. One way of enhancing the directional effects is to decrease the working pressure to increase the mean free path of the reactive molecules. The plasma source used in this work was designed to study the plasma polymerization process at pressures below 0.1 Pa. The source consists of the classical radio frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz, capacitive coupled) tubular reactor enhanced by an external magnetic circuit. The working gas is introduced into the discharge by a capillary. This forms a relatively localized zone of higher pressure where the monomer is activated. Due to the magnetic field, the plasma is constricted near the axis of the reactor with nearly collisionless gas flow. The plasma parameters were obtained using a double Langmuir probe. Plasma density in the range ni = 1013-1016 m-3 was obtained in various parts of the discharge under typical conditions. The presence of the magnetic field led to the presence of relatively strong electric fields (103 V m-1) and relatively high electron energies up to several tens of eV in the plasma.

  11. Langmuir probe study of a magnetically enhanced RF plasma source at pressures below 0.1 Pa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kousal, Jaroslav; Tichy, Milan; Sebek, Ondrej; Cechvala, Juraj; Biederman, Hynek, E-mail: jaroslav.kousal@mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00, Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    The majority of plasma polymerization sources operate at pressures higher than 1 Pa. At these pressures most common deposition methods do not show significant directionality. One way of enhancing the directional effects is to decrease the working pressure to increase the mean free path of the reactive molecules. The plasma source used in this work was designed to study the plasma polymerization process at pressures below 0.1 Pa. The source consists of the classical radio frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz, capacitive coupled) tubular reactor enhanced by an external magnetic circuit. The working gas is introduced into the discharge by a capillary. This forms a relatively localized zone of higher pressure where the monomer is activated. Due to the magnetic field, the plasma is constricted near the axis of the reactor with nearly collisionless gas flow. The plasma parameters were obtained using a double Langmuir probe. Plasma density in the range n{sub i} = 10{sup 13}-10{sup 16} m{sup -3} was obtained in various parts of the discharge under typical conditions. The presence of the magnetic field led to the presence of relatively strong electric fields (10{sup 3} V m{sup -1}) and relatively high electron energies up to several tens of eV in the plasma.

  12. Influence of excited molecules on electron swarm transport coefficients and gas discharge kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Z.L.; Jovanovic, J.V.; Raspopovic, Z.M.; Bzenic, S.A.; Vrhovac, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we study different effects of excited molecules on swarm parameters, electron energy distribution functions and gas discharge modeling. First we discuss a possible experiment in parahydrogen to resolve the discrepancy in hydrogen vibrational excitation cross section data. Negative differential conductivity (NDC) is a kinetic phenomenon which manifests itself in a particular dependence of the drift velocity on E=N and it is affected by superelastic collisions with excited states. A complete kinetic scheme for argon required to model excited state densities in gas discharges is also described. These results are used to explain experiments in capacitively and inductively coupled RF plasmas used for processing. The paper illustrates the application of atomic and molecular collision data, swarm data and the theoretical techniques in modeling of gas discharges with large abundances of excited molecules. It is pointed out that swarm experiments with excited molecules are lacking and that there is a shortage of reliable data, while the numerical procedures are sufficiently developed to include all the important effects. (authors). 59 refs., 12 figs

  13. Self-consistent nonlinear transmission line model of standing wave effects in a capacitive discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, P.; Raimbault, J.L.; Rax, J.M.; Lieberman, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown previously [Lieberman et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 11, 283 (2002)], using a non-self-consistent model based on solutions of Maxwell's equations, that several electromagnetic effects may compromise capacitive discharge uniformity. Among these, the standing wave effect dominates at low and moderate electron densities when the driving frequency is significantly greater than the usual 13.56 MHz. In the present work, two different global discharge models have been coupled to a transmission line model and used to obtain the self-consistent characteristics of the standing wave effect. An analytical solution for the wavelength λ was derived for the lossless case and compared to the numerical results. For typical plasma etching conditions (pressure 10-100 mTorr), a good approximation of the wavelength is λ/λ 0 ≅40 V 0 1/10 l -1/2 f -2/5 , where λ 0 is the wavelength in vacuum, V 0 is the rf voltage magnitude in volts at the discharge center, l is the electrode spacing in meters, and f the driving frequency in hertz

  14. Discharge physics and chemistry of a novel atmospheric pressure plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.; Henins, I.; Hermann, J.W.; Selwyn, G.S.; Jeong, J.Y.; Hickis, R.

    1999-07-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a unique plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure. The APPJ operates with RF power and produces a stable non-thermal discharge in capacitively-coupled configuration. The discharge is spatially and temporally homogeneous and provides a unique gas phase chemistry that is well suited for various applications including etching, film deposition, surface treatment and decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents. A theoretical model shows electron densities of 0.2--2 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3} for a helium discharge at a power level of 3--30 W cm{sup {minus}3}. The APPJ also produces a large flux, equivalent of up to 10,000 monolayer s{sup {minus}1}, of chemically-active, atomic and metastable molecular species which can impinge surfaces several cm downstream of the confined source. In addition, the efforts are in progress to measure the electron density using microwave diagnostics and to benchmark the gas phase chemical model by using LIF and titration.

  15. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  16. Progress of the ''batman'' RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, P.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Probst, F.; Speth, E.; Vollmer, O.; Bucalossi, J.; Trainham, R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of a collaboration between CEA Cadarache and IPP Garching is to investigate the ability of an rf source to produce negative-ion current densities compatible with ITER NBI requirements (20 mA/cm 2 D-). A standard PlNI-size rf source developed for ASDEX-Upgrade and a three-grid extraction system form the basis of BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative Ions). In the case of a pure hydrogen plasma a current density of 5.5 mA/cm 2 at elevated pressure (2.4 Pa) can be reached. Adding small amounts of argon ( 2 . In the low pressure range (0.7 Pa) the negative ion yield is strongly reduced, but with an admixture of argon and a cesium injection the current density is higher approx. by a factor 8 (4 mA/cm 2 ) compared to the pure hydrogen discharge. The negative ion yield shows a saturation with increasing rf power. (author)

  17. A calibrated, broadband antenna for plasma RF emission measurements below 1 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, P.D.; Rosenberg, D.; Roth, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A constant impedance, constant aperture antenna can make possible broadband plasma RF emission measurements which yield relative and absolute power levels. However, good technique must be followed for the immersion of such an RF probe into plasma radiation. The authors have used a complementary conical spiral antenna to observe plasma RF emission over the frequency range 100 ≤ν≤ 1200 MHz. The RF emission was emitted by a modified Penning discharge. The RF emission from the discharge typically exhibits harmonic structure over a broad frequency range, necessitating a broadband antenna with a flat frequency response curve to allow detailed spectral analysis. The antenna consists of two metal strips of approximately uniform width wound helically on a cone made of Lexan plastic. Since the antenna is a balanced network, a balun is employed to make the transition to a 50-ohm coaxial line. The antenna feed method is critical in maintaining a uniform impedance network. Neglecting stray transmission line effects, the probe circuit for the frequency range 100 ≤ν≤ 500 MHz is 50 ohms due to the spectrum analyzer, paralleled by 291 ohms due to balun magnetization; the combination is fed by a 144 ohm probe aperture

  18. A 1D ion species model for an RF driven negative ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, I.; Holmes, A. J. T.

    2017-08-01

    A one-dimensional model for an RF driven negative ion source has been developed based on an inductive discharge. The RF source differs from traditional filament and arc ion sources because there are no primary electrons present, and is simply composed of an antenna region (driver) and a main plasma discharge region. However the model does still make use of the classical plasma transport equations for particle energy and flow, which have previously worked well for modelling DC driven sources. The model has been developed primarily to model the Small Negative Ion Facility (SNIF) ion source at CCFE, but may be easily adapted to model other RF sources. Currently the model considers the hydrogen ion species, and provides a detailed description of the plasma parameters along the source axis, i.e. plasma temperature, density and potential, as well as current densities and species fluxes. The inputs to the model are currently the RF power, the magnetic filter field and the source gas pressure. Results from the model are presented and where possible compared to existing experimental data from SNIF, with varying RF power, source pressure.

  19. Review of the Hatfield and Dawson RF assessment for Bechtel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Ron J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-10-05

    The construction project at the Russell City Energy Center (RCEC) in Hayward, CA encountered a complication due to RF induction into the construction cranes resulting from operation of the two AM broadcast systems located immediately south of the site. The consulting firm Hatfield and Dawson was contacted by Bechtel for the assessment and mitigation of the induced currents and voltages and their recommendations were implemented by Bechtel. The staff at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was subsequently asked to review the analysis of the Hatfield and Dawson work, provide an independent assessment and offer further mitigation comments. LLNL has examined the work by Hatfield and Dawson, the numerical analyses of both agrees and correlates well with local field measurements. The mitigation efforts follow the OSHA rules and have been adapted to further reduce the possibility of worker injury through specialized training, daily task planning and specific assignments to workers to minimize exposure of all to the induced RF currents. LLNL further recommends that Bechtel formalize the RF training to provide additional value to the individual workers as well as for Bechtel to maintain documentation so that future work could make use of experienced workers. There is a possibility that the RF energy will couple into the actuator and sensors as the facility is built out. The operation of the two transmitters could introduce interference formed from the interaction of the signals in nonlinear circuit responses producing intermodulation distortion. The result is interference at unexpected frequencies, some of which can be low and not filtered out of the sensors unless specifically identified. Future testing is planned for evaluating the likelihood for RF interference issues.

  20. Influence of the matrix composition in the Emission spectroscopic analysis of solutions with continuous nebulization of the sample and excitation of the spectrum in a high-frequency inductively coupled plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zil'bershtein, K.I.; Kartasheva, M.A.; Mushkovich, G.N.

    1986-01-01

    Numerous investigations have shown that the emission spectroscopic analysis of solutions with the use of a high-frequency inductively coupled plasma discharge is characterized by the absence of an influence or the presence of a small influence of the matrix elements on the amplitudes of the analytical signals of the elements being determined and, consequently, on the results of an analysis. The influences of the first type include the influences of easily ionized elements, which, as we know, are very significant in spectroscopic analysis with the use of traditional sources for the excitation of the spectra (arcs, sparks, and flames). The influences of the second type include, in particular, the influences associated with changes in the viscosity and surface tension of the solutions as the concentration of the matrix elements in the solutions is increased. In order to obtain correct results from an analysis in the case of spectral interference, special methods for treating the spectra are used for the purpose of taking into account the background and the instances of superposition and establishing the true (''pure'') intensity of the analytical lines. Results are shown of the Determination of impurities in aqueous solutions of sodium Molybate Single Crystals (the concentration of Na 2 Mo 2 O 7 in the solution was 1 mg/ml). When the solutions being analyzed are diluted to a concentration of Na 2 Mo 2 O 7 equal to 1 mg/ml, good agreement between the results of the determination of vanadium (and other impurities) obtained with the use of reference solutions not containing the matrix elements and the results obtained with the use of reference solutions containing the matrix elements in the same concentrations as in the solutions being analyzed (1mg/ml) was guaranteed

  1. New phenomenology of gas breakdown in DC and RF fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Sivoš, Jelena; Savić, Marija; Škoro, Nikola; Radmilović Radenović, Marija; Malović, Gordana; Gocić, Saša; Marić, Dragana

    2014-05-01

    This paper follows a review lecture on the new developments in the field of gas breakdown and low current discharges, usually covered by a form of Townsend's theory and phenomenology. It gives an overview of a new approach to identifying which feedback agents provide breakdown, how to model gas discharge conditions and reconcile the results with binary experiments and how to employ that knowledge in modelling gas discharges. The next step is an illustration on how to record volt-ampere characteristics and use them on one hand to obtain the breakdown voltage and, on the other, to identify the regime of operation and model the secondary electron yields. The second aspect of this section concerns understanding the different regimes, their anatomy, how those are generated and how free running oscillations occur. While temporal development is the most useful and interesting part of the new developments, the difficulty of presenting the data in a written form precludes an easy publication and discussion. Thus, we shall only mention some of the results that stem from these measurements. Most micro discharges operate in DC albeit with complex geometries. Thus, parallel plate micro discharge measurements were needed to establish that Townsend's theory, with all its recent extensions, is still valid until some very small gaps. We have shown, for example, how a long-path breakdown puts in jeopardy many experimental observations and why a flat left-hand side of the Paschen curve often does not represent good physics. We will also summarize a kinetic representation of the RF breakdown revealing a somewhat more complex picture than the standard model. Finally, we will address briefly the breakdown in radially inhomogeneous conditions and how that affects the measured properties of the discharge. This review has the goal of summarizing (rather than developing details of) the current status of the low-current DC discharges formation and operation as a discipline which, in spite of

  2. HOM Dampers or not in Superconducting RF Proton Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by Coupled Bunch Instabilities, driven by impedance peaks, irrespectively of their frequency relation to machine lines; hence all cavity Higher Order Modes are possible drivers. This is the fundamental reason that all superconducting RF cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. This raises the question if HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current proton linacs where a mechanism akin to CBI might exist. To clarify this question we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in linacs, allowing bunch-to-bunch variations in time-of-arrival. Simulations were executed for a generic proton linac with properties close to SNS or the planned SPL at CERN. It was found that for monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter or even beam loss cannot be excluded. Therefore omitting HOM dampers on superconducting RF cavities in high current proton linacs, even pulsed ones, is a very risky decision.

  3. HOM Dampers or not in SUPERCONDUCTING RF Proton Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Circular machines are plagued by Coupled Bunch Instabilities, driven by impedance peaks, irrespectively of their frequency relation to machine lines; hence all cavity Higher Order Modes are possible drivers. This is the fundamental reason that all superconducting RF cavities in circular machines are equipped with HOM dampers. This raises the question if HOM damping would not be imperative also in high current proton linacs where a mechanism akin to CBI might exist. To clarify this question we have simulated the longitudinal bunched beam dynamics in linacs, allowing bunch-to-bunch variations in time-of-arrival. Simulations were executed for a generic proton linac with properties close to SNS or the planned SPL at CERN. It was found that for monopole HOMs with high Qext large beam scatter or even beam loss cannot be excluded. Therefore omitting HOM dampers on superconducting RF cavities in high current proton linacs, even pulsed ones, is a very risky decision.

  4. Modeling and design of an X-band rf photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Marsh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A design for an X-band rf photoinjector that was developed jointly by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is presented. The photoinjector is based around a 5.59 cell rf gun that has state-of-the-art features including: elliptical contoured irises; improved mode separation; an optimized initial half cell length; a racetrack input coupler; and coupling that balances pulsed heating with cavity fill time. Radio-frequency and beam dynamics modeling have been done using a combination of codes including PARMELA, HFSS, IMPACT-T, ASTRA, and the ACE3P suite of codes developed at SLAC. The impact of lower gradient operation, magnet misalignment, solenoid multipole errors, beam offset, mode beating, wakefields, and beam line symmetry have been analyzed and are described. Fabrication and testing plans at both LLNL and SLAC are discussed.

  5. Diagnostic study of multiple double layer formation in expanding RF plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Paul, Manash Kumar; Roy, Jitendra Nath; Nath, Aparna

    2018-03-01

    Intensely luminous double layers develop and then expand in size in a visibly glowing RF discharge produced using a plasma source consisting of a semi-transparent cylindrical mesh with a central electrode, in a linear plasma chamber. Although RF discharge is known to be independent of device geometry in the absence of magnetic field, the initiation of RF discharge using such a plasma source results in electron drift and further expansion of the plasma in the vessel. The dynamics of complex plasma structures are studied through electric probe diagnostics in the expanding RF plasma. The measurements made to study the parametric dependence of evolution of double layer structures are analyzed and presented here. The plasma parameter measurements suggest that the complex potential structures initially form with low potential difference between the layers and then gradually expand producing burst oscillations. The present study provides interesting information about the stability of plasma sheath and charge particle dynamics in it that are important to understand the underlying basic sheath physics along with applications in plasma acceleration and propulsion.

  6. rf power dependence of subharmonic voltage spectra of two-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebboul, S.E.; Garland, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the rf-bias-current dependence of the ν/2 subharmonic spectral response of planar 300x300 Nb-Au-Nb proximity-coupled Josephson-junction arrays. The ν/2 subharmonic voltage spectrum was examined at two rf-bias frequencies, ν/ν c ∼1.4, 2.0 (ν c ∼120 MHz), and in applied magnetic fields corresponding to f=0,1/2 flux quantum per plaquette. The measurements were compared to analytical predictions for an rf-biased asymmetric superconducting quantum interference device with non-negligble loop inductance and large rf-bias-current amplitudes, based on the resistively shunted Josephson-junction model. Reasonable agreement was found between experiment and theory, suggesting that a possible origin for the observed subharmonic behavior in arrays involves an interplay between array plaquette inductances and junction critical-current variations

  7. Look at energy compression as an assist for high power rf production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birx, D.L.; Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    The desire to construct electron linacs of higher and higher energies, coupled with the realities of available funding and real estate, has forced machine designers to reassess the limitations in both accelerator gradient (MeV/m) and energy. The gradients achieved in current radio-frequency (RF) linacs are sometimes set by electrical breakdown in the accelerating structure, but are in most cases determined by the RF power level available to drive the linac. In this paper we will not discuss RF power sources in general, but rather take a brief look at several energy compression schemes which might be of service in helping to make better use of the sources we employ. We will, however, diverge for a bit and discuss what the RF power requirements are. 12 references, 21 figures, 3 tables

  8. High-power RF controls for the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddl, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The high-power rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)-Los Alamos racetrack microtron (RTM) uses waveguide power splitters and waveguide phase shifters to distribute rf power from a single 500-kw cw klystron to four side-coupled accelerating structures. The amplitude and phase of each structure is controlled by a feedback system that uses the waveguide variable power splitters, waveguide phase shifters, and klystron drive as the active control elements. The feedback controls on the capture section use low-level rf amplitude and phase controls on the rf drive to the klystron. These controls are very fast with an open loop gain bandwidth of approximately 40 kHz. The feedback loop is identical to the feedback loop used in the chopper/buncher system described in another paper at this conference

  9. Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system

  10. RF and microwave microelectronics packaging II

    CERN Document Server

    Sturdivant, Rick

    2017-01-01

    Reviews RF, microwave, and microelectronics assembly process, quality control, and failure analysis Bridges the gap between low cost commercial and hi-res RF/Microwave packaging technologies Engages in an in-depth discussion of challenges in packaging and assembly of advanced high-power amplifiers This book presents the latest developments in packaging for high-frequency electronics. It is a companion volume to “RF and Microwave Microelectronics Packaging” (2010) and covers the latest developments in thermal management, electrical/RF/thermal-mechanical designs and simulations, packaging and processing methods, and other RF and microwave packaging topics. Chapters provide detailed coverage of phased arrays, T/R modules, 3D transitions, high thermal conductivity materials, carbon nanotubes and graphene advanced materials, and chip size packaging for RF MEMS. It appeals to practicing engineers in the electronic packaging and high-frequency electronics domain, and to academic researchers interested in underst...

  11. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... long as you are told. This helps ensure tennis elbow will not return. You may be prescribed a ...

  12. Ankle replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total - discharge; Total ankle arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement - discharge; Osteoarthritis - ankle ... You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped ... an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were ...

  13. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge ... in the hospital for surgery to repair a hip fracture, a break in the upper part of ...

  14. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  15. Lasers for RF guns: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, laser driven RF guns have matured from a device under development to a proven source for high brightness and low emittance electron beams. The reliability of the electron beam from these sources is dictated by the laser system that drives it. In addition, capabilities of the laser systems play a vital role in the design of the electron source for future machines such as the TESLA and NLC. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for discussing the design criteria for the laser systems so that the reliability of the existing sources could be improved and the future machines could be serviced. The Workshop brought together experts in RF Guns, accelerators, and lasers, from both the commercial and academic community. Most of the presentations, discussions and conclusions at the workshop are included in these proceedings. The contents are divided into three sections, Section I contains the invited talks that outline the requirements of the RF Guns and the capabilities of the laser systems to meet these requirements. Section II includes most of the papers presented in the poster session. These papers describe various laser systems used with electron guns, schemes to modify the laser beam profile to optimize the electron bunch, and computer simulations of electron trajectories. Section III contains the summaries of the working groups. As the summary section indicates, with sufficient feed back systems, the electron gun could be made to operate reliably with minimum downtime, using commercial lasers currently available. The design of laser systems for future colliders depend critically on the choice of the cathode m the gun and its efficiency. Tentative designs of laser systems for the TESLA test facility and LCLS had been drawn assuming a copper cathode. Using a more efficient cathode will ease the energy requirement of the laser and simplify the design. The individual papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  16. On the frequency scalings of RF guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.C.; Chen, S.C.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A frequency scaling law for RF guns is derived from the normalized Vlasov-Maxwell equations. It shows that higher frequency RF guns can generate higher brightness beams under the assumption that the accelerating gradient and all beam and structure parameters are scaled with the RF frequency. Numerical simulation results using MAGIC confirm the scaling law. A discussion of the range of applicability of the law is presented. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  17. Analog techniques in CEBAF's RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional RF technology. Diode related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF RF control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. RF signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  18. Analog techniques in CEBAF'S RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional rf technology. Diode-related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF rf control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. Rf signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  19. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  20. RF front-end world class designs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Janine

    2009-01-01

    All the design and development inspiration and direction a harware engineer needs in one blockbuster book! Janine Love site editor for RF Design Line,columnist, and author has selected the very best RF design material from the Newnes portfolio and has compiled it into this volume. The result is a book covering the gamut of RF front end design from antenna and filter design fundamentals to optimized layout techniques with a strong pragmatic emphasis. In addition to specific design techniques and practices, this book also discusses various approaches to solving RF front end design problems and h

  1. High power RF transmission line component development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I.

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant ε=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  2. High power RF transmission line component development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant {epsilon}=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  3. Fundamental mode rf power dissipated in a waveguide attached to an accelerating cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.

    1993-01-01

    An accelerating RF cavity usually requires accessory devices such as a tuner, a coupler, and a damper to perform properly. Since a device is attached to the wall of the cavity to have certain electrical coupling of the cavity field through the opening. RF power dissipation is involved. In a high power accelerating cavity, the RF power coupled and dissipated in the opening and in the device must be estimated to design a proper cooling system for the device. The single cell cavities of the APS storage ring will use the same accessories. These cavities are rotationally symmetric and the fields around the equator can be approximated with the fields of the cylindrical pillbox cavity. In the following, the coupled and dissipated fundamental mode RF power in a waveguide attached to a pillbox cavity is discussed. The waveguide configurations are (1) aperture-coupled cylindrical waveguide with matched load termination; (2) short-circuited cylindrical waveguide; and (3) E-probe or H-loop coupled coaxial waveguide. A short-circuited, one-wavelength coaxial structure is considered for the fundamental frequency rejection circuit of an H-loop damper

  4. Coupling of an ICRF compact loop antenna to H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayberry, M.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Luxon, J.L.; Owens, T.L.; Prater, R.

    1987-01-01

    Low power coupling tests have been carried out with a prototype ICRF compact loop antenna on the DIII-D tokamak. During neutral-beam-heated L-mode discharges the antenna loading is typically R≅1-2Ω for an rf frequency of 32 MHz (B/sub T/ = 21 kG, ω = 2Ω/sub D/(0)). When a transition into the H-mode regime of improved confinement occurs, the loading drops to R≅0.5-1.0Ω. During ELMs, transient increases in loading up to several Ohms are observed. The apparent sensitivity of ICRF antenna coupling to changes in the edge plasma profiles associated with the H-mode regime could have important implications for the design of future high power systems

  5. On-chip RF-to-optical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anders; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Seis, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    these diverse systems, plus technologies that utilize them, and the mature toolbox of optical techniques that routinely operates at the quantum limit. In a previous work [1], we demonstrated such a bridge by realizing simultaneous coupling between an electronic LC circuit and a quantum-noise limited optical...... noise temperatures far below the actual temperature of the mechanical element. On-chip integration of the electrical, mechanical and optical elements is necessary for an implementation of the transduction scheme that is viable for commercial applications. Reliable assembly of a strongly coupled...... electromechanical device, and inclusion of an optical cavity for enhanced optical readout, are key features of the new platform. Both can be achieved with standard cleanroom fabrication techniques. We will furthermore present ongoing work to couple our transducer to an RF or microwave antenna, for low...

  6. The RF inlet of the RFQ of IPHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquet, O.; Desmons, M.; France, A.

    2005-02-01

    The power supply of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) requires a new type of transition between the WR2300 waveguide and the RFQ cavity. This transition is an impedance transformer with a bottleneck shape that allows the transmission of the power along a 3.7 MHz broad pass-band centered on an operating frequency of 352.2 MHz. This design has allowed us to separate the adjustment of the transition from the setting of the coupling holes in the cavity wall. This whole transition has been tested on the RFQ mockup in order to optimize the diameter of the coupling holes. It appears that an important point for a good coupling is to be sure of good RF contacts between the different components of the transition device. (A.C.)

  7. PEP II: RF and feedback R ampersand D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindi, H.: Fox, J.; Eisen, N.; Linscott, I.; Oxoby, G.; Pendleton, R.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Rimmer, R.; Lambertson, A.; Voelker, F.; Serio, M.

    1992-11-01

    The key elements of the PEP 11 approach to dealing with the problem of coupled-bunch instabilities are presented. The approach involves using warm copper RF cavities with damping waveguides (above the cutoff of the fundamental) attached to the cavity walls. These couple out the troublesome higher-order modes (HOMs) into absorbing loads, while the fundamental mode remains in the cavity. The Q of the worst HOM is reduced to below 70. Instabilities due to residual coupling are damped using a bunch-by-bunch feedback system, which is implemented using digital signal processors. A prototype cavity has been built and the concept of HOM damping has been verified. A prototype feedback system has been built and tested at SPEAR. Results to date indicate that the combination of damped cavities and bunch-by-bunch feedback provide a very effective means of dealing with the problem

  8. RF Power Generation in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, O C; Valuch, D

    2003-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be captured and then accelerated to their final energies of 2 x 7 TeV by two identical 400 MHz RF systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell super-conducting (SC) cavity. Four klystrons are powered by a 100 kV, 40A AC/DC power converter, previously used for the operation of the LEP klystrons. A five-gap thyratron crowbar protects the four klystrons in each of these units. The technical specification and measured performance of the various high-power elements are discussed. These include the 400MHz/300kW klystrons with emphasis on their group delay and the three-port circulators, which have to cope with peak reflected power levels up to twice the simultaneously applied incident power of 300 kW. In addition, a novel ferrite loaded waveguide absorber, used as termination for port No...

  9. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  10. The RF system of FELI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Y.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A.; Abe, H.; Keishi, T.; Bessho, I.; Tomimasu, T.

    1994-01-01

    FELI (Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a Free Electron Laser facility covering from 20 μm (infra red region) to 0.35 μm (ultra violet region), using an S-band linac. The building will be completed in November 1993 and installation of the linac will start in December 1993. The linac consists of a thermoionic 0.5ns-pulse triggered gun, a 714 MHz SHB (subharmonic buncher), a 2856 MHz standing wave type buncher, and 7 ETL (Electrotechnical Laboratory) type accelerating sections. An RF system of the linac for FELs is required of long pulse duration and high stability. S-band klystrons (TOSHIBA E3729) are operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power); 24 μs - 24 MW, 12.5 μs - 34 MW, 0.5 μs - 70 MW. Each klystron modulator has the PFN consisting of 4 parallel networks of 24 capacitors and 24 inductors, and it has a line switch of an optical thyristor stack. These equipments are manufactured now, and an S-band klystron and modulator will be combined to test their performance at the works of NISSIN ELECTRIC Co. in October 1993. (author)

  11. High gradient RF breakdown study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Hanna, S.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and UC Davis have been investigating high gradient RF breakdown and its effects on pulse shortening in high energy microwave devices. RF breakdown is a critical issue in the development of high power microwave sources and next generation linear accelerators since it limits the output power of microwave sources and the accelerating gradient of linacs. The motivation of this research is to find methods to increase the breakdown threshold level in X-band structures by reducing dark current. Emphasis is focused on improved materials, surface finish, and cleanliness. The test platform for this research is a traveling wave resonant ring. A 30 MW klystron is employed to provide up to 300 MW of traveling wave power in the ring to trigger breakdown in the cavity. Five TM 01 cavities have previously been tested, each with a different combination of surface polish and/or coating. The onset of breakdown was extended up to 250 MV/m with a TiN surface finish, as compared to 210 MV/m for uncoated OFE copper. Although the TiN coating was helpful in depressing the field emission, the lowest dark current was obtained with a 1 microinch surface finish, single-point diamond-turned cavity

  12. Direct RF modulation transmitter, sampling clock frequency setting method for direct RF modulation transmitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a direct RF modulation transmitter capable of satisfying a radiation level regulation even without providing a SAW filter. SOLUTION: A direct RF modulation transmitter includes: digital/RF converters 105, 106 to which an I digital baseband signal, a Q digital

  13. Direct RF modulation transmitter, sampling clock frequency setting method for direct RF modulation transmitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nauta, Bram

    2014-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a direct RF modulation transmitter capable of satisfying a radiation level regulation even without providing a SAW filter. SOLUTION: A direct RF modulation transmitter includes: digital/RF converters 105, 106 to which an I digital baseband signal, a Q digital

  14. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Matsumoto, K.

    1993-01-01

    A large cryogenic system has been designed, constructed and operated in the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at KEK for 508 MHz, 32x5-cell superconducting RF cavities. A 6.5 kW, 4.4 K helium refrigerator with 5 turbo-expanders on the ground level supplies liquid helium in parallel to the 16 cryostats in the TRISTAN tunnel through about 250 m long multichannel transfer line. Two 5-cell cavities are coupled together, enclosed in a cryostat and cooled by about 830 L pool boiling liquid helium. A liquid nitrogen circulation system with a turbo-expander has been adopted for 80 K radiation shields in the multichannel transfer line and the cryostats to reduce liquid nitrogen consumption and to increase the operation stability of the system. The cryogenic system has a total of about 18 000 hours of operating time from the first cool down test in August 1988 to November 1991. The design principle and outline of the cryogenic system and the operational experience are presented. (orig.)

  15. Superconducting rf and beam-cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Beam-cavity interactions can limit the beam quality and current handling capability of linear and circular accelerators. These collective effects include cumulative and regenerative transverse beam breakup (BBU) in linacs, transverse multipass beam breakup in recirculating linacs and microtrons, longitudinal and transverse coupled-bunch instabilities in storage rings, and a variety of transverse and longitudinal single-bunch phenomena (instabilities, beam breakup, and energy deposition). The superconducting radio frequency (SRF) environment has a number of features which distinguish it from room temperature configuration with regard to these beam-cavity interactions. Typically the unloaded Qs of the lower higher order modes (HOM) are at the 10 9 level and require significant damping through couplers. High gradient CW operation, which is a principal advantage of SRF, allows for better control of beam quality, which for its preservation requires added care which respect to collective phenomena. Gradients are significantly higher than those attainable with copper in CW operation but remain significantly lower than those obtainable with pulsed copper cavities. Finally, energy deposition by the beam into the cavity can occur in a cryogenic environment. In this note those characteristics of beam-cavity interactions which are of particular importance for superconducting RF cavities are highlighted. 6 refs., 4 figs

  16. RF cogging in the FNAL Booster Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William A. Pellico and Robert C. Webber

    2000-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster operates at a Radio Frequency (RF) harmonic number of 84 with beam in all buckets. One or two bunches of beam are systematically lost in the 8 GeV extraction process as beam is swept across a magnetic septum during the extraction kicker rise time. The prompt radiation and component activation resulting from this localized high energy beam loss become serious concerns as Booster beam throughput must be increased more than tenfold to meet the requirements of RUN II, NUMI, and MiniBooNE experiments. Synchronizing a gap in the beam to the firing of the extraction kickers, a relatively easy and standard practice in many machines, can eliminate the problem. This seemingly simple operation is greatly complicated in the Booster by the need to synchronize extraction to beam already circulating in the Main Injector. Coupled with the inflexibility of the Booster resonant magnetic cycle, cycle to cycle variations, and constraints inherent in the accelerator physics, that requirement forces active control of the gap's azimuthal position throughout the acceleration process as the revolution frequency sweeps rapidly. Until recently, the complexities of actually implementing and demonstrating this process in the Booster had not been worked out. This paper describes a successful demonstration of gap cogging in the Booster

  17. Interpretation of PISCES -- A RF antenna system experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothweil, D.A.; Phelps, D.A.; Doerner, R.

    1995-10-01

    The paper describes experimental data from rf coupling experiments using one to four coil antenna arrays that encircle a linear magnetized plasma column. Experimental results using single turn coil that produce symmetric (i.e. m = 0), dipole (m = 1), and radial rf magnetic fields for coupling to ion waves are compared. By operating without a Faraday shield, it was observed for the first time that the plasma resistive load seen by these different antenna types tends to increase with the number of turns to at least the second power. A four-turn m = 0 coil experienced a record 3--5 Ω loading, corresponding to over 90% power coupling to the plasma. A four-turn m = 1 coil experienced up to 1--1.5 Ω loading, also higher than previous observations. First time observations using a two coil array of m = 0 coil are also reported. As predicted, the loading decreases with increasing phase between coil from 0 degree to 180 degree. Experiments using four coil arrays were difficult to optimize and interpret primarily due to complexity of the manual tuning. To facilitate this optimization in the future, a proposed feedback control system that automatically matches load variations between 0.2 and 10 Ω is described

  18. Improved planar radio frequency inductively coupled plasma configuration in plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.L.; Fu, R.K.Y.; Tian, X.B.; Chu, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Plasmas with higher density and better uniformity are produced using an improved planar radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma configuration in plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). An axial magnetic field is produced by external electromagnetic coils outside the discharge chamber. The rf power can be effectively absorbed by the plasma in the vicinity of the electron gyrofrequency due to the enhanced resonant absorption of electromagnetic waves in the whistler wave range, which can propagate nearly along the magnetic field lines thus greatly increases the plasma density. The plasma is confined by a longitudinal multipolar cusp magnetic field made of permanent magnets outside the process chamber. It can improve the plasma uniformity without significantly affecting the ion density. The plasma density can be increased from 3x10 9 to 1x10 10 cm -3 employing an axial magnetic field of several Gauss at 1000 W rf power and 5x10 -4 Torr gas pressure. The nonuniformity of the plasma density is less than 10% and can be achieved in a process chamber with a diameter of 600 mm. Since the plasma generation and process chambers are separate, plasma extinction due to the plasma sheath touching the chamber wall in high-energy PIII can be avoided. Hence, low-pressure, high-energy, and high-uniformity ion implantation can be accomplished using this setup

  19. RF generation in the DARHT Axis-II beam dump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-03

    We have occasionally observed radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic signals in the downstream transport (DST) of the second axis linear induction accelerator (LIA) at the dual-axis radiographic hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility. We have identified and eliminated some of the sources by eliminating the offending cavities. However, we still observe strong RF in the range 1 GHz t0 2 GHz occurring late in the {approx}2-{micro}s pulse that can be excited or prevented by varying the downstream tune. The narrow frequency width (<0.5%) and near exponential growth at the dominant frequency is indicative of a beam-cavity interaction, and electro-magnetic simulations of cavity structure show a spectrum rich in resonances in the observed frequency range. However, the source of beam produced RF in the cavity resonance frequency range has not been identified, and it has been the subject of much speculation, ranging from beam-plasma or beam-ion instabilities to unstable cavity coupling.

  20. RF Wave Simulation Using the MFEM Open Source FEM Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillerman, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Green, D. L.; Kolev, T.

    2016-10-01

    A new plasma wave simulation environment based on the finite element method is presented. MFEM, a scalable open-source FEM library, is used as the basis for this capability. MFEM allows for assembling an FEM matrix of arbitrarily high order in a parallel computing environment. A 3D frequency domain RF physics layer was implemented using a python wrapper for MFEM and a cold collisional plasma model was ported. This physics layer allows for defining the plasma RF wave simulation model without user knowledge of the FEM weak-form formulation. A graphical user interface is built on πScope, a python-based scientific workbench, such that a user can build a model definition file interactively. Benchmark cases have been ported to this new environment, with results being consistent with those obtained using COMSOL multiphysics, GENRAY, and TORIC/TORLH spectral solvers. This work is a first step in bringing to bear the sophisticated computational tool suite that MFEM provides (e.g., adaptive mesh refinement, solver suite, element types) to the linear plasma-wave interaction problem, and within more complicated integrated workflows, such as coupling with core spectral solver, or incorporating additional physics such as an RF sheath potential model or kinetic effects. USDoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  1. rf traveling-wave electron gun for photoinjectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Mattia; Citterio, Alessandro; Craievich, Paolo; Reiche, Sven; Stingelin, Lukas; Zennaro, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    The design of a photoinjector, in particular that of the electron source, is of central importance for free electron laser (FEL) machines where a high beam brightness is required. In comparison to standard designs, an rf traveling-wave photocathode gun can provide a more rigid beam with a higher brightness and a shorter pulse. This is illustrated by applying a specific optimization procedure to the SwissFEL photoinjector, for which a brightness improvement up to a factor 3 could be achieved together with a double gun output energy compared to the reference setup foreseeing a state-of-the-art S-band rf standing-wave gun. The higher brightness is mainly given by a (at least) double peak current at the exit of the gun which brings benefits for both the beam dynamics in the linac and the efficiency of the FEL process. The gun design foresees an innovative coaxial rf coupling at both ends of the structure which allows a solenoid with integrated bucking coil to be placed around the cathode in order to provide the necessary focusing right after emission.

  2. rf traveling-wave electron gun for photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Schaer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a photoinjector, in particular that of the electron source, is of central importance for free electron laser (FEL machines where a high beam brightness is required. In comparison to standard designs, an rf traveling-wave photocathode gun can provide a more rigid beam with a higher brightness and a shorter pulse. This is illustrated by applying a specific optimization procedure to the SwissFEL photoinjector, for which a brightness improvement up to a factor 3 could be achieved together with a double gun output energy compared to the reference setup foreseeing a state-of-the-art S-band rf standing-wave gun. The higher brightness is mainly given by a (at least double peak current at the exit of the gun which brings benefits for both the beam dynamics in the linac and the efficiency of the FEL process. The gun design foresees an innovative coaxial rf coupling at both ends of the structure which allows a solenoid with integrated bucking coil to be placed around the cathode in order to provide the necessary focusing right after emission.

  3. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  4. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  5. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (''port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation

  6. Special MAFIA postprocessors for the analysis of RF structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browman, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes three stand-alone programs that use the electromagnetic fields generated by the MAFIA 2.04 codes to analyze radio-frequency (RF) cavities. Illustrations are provided that show how these codes are used to analyze the effect of the coupling slots on the electric and magnetic fields of the linacs for the APLE Prototype Experiment (APEX) and the Advanced Free-Electron Laser (AFEL); verify the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem for a high-energy deflecting cavity proposed for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project; and study the effectiveness of that deflecting cavity. (Author) 10 refs., 4 figs

  7. Special MAFIA postprocessors for the analysis of rf structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browman, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes three stand-alone programs that use the electromagnetic fields generated by the MAFIA 2.04 codes to analyze radio-frequency (RF) cavities. Illustrations are provided that show how these codes are used to (1) analyze the effect of the coupling slots on the electric and magnetic fields of the linacs for the APLE Prototype Experiment (APEX) and the Advanced Free-Electron Laser (AFEL), (2) verify the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem for a high-energy deflecting cavity proposed for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project, and (3) study the effectiveness of that deflecting cavity

  8. Dynamic modelling of tearing mode stabilization by RF current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Zabiego, M.; Gianakon, T.A.; Garbet, X.; Bernabei, S.

    1998-01-01

    The theory of tearing mode stabilization in toroidal plasmas by RF-driven currents that are modulated in phase with the island rotation is investigated. A time scale analysis of the phenomena involved indicates that transient effects, such as finite time response of the driven currents, island rotation during the power pulses, and the inductive response of the plasma, are intrinsically important. A dynamic model of such effects is developed, based on a 3-D Fokker-Planck code coupled to both the electric field diffusion and the island evolution equations. Extensive applications to both Electron Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid current drive in ITER are presented. (author)

  9. Influence of the Preparation Method, DC and RF Sputtering, on theProperties of Thin Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-Mardji-Atmono; Widdi-Usada; Agus-Purwadi; Yunanto; Edi-Suharyadi

    2000-01-01

    The research on the influence of preparation method DC- and RF Sputteringon the properties of Fe-thin films has been done. The measurement with EDAXshows. that the Fe-content of RF-sputtered film increased with the increasingof self-bias voltage in the range of 850 - 1000 V. The observation ofmicrostructure using SEM shows a more homogeneity of thin film and smallergrain size with the increasing of the self-bias voltage. On the other hand,thin films with inhomogeneity of the structure were produced by DC-Sputteringprocess, indicated by the non continuity and the spread of theglow-discharge. Based on the investigation with X-ray diffraction, thin filmprepared by RF-Sputtering was amorphous, while the film produced by theDC-Sputtering is known as crystal structure. Preparation using DC-voltageshows continual sputtering-process at the voltage of 3000 V betweenelectrode. (author)

  10. Simulation of RF power and multi-cusp magnetic field requirement for H{sup −} ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Manish [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Senecha, V.K., E-mail: kumarvsen@gmail.com [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Kumar, Rajnish; Ghodke, Dharmraj V. [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-12-01

    A computer simulation study for multi-cusp RF based H{sup −} ion source has been carried out using energy and particle balance equation for inductively coupled uniformly dense plasma considering sheath formation near the boundary wall of the plasma chamber for RF ion source used as high current injector for 1 Gev H{sup −} Linac project for SNS applications. The average reaction rates for different reactions responsible for H{sup −} ion production and destruction have been considered in the simulation model. The RF power requirement for the caesium free H{sup -} ion source for a maximum possible H{sup −} ion beam current has been derived by evaluating the required current and RF voltage fed to the coil antenna using transformer model for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Different parameters of RF based H{sup −} ion source like excited hydrogen molecular density, H{sup −} ion density, RF voltage and current of RF antenna have been calculated through simulations in the presence and absence of multicusp magnetic field to distinctly observe the effect of multicusp field. The RF power evaluated for different H{sup −} ion current values have been compared with the experimental reported results showing reasonably good agreement considering the fact that some RF power will be reflected from the plasma medium. The results obtained have helped in understanding the optimum field strength and field free regions suitable for volume emission based H{sup −} ion sources. The compact RF ion source exhibits nearly 6 times better efficiency compare to large diameter ion source.

  11. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  12. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the 70...

  13. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF safety...

  14. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable devices...

  15. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to the...

  16. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-01-01

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed

  17. Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lax, J.; Lindner, A.; Richter, R.; Ridgeway, W.

    1991-01-01

    With the assistance of the DOE In-house Energy Management Program, the Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier systems have been successfully upgraded to reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This recently completed project removed the energy-inefficient plate voltage modulator circuits that were used in conjunction with the final stage RF amplifiers. Construction, design, and operating parameters are described in detail

  18. Mass spectrometry investigation of magnetron sputtering discharges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Petr; Musil, Jindřich; Lančok, Ján; Fitl, Přemysl; Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Vlček, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 143, č. 6 (2017), s. 438-443 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010490; GA ČR GA17-13427S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mass spectrometry * atoms * radicals and ions * RF discharge * contamination * metallic films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.530, year: 2016

  19. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    thunderstorms in the southwestern United States (US). The events occurred at altitudes between 8 and 11 km above mean sea level (MSL). Radar reflectivity data from two of the storms showed that CIDS occurred in close spatial proximity to thunderstorm cores with peak radar reflectivities of 47 to 58 dBZ. Over one hundred CIDS were also recorded from tropical cyclone Fausto off the coast of Mexico. These events occurred at altitudes between 15 and 17 km MSL. CIDS are singular discharges that usually occur in temporal isolation from other thunderstorm radio emissions on time scales of at least a few milliseconds. Calculations show that the discharges are vertically oriented and 300 to 1000 m in spatial extent. They produce average currents of several tens to a couple hundred kA for time periods of approximately 15 ps. Based on the results of a charge distribution model, the events occur in thunderstorm regions with charge densities on the order of several tens of nC/m3 and peak electric fields that are greater than 1 x 106 V/m. Both of these values are an order of magnitude greater than values previously measured orinfemed frominsitu thunderstom measurements. Theunique radio emissions from CIDS, in combination with their unprecedented physical characteristics, clearly distinguish the events from other types of previously observed thunderstorm electrical processes.

  20. RF magnetron sputtering of polypropylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stelmashuk, Vitaliy; Biederman, H.; Slavinská, D.; Trchová, Miroslava; Hlídek, P.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3 (2004), s. 207-215 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 553; GA MŠk ME 554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : materials science, multidisciplinary, physics, applied Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.902, year: 2004