WorldWideScience

Sample records for coupled fiber-optic probe

  1. Demonstration of a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to provide localized, real-time monitoring of material regression rates in various applications has the potential to provide a new stream of data for development testing of various components and systems, as well as serving as a monitoring tool in flight applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the regression of a combusting solid fuel surface, the ablation of the throat in a chemical rocket or the heat shield of an aeroshell, and the monitoring of erosion in long-life plasma thrusters. The rate of regression in the first application is very fast, while the second and third are increasingly slower. A recent fundamental sensor development effort has led to a novel regression, erosion, and ablation sensor technology (REAST). The REAST sensor allows for measurement of real-time surface erosion rates at a discrete surface location. The sensor is optical, using two different, co-located fiber-optics to perform the regression measurement. The disparate optical transmission properties of the two fiber-optics makes it possible to measure the regression rate by monitoring the relative light attenuation through the fibers. As the fibers regress along with the parent material in which they are embedded, the relative light intensities through the two fibers changes, providing a measure of the regression rate. The optical nature of the system makes it relatively easy to use in a variety of harsh, high temperature environments, and it is also unaffected by the presence of electric and magnetic fields. In addition, the sensor could be used to perform optical spectroscopy on the light emitted by a process and collected by fibers, giving localized measurements of various properties. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of material regression rates is useful in addressing a variety of physical issues in various applications. An in-situ measurement allows for real-time data regarding the erosion rates, providing a quick method for

  2. Noninvasive encapsulated fiber optic probes for interferometric measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zboril, O.; Cubik, J.; Kepak, S.; Nedoma, J.; Fajkus, M.; Zavodny, P.; Vasinek, V.

    2017-10-01

    This article focuses on the sensitivity of encapsulated interferometric probes. These probes are used mainly for BioMed and security applications. Fiber-optic sensors are interesting for these applications, as they are resistant to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and that also do not affect the surrounding medical and security equipment. Using a loop of the optical fiber with is not a suitable for these measurements. The optical fiber should be fixed to one position, and should not significantly bend. For these reasons, the optical fiber is encapsulated. Furthermore, it is necessary that the encapsulated measuring probes were flexible, inert, water resistant and not toxic. Fiber-optic sensors shouldn't be magnetically active, so they can be used for example, in magnetic resonance environments (MR). Probes meeting these requirements can be widely used in health care and security applications. Encapsulation of interferometric measuring arm brings changes in susceptibility of measurements in comparison with the optical fiber without encapsulation. To evaluate the properties of the encapsulated probes, series of probes made from different materials for encapsulation was generated, using two types of optical fibers with various degrees of protection. Comparison of the sensitivity of different encapsulated probes was performed using a series of measurements at various frequencies. The measurement results are statistically compared in the article and commented. Given the desired properties polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer has been proven the most interesting encapsulating material for further research.

  3. Portable fiber-optic taper coupled optical microscopy platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Yu, Yan; Huang, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    The optical fiber taper coupled with CMOS has advantages of high sensitivity, compact structure and low distortion in the imaging platform. So it is widely used in low light, high speed and X-ray imaging systems. In the meanwhile, the peculiarity of the coupled structure can meet the needs of the demand in microscopy imaging. Toward this end, we developed a microscopic imaging platform based on the coupling of cellphone camera module and fiber optic taper for the measurement of the human blood samples and ascaris lumbricoides. The platform, weighing 70 grams, is based on the existing camera module of the smartphone and a fiber-optic array which providing a magnification factor of 6x.The top facet of the taper, on which samples are placed, serves as an irregular sampling grid for contact imaging. The magnified images of the sample, located on the bottom facet of the fiber, are then projected onto the CMOS sensor. This paper introduces the portable medical imaging system based on the optical fiber coupling with CMOS, and theoretically analyzes the feasibility of the system. The image data and process results either can be stored on the memory or transmitted to the remote medical institutions for the telemedicine. We validate the performance of this cell-phone based microscopy platform using human blood samples and test target, achieving comparable results to a standard bench-top microscope.

  4. Infrared fiber optic probes for evaluation of musculoskeletal tissue pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalkar, Mugdha; McGoverin, Cushla; Onigbanjo, Quam; Spencer, Richard; Barbash, Scott; Kropf, Eric; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pathology of the knee commonly occurs with aging and as a result of injury. The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries continues to increase annually, and may precede the eventual onset of osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating and prevalent disease characterized by cartilage degeneration. Early detection of OA remains elusive, with current imaging methods lacking adequate sensitivity to detect early pathologic cartilage changes. We used mid- and near- infrared (IR) spectroscopy through arthroscopic-based fiber-optic devices to assess cartilage damage and differentiate tendon from ligament. Mid-IR spectroscopy is characterized by distinct bands and low penetration depth (< 10 μm) and near-IR spectroscopy is characterized by complex overlapping bands and greater penetration depths (< 1 cm). We have found that combined mid- and near-IR analysis greatly extends the information available through either in the analysis of soft tissues, including cartilage, ligaments and tendons. We discuss here basic science studies and the potential for translation to clinical research with novel arthroscopic probes.

  5. Polymer-capped fiber-optic Raman probe for non-invasive Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Okagbare, Paul I.; Morris, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in fiber optic probe design are moving Raman spectroscopy into the clinic, although there remain important practical problems. While much effort has been devoted to minimizing Raman and fluorescence background from fibers, less attention has been given to the need to generate reference Raman signals that can correct for variations in tissue albedo, which is important in quantifying changes in tissue composition. To address this shortcoming, we have developed a fiber optic probe that ...

  6. Test Port for Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley; Rinis, Haris; Cavanaugh, John

    2011-01-01

    A test port designed as part of a fiber optic coupled laser altimeter receiver optical system allows for the back-illumination of the optical system for alignment verification, as well as illumination of the detector(s) for testing the receiver electronics and signal-processing algorithms. Measuring the optical alignment of a laser altimeter instrument is difficult after the instrument is fully assembled. The addition of a test port in the receiver aft-optics allows for the back-illumination of the receiver system such that its focal setting and boresight alignment can be easily verified. For a multiple-detector receiver system, the addition of the aft-optics test port offers the added advantage of being able to simultaneously test all the detectors with different signals that simulate the expected operational conditions. On a laser altimeter instrument (see figure), the aft-optics couple the light from the receiver telescope to the receiver detector(s). Incorporating a beam splitter in the aft-optics design allows for the addition of a test port to back-illuminate the receiver telescope and/or detectors. The aft-optics layout resembles a T with the detector on one leg, the receiver telescope input port on the second leg, and the test port on the third leg. The use of a custom beam splitter with 99-percent reflection, 1-percent transmission, and a mirrored roof can send the test port light to the receiver telescope leg as well as the detector leg, without unduly sacrificing the signal from the receiver telescope to the detector. The ability to test the receiver system alignment, as well as multiple detectors with different signals without the need to disassemble the instrument or connect and reconnect components, is a great advantage to the aft-optics test port. Another benefit is that the receiver telescope aperture is fully back-illuminated by the test port so the receiver telescope focal setting vs. pressure and or temperature can be accurately measured (as

  7. A Raman Fiber Optic Probe Assembly for use in Hostile Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmucker, John E.; Falk, Jon C.; Archer, William B.; Blasi, Raymond J.

    1998-09-21

    This invention provides a device for Raman spectroscopic measurement of composition and concentrations in a hostile environment by the use of a first fiber optic as a means of directing high intensity monochromatic light from a laser to the hostile environment and a second fiber optic to receive the lower intensity scattered light for transmittal to a monochromator for analysis. To avoid damage to the fiber optics, they are protected from the hostile environment. A preferred embodiment of the Raman fiber optic probe is able to obtain Raman spectra of corrosive gases and solutions at temperatures to 600 F and pressures up to 2000 psi. The incident exciting fiber optic cable makes an angle of substantially 90{degree} with the collecting fiber optic cable. This 90{degree} geometry minimizes the Rayleigh scattering signal picked up by the collecting fiber, because the intensity of Rayleigh scattering is lowest in the direction perpendicular to the beam path of the exciting light and therefore a 90{degree} scattering geometry optimizes the signal to noise ratio.

  8. Miniaturized fiber-optic ultrasound probes for endoscopic tissue analysis by micro-opto-mechanical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannacci, E; Belsito, L; Mancarella, F; Ferri, M; Veronese, G P; Roncaglia, A; Biagi, E

    2014-06-01

    A new Micro-Opto-Mechanical System (MOMS) technology for the fabrication of optoacoustic probes on optical fiber is presented. The technology is based on the thermoelastic emission of ultrasonic waves from patterned carbon films for generation and on extrinsic polymer Fabry-Perot acousto-optical transducers for detection, both fabricated on miniaturized single-crystal silicon frames used to mount the ultrasonic transducers on the tip of an optical fiber. Thanks to the fabrication process adopted, high miniaturization levels are reached in the MOMS devices, demonstrating fiber-optic emitters and detectors with minimum diameter around 350 and 250 μm respectively. A thorough functional testing of the ultrasound emitters mounted on 200 and 600 μm diameter optical fibers is presented, in which the fiber-optic emitter with a diameter of 200 μm shows generated acoustic pressures with peak-to-peak value up to 2.8 MPa with rather flat emission spectra extended beyond 150 MHz. The possibility to use the presented optoacoustic sources in conjunction with the fiber-optic acousto-optical detectors within a minimally invasive probe is also demonstrated by successfully measuring the ultrasonic echo reflected from a rigid surface immersed in water with various concentration of scatterers. The resulting spectra highlight the possibility to discriminate the effects due to frequency selective attenuation in a very wide range of frequencies within a biological medium using the presented fiber-optic probes.

  9. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  10. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranch, Geoffrey A; Lunsford, Robert; Grün, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-10

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry-Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry-Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. The peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  11. Optical Coupling Structures of Fiber-Optic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers Using CO2 Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI can be used to test changes in the refractive index of sucrose solutions at different concentrations. However, the popularity of this measurement tool is limited by its substantial size and portability. Therefore, the MZI was integrated with a small fiber-optic waveguide component to develop an interferometer with fiber-optic characteristics, specifically a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FO-MZI. Optical fiber must be processed to fabricate two optical coupling structures. The two optical coupling structures are a duplicate of the beam splitter, an optical component of the interferometer. Therefore, when the sensor length and the two optical coupling structures vary, the time or path for optical transmission in the sensor changes, thereby influencing the back-end interference signals. The researchers successfully developed an asymmetrical FO-MZI with sensing abilities. The spacing value between the troughs of the sensor length and interference signal exhibited an inverse relationship. In addition, image analysis was employed to examine the size-matching relationship between various sensor lengths and the coupling and decoupling structure. Furthermore, the spectral wavelength shift results measured using a refractive index sensor indicate that FO-MZIs with a sensor length of 38 mm exhibited excellent sensitivity, measuring 59.7 nm/RIU.

  12. Autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue using a depth-sensitive fiber-optic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Gao, Wen; Daye, Dania; Williams, Michelle D.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Gillenwater, Ann M.

    2008-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy can provide useful diagnostic information about the morphological and biochemical changes related to the progression of precancer in epithelial tissue. As precancerous lesions develop, the optical properties of both the superficial epithelium and underlying stroma are altered; measuring spectral data as a function of depth has the potential to improve diagnostic performance. We describe a clinical spectroscopy system with a depth-sensitive, ball lens coupled fiber-optic probe for noninvasive in vivo measurement of oral autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra. We report results of spectroscopic measurements from oral sites in normal volunteers and in patients with neoplastic lesions of the oral mucosa; results indicate that the addition of depth selectivity can enhance the detection of optical changes associated with precancer.

  13. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor based on coupling optical path length variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Pabitra; Singh, Hidam Kumarjit; Tiwari, Dhananjay; Basumatry, Tenisen

    2012-05-01

    The concept for a new and simple fiber-optic liquid level sensor is presented and experimental results are shown to demonstrate the principle. The sensing principle is based on light intensity modulation when rising and falling mode of liquid level causes coupling optical path distance variation between two optical fibers. Near continuous mode of liquid level variation could be monitored with resolution as low as 1 mm can be measured in the length scale of 25 cm.

  14. Development of combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor dip probe for quantitative estimation of interleukin-6 in serum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun Wei; Manne, Upender; Reddy, Vishnu B.; Oelschlager, Denise K.; Katkoori, Venkat R.; Grizzle, William E.; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2010-11-01

    A combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip probe for rapid and cost-effective quantification of proteins in serum samples has been developed. This device relies on diode laser excitation and a charged-coupled device spectrometer and functions on a technique of sandwich immunoassay. As a proof of principle, this technique was applied in a quantitative estimation of interleukin IL-6. The probes detected IL-6 at picomolar levels in serum samples obtained from a patient with lupus, an autoimmune disease, and a patient with lymphoma. The estimated concentration of IL-6 in the lupus sample was 5.9 +/- 0.6 pM, and in the lymphoma sample, it was below the detection limit. These concentrations were verified by a procedure involving bead-based xMAP technology. A similar trend in the concentrations was observed. The specificity of the CTFOB dip probes was assessed by analysis with receiver operating characteristics. This analysis suggests that the dip probes can detect 5-pM or higher concentration of IL-6 in these samples with specificities of 100%. The results provide information for guiding further studies in the utilization of these probes to quantify other analytes in body fluids with high specificity and sensitivity.

  15. Novel fiber-optical interferometer with miniaturized probe for in-hole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Robert; Pfeifer, Tilo; Depiereux, Frank; König, Niels

    2008-03-01

    Today, micro-system technology and the development of new MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) are emerging rapidly. In order for this development to become a success in the long run, measurement systems have to ensure product quality. Most often, MEMS have to be tested by means of functionality or destructive tests. One reason for this is that there are no suitable systems or sensing probes available which can be used for the measurement of quasi inaccessible features like small holes or cavities. We present a measurement system that could be used for these kinds of measurements. The system combines a fiber optical, miniaturized sensing probe with low-coherence interferometry, so that absolute distance measurements with nanometer accuracy are possible.

  16. Effective light coupling in reflective fiber optic distance sensors using a double-clad fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werzinger, Stefan; Härteis, Lisa; Köhler, Aaron; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Many fiber optic distance sensors use a reflective configuration, where a light beam is launched from an optical fiber, reflected from a target and coupled back into the fiber. While singlemode fibers (SMF) provide low-loss, high-performance components and a well-defined output beam, the coupling of the reflected light into the SMF is very sensitive to mechanical misalignments and scattering at the reflecting target. In this paper we use a double-clad fiber (DCF) and a DCF coupler to obtain an enhanced multimodal coupling of reflected light into the fiber. Increased power levels and robustness are achieved compared to a pure SMF configuration.

  17. A Fiber-Optic Coupled Telescope for Water Vapor DIAL Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Lonn, Frederick

    1998-01-01

    A fiber-optic coupled telescope of low complexity was constructed and tested. The major loss mechanisms of the optical system have been characterized. Light collected by the receiver mirror is focused onto an optical fiber, and the output of the fiber is filtered by an interference filter and then focused onto an APD detector. This system was used in lidar field measurements with a 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam. The results were encouraging. A numerical model used for calculation of the expected return signal agreed with the lidar return signal obtained. The assembled system was easy to align and operate and weighed about 8 kg for a 30 cm (12") mirror system. This weight is low enough to allow mounting of the fiber-optic telescope receiver system in a UAV. Furthermore, the good agreement between the numerical lidar model and the performance of the actual receiver system, suggests that this model may be used for estimation of the performance of this and other lidar systems in the future. Such telescopes are relatively easy to construct and align. The fiber optic cable allows easy placement of the optical detector in any position. These telescope systems should find widespread use in aircraft and space home DIAL water vapor receiver systems.

  18. Ophthalmic diagnostics using a new dynamic light scattering fiber optic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Dubin, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    A new fiber optic probe is developed to study different parts of the eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like material in the vitreous humor. We report alpha-crystalline size distributions, as a function of penetration depth, inside the lens and hyaluronic acid molecular size distribution in the vitreous body. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a slit- lamp apparatus simply by using a H-ruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and peripheral, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment.

  19. Fiber-Optic Imaging Probe Developed for Space Used to Detect Diabetes Through the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Chenault, Michelle V.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; Sebag, J.; Suh, Kwang I.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes mellitus, which can severely impair eyesight by causing cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Cataracts are 1.6 times more common in people with diabetes than in those without diabetes, and cataract extraction is the only surgical treatment. In many cases, diabetes-related ocular pathologies go undiagnosed until visual function is compromised. This ongoing pilot project seeks to study the progression of diabetes in a unique animal model by monitoring changes in the lens with a safe, sensitive, dynamic light-scattering probe. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), has the potential to diagnose cataracts at the molecular level. Recently, a new DLS fiber-optic probe was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for noncontact, accurate, and extremely sensitive particle-sizing measurements in fluid dispersions and suspensions (ref. 1). This compact, portable, and rugged probe is free of optical alignment, offers point-and-shoot operation for various online field applications and challenging environments, and yet is extremely flexible in regards to sample container sizes, materials, and shapes. No external vibration isolation and no index matching are required. It can measure particles as small as 1 nm and as large as few micrometers in a wide concentration range from very dilute (waterlike) dispersions to very turbid (milklike) suspensions. It is safe and fast to use, since it only requires very low laser power (10 nW to 3 mW) with very short data acquisition times (2 to 10 sec).

  20. A Fiber-Optic Probe Design for Combustion Chamber Flame Detection Applications-Design Criteria, Performance Specifications, and Fabrication Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Stephen E.; Harper, Samuel E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper documents the design and development of the fiber-optic probes utilized in the flame detection systems used in NASA Langley Research Center's 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (8-ft HTT). Two independent flame detection systems are utilized to monitor the presence and stability of the main-burner and pilot-level flames during facility operation. Due to the harsh environment within the combustor, the successful development of a rugged and efficient fiber-optic probe was a critical milestone in the development of these flame detection systems. The final optical probe design for the two flame detection systems resulted from research that was conducted in Langley's 7-in High Temperature Pilot Tunnel (7-in HTT). A detailed description of the manufacturing process behind the optical probes used in the 8-ft HTT is provided in Appendix A of this report.

  1. Fiber optic photoacoustic probe with ultrasonic tracking for guiding minimally invasive procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Mari, Jean Martial; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    In a wide range of clinical procedures, accurate placement of medical devices such as needles and catheters is critical to optimize patient outcomes. Ultrasound imaging is often used to guide minimally invasive procedures, as it can provide real-time visualization of patient anatomy and medical devices. However, this modality can provide low image contrast for soft tissues, and poor visualization of medical devices that are steeply angled with respect to the incoming ultrasound beams. Photoacoustic sensors can provide information about the spatial distributions of tissue chromophores that could be valuable for guiding minimally invasive procedures. In this study, a system for guiding minimally invasive procedures using photoacoustic sensing was developed. This system included a miniature photoacoustic probe with three optical fibers: one with a bare end for photoacoustic excitation of tissue, a second for photoacoustic excitation of an optically absorbing coating at the distal end to transmit ultrasound, and a third with a Fabry-Perot cavity at the distal end for receiving ultrasound. The position of the photoacoustic probe was determined with ultrasonic tracking, which involved transmitting pulses from a linear-array ultrasound imaging probe at the tissue surface, and receiving them with the fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in the photoacoustic probe. The axial resolution of photoacoustic sensing was better than 70 μm, and the tracking accuracy was better than 1 mm in both axial and lateral dimensions. By translating the photoacoustic probe, depth scans were obtained from different spatial positions, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using a frequency-domain algorithm.

  2. Analysis and Design of a Fiber-optic Probe for DNA Sensors Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1147-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molau, Nicole [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vail, Curtis [Accu.Photonics, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2018-01-24

    In 1995, a challenge in the field of genetics dealt with the acquisition of efficient DNA sequencing techniques for reading the 3 billion base-pairs that comprised the human genome. AccuPhotonics, Inc. proposed to develop and manufacture a state-of-the-art near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) fiber-optic probe that was expected to increase probe efficiency by two orders of magnitude over the existing state-of-the-art and to improve resolution to 10Å. The detailed design calculation and optimization of electrical properties of the fiber-optic probe tip geometry would be performed at LLNL, using existing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic (EM) codes.

  3. Characterizing shock waves in hydrogel using high speed imaging and a fiber-optic probe hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip A.; Betney, M. R.; Doyle, H. W.; Tully, B.; Ventikos, Y.; Hawker, N. A.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of a stainless steel disk-shaped projectile launched by a single-stage light gas gun is used to generate planar shock waves with amplitudes on the order of 102MPa in a hydrogel target material. These shock waves are characterized using ultra-high-speed imaging as well as a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. Although the hydrogel equation of state (EOS) is unknown, the combination of these measurements with conservation of mass and momentum allows us to calculate pressure. It is also shown that although the hydrogel behaves similarly to water, the use of a water EOS underpredicts pressure amplitudes in the hydrogel by ˜10 % at the shock front. Further, the water EOS predicts pressures approximately 2% higher than those determined by conservation laws for a given value of the shock velocity. Shot to shot repeatability is controlled to within 10%, with the shock speed and pressure increasing as a function of the velocity of the projectile at impact. Thus the projectile velocity may be used as an adequate predictor of shock conditions in future work with a restricted suite of diagnostics.

  4. Measurement of characteristics of solid flow in the cyclone separators with fiber optical probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shaohua; Li Yan; Li Jinjing; Yang Shi; Yang Hairui; Zhang Hai; Lu Junfu; Yue Guangxi, E-mail: lishaohua00@mails.tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: li-y-05@mails.tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: lijinjing00@mails.tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: yangshi07@mails.tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: yhr@mail.tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: haizhang@mail.tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: Lvjf@mail.tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: ygx-dte@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2009-02-01

    In some applications, e.g. circulating fluidized beds (CFB), cyclones are usually operated at high solid loadings. Under high inlet solid concentration, most of the particles are collected at the wall and form a dense particle spiral band because of high separation efficiency. As a result, gas-solid reactions should occur mostly in the near-wall region. To understand the gas-solid reaction mechanism in the cyclone, an experimental study was conducted in a plexiglass CFB cold apparatus, with a riser of 0.2m I.D. and 5m high, and a standard Lapple cyclone. Fiber optical probe was used to measure the characteristics of solid flow in the cyclone, including particle velocity and volumetric solid concentration, especially in the near-wall region of the cyclone. Based on the experiment results, the combustion of carbon particles in the cyclone of a CFB boiler was estimated with group combustion theory. The calculated results show that combustion effectiveness factor etaeff of near-wall particle cloud is smaller than 1/25, which means the combustion rate of a carbon particle in the near-wall region is greatly restricted by other particles in the cloud.

  5. Optical Coupling Structures of Fiber-Optic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers Using CO2 Laser Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Hsing Chen; Chih-Yu Hsu; Pei-Hsing Huang; Jian-Neng Wang; Wei-Te Wu

    2014-01-01

    The Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) can be used to test changes in the refractive index of sucrose solutions at different concentrations. However, the popularity of this measurement tool is limited by its substantial size and portability. Therefore, the MZI was integrated with a small fiber-optic waveguide component to develop an interferometer with fiber-optic characteristics, specifically a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FO-MZI). Optical fiber must be processed to fabricate two ...

  6. Fiber Optic Coupled Raman Based Detection of Hazardous Liquids Concealed in Commercial Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Ramírez-Cedeño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been widely proposed as a technique to nondestructively and noninvasively interrogate the contents of glass and plastic bottles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy is used in a concealed threat scenario where hazardous liquids have been intentionally mixed with common consumer products to mask its appearance or spectra. The hazardous liquids under consideration included the chemical warfare agent (CWA simulant triethyl phosphate (TEP, hydrogen peroxide, and acetone as representative of toxic industrial compounds (TICs. Fiber optic coupled Raman spectroscopy (FOCRS and partial least squares (PLS algorithm analysis were used to quantify hydrogen peroxide in whiskey, acetone in perfume, and TEP in colored beverages. Spectral data was used to evaluate if the hazardous liquids can be successfully concealed in consumer products. Results demonstrated that FOC-RS systems were able to discriminate between nonhazardous consumer products and mixtures with hazardous materials at concentrations lower than 5%.

  7. A novel minimally invasive dual-modality fiber optic probe for prostate cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikrant

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in males, and is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in United States. In prostate cancer diagnostics and therapy, there is a critical need for a minimally invasive tool for in vivo evaluation of prostate tissue. Such a tool finds its niche in improving TRUS (trans-rectal ultrasound) guided biopsy procedure, surgical margin assessment during radical prostatectomy, and active surveillance of patients with a certain risk levels. This work is focused on development of a fiber-based dual-modality optical device (dMOD), to differentiate prostate cancer from benign tissue, in vivo. dMOD utilizes two independent optical techniques, LRS (light reflectance spectroscopy) and AFLS (auto-fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy). LRS quantifies scattering coefficient of the tissue, as well as concentrations of major tissue chromophores like hemoglobin derivatives, β-carotene and melanin. AFLS was designed to target lifetime signatures of multiple endogenous fluorophores like flavins, porphyrins and lipo-pigments. Each of these methods was independently developed, and the two modalities were integrated using a thin (1-mm outer diameter) fiber-optic probe. Resulting dMOD probe was implemented and evaluated on animal models of prostate cancer, as well as on human prostate tissue. Application of dMOD to human breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma) identification was also evaluated. The results obtained reveal that both LRS and AFLS are excellent techniques to discriminate prostate cancer tissue from surrounding benign tissue in animal models. Each technique independently is capable of providing near absolute (100%) accuracy for cancer detection, indicating that either of them could be used independently without the need of implementing them together. Also, in case of human breast cancer, LRS and AFLS provided comparable accuracies to dMOD, LRS accuracy (96%) being the highest for the studied population. However, the

  8. Design and characterization of a novel multimodal fiber-optic probe and spectroscopy system for skin cancer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manu; Marple, Eric; Reichenberg, Jason; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-08-01

    The design and characterization of an instrument combining Raman, fluorescence, and reflectance spectroscopic modalities is presented. Instrument development has targeted skin cancer applications as a novel fiber-optic probe has been specially designed to interrogate cutaneous lesions. The instrument is modular and both its software and hardware components are described in depth. Characterization of the fiber-optic probe is also presented, which details the probe's ability to measure diagnostically important parameters such as intrinsic fluorescence and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients along with critical performance metrics such as high Raman signal-to-noise ratios at clinically practical exposure times. Validation results using liquid phantoms show that the probe and system can extract absorption and scattering coefficients with less than 10% error. As the goal is to use the instrument for the clinical early detection of skin cancer, preliminary clinical data are also presented, which indicates our system's ability to measure physiological quantities such as relative collagen and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentration, oxygen saturation, blood volume fraction, and mean vessel diameter.

  9. Fiber Optic Microcantilever Sensor Coupled with Reactive Polymers for Vapor Phase Detection of Ammonia Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to adapt its current aqueous-based, fiber-optic microcantilever sensor technology for real-time, monitoring of ammonia in air. Phase I...

  10. Real-time association rate constant measurement using combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Boris; Wang, Chun-Wei; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2010-02-01

    This document reports a novel method of measuring association rate constant (ka) for antibody-antigen interaction using evanescent wave-based combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes. The method was demonstrated by measuring association rate constant for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA antibody interaction. "Direct method" was used for detection; goat anti-BSA "capture" antibodies were immobilized on the probe surfaces while the antigen (BSA) was directly labeled with Alexa 488 dye. The probes were subsequently submerged in 3nM Labeled BSA in egg albumin (1 mg/ml). The fluorescence signal recorded was proportional to BSA anti-BSA conjugates and continuous signal was acquired suing a fiber optic spectrometer (Ocean Optics, Inc.). A 476 nm diode laser was use as an excitation source. Association constant was estimated from a plot of signal as a function of time. Measured association rate constant ka for the binding of BSA with anti-BSA at room temperature is (8.33 +/- 0.01) x 104 M-1s-1.

  11. Detection of trace levels of mercury in aqueous systems via a fiber optic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Kenneth J.; Nau, Gregory M.; Jaganathan, J.; Bilodeau, Tom G.; Schneider, I.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Robitaille, George E.

    1994-03-01

    Currently there is a great deal of interest in the development and use of fiber optic chemical sensors for characterization of contaminated waste sites. Development of remote, in-situ sensors for rapid determination of the presence, and concentration of hazardous materials will significantly reduce site remediation costs. The state-of-the-art technology for assessing site contamination is the cone penetrometer system. This system consists of a 2-1/2 ton truck, a hydraulic ram, and a steel tube. The steel tube, which is generally 1-3/4 inches OD and 1 inch ID, has a sharp tip on one end. To begin site characterization the penetrometer tube is placed into the hydraulic ram then the tube is pushed into the ground. Sensors are mounted in the penetrometer tube to measure contaminants in the surrounding soil and ground water. This system has several distinct advantages over conventional drilling techniques. Additionally, site characterization can be performed much quicker than standard drilling techniques. Fiber optic chemical sensors are readily applicable towards use in cone penetrometer systems since they are small in size and can report real time, in-situ results. Some fiber optic chemical sensors have been deployed and tested in the cone penetrometer system.

  12. Highly specific fiber optic immunosensor coupled with immunomagnetic separation for detection of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and immunoassays are widely used for pathogen detection. However, novel technology platforms with highly selective antibodies are essential to improve detection sensitivity, specificity and performance. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Internalin A (InlA) and p30 were generated and used on paramagnetic beads of varying diameters for concentration, as well as on fiber-optic sensor for detection. Results Anti-InlA MAb-2D12 (IgG2a subclass) was specific for Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, and p30-specific MAb-3F8 (IgM) was specific for the genus Listeria. At all bacterial concentrations (103–108 CFU/mL) tested in the IMS assay; the 1-μm diameter MyOne beads had significantly higher capture efficiency (P Listeria antibody (9 %). Furthermore, capture efficiency for MyOne-2D12 was highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii. Subsequently, we captured L. monocytogenes by MyOne-2D12 and MyOne-3F8 from hotdogs inoculated with mono- or co-cultures of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua (10–40 CFU/g), enriched for 18 h and detected by fiber-optic sensor and confirmed by plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays. The detection limit for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii by the fiber-optic immunosensor was 3 × 102 CFU/mL using MAb-2D12 as capture and reporter antibody. Selective media plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays confirmed the IMS and fiber-optic results. Conclusions IMS coupled with a fiber-optic sensor using anti-InlA MAb is highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii and enabled detection of these pathogens at low levels from buffer or food. PMID:23176167

  13. Highly specific fiber optic immunosensor coupled with immunomagnetic separation for detection of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Marcelo; Conrad, Neida L; Conceição, Fabricio R; Moreira, Angela N; da Silva, Wladimir P; Aleixo, José Ag; Bhunia, Arun K

    2012-11-23

    Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and immunoassays are widely used for pathogen detection. However, novel technology platforms with highly selective antibodies are essential to improve detection sensitivity, specificity and performance. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Internalin A (InlA) and p30 were generated and used on paramagnetic beads of varying diameters for concentration, as well as on fiber-optic sensor for detection. Anti-InlA MAb-2D12 (IgG2a subclass) was specific for Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, and p30-specific MAb-3F8 (IgM) was specific for the genus Listeria. At all bacterial concentrations (10³-10⁸ CFU/mL) tested in the IMS assay; the 1-μm diameter MyOne beads had significantly higher capture efficiency (P Listeria antibody (9 %). Furthermore, capture efficiency for MyOne-2D12 was highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii. Subsequently, we captured L. monocytogenes by MyOne-2D12 and MyOne-3F8 from hotdogs inoculated with mono- or co-cultures of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua (10-40 CFU/g), enriched for 18 h and detected by fiber-optic sensor and confirmed by plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays. The detection limit for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii by the fiber-optic immunosensor was 3 × 10² CFU/mL using MAb-2D12 as capture and reporter antibody. Selective media plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays confirmed the IMS and fiber-optic results. IMS coupled with a fiber-optic sensor using anti-InlA MAb is highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii and enabled detection of these pathogens at low levels from buffer or food.

  14. A compact fiber-optic probe-based singlet oxygen luminescence detection system

    OpenAIRE

    Gemmell, Nathan R.; McCarthy, Aongus; Kim, Michele M.; Veilleux, Israel; Zhu, Timothy C.; Buller, Gerald S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel compact fiberoptic based singlet oxygen near-infrared luminescence probe coupled to an InGaAs/InP single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector. Patterned time gating of the single-photon detector is used to limit unwanted dark counts and eliminate the strong photosensitizer luminescence background. Singlet oxygen luminescence detection at 1270 nm is confirmed through spectral filtering and lifetime fitting for Rose Bengal in water, and Photofrin in methanol as mod...

  15. Characterization of silver halide fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides for use in the construction of a mid-infrared attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damin, Craig A; Sommer, André J

    2013-11-01

    Advances in fiber optic materials have allowed for the construction of fibers and waveguides capable of transmitting infrared radiation. An investigation of the transmission characteristics associated with two commonly used types of infrared-transmitting fibers/waveguides for prospective use in a fiber/waveguide-coupled attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) probe was performed. Characterization of silver halide polycrystalline fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides was done on the basis of the transmission of infrared light using a conventional fiber optic coupling accessory and an infrared microscope. Using the fiber optic coupling accessory, the average percent transmission for three silver halide fibers was 18.1 ± 6.1% relative to a benchtop reflection accessory. The average transmission for two hollow waveguides (HWGs) using the coupling accessory was 8.0 ± 0.3%. (Uncertainties in the relative percent transmission represent the standard deviations.) Reduced transmission observed for the HWGs was attributed to the high numerical aperture of the coupling accessory. Characterization of the fibers/waveguides using a zinc selenide lens objective on an infrared microscope indicated 24.1 ± 7.2% of the initial light input into the silver halide fibers was transmitted. Percent transmission obtained for the HWGs was 98.7 ± 0.1%. Increased transmission using the HWGs resulted from the absence or minimization of insertion and scattering losses due to the hollow air core and a better-matched numerical aperture. The effect of bending on the transmission characteristics of the fibers/waveguides was also investigated. Significant deviations in the transmission of infrared light by the solid-core silver halide fibers were observed for various bending angles. Percent transmission greater than 98% was consistently observed for the HWGs at the bending angles. The combined benefits of high percent transmission, reproducible instrument responses, and increased bending

  16. An integrated fiber-optic probe combined with support vector regression for fast estimation of optical properties of turbid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang; Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin; Fang, Zhenhuan

    2015-06-23

    A fiber-optic probe system was developed to estimate the optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. Because of the limitations in numerical calculation of radiative transfer equation (RTE), diffusion approximation (DA) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC), support vector regression (SVR) was introduced to model the relationship between diffuse reflectance values and optical properties. The SVR models of four collection fibers were trained by phantoms in calibration set with a wide range of optical properties which represented products of different applications, then the optical properties of phantoms in prediction set were predicted after an optimal searching on SVR models. The results indicated that the SVR model was capable of describing the relationship with little deviation in forward validation. The correlation coefficient (R) of reduced scattering coefficient μ'(s) and absorption coefficient μ(a) in the prediction set were 0.9907 and 0.9980, respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of μ'(s) and μ(a) in inverse validation were 0.411 cm(-1) and 0.338 cm(-1), respectively. The results indicated that the integrated fiber-optic probe system combined with SVR model were suitable for fast and accurate estimation of optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evanescent-coupling fiber optic pollution monitoring system using etched D-shape E-core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shing M.; Yang, Changjie; Pan, Wei P.

    1996-12-01

    Surface contamination of insulators in high voltage transmission and distribution systems may lead to troublesome flashovers which interrupt service. Insulator contamination may be monitored using direct measurement of equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD), which directly relates to the flashover voltage. A fiber-optic evanescent- coupling fiber-optic ESDD monitor is presented. The use of a piece of D-shape E-core fiber as sensor head can provide a sensitive and large area ESDD monitoring system. We have demonstrated the use of D-shape fiber in monitoring ESDD on insulator surfaces. A simple process has been developed to precisely etch the D-fiber. The polarimetric and evanescent loss sensors have been investigated. The evanescent loss sensor is particularly suitable for in-situ ESDD monitoring in power transmission lines and substations.

  18. Development and Comparison of Fiber-Optic Beta Radiation Sensors with Different Diameters of Their Sensing Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinah Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS was developed for remote and real-time measurements of beta radiation from radioactive-contaminated soil. The sensing probe consisted of a bundle of organic scintillators and a mixture of epoxy resin to improve the detection efficiency. The measurement system consisted of a sensing probe with an aluminium foil reflector, a transmitting plastic optical fiber, and a light-measuring system comprising a photomultiplier tube, a preamplifier, a multichannel analyzer, and a laptop computer. Several sensing probes, whose dead-end diameters were 26 mm (bundle type I, 36 mm (bundle type II, and 46 mm (bundle type III, were prepared and characterized to identify the best sensing probe in terms of its radiation detection efficiency. The reproducibility of the FORS for the measurement of beta radiation was confirmed using a χ2-test. The measurements showed that the FORS sensing probe with a diameter 46 mm has the best detection performance.

  19. Highly specific fiber optic immunosensor coupled with immunomagnetic separation for detection of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça Marcelo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunomagnetic separation (IMS and immunoassays are widely used for pathogen detection. However, novel technology platforms with highly selective antibodies are essential to improve detection sensitivity, specificity and performance. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against Internalin A (InlA and p30 were generated and used on paramagnetic beads of varying diameters for concentration, as well as on fiber-optic sensor for detection. Results Anti-InlA MAb-2D12 (IgG2a subclass was specific for Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, and p30-specific MAb-3F8 (IgM was specific for the genus Listeria. At all bacterial concentrations (103–108 CFU/mL tested in the IMS assay; the 1-μm diameter MyOne beads had significantly higher capture efficiency (P 5 CFU/mL was significantly higher (P Listeria antibody (9 %. Furthermore, capture efficiency for MyOne-2D12 was highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii. Subsequently, we captured L. monocytogenes by MyOne-2D12 and MyOne-3F8 from hotdogs inoculated with mono- or co-cultures of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua (10–40 CFU/g, enriched for 18 h and detected by fiber-optic sensor and confirmed by plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays. The detection limit for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii by the fiber-optic immunosensor was 3 × 102 CFU/mL using MAb-2D12 as capture and reporter antibody. Selective media plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays confirmed the IMS and fiber-optic results. Conclusions IMS coupled with a fiber-optic sensor using anti-InlA MAb is highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii and enabled detection of these pathogens at low levels from buffer or food.

  20. Self-injection-locking linewidth narrowing in a semiconductor laser coupled to an external fiber-optic ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, Dmitry A.; Zolotovskii, Igor O.; Panajotov, Krassimir; Spirin, Vasily V.; Fotiadi, Andrei A.

    2017-12-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for modeling of semiconductor laser coupled to an external fiber-optic ring resonator. The developed approach has shown good qualitative agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental results for particular configuration of a self-injection locked DFB laser delivering narrow-band radiation. The model is capable of describing the main features of the experimentally measured laser outputs such as laser line narrowing, spectral shape of generated radiation, mode-hoping instabilities and makes possible exploring the key physical mechanisms responsible for the laser operation stability.

  1. Applications of Fiber Optics in Experimental Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    reflected light intensity decreases metrology and moire interferometry. due to reduced surface reflectivity. Many workers have demonstrated the advantages oa...compact, two beam "white light"󈧩.38 speckle metrology . The)y also submersible singlemode fiber optic LDV probe fluid flow demonstrated the use of...coupling based liquid level the strain is not uniform, the gage will, of course, yield some sensors, doped coating chemical species sensors. Sagnac

  2. Demonstration of a Fiber Optic Regression Probe in a High-Temperature Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    The capability to provide localized, real-time monitoring of material regression rates in various applications has the potential to provide a new stream of data for development testing of various components and systems, as well as serving as a monitoring tool in flight applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the regression of a combusting solid fuel surface, the ablation of the throat in a chemical rocket or the heat shield of an aeroshell, and the monitoring of erosion in long-life plasma thrusters. The rate of regression in the first application is very fast, while the second and third are increasingly slower. A recent fundamental sensor development effort has led to a novel regression, erosion, and ablation sensor technology (REAST). The REAST sensor allows for measurement of real-time surface erosion rates at a discrete surface location. The sensor is optical, using two different, co-located fiber-optics to perform the regression measurement. The disparate optical transmission properties of the two fiber-optics makes it possible to measure the regression rate by monitoring the relative light attenuation through the fibers. As the fibers regress along with the parent material in which they are embedded, the relative light intensities through the two fibers changes, providing a measure of the regression rate. The optical nature of the system makes it relatively easy to use in a variety of harsh, high temperature environments, and it is also unaffected by the presence of electric and magnetic fields. In addition, the sensor could be used to perform optical spectroscopy on the light emitted by a process and collected by fibers, giving localized measurements of various properties. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of material regression rates is useful in addressing a variety of physical issues in various applications. An in-situ measurement allows for real-time data regarding the erosion rates, providing a quick method for

  3. Development of a Novel Fiber Optic Sensor Combined with a Fluorescence Turn-on Probe for Cu (II Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Existing staining-based methodology for the detection of metal ions is not well suited for real-time or in situ use. This is a significant problem, given that these ions can have a considerable impact on both human health and the environment. Thus, there is growing interest and need for simple, rapid and in-situ monitoring techniques for the purpose of detecting various target analytes (e.g. heavy metals, which is of a significant importance in many fields ranging from environmental monitoring to the study of intracellular processes. Among various sensors developed, optical fiber-optic sensors (FOS, based on fluorescence, are one class of sensors that address this goal [1]. Optical fibers are ideal for environmental sensing applications because of their ability to transmit optical signals to and from the sensing region without the use of free-space optics. In this work, we present, for the first time, a simple FOS incorporating novel fluorescence turn-on mechanism [2] that could detect Cu (II as low as 10−4 M. Traditionally, fluorescence quenching or “turn-off” was used to detect Cu (II [3]. In recent years, fluorescence “turn-on” emerges as a preferable tool. The developed fiber-optic sensor has two fiber leads and one probe head. One fiber lead includes 6 fibers for He-Ne laser excitation light delivery (e-fibers. Another fiber lead has one receiving fiber (r-fiber connected to an Ocean Optics QE65000 scientific grade spectrometer, which is interrogated by a computer via USB connection. The SpectroSuite software is used to observe and to record all spectra. The probe head combines all fibers together to form a coaxial structure with the r-fiber placed in the center. The key component in the proposed fluorescent sensing system is a probe prepared by binding a receptor containing a zwitterionic chromophore (M1, through noncovalent interactions, to the fluorescent polymer (P1 resulting in quenching its emission. The sensing mechanism

  4. NDT of fiber-reinforced composites with a new fiber-optic pump-probe laser-ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Laser-ultrasonics is an attractive and powerful tool for the non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of composite materials. Current systems for non-contact detection of ultrasound have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact peizotransducers. They are also expensive, difficult to adjust, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Moreover, laser-ultrasound (LU) systems typically launch only about 50 firings per second, much slower than the kHz level pulse repetition rate of conventional systems. As demonstrated here, most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive, high repetition rate nanosecond fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe beam detector. In particular, a modified fiber-optic balanced Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of a LU pump-probe system for NDT&E of aircraft composites. The performance of the all-optical system is demonstrated for a number of composite samples with different types and locations of inclusions.

  5. Incorporation of fiber optic beam shaping into a laparoscopic probe for laser stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Mayeh, Mona; Burnett, Arthur L.; Farahi, Faramarz; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the nerve surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5- ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of the CN's during laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  6. Study of polarization properties of fiber-optics probes with use of a binary phase plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferov, S V; Khonina, S N; Karpeev, S V

    2014-04-01

    We conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the distribution of the electric field components in the sharp focal domain when rotating a zone plate with a π-phase jump placed in the focused beam. Comparing the theoretical and experimental results for several kinds of near-field probes, an analysis of the polarization sensitivity of different types of metal-coated aperture probes is conducted. It is demonstrated that with increasing diameter of the non-metal-coated tip part there occurs an essential redistribution of sensitivity in favor of the transverse electric field components and an increase of the probe's energy throughput.

  7. Fiber optic probe for region of interest (ROI) selective time averaged multi-fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep M.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    Time averaged imaging is one of the widely used methods to achieve improved image quality, used in different types of microscopic methods. Time averaged imaging refers to adjusting the exposure time of the imaging system to obtain optimal images. In state of the art microscopes, the region of interest (ROI) of illumination beam for time averaged imaging can be selected to be of regular shapes such as circle or rectangle. This forces smallest possible ROI to be larger than the actual sample's ROI which can be of a specific shape with complex contours. In this context, we present a flexible fiber bundle based illumination probe capable of illuminating samples of irregular shapes for time averaged imaging. Further, this probe is capable of multi-wavelength illumination, hence can be used for multi-fluorescence imaging. The fiber probe with features such as region selective and multi- wavelength illumination allows it to be used for optimal imaging of multi-fluorescence sample.

  8. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  9. Wide bandwidth fiber-optic ultrasound probe in MOMS technology: Preliminary signal processing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannacci, E; Granchi, S; Belsito, L; Roncaglia, A; Biagi, E

    2017-03-01

    An ultrasonic probe consisting of two optical fiber-based miniaturized transducers for wideband ultrasound emission and detection is employed for the characterization of in vitro biological tissues. In the probe, ultrasound generation is obtained by thermoelastic emission from patterned carbon films in Micro-Opto-Mechanical-System (MOMS) devices mounted on the tip of an optical fiber, whereas acousto-optical detection is performed in a similar way by a miniaturized polymeric interferometer. The microprobe presents a wide, flat bandwidth that is a very attractive feature for ultrasonic investigation, especially for tissue characterization. Thanks to the very high ultrasonic frequencies obtained, the probe is able to reveal different details of the object under investigation by analyzing the ultrasonic signal within different frequencies ranges, as shown by specific experiments performed on a patterned cornstarch flour sample in vitro. This is confirmed by measurements executed to determine the lateral resolution of the microprobe at different frequencies of about 70μm at 120MHz. Moreover, measurements performed with the wideband probe in pulsed-echo mode on a histological finding of porcine kidney are presented, on which two different spectral signal processing algorithms are applied. After processing, the ultrasonic spectral features show a peculiar spatial distribution on the sample, which is expected to depend on different ultrasonic backscattering properties of the analyzed tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biconically tapered fiber optic dip probe for rapid label-free immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Castaneda, Angelica; Lee, Kun Ho; Sanchez, Martin; Murinda, Shelton; Lin, Wei-Jen; Salik, Ertan

    2014-02-01

    We report U-shaped biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF) as dip probes for label-free immunoassays. The tapered regions of the sensors were functionalized by immobilization of immunoglobulin-G (Ig-G) and tested for detection of anti-IgG at concentrations of 0.5, 5.0, and 50 μg/mL. Antibody-antigen reaction creates a biological nanolayer modifying the waveguide structure leading to a change in the sensor signal, which allows real-time monitoring. The kinetics of the antibody (mouse Ig-G) -antigen (rabbit anti-mouse IgG) reactions was studied. The limit of detection for the sensor was estimated to be less than 0.5 μg/mL with low temperature sensitivity. Utilization of the rate of the sensor peak shift within the first few minutes of antibody-antigen reaction is proposed as a rapid detection method.

  11. A ruggedized fiber optic cable offering superior coupled power and bandwidth capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Douglas; Mann, Xavier

    1986-11-01

    A tactical fiber optic cable utilizing an 85 micron core/125 micron cladding/0.26 numerical aperture fiber was designed, manufactured, and tested. The 85/125/0.26 fiber was selected because of its high bandwidth capability and low cost for the power benefits gained. This cable design used a composite buffer for superior environmental performance, and an epoxy fiberglass reinforced double polyurethane jacket to obtain the mechanical performance required. Rigorous environmental and mechanical testing (in accordance with the applicable DOD or EIA standards) was conducted. Testing included attenuation performance over temperature, tensile strength, cyclic flex, twist bend, radial compression, impact, cold bend, freezing water immersion, and flammability. This cable design exhibited outstanding performance in both environmental and mechanical testing, with less than a 0.3 dB increase over the entire temperature range and no measurable increase in attenuation from mechanical testing. Storage temperatures of -70 C to +85 C and operating temperatures of -55 C to +85 C were achieved.

  12. Biconically Tapered Fiber Optic Probes for Rapid Label-Free Immunoassays ǂ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Castaneda, Angelica; Lee, Kun Ho; Sanchez, Martin; Ortiz, Adrian; Almaz, Ekrem; Turkoglu Almaz, Zuleyha; Murinda, Shelton; Lin, Wei-Jen; Salik, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    We report use of U-shaped biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF) as probes for label-free immunoassays. The tapered regions of the sensors were functionalized by immobilization of immunoglobulin-G (Ig-G) and tested for detection of anti-IgG at concentrations of 50 ng/mL to 50 µg/mL. Antibody-antigen reaction creates a biological nanolayer modifying the waveguide structure leading to a change in the sensor signal, which allows real-time monitoring. The kinetics of the antibody (mouse Ig-G)-antigen (rabbit anti-mouse IgG) reactions was studied. Hydrofluoric acid treatment makes the sensitive region thinner to enhance sensitivity, which we confirmed by experiments and simulations. The limit of detection for the sensor was estimated to be less than 50 ng/mL. Utilization of the rate of the sensor peak shift within the first few minutes of the antibody-antigen reaction is proposed as a rapid protein detection method. PMID:25836359

  13. Development of a Fiber-Optics Microspatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy Sensor for Probing Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Conti, Claudia; Rousaki, Anastasia; Moens, Luc; Realini, Marco; Matousek, Pavel

    2017-09-05

    Microspatially offset Raman spectroscopy (micro-SORS) has been proposed as a valuable approach to sample molecular information from layers that are covered by a turbid (nontransparent) layer. However, when large magnifications are involved, the approach is not straightforward, as spatial constraints exist to position the laser beam and the objective lens with the external beam delivery or, with internal beam delivery, the maximum spatial offset achievable is restricted. To overcome these limitations, we propose here a prototype of a new micro-SORS sensor, which uses bare glass fibers to transfer the laser radiation to the sample and to collect the Raman signal from a spatially offset zone to the Raman spectrometer. The concept also renders itself amenable to remote delivery and to the miniaturization of the probe head which could be beneficial for special applications, e.g., where access to sample areas is restricted. The basic applicability of this approach was demonstrated by studying several layered structure systems. Apart from proving the feasibility of the technique, also, practical aspects of the use of the prototype sensor are discussed.

  14. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  15. Terminated and Tailbiting Spatially Coupled Codes with Optimized Bit Mappings for Spectrally Efficient Fiber-Optical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Häger, Christian; Brännström, Fredrik; Alvarado, Alex; Agrell, Erik

    2014-01-01

    We study the design of spectrally efficient fiber-optical communication systems based on different spatially coupled (SC) forward error correction (FEC) schemes. In particular, we optimize the allocation of the coded bits from the FEC encoder to the modulation bits of the signal constellation. Two SC code classes are considered. The codes in the first class are protograph-based low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes which are decoded using iterative soft-decision decoding. The codes in the second class are generalized LDPC codes which are decoded using iterative hard-decision decoding. For both code classes, the bit allocation is optimized for the terminated and tailbiting SC cases based on a density evolution analysis. An optimized bit allocation can significantly improve the performance of tailbiting SC codes codes over the baseline sequential allocation, up to the point where they have a comparable gap to capacity as their terminated counterparts, at a lower FEC overhead. For the considered terminated SC co...

  16. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  17. Fiber-Optic Coupled Lidar Receiver System to Measure Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David Brent; Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of ozone in the atmosphere has become increasingly important over the past two decades. Significant increases of ozone concentrations in the lower atmosphere, or troposphere, and decreases in the upper atmosphere, or stratosphere, have been attributed to man-made causes. High ozone concentrations in the troposphere pose a health hazard to plants and animals and can add to global warming. On the other hand, ozone in the stratosphere serves as a protective barrier against strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Man-made CFC's (chlorofluorocarbons) act as a catalyst with a free oxygen atom and an ozone molecule to produce two oxygen molecules therefore depleting the protective layer of ozone in the stratosphere. The beneficial and harmful effects of ozone require the study of ozone creation and destruction processes in the atmosphere. Therefore, to provide an accurate model of these processes, an ozone lidar system must be able to be used frequently with as large a measurement range as possible. Various methods can be used to measure atmospheric ozone concentrations. These include different airborne and balloon measurements, solar occulation satellite techniques, and the use of lasers in lidar (high detection and ranging,) systems to probe the atmosphere. Typical devices such as weather balloons can only measure within the direct vicinity of the instrument and are therefore used infrequently. Satellites use solar occulation techniques that yield low horizontal and vertical resolution column densities of ozone.

  18. On the mechanical coupling of a fiber optic cable used for distributed acoustic/vibration sensing applications—a theoretical consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, Thomas; Thurley, Tom; Jousset, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, fiber optic cables are increasingly used for the acquisition of dynamic strain changes for seismic surveys. When considering seismic amplitudes, one of the first questions arising is the mechanical coupling between optical fiber and the surrounding medium. Here we analyse the interaction of ground movement with a typical telecom-grade fiber optic cable from an existing telecommunication network deployed in a sand filled trench at the surface. Within the cable, the optical fiber is embedded in a gel-filled plastic tube. We apply Hooke’s law to calculate the stress needed to strain the optical fiber throughout the cable structure. In case the stress magnitude at the cable–sand interface as well as the gel–optical fiber interface is below the yield strength of the respective material, sand and gel, it can be regarded as an elastic medium. Hence, a multilayer radial symmetric model can be used to calculate the coupling of the optical fiber with the surrounding medium. We show that the transfer function has a -3 dB lower cut-off wavelength of about 22 m. The magnitude response of this telecom-grade fiber optic cable is therefore almost perfect at typical low frequency seismic waves. The approach presented here can be applied to various cable designs to estimate the strain transfer between ground movement and an optical fiber.

  19. Performance evaluation of a digital intraoral imaging device based on the CMOS photosensor array coupled with an integrated X-ray conversion fiber-optic faceplate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyosung [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, 234 Maeji Heungup, Wonju 220 710 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hscho1@yonsei.ac.kr; Choi, Sungil [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, 234 Maeji Heungup, Wonju 220 710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongguk [Department of Physics, Myongji University, 38-2 Namdong Cheuingu, Yongin 449 728 (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Yangseo; Kim, Taewoo; Ro, Changjoon [Radiation Technology Laboratory, Vatech Co., Ltd., 75-11 Seogu Dongtan, Hwaseong 445 811 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bongsoo [School of Biomedical Engineering, Konkuk University, 322 Danweul, Chungju 380 701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sin [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Cheju National University, 66 Chejudaehakro, Cheju 690 756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hokyung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeun Geumjung, Pusan 609 735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-21

    As a continuation of our digital X-ray imaging sensor R and D, we have developed a cost-effective, intraoral imaging device based on the complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photosensor array coupled with an integrated X-ray conversion fiber-optic faceplate. It consists of a commercially available CMOS photosensor of a 35x35 {mu}m{sup 2} pixel size and a 688x910 pixel array dimension, and a high-efficiency columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator of a 90 {mu}m thickness directly deposited on a fiber-optic faceplate of a 6 {mu}m core size and an 1.46 mm thickness with 85/15 core-cladding ratio (NA{approx}1.0 in air). The fiber-optic faceplate is a highly X-ray attenuating material that minimizes X-ray absorption on the end CMOS photosensor array, thus, minimizing X-ray induced noise at the photosensor array. It uses a high light-output columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator with a peak spectral emission at 545 nm, giving better spatial resolution, but attenuates some of this light due to interfacial and optical attenuation factors. In this paper, we presented the performance analysis of the intraoral imaging device with experimental measurements and acquired X-ray images in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE)

  20. Python fiber optic seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  1. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR)-Coupled Fiber-Optic Nanoprobe for the Detection of Protein Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianjun; Zeng, Zheng; Lin, Yongbin

    2017-01-01

    Here is presented a miniaturized, fiber-optic (FO) nanoprobe biosensor based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at the reusable dielectric-metallic hybrid interface with a robust, gold nano-disk array at the fiber end facet. The nanodisk array is directly fabricated using electron beam lithography (EBL) and metal lift-off process. The free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) has been detected with a mouse anti-human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a specific receptor linked with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at the LSPR-FO facet surfaces. Experimental investigation and data analysis found near field refractive index (RI) sensitivity at ~226 nm/RIU with the LSPR-FO nanoprobe, and demonstrated the lowest limit of detection (LOD) at 100 fg/mL (~3 fM) of f-PSA in PBS solutions. The SAM shows insignificant nonspecific binding to the target biomarkers in the solution. The control experimentation using 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin in PBS and nonspecific surface test shows the excellent specificity and selectivity in the detection of f-PSA in PBS. These results indicate important progress toward a miniaturized, multifunctional fiber-optic technology that integrates informational communication and sensing function for developing a high-performance, label-free, point-of-care (POC) device.

  2. Fiber optic spanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-10-01

    Rotation is a fundamental function in nano/biotechnology and is being useful in a host of applications such as pumping of fluid flow in microfluidic channels for transport of micro/nano samples. Further, controlled rotation of single cell or microscopic object is useful for tomographic imaging. Though conventional microscope objective based laser spanners (based on transfer of spin or orbital angular momentum) have been used in the past, they are limited by the short working distance of the microscope objective. Here, we demonstrate development of a fiber optic spanner for rotation of microscopic objects using single-mode fiber optics. Fiber-optic trapping and simultaneous rotation of pin-wheel structure around axis perpendicular to fiber-optic axis was achieved using the fiber optic spanner. By adjusting the laser beam power, rotation speed of the trapped object and thus the microfluidic flow could be controlled. Since this method does not require special optical or structural properties of the sample to be rotated, three-dimensional rotation of a spherical cell could also be controlled. Further, using the fiber optic spanner, array of red blood cells could be assembled and actuated to generate vortex motion. Fiber optical trapping and spinning will enable physical and spectroscopic analysis of microscopic objects in solution and also find potential applications in lab- on-a-chip devices.

  3. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  4. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  5. Fiber optic data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Steven T.

    1987-01-01

    The Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center is currently developing a fiber optic data bus transmission and reception system that could eventually replace copper cable connections in airplanes. The original form of the system will transmit information from an encoder to a transponder via a fiber optic cable. An altimeter and an altitude display are connected to a fiber optic transmitter by copper cable. The transmitter converts the altimetry data from nine bit parallel to serial form and send these data through a fiber optic cable to a receiver. The receiver converts the data using a cable similar to that used between the altimeter and display. The transmitting and receiving ends also include a display readout. After completion and ground testing of the data bus, the system will be tested in an airborne environment.

  6. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  7. Infrared fiber optic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  8. Ex-vivo endoscopic laryngeal cancer imaging using two forward-looking fiber optic scanning endoscope probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernat, R.; Tatla, T.; Pang, J.-Y.; Tadrous, P. J.; Gelikonov, G.; Gelikonov, V.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Bradu, A.; Li, X. D.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    Larynx cancer is one of the most common primary head and neck cancers. For early-stage laryngeal cancer, both surgery and radiotherapy are effective treatment modalities, offering a high rate of local control and cure. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an established non-invasive optical biopsy method, capable of imaging ranges of 2- 3 mm into tissue. By using the principles of low coherence light interferometry, OCT can be used to distinguish normal from unhealthy laryngeal mucosa in patients. Two forward-looking endoscope OCT probes of different sizes in a sweeping frequency OCT (SS-OCT) configuration were compared in terms of their performances for ex-vivo laryngeal cancer imaging. The setup configuration of the first OCT probe unit was designed and constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics RAS, Russia (diameter of 1.9 mm and the rigid part at the distal end is 13 mm long). The second OCT endoscope probe was constructed at the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, USA, using a tubular piezoelectric actuator with quartered electrodes in combination with a resonant fiber cantilever (diameter of 2.4 mm, and rigid part of 45 mm). Cross-sectional images of laryngeal lesions using the two OCT configurations were aquired and compared with OCT images obtained in a 1310 nm SS-OCT classical non-endoscopic system. The work presented here is an intermediate step in our research towards in-vivo endoscopic laryngeal cancer imaging.

  9. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tosi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm. Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies.

  10. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-01-01

    We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA) of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI) miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm). Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies. PMID:27092504

  11. Nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2001-01-01

    The Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering have awarded Govind Agrawal with an honorable mention for the Joseph W. Goodman Book Writing Award for his work on Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd edition.Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd Edition, provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers. It retains most of the material that appeared in the first edition, with the exception of Chapter 6, which is now devoted to the polarization effects relevant for light propagation in optical

  12. Validation of dose measurements by scintillating fiber optic dosimeters for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, A.; Pirraco, R.; Rosa, C. C.

    2013-11-01

    Organic scintillators have been promoted and widely used in scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters (SFOD) due to their tissue-equivalent characteristics, small sensitive volume combined with high spatial resolution, and emission of visible light proportional to the absorbed electron and gamma dose rate. In this paper we will present the validation of Monte Carlo simulations of dose measurements assisted by scintillating fiber optic dosimeters operating in the visible spectral range, in the context of the development of fiber optic dosimeters targeted to Brachytherapy. The Monte Carlo simulation results are compared to measurements performed with SFOD test probes, assembled with BCF-60 (Saint Gobain) samples of 1 mm diameter and 0.35 to 1.5 cm length, coupled to PMMA optical fiber. The optical signal resulting from scintillation and Cherenkov light is transmitted through an additional optical fiber link to a remote measuring device. For SFOD probes irradiation a dedicated PMMA phantom was used. The results were validated against measurements obtained with a properly calibrated pinpoint ionization chamber (PTW). The probes were positioned in a radial arrangement, with a radioactive source at its center point. The γ-rays source is a Nucletron Microselectron-V2 192Ir. The dose curves are obtained according to the different positions in the phantom with the SFOD dosimeters. The system is able to use a Fiber Optic Multiplexer (FOM) controlled with Labview software.

  13. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  14. Fiber optics welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  15. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A lot of research is focused on all-optical signal processing, aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for an efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods, involving high-temperature processes performed in highly pure environment, slow down the fabrication and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, ...

  16. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  17. Fiber-Optic Sensor Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Constructs and evaluates fiber-optic sensors for a variety of measurands. These measurands include acoustic, pressure, magnetic, and electric field as well...

  18. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  19. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  20. Simple fiber-optic technique for in-situ corrosion sensing in structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nahar; Jain, Subhash C.; Aggarwal, Anil K.; Singla, Madan L.; Singh, Mewa

    2000-05-01

    Corrosion of structures is a serious problem involving man and material safety. Over the years, though several methods of monitoring corrosion have been devised with some success, but there is a persistent need for devising non-destructive and in-situ techniques for monitoring corrosion in structures. Fiber optic techniques are capable of meeting these requirements, besides offering several other important advantages. Fiber optic corrosion sensors have thus become quite attractive and are currently being investigated to address the high costs associated with the existing structural maintenance procedures. Fiber optics based direct absorption spectroscopic techniques investigated by some groups for estimating corrosion have used single fiber elements for recording the signal reflected from specimen at different wavelengths. As the light coupling efficiency of the single fiber elements is relatively poor in comparison with that of fiber bundles and the signal available for processing is weak, the paper presents a simple and alternate technique based on the color matching principle of fiber optic colorimetry to detect corrosion induced color changes. It employs a thin Y- shaped fiber optic bundle which increases the quantity of light energy coupled from a whitelight source. The light reflected off the sample is made incident on a PIN photo- detector through a complementary filter. A series of such probes can be safety embedded and or bonded to structures at pre-determined locations. The experimental set up for this sensor was implemented and feasibility of in-situ corrosion detection in structures demonstrated. Measurement data was acquired for steel samples corroded both in concrete embedded and open ambience conditions and results analyzed.

  1. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  2. Depth probing of the hydride formation process in thin Pd films by combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Björn; Fredriksson, Mattias; Feng, Ligang; Lindahl, Niklas; Hagberg, Johan; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a flexible combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy setup to gain insight into the depth evolution of electrochemical hydride and oxide formation in Pd films with thicknesses of 20 and 100 nm. The thicknesses of our model systems are chosen such that the films are thinner or significantly thicker than the optical skin depth of Pd to create two distinctly different situations. Low power white light is irradiated on the sample and analyzed in three different configurations; transmittance through, and, reflectance from the front and the back side of the film. The obtained optical sensitivities correspond to fractions of a monolayer of adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) on Pd. Moreover, a combined simultaneous readout obtained from the different optical measurement configurations provides mechanistic insights into the depth-evolution of the studied hydrogenation and oxidation processes.

  3. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  4. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2

  5. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  6. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  7. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  8. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  9. Fiber-Optical Sensors: Basics and Applications in Multiphase Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozheng Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a brief introduction on the basics of fiber-optical sensors and an overview focused on the applications to measurements in multiphase reactors. The most commonly principle utilized is laser back scattering, which is also the foundation for almost all current probes used in multiphase reactors. The fiber-optical probe techniques in two-phase reactors are more developed than those in three-phase reactors. There are many studies on the measurement of gas holdup using fiber-optical probes in three-phase fluidized beds, but negative interference of particles on probe function was less studied. The interactions between solids and probe tips were less studied because glass beads etc. were always used as the solid phase. The vision probes may be the most promising for simultaneous measurements of gas dispersion and solids suspension in three-phase reactors. Thus, the following techniques of the fiber-optical probes in multiphase reactors should be developed further: (1 online measuring techniques under nearly industrial operating conditions; (2 corresponding signal data processing techniques; (3 joint application with other measuring techniques.

  10. A fiber optic sensor for ophthalmic refractive diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Campbell, Melanie C. W.; Dellavecchia, Michael A.

    1992-04-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of a lensless fiber optic spectrometer (sensor) to study the onset of cataracts. This new miniaturized and rugged fiber optic probe is based upon dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles. It has no moving parts, no apertures, and requires no optical alignment. It is flexible and easy to use. Results are presented for cold-induced cataract in excised bovine eye lenses, and aging effects in excised human eye lenses. The device can be easily incorporated into a slit-lamp apparatus (ophthalmoscope) for complete eye diagnostics.

  11. Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab develops, tests and evaluates high speed fiber optic network components as well as network protocols. In addition, this...

  12. Catching Attention in Fiber Optics Class

    OpenAIRE

    Kezerashvili, R. Ya.; Leng, L.

    2004-01-01

    Following a brief review on the history and the current development of fiber optics, the significance of teaching fiber optics for science and non-science major college students is addressed. Several experimental demonstrations designed to aid the teaching and learning process in fiber optics lectures are presented. Sample laboratory projects are also proposed to help the students to understand the physical principles of fiber optics.

  13. Oceanic Applications of Fiber Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    theoretical performance of the optical hydrophone is 0 dB RE Qoherent Sensors IpPa [141. The Navy is investing heavily in fiber optic sensor While relatively...frequencies. The expected resolutions down to 0.5 degrees. theoretical performance of the optical hydrophone is 0 dB RE Coherent Sensors IpPa [14]. The Navy is

  14. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  15. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  16. Fiber Optic Aircraft Systems Electromagnetic Pulse (Emp) Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Byron; Greenwell, Roger; Summerlin, Michael; Zetlen, Bryan

    1984-10-01

    Mitigation of EMP coupling into sensitive, mission critical equipment is essential for Aircraft required to operate in adverse nuclear environments. As has been demonstrated in several aircraft test-fix-test programs, traditional hardening can eliminate most EMP problems but generally adds weight, volume, and complexity which impacts system reliability, maintainability and hardness surveillance. Fiber optic technology reduces weight, volume, and complexity while reducing overall life cycle costs and can also mitigate or eliminate many EMP related problems. As requirements for data transfer volume increase, aircraft system expansion utilizing present technology within extended design constraints is hampered by mission requirements for extensive EMI, RFI, EMP, lightning and short circuit shielding and protection. The criticality of excessive weight and space needed for shielding protection is well known and so are the problems of bent pins associated with filter pin connec-tors. The use of non-metallic composite structural materials for the aircraft skin further exacerbates the traditional shielding and filtering problems. The complete elimination of shielding and filtering is not possible. However, the use of fiber optics paths, complex penetrations and other intentional or inherent inadvertent conductors and thereby greatly simplifies EMP hardening. The inherent dielectric nature of fiber optics makes it relatively resistant or immune to the upset/damage potential of EMP. Fiber optic technology is also capable of electromagnetic interference and cross talk. The vulnerability of fiber optic technology to other significant factors in the operational environment, i.e., ionizing radiation, should also be examined and assessed.

  17. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  18. Fiber optic sensors IV; Proceedings of the Third European Congress on Optics, The Hague, Netherlands, Mar. 13, 14, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Ralf T. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in fiber-optic sensor (FOS) technology are examined in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to components for FOSs, special fibers for FOSs, interferometry, FOS applications, and sensing principles and influence. Particular attention is given to solder glass sealing technology for FOS packaging, the design of optical-fiber current sensors, pressure and temperature effects on beat length in highly birefringent optical fibers, a pressure FOS based on vibrating-quartz-crystal technology, remote sensing of flammable gases using a fluoride-fiber evanescent probe, a displacement sensor with electronically scanned white-light interferometer, the use of multimode laser diodes in low-coherence coupled-cavity interferometry, electronic speckle interferometry compensated for environmentally induced phase noise, a dual-resolution noncontact vibration and displacement sensor based on a two-wavelength source, and fiber optics in composite materials.

  19. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  20. Integrated optics for fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minford, W. J.; Depaula, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress achieved in the field of fiber-optic sensor applications is discussed with emphasis placed on LiNbO3-based integrated optics (IO). Particular consideration is given to advanced electromagnetic-field sensors, an integrated laser vibrometer system, and a fiber-optic gyroscope system. It is shown that the multifunction IO chips have enabled high perforamance fiber-optic sensors (e.g., fiber-optic gyros), provided advanced and unique signal processing capabilities and advanced architectures, and have a potential of making fiber-optic sensors at low cost.

  1. Feasibility of Ultra-Thin Fiber-Optic Dosimeters for Radiotherapy Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongsoo Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, prototype ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters were fabricated using organic scintillators, wavelength shifting fibers, and plastic optical fibers. The sensor probes of the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters consisted of very thin organic scintillators with thicknesses of 100, 150 and 200 μm. These types of sensors cannot only be used to measure skin or surface doses but also provide depth dose measurements with high spatial resolution. With the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, surface doses for gamma rays generated from a Co-60 therapy machine were measured. Additionally, percentage depth doses in the build-up regions were obtained by using the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, and the results were compared with those of external beam therapy films and a conventional fiber-optic dosimeter.

  2. Feasibility of fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov effect for detecting thermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-06-17

    In this research, we propose a novel method for detecting thermal neutrons with a fiber-optic radiation sensor using the Cerenkov effect. We fabricate a fiber-optic radiation sensor that detects thermal neutrons with a Gd-foil, a rutile crystal, and a plastic optical fiber. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation in the sensor probe of the fiber-optic radiation sensor and thermal neutron fluxes is determined using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code simulations. To evaluate the fiber-optic radiation sensor, the Cerenkov radiation generated in the fiber-optic radiation sensor by irradiation of pure thermal neutron beams is measured according to the depths of polyethylene.

  3. Applications of nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2008-01-01

    * The only book describing applications of nonlinear fiber optics * Two new chapters on the latest developments: highly nonlinear fibers and quantum applications* Coverage of biomedical applications* Problems provided at the end of each chapterThe development of new highly nonlinear fibers - referred to as microstructured fibers, holey fibers and photonic crystal fibers - is the next generation technology for all-optical signal processing and biomedical applications. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate these key technology developments.The bo

  4. Theoretical and experimental study of fiber-optic fluorescence immunosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, He

    This dissertation investigates the optical detection of antigens (in this case, food pathogens such as Salmonella) with fiber-optic immunosensors. The major techniques used for this optical detection include: (1)Linking the antigens to some physical tracers that can be optically detected; (2)Collecting and transmitting the optical signal to an optical detector. From an optical point of view, the problem is a nonimaging-optics problem to collect a fluorescent signal from an extended Lambertian source and deliver it to an optical detection system with maximum energy transfer and distinct wavelength separation. A raytrace model of the optical detection system was used for numerical simulations to analyze and optimize the optical design. The result leads to an improvement of the optical detection. Related physical problems such as magnetic focusing effect, fluorescence detection, and wavelength separation have also been studied in detail. With the adoption of a single-step immunomagnetic assay, experimental studies have been conducted for the detection of Salmonella, with a dual- fiber optical probe and tapered tubular waveguide probes. The test results have shown that the detection system gives detection limit of approximately 106 CFU/ml with dual-fiber optical probes, and 105 CFU/ml with improved tubular waveguide probes. The system developed for this research project is designed as a cost-effective portable instrument that may be used for field-testing. Rapid and on-site detection, low cost instrumentation and a reusable optical probe have been emphasized throughout the study.

  5. A chip of fiber optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Heming; Hu, Huizhu; Zhang, Lei; Ge, Xiaojia; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    A chip of fiber optical trap paves the way to realize the miniaturization and portability of devices based on dual beam optical trap, without loss of stability. We have designed two types of chip of fiber optical trap according to our theoretical simulation. The first one integrates dual beam optical trap with microfluidic chip, called a chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. It is generally used in chemical, biological, medical and other high-throughput experiments. The second one is a chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap. It is used to measure precisely the coefficient of viscosity or the Brownian movement of micro-object's in liquid. This paper focuses on the chip of fiber optical trap. We present two types of chips of fiber optical trap and detail their designs, fabrication and validation. The chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap is integrated with optical fiber and microfluidic chip made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). We have achieved the micro-sized alignment of optical paths and the trapping of micro-sized particles in the chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. In addition, it is easy to fabrication and clean. The chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap was based on a cubic micro-cavity made by a rectangular capillary tube and sealed by PDMS. We have achieved micro-sized alignment accuracy, high trapping efficiency and better trapping stability in the chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap as well.

  6. A compact fiber optic eye diagnostic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Dubin, Stephen; Della Vecchia, Michael A.

    1996-03-01

    A new fiber optic probe developed for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluids experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to study different parts of an eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power (˜few μW) light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like material in the vitreous humor. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a standard slit-lamp apparatus simply using a Hruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and cortical, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to ``dissolve'' or slow down the cataract formation before the surgery becomes necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber and their complications, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

  7. Detection of inflammatory cytokines using a fiber optic microsphere immunoassay array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blicharz, Timothy M.; Walt, David R.

    2006-10-01

    A multiplexed fiber optic microsphere-based immunoassay array capable of simultaneously measuring five inflammatory cytokines has been developed. Five groups of amine-functionalized 3.1 micron microspheres were internally encoded with five distinct concentrations of a europium dye and converted to cytokine probes by covalently coupling monoclonal capture antibodies specific for human VEGF, IFN-gamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3 to the microspheres via glutaraldehyde chemistry. The microspheres were pooled and loaded into a 1 mm diameter fiber optic bundle containing ~50,000 individual etched microwells, producing the multiplexed cytokine immunoassay array. Multiple arrays can be created from a single microsphere pool for high throughput sample analysis. Sandwich fluoroimmunoassays were performed by incubating the probe array in a sample, followed by incubation in a mixture of biotin-labeled detection antibodies that are complementary to the five cytokines. Finally, universal detection of each protein was performed using a fluorescence imaging system after briefly immersing the array in a solution of fluorophore-labeled streptavidin. The multiplexed cytokine array has been shown to respond selectively to VEGF, IFNgamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3, permitting multiplexed quantitative analysis. Ultimately, the multiplexed cytokine array will be utilized to evaluate the potential of using saliva as a noninvasive diagnostic fluid for pulmonary inflammatory diseases such as asthma.

  8. Nonlinear fiber optics formerly quantum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    1995-01-01

    The field of nonlinear fiber optics has grown substantially since the First Edition of Nonlinear Fiber Optics, published in 1989. Like the First Edition, this Second Edition is a comprehensive, tutorial, and up-to-date account of nonlinear optical phenomena in fiber optics. It synthesizes widely scattered research material and presents it in an accessible manner for students and researchers already engaged in or wishing to enter the field of nonlinear fiber optics. Particular attention is paid to the importance of nonlinear effects in the design of optical fiber communication systems. This is

  9. Fiber optic lightning current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Miaoyuan; Li, Kaicheng; Wang, Jing-Gang; Feng, Chunmei

    1995-09-01

    A fiber-optic sensor has been developed to measure the lightening current. The lightening current which induces birefringence in a glass loop is to modulate a linearly polarized optical beam ((lambda) equals 0.85 micrometers ). The modulated optical information is transmitted to a PIN through an optical cable and converted to the electrical signal. A high-speed data acquisition system is used to sample the pulse signal. The waveform, rise time, peak value, and frequency components of the pulse signal can be shown on the screen of the computer.

  10. Fiber-optic communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive account of fiber-optic communication systems. The 3rd edition of this book is used worldwide as a textbook in many universities. This 4th edition incorporates recent advances that have occurred, in particular two new chapters. One deals with the advanced modulation formats (such as DPSK, QPSK, and QAM) that are increasingly being used for improving spectral efficiency of WDM lightwave systems. The second chapter focuses on new techniques such as all-optical regeneration that are under development and likely to be used in future communication systems. All othe

  11. Fiber-optic technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A history of fiber technology is presented. The advantages of fiber optics are discussed (bandwidth, cost, weight and size, nonmetallic construction and isolation). Some aspects of the disadvantages of fiber systems briefly discussed are fiber and cable availability, fiber components, radiation effects, receivers and transmitters, and material dispersion. Particular emphasis over the next several years will involve development of fibers and systems optimized for use at wavelengths near 1.3 ..mu..m and development of wavelengths multiplexers for simultaneous system operation at several wavelengths.

  12. Demonstration of theoretical and experimental simulations in fiber optics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tianfu; Wang, Xiaolin; Shi, Jianhua; Lei, Bing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Hu, Haojun

    2017-08-01

    "Fiber optics" course plays a supporting effect in the curriculum frame of optics and photonics at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Moreover, the course can be treated as compulsory for students specialized in the fiber-related field, such as fiber communication, fiber sensing and fiber light source. The corresponding content in fiber optics requires the knowledge of geometrical and physical optics as background, including basic optical theory and fiber components in practice. Thus, to help the students comprehend the relatively abundant and complex content, it is necessary to investigate novel teaching method assistant the classic lectures. In this paper, we introduce the multidimensional pattern in fiber-optics teaching involving theoretical and laboratory simulations. First, the theoretical simulations is demonstrated based on the self-developed software named "FB tool" which can be installed in both smart phone with Android operating system and personal computer. FB tool covers the fundamental calculations relating to transverse modes, fiber lasers and nonlinearities and so on. By comparing the calculation results with other commercial software like COMSOL, SFTool shows high accuracy with high speed. Then the laboratory simulations are designed including fiber coupling, Erbium doped fiber amplifiers, fiber components and so on. The simulations not only supports students understand basic knowledge in the course, but also provides opportunities to develop creative projects in fiber optics.

  13. Golden probe of the top Yukuwa coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We perform a preliminary study of the ability of the Higgs decay to four leptons to shed light on the top quark Yukawa couplings. In particular we examine whether the $h\\to 4\\ell$ `golden channel' is sensitive to the $CP$ properties of the top quark couplings to the Higgs boson. We show that kinematic distributions are sensitive to interference of the next-to-leading order electroweak corrections with the tree level $ZZ$ contribution. This translates into a sensitivity to the top quark Yukawa couplings such that meaningful constraints on their $CP$ properties can begin to be obtained once $\\sim 300$ fb$^{-1}$ of data has been collected at $\\sim 14$ TeV, with significant improvements at higher luminosity or with a higher energy hadron collider. This makes the $h\\to4\\ell$ channel a useful probe of the top quark Yukawa couplings that is qualitatively different from already established searches in $h\\to V\\gamma$ two body decays, $tth$, and $gg\\to h$. We also briefly discuss other potential possibilities for probi...

  14. Ec-135 Fiber Optic Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jan R...; Hodges, Harry N.

    1984-10-01

    Fiber optic technology offers many advantages for upgrading nuclear survivability in systems such as the Airborne Command Post EC-135 aircraft, including weight and cost savings, EMI and EMC immunity, high data rates. The greatest advantage seen for nuclear survivable systems, however, is that a fiber optic system's EMP hardness can be maintained more easily with the use of fiber optics than with shielded cables or other protective methods. TRW recently completed a study to determine the feasibility of using fiber optic technology in an EC-135 aircraft environment. Since this study was conducted for a USAF Logistics Command Agency, a feasible system had to be one which could be realistically priced by an integrating contractor. Thus, any fiber optic approach would have to be well developed before it could be considered feasible. During the course of the study problem areas were encountered which are associated with the readiness of the technology for use rather than with the technology itself. These included connectors, standards, fiber radiation resistance, busing, maintenance, and logistics. Because these problems areas have not been resolved, it was concluded that fiber optic technology, despite its advantages, is not ready for directed procurement (i.e., included as a requirement in a prime mission equipment specification). However, offers by a manufacturer to use fiber optic technology in lieu of conventional technology should be considered. This paper treats these problems in more detail, addresses the areas which need further development, and discusses the hardness maintenance advantages of using fiber optic technology.

  15. Spectrum-Modulating Fiber-Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Family of spectrum-modulating fiber-optic sensors undergoing development for use in aircraft-engine control systems. Fiber-optic sensors offer advantages of small size, high bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and light weight. Furthermore, they reduce number of locations on aircraft to which electrical power has to be supplied.

  16. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  17. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  18. Fiber optically coupled radioluminescence detectors: A short review of key strengths and weaknesses of BCF-60 and Al2O3:C scintillating-material based systems in radiotherapy dosimetry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranurak, S.; Andersen, C. E.

    2017-06-01

    Radiotherapy technologies have improved for several decades aiming to effectively destroy cancerous tissues without overdosing surrounding healthy tissues. In order to fulfil this requirement, accurate and precise dosimetry systems play an important role. Throughout the years, ionization chambers have been used as a standard detector for basic linear accelerator calibrations and reference dosimetry in hospitals. However, they are not ideal for all treatment modalities: and limitations and difficulties have been reported in case of (i) small treatment fields, (ii) strong magnetic field used in the new hybrid MRI LINAC/cobalt systems, and (iii) in vivo measurements due to safety-issues related to the high operating voltage. Fiber optically coupled luminescence detectors provide a promising supplement to ionization chambers by offering the capability of real-time in vivo dose monitoring with high time resolution. In particular, the all-optical nature of these detectors is an advantage for in vivo measurements due to the absence of high voltage supply or electrical wire that could cause harm to the patient or disturb the treatment. Basically, fiber-coupled luminescence detector systems function by radiation-induced generation of radioluminescence from a sub-mm size organic/inorganic phosphor. A thin optical fiber cable is used for guiding the radioluminescence to a photomultiplier tube or similar sensitive light detection systems. The measured light intensity is proportional to dose rate. Throughout the years, developments and research of the fiber detector systems have undergone in several groups worldwide. In this article, the in-house developed fiber detector systems based on two luminescence phosphors of (i) BCF-60 polystyrene-based organic plastic scintillator and (ii) carbon-doped aluminum oxide crystal (Al2O3:C) are reviewed with comparison to the same material-based systems reported in the literature. The potential use of these detectors for reference

  19. Applications of fiber-optics-based nanosensors to drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Gregas, Molly; Zhang, Yan; Seewaldt, Victoria

    2009-08-01

    Fiber-optic nanosensors are fabricated by heating and pulling optical fibers to yield sub-micron diameter tips and have been used for in vitro analysis of individual living mammalian cells. Immobilization of bioreceptors (e.g., antibodies, peptides, DNA) selective to targeting analyte molecules of interest provides molecular specificity. Excitation light can be launched into the fiber, and the resulting evanescent field at the tip of the nanofiber can be used to excite target molecules bound to the bioreceptor molecules. The fluorescence or surface-enhanced Raman scattering produced by the analyte molecules is detected using an ultra-sensitive photodetector. This article provides an overview of the development and application of fiber-optic nanosensors for drug discovery. The nanosensors provide minimally invasive tools to probe subcellular compartments inside single living cells for health effect studies (e.g., detection of benzopyrene adducts) and medical applications (e.g., monitoring of apoptosis in cells treated with anticancer drugs).

  20. Design and optimization of an optical refractometer for remote measurements via fiber-optic cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotiaintsev, S.; García-Guerra, C. E.; Morales-Farah, J. E.; Perez-Garcia, S.; Yam-Ontiveros, L. E.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a fiber-optic refractometer which can operate via long fiber-optic cables. We address the relationship between the span and the linearity of the small micro-optical evanescent-field transducer with spherical working surface used in the sensor, under different parameter combinations. We designed the transducer for the range of 1.333unit. This made the refractometer almost insensitive to the parasitic variation of optical source and loss in the fiber-optic cables which connects the optical probe with the optoelectronic unit. Due to these measures, this refractometer can successfully operate via long fiber-optic cables. It can have applications such as in the food industry, where salt-brine solutions of various concentrations are widely used.

  1. Design of a multimodal fibers optic system for small animal optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Pagliazzi, Marco; Boschi, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Small animals optical imaging systems are widely used in pre-clinical research to image in vivo the bio-distribution of light emitting probes using fluorescence or bioluminescence modalities. In this work we presented a set of simulated results of a novel small animal optical imaging module based on a fibers optics matrix, coupled with a position sensitive detector, devoted to acquire bioluminescence and Cerenkov images. Simulations were performed using GEANT 4 code with the GAMOS architecture using the tissue optics plugin. Results showed that it is possible to image a 30 × 30 mm region of interest using a fiber optics array containing 100 optical fibers without compromising the quality of the reconstruction. The number of fibers necessary to cover an adequate portion of a small animal is thus quite modest. This design allows integrating the module with magnetic resonance (MR) in order to acquire optical and MR images at the same time. A detailed model of the mouse anatomy, obtained by segmentation of 3D MRI images, will improve the quality of optical 3D reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comprehensive validation scheme for in situ fiber optics dissolution method for pharmaceutical drug product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Tahseen; Liu, Qian Julie; Vivilecchia, Richard; Joshi, Yatindra

    2009-03-01

    There has been a growing interest during the past decade in the use of fiber optics dissolution testing. Use of this novel technology is mainly confined to research and development laboratories. It has not yet emerged as a tool for end product release testing despite its ability to generate in situ results and efficiency improvement. One potential reason may be the lack of clear validation guidelines that can be applied for the assessment of suitability of fiber optics. This article describes a comprehensive validation scheme and development of a reliable, robust, reproducible and cost-effective dissolution test using fiber optics technology. The test was successfully applied for characterizing the dissolution behavior of a 40-mg immediate-release tablet dosage form that is under development at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey. The method was validated for the following parameters: linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, and robustness. In particular, robustness was evaluated in terms of probe sampling depth and probe orientation. The in situ fiber optic method was found to be comparable to the existing manual sampling dissolution method. Finally, the fiber optic dissolution test was successfully performed by different operators on different days, to further enhance the validity of the method. The results demonstrate that the fiber optics technology can be successfully validated for end product dissolution/release testing. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  3. Harsh environment fiber optic connectors/testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Douglas A.

    2014-09-01

    Fiber optic systems are used frequently in military, aerospace and commercial aviation programs. There is a long history of implementing fiber optic data transfer for aircraft control, for harsh environment use in local area networks and more recently for in-flight entertainment systems. The advantages of fiber optics include high data rate capacity, low weight, immunity to EMI/RFI, and security from signal tapping. Technicians must be trained particularly to install and maintain fiber systems, but it is not necessarily more difficult than wire systems. However, the testing of the fiber optic interconnection system must be conducted in a standardized manner to assure proper performance. Testing can be conducted with slight differences in the set-up and procedure that produce significantly different test results. This paper reviews various options of interconnect configurations and discusses how these options can affect the performance, maintenance required and longevity of a fiber optic system, depending on the environment. Proper test methods are discussed. There is a review of the essentials of proper fiber optic testing and impact of changing such test parameters as input launch conditions, wavelength considerations, power meter options and the basic methods of testing. This becomes important right from the start when the supplier test data differs from the user's data check upon receiving the product. It also is important in periodic testing. Properly conducting the fiber optic testing will eliminate confusion and produce meaningful test results for a given harsh environment application.

  4. Fiber optic communications fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication systems have advanced dramatically over the last four decades, since the era of copper cables, resulting in low-cost and high-bandwidth transmission. Fiber optics is now the backbone of the internet and long-distance telecommunication. Without it we would not enjoy the benefits of high-speed internet, or low-rate international telephone calls. This book introduces the basic concepts of fiber-optic communication in a pedagogical way. The important mathematical results are derived by first principles rather than citing research articles. In addition, physical interpre

  5. Laboratory Equipment Type Fiber Optic Refractometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Carome

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Using fiber optics and micro optics technologies we designed aninnovative fiber optic index of refraction transducer that has uniqueproperties. On the base of this transducer a laboratory equipment typefiber optic refractometer was developed for liquid index of refractionmeasurements. Such refractometer may be used for medical,pharmaceutical, industrial fluid, petrochemical, plastic, food, andbeverage industry applications. For example, it may be used formeasuring the concentrations of aqueous solutions: as the concentrationor density of a solute increase, the refractive index increasesproportionately. The paper describes development work related to designof laboratory type fiber optic refractometer and describes experimentsto evaluation of its basic properties.

  6. Review on developments in fiber optical sensors and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamdas, Kiran Kishore Kumar; Annamdas, Venu Gopal Madhav

    2010-04-01

    The last couple of decades had witnessed a rise in the research of optoelectronic and fiber optical communication fields, which resulted in applications focused initially in military and aerospace equipments, and later in health monitoring for medicine, heritage culture and various engineering fields. The monitoring of existing or /and new engineering, biomedical structures has become a regular feature throughout the world. Monitoring is fast emerging as a pioneering field with high precision and quality equipments. This field is very vast, consisting of both traditional as well as smart materials based methods. The fiber optics belong to the finest class of smart materials, there are many types and classifications based on the necessity, manufacturer and the end user. In this paper, a complete over view of fiber sensing systems and their usefulness is briefly presented.

  7. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array System for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight...

  8. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight Load Test...

  9. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  10. Adjustable Fiber Optic Microwave Transversal Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadaram, Mehdi; Lutes, George F.; Logan, Ronald T.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Microwave transversal filters implemented as adjustable tapped fiber optic delay lines developed. Main advantages of these filters (in comparison with conventional microwave transversal filters) are small size, light weight, no need for matching of radio-frequency impedances, no need for shielding against electromagnetic radiation at suboptical frequencies, no need for mechanical tuning, high stability of amplitude and phase, and active control of transfer functions. Weights of taps in fiber optic delay lines adjusted.

  11. Universal liquid level sensor employing Fresnel coefficient based discrete fiber optic measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Syed H.

    2014-09-01

    A compact and light weight liquid-level-measuring system based on fiber-optics sensor technology is presented as alternative to systems based on float gauges and other conventional level sensors for liquids that pose fire, corrosion and explosion hazards. These Fresnel reflection based fiber-optic sensors are inherently safer because they do not include electrical connections inside fuel/chemical tanks, and they exploit changes in internal reflection of guided electromagnetic modes as a result of contact between the outer surface of optical fiber and a liquid. Discrete changes in light transmission/reflection are used to indicate that liquid has come into contact with a suitably designed fiber optic probe at the output end of the fiber. This endeavor presents a quasi-continuous fiber optic level detection system that measures liquid level to within known increments of depth, by placing the probes of a number of such sensors at known depths in a tank where each probe effectively serves as a level switch. Due to the fiber optic nature of the design, the system can operate from cryogenic applications to boiling fluids. Experimental results for liquid nitrogen and water are presented.

  12. Fiber optic high-definition large-screen display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Lawrence L.; Reidinger, Michael J.; Feigles, Edward M.

    1990-08-01

    TRU-LYTE Systems, Inc. is developing an HDTV display that will exceed displays in the large screen display (LSD) market. Due to the present design and manufacturing techniques of LCDs, ELs, and CRTs there are limitations with LSD applications. One of the possible solutions is a hybrid of fiber optic technology and transmissive active matrix LCDs. In this design, multiple LCD modules are coupled with an equal number of fiber optic modules. These modules are designed so that strands of fiber optics are placed in a coherent manner from a rear panel to a predetermined spaced front panel. An image projected onto the rear panel will result in an enlarged image being displayed on the front panel. Imageboard modules would then be manufactured using this design of the building block method. The determining factors would include the desired output intensity, size restrictions, and cost factors. Research has also developed a technology that allows for consistent wide-angle viewing of the image displa'ed by the optical fibers. Applications for this product range from HDTV to stadium scoreboards.

  13. Introduction to fiber optics: Sensors for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R Y; Agrawal, Y K

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on the introduction of fiber optics, a fusion of science and engineering and describes the materials generally used for its construction along with the procedure used to design the fibers. It gives an idea of the materials used for the construction along with the pros and cons associated with them and various factors governing the emission of ultraviolet, infrared or visible radiations. The central core revolves around the applications of optical fibers in the medical and biomedical field and extending the use of the same in pharmaceutical industry as probes in quality control and dosage form analysis.

  14. DNA origami nanorobot fiber optic genosensor to TMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Emanuela; Manzano, Marisa; Srivastava, Sachin K; Marks, Robert S

    2018-01-15

    In the quest of greater sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic systems, one continually searches for alternative DNA hybridization methods, enabling greater versatility and where possible field-enabled detection of target analytes. We present, herein, a hybrid molecular self-assembled scaffolded DNA origami entity, intimately immobilized via capture probes linked to aminopropyltriethoxysilane, onto a glass optical fiber end-face transducer, thus producing a novel biosensor. Immobilized DNA nanorobots with a switchable flap can then be actuated by a specific target DNA present in a sample, by exposing a hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme, which then catalyzes the generation of chemiluminescence, once the specific fiber probes are immersed in a luminol-based solution. Integrating organic nanorobots to inorganic fiber optics creates a hybrid system that we demonstrate as a proof-of-principle can be utilized in specific DNA sequence detection. This system has potential applications in a wide range of fields, including point-of-care diagnostics or cellular in vivo biosensing when using ultrathin fiber optic probes for research purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hot Springs-Garrison Fiber Optic Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to upgrade its operational telecommunications system between the Hot Springs Substation and the Garrison Substation using a fiber optic system. The project would primarily involve installing 190 kilometers (120 miles) of fiber optic cable on existing transmission structures and installing new fiber optic equipment in BPA`s substation yards and control houses. BPA prepared an environmental assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed action. This EA was published in October 1994. The EA identifies a number of minor impacts that might occur as a result of the proposed action, as well as some recommended mitigation measures. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) identifies specific measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for impacts identified in the EA.

  16. Synopsis of fiber optics in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirich, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Fiber optic technology is making significant advances for use in a number of harsh environments, such as air and space platforms. Many of these applications involve integration into systems which make extensive use of optical fiber for high bandwidth signal transmission. The large signal transmission bandwidth of optical fiber has a large and positive impact on the overall performance and weight of the cable harness. There are many benefits of fiber optic systems for air and space harsh environment applications, including minimal electromagnetic interference and environmental effects, lightweight and smaller diameter cables, greater bandwidth, integrated prognostics and diagnostics and the ability to be easily upgraded. To qualify and use a fiber optic cable in space and air harsh environments requires treatment of the cable assembly as a system and understanding the design and behavior of its parts. Many parameters affect an optical fiber's ability to withstand a harsh temperature and radiation environment. The space radiation environment is dependent on orbital altitude, inclination and time, contains energetic magnetically-trapped electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt, trapped protons in the inner belt and solar event protons and ions. Both transient and permanent temperature and radiation have an attenuation effect on the performance of the cable fiber. This paper presents an overview of defining fiber optic system and component performance by identifying operating and storage environmental requirements, using appropriate standards to be used in fiber optic cable assembly manufacturing and integration, developing inspection methods and fixtures compliant with the selected standards and developing a fiber optic product process that assures compliance with each design requirement.

  17. Handbook of fiber optics theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Chai

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Yeh supplies a firm theoretical foundation in such topics as propagation of light through fibers, fiber fabrication, loss mechanisms, and dispersion properties. He then expands from this into such practical areas as fiber splicing, measuring loss in fibers, fiber-based communications networks, remote fiber sensors, and integrated optics. Whether involved in fiber optics research, design, or practical implementation of systems, this handbook will be extremely useful.Key Features* Here is a comprehensive, ""one-stop"" reference with state-of-the-art information on fiber optics Included is da

  18. Wideband electromagnetically coupled coaxial probe fed slot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The antenna structure is shown in figure 1. The upper parasitic layer is horizontal slot loaded rectangular patch and lower one is coaxial probe fed U-slot loaded patch. Due to presence of parasitic element in the stacked configuration, there are two resonant associated with two resonators. These two resonance frequencies ...

  19. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes an innovative fiber optic-based, multiplexable, highly ruggedized, integrated sensor system for real-time...

  20. [The recent development of fiber-optic chemical sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wei, Jian-ping; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Li-wei; Yang, Xue-feng

    2014-08-01

    The present article provides a brief review of recent research on fiber-optic chemical sensor technology and the future development trends. Especially, fiber-optic pH chemical sensor, fiber-optic ion chemicl sensor, and fiber-optic gas chemical sensor are introduced respectively. Sensing film preparation methods such as chemical bonding method and sol-gel method were briefly reviewed. The emergence of new type fiber-microstructured optical fiber opened up a new development direction for fiber-optic chemical sensor. Because of its large inner surface area, flexible design of structure, having internal sensing places in fibers, it has rapidly become an important development direction and research focus of the fiber-optic chemical sensors. The fiber-optic chemical sensor derived from microstructured optical fiber is also discussed in detail. Finally, we look to the future of the fiber-optic chemical sensor.

  1. Stress homogenization effect in multicore fiber optic bending sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla-Gonzalez, G; May-Arrioja, D A; Lopez-Cortes, D; Guzman-Sepulveda, J R

    2017-03-10

    In this work we study the particular case of an optical fiber subjected to compression-bending load, the most common loading configuration for testing fiber optic bending sensors. Our analysis is based on the foundations of column theory and reveals a progressive stress homogenization across the optical fiber with increasing bending. This effect is general to any optical fiber subjected to this load configuration and it is of particular interest for structures with multiple cores since the state of stress experienced by each core can significantly differ even for a condition of constant load. The approach outlined here captures relevant features observed in experiments with multicore fiber optic bending sensors. Also, this approach can be incorporated into coupled-mode theory for assessing the performance of spectrally operated fiber sensors based on multicore coupled structures under realistic conditions commonly encountered in the experiments and without the need of performing computationally expensive simulations. The progressive stress homogenization, as well as the regime of homogeneous stress dominated by the bending contribution, is experimentally demonstrated using a multicore optical fiber with three coupled cores. Our observations are similar to those reported in recent experiments using other multicore fibers with different number of cores.

  2. Fiber optic fluorescence microscopy for functional brain imaging in awake, mobile mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Paukert, Martin; Bergles, Dwight E.; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    Fiber-optic based optical imaging is an emerging technique for studying brain activity in live animals. Here, we introduce a novel fluorescence fiber-optic microendoscopy approach to minimal invasively detect neural activities in a live mouse brain . The system uses a flexible endoscopic probe composed of a multi-core coherent fiber-bundle terminated with an approximately 1500-micron working distance objective lens. The fiber-optic neural interface is mounted on a 4-mm2 cranial window enabling visualization of glial calcium transients from the same brain region for weeks. We evaluated the system performance through in vivo imaging of GCaMP3 fluorescence in transgenic headrestrained mice during locomotion.

  3. Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Bogert, Gail A.; Minford, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated three-waveguide directional coupler functions as polarizer and splitter. Designed with transverse electric (TE) polarization in bar state (two coupling lengths) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarization in cross state (one coupling length). Intended for eventual fabrication as in mass-producible integrated optical circuit that provides advantages including low drive voltage, large-bandwidth phase modulation, preservation of polarization in transmission between devices on same substrate, and low cost.

  4. Stabilizing Fiber-Optic Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutes, G. F.; Lau, K. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Voltage-controlled optical phase shifter is key. Optical phase shifter stabilizes propagation delay of fiber-optic transmission line by compensating for temperature and pressure effects. Applicable to phased array antenna systems and very-long-baseline interferometer distribution systems.

  5. Triboluminescent Fiber-Optic Sensors Measure Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Triboluminescence exploited in fiber-optic sensor system for measuring changes in pressures, strains, vibrations, and acoustic emissions, in structural members. Sensors embedded in members for in situ monitoring of condition of structure. System passive in sense no source of radiation required to interrogate optical fiber. Technique has potential for wide range of applications in which detection and measurement of structural stress required.

  6. Study of fiber optic sugar sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work, an intensity-modulated intrinsic fiber optic sugar sensor is presented. This type of sensor, with slight modification, can be used for on-line determination of the concentration of sugar content in sugarcane juice in sugar industry. In the present set-up, a plastic fiber made of polymethylmethacrylate is used.

  7. Study of fiber optic sugar sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work, an intensity-modulated intrinsic fiber optic sugar sensor is pre- sented. This type of sensor, with slight modification, can be used for on-line determination of the concentration of sugar content in sugarcane juice in sugar industry. In the present set-up, a plastic fiber made of polymethylmethacrylate is used.

  8. Achromatic optical diode in fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Berent, Michal; Vitanov, Nikolay V

    2013-01-01

    We propose a broadband optical diode, which is composed of one achromatic reciprocal quarter-wave plate and one non-reciprocal quarter-wave plate, both placed between two crossed polarizers. The presented design of achromatic wave plates relies on an adiabatic evolution of the Stokes vector, thus, the scheme is robust and efficient. The possible simple implementation using fiber optics is suggested.

  9. Standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.; Santbergen, R.; Tijssen, M.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented giving the response of three types of fiber-optic interferometers by which a standing wave through an object is investigated. The three types are a Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder and Michelson–Morley interferometer. The response of the Mach–Zehnder interferometer is similar to the Sagnac

  10. Fiber Optic Communications Technology. A Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Joseph A.

    Fiber optic communications (communications over very pure glass transmission channels of diameter comparable to a human hair) is an emerging technology which promises most improvements in communications capacity at reasonable cost. The fiber transmission system offers many desirable characteristics representing improvements over conventional…

  11. Career Directions--Fiber Optic Installer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber that is roughly the diameter of a human hair. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Each optical fiber is capable of carrying an enormous amount of…

  12. Cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We report on a theoretical and experimental study of cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics. We show that the usual energy-momentum conservation of Bragg scattering can be considerably relaxed via cascade-induced phase-matching. Experimentally we demonstrate frequency translation over six- and 11-fold cascades, in excellent agreement with derived phase-matching conditions.

  13. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass or...

  14. 46 CFR 111.60-6 - Fiber optic cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fiber optic cable. 111.60-6 Section 111.60-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-6 Fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic cable must— (a) Be...

  15. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd 2O 2S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  16. Biomedical, environmental, and industrial application of fiber optical infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Kolyakov, Sergei F.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Gummuluri, Satyashree

    2000-07-01

    An advanced infrared interferometric method using fiber optics has been developed for biomedical, environmental and industrial applications. The fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Fourier Transform Infrared (FEW-FTIR) spectroscopy method has been applied to diagnostics of numerous materials including living tissue without sample preparation. This highly sensitive diagnostics tool can conduct surface and subsurface analysis at the molecular level on such diverse materials as human tissue and body fluids, plants, soil, rocks, chemicals, oil, paper and polymers nondestructively, noninvasively in vivo. Operating in the attenuated total reflection regime in the middle-infrared range, the FEW-FTIR technique provides direct contact between the fiber probe and any surface. Our fiber optical spectroscopic device is compact, portable for any application and operates up to a distance of three meters with extremely low loss and nontoxic fibers. This method allows the detection of functional chemical groups and bonds directly from a surface by soft touching of a surface for 15 sec. Applications of this method include (1) early diagnostics of precancerous conditions and other diseases, (2) sun, laser radiation and the influence of other environmental factors (water, pollution and weather), (3) quality control during manufacturing processes, in process analysis.

  17. Impact of nonlinearities on fiber optic communications

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    This book covers the recent progress in fiber-optic communication systems with a main focus on the impact of fiber nonlinearities on system performance. There has been significant progress in coherent communication systems in the past few years due to the advances in digital signal processing techniques. This has led to renewed interest in fiber linear and nonlinear impairments as well as techniques to mitigate them in the electrical domain. In this book, the reader will find all the important topics of fiber optic communication systems in one place, with in-depth coverage by the experts of each sub-topic. Pioneers from each of the sub-topics have been invited to contribute. Each chapter will have a section on fundamentals as well as reviews of literature and of recent developments. Readers will benefit from this approach since many of the conference proceedings and journal articles mainly focus on the authors’ research, without spending space on preliminaries.

  18. Fiber optical sensors for aircraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechstedt, Ralf D.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper selected fiber optical point sensors that are of potential interest for deployment in aircraft are discussed. The operating principles together with recent measurement results are described. Examples include a high-temperature combined pressure and temperature sensor for engine health, hydraulics and landing gear monitoring, an ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor for oil, pneumatic and fluid aero systems applications and a combined acceleration and temperature sensor for condition monitoring of rotating components.

  19. Fabrication Of Fiber-Optic Waveguide Coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Willis; Nelson, Mark D.; Mclauchlan, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Technique for making four-port, single-mode fiber-optic waveguide couplers requires no critically-precise fabrication operations or open-loop processes. Waveguide couplers analogous to beam-splitter prisms. Essential in many applications that require coherent separation or combination of two waves; for example, for interferometric purposes. Components of optical waveguide coupler held by paraffin on microscope slide while remaining cladding of two optical fibers fused together by arc welding.

  20. Harsh-environment fiber optic sensors for structural monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Palmer, Matthew E.

    2004-07-01

    The objective of the work presented was to develop a suite of sensors for use in high-temperature aerospace environments, including turbine engine monitoring, hypersonic vehicle skin friction measurements, and support ground and flight test operations. A fiber optic sensor platform was used to construct the sensor suite. Successful laboratory demonstrations include calibration of a pressure sensor to 100psi at a gas temperature of 800°C, calibration of an accelerometer to 2.5g at a substrate temperature of 850°C. Temperature sensors have been field tested up to 1400°C, and a skin friction sensor designed for 870°C operation has been constructed. The key advancement that enabled the operation of these novel harsh environment sensors was a fiber optic packaging methodology that allowed the coupling of alumina and sapphire transducer components, optical fiber, and high-temperature alloy housing materials. The basic operation of the sensors and early experimental results are presented. Each of the sensors described here represent a quantifiable advancement in the state of the art in high-temperature physical sensors and will have a significant impact on the aerospace propulsion instrumentation industry.

  1. Distributed Fiber Optic Sensing of Earthquake Wavefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, N.; Dreger, D. S.; Wagner, A. M.; James, S. R.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic hazard strongly depends on local site response, which is rarely captured by even the densest seismometer arrays. Using laser-based Rayleigh scattering with fiber optic telecommunication cables, seismic wavefield information can be recorded as strain-rate at a meter-scale resolution over 10's of kilometers, a technique known as distributed acoustic sensing (DAS). Recent active and passive DAS experiments confirm trade-offs in directionality and sensitivity compared with standard seismic sensors, however the possibility of using inexpensive fiber optics and a single instrument to characterize and monitor entire earthquake-prone regions with field-scale accuracy could represent a complimentary new direction for array seismology, seismic hazard analysis, and earthquake early warning. We present earthquake observations recorded using two different trenched fiber optic cables: (1) a 200m L-shaped test array at the Richmond Field Station in Richmond, CA; and (2) a 4000 linear meter sparse grid array at the Permafrost Experiment Station in Fairbanks, Alaska. We compare wavefield observations made using DAS to broadband recordings collocated with the two arrays, as well as spatial variations in amplitude and signal duration across the DAS arrays. We then perform 2-D beamforming across the array to locate the events. We discuss the quality of the wavefield reconstruction, the uncertainty in the beamformed hypocenter location, and implications for site response characterization.

  2. Hybrid Piezoelectric/Fiber-Optic Sensor Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mark; Qing, Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid piezoelectric/fiber-optic (HyPFO) sensor sheets are undergoing development. They are intended for use in nondestructive evaluation and long-term monitoring of the integrity of diverse structures, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive, and large stationary ones. It is anticipated that the further development and subsequent commercialization of the HyPFO sensor systems will lead to economic benefits in the form of increased safety, reduction of life-cycle costs through real-time structural monitoring, increased structural reliability, reduction of maintenance costs, and increased readiness for service. The concept of a HyPFO sensor sheet is a generalization of the concept of a SMART Layer(TradeMark), which is a patented device that comprises a thin dielectric film containing an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric actuator/sensors. Such a device can be mounted on the surface of a metallic structure or embedded inside a composite-material structure during fabrication of the structure. There is has been substantial interest in incorporating sensors other than piezoelectric ones into SMART Layer(TradeMark) networks: in particular, because of the popularity of the use of fiber-optic sensors for monitoring the "health" of structures in recent years, it was decided to incorporate fiber-optic sensors, giving rise to the concept of HyPFO devices.

  3. Toward fluorescent probes for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhao; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2014-10-23

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), a superfamily of cell-surface receptors that are the targets of about 40% of prescription drugs on the market, can sense numerous critical extracellular signals. Recent breakthroughs in structural biology, especially in holo-form X-ray crystal structures, have contributed to our understanding of GPCR signaling. However, actions of GPCRs at the cellular and molecular level, interactions between GPCRs, and the role of protein dynamics in receptor activities still remain controversial. To overcome these dilemmas, fluorescent probes of GPCRs have been employed, which have advantages of in vivo safety and real-time monitoring. Various probes that depend on specific mechanisms and/or technologies have been used to study GPCRs. The present review focuses on surveying the design and applications of fluorescent probes for GPCRs that are derived from small molecules or using protein-labeling techniques, as well as discussing some design strategies for new probes.

  4. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-09-30

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 μm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  5. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Pospíšilová; Gabriela Kuncová; Josef Trögl

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 μm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in ...

  6. Using passive fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing to estimate soil water content at a discontinuous permafrost site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A. M.; Lindsey, N.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Gelvin, A.; Saari, S.; Ekblaw, I.; Ulrich, C.; Dou, S.; James, S. R.; Martin, E. R.; Freifeld, B. M.; Bjella, K.; Daley, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present preliminary results from an experimental study targeting the use of passive fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in a variety of geometries to estimate moisture content evolution in a dynamic permafrost system. A 4 km continuous 2D array of multi-component fiber optic cable (6 SM/6 MM) was buried at the Fairbanks Permafrost Experiment Station to investigate the possibility of using fiber optic distributed sensing as an early detection system for permafrost thaw. A heating experiment using 120 60 Watt heaters was conducted in a 140 m2 area to artificially thaw the topmost section of permafrost. The soils at the site are primarily silt but some disturbed areas include backfilled gravel to depths of approximately 1.0 m. Where permafrost exists, the depth to permafrost ranges from 1.5 to approximately 5 m. The experiment was also used to spatially estimate soil water content distribution throughout the fiber optic array. The horizontal fiber optic cable was buried at depths between 10 and 20 cm. Soil temperatures were monitored with a DTS system at 25 cm increments along the length of the fiber. At five locations, soil water content time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes were also installed at two depths, in line with the fiber optic cable and 15 to 25 cm below the cable. The moisture content along the fiber optic array was estimated using diurnal effects from the dual depth temperature measurements. In addition to the horizontally installed fiber optic cable, vertical lines of fiber optic cable were also installed inside and outside the heater plot to a depth of 10 m in small diameter (2 cm) boreholes. These arrays were installed in conjunction with thermistor strings and are used to monitor the thawing process and to cross correlate with soil temperatures at the depth of the TDR probes. Results will be presented from the initiation of the artificial thawing through subsequent freeze-up. A comparison of the DTS measured temperatures and

  7. Development and characterization of the integrated fiber-optic sensor for remote detection of alpha radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Hee; Moon, Joo Hyun; Seo, Bum Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we developed and characterized an integrated fiber-optic sensor for the remote detection of alpha radiation emitted from radioactive contamination in areas relatively inaccessible by radiation workers. The fiber-optic sensor consisted of an epoxy-resin supporter and a sensing probe attached to it. The epoxy-resin supporter to hold the optical fiber tightly was fabricated by using epoxy-resin and a small amount of hardener. The sensing probe was fabricated by mixing epoxy-resin with inorganic scintillator ZnS(Ag) powder and solidifying the mixture. Then, the sensing probe was attached to the epoxy-resin supporter. As a light guide, an optical fiber, which was also compatible with the epoxy-resin, was used. The optical fiber was submerged in the epoxyresin supporter before solidification to make it in an integral form to minimize the loss of scintillation light due to incomplete connections between them. The four assembled fiber-optic sensors with sensing probes whose density thicknesses of ZnS(Ag) were 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/cm2, respectively, were evaluated in terms of the total counts of alpha radiation to determine the optimum density thickness of ZnS(Ag). From the evaluation, a density thickness of 15 mg/cm2 was found to be the best for detecting alpha radiation.

  8. Investigation of residual core ellipticity induced nonreciprocity in air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zuchen; Zhang, Zhihao; Jin, Jing; Song, Ningfang

    2014-11-03

    Air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) is an excellent choice for fiber optic gyroscope owing to its incomparable adaptability of environment. Strong and continuous polarization mode coupling is found in PBFs with an average intensity of ~-30 dB, but the coupling arrives at the limit when the maximum optical path difference between the primary waves and the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves reaches ~10mm, which is corresponding to the PBF length of ~110 m according to the birefringence in the PBF. Incident light with the low extinction ratio (ER) can suppress the birth of the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves, but the low-ER light obtained by the conventional Lyot depolarizers does not work here. Consequently, a large nonreciprocity and a bias error of ~13°/h are caused in the air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope (PBFOG) with a PBF coil of ~268 m.

  9. Fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jan; Nedjalkov, Antonio; Doering, Alexander; Angelmahr, Martin; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Over the last years, battery safety becomes more and more important due to the wide spread of high-capacity lithium ion batteries applied in e.g. consumer electronics and electrical power storages for vehicles or stationary energy storage systems. However, for these types of batteries, malfunctions could be highly dangerous and all aspects of safety issues are not sufficiently considered, yet. Therefore, the improvement of the battery safety behavior is one of the most important issues discussed in actual research projects. In this paper the application of fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety is presented. The temperature is one of the most critical parameters indicating a failure of the cell, but even state-to-the-art battery management systems (BMS) are not able to monitor and interpret the distributed temperature field of a total battery storage system sufficiently. Furthermore, the volume expansion of the battery cell, which could be monitored by the strain on the cells' surfaces, is one additional parameter not considered up to now. Both parameters could be simultaneous monitored by fiber optical sensor arrays, consisting of discrete fiber Bragg grating (FBG) elements. The FBG sensors are directly attached on the surface of the cell, recording the temperature as well as the strain distribution highly accurate and close-meshed. Failures and malfunction such as overcharging, gassing, and thermal runaway can be early predicted and avoided to extend the battery lifetime and enhance the operational battery safety. Moreover, battery aging effects lead to variations in the volume change behavior which can be detected additionally. Hence, a battery fully equipped with fiber optical sensor arrays in combination with an appropriate BMS enables a safe and continuous utilization of the energy storage system even under harsh conditions like rapid charging.

  10. Fiber optic, Fabry-Perot high temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K.; Quick, B.

    1984-01-01

    A digital, fiber optic temperature sensor using a variable Fabry-Perot cavity as the sensor element was analyzed, designed, fabricated, and tested. The fiber transmitted cavity reflection spectra is dispersed then converted from an optical signal to electrical information by a charged coupled device (CCD). A microprocessor-based color demodulation system converts the wavelength information to temperature. This general sensor concept not only utilizes an all-optical means of parameter sensing and transmitting, but also exploits microprocessor technology for automated control, calibration, and enhanced performance. The complete temperature sensor system was evaluated in the laboratory. Results show that the Fabry-Perot temperature sensor has good resolution (0.5% of full seale), high accuracy, and potential high temperature ( 1000 C) applications.

  11. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS), in collaboration with North Carolina State University, successfully demonstrated a Fiber Bragg...

  12. A forty-year history of fiber optic smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric; Scheel, Ingrid U.

    2017-04-01

    In 1977 McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company began a project on using fiber optic sensors to support the Delta Rocket program. This resulted in a series of fiber sensors to support the measurement of rotation, acoustics, vibration, strain, and temperature for a variety of applications and early work on fiber optic smart structures. The work on fiber optic smart structures transitioned in part to Blue Road Research in 1993 and continued in 2006 to the present at Columbia Gorge Research. This paper summarizes some of the efforts made by these companies to implement fiber optic smart structures over this forty year period.

  13. Compact Fiber Optic Strain Sensors (cFOSS) Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong researchers are reducing the Fiber Optic Sensing Sysme (FOSS) technology’s size, power requirement, weight, and cost to effectively extend...

  14. Measuring Stream Dynamics with Fiber Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufillaro, Nicholas

    2008-05-01

    I'll review recent work using a fiber optic based distributed temperature system to gauge stream temperatures over a several kilometer reach with spatial resolution down to one meter, and temperature resolution to 0.1C. The system has been installed in the H. J. Andrews Long Term Ecological Research Site in southern Oregon to help gauge ground water/surface water fluxes, as well as the Walla Walla river to aid with fish habitat studies. The talk will describe how interdisciplinary work between applied physics and ecology can provide novel measurement solutions for ecologies and climates in flux.

  15. A compact fiber optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuanetti, Bryan; Wang, Tianxue; Prakash, Vikas

    2017-03-01

    While Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has become a common diagnostic tool for the measurement of normal component of particle motion in shock wave experiments, this technique has not yet been modified for the measurement of combined normal and transverse motion, as needed in oblique plate impact experiments. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation of a compact fiber-optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer. Like the standard PDV, this diagnostic tool is assembled using commercially available telecommunications hardware and uses a 1550 nm wavelength 2 W fiber-coupled laser, an optical focuser, and single mode fibers to transport light to and from the target. Two additional optical probes capture first-order beams diffracted from a reflective grating at the target free-surface and deliver the beams past circulators and a coupler where the signal is combined to form a beat frequency. The combined signal is then digitized and analyzed to determine the transverse component of the particle motion. The maximum normal velocity that can be measured by this system is limited by the equivalent transmission bandwidth (3.795 GHz) of the combined detector, amplifier, and digitizer and is estimated to be ˜2.9 km/s. Sample symmetric oblique plate-impact experiments are performed to demonstrate the capability of this diagnostic tool in the measurement of the combined normal and transverse displacement particle motion.

  16. A compact fiber optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuanetti, Bryan; Wang, Tianxue; Prakash, Vikas

    2017-03-01

    While Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has become a common diagnostic tool for the measurement of normal component of particle motion in shock wave experiments, this technique has not yet been modified for the measurement of combined normal and transverse motion, as needed in oblique plate impact experiments. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation of a compact fiber-optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer. Like the standard PDV, this diagnostic tool is assembled using commercially available telecommunications hardware and uses a 1550 nm wavelength 2 W fiber-coupled laser, an optical focuser, and single mode fibers to transport light to and from the target. Two additional optical probes capture first-order beams diffracted from a reflective grating at the target free-surface and deliver the beams past circulators and a coupler where the signal is combined to form a beat frequency. The combined signal is then digitized and analyzed to determine the transverse component of the particle motion. The maximum normal velocity that can be measured by this system is limited by the equivalent transmission bandwidth (3.795 GHz) of the combined detector, amplifier, and digitizer and is estimated to be ∼2.9 km/s. Sample symmetric oblique plate-impact experiments are performed to demonstrate the capability of this diagnostic tool in the measurement of the combined normal and transverse displacement particle motion.

  17. All fiber optics circular-state swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hermann; Kao, Meng-Chun; Lai, Chih-Ming; Huang, Jyun-Cin; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    A swept source (SS)-based circular-state (CS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) constructed entirely with polarization-maintaining fiber optics components is proposed with the experimental verification. By means of the proposed calibration scheme, bulk quarter-wave plates can be replaced by fiber optics polarization controllers to, therefore, realize an all-fiber optics CS SSPS-OCT. We also present a numerical dispersion compensation method, which can not only enhance the axial resolution, but also improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the images. We demonstrate that this compact and portable CS SSPS-OCT system with an accuracy comparable to bulk optics systems requires less stringent lens alignment and can possibly serve as a technology to realize PS-OCT instrument for clinical applications (e.g., endoscopy). The largest deviations in the phase retardation (PR) and fast-axis (FA) angle due to sample probe in the linear scanning and a rotation angle smaller than 65 deg were of the same order as those in stationary probe setups. The influence of fiber bending on the measured PR and FA is also investigated. The largest deviations of the PR were 3.5 deg and the measured FA change by ~12 to 21 deg. Finally, in vivo imaging of the human fingertip and nail was successfully demonstrated with a linear scanning probe.

  18. Fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy (45°x: 45°) for color analysis of dental composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Federighi, Veronica; Sykes, Ros; Lodi, Giovanni; Sardella, Andrea; Carrassi, Antonio; Varoni, Elena M

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the application of a fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) prototype probe for 45°x: 45° FORS for determining color of dental materials. A portable spectrophotometer with a highly manageable fiber optics co-axial probe was used to apply 45°x: 45° FORS for color matching in restorative dentistry. The color coordinates in CIELAB space of two dental shade guides and of the corresponding photopolymerized composites were collected and compared. The 45°x: 45° FORS with the co-axial probe (test system), the integrating sphere spectroscopy (reference system) and a commercial dental colorimeter (comparator system) were used to collect data and calculate color differences (ΔE and ΔE00). FORS system displayed high repeatability, reproducibility and accuracy. ΔE and ΔE00 values between the shade-guide, each other, and the corresponding composites resulted above the clinically acceptable limit. The 45°x: 45° FORS test system demonstrated suitable in vitro performance for dental composite color evaluation. 45°x: 45° fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy allows reliable color analysis of small surfaces of dental composites, favoring the color matching of material with the closely surrounding dental tissue, and confirming significant color differences between shade guide tabs and photo-polymerized composites.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis Of Evanescent Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyu; Christensen, Douglas A.; Brynda, E.; Andrade, Joseph D.; Ives, Jeffrey T.; Lin, Jinnan

    1989-06-01

    Evanescent fiber optic sensors are being developed for remote in situ immunoassay. The single reflection total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) geometry can serve as a well-defined model against which evanescent waveguide devices can be compared and evaluated. This paper addresses the problem of optimizing the sensitivity of an evanescent fiber optic sensor (EFOS). Two aspects are discussed: (1) the modes of exciting laser light in the fiber have an effect on the sensor efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio; (2) in a fiber biosensor, there is generally a protein layer attached to the core surface; the thickness of the layer is at least 5nm. If the refractive index of the protein layer can be made equal to the refractive index of the core, we can get a new fiber waveguide in which the core also contains the protein layer. The fluorescent emission sources are thus inside the core region and generate the highest signal collection efficiency. We also discuss the situation when the refractive index of the protein layer is larger or smaller than that of the optical fiber core.

  20. Grizzly Substation Fiber Optics : Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-02-01

    This notice announces BPA`s decision to construct, operate, and maintain the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project (Project). This Project is part of a continuing effort by BPA to complete a regionwide upgrade of its existing telecommunications system. The US Forest Service and BPA jointly prepared the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1241) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action, the Underground Installation Alternative, and the No Action Alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, the US Forest Service and BPA have determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI. The US Forest Service has separately issued a FONSI and Decision Notice authorizing BPA to construct, operate, and maintain the Project within the Crooked River National Grassland (Grassland).

  1. Fiber optic/cone penetrometer system for subsurface heavy metals detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saggese, S.; Greenwell, R. [Science & Engineering Associates, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an integrated fiber optic sensor/cone penetrometer system to analyze the heavy metals content of the subsurface. This site characterization tool will use an optical fiber cable assembly which delivers high power laser energy to vaporize and excite a sample in-situ and return the emission spectrum from the plasma produced for chemical analysis. The chemical analysis technique, often referred to as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), has recently shown to be an effective method for the quantitative analysis of contaminants soils. By integrating the fiber optic sensor with the cone penetrometer, we anticipate that the resultant system will enable in-situ, low cost, high resolution, real-time subsurface characterization of numerous heavy metal soil contaminants simultaneously. There are several challenges associated with the integration of the LIBS sensor and cone penetrometer. One challenge is to design an effective means of optically accessing the soil via the fiber probe in the penetrometer. A second challenge is to develop the fiber probe system such that the resultant emission signal is adequate for quantitative analysis. Laboratory techniques typically use free space delivery of the laser to the sample. The high laser powers used in the laboratory cannot be used with optical fibers, therefore, the effectiveness of the LIBS system at the laser powers acceptable to fiber delivery must be evaluated. The primary objectives for this project are: (1) Establish that a fiber optic LIBS technique can be used to detect heavy metals to the required concentration levels; (2) Design and fabricate a fiber optic probe for integration with the penetrometer system for the analysis of heavy metals in soil samples; (3) Design, fabricate, and test an integrated fiber/penetrometer system; (4) Fabricate a rugged, field deployable laser source and detection hardware system; and (6) Demonstrate the prototype in field deployments.

  2. Feasibility of soil moisture monitoring with heated fiber optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sayde, C.; Gregory, C.; Gil-Rodriguez, M.; Tufillaro, N.; Tyler, S.; Van de Giesen, N.C.; English, M.; Cuenca, R.; Selker, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate methods are needed to measure changing soil water content from meter to kilometer scales. Laboratory results demonstrate the feasibility of the heat pulse method implemented with fiber optic temperature sensing to obtain accurate distributed measurements of soil water content. A fiber optic

  3. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  4. Fiber Optics Deliver Real-Time Structural Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To alter the shape of aircraft wings during flight, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center worked on a fiber optic sensor system with Austin-based 4DSP LLC. The company has since commercialized a new fiber optic system for monitoring applications in health and medicine, oil and gas, and transportation, increasing company revenues by 60 percent.

  5. Fiber Optics Technician. Curriculum Research Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Herschel K.

    A study examined the role of technicians in the fiber optics industry and determined those elements that should be included in a comprehensive curriculum to prepare fiber optics technicians for employment in the Texas labor market. First the current literature, including the ERIC database and equipment manufacturers' journals were reviewed. After…

  6. Modelling of Extrinsic Fiber Optic Sagnac Ultrasound Interferometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasonic waves are used extensively in nondestructive testing both for characterization of material properties, in this paper, we describe a fiber optic sensor suitable for detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on an extrinsic fiber optic sagnac interferometer. The proposed sensor model can act as a conventional ...

  7. DIRECTIVITY PATTERN INVESTIGATION OF DUAL FIBER OPTIC HYDROPHONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Efimov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper provides comparison of theoretical and experimental research results of directivity pattern of dual fiber optic hydrophone at various acoustic frequencies. Application of multiple fiber optic transducers in fiber optic hydrophone design placed in sensitive arm of the interferometer gives the possibility for increasing the sensitivity of a fiber optic hydrophone without changing the fiber-optic transducers. In the simplest case, such fiber optic hydrophone can be built on the basis of two spatially separated acoustic transducers. However, this diversity inevitably leads to the directivity pattern unevenness of the fiber optic hydrophone at acoustic frequencies which wavelengths are commensurate with the size of the transducers system. Method. Mathematical model has been created and it became the base material for a theoretical study of two acoustic transducers system in Mathcad environment. Directivity pattern was described by a mathematical formula, depending on the frequency of the acoustic impact and the distance between sensors. To confirm the correctness of theoretical research of the directivity pattern, dual fiber optic hydrophone on Bragg gratings was produced and investigated experimentally. It consists of two consequently welded sensitive elements with a 9 cm distance between them. In trials carried out in open water conditions, fiber-optic hydrophone was placed on the rotator and rotated relative to the piezoceramic emitter for 360 degrees. During investigation, the signal from a fiber optic hydrophone has been recorded simultaneously with the rotation. Further, after the data processing in MATLAB, amplitude of the measured phase signal and the directivity pattern of the test sample were estimated. Amplitude estimation of the measured phase signal and directivity pattern creation of the sample was performed at frequencies equal to 1000, 3000 and 8000 Hz. Main Results. Sensitivity of the dual fiber optic

  8. Ultra-high Frequency Linear Fiber Optic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Kam

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth treatment of both linear fiber-optic systems and their key enabling devices. It presents a concise but rigorous treatment of the theory and practice of analog (linear) fiber-optics links and systems that constitute the foundation of Hybrid Fiber Coax infrastructure in present-day CATV distribution and cable modem Internet access. Emerging applications in remote fiber-optic feed for free-space millimeter wave enterprise campus networks are also described. Issues such as dispersion and interferometric noise are treated quantitatively, and means for mitigating them are explained. This broad but concise text will thus be invaluable not only to students of fiber-optics communication but also to practicing engineers. To the second edition of this book important new aspects of linear fiber-optic transmission technologies are added, such as high level system architectural issues, algorithms for deriving the optimal frequency assignment, directly modulated or externally modulated laser t...

  9. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musin, Frédéric; Mégret, Patrice; Wuilpart, Marc

    2016-07-28

    Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  10. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  11. Evaluation of the Detection Efficiency of LYSO Scintillator in the Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Hee Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate fiber-optic sensors for the remote detection of gamma rays in areas that are difficult to access, such as a spent fuel pool. The fiber-optic sensor consists of a light-generating probe, such as scintillators for radiation detection, plastic optical fibers, and light-measuring devices, such as PMT. The (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator was chosen as the light-generating probe. The (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator has higher scintillation efficiency than the others and transmits light well through an optical fiber because its refraction index is similar to the refractive index of the optical fiber. The fiber-optic radiation sensor using the (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator was evaluated in terms of the detection efficiency and reproducibility for examining its applicability as a radiation sensor.

  12. Fiber optic spectrophotometry for monitoring dissolved oxygen in a tropical ornamental fish tank environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; He, Duo-Min

    1999-05-01

    Using Fiber Optic Spectro-Photometry (FOSP) methodology, a set of high sensitivity fiber optic oxygen monitoring system performing NDT is developed for fish farming environment. The working principle of the sensor is based on the detection signal at a particular wavelength due to the fluorescence and quenching of coated dye (ruthenium complex) in response to oxygen concentration at the tip of the probe. This paper looks into the application of fiber optics oxygen sensor in an aquatic environment. A comparison study of the optical probe was made with a conventional electrochemical oxygen sensor. Both sensors were setup to monitor the dissolved oxygen of an aquatic system for a period of time. This new methodology offers an alternative choice for monitoring dissolved oxygen. Apart from the possibility to miniaturize the monitoring equipment for aquatic environment, it is also feasible to 'bundle' other chemical sensors together into one single cable, thus achieving compactness, effectiveness and yet without forgoing whatever the traditional electrochemical sensors could offer.

  13. Normal dispersion femtosecond fiber optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T N; Kieu, K; Maslov, A V; Miyawaki, M; Peyghambarian, N

    2013-09-15

    We propose and demonstrate a synchronously pumped fiber optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) operating in the normal dispersion regime. The FOPO generates chirped pulses at the output, allowing significant pulse energy scaling potential without pulse breaking. The output average power of the FOPO at 1600 nm was ∼60  mW (corresponding to 1.45 nJ pulse energy and ∼55% slope power conversion efficiency). The output pulses directly from the FOPO were highly chirped (∼3  ps duration), and they could be compressed outside of the cavity to 180 fs by using a standard optical fiber compressor. Detailed numerical simulation was also performed to understand the pulse evolution dynamics around the laser cavity. We believe that the proposed design concept is useful for scaling up the pulse energy in the FOPO using different pumping wavelengths.

  14. AGV guidance by fiber optic tactility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevich, Alexandar; Tso, Shiu K.; Zhu, H. Y.; Pjevalica, V.

    1999-11-01

    In order to increase the tactile sensing range and allow larger AGV speeds that result in larger vehicle stopping distances, the recently reported fiber-optic 'curvature gauges' sensitized to their geometric curvature are arranged in loops around the AGV. When the AGV is driven into other objects, these loops deform, resulting in the change of their curvature - which is registered. While many different types of bumpers and whiskers have been sued in the past for a similar purpose, the key difference here is that no intermediate mechanical elements are employed to either transfer the impact loads onto the sensitive element or provide compliance to it. Optical fibers themselves provide both functions simultaneously. As a result, tactility is achieved within a comparatively large range extending over 10 cm. Throughout this range, virtually no reaction forces are generated with the impacting body. The range mentioned is on top of the one provided by the more traditional elastic bumper the optical fibers are mounted on.

  15. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Moore, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in composite materials by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of composites with subsurface defects. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Methods and limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  16. Fiber Optic Thermal Detection of Composite Delaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of delaminations in composites by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. A single optical fiber with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors was bonded to the surface of a composite with subsurface defects. The investigated structure was a 10-ply composite specimen with prefabricated delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared and found to be consistent with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Also discussed are methods including various heating sources and patterns, and their limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring.

  17. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buis E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order of magnitude larger than what has presently been realized. With a large detection volume and a large number of hydrophones, there is a need for technology that is cheap and easy to deploy. Fiber optics provide a natural way for distributed sensing. In addition, a sensor has been designed and manufactured that can be produced cost-effectively on an industrial scale. Sensitivity measurements show that the sensor is able to reach the required sea-state zero level. For a proper interpretation of the expected bipolar signals, filtering techniques should be applied to remove the effects of the unwanted resonance peaks.

  18. Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing of Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwald, H.; Higgins, C. W.; Diebold, M.; Lehning, M.; Tyler, S. W.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2009-12-01

    Physical properties of seasonal and perennial snow covers can vary significantly on the order of a few meters with direct impact on snow dynamics, thermodynamics, temporal evolution, and ultimately on local snow water storage representing a challenge for measurement and modeling efforts. Detailed knowledge on small scale variability in snow internal temperature, density, and resulting subsurface heat fluxes is relatively limited, and pertinent snow cover internal data are also difficult to obtain. Uncertainty in the quantification of the components of the surface and snow internal energy budget is a consequence. From an experimental point of view, acquisition of distributed temperature data in the snow pack is non-trivial since accumulation, ablation, metamorphosis, etc., lead to continuous changes in the snow surface level. To provide better observational evidence of small scale variability and the associated snow physical processes we use fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS), a rapidly emerging technology in environmental sensing, which provides high resolution temperature measurements in space (1 meter) and time (a few minutes) with a resolution better than 0.1C over distances of several kilometers. Innovative experimental designs such as 2D transects and high resolution vertical temperature profiles using fiber optic cables were deployed and tested at high altitude sites in the Swiss Alps. The results of the experiments yield both expertise in the application of the novel measurement systems and new insight in snow pack thermodynamics such as 2D conductive heat fluxes. Also, wind pumping processes were investigated with a complimentary experimental system of synchronized high frequency measurements of atmospheric turbulence and barometric pressure fluctuations in the snow.

  19. From space qualified fiber optic gyroscope to generic fiber optic solutions available for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buret, Thomas; Ramecourt, David; Napolitano, Fabien

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this article is to present how the qualification of the Fiber Optic Gyroscope technology from IXSEA has been achieved through the qualification of a large range of optical devices and related manufacturing processes. These qualified optical devices and processes, that are now fully mastered by IXSEA through vertical integration of the technology, can be used for other space optical sensors. The example of the SWARM project will be discussed.

  20. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito E-mail: matsu3@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-21

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  1. Fiber optic sensors for measuring angular position and rotational speed. [air breathing engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two optical sensors, a 360 deg rotary encoder and a tachometer, were built for operation with the light source and detectors located remotely from the sensors. The source and detectors were coupled to the passive sensing heads through 3.65 meter fiber optic cables. The rotary encoder and tachometer were subjected to limited environmental testing. They were installed on an air breathing engine during recent altitude tests. Over 100 hours of engine operation were accumulated without any failure of either device.

  2. Development and Testing of a Post-Installable Deepwater Monitoring System Using Fiber-Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Calvin H.; Brower, David V.; Le, Suy Q.; Tang, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the design and development of a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing deepwater risers and flowlines; and provides a summary of test article fabrication and the subsequent laboratory testing performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC). A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the riser or flowline of interest. This work investigates the sensor coupling for pipelines that are suspended in a water column (from topside platform to seabed) using a fiber-optic sensor clamp and subsea bonding adhesive. The study involved the design, fabrication, and test of several prototype clamps that contained fiber-optic sensors. A mold was produced by NASA using 3-D printing methods that allowed the casting of polyurethane clamp test articles to accommodate 4-inch and 8-inch diameter pipes. The prototype clamps were installed with a subsea adhesive in a "wet" environment and then tested in the NASA Structures Test Laboratory (STL). The tension, compression, and bending test data showed that the prototype sensor clamps achieved good structural coupling, and could provide high quality strain measurement for active monitoring.

  3. Performance evaluation of fiber optic components in nuclear plant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, M.C.; Miller, D.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); James, R.W. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Over the past several years, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded several projects to evaluate the performance of commercially available fiber optic cables, connective devices, light sources, and light detectors under environmental conditions representative of normal and abnormal nuclear power plant operating conditions. Future projects are planned to evaluate commercially available fiber optic sensors and to install and evaluate performance of instrument loops comprised of fiber optic components in operating nuclear power plant applications. The objective of this research is to assess the viability of fiber optic components for replacement and upgrade of nuclear power plant instrument systems. Fiber optic instrument channels offer many potential advantages: commercial availability of parts and technical support, small physical size and weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference, relatively low power requirements, and high bandwidth capabilities. As existing nuclear power plants continue to replace and upgrade I&C systems, fiber optics will offer a low-cost alternative technology which also provides additional information processing capabilities. Results to date indicate that fiber optics are a viable technology for many nuclear applications, both inside and outside of containments. This work is funded and manage& under the Operations & Maintenance Cost Control research target of EPRI`s Nuclear Power Group. The work is being performed by faculty and students in the Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Departments and the staff of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory of the Ohio State University.

  4. Modulated-splitting-ratio fiber-optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Anthan, Donald J.; Rys, John R.; Fritsch, Klaus; Ruppe, Walter A.

    1988-01-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor is described, which uses a small silicon beamsplitter whose splitting ratio varies as a function of temperature. A four-beam technique is used to measure the sensor's temperature-indicating splitting ratio. This referencing method provides a measurement that is largely independent of the transmission properties of the sensor's optical fiber link. A significant advantage of this sensor, relative to other fiber-optic sensors, is its high stability, which permits the fiber-optic components to be readily substituted, thereby simplifying the sensor's installation and maintenance.

  5. Fiber optic sensor technology - An opportunity for smart aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, J. S.; Rogowski, R. S.; Claus, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide the opportunity for fabricating materials with internal sensors which can serve as lifetime health monitors, analogous to a central nervous system. The embedded fiber optic sensors can be interrogated by various techniques to measure internal strain, temperature, pressure, acoustic waves and other parameters indicative of structural integrity. Experiments have been conducted with composite samples with embedded sensors to measure strain using optical time domain reflectometry, modal interference and an optical phase locked loop. Fiber optic sensors have been developed to detect acoustic emission and impact damage and have been demonstrated for cure monitoring. These sensors have the potential for lifetime monitoring of structural properties, providing real time nondestructive evaluation.

  6. Vibration Performance Comparison Study on Current Fiber Optic Connector Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Thomes Jr., William J.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Chuska, Rick F.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are increasingly being used in harsh environments where they are subjected to vibration. Understanding the degradation in performance under these conditions is essential for integration of the fibers into the given application. System constraints oftentimes require fiber optic connectors so subsystems can be removed or assembled as needed. In the present work, various types of fiber optic connectors were monitored in-situ during vibration testing to examine the transient change in optical transmission and the steady-state variation following the event. Inspection of the fiber endfaces and connectors was performed at chosen intervals throughout the testing.

  7. Modulated-splitting-ratio fiber-optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Anthan, Donald J.; Rys, John R.; Fritsch, Klaus; Ruppe, Walter R.

    1989-06-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor is described that uses a small silicon beamsplitter whose splitting ratio varies as a function of temperature. A four-beam technique is used to measure the sensor's temperature-indicating splitting ratio. This referencing method provides a measurement that is largely independent of the transmission properties of the sensor's optical fiber link. A significant advantage of this sensor, relative to other fiber-optic sensors, is its high stability, which permits the fiber-optic components to be readily substituted, thereby simplifying the sensor's installation and maintenance.

  8. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  9. High Speed and High Spatial Density Parameter Measurement Using Fiber Optic Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Allen R. Jr. (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Inventor); Hamory, Philip J (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an improved fiber optic sensing system (FOSS) having the ability to provide both high spatial resolution and high frequency strain measurements. The inventive hybrid FOSS fiber combines sensors from high acquisition speed and low spatial resolution Wavelength-Division Multiplexing (WDM) systems and from low acquisition speed and high spatial resolution Optical Frequency Domain Reflection (OFDR) systems. Two unique light sources utilizing different wavelengths are coupled with the hybrid FOSS fiber to generate reflected data from both the WDM sensors and OFDR sensors operating on a single fiber optic cable without incurring interference from one another. The two data sets are then de-multiplexed for analysis, optionally with conventionally-available WDM and OFDR system analyzers.

  10. Analysis of the use of fiber optic technology for the monitoring heart rate of the pregnant and fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoma, Jan; Fajkus, Marcel; Martinek, Radek; Jargus, Jan; Zboril, Ondrej; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    This article describes an analysis of the use of fiber-optic technology in biomedical applications, specifically for the monitoring heart rate of the pregnant (mHR) and fetal (fHR). Authors focused on the use of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) and Fiber-Optic Interferometers (FOI). Thanks to the utilization of conventional method so-called cardiotocography (CTG), the mortality of newborn babies during delivery has decreased. Generally, among disadvantages of this method, there is a high sensitivity to noises caused by the movement of a mother, and it is connected with the frequent transfer of ultrasonic converters. This method is not suitable for a long-term continuous monitoring due to a possible influence of ultrasonic radiation on the fetus. Use of fiber-optic technology offers many advantages, for example, use measuring probes based FBG or FOI does not represent any additional radiation burden for the pregnant woman or fetus, fiber-optic measurement probes are resistant to technical artifacts such as electromagnetic interferences (EMI), thus they can be used in situations where it is impossible to use classic methods, e.g. examination by magnetic resonance (MR) or in case of delivery in water. The article describes the first experimental knowledge of based on real measurements.

  11. Novel fiber optic tip designs and devices for laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Thomas Clifton

    Fiber optic delivery of laser energy has been used for years in various types of surgical procedures in the human body. Optical energy provides several benefits over electrical or mechanical surgery, including the ability to selectively target specific tissue types while preserving others. Specialty fiber optic tips have also been introduced to further customize delivery of laser energy to the tissue. Recent evolution in lasers and miniaturization has opened up opportunities for many novel surgical techniques. Currently, ophthalmic surgeons use relatively invasive mechanical tools to dissect retinal deposits which occur in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. By using the tight focusing properties of microspheres combined with the short optical penetration depth of the Erbium:YAG laser and mid-IR fiber delivery, a precise laser scalpel can be constructed as an alternative, less invasive and more precise approach to this surgery. Chains of microspheres may allow for a self limiting ablation depth of approximately 10 microm based on the defocusing of paraxial rays. The microsphere laser scalpel may also be integrated with other surgical instruments to reduce the total number of handpieces for the surgeon. In current clinical laser lithotripsy procedures, poor input coupling of the Holmium:YAG laser energy frequently damages and requires discarding of the optical fiber. However, recent stone ablation studies with the Thulium fiber laser have provided comparable results to the Ho:YAG laser. The improved spatial beam profile of the Thulium fiber laser can also be efficiently coupled into a fiber approximately one third the diameter and reduces the risk of damaging the fiber input. For this reason, the trunk optical fiber minus the distal fiber tip can be preserved between procedures. The distal fiber tip, which degrades during stone ablation, could be made detachable and disposable. A novel, low-profile, twist-locking, detachable distal fiber tip interface was designed

  12. Design and Fabrication of Fiber-Optic Nanoprobes for Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the design and fabrication of fiber-optic nanoprobes developed for optical detection in single living cells. It is critical to fabricate probes with well-controlled nanoapertures for optimized spatial resolution and optical transmission. The detection sensitivity of fiber-optic nanoprobe depends mainly on the extremely small excitation volume that is determined by the aperture sizes and penetration depths. We investigate the angle dependence of the aperture in shadow evaporation of the metal coating onto the tip wall. It was found that nanoaperture diameters of approximately 50 nm can be achieved using a 25° tilt angle. On the other hand, the aperture size is sensitive to the subtle change of the metal evaporation angle and could be blocked by irregular metal grains. Through focused ion beam (FIB milling, optical nanoprobes with well-defined aperture size as small as 200 nm can be obtained. Finally, we illustrate the use of the nanoprobes by detecting a fluorescent species, benzo[a]pyrene tetrol (BPT, in single living cells. A quantitative estimation of the numbers of BPT molecules detected using fiber-optic nanoprobes for BPT solutions shows that the limit of detection was approximately 100 molecules.

  13. Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensor Suite for Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) for microspacecraft is a rapidly growing technology area for the use of fiber optics and MEMS. Morgan Research Corporation...

  14. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  15. Pulse Distortion in Saturated Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is experimentally compared for different chirped pulses in the picosecond regime. The amplified chirped pulses show distortion appearing as pedestals after recompression when the amplifier is operated in saturation....

  16. Fiber Optic Detection of Action Potentials in Axons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smela, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    In prior exploratory research, we had designed a fiber optic sensor utilizing a long period Bragg grating for the purpose of detecting action potentials in axons optically, through a change in index...

  17. Ultra-high Frequency Linear Fiber Optic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Kam Y

    2009-01-01

    Designed for a one-semester course on fiber-optics systems and communication links, this book provides a concise but rigorous treatment of the theory and practice of analog (linear) fiber-optics links and systems that constitute the foundation of Hybrid Fiber Coax infrastructure in present-day CATV distribution and cable modem Internet access. Emerging applications in remote fiber-optic feed for free-space millimeter wave enterprise campus networks are also described. Issues such as dispersion and interferometric noise are treated quantitatively, and means for mitigating them are explained. This broad but concise text will thus be invaluable not only to students of fiber-optics communication but also to practicing engineers.

  18. Fiber-Optic Sensing for In-Space Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Francisco; Richards, W. Lance; Piazza, Anthony; Parker, Allen R.; Hudson, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides examples of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Armstrong. Examples of current and previous work that support in-space inspection techniques and methodologies are highlighted.

  19. Fiber Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Incorporated proposes to develop a patent-pending fiber optic continuous liquid sensor for low-thrust level settled mass gauging with measurement...

  20. Fiber Optic Wing Shape Sensing on NASA's Ikhana UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This document discusses the development of fiber optic wing shape sensing on NASA's Ikhana vehicle. The Dryden Flight Research Center's Aerostructures Branch initiated fiber-optic instrumentation development efforts in the mid-1990s. Motivated by a failure to control wing dihedral resulting in a mishap with the Helios aircraft, new wing displacement techniques were developed. Research objectives for Ikhana included validating fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions; the validation of fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; assessing technical viability and, if applicable, developing methodology and approaches to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system; and, developing and flight validating approaches to perform active wing shape control using conventional control surfaces and active material concepts.

  1. Enabling technologies for fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Selwan K.; Farnan, Martin; Karabacak, Devrez M.; Singer, Johannes M.

    2016-04-01

    In order for fiber optic sensors to compete with electrical sensors, several critical parameters need to be addressed such as performance, cost, size, reliability, etc. Relying on technologies developed in different industrial sectors helps to achieve this goal in a more efficient and cost effective way. FAZ Technology has developed a tunable laser based optical interrogator based on technologies developed in the telecommunication sector and optical transducer/sensors based on components sourced from the automotive market. Combining Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology with the above, high speed, high precision, reliable quasi distributed optical sensing systems for temperature, pressure, acoustics, acceleration, etc. has been developed. Careful design needs to be considered to filter out any sources of measurement drifts/errors due to different effects e.g. polarization and birefringence, coating imperfections, sensor packaging etc. Also to achieve high speed and high performance optical sensing systems, combining and synchronizing multiple optical interrogators similar to what has been used with computer/processors to deliver super computing power is an attractive solution. This path can be achieved by using photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology which opens the doors to scaling up and delivering powerful optical sensing systems in an efficient and cost effective way.

  2. Fiber optic multiple blood gas analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Diane M.; Zimmerman, Donald E.; James, Kenneth A.; Quick, William H.

    1994-07-01

    Blood gas analysis has been shown to be the most critical factor in determining patient survivability in a trauma care environment. Present techniques of non-invasive measurement of blood gases in the trauma care unit such as optical pulse oximetry and transcutaneous electrodes are inadequate due to complexity and inaccuracy. The crux of the solution to this problem is the application of a recent, DOD/NASA developed micro-optic spectrophotometer to perform blood gas analysis via fiber optic transmission. The newly developed blood gas analyzer described here will not only overcome the aforementioned drawbacks but also be highly accurate, durable, and safe in hazardous environments: e.g., oxygen rich environments. This spectrophotometer is driven by a microprocessor based `Kalman filter' algorithm which not only controls the monitoring of all the patients in the care center but also separates the patient's superimposed blood gas spectra into its individual components to allow a number of gases critical for trauma care to be analyzed simultaneously.

  3. Fiber-Optic Strain Sensors With Linear Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    Fiber-optic modal domain strain sensors having linear characteristics over wide range of strains proposed. Conceived in effort to improve older fiber-optic strain sensors. Linearity obtained by appropriate choice of design parameters. Pattern of light and dark areas at output end of optical fiber produced by interference between electromagnetic modes in which laser beam propagates in fiber. Photodetector monitors intensity at one point in pattern.

  4. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Samla Gauri; Zurina Zainal Abidin; Mohd Firdaus Kamuri; Mohd Adzir Mahdi; Nurul Amziah Md. Yunus

    2017-01-01

    This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided b...

  5. More on thermal probes of a strongly coupled anisotropic plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnke, Viktor [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,05314-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Luna, Andrés; Patiño, Leonardo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,A.P. 50-542, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Trancanelli, Diego [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,05314-970 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-01-27

    We extend the analysis of arXiv:1211.2199, where the photon production rate of an anisotropic strongly coupled plasma with N{sub f}≪N{sub c} massless quarks was considered. We allow here for non-vanishing quark masses and study how these affect the spectral densities and conductivities. We also compute another important probe of the plasma, the dilepton production rate. We consider generic angles between the anisotropic direction and the photon and dilepton wave vectors, as well as arbitrary quark masses and arbitrary values of the anisotropy parameter. Generically, the anisotropy increases the production rate of both photons and dileptons, compared with an isotropic plasma at the same temperature.

  6. Intrastromal photorefractive keratectomy with a new optically coupled laser probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, J; Poirier, R H; Yee, R W; Tio, F O

    1992-01-01

    Intrastromal photorefractive keratectomy is a new procedure in which compact linear or area regions of the corneal stroma can be vacuolized, yielding changes in corneal curvature. Diffraction-limited 1064-nanometer light pulses from a high rep rate Q-switched Nd-YAG laser were coupled through novel means into a probe with index-matched optical contact with the cornea. The resulting extremely reduced focal region initiated a plasma point that was free of shock front effects where tissue was reduced to liquid. This probe process was applied to the corneas of eye-bank eyes, and to living rabbit and primate eyes. The refractive effects were evaluated with slit-lamp microscopy, keratoscopy light and electron microscopy. Refractive effects similar to refractive keratotomy were observed immediately after treatment. Intrastromal highly localized vacuolized regions were observed at the depth of focus with variability of only 20 microns. The plasma point vacuoles were about 100 microns in diameter. Stromal material that occupied the vacuole space appeared completely reduced to liquid. The transition region between vacuole and normal tissue was less than 0.5 microns. The treatment vacuoles disappeared to the unaided eye 24 to 48 hours after treatment. Corneal refractive power can be achieved with intrastromal keratectomy.

  7. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 2: Fiber optic technology and long distance networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The study projects until 2000 the evolution of long distance fiber optic networks in the U.S. Volume 1 is the Executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic components and systems that are directly related to the operation of long-haul networks. Optimistic, pessimistic and most likely scenarios of technology development are presented. The activities of national and regional companies implementing fiber long haul networks are also highlighted, along with an analysis of the market and regulatory forces affecting network evolution. Volume 3 presents advanced fiber optic network concept definitions. Inter-LATA traffic is quantified and forms the basis for the construction of 11-, 15-, 17-, and 23-node networks. Using the technology projections from Volume 2, a financial model identifies cost drivers and determines circuit mile costs between any two LATAs. A comparison of fiber optics with alternative transmission concludes the report.

  8. Smart design of fiber optic surfaces for improved plasmonic biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghir, Iulia; Delport, Filip; Spasic, Dragana; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2015-09-25

    Although the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is known for more than a century now, traditional prism-based SPR platforms have hardly escaped the research laboratories despite being recognized for the sensitive and specific performance. Significant efforts have been made over the last years to overcome their existing limitations by coupling the SPR phenomenon to the fiber optic (FO) technology. While this platform has been promoted as cost-effective and simpler alternative capable of handling label-free bioassays, quantification and real-time monitoring of biomolecular interactions, examples of its applicability in sensing and biosensing remain to date very limited. The FO-SPR system is still in development and requires further advancements for reaching the stability and sensitivity of the benchmark SPR systems. Among existing strategies for device improvement, those based on modifying the FO tips using nanomaterials are mostly studied. These small-scale objects provide a wide range of possibilities for alternating the architecture of the FO sensitive zone, enabling also unique effects such as localized SPR (LSPR). This mini-review summarizes the latest innovations in the fabrication procedures which use nanoparticles or other nanomaterials, aiming at FO-SPR technology performance improvements, as well as addition of new device features and functionalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fiber optically coupled radioluminescence detectors: A short review of key strengths and weaknesses of BCF-60 and Al2O3:C scintillating-material based systems in radiotherapy dosimetry applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buranurak, Siritorn; Andersen, Claus E.

    2017-01-01

    time resolution. In particular, the all-optical nature of these detectors is an advantage for in vivo measurements due to the absence of high voltage supply or electrical wire that could cause harm to the patient or disturb the treatment. Basically, fiber-coupled luminescence detector systems function...

  10. State of the art in high-temperature fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Palmer, Matthew E.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the work presented was to develop a suite of sensors for use in high-temperature aerospace environments, including turbine engine monitoring, hypersonic vehicle skin friction measurements, and support ground and flight test operations. A fiber optic sensor platform was used to construct the sensor suite. Successful laboratory demonstrations include calibration of pressure sensors to 500psi at a gas temperature of 800°C. Additionally, pressure sensors were demonstrated at 800°C in combination with a high-speed (1.0MHz) fiber optic readout system enabling previously unobtainable dynamic measurements at high-temperatures. Temperature sensors have been field tested up to 1400°C and as low as -195°C. The key advancement that enabled the operation of these novel harsh environment sensors was a fiber optic packaging methodology that allowed the coupling of alumina and sapphire transducer components, optical fiber, and high-temperature alloy housing materials. The basic operation of the sensors and early experimental results are presented. Each of the sensors described here represent a quantifiable advancement in the state of the art in high-temperature physical sensors and will have a significant impact on the aerospace propulsion instrumentation industry.

  11. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Human Skin Using a Commercial Fiber Optic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencio, J. A. Delgado; Rodríguez, M. Cunill; Montiel, S. Vázquez y.; Gutiérrez, J. L.; Martínez, F.; Gutiérrez, B.; Orozco, E.; Castro, Jorge; Rodríguez, A. Cornejo

    2008-08-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a reliable and easy to implement technique in human tissue characterization. In this work we evaluate the performance of the commercial USB4000 miniature fiber optic spectrometer in the in-vivo measurement of the diffuse reflectance spectra of different healthy skin sites and lesions in a population of 54 volunteers. Results show, that this spectrometer reproduces well the typical signatures of skin spectra over the 400-1000 nm region. Remarkable spectral differences exist between lesions and normal surrounding skin. A diffusion-based model was used to simulate reflectance spectra collected by the optical probe of the system.

  12. An All-Fiber-Optic Combined System of Noncontact Photoacoustic Tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghyun Eom

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose an all-fiber-based dual-modal imaging system that combines noncontact photoacoustic tomography (PAT and optical coherence tomography (OCT. The PAT remotely measures photoacoustic (PA signals with a 1550-nm laser on the surface of a sample by utilizing a fiber interferometer as an ultrasound detector. The fiber-based OCT, employing a swept-source laser centered at 1310 nm, shares the sample arm of the PAT system. The fiber-optic probe for the combined system was homemade with a lensed single-mode fiber (SMF and a large-core multimode fiber (MMF. The compact and robust common probe is capable of obtaining both the PA and the OCT signals at the same position without any physical contact. Additionally, the MMF of the probe delivers the short pulses of a Nd:YAG laser to efficiently excite the PA signals. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed dual-modal system with a phantom made of a fishing line and a black polyethylene terephthalate fiber in a tissue mimicking solution. The all-fiber-optic system, capable of providing complementary information about absorption and scattering, has a promising potential in minimally invasive and endoscopic imaging.

  13. Qualification of Fiber Optic Cables for Martian Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Lindensmith, Christian A.; Roberts, William T.; Rainen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Means have been developed for enabling fiber optic cables of the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometer instrument to survive ground operations plus the nominal 670 Martian conditions that include Martian summer and winter seasons. The purpose of this development was to validate the use of the rover external fiber optic cabling of ChemCam for space applications under the extreme thermal environments to be encountered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Flight-representative fiber optic cables were subjected to extreme temperature thermal cycling of the same diurnal depth (or delta T) as expected in flight, but for three times the expected number of in-flight thermal cycles. The survivability of fiber optic cables was tested for 600 cumulative thermal cycles from -130 to +15 C to cover the winter season, and another 1,410 cumulative cycles from -105 to +40 C to cover the summer season. This test satisfies the required 3 times the design margin that is a total of 2,010 thermal cycles (670 x 3). This development test included functional optical transmission tests during the course of the test. Transmission of the fiber optic cables was performed prior to and after 1,288 thermal cycles and 2,010 thermal cycles. No significant changes in transmission were observed on either of the two representative fiber cables subject through the 3X MSL mission life that is 2,010 thermal cycles.

  14. Development of a 1 x N Fiber Optic Sensor Array for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repasky, Kevin [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2014-02-01

    A fiber sensor array for sub-surface CO2 concentrations measurements was developed for monitoring geologic carbon sequestration sites. The fiber sensor array uses a single temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating with a nominal wavelength of 2.004 μm. Light from this DFB laser is direct to one of the 4 probes via an in-line 1 x 4 fiber optic switch. Each of the 4 probes are buried and allow the sub-surface CO2 to enter the probe through Millipore filters that allow the soil gas to enter the probe but keeps out the soil and water. Light from the DFB laser interacts with the CO2 before it is directed back through the in-line fiber optic switch. The DFB laser is tuned across two CO2 absorption features where a transmission measurement is made allowing the CO2 concentration to be retrieved. The fiber optic switch then directs the light to the next probe where this process is repeated allowing sub-surface CO2 concentration measurements at each of the probes to be made as a function of time. The fiber sensor array was deployed for fifty-eight days beginning June 19, 2012 at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site where sub-surface CO2 concentrations were monitored. Background measurements indicate the fiber sensor array can monitor background levels as low as 1,000 parts per million (ppm). A thirty four day sub-surface release of 0.15 tones CO2/day began on July 10, 2012. The elevated subsurface CO2 concentration was easily detected by each of the four probes with values ranging to over 60,000 ppm, a factor of greater than 6 higher than background measurements. The fiber sensor array was also deploy at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) site in north-central Montana between July 9th and August 7th, 2013 where background measurements were made in a remote sequestration site with minimal infrastructure. The project

  15. Chemometrics-enhanced fiber optic Raman detection, discrimination and quantification of chemical agents simulants concealed in commercial bottles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly J. Galan-Freyle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemometric techniques such as partial least squares combined with discriminant analysis (PLS–DA and artificial neural networks (ANN analysis were used to enhance the detection, discrimination and quantification of chemical warfare agents simulants. Triethyl phosphate (TEP mixed with commercial products in their original containers was analyzed through the container walls using fiber-optic-coupled Raman spectroscopy. Experiments were performed by employing a custom built optical fiber probe operating at 488 nm. Detection was accomplished using mixtures of the contents of the commercial bottles and water. The bottle materials included green plastic, green glass, clear plastic, clear glass, amber glass and white plastic. To account for the low scattering-peak intensities of some bottle materials, integration times were increased. Short integration times provided no information for amber glass and white plastic. The limits of detection were on the order of 1–5%, depending on bottle materials and contents. Good discrimination was achieved with PLS–DA when models were generated from a dataset originating from the same type of bottle material. ANN performed better when large sets of data were used, discriminating TEP from bottle materials and contents, as well as accurately classifying over 90% of the data.

  16. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samla Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided by UV spectrophotometer and also theoretical calculation by Beer-Lambert Absorption Law. The entire detection can be done in less than 10 minutes using a total volume of 3 μL only. This result promises good potential of this fiber optic microchannel sensor as a reliable, portable, and disposable sensor.

  17. Fundamental concepts of integrated and fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Margaret L.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter discusses fiber optic and integrated optic sensor concepts. Unfortunately, there is no standard method to categorize these sensor concepts. Here, fiber optic and integrated optic sensor concepts will be categorized by the primary modulation technique. These modulation techniques have been classified as: intensity, phase, wavelength, polarization, and time/frequency modulation. All modulate the output light with respect to changes in the physical or chemical property to be measured. Each primary modulation technique is then divided into fiber optic and integrated optic sections which are treated independently. For each sensor concept, possible sensor applications are discussed. The sensors and references discussed are not exhaustive, but sufficient to give the reader an overview of sensor concepts developed to date. Sensor multiplexing techniques such as wavelength division, time division, and frequency division will not be discussed as they are beyond the scope of this report.

  18. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered.

  19. Laser Brazing metallic embedding technique for fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandal, Tania; Fraga, Sergio; Castro, Gemma; Vazquez, Esteban; Zornoza, Ander

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a fiber optic metallic embedding technique is presented based on laser Brazing manufacturing process. The embedding strategy to follow by the laser Brazing, which consists in three steps, minimizes the thermal stress of the embedded fiber, relaxes microbending strains and reduces damage on the fiber. The minimum embedded fiber optic Ni coating total diameter is 237 μm for a successful process with negligible optical loss on the fiber. Fiber Bragg Gratings were successfully embedded in metallic specimens and their strain response was in accordance with their specifications.

  20. Short-pulse propagation in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina

    Fiber optical parametric amplifiers (FOPAs) are attractive because they can provide large gain over a broad range of central wavelengths, depending only on the availability of a suitable pump laser. In addition, FOPAs are suitable for the realization of all-optical signal processing functionalities...... is implemented to obtain an all-fiber system. The advantages of all fiber-systems are related to their reliability, long-term stability and compactness. Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is promising for the amplification of such signals thanks to the inherent compatibility of FOPAs with fiber...

  1. Chip scale package fiber optic transceiver integration for harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Chuck; Kuznia, Charles

    2017-11-01

    We present fiber optic technology for 850 nm, VCSEL-based embedded optical computing solutions. We introduce concepts for compact, rugged fiber optic transceivers that provide multi-channel operation at 12.5 Gbps per channel. The transceiver can be placed in close proximity to high performance ASICs to provide direct optical I/O between components. The transceiver is packaged with material having match coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE), and expanded beam optical interface - these features offer survivability and operation over wide temperature ranges.

  2. Fiber Optic Cable Thermal Preparation to Ensure Stable Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoames Jr, William J.; Chuska, Rick F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are widely used in modern systems that must provide stable operation during exposure to changing environmental conditions. For example, a fiber optic cable on a satellite may have to reliably function over a temperature range of -50 C up to 125 C. While the system requirements for a particular application will dictate the exact method by which the fibers should be prepared, this work will examine multiple ruggedized fibers prepared in different fashions and subjected to thermal qualification testing. The data show that if properly conditioned the fiber cables can provide stable operation, but if done incorrectly, they will have large fluctuations in transmission.

  3. The silver layers in fiber-optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listewnik, Paulina; Aydoǧan, Melike; Majchrowicz, Daria; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata

    2017-12-01

    In this paper a method of deposition of the silver layers on the surface of an optical fiber was proposed. The optical properties and surface quality of the silver layer was examined by optical microscopy. The reflection and transmission of the sample were investigated. To investigate the quality the silver mirror it was placed in a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer and the quality of the spectra was analyzed. The commercial mirror was used as a reference reflective layer. Our studies confirm that the silver layer obtained in laboratory can be used for the application in the fiber-optic sensor and it is just as good as commercial mirror.

  4. High-temperature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenhui; Jiang, Yi; Gao, Ran; Liu, Yuewu

    2015-05-01

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based high-temperature fiber-optic sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor head is a Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured with a short section of endless single-mode photonic crystal fiber (ESM PCF). The interferometric spectrum of the Fabry-Perot interferometer is collected by a charge coupled device linear array based micro spectrometer. A high-resolution demodulation algorithm is used to interrogate the peak wavelengths. Experimental results show that the temperature range of 1200 °C and the temperature resolution of 1 °C are achieved.

  5. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    interaction between the sensing material and fossil fuel gas results in a refractive index change and optical absorption in the sensing layer. This induces mode coupling strength and boundary conditions changes and thereby shifts the central wavelengths of the guiding mode and cladding modes propagation. GE's experiments demonstrated that such an interaction between the fossil fuel gas and sensing material not only shifts the central wavelengths of the guide mode and cladding modes propagation, but also alters their power loss characteristics. The integrated fiber gas sensing system includes multiple fiber gas sensors, fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensors, fiber optical interrogator, and signal processing software.

  6. Fiber optic microneedles for transdermal light delivery: ex vivo porcine skin penetration experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Hood, Robert L; Chen, Ye; Xu, Yong; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G

    2010-09-01

    Shallow light penetration in tissue has been a technical barrier to the development of light-based methods for in vivo diagnosis and treatment of epithelial carcinomas. This problem can potentially be solved by utilizing minimally invasive probes to deliver light directly to target areas. To develop this solution, fiber optic microneedles capable of delivering light for either imaging or therapy were manufactured by tapering step-index silica-based optical fibers employing a melt-drawing process. Some of the microneedles were manufactured to have sharper tips by changing the heat source during the melt-drawing process. All of the microneedles were individually inserted into ex vivo pig skin samples to demonstrate the feasibility of their application in human tissues. The force on each microneedle was measured during insertion in order to determine the effects of sharper tips on the peak force and the steadiness of the increase in force. Skin penetration experiments showed that sharp fiber optic microneedles that are 3 mm long penetrate through 2 mm of ex vivo pig skin specimens. These sharp microneedles had a minimum average diameter of 73 mum and a maximum tip diameter of 8 mum. Flat microneedles, which had larger tip diameters, required a minimum average diameter of 125 mum in order to penetrate through pig skin samples. Force versus displacement plots showed that a sharp tip on a fiber optic microneedle decreased the skin's resistance during insertion. Also, the force acting on a sharp microneedle increased more steadily compared with a microneedle with a flat tip. However, many of the sharp microneedles sustained damage during skin penetration. Two designs that did not accrue damage were identified and will provide a basis of more robust microneedles. Developing resilient microneedles with smaller diameters will lead to transformative, novel modes of transdermal imaging and treatment that are less invasive and less painful for the patient.

  7. Qualification and Lessons Learned with Space Flight Fiber Optic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    This presentation covers lessons learned during the design, development, manufacturing and qualification of space flight fiber optic components. Changes at NASA, including short-term projects and decreased budgets have brought about changes to vendors and parts. Most photonics for NASA needs are now commercial off the shelf (COTS) products. The COTS Tecnology Assurance approach for space flight and qualification plans are outlined.

  8. Gain characteristics of a saturated fiber optic parametric amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2008-01-01

    In this work we discuss saturation performance of a fiber optic parametric amplifier. A simple numerical model is described and applied to specific cases. A system experiment using a saturated amplifier illustrates a 4 dB improvement in required signal to noise ratio for a fixed bit error ratio....

  9. Utilization of Infrared Fiber Optic in the Automotive Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optics are finding a place in the automotive industry. Illumination is the primary application today. Soon, however, fiber optics will be used for data communications and sensing applications. Silica fiber optics and plastic fibers are sufficient for illumination and communication applications however, sensing applications involving high temperature measurement and remote gas analysis would benefit from the use of infrared fiber optics. Chalcogonide and heavy metal fluoride glass optical fibers are two good candidates for these applications. Heavy metal fluoride optical fibers are being investigated by NASA for applications requiring transmission in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Zirconium-Barium-Lanthanum-Aluminum-Sodium-Fluoride (ZBLAN) is one such material which has been investigated. This material has a theoretical attenuation coefficient 100 times lower than that of silica and transmits into the mid-IR. However, the measured attenuation coefficient is higher than silica due to impurities and crystallization. Impurities can be taken care of by utilizing cleaner experimental protocol. It has been found that crystallization can be suppressed by processing in reduced gravity. Fibers processed in reduced gravity on the KC135 reduced gravity aircraft were found to be free of crystals while those processed on the ground were found to have crystals. These results will be presented along with plans for producing continuous lengths of ZBLAN optical fiber on board the International Space Station.

  10. Design of Fiber Optic Sensors for Measuring Hydrodynamic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Quiett, Carramah; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The science of optical hydrodynamics involves relating the optical properties to the fluid dynamic properties of a hydrodynamic system. Fiber-optic sensors are being designed for measuring the hydrodynamic parameters of various systems. As a flowing fluid makes an encounter with a flat surface, it forms a boundary layer near this surface. The region between the boundary layer and the flat plate contains information about parameters such as viscosity, compressibility, pressure, density, and velocity. An analytical model has been developed for examining the hydrodynamic parameters near the surface of a fiber-optic sensor. An analysis of the conservation of momentum, the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible flow were used to develop expressions for the velocity and the density as a function of the distance along the flow and above the surface. When examining the flow near the surface, these expressions are used to estimate the sensitivity required to perform direct optical measurements and to derive the shear force for indirect optical measurements. The derivation of this result permits the incorporation of better design parameters for other fiber-based sensors. Future work includes analyzing the optical parametric designs of fiber-optic sensors, modeling sensors to utilize the parameters for hydrodynamics and applying different mixtures of hydrodynamic flow. Finally, the fabrication of fiber-optic sensors for hydrodynamic flow applications of the type described in this presentation could enhance aerospace, submarine, and medical technology.

  11. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications. PMID:27472334

  12. Application of fiber optic interferometers for Cook-off measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.; Meer, B.J. van der

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometer comprising of a Sagnac interferometer and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was developed. The interferometer enabled detection of explosive subtonic expansion velocities during the Cook-off test. The system enabled a comparison between the results of the two interferometer

  13. Fiber optic sensors at the Universidade Federal Fluminense (Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Edmundo A.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.; Guedes Valente, Luiz C.

    1990-02-01

    In this paper is presented the research work in Fiber Optic Sensors currently being developed at the Departamento de Engenharia de Telecomunicaaes of Universidade Federal Fluminense(TET-UFF) jointly with the Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletri-ca(CEPEL). It is given particular emphasis to the present state of development of the temperature, vibration and electrical current sensors.

  14. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  15. Silicon-Etalon Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus; Flatico, Joseph M.; Azar, Massood Tabib

    1993-01-01

    Developmental temperature sensor consists of silicon Fabry-Perot etalon attached to end of optical fiber. Features immunity to electrical interference, small size, light weight, safety, and chemical inertness. Output encoded in ration of intensities at two different wavelengths, rather than in overall intensity, with result that temperature readings not degraded much by changes in transmittance of fiber-optic link.

  16. Variable configuration fiber optic laser doppler vibrometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Roman, Julio E.; Jackson, David A.; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    A multichannel heterodyne fiber optic vibrometer is demonstrated which can be operated at ranges in excess of 50 m. The system is designed to measure periodic signals, impacts, rotation, 3D strain, and vibration mapping. The displacement resolution of each channel exceeds 1 nm. The outputs from all channels are simultaneous, and the number of channels can be increased by using optical switches.

  17. Feasibility of soil moisture monitoring with heated fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayde, Chadi; Gregory, Christopher; Gil-Rodriguez, Maria; Tufillaro, Nick; Tyler, Scott; van de Giesen, Nick; English, Marshall; Cuenca, Richard; Selker, John S.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate methods are needed to measure changing soil water content from meter to kilometer scales. Laboratory results demonstrate the feasibility of the heat pulse method implemented with fiber optic temperature sensing to obtain accurate distributed measurements of soil water content. A fiber optic cable with an electrically conductive armoring was buried in variably saturated sand and heated via electrical resistance to create thermal pulses monitored by observing the distributed Raman backscatter. A new and simple interpretation of heat data that takes advantage of the characteristics of fiber optic temperature measurements is presented. The accuracy of the soil water content measurements varied approximately linearly with water content. At volumetric moisture content of 0.05 m3/m3 the standard deviation of the readings was 0.001 m3/m3, and at 0.41 m3/m3 volumetric moisture content the standard deviation was 0.046 m3/m3. This uncertainty could be further reduced by averaging several heat pulse interrogations and through use of a higher-performance fiber optic sensing system.

  18. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  19. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  20. Fluorescence based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito-Peña, Elena [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Valdés, Mayra Granda [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of La Habana, 10400 La Habana (Cuba); Glahn-Martínez, Bettina [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Moreno-Bondi, Maria C., E-mail: mcmbondi@quim.ucm.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-02

    The application of optical biosensors, specifically those that use optical fibers and planar waveguides, has escalated throughout the years in many fields, including environmental analysis, food safety and clinical diagnosis. Fluorescence is, without doubt, the most popular transducer signal used in these devices because of its higher selectivity and sensitivity, but most of all due to its wide versatility. This paper focuses on the working principles and configurations of fluorescence-based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors and will review biological recognition elements, sensing schemes, as well as some major and recent applications, published in the last ten years. The main goal is to provide the reader a general overview of a field that requires the joint collaboration of researchers of many different areas, including chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, and material science. - Highlights: • Principles, configurations and fluorescence techniques using fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors are discussed. • The biorecognition elements and sensing schemes used in fiber optic and planar waveguide platforms are reviewed. • Some major and recent applications of fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors are introduced.

  1. Processing of optical combs with fiber optic parametric amplifiers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, Radan; Kakande, J.; Richardson, D.J.; Petropoulos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 9 (2012), s. 10059-10070 ISSN 1094-4087 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Fiber-optic parametric amplifier * Phase sensitive * Spectral coverage Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.546, year: 2012

  2. Unidirectional Manchester Encoded Data Transfer via a Fiber Optic Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    The subject of this thesis is the application of Manchester coding techniques to digital data transfer . Asynchronous receipt of digital data for...necessary hardware to allow Manchester encoded data transfer over a fiber optic data link. The scope of the project was limited to the transfer of byte

  3. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  4. Kansas Communication and Instruction System through Fiber-Optic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    Schools and communities will restructure as they move into the next decade. The success of this restructuring will be dependent upon access to and sharing of quality teaching and information through an expanded communication system. One of the major two-way interactive technologies is the fiber-optic cable: a delivery system that will provide…

  5. Fiber optic signal collection system for primary flight control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Sandy L.

    1994-10-01

    The FOPMN is a fiber-optic signal collection system for primary flight control applications. An avionics bay protected electro-optic interface unit transmits light down fiber optic cable to an optical sensor housed in the harsh environment of a hydraulic actuator. The interface unit also receives the sensor's reflected pattern and calculates independent positions from the multiplexed signals. This paper discusses the FOPMN method for fiber-optically sensing and multiplexing two channels of position of a TEF actuator's main ram cylinder. Currently installed in NASA Dryden's SRA F/A-18, the FOPMN has accumulated approximately 15 hours of flight time. A performance comparison is made between the FOPMN positions and the flight control computer's feedback mechanism (the actuator LVDTs). Included is a discussion of some of the lessons learned as a result of testing the FOPMN in the lab and in flight. The FOPMN is well on its way to proving itself as a robust fiber optic system with the ability to multiplex numerous optical sensors for primary flight control. The success of the FOPMN leads to the second phase of the project--optical loop closure. Our goal for this phase is to have four FOPMN sensor channels on the main ram and/or the main control valve of the actuator to serve as the quad redundant feedback mechanism for flight control.

  6. Programme Code for Projecting of WDM Fiber Optic Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Probstner

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Wavelength division multiplex (WDM offers a potentially powerful technique for use within optical fibre sensor systems. The paper deals with short description of methodology and a programme code for WDM fiber optic sensor system projecting with use of CAD.

  7. Dual type fiber-optic radiation sensor for measuring alpha and beta particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Song, Young Beom; Kim, Mingeon; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoo, Wook Jae; Jang, Kyoung Won; Lee, Bongsoo

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we fabricated a dual type fiber-optic radiation sensor (DFORS) system using a spectroscopic technique to measure alpha and beta particles simultaneously and separately. The DFORS is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF), a photomultiplier tube (PMT)-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA). As sensing probes, a ZnS(Ag) film and CaF2(Eu) crystal were used for alpha and beta spectroscopy. And, we measured the alpha and beta energy spectra using the proposed DFORS system to discriminate species of the radioisotopes emitting alpha or beta particle. From the experimental results, we demonstrated that the small-sized, flexible, and insertable DFORS system can measure and discriminate the alpha and beta successfully with the spectral information of each radioisotope.

  8. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  9. 78 FR 17187 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation, a revocable, nonassignable, exclusive... its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a revocable, nonassignable...

  10. 75 FR 34988 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a.... Patent No. 7,149,374: Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 84,557.//U.S. Patent No. 7,379,630...

  11. Formation of femtosecond pulses during the SRS self-transformation of optical solitons in fiber-optic waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkin, V. N.

    1987-07-01

    A physical model is proposed which describes the SRS self-transformation of femtosecond pulses in a nonlinear dispersing medium. The dynamics of the decomposition of the coupled states of solitons in fiber-optic waveguides to femtosecond wave packets is analyzed. An indirect method for measuring the lifetime of the excited state of vibrational resonances in glass is proposed which is based on an analysis of the correlation functions of luminescence.

  12. UW Imaging of Seismic-Physical-Models in Air Using Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Qiangzhou Rong; Yongxin Hao; Ruixiang Zhou; Xunli Yin; Zhihua Shao; Lei Liang; Xueguang Qiao

    2017-01-01

    A fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) has been proposed and demonstrated for the ultrasound wave (UW) imaging of seismic-physical models. The sensor probe comprises a single mode fiber (SMF) that is inserted into a ceramic tube terminated by an ultra-thin gold film. The probe performs with an excellent UW sensitivity thanks to the nanolayer gold film, and thus is capable of detecting a weak UW in air medium. Furthermore, the compact sensor is a symmetrical structure so that it presen...

  13. Research in Fiber Optics: Implications for Fiber Optics in Vocational-Technical Education. Final Report 1984-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen County Vocational-Technical High School, Hackensack, NJ.

    This project was conducted to determine the vocational, technical, and scientific skills and knowledge needed to work with the fiber optics applications that are in all areas of technology. A research assistant was hired by the project director to collect data and develop a research base for the project. Information was gathered through a…

  14. Fiber Optic Sensing Monitors Strain and Reduces Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In applications where stress on a structure may vary widely and have an unknown impact on integrity, a common engineering strategy has been overbuilding to ensure a sufficiently robust design. While this may be appropriate in applications where weight concerns are not paramount, space applications demand a bare minimum of mass, given astronomical per-pound launch costs. For decades, the preferred solution was the tactic of disassembly and investigation between flights. Knowing there must be a better way, Dr. Mark Froggatt, of Langley Research Center, explored alternate means of monitoring stresses and damage to the space shuttle. While a tear-it-apart-and-have-a-look strategy was effective, it was also a costly and time consuming process that risked further stresses through the very act of disassembly and reassembly. An alternate way of monitoring the condition of parts under the enormous stresses of space flight was needed. Froggatt and his colleagues at Langley built an early-warning device to provide detailed information about even minuscule cracks and deformations by etching a group of tiny lines, or grating, on a fiber optic cable five-thousandths of an inch thick with ultraviolet light. By then gluing the fiber to the side of a part, such as a fuel tank, and shining a laser beam down its length, reflected light indicated which gratings were under stress. Inferring this data from measurements in light rather than in bonded gauges saved additional weight. Various shuttle components now employ the ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS), allowing stress detection by measuring light beamed from a built-in mini-laser. By measuring changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in a material or structure, and including phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe, the UDVSS proved especially useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and design evaluation. Engineers could ensure safety in airplanes

  15. Fiber Optic Cables for Transmission of High-Power Laser Pulses in Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. J., Jr.; Ott, M. N.; Chuska, R. F.; Switzer, R. C.; Blair, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    Lasers with high peak power pulses are commonly used in spaceflight missions for a wide range of applications, from LIDAR systems to optical communications. Due to the high optical power needed, the laser has to be located on the exterior of the satellite or coupled through a series of free space optics. This presents challenges for thermal management, radiation resistance, and mechanical design. Future applications will require multiple lasers located close together, which further complicates the design. Coupling the laser energy into a fiber optic cable allows the laser to be relocated to a more favorable position on the spacecraft. Typical fiber optic termination procedures are not sufficient for injection of these high-power laser pulses without catastrophic damage to the fiber endface. In the current study, we will review the causes of fiber damage during high-power injection and discuss our new manufacturing procedures that overcome these issues to permit fiber use with high reliability in these applications. We will also discuss the proper methods for launching the laser pulses into the fiber to avoid damage and how this is being implemented for current spaceflight missions.

  16. In-line fiber optic interferometric sensors in single-mode fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao; Wu, Di; Liu, Min; Duan, De-Wen

    2012-01-01

    In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It's known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, we review two kinds of typical in-line fiber optic interferometers formed in single-mode fibers fabricated with different post-processing techniques. Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

  17. Probing top anomalous couplings at the Tevatron and the Large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Limits are set on the scale of new physics that might lead to such contributions using latest Tevatron measurements of the t t ¯ cross-section. It is demonstrated that the invariant mass distribution is a sensitive probe. Prospects at the LHC are examined. It is shown that, for unitarized amplitudes, an increase in the LHC energy ...

  18. Evaluation of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization towards applicability for fiber optic lensless imaging setup: phantom experiments and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkanova, I.; Pandya, A.; Saiko, G.; Nacy, L.; Babar, H.; Shah, D.; Lilge, L.; Douplik, A.

    2015-07-01

    A portable, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance (SRDR) lensless imaging technique based on the charge coupled device (CCD), or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor directly coupled with fiber optic bundle can be proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as intrapapillary capillary loops (IPCLs). In this article, we discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiberoptic cable (where image is relayed onto the sensor surface through a fiber-optic cable equivalent to coupling a fiber optic conduit directly onto the sensor surface without any lenses) over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. For mimicking scattering properties of turbid media, a diffusive layer formed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) was placed atop of the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2-0.7mm, and the μs` value of the layers were in the range of 0.85 mm-1 - 4.25mm-1. The results demonstrate that a fiber-optic bundle/plate coupled lensless imaging setup has a high potential to recover intensity modulations from the subsurface patterns. Decreasing of the interrogation volumes leads to enhanced spatial resolution of diffuse reflectance imaging, and hence, can potentially overcome the scattering caused blurring.

  19. Tooth structural health monitoring with a fiber optic microbend sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishen, A.; Rafique, A.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to monitor structural response in intact teeth and teeth with structural loss using a noninvasive fiber optic microbend (FOMB) sensor. In this study a miniature fiber optic microbend sensor is fabricated and tested on intact tooth specimens, tooth specimens in which one-third crown structure was removed, tooth specimens in which access cavity was prepared and tooth specimens in which access cavity and root canal were prepared. The microbend sensor displayed a direct relationship between the applied load and the output light intensity. The rate of change in light intensity with increase in loads corresponded with the structural response of the tooth. This experiment highlights the potential of FOMB sensor technology to quantitatively monitor tooth structural loss during post endodontic restorations.

  20. Fiber Optic Displacement Sensor System for Structural Health Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kun Ho; Ahn, Byung Jun; Kim, Dae Hyun [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    It has been doing to research on novel techniques for structural health monitoring by applying various sensor techniques to measure the deflection in mechanical and civil structures. Several electric-based displacement sensors have many difficulties for using them because of EMI (Electro-Magnetic Interference) noise of many lead-wires when they are installed to many points in the structures. In this paper, it is proposed an affordable intensity-based fiber optic sensor to measure small displacement solving the problems of conventional sensors. In detail, the sensor head was designed on the basis of the principle of bending loss and a basic experiment was performed to obtain the sensitivity, the linearity and the stroke of the sensor. Moreover, a prototype was designed and manufactured to be easily installed to a structure and a real-time control software was also successfully developed to drive the fiber optic sensor system.

  1. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Yao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  2. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  3. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, R.L. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rose, A.H.; Tang, D.; Day, G.W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A robust, accurate, broad-band, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low and high voltage 60 Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400 Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically EMI immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. This paper reports on the technology contained in the sensor and also relates the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range. It also shows the results of early EMI tests.

  4. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  5. Fiber optic sensors current status and future possibilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ikezawa, Satoshi; Corres, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    This book describes important recent developments in fiber optic sensor technology and examines established and emerging applications in a broad range of fields and markets, including power engineering, chemical engineering, bioengineering, biomedical engineering, and environmental monitoring. Particular attention is devoted to niche applications where fiber optic sensors are or soon will be able to compete with conventional approaches. Beyond novel methods for the sensing of traditional parameters such as strain, temperature, and pressure, a variety of new ideas and concepts are proposed and explored. The significance of the advent of extended infrared sensors is discussed, and individual chapters focus on sensing at THz frequencies and optical sensing based on photonic crystal structures. Another important topic is the resonances generated when using thin films in conjunction with optical fibers, and the enormous potential of sensors based on lossy mode resonances, surface plasmon resonances, and long-range...

  6. Liquid crystalline fiber optic colorimeter for hydrostatic pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Tomasz R.; Bajdecki, Waldemar K.; Domanski, Andrzej W.; Karpierz, Miroslaw A.; Konopka, Witold; Nasilowski, T.; Sierakowski, Marek W.; Swillo, Marcin; Dabrowski, Roman S.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, Edward; Wasowski, Janusz

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents results of tests performed on a fiber optic system of liquid crystalline transducer for hydrostatic pressure monitoring based on properties of colorimetry. The system employs pressure-induced deformations occurring in liquid crystalline (LC) cells configured in a homogeneous Frederiks geometry. The sensor is compared of a round LC cell placed inside a specially designed pressure chamber. As a light source we used a typical diode operating at red wavelength and modulated using standard techniques. The pressure transducer was connected to a computer with a specially designed interface built on the bas of advanced ADAM modules. Results indicate that the system offers high response to pressure with reduced temperature sensitivity and, depending on the LC cell used, can be adjusted for monitoring of low hydrostatic pressures up to 6 MPa. These studies have demonstrated the feasibility of fiber optic liquid crystal colorimeter for hydrostatic pressure sensing specially dedicated to pipe- lines, mining instrumentation, and process-control technologies.

  7. Utilization of Faraday Mirror in Fiber Optic Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic sensors dispose of some advantages in the field of electrical current and magnetic field measurement, like large bandwidth, linearity, light transmission possibilities. Unfortunately, they suffer from some parasitic phenomena. The crucial issue is the presence of induced and latent linear birefringence, which is imposed by the fiber manufacture imperfections as well as mechanical stress by fiber bending. In order to the linear birefringence compensation a promising method was chosen for pulsed current sensor design. The method employs orthogonal polarization conjugation by the back direction propagation of the light wave in the fiber. The Jones calculus analysis presents its propriety. An experimental fiber optic current sensor has been designed and realized. The advantage of the proposed method was proved considering to the sensitivity improvement.

  8. Nonreciprocal effects and their applications in fiber optic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Xiaojun

    1996-01-01

    Nonreciprocity is a fundamental property of networks. Unlike electronic networks theory, optical network theory is still a field to be investigated. Lightwave systems, including fiber optic and integrated optic, are becoming more and more complex, new function blocks ( or components) and networking strategies are very important for future highly integrated lightwave circuits. Several common nonreciprocal optical effects studied in this disseration and several basic applications...

  9. Fiber Optic Codec Link (FOCOL). Volume 2 - Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-26

    Effects Test 20. ASSWACT (Cantonue o n eree aide II neceesvy and td ,ntsly b block number) The fiber optic codec link was designed to meet the majority of...0 a w z I-- I woD (n - PL) 44 -4 (N - 4-b (- E- W - - z z o 0 z N :3 100 45 - - - - zcc Ii tj o co z An Bon I . ow to 2 -zz 2~ II 0 * ~ ~~ ~~~ 7. o4h

  10. Standardization Plan for Fiber Optics Optional Phase. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Attention: AFALD/PTS Gentile AFS; OH 45444 Individual: Phone: Autovon: Issue Date: 11/10/81 011. Fiber Optic Mod=n Specs. Number: Organizln: Quality ...Industries Assoc.; Engineering Dept. 2001 Eye Street NW Washington; DC 20006 Individual: Phone: Autovon: Issue Date: 6/83 039. Ref ractive Indez Prof...DC 20006 Individual: Phone: Autovon: Issue Date: UNKNOWN 129. Water Pressure Cycling (POTP-102) * Number: EIA Standard Organiz’n: Electronic

  11. Fiber Optic Magnetometers Using Planar And Cylindrical Magnetostrictive Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholtz, F.; Yurek, A. M.; Koo, K. P.; Dandridge, A.

    1987-04-01

    Fiber optic magnetometers which require high sensitivity at low frequencies (dc-10 Hz) rely on the nonlinear magnetostriction of materials such as amorphous metallic glass alloys. Typically, fiber is bonded to a magnetostrictive sample to convert strain in the sample to phase shift in a fiber interferometer. We present the results of measurements of the frequency dependence and dc and ac magnetic field sensitivity of both planar and cylindrical transducing elements, and discuss the practical advantages and disadvan-tages of each configuration.

  12. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    OpenAIRE

    Behrmann Gregory P; Hidler Joseph; Mirotznik Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The meta...

  13. Practical fiber optic sensor for measuring large mechanical deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Kjetil; Wessel Johnsen, Lars G.

    1994-09-01

    A fiber-optic sensor for measuring large mechanical deformations based on a digital use of fringes in a polarimeter was developed and tested in the laboratory. Two sensors were mounted on an air cushion catamaran and used for measuring strain in the fiberglass laminates and thereby also the relative movement of the two hulls. The data were logged together with other ship movement data and provided useful information on the craft performance.

  14. Review Of Fiber-Optic Electric-Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P.; Jarzynski, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    Tutorial paper reviews state of art in fiber-optic sensors of alternating electric fields. Because such sensors are made entirely of dielectric materials, they are relatively transparent to incident electric fields; they do not distort fields significantly. Paper presents equations that express relationships among stress, strain, and electric field in piezoactive plastic and equations for phase shift in terms of photoelastic coefficients and strains in optical fiber.

  15. Closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope with homodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Qin, BingKun; Chen, Shufen

    1996-09-01

    Interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) has been analyzed with autocontrol theory in this paper. An open-loop IFOG system is not able to restrain the bias drift, but a closed-loop IFOG system can do it very well using negative feedback in order to suppress zero drift. The result of our theoretic analysis and computer simulation indicate that the bias drift of a closed-loop system is smaller than an open- loop one.

  16. Smoke and mirrors: a fiber optic smoke sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesel, Henry K.; Overby, John K.; Ransford, Michael J.; Tatem, Patricia A.

    1994-11-01

    Smoke detectors in general, are usually threshold devices that frequently experience false alarms. Optical smoke detectors usually depend on the measurement of optical power absorption and scattering across an air gap and are usually threshold devices. Fiber optic sensor technology offers potential improvements for existing smoke detector technology. We have developed a new smoke sensor design based on wavelength selective absorption and scattering that generates a continuous measurement of smoke density. This technique provides first order compensation for water and dirt coatings on the optical surfaces and for optical power and ambient light changes. The sensor has a 2 inch sensing region and utilizes multimode technology with an 850 nanometer LED source. Experimental models of the fiber optic smoke sensors were tested successfully in our laboratory and on the ex-USS SHADWELL. Operational performance advantages of the fiber optic smoke sensor are expected in the areas of monitoring visibility, reducing false alarms, improving reliability, and continuous measurement of smoke density; this will improve fire detection capability and will assist in developing fire fighting strategy. Application of the sensors are planned for the shipboard environment to provide sensor input to new damage control management systems.

  17. Recent Developments in Micro-Structured Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in fiber-optic sensing have involved booming research in the design and manufacturing of novel micro-structured optical fiber devices. From the conventional tapered fiber architectures to the novel micro-machined devices by advanced laser systems, thousands of micro-structured fiber-optic sensors have been proposed and fabricated for applications in measuring temperature, strain, refractive index (RI, electric current, displacement, bending, acceleration, force, rotation, acoustic, and magnetic field. The renowned and unparalleled merits of sensors-based micro-machined optical fibers including small footprint, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interferences, durability to harsh environment, capability of remote control, and flexibility of directly embedding into the structured system have placed them in highly demand for practical use in diverse industries. With the rapid advancement in micro-technology, micro-structured fiber sensors have benefitted from the trends of possessing high performance, versatilities and spatial miniaturization. Here, we comprehensively review the recent progress in the micro-structured fiber-optic sensors with a variety of architectures regarding their fabrications, waveguide properties and sensing applications.

  18. Unusual Attenuation Recovery Process After Fiber Optic Cable Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečná, Z.; Plaček, V.; Havránek, P.

    2017-11-01

    At present, the number of optical cables in nuclear power plants has been increasing. Fiber optic cables are commonly used at nuclear power plants in instrumentation and control systems but they are usually used in environments without radiation. Nevertheless, currently, the number of applications in NPP containment with radiation is increasing. One of the most prevalent effects of radiation exposure is an increase of signal attenuation (signal loss). This is the result of fiber darkening due to radiation exposure and it is the main limitation factor in application of fiber optics in radiation environment. However, after the irradiation, the fiber optics go through a “recovery process” during which the optical properties improve again; i.e. attenuation decreases. However, we have found cable, where the expected healing process after few days changed its trend and the attenuation increased again to a value well above the attenuation just after the irradiation. This paper describes experiments that were carried out to explain this unusual recovery behaviour.

  19. High-speed digital fiber optic links for satellite traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryoush, A. S.; Ackerman, E.; Saedi, R.; Kunath, R. R.; Shalkhauser, K.

    1989-01-01

    Large aperture phased array antennas operating at millimeter wave frequencies are designed for space-based communications and imaging platforms. Array elements are comprised of active T/R modules which are linked to the central processing unit through high-speed fiber-optic networks. The system architecture satisfying system requirements at millimeter wave frequency is T/R level data mixing where data and frequency reference signals are distributed independently before mixing at the T/R modules. This paper demonstrates design procedures of a low loss high-speed fiber-optic link used for transmission of data signals over 600-900 MHz bandwidth inside satellite. The fiber-optic link is characterized for transmission of analog and digital data. A dynamic range of 79 dB/MHz was measured for analog data over the bandwidth. On the other hand, for bursted SMSK satellite traffic at 220 Mbps rates, BER of 2 x 10 to the -7th was measured for E(b)/N(o) of 14.3 dB.

  20. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  1. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1994-01-01

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  2. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy; Wood, Karen; Childers, Brooks; Cano, Roberto; Jensen, Brian; Rogowski, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors are being developed for health monitoring of future aircraft. Aircraft health monitoring involves the use of strain, temperature, vibration and chemical sensors. These sensors will measure load and vibration signatures that will be used to infer structural integrity. Sine the aircraft morphing program assumes that future aircraft will be aerodynamically reconfigurable there is also a requirement for pressure, flow and shape sensors. In some cases a single fiber may be used for measuring several different parameters. The objective of the current program is to develop techniques for using optical fibers to monitor composite cure in real time during manufacture and to monitor in-service structural integrity of the composite structure. Graphite-epoxy panels were fabricated with integrated optical fibers of various types. The panels were mechanically and thermally tested to evaluate composite strength and sensor durability. Finally the performance of the fiber optic sensors was determined. Experimental results are presented evaluating the performance of embedded and surface mounted optical fibers for measuring strain, temperature and chemical composition. The performance of the fiber optic sensors was determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation. The facilities for fabricating optical fiber and associated sensors and methods of demodulating Bragg gratings for strain measurement will be described.

  3. Fiber Optic Strain Sensor for Planetary Gear Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Lewicki, David G.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Ehinger, Ryan T.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new sensing approach for helicopter damage detection in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission based on a fiber optic strain sensor array. Complete helicopter transmission damage detection has proven itself a difficult task due to the complex geometry of the planetary reduction stage. The crowded and complex nature of the gearbox interior does not allow for attachment of sensors within the rotating frame. Hence, traditional vibration-based diagnostics are instead based on measurements from externally mounted sensors, typically accelerometers, fixed to the gearbox exterior. However, this type of sensor is susceptible to a number of external disturbances that can corrupt the data, leading to false positives or missed detection of potentially catastrophic faults. Fiber optic strain sensors represent an appealing alternative to the accelerometer. Their small size and multiplexibility allows for potentially greater sensing resolution and accuracy, as well as redundancy, when employed as an array of sensors. The work presented in this paper is focused on the detection of gear damage in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission using a fiber optic strain sensor band. The sensor band includes an array of 13 strain sensors, and is mounted on the ring gear of a Bell Helicopter OH-58C transmission. Data collected from the sensor array is compared to accelerometer data, and the damage detection results are presented

  4. Visual stimulus presentation using fiber optics in the MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruey-Song; Sereno, Martin I

    2008-03-30

    Imaging the neural basis of visuomotor actions using fMRI is a topic of increasing interest in the field of cognitive neuroscience. One challenge is to present realistic three-dimensional (3-D) stimuli in the subject's peripersonal space inside the MRI scanner. The stimulus generating apparatus must be compatible with strong magnetic fields and must not interfere with image acquisition. Virtual 3-D stimuli can be generated with a stereo image pair projected onto screens or via binocular goggles. Here, we describe designs and implementations for automatically presenting physical 3-D stimuli (point-light targets) in peripersonal and near-face space using fiber optics in the MRI scanner. The feasibility of fiber-optic based displays was demonstrated in two experiments. The first presented a point-light array along a slanted surface near the body, and the second presented multiple point-light targets around the face. Stimuli were presented using phase-encoded paradigms in both experiments. The results suggest that fiber-optic based displays can be a complementary approach for visual stimulus presentation in the MRI scanner.

  5. Testing of a Fiber Optic Wear, Erosion and Regression Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the physical processes and harsh environments associated with erosion and wear in propulsion environments makes their measurement and real-time rate quantification difficult. A fiber optic sensor capable of determining the wear (regression, erosion, ablation) associated with these environments has been developed and tested in a number of different applications to validate the technique. The sensor consists of two fiber optics that have differing attenuation coefficients and transmit light to detectors. The ratio of the two measured intensities can be correlated to the lengths of the fiber optic lines, and if the fibers and the host parent material in which they are embedded wear at the same rate the remaining length of fiber provides a real-time measure of the wear process. Testing in several disparate situations has been performed, with the data exhibiting excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical description of the process and when a separate calibrated regression measurement is available good quantitative agreement is obtained as well. The light collected by the fibers can also be used to optically obtain the spectra and measure the internal temperature of the wear layer.

  6. Probing Scalar Couplings Through Tests Of The Equivalence Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, J

    2005-01-01

    It could be that our universe contains one or more nearly-massless neutral scalars, either as low energy relics of the UV complete theory, or as dynamical dark energy as called upon by observations. Here we discuss phenomenological ramifications of the coupling of a light scalar to the Standard Model. More precisely, we argue that low energy effects of this scalar are dominated by its linear couplings to gauge field kinetic terms and to fermion mass terms, which could then source fifth forces and induce variations in the 'constants.' We determine the limits on each of these couplings, first by determining the strength of the source from each sector. We find that couplings to the gluon kinetic term and to the strange quark mass term are most constrained by current null results for long range composition dependent fifth forces. Should such as detection occur, it would most likely arise from couplings to these sectors. If we are fortunate enough to make multiple measurements of scalar forces with test body pairs...

  7. Development of photon pair sources using periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide technology and fiber optic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterling, Lee; Monteiro, Fernando; Krupa, Sean; Nippa, David; Wolterman, Richard; Hayford, Donald; Stinaff, Eric; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Zbinden, Hugo; Thew, Rob

    2015-11-01

    To support quantum technologies that require entangled photon pairs and/or heralded photons for operation, a photon pair source was developed that uses periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguides that are coupled to optical fibers. Both Ti-indiffused and annealed proton-exchanged (APE) waveguide technologies were studied, and waveguide/fiber interfaces were designed to increase the coupling efficiency of the photon pairs into optical fiber. PPLN waveguide devices were fabricated and the optical loss, wavelength conversion efficiency, and heralding efficiency were measured. The maximum heralding efficiencies achieved were 75 and 68% for Ti-indiffused and APE waveguides, respectively. A compact photon pair source based on a packaged PPLN waveguide device and commercially available fiber optic components is presented.

  8. Compensation of thermal strain induced polarization nonreciprocity in dual-polarization fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rongya; Li, Yulin; Deng, Sheng; He, Dong; Peng, Chao; Li, Zhengbin

    2017-10-30

    Dual-polarization interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) is a novel scheme in which the polarization nonreciprocal (PN) phase error of the two orthogonal polarizations can be optically compensated. In this work, we investigate the effective of PN phase error compensation under varying temperature. It is proved that, the thermally induced strain deforms the fiber, and results in perturbations on the birefringence and polarization cross coupling which degrades the IFOG's stability. A wave propagation model and analytical expressions of PN phase error are derived by using coupled-wave equation and Jones matrix. We theoretically and experimentally verify that, although the single-mode (SM) and polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber coils behave different owing to their intrinsic properties of wave propagation, the thermal strain induced PN phase error can still be compensated under slow and adiabatic temperature variations. This could be a promising feature to overcome the temperature fragility of IFOG.

  9. In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lee, L.T. Jr. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.

    1993-03-05

    A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site.

  10. A simple fiber-optic microprobe for high resolution light measurements: application in marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic microphobe is described which is inexpensive and simple to build and use. It consists of an 80-micrometers optical fiber which at the end is tapered down to a rounded sensing tip of 20-30-micrometers diameter. The detector is a hybrid photodiode/amplifier. The probe has a sensitivity of 0.01 microEinst m-2 s-1 and a spectral range of 300-1,100 nm. Spectral light gradients were measured in fine-grained San Francisco Bay sediment that had an undisturbed diatom coating on the surface. The photic zone of the mud was only 0.4 mm deep. Measured in situ spectra showed extinction maxima at 430-520, 620-630, 670, and 825-850 nm due to absorption by chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, and bacterio-chlorophyll a. Maximum light penetration in the visible range was found in both the violet and the red or = 700 nm.

  11. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) fiber optic monitoring of composites during cure in an autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druy, Mark A.; Elandjian, Lucy; Stevenson, William A.; Driver, Richard D.; Leskowitz, Garett M.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time in situ monitoring of the chemical states of epoxy resins was investigated during cure in an autoclave using infrared evanescent spectroscopy. Fiber evanescent sensors were developed which may be sandwiched between the plies of the prepreg sample. A short length of sapphire fiber was used as the sensor cell portion of the fiber probe. Heavy metal fluoride glass optical fiber cables were designed for connecting the FTIR spectrometer to the sensor fiber within the autoclave. The sapphire fibers have outstanding mechanical thermal properties which should permit their use as an embedded link in all thermoset composites. The system is capable of operation at a temperature of 250 C for periods up to 8 hours without major changes to the fiber transmission. A discussion of the selection of suitable sensor fibers, the construction of a fiber-optic interface, and the interpretation of in situ infrared spectra of the curing process is presented.

  12. A Fiber-Optic Sensor Using an Aqueous Solution of Sodium Chloride to Measure Temperature and Water Level Simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Sim, Hyeok In; Shin, Sang Hun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Moon, Joo Hyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system using a multiplexed array of sensing probes based on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl solution) and an optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) for simultaneous measurement of temperature and water level is proposed. By changing the temperature, the refractive index of the NaCl solution is varied and Fresnel reflection arising at the interface between the distal end of optical fiber and the NaCl solution is then also changed. We measured the modified optical power of the light reflected from the sensing probe using a portable OTDR device and also obtained the relationship between the temperature of water and the optical power. In this study, the water level was simply determined by measuring the signal difference of the optical power due to the temperature difference of individual sensing probes placed inside and outside of the water. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the temperature and water level can be obtained simultaneously by measuring optical powers of light reflected from sensing probes based on the NaCl solution. It is anticipated that the proposed fiber-optic sensor system makes it possible to remotely monitor the real-time change of temperature and water level of the spent fuel pool during a loss of power accident. PMID:25310471

  13. A Fiber-Optic Sensor Using an Aqueous Solution of Sodium Chloride to Measure Temperature and Water Level Simultaneously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-optic sensor system using a multiplexed array of sensing probes based on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl solution and an optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR for simultaneous measurement of temperature and water level is proposed. By changing the temperature, the refractive index of the NaCl solution is varied and Fresnel reflection arising at the interface between the distal end of optical fiber and the NaCl solution is then also changed. We measured the modified optical power of the light reflected from the sensing probe using a portable OTDR device and also obtained the relationship between the temperature of water and the optical power. In this study, the water level was simply determined by measuring the signal difference of the optical power due to the temperature difference of individual sensing probes placed inside and outside of the water. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the temperature and water level can be obtained simultaneously by measuring optical powers of light reflected from sensing probes based on the NaCl solution. It is anticipated that the proposed fiber-optic sensor system makes it possible to remotely monitor the real-time change of temperature and water level of the spent fuel pool during a loss of power accident.

  14. Fiber optical sensing on-board communication satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurni, A.; Lemke, N. M. K.; Roner, M.; Obermaier, J.; Putzer, P.; Kuhenuri Chami, N.

    2017-11-01

    Striving constantly to reduce mass, AIT effort and overall cost of the classical point-to-point wired temperature sensor harness on-board telecommunication satellites, OHB System (formerly Kayser-Threde) has introduced the Hybrid Sensor Bus (HSB) system. As a future spacecraft platform element, HSB relies on electrical remote sensor units as well as fiber-optical sensors, both of which can serially be connected in a bus architecture. HSB is a modular measurement system with many applications, also thanks to the opportunities posed by the digital I²C bus. The emphasis, however, is on the introduction of fiber optics and especially fiber-Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors as disruptive innovation for the company's satellite platforms. The light weight FBG sensors are directly inscribed in mechanically robust and radiation tolerant fibers, reducing the need for optical fiber connectors and splices to a minimum. Wherever an FBG sensor shall be used, the fiber is glued together with a corresponding temperature transducer to the satellites structure or to a subsystem. The transducer is necessary to provide decoupling of mechanical stress, but simultaneously ensure a high thermal conductivity. HSB has been developed in the frame of an ESA-ARTES program with European and German co-funding and will be verified as flight demonstrator on-board the German Heinrich Hertz satellite (H2Sat). In this paper the Engineering Model development of HSB is presented and a Fiber-optical Sensor Multiplexer for a more flexible sensor bus architecture is introduced. The HSB system aims at telecommunication satellite platforms with an operational life time beyond 15 years in geostationary orbit. It claims a high compatibility in terms of performance and interfaces with existing platforms while it was designed with future applications with increased radiation exposure already in mind. In its basic configuration HSB consists of four modules which are the Power Supply Unit, the HSB

  15. Probing light-quark Yukawa couplings via hadronic event shapes at lepton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun

    2018-01-01

    We propose a novel idea for probing the Higgs boson couplings through the measurement of hadronic event shape distributions in the decay of the Higgs boson at lepton colliders. The method provides a unique test of the Higgs boson couplings and of QCD effects in the decay of the Higgs boson. It can be used to probe the Yukawa couplings of the light quarks and to further test the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. From a case study for the proposed Circular Electron-Positron Collider, assuming a hypothesis of SM-like theory, light-quark couplings with a strength greater than 9% of the bottom-quark Yukawa coupling in the standard model can be excluded.

  16. A Noninvasive Miniaturized-Wireless Laser-Doppler Fiber-Optic Sensor for Understanding Distal Fingertip Injuries in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Pollonini, Luca; Rodriquez, Mikael; Opperman, Roedolph; Hochstein, Jason

    2009-01-01

    During extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks astronauts over use their fingertips under pressure inside the confined spaces of gloves/space suits. The repetitive hand motion is a probable cause for discomfort and injuries to the fingertips. We describe a new wireless fiber-optic probe that can be integrated inside the astronaut glove for noninvasive blood perfusion measurements in distal fingertips. In this preliminary study, we present blood perfusion measurements while performing hand-grip exercises simulating the use of space tools.

  17. Fiber optics and microprocessors: a control-system solution for the laser-fusion environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuot, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of fiber optics and microprocessors in a distributed computer control system for a 100-kJ CO/sub 2/ laser fusion facility is described. Gas-laser control systems must operate in an environment in which megavolt Marx circuits generate megampere discharges in the laser amplifiers, with attendant high electromagnetic fields. By linking the distributed controls with fiber optics we minimize the adverse effect of these fields on the hard-wired controls and gain the additional advantage of ground isolation. Our fiber-optic subsystems and interfaces include low-error-rate digital communication links between computers; nanosecond timing and trigger links; fiber-optic parameter monitors with dc-to-10 MHz bandwidths; binary fiber-optic power control for valves, motors, and contractors; and binary fiber-optic status interfaces to monitor the system response to control outputs.

  18. Probing gravitational non-minimal coupling with dark energy surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang [Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Physics, Hsinchu (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu (China); Wu, Yi-Peng [Academia Sinica, Institute of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2017-03-15

    We investigate observational constraints on a specific one-parameter extension to the minimal quintessence model, where the quintessence field acquires a quadratic coupling to the scalar curvature through a coupling constant ξ. The value of ξ is highly suppressed in typical tracker models if the late-time cosmic acceleration is driven at some field values near the Planck scale. We test ξ in a second class of models in which the field value today becomes a free model parameter. We use the combined data from type-Ia supernovae, cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and matter power spectrum, to weak lensing measurements and find a best-fit value ξ > 0.289 where ξ = 0 is excluded outside the 95% confidence region. The effective gravitational constant G{sub eff} subject to the hint of a non-zero ξ is constrained to -0.003 < 1 - G{sub eff}/G < 0.033 at the same confidence level on cosmological scales, and it can be narrowed down to 1 - G{sub eff}/G < 2.2 x 10{sup -5} when combining with Solar System tests. (orig.)

  19. Probing cell membrane dynamics using plasmon coupling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Guoxin

    The plasma membrane of mammalian cells is depicted as a two-dimensional hybrid material which is compartmentalized into submicron-sized domains. These membrane domains play a pivotal role in cellular signaling processes due to selective recruitment of specific cell surface receptors. The structural dynamics of the membrane domains and their exact biological functions are, however, still unclear, partially due to the wave nature of light, which limits the optical resolution in the visible light to approximately 400 nm in conventional optical microscopy. Here, we provide a non-fluorescence based approach for monitoring distance changes on subdiffraction limit length scales in a conventional far-field optical microscope. This approach, which is referred to as plasmon coupling microscopy (PCM), utilizes the distance dependent near-field coupling between noble metal nanoparticle (NP) labels to resolve close contacts on the length scale of approximately one NP diameter. We firstly utilize this PCM strategy to resolve interparticle separations during individual encounters of gold NP labeled fibronectin-integrin complexes in living HeLa cells. We then further refine this ratiometric detection methodology by augmenting it with a polarization-sensitive detection, which enables simultaneous monitoring of the distance and conformation changes in NP dimers and clusters. We apply this polarization resolved PCM approach to characterize the structural lateral heterogeneity of cell membranes on sub-micron length scales. Finally, we demonstrate that PCM can provide quantitative information about the structural dynamics of individual epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB1)-enriched membrane domains in living cells.

  20. In-plane ultrasonic needle tracking using a fiber-optic hydrophone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Wenfeng, E-mail: wenfeng.xia@ucl.ac.uk; Desjardins, Adrien E. [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Mari, Jean Martial [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and GePaSud, University of French Polynesia, Faa’a 98702, French Polynesia (France); West, Simeon J. [Department of Anaesthesia, University College Hospital, Main Theatres, Maple Bridge Link Corridor, Podium 3, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Ginsberg, Yuval; David, Anna L. [Institute for Women’s Health, University College London, 86-96 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sebastien [Center for Medical Imaging Computing, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate and efficient guidance of needles to procedural targets is critically important during percutaneous interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging is widely used for real-time image guidance in a variety of clinical contexts, but with this modality, uncertainties about the location of the needle tip within the image plane lead to significant complications. Whilst several methods have been proposed to improve the visibility of the needle, achieving accuracy and compatibility with current clinical practice is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, the authors present a method for directly visualizing the needle tip using an integrated fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in conjunction with the imaging probe used to acquire B-mode ultrasound images. Methods: Needle visualization and ultrasound imaging were performed with a clinical ultrasound imaging system. A miniature fiber-optic ultrasound hydrophone was integrated into a 20 gauge injection needle tip to receive transmissions from individual transducer elements of the ultrasound imaging probe. The received signals were reconstructed to create an image of the needle tip. Ultrasound B-mode imaging was interleaved with needle tip imaging. A first set of measurements was acquired in water and tissue ex vivo with a wide range of insertion angles (15°–68°) to study the accuracy and sensitivity of the tracking method. A second set was acquired in an in vivo swine model, with needle insertions to the brachial plexus. A third set was acquired in an in vivo ovine model for fetal interventions, with insertions to different locations within the uterine cavity. Two linear ultrasound imaging probes were used: a 14–5 MHz probe for the first and second sets, and a 9–4 MHz probe for the third. Results: During insertions in tissue ex vivo and in vivo, the imaged needle tip had submillimeter axial and lateral dimensions. The signal-to-noise (SNR) of the needle tip was found to depend on the insertion angle. With

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH OF FIBER-OPTIC HYDROPHONE PROTECTIVE HOUSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Yu. Plotnikov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available working model of the ocean seismic bottom station. The fiber-optic hydrophone is built on the base of Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Its sensitive arm is wounded on the elastic mandrel. The mandrel material increases acoustic pressure sensitivity of the optical fiber. The developed housing is designed to protect the sensitive optical fiber from mechanical damage. The housing also passes the acoustic signals in water without attenuation in the work frequency range of the fiberoptic hydrophone up to 8 kHz. Method. The theoretical calculations, based on the Helmholtz resonator theory, and mathematical modeling by the finite element method in the ComsolMultiphysics environment were used to develop the protective housing with required parameters. Created models enabled the definition of the protective housing final construction that passes acoustic signals in the required frequency range. Main Results. As a result of mathematical modeling the final construction of the protective housing was chosen. The construction is based on the aluminum cylinder with the external radius equal to 30 mm, the height - 14 cm and the wall thickness - 1 mm and it contains 1900 holes with the radius equal to 1 mm. During the modeling the frequency response of the protective housing was obtained; this response demonstrated its acoustic transparency in water at frequencies up to 8 kHz. The chosen protective housing was fabricated and studied in the working model of the ocean seismic bottom station. Experiment results confirmed the acoustic transparency of the protective housing in the required frequency range. Practical Relevance. The results of this work might be used for the developing and creating of protective housings for fiber-optic hydrophones with the required frequency responses. The developed protective housing is used in the working model of the ocean seismic bottom station and it provides the mechanical protection of the optical fiber in the sensitive element of

  2. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  3. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Yuan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPDmeasurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl, ammonia (NH3, hydrazine(H4N2, and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  4. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud; Bansal, Lalitkumar; Yuan, Jianming

    2007-12-04

    Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPD)measurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl), ammonia (NH₃), hydrazine(H₄N₂), and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP) {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  5. Re-inventing the fiber-optic textbook: a proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jeff; Hecht, Deborah; Chowdary, Ahsan; Massa, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    It's time to reinvent the textbook to meet the needs of today's students, educators, and self-study readers. Students aren't buying them, and authors and publishers have slowed or stopped revising them keep up with new technology and new pedagogy. We want to demonstrate new possibilities by completely overhauling Understanding Fiber Optics, an introduction to fiber optics originally written by J.H. for self-study and later republished as a textbook for technician training. After five editions that sold over 100,000 copies, its page count nearly doubled and its price soared more than tenfold from its original $16.95. We envision a modular structure to meet the needs of students and instructors. Basic concepts will be covered at an introductory level in a "core book" of some 200-250 pages, suitable for self-study, STEM programs at the high school level, and technician training. Additional separate modules primarily intended for instructors will cover details, such as how to install connectors. All materials will be distributed electronically at low cost, and will include interactive demonstrations, animations, simulations, and audio and video supplements explaining key concepts. Our goal is to keep the best aspects of a well-written and well-illustrated textbook, take advantage of new tools for presenting material to students, and make the whole package readily accessible and affordable to students, instructors, and anyone else wanting a working knowledge of fiber optics. We are developing a proposal to achieve these goals, and looking for partners to help us develop, test and evaluate instructional materials.

  6. Interferometric fiber-optic bending / nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, H; Skorobogatiy, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an interferometric fiber-optic bending/micro-displacement sensor based on a plastic dual-core fiber with one end coated with a silver mirror. The two fiber cores are first excited with the same laser beam, the light in each core is then back-reflected at the mirror-coated fiber-end, and, finally, the light from the two cores is made to interfere at the coupling end. Bending of the fiber leads to shifting interference fringes that can be interrogated with a slit and a single photodetector. We find experimentally that the resolution of our bending sensor is ~3x10-4 m-1 for sensing of bending curvature, as well as ~70 nm for sensing of displacement of the fiber tip. We demonstrate operation of our sensor using two examples. One is weighting of the individual micro-crystals of salt, while the other one is monitoring dynamics of isopropanol evaporation.

  7. Fiber Optic Ring Resonator Sensor Detection Technique Based on Spectral Intensity Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo Sidi Priambodo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resonant field phenomenon in optical ring resonator has been a major theme for various studies and can be used for various sensor applications. The spectral response shape changes are subjects to be discussed and analyzed for detection in optical sensor system. The spectral response changes are caused by various factors ranging from refractive index of the surrounding medium, medium loss due to absorption and scattering, and coupling variation between waveguides. These optical phenomena are mostly used for bio-sensor applications, since it is free from electromagnetic interference (EMI and non-physically destructive. In this paper, we discuss our current research in developing optical bio-sensor in the form of a fiber optic ring resonator with monochromatic laser source based on spectral integration detection method, which is sufficiently sensitive and accurate.

  8. Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelepouga, Serguei A [Hoffman Estates, IL; Rue, David M [Chicago, IL; Saveliev, Alexei V [Chicago, IL

    2011-03-15

    A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

  9. Nanostructured Fiber Optic Cantilever Arrays and Hybrid MEMS Sensors for Chemical and Biological Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in nano-/micro-scale sensor fabrication and molecular recognition surfaces offer promising opportunities to develop miniaturized hybrid fiber optic and...

  10. Real-time In-Flight Strain and Deflection Monitoring with Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Dryden's efforts to develop in-flight monitoring based on Fiber Optics. One of the motivating factors for this development was the breakup of the Helios aircraft. On Ikhana the use of fiber optics for wing shape sensing is being developed. They are being used to flight validate fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions on NASA's Ikhana vehicle; validate fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; Assess technical viability and, if applicable, develop methodology and approach to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system, and develop and flight validate advanced approaches to perform active wing shape control.

  11. Full Stokes polarimeter for characterization of fiber optic gyroscope coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lompado, Arthur; Reinhardt, John C; Heaton, L Chris; Williams, Jeff L; Ruffin, Paul B

    2009-05-11

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and validation of a Stokes vector polarimeter for investigating the polarization characteristics of fiber optic gyroscope coils. The device measures the complete Stokes vector, and reports conventional polarization properties including the Degree of Polarization (DoP), the orientation and Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP), and the handedness and Degree of Circular Polarization (DoCP). The sensor operates at 1550 nm and employs a division of aperture optical architecture to acquire full Stokes vectors at 8 kHz while calculating polarization properties at a rate of 200 Hz. Preliminary measurements performed on both traditionally and unconventionally wound gyroscope coils are also presented.

  12. Asymmetric gain-saturated spectrum in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rottwitt, Karsten; Galili, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and numerically an unexpected spectral asymmetry in the saturated-gain spectrum of single-pump fiber optical parametric amplifiers. The interaction between higher-order four-wave mixing products and dispersive waves radiated as an effect of third-order dispersion...... influences the energy transfer to the signal, depending on its detuning with respect to the pump, and breaks the symmetry of the gain expected from phase-matching considerations in unsaturated amplifiers. The asymmetry feature of the saturated spectrum is shown to particularly depend on the dispersion...... characteristics of the amplifier and shows local maxima for specific dispersion values....

  13. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  14. Microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Hee, Hwan Ing; Ng, Soon Huat; Teo, Ju Teng; Yang, Xiufeng; Wang, Dier

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring that is free from direct contact with skin, cableless, electromagnetic interference free and low cost. The feasibility of our device was studied on infants undergoing surgery and 10 participants ranging from one month to 12 months were enrolled. The sensor was placed under a barrier sheet on the operating table. All patients received standard intraoperative monitoring. The results showed good agreement in heart rate and respiratory rate between our device and the standard physiological monitoring when signals are clean.

  15. Fiber-optic sensors for aerospace electrical measurements: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors are being developed for electrical current, voltage, and power measurements in aerospace applications. These sensors are presently designed to cover ac frequencies from 60 Hz to 20 kHz. The current sensor, based on the Faraday effect in optical fiber, is in advanced development after some initial testing. Concentration is on packaging methods and ways to maintain consistent sensitivity with changes in temperature. The voltage sensor, utilizing the Pockels effect in a crystal, has excelled in temperature tests. This paper reports on the development of these sensors, the results of evaluation, improvements now in progress, and the future direction of the work.

  16. Fiber optic liquid mass flow sensor and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Gregory, Don Allen (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Pedersen, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing the mass flow rate of a fluid flowing through a pipe. A light beam containing plural individual wavelengths is projected from one side of the pipe across the width of the pipe so as to pass through the fluid under test. Fiber optic couplers located at least two positions on the opposite side of the pipe are used to detect the light beam. A determination is then made of the relative strengths of the light beam for each wavelength at the at least two positions and based at least in part on these relative strengths, the mass flow rate of the fluid is determined.

  17. Femtosecond nonlinear fiber optics in the ionization regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, P; Chang, W; Travers, J C; Nazarkin, A; Nold, J; Joly, N Y; Saleh, M F; Biancalana, F; Russell, P St J

    2011-11-11

    By using a gas-filled kagome-style photonic crystal fiber, nonlinear fiber optics is studied in the regime of optically induced ionization. The fiber offers low anomalous dispersion over a broad bandwidth and low loss. Sequences of blueshifted pulses are emitted when 65 fs, few-microjoule pulses, corresponding to high-order solitons, are launched into the fiber and undergo self-compression. The experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulations which suggest that free-electron densities of ∼10(17) cm(-3) are achieved at peak intensities of 10(14) W/cm(2) over length scales of several centimeters.

  18. Fiber optic gas sensor with nanocrystalline ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renganathan, B.; Ganesan, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber optic gas sensor with a PMMA fiber whose clad is modified with chemically sensitive nano-crystalline zinc oxide has been developed and investigated to detect acetone, isopropyl alcohol and benzene gases. The spectral characteristics of the sensor were recorded for different concentrations ranging from (0-500 ppm) for these gases both with as-prepared and annealed nanocrystalline ZnO, and the influence of annealing on the gas sensing has been studied.The response time and recovery time were found to be 48 min. and 42 min. respectively for 500 ppm concentration.

  19. Fiber optical parametric amplifiers in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhic, Michel E.; Andrekson, Peter A.; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2015-01-01

    The prospects for using fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) in optical communication systems are reviewed. Phase-insensitive amplifiers (PIAs) and phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) are considered. Low-penalty amplification at/or near 1 Tb/s has been achieved, for both wavelength- and time......-modulated signals. A PSA with 1.1-dB noise figure has been demonstrated, and preliminary wavelength-division multiplexing experiments have been performed with PSAs. 512Gb/s have been transmitted over 6,000km by periodic phase conjugation. Simulations indicate that PIAs could reach data rate x reach products...

  20. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  1. Intraoral fiber-optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Gutierrez, Dora M.; Everett, Matthew J.; Brown, Steve B.; Langry, Kevin C.; Cox, Weldon R.; Johnson, Paul W.; Roe, Jeffrey N.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic senor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research too.

  2. Intraoral fiber optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P W; Gutierrez, D M; Everett, M J; Brown, S B; Langry, K C; Colston, B W; Roe, J N

    2000-01-21

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic sensor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool.

  3. A Non-Invasive Multichannel Hybrid Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir; Nazeran, Homer; Siska, Petr

    2017-01-08

    In this article, we briefly describe the design, construction, and functional verification of a hybrid multichannel fiber-optic sensor system for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor uses a novel non-invasive measurement probe based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The probe is composed of two FBGs encapsulated inside a polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS). The PDMS is non-reactive to human skin and resistant to electromagnetic waves, UV absorption, and radiation. We emphasize the construction of the probe to be specifically used for basic vital sign monitoring such as body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate. The proposed sensor system can continuously process incoming signals from up to 128 individuals. We first present the overall design of this novel multichannel sensor and then elaborate on how it has the potential to simplify vital sign monitoring and consequently improve the comfort level of patients in long-term health care facilities, hospitals and clinics. The reference ECG signal was acquired with the use of standard gel electrodes fixed to the monitored person's chest using a real-time monitoring system for ECG signals with virtual instrumentation. The outcomes of these experiments have unambiguously proved the functionality of the sensor system and will be used to inform our future research in this fast developing and emerging field.

  4. A Non-Invasive Multichannel Hybrid Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Fajkus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we briefly describe the design, construction, and functional verification of a hybrid multichannel fiber-optic sensor system for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor uses a novel non-invasive measurement probe based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG. The probe is composed of two FBGs encapsulated inside a polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS. The PDMS is non-reactive to human skin and resistant to electromagnetic waves, UV absorption, and radiation. We emphasize the construction of the probe to be specifically used for basic vital sign monitoring such as body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate. The proposed sensor system can continuously process incoming signals from up to 128 individuals. We first present the overall design of this novel multichannel sensor and then elaborate on how it has the potential to simplify vital sign monitoring and consequently improve the comfort level of patients in long-term health care facilities, hospitals and clinics. The reference ECG signal was acquired with the use of standard gel electrodes fixed to the monitored person's chest using a real-time monitoring system for ECG signals with virtual instrumentation. The outcomes of these experiments have unambiguously proved the functionality of the sensor system and will be used to inform our future research in this fast developing and emerging field.

  5. UW Imaging of Seismic-Physical-Models in Air Using Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Hao, Yongxin; Zhou, Ruixiang; Yin, Xunli; Shao, Zhihua; Liang, Lei; Qiao, Xueguang

    2017-02-17

    A fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) has been proposed and demonstrated for the ultrasound wave (UW) imaging of seismic-physical models. The sensor probe comprises a single mode fiber (SMF) that is inserted into a ceramic tube terminated by an ultra-thin gold film. The probe performs with an excellent UW sensitivity thanks to the nanolayer gold film, and thus is capable of detecting a weak UW in air medium. Furthermore, the compact sensor is a symmetrical structure so that it presents a good directionality in the UW detection. The spectral band-side filter technique is used for UW interrogation. After scanning the models using the sensing probe in air, the two-dimensional (2D) images of four physical models are reconstructed.

  6. UW Imaging of Seismic-Physical-Models in Air Using Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangzhou Rong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI has been proposed and demonstrated for the ultrasound wave (UW imaging of seismic-physical models. The sensor probe comprises a single mode fiber (SMF that is inserted into a ceramic tube terminated by an ultra-thin gold film. The probe performs with an excellent UW sensitivity thanks to the nanolayer gold film, and thus is capable of detecting a weak UW in air medium. Furthermore, the compact sensor is a symmetrical structure so that it presents a good directionality in the UW detection. The spectral band-side filter technique is used for UW interrogation. After scanning the models using the sensing probe in air, the two-dimensional (2D images of four physical models are reconstructed.

  7. Integrated fiber optic structural health sensors for inflatable space habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, Osgar John; Garg, Naman; Castellucci, Matthew A.

    2017-04-01

    Inflatable space habitats offer many advantages for future space missions; however, the long term integrity of these flexible structures is a major concern in harsh space environments. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of these structures is essential to ensure safe operation, provide early warnings of damage, and measure structural changes over long periods of time. To address this problem, the authors have integrated distributed fiber optic strain sensors to measure loading and to identify the occurrence and location of damage in the straps and webbing used in the structural restraint layer. The fiber optic sensors employed use Rayleigh backscatter combined with optical frequency domain reflectometry to enable measurement of strain every 0.65 mm (0.026 inches) along the sensor. The Kevlar woven straps that were tested exhibited large permanent deformation during initial cycling and continued to exhibit hysteresis thereafter, but there was a consistent linear relationship between the sensor's measurement and the actual strain applied. Damage was intentionally applied to a tensioned strap, and the distributed strain measurement clearly identified a change in the strain profile centered on the location of the damage. This change in structural health was identified at a loading that was less than half of the ultimate loading that caused a structural failure. This sensing technique will be used to enable integrated SHM sensors to detect loading and damage in future inflatable space habitat structures.

  8. A new fiber-optic microphone based on waveguide modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengmei; Zhen, Shenglai; Zhang, Bo; Ai, Fei; Zhang, Shuangxi; Jiang, Chao; Yu, Benli

    2009-11-01

    A new fiber-optic microphone was demonstrated theoretically and experimentally in this paper. The microphone is based on Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac interferometers, which comprise an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) light source, a conventional single-mode fiber, a fiber reflector and two 3dB couplers. As two light paths have the same optical length but travel different sequence paths in this hybrid interferometer, the beams in different paths pass through the sensing fiber at different times and the phase signals differ from each other. Utilizing the two light paths interfered and fiber waveguide modulator replaced by piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) modulation, to implement the direct acquiring of weak voice signals. Adoption of the ASE light source and the single-mode fiber as sensing fiber decreases the system cost. The application of the fiber waveguide modulator overcomes the limitation in high frequency and nonlinear effect of PZT modulation, improves the flexibility of the system and the frequency response range. Phase shifts of the two interfered beams, which is caused by the slowly varying environmental parameter, is equal to eliminate the influence from outside effectively. In this system, the signal demodulation circuit based on weak voice signal is simpler than the PGC demodulation circuit. The experimental results of the fiber-optic microphone based on waveguide modulator have been demonstrated that the simple circuit demodulation for the weak voice signal is feasible.

  9. Fiber-optic perimeter security system based on WDM technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Alexandre V.

    2017-10-01

    Intelligent underground fiber optic perimeter security system is presented. Their structure, operation, software and hardware with neural networks elements are described. System allows not only to establish the fact of violation of the perimeter, but also to locate violations. This is achieved through the use of WDM-technology division spectral information channels. As used quasi-distributed optoelectronic recirculation system as a discrete sensor. The principle of operation is based on registration of the recirculation period change in the closed optoelectronic circuit at different wavelengths under microstrain exposed optical fiber. As a result microstrain fiber having additional power loss in a fiber optical propagating pulse, which causes a time delay as a result of switching moments of the threshold device. To separate the signals generated by intruder noise and interference, the signal analyzer is used, based on the principle of a neural network. The system detects walking, running or crawling intruder, as well as undermining attempts to register under the perimeter line. These alarm systems can be used to protect the perimeters of facilities such as airports, nuclear reactors, power plants, warehouses, and other extended territory.

  10. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  11. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Massaroni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  12. Hybrid fiber optic interferometers for temperature and strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianyin; Quan, Wenwen; Shao, Laipeng; Lu, Hanglin; Du, Jing; Hu, Junhui

    2017-10-01

    The hybrid fiber optic interferometers are proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In our schemes, the hybrid fiber optic interferometers are constructed by single mode-multimode-polarization maintaining-single mode optical fiber (SMPS) structure and a Sagnac loop. The temperature and strain characteristics of the hybrid interferometers are studied in experiment, and the sensitivities depending on the length of polarization maintaining optical fiber (PMF) and multimode optical fiber (MMF) are detailedly investigated in experiment. The experimental results have demonstrated that the PMF and MMF lengths have low affect on the strain sensitivity but has great influence on the temperature sensitivity. The achieved strain sensitivity is 37.2pm/μɛ for 10cm PMF and 12cm MMF. The achieved strain sensitivity is 38.0pm/μɛ for 12cm PMF when the length of MMF is fixed at 15cm, and is 37.2 pm/μɛ for 12cm MMF when the length of PMF is fixed at 10cm. The obtained temperature sensitivities is 1.723nm/°C when the length of MPF is 8cm with the fixed length of 15cm MMF, and the obtained temperature sensitivities reach 1.848nm/℃when the length of MMF is 12cm with the fixed length of 10cm PMF.

  13. Magnetic Sensing with Ferrofluid and Fiber Optic Connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Homa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, cost effective and sensitive fiber optic magnetic sensor fabricated with ferrofluid and commercially available fiber optic components is described in this paper. The system uses a ferrofluid infiltrated extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI interrogated with an infrared wavelength spectrometer to measure magnetic flux density. The entire sensing system was developed with commercially available components so it can be easily and economically reproduced in large quantities. The device was tested with two different ferrofluid types over a range of magnetic flux densities to verify performance. The sensors readily detected magnetic flux densities in the range of 0.5 mT to 12.0 mT with measurement sensitivities in the range of 0.3 to 2.3 nm/mT depending on ferrofluid type. Assuming a conservative wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm for state of the art EFPI detection abilities, the estimated achievable measurement resolution is on the order 0.04 mT. The inherent small size and basic structure complimented with the fabrication ease make it well-suited for a wide array of research, industrial, educational and military applications.

  14. Fiber-optical method of pyrometric measurement of melts temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V. A.; Veprikova, Ya R.

    2018-01-01

    There is a scientific problem of non-contact measurement of the temperature of metal melts now. The problem is related to the need to achieve the specified measurement errors in conditions of uncertainty of the blackness coefficients of the radiating surfaces. The aim of this work is to substantiate the new method of measurement in which the influence of the blackness coefficient is eliminated. The task consisted in calculating the design and material of special crucible placed in the molten metal, which is an emitter in the form of blackbody (BB). The methods are based on the classical concepts of thermal radiation and calculations based on the Planck function. To solve the problem, the geometry of the crucible was calculated on the basis of the Goofy method which forms the emitter of a blackbody at the immersed in the melt. The paper describes the pyrometric device based on fiber optic pyrometer for temperature measurement of melts, which implements the proposed method of measurement using a special crucible. The emitter is formed by the melt in this crucible, the temperature within which is measured by means of fiber optic pyrometer. Based on the results of experimental studies, the radiation coefficient ε‧ > 0.999, which confirms the theoretical and computational justification is given in the article

  15. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  16. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, Δλ(CCD) = 30 nm and Δλ(InGaAs) = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  17. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  18. Yeast metabolic state identification using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. S.; Castro, C. C.; Vicente, A. A.; Tafulo, P.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Martins, R. C.

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae morphology is known to be dependent on the cell physiological state and environmental conditions. On their environment, wild yeasts tend to form complex colonies architectures, such as stress response and pseudohyphal filaments morphologies, far away from the ones found inside bioreactors, where the regular cell cycle is observed under controlled conditions (e.g. budding and flocculating colonies). In this work we explore the feasibility of using micro-fiber optics spectroscopy to classify Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C colony structures in YPD media, under different growth conditions, such as: i) no alcohol; ii) 1 % (v/v) Ethanol; iii) 1 % (v/v) 1-butanol; iv) 1 % (v/v) Isopropanol; v) 1 % (v/v) Tert-Amyl alcohol (2 Methyl-2-butanol); vi) 0,2 % (v/v) 2-Furaldehyde; vii) 5 % (w/v) 5 (Hydroxymethyl)-furfural; and viii) 1 % (w/v) (-)-Adenosine3', 5'cyclic monophosphate. The microscopy system includes a hyperspectral camera apparatus and a micro fiber (sustained by micro manipulator) optics system for spectroscopy. Results show that micro fiber optics system spectroscopy has the potential for yeasts metabolic state identification once the spectral signatures of colonies differs from each others. This technique associated with others physico-chemical information can benefit the creation of an information system capable of providing extremely detailed information about yeast metabolic state that will aid both scientists and engineers to study and develop new biotechnological products.

  19. 1st International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Arditty, Hervé

    1982-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in the application of optical meth­ ods for the measurement of absolute rotation. Active approaches, so-called ring laser gyros, have been under serious development for at least 15 years. More recently, passive approaches using ring resonators or multi turn fiber interferometers have also demonstrated much pro~ise. The only previous conference devoted exclusively to optical rotation sensors, held in 1978 in San Diego, California, was organized by the Society of Photo-optical Instru­ mentation Engineers(S.P.I.E.J. Although the main emphasis at that conference was on ring laser gyros, a number of papers were also included that described the early development of fiber gyroscopes. Since then the field of fiber optic rotation sensors has grown so rapidly that a conference devoted primarily to this subject was needed. The First International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Nove~­ b...

  20. Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor for Salmonella Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Bhunia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a major food-borne pathogen of world-wide concern. Sensitive and rapid detection methods to assess product safety before retail distribution are highly desirable. Since Salmonella is most commonly associated with poultry products, an evanescent wave fiber-optic assay was developed to detect Salmonella in shell egg and chicken breast and data were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF assay. Anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibody was immobilized onto the surface of an optical fiber using biotin-avidin interactions to capture Salmonella. Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated antibody (MAb 2F-11 was used as the reporter. Detection occurred when an evanescent wave from a laser (635 nm excited the Alexa Fluor and the fluorescence was measured by a laser-spectrofluorometer at 710 nm. The biosensor was specific for Salmonella and the limit of detection was established to be 103 cfu/mL in pure culture and 104 cfu/mL with egg and chicken breast samples when spiked with 102 cfu/mL after 2–6 h of enrichment. The results indicate that the performance of the fiber-optic sensor is comparable to TRF, and can be completed in less than 8 h, providing an alternative to the current detection methods.

  1. Computational imaging through a fiber-optic bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad A.; Dumas, John Paul; Pierce, Mark C.; Bajwa, Waheed U.

    2017-05-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has proven to be a viable method for reconstructing high-resolution signals using low-resolution measurements. Integrating CS principles into an optical system allows for higher-resolution imaging using lower-resolution sensor arrays. In contrast to prior works on CS-based imaging, our focus in this paper is on imaging through fiber-optic bundles, in which manufacturing constraints limit individual fiber spacing to around 2 μm. This limitation essentially renders fiber-optic bundles as low-resolution sensors with relatively few resolvable points per unit area. These fiber bundles are often used in minimally invasive medical instruments for viewing tissue at macro and microscopic levels. While the compact nature and flexibility of fiber bundles allow for excellent tissue access in-vivo, imaging through fiber bundles does not provide the fine details of tissue features that is demanded in some medical situations. Our hypothesis is that adapting existing CS principles to fiber bundle-based optical systems will overcome the resolution limitation inherent in fiber-bundle imaging. In a previous paper we examined the practical challenges involved in implementing a highly parallel version of the single-pixel camera while focusing on synthetic objects. This paper extends the same architecture for fiber-bundle imaging under incoherent illumination and addresses some practical issues associated with imaging physical objects. Additionally, we model the optical non-idealities in the system to get lower modelling errors.

  2. Fiber-Optic Current Sensor Validation with Triggered Lightning Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed that is highly suitable for aircraft installation and can measure total current enclosed in a fiber loop down to DC. Other attributes include being small, light-weight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the induced light polarization rotation in fiber loops yields the total current enclosed. Two sensor systems were constructed and installed at Camp Blanding, Florida, measuring rocket-triggered lightning. The systems were similar in design but with different laser wavelengths, sensitivities and ranges. Results are compared to a shunt resistor as reference. The 850nm wavelength system tested in summer 2011 showed good result comparison early. However, later results showed gradual amplitude increase with time, attributed to corroded connections affecting the 50-ohm output termination. The 1550nm system also yielded good results in the summer 2012. The successful measurements demonstrate the fiber optic sensor's accuracies in capturing real lightning currents, and represent an important step toward future aircraft installation.

  3. Fiber-optic evanescent-field sensor for attitude measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Chen, Shimeng; Liu, Zigeng; Guang, Jianye; Peng, Wei

    2017-11-01

    We proposed a new approach to attitude measurement by an evanescent field-based optical fiber sensing device and demonstrated a liquid pendulum. The device consisted of three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors which were fabricated by tapered single mode fibers and immersed in liquid. Three fiber Bragg gratings were used to measure the changes in evanescent field. And their reflection peaks were monitored in real time as measurement signals. Because every set of reflection responses corresponded to a unique attitude, the attitude of the device could be measured by the three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors. After theoretical analysis, computerized simulation and experimental verification, regular responses were obtained using this device for attitude measurement. The measurement ranges of dihedral angle and direction angle were 0°–50° and 0°–360°. The device is based on cost-effective power-referenced scheme. It can be used in electromagnetic or nuclear radiation environment.

  4. Low-cost fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Hishmeh, G.; Ciszek, P.; Lee, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The ability to detect hydrogen gas leaks economically and with inherent safety is an important technology that could facilitate commercial acceptance of hydrogen fuel in various applications. In particular, hydrogen fueled passenger vehicles will require hydrogen leak detectors to signal the activation of safety devices such as shutoff valves, ventilating fans, alarms, etc. Such detectors may be required in several locations within a vehicle--wherever a leak could pose a safety hazard. It is therefore important that the detectors be very economical. This paper reports progress on the development of low-cost fiber-optic hydrogen detectors intended to meet the needs of a hydrogen-fueled passenger vehicle. In the design, the presence of hydrogen in air is sensed by a thin-film coating at the end of a polymer optical fiber. When the coating reacts reversibly with the hydrogen, its optical properties are changed. Light from a central electro-optic control unit is projected down the optical fiber where it is reflected from the sensor coating back to central optical detectors. A change in the reflected intensity indicates the presence of hydrogen. The fiber-optic detector offers inherent safety by removing all electrical power from the leak sites and offers reduced signal processing problems by minimizing electromagnetic interference. Critical detector performance requirements include high selectivity, response speed and durability as well as potential for low-cost production.

  5. Probing CP-violating WWγ couplings in γp collision at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, B.

    2017-12-01

    We have studied the potential of γp collision at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to probe CP (Charge and Parity)-violating anomalous WWγ couplings via the process pp → pγp → pWqX → pℓνℓqX. Considering various integrated luminosities and forward detector acceptance values, we have obtained 95% confidence level (CL) bounds on the anomalous coupling parameters λ˜γ and κ˜γ. Obtained limits on the coupling parameters have been compared with the current limits.

  6. Probing anomalous couplings using di-Higgs production in electron–proton collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A proposed high energy Future Circular Hadron-Electron Collider would provide sufficient energy in a clean environment to probe di-Higgs production. Using this channel we show that the azimuthal angle correlation between the missing transverse energy and the forward jet is a very good probe for the non-standard hhh and hhWW couplings. We give the exclusion limits on these couplings as a function of integrated luminosity at a 95% C.L. using the fiducial cross sections. With appropriate error fitting methodology we find that the Higgs boson self coupling could be measured to be ghhh(1=1.00−0.17(0.12+0.24(0.14 of its expected Standard Model value at s=3.5(5.0 TeV for an ultimate 10 ab−1 of integrated luminosity.

  7. Integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide: chitosan: silica sol gel with fiber optic SPR for caffeine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2017-05-01

    Caffeine is the most popular psychoactive drug consumed in the world for improving alertness and enhancing wakefulness. However, caffeine consumption beyond limits can result in lot of physiological complications in human beings. In this work, we report a novel detection scheme for caffeine integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in chitosan modified silica sol gel (rGO: chitosan: silica sol gel) with fiber optic surface plasmon resonance. The chemically synthesized nanohybrid membrane forming the sensing route has been dip coated over silver coated unclad central portion of an optical fiber. The sensor works on the mechanism of modification of dielectric function of sensing layer on exposure to analyte solution which is manifested in terms of red shift in resonance wavelength. The concentration of rGO in polymer network of chitosan and silica sol gel and dipping time of the silver coated probe in the solution of nanohybrid membrane have been optimized to extricate the supreme performance of the sensor. The optimized sensing probe possesses a reasonably good sensitivity and follows an exponentially declining trend within the entire investigating range of caffeine concentration. The sensor boasts of an unparalleled limit of detection value of 1.994 nM and works well in concentration range of 0-500 nM with a response time of 16 s. The impeccable sensor methodology adopted in this work combining fiber optic SPR with nanotechnology furnishes a novel perspective for caffeine determination in commercial foodstuffs and biological fluids.

  8. Integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide: chitosan: silica sol gel with fiber optic SPR for caffeine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2017-05-12

    Caffeine is the most popular psychoactive drug consumed in the world for improving alertness and enhancing wakefulness. However, caffeine consumption beyond limits can result in lot of physiological complications in human beings. In this work, we report a novel detection scheme for caffeine integrating nanohybrid membranes of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in chitosan modified silica sol gel (rGO: chitosan: silica sol gel) with fiber optic surface plasmon resonance. The chemically synthesized nanohybrid membrane forming the sensing route has been dip coated over silver coated unclad central portion of an optical fiber. The sensor works on the mechanism of modification of dielectric function of sensing layer on exposure to analyte solution which is manifested in terms of red shift in resonance wavelength. The concentration of rGO in polymer network of chitosan and silica sol gel and dipping time of the silver coated probe in the solution of nanohybrid membrane have been optimized to extricate the supreme performance of the sensor. The optimized sensing probe possesses a reasonably good sensitivity and follows an exponentially declining trend within the entire investigating range of caffeine concentration. The sensor boasts of an unparalleled limit of detection value of 1.994 nM and works well in concentration range of 0-500 nM with a response time of 16 s. The impeccable sensor methodology adopted in this work combining fiber optic SPR with nanotechnology furnishes a novel perspective for caffeine determination in commercial foodstuffs and biological fluids.

  9. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Over the past two decades, fiber optics has emerged as a highly practical and cost-efficient communications technology. Its competitiveness vis-a-vis other transmission media, especially satellite, has become a critical question. This report studies the likely evolution and application of fiber optic networks in the United States to the end of the century. The outlook for the technology of fiber systems is assessed and forecast, scenarios of the evolution of fiber optic network development are constructed, and costs to provide service are determined and examined parametrically as a function of network size and traffic carried. Volume 1 consists of the Executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic technology and long distance fiber optic networks. Volume 3 develops a traffic and financial model of a nationwide long distance transmission network. Among the study's most important conclusions are: revenue requirements per circuit for LATA-to-LATA fiber optic links are less than one cent per call minute; multiplex equipment, which is likely to be required in any competing system, is the largest contributor to circuit costs; the potential capacity of fiber optic cable is very large and as yet undefined; and fiber optic transmission combined with other network optimization schemes can lead to even lower costs than those identified in this study.

  10. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  11. Air data measurement using distributed processing and fiber optics data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farry, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    Distributed processing, fiber optics technology, and redundancy management in the aircraft environment are discussed. The project features the development of an angle-of-attack and sideslip data collection system hich features: (1) two independent microprocessor controlled data collection and calibration units; (2) transmission of data to the control system on a fiber optic data bus; and (3) software implemented error detection and recovery.

  12. Analyzing Fourier Transforms for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechtner, Kaitlyn Leann

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a basic overview of the fiber optic technology used for sensing stress, strain, and temperature. Also, the document summarizes the research concerning speed and accuracy of the possible mathematical algorithms that can be used for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing (FOSS) system.

  13. Toward the next fiber optic revolution and decision making in the oil and gas industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Boering, M.; Braal, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber optic data transmission has caused revolutionary developments in the current information society. It was also an eye opener for the Oil & Gas industry when fiber optic-based Distributed Temperature Sensing was introduced in the nineties. Temperature profiles over the entire length of the

  14. Laser Communications and Fiber Optics Lab Manual. High-Technology Training Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddick, Robert

    This laboratory training manual on laser communications and fiber optics may be used in a general technology-communications course for ninth graders. Upon completion of this exercise, students achieve the following goals: match concepts with laser communication system parts; explain advantages of fiber optic cable over conventional copper wire;…

  15. Awake nasotracheal fiber-optic intubation in a patient with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    using a flexible fiber-optic choledochoscope (1) The technique is indicated in patients with difficult airways in whom losing the airway following induction of anes- thesia is deemed dangerous or fatal. Successful awake fiber-optic intubation requires con-. Introduction. Trauma to the face presents considerable challenges to.

  16. 7 CFR 1755.404 - Fiber optic cable telecommunications plant measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiber optic cable telecommunications plant...) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.404 Fiber optic cable telecommunications plant...

  17. Analysis of dead zone sources in a closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kyoung-Ho; Choi, Woo-Seok; Chong, Kil-To

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the dead zone is among the intensive studies in a closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope. In a dead zone, a gyroscope cannot detect any rotation and produces a zero bias. In this study, an analysis of dead zone sources is performed in simulation and experiments. In general, the problem is mainly due to electrical cross coupling and phase modulation drift. Electrical cross coupling is caused by interference between modulation voltage and the photodetector. The cross-coupled signal produces spurious gyro bias and leads to a dead zone if it is larger than the input rate. Phase modulation drift as another dead zone source is due to the electrode contamination, the piezoelectric effect of the LiNbO3 substrate, or to organic fouling. This modulation drift lasts for a short or long period of time like a lead-lag filter response and produces gyro bias error, noise spikes, or dead zone. For a more detailed analysis, the cross-coupling effect and modulation phase drift are modeled as a filter and are simulated in both the open-loop and closed-loop modes. The sources of dead zone are more clearly analyzed in the simulation and experimental results.

  18. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  19. Multisensor transducer based on a parallel fiber optic digital-to-analog converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grechishnikov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered possibility of creating a multisensory information converter (MSPI based on new fiber-optic functional element-digital-to-analog (DAC fiber optic converter. The use of DAC fiber-optic provides jamming immunity combined with low weight and cost of indicators .Because of that MSPI scheme was developed based on parallel DAC fiber-optic (Russian Federation Patent 157416. We came up with an equation for parallel DAC fiber-optic. An eleborate general mathematical model of the proposed converter. Developed a method for reducing conversion errors by placing the DAC transfer function between i and i + 1 ADC quantization levels. By using this model it allows you to obtain reliable information about the technical capabilities of a converter without the need for costly experiments.

  20. In-Line Fiber Optic Interferometric Sensors in Single-Mode Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Wen Duan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It’s known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, we review two kinds of typical in-line fiber optic interferometers formed in single-mode fibers fabricated with different post-processing techniques. Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

  1. Intrinsic fiber optic sensor for distributed water detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Robert A.; Mendoza, Edgar A.; Ferrell, Douglas J.; Schmidlin, Edward M.; Syracuse, Steven J.; Khalil, Albert N.; Dergevorkian, Ara; Sun, Zongjian; Gunther, Michael F.

    1994-03-01

    A distributed fiber optic moisture sensor based on intrinsic changes in the optical properties of the cladding is reported. A 10-meter-long fiber sensor was fabricated that demonstrated a response to humidity in less than 5 minutes. The humidity-sensitive cladding was fabricated on-line during fiber draw by continuously coating a multimode glass core fiber with a polyvinyl acetate cladding, in which a water-sensitive indicator had been dissolved. The indicator was a solvatochromic dye that showed a pronounced hypsochromic shift in its absorption spectrum in the presence of water. The moisture response of the sensor was monitored by measuring changes in the optical attenuation of the fiber in the region between 580 nm and 650 nm. This spectral region facilitates the use of commercially available solid state optoelectronic devices such as LEDs, laser diodes, and PIN photodiode detectors, in order to produce a low-cost, compact, lightweight humidity sensor.

  2. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  3. Fiber-optic sensors for aerospace electrical measurements - An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the progress made on the development of aerospace current and voltage sensors which use fiber-optic and optical sensing heads. These sensors are presently designed to cover ac frequencies from 60 Hz to 20 kHz. The current sensor, based on the Faraday effect in optical fiber, is in advanced development after some initial testing. The emphasis is on packaging methods and ways to maintain consistent sensitivity with changes in temperature. The voltage sensor, utilizing the Pockels effect in a crystal, has excelled in temperature tests. The authors report on the development of these sensors. The authors also relate the technology used in the sensors, the results of evaluation, improvements being made, and the future direction of the work.

  4. Interferometric fiber optic sensors for biomedical applications of optoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamela, Horacio; Gallego, Daniel; Gutierrez, Rebeca; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    We present a non-metallic interferometric silica optical fiber ultrasonic wideband sensor for optoacoustic imaging applications. The ultrasonic sensitivity of this sensor has been characterized over the frequency range from 1 to 10 MHz. A comparative analysis has been carried out between this sensor and an array of piezoelectric transducers using optoacoustic signals generated from an optical absorbent embedded in a tissue mimicking phantom. Also, a two dimensional reconstructed image of the phantom using the fiber interferometric sensor is presented and compared to the image obtained using the Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-64B. The feasibility of our fiber optic based sensor for wideband ultrasonic detection is demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fiber optic evanescent wave (FOEW) microbial sensor for dental application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishen, Anil; John, M. S.; Chen, Jun-Wei; Lim, Chu S.; Hu, Xiao; Asundi, Anand K.

    2001-10-01

    In this work a new approach based on the fiber Optic Evanescent Wave (FOEW) Spectroscopy is developed for the effective determination of dental caries activity in human saliva. The biosensor design utilized the exponentially decaying wave that extends to the lower index region of the optical fiber's core-cladding interface. In order to achieve this, a short length of the cladding is removed and the fiber core surface is coated with a porous glass medium using sol-gel technique. The acidogenic profile resulting from the Streptococcus mutans activity in the human saliva is monitored using an indicator, which was encapsulated within the porous coating. These investigations display the potential benefits of FOEW based microbial sensor to monitor caries activity in human saliva.

  6. Fluorescence based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Peña, Elena; Valdés, Mayra Granda; Glahn-Martínez, Bettina; Moreno-Bondi, Maria C

    2016-11-02

    The application of optical biosensors, specifically those that use optical fibers and planar waveguides, has escalated throughout the years in many fields, including environmental analysis, food safety and clinical diagnosis. Fluorescence is, without doubt, the most popular transducer signal used in these devices because of its higher selectivity and sensitivity, but most of all due to its wide versatility. This paper focuses on the working principles and configurations of fluorescence-based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors and will review biological recognition elements, sensing schemes, as well as some major and recent applications, published in the last ten years. The main goal is to provide the reader a general overview of a field that requires the joint collaboration of researchers of many different areas, including chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, and material science. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adaptive fiber optics collimator based on flexible hinges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Ma, Pengfei; Si, Lei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu

    2014-08-20

    In this manuscript, we present a new design for an adaptive fiber optics collimator (AFOC) based on flexible hinges by using piezoelectric stacks actuators for X-Y displacement. Different from traditional AFOC, the new structure is based on flexible hinges to drive the fiber end cap instead of naked fiber. We fabricated a real AFOC based on flexible hinges, and the end cap's deviation and resonance frequency of the device were measured. Experimental results show that this new AFOC can provide fast control of tip-tilt deviation of the laser beam emitting from the end cap. As a result, the fiber end cap can support much higher power than naked fiber, which makes the new structure ideal for tip-tilt controlling in a high-power fiber laser system.

  8. Fresnel-reflection-based fiber optic cryogenic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Umesh; Kim, Dae-gil; Kim, Hyunjin; Song, Minho

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, Fresnel reflection based fiber-optic sensor for the real-time monitoring of cryogenic temperature is presented. The proposed sensor system utilizes a linear thermo-optic coefficient of polymer and Fresnel reflection of the fiber end. Epoxy resin and poly methyl metha acrylate (PMMA) are used as sensor head material. The designed sensor head measures the temperature ranging from -180°C to 25°C with an average sensitivity of 0.039dB/°C for epoxy resin and 0.029dB/°C for PMMA. Experimental results have proven the stability and the effectiveness of the proposed sensor system to measure the applied cryogenic temperatures.

  9. Engineering surface plasmon based fiber-optic sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhawan, Anuj [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Muth, John F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)], E-mail: muth@unity.ncsu.edu

    2008-04-15

    Ordered arrays of nanoholes with subwavelength diameters, and submicron array periodicity were fabricated on the tips of gold-coated optical fibers using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. This provided a convenient platform for evaluating extraordinary transmission of light through subwavelength apertures and allowed the implementation of nanostructures for surface plasmon engineered sensors. The fabrication procedure was straightforward and implemented on single mode and multimode optical fibers as well as etched and tapered fiber tips. Control of the periodicity and spacing of the nanoholes allowed the wavelength of operation to be tailored. Large changes in optical transmission were observed at the designed wavelengths, depending on the surrounding refractive index, allowing the devices to be used as fiber-optic sensors.

  10. The 1994 Fiber Optic Sensors for Aerospace Technology (FOSAT) Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, Robert (Compiler); Adamovsky, Grigory (Compiler); Tuma, Meg (Compiler); Beheim, Glenn (Compiler); Sotomayor, Jorge (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a workshop on fiber optic technology on October 18-20, 1994. The workshop objective was to discuss the future direction of fiber optics and optical sensor research, especially in the aerospace arena. The workshop was separated into four sections: (1) a Systems Section which dealt specifically with top level overall architectures for the aircraft and engine; (2) a Subsystems Section considered the parts and pieces that made up the subsystems of the overall systems; (3) a Sensor/Actuators section considered the status of research on passive optical sensors and optical powered actuators; and (4) Components Section which addressed the interconnects for the optical systems (e.g., optical connectors, optical fibers, etc.). This report contains the minutes of the discussion on the workshop, both in each section and in the plenary sessions. The slides used by a limited number of presenters are also included as presented. No attempt was made to homogenize this report. The view of most of the attendees was: (1) the government must do a better job of disseminating technical information in a more timely fashion; (2) enough work has been done on the components, and system level architecture definition must dictate what work should be done on components; (3) a Photonics Steering Committee should be formed to coordinate the efforts of government and industry in the photonics area, to make sure that programs complimented each other and that technology transferred from one program was used in other programs to the best advantage of the government and industry.

  11. Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Sensors Based upon Chromogenic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Roland

    2002-03-01

    The development of lightweight, low cost, inherently safe, reliable hydrogen sensors is crucial to the development of an infrastructure for a hydrogen-based economy. Since the involvement of hydrogen in the Hindenburg disaster (May 7, 1937), the public perception is that hydrogen is dangerous to use, store, and handle. It will require extraordinary safety measures to ensure the public that hydrogen leaks can be detected and controlled early. Detection requires sensors to be arrayed in locations where explosive concentrations of hydrogen can accumulate, and mitigation of risk requires a control function associated with detection that can trigger alarms or actuate devices to prevent hydrogen concentrations from reaching the explosive limit. The approach at NREL to meet the needs for hydrogen detection that are anticipated in the transportation sector uses thin films to indicate the presence of hydrogen. The thin films react with hydrogen to produce a change in optical properties that can be sensed with a light beam propagating along a fiber-optic element. Sensitivity of the device is 200 ppm hydrogen in air, with response times less than one second. The sensor response is unique to hydrogen. It is inherently safe, in that no wires are used that could provide an ignition source in a monitored space. Sensor films can be deposited inexpensively on the end of commercial fiber optic cables, either glass or polymer. They are lightweight and resistant to interference from electric and magnetic fields. Arrays of sensors can be operated from a single detection and control point. Primary challenges involve stabilizing the response in real environments, where pollutants and contamination of the thin film surface interfere with response, and extending the lifetime of the sensor to periods of interest in the transportation sector.

  12. Fiber-optic combined FPI/FBG sensors for monitoring of radiofrequency thermal ablation of liver tumors: ex vivo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Braschi, Giovanni; Cigada, Alfredo; Gallati, Mario; Rossi, Sandro; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-04-01

    We present a biocompatible, all-glass, 0.2 mm diameter, fiber-optic probe that combines an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry and a proximal fiber Bragg grating sensor; the probe enables dual pressure and temperature measurement on an active 4 mm length, with 40 Pa and 0.2°C nominal accuracy. The sensing system has been applied to monitor online the radiofrequency thermal ablation of tumors in liver tissue. Preliminary experiments have been performed in a reference chamber with uniform heating; further experiments have been carried out on ex vivo porcine liver, which allowed the measurement of a steep temperature gradient and monitoring of the local pressure increase during the ablation procedure.

  13. Bubble velocity, diameter, and void fraction measurements in a multiphase flow using fiber optic reflectometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ho-Joon; Chang, Kuang-An; Su, Chin B; Chen, Chi-Yueh

    2008-12-01

    A fiber optic reflectometer (FOR) technique featuring a single fiber probe is investigated for its feasibility of measuring the bubble velocity, diameter, and void fraction in a multiphase flow. The method is based on the interference of the scattered signal from the bubble surface with the Fresnel reflection signal from the tip of the optical fiber. Void fraction is obtained with a high accuracy if an appropriate correction is applied to compensate the underestimated measurement value. Velocity information is accurately obtained from the reflected signals before the fiber tip touches the bubble surface so that several factors affecting the traditional dual-tip probes such as blinding, crawling, and drifting effects due to the interaction between the probe and bubbles can be prevented. The coherent signals reflected from both the front and rear ends of a bubble can provide velocity information. Deceleration of rising bubbles and particles due to the presence of the fiber probe is observed when they are very close to the fiber tip. With the residence time obtained, the bubble chord length can be determined by analyzing the coherent signal for velocity determination before the deceleration starts. The bubble diameters are directly obtained from analyzing the signals of the bubbles that contain velocity information. The chord lengths of these bubbles measured by FOR represent the bubble diameters when the bubble shape is spherical or represent the minor axes when the bubble shape is ellipsoidal. The velocity and size of bubbles obtained from the FOR measurements are compared with those obtained simultaneously using a high speed camera.

  14. Dephasing in semiconductor-superconductor structures by coupling to a voltage probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Flensberg, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    junction in the normal region. For a single-mode system we study the conductance both as a function of the position of the Fermi level and as a function of the barrier transparency. At resonance, where the double barrier is fully transparent, we study the suppression of the ideal factor-of-two enhancement...... of the conductance when a finite coupling to the voltage probe is taken into account....

  15. Calibration of soil moisture flow simulation models aided by the active heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing AHFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Zubelzu, Sergio; Sobrino, Fernando Fernando; Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    Most of the studies dealing with the development of water flow simulation models in soils, are calibrated using experimental data measured by soil probe sensors or tensiometers which locate at specific points in the study area. However since the beginning of the XXI century, the use of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature Measurement for estimating temperature variation along a cable of fiber optic has been assessed in multiple environmental applications. Recently, its application combined with an active heating pulses technique (AHFO) has been reported as a sensor to estimate soil moisture. This method applies a known amount of heat to the soil and monitors the temperature evolution, which mainly depends on the soil moisture content. Thus, it allows estimations of soil water content every 12.5 cm along the fiber optic cable, as long as 1500 m , with 2 % accuracy , every second. This study presents the calibration of a soil water flow model (developed in Hydrus 2D) with the AHFO technique. The model predicts the distribution of soil water content of a green area irrigated by sprinkler irrigation. Several irrigation events have been evaluated in a green area located at the ETSI Agronómica, Agroalimentaria y Biosistemas in Madrid where an installation of 147 m of fiber optic cable at 15 cm depth is deployed. The Distribute Temperature Sensing unit was a SILIXA ULTIMA SR (Silixa Ltd, UK) and has spatial and temporal resolution of 0.29 m. Data logged in the DTS unit before, during and after the irrigation event were used to calibrate the estimations in the Hydrus 2D model during the infiltration and redistribution of soil water content within the irrigation interval. References: Karandish, F., & Šimůnek, J. (2016). A field-modeling study for assessing temporal variations of soil-water-crop interactions under water-saving irrigation strategies. Agricultural Water Management, 178, 291-303. Li, Y., Šimůnek, J., Jing, L., Zhang, Z., & Ni, L. (2014). Evaluation of

  16. The induced motion of a probe coupled to a bath with random resettings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Christian; Thiery, Thimothée

    2017-10-01

    We consider a probe linearly coupled to the center of mass of a nonequilibrium bath. We study the induced motion on the probe for a model where a resetting mechanism is added to an overdamped bath dynamics with quadratic potentials. The fact that each bath particle is at random times reset to a fixed position is known for optimizing diffusive search strategies, but here stands for the nonequilibrium aspect of the bath. In the large bath scaling limit the probe is governed by an effective Langevin equation. Depending on the value of the parameters, there appear three regimes: (i) an equilibrium-like regime but with a reduced friction and an increased effective temperature; (ii) a regime where the noise felt by the probe is continuous but non-Gaussian and exhibits fat-tails; (iii) a regime with a non-Gaussian noise exhibiting power-law distributed jumps. The model thus represents an exactly solvable case for the origin of nonequilibrium probe dynamics.

  17. Probing the Higgs couplings to photons in h→4ℓ at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Harnik, Roni; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2014-11-07

    We explore the sensitivity of the Higgs decay to four leptons, the so-called golden channel, to higher dimensional loop-induced couplings of the Higgs boson to ZZ, Zγ, and γγ pairs, allowing for general CP mixtures. The larger standard model tree level coupling hZ(μ)Z(μ) is the dominant "background" for the loop-induced couplings. However, this large background interferes with the smaller loop-induced couplings, enhancing the sensitivity. We perform a maximum likelihood analysis based on analytic expressions of the fully differential decay width for h→4ℓ (4ℓ≡2e2μ,4e,4μ), including all interference effects. We find that the spectral shapes induced by Higgs couplings to photons are particularly different than the hZ(μ)Z(μ) background leading to enhanced sensitivity to these couplings. We show that even if the h→γγ and h→4ℓ rates agree with that predicted by the standard model, the golden channel has the potential to probe both the CP nature as well as the overall sign of the Higgs coupling to photons well before the end of a high-luminosity LHC.

  18. A sensitive DNA biosensor based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction for capture probe immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Ding, Yingtao; Gao, Feng [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Jiang, Shulian [Zhangzhou Product Quality Supervision and Inspection Institute, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhang, Bin; Ni, Jiancong; Gao, Fei [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction between probe DNA and the sulfonic dye of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid that electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode. -- Highlights: •A versatile sulfonic dye of ANS was electrodeposited on a GCE. •A DNA biosensor was fabricated based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. •High probe DNA density of 3.18 × 10{sup 13} strands cm{sup −2} was determined. •A wide linear range and a low detection limit were obtained. -- Abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. First, the versatile sulfonic dye molecule of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonate (AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −}) was electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to form a steady and ordered AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −} layer. Then the amino-terminated capture probe was covalently grafted to the surface of SO{sub 3}{sup −}-AN deposited GCE through the sulfamide coupling reaction between the amino groups in the probe DNA and the sulfonic groups in the AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −}. The step-by-step modification process was characterized by electrochemistry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Using Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} as probe, the probe density and the hybridization efficiency of the biosensor were determined to be 3.18 × 10{sup 13} strands cm{sup −2} and 86.5%, respectively. The hybridization performance of the biosensor was examined by differential pulse voltammetry using Co(phen){sub 3}{sup 3+/2+} (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) as the indicator. The selectivity experiments showed that the biosensor presented distinguishable response after hybridization with the three-base mismatched, non-complementary and complementary sequences. Under the optimal conditions, the oxidation peak currents of Co(phen){sub 3}{sup 3+/2+} increased linearly with the logarithm values of the concentration

  19. Probe And Enhancement Of SBS Based Phonons In Infrared Fibers Using Waveguide Coupled External Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung; Chong, Yat C.; Fong, Chee K.

    1989-06-01

    Interaction of GHz and MHz radiation with CO2 laser propagation in a silver halide fiber using sBs based phonon coupling is furthet investigated. The external signal serves to both probe and enhance laser generated sBs phonons in the fiber. Efficient coupling of microwave radiation into the fiber is accomplished by placing the fiber in a hollow metallic waveguide, designed and constructed to transmit the dominant mode in the 0.9-2.0 GHz band. MHz radiation is conveniently coupled into the fiber using the guided microwave radiation as carrier. Phonon emissions from the fiber under CO2 laser pumping are first established on a spectrum analyzer; low frequency generators ale then tuned to match these frequencies and their maximum interaction recorded. Such interactions are systematically studied by monitoring the amplitude and waveform of the reflected and transmitted laser pulse at various power levels and frequencies of the externally coupled radiation. A plot of reflected laser power versus incident laser power reveals a distinct sBs generated phonon threshold. Variouslaunch directions of the GHz and MHz radiation with respect to the direction of laser propagation are realized to verify theory governing sBs interactions. The MHz radiation and its associated phonons in the fiber are convenient tools for probing sBs related phenomenon in infrared fibers.

  20. Probing dark excitons in atomically thin semiconductors via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Scuri, Giovanni; Wild, Dominik S.; High, Alexander A.; Dibos, Alan; Jauregui, Luis A.; Shu, Chi; de Greve, Kristiaan; Pistunova, Kateryna; Joe, Andrew Y.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kim, Philip; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Park, Hongkun

    2017-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers with a direct bandgap feature tightly bound excitons, strong spin-orbit coupling and spin-valley degrees of freedom. Depending on the spin configuration of the electron-hole pairs, intra-valley excitons of TMD monolayers can be either optically bright or dark. Dark excitons involve nominally spin-forbidden optical transitions with a zero in-plane transition dipole moment, making their detection with conventional far-field optical techniques challenging. Here, we introduce a method for probing the optical properties of two-dimensional materials via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). This coupling selectively enhances optical transitions with dipole moments normal to the two-dimensional plane, enabling direct detection of dark excitons in TMD monolayers. When a WSe2 monolayer is placed on top of a single-crystal silver film, its emission into near-field-coupled SPPs displays new spectral features whose energies and dipole orientations are consistent with dark neutral and charged excitons. The SPP-based near-field spectroscopy significantly improves experimental capabilities for probing and manipulating exciton dynamics of atomically thin materials, thus opening up new avenues for realizing active metasurfaces and robust optoelectronic systems, with potential applications in information processing and communication.

  1. Demodulation of FBG sensors embedded in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Lee, JuneHo; Lee, Jong-kil; Song, Minho

    2012-04-01

    For condition monitoring of large scale electrical power transformers, a fiber-optic multi-stress sensor system was constructed by combining fiber-optic acoustic sensors and fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors in a fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer. To separate the grating signals from the interferometer output, an attenuator was placed at an asymmetrical position in the Sagnac loop. By balancing the counter propagating light intensities with the attenuator, the background noises could be suppressed to obtain grating signals with enough signal-to-noise ratio. With the preliminary experiments, the temperature and the vibration information at multiple locations could be measured simultaneously with single optical circuit and signal processing unit.

  2. Design of a Fiber Optic Biosensor for Cholesterol Detection in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunianto, M.; Permata, A. N.; Eka, D.; Ariningrum, D.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Marzuki, A.

    2017-02-01

    A fiber optic sensor is to detect the cholesterol content in blood serum-based biosensor using plastic optical fiber that has been designed. The fiber optic sensor designed with sensing area was a fiber optic grated by 5 scratches then given bending treatment by 5 cm. The first test was by UV-Vis spectrometer with linearity of 0.96. The second test was by light spectrometer with linearity in white LED of 0.94. Optical fiber sensors were made to work well on a range of blood serum concentration of 140 mg/dL to 250 mg/dL.

  3. Fiber-Optic Strain Monitoring System for DUSEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Maclaughlin, M.; Noni, N.; Turner, A.; Murdoch, L.; Fratta, D.

    2008-12-01

    The opportunity to understand the response of rock masses to stresses deep within the earth's crust as a function of spatial and temporal scale is at the center of the geomechanics research program proposed for DUSEL. Within the 10-km3 volume of the former Homestake mine, deformations are expected from effective stress changes caused by mine dewatering, seasonal water table changes, and new excavations as well as from long-term creep of drifts and shafts. Data from a whole-mine deformation monitoring and measurement system are integral to calibrating a mine-scale, mechanical and hydrological finite-element model of laboratory and detector space. A synergistic objective of a long-term, state-of-the-art monitoring system is to ensure shaft, tunnel, and cavern stability as well as occupant safety. Fiber-optic sensors are highly stable over long periods of time and they can be daisy-chained to simply significantly the logistics of data acquisition of dozens of sensors on a string. Temperature measurements over large spatial scales can delineate fluid-flow paths and serve simultaneously as a detection system for anomalous temperatures. Two types of fiber-optic sensors are available: distributed strain and temperature (DST) and Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). DST systems can be installed over kilometers of distance with measurement resolutions of 1-to-10 microstrains and 0.1°C over intervals of one-to-two meters. FBG strain gages and displacement transducers function the same as their electrical counterparts, save for the underlying physics in that displacements are measured as a shift in the spacing of a Bragg grating embedded into the optical fiber. These systems are highly scalable as more than 50,000 points of temperature and strain measurements can be collected from a single daisy-chained fiber-optic cable. Other fiber-based sensors, e.g., acceleration, air pressure, and gases, are also available and can become part of a fiber-based monitoring infrastructure. We

  4. Compact vector fiber-optic displacement sensor using an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xunli; Zhou, Ruixiang

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer for vector displacement measurement. The sensor is a compact structure in which a short length of thin-core fiber (TCF) is sandwiched between two single mode fibers (SMFs) by core-aligned fusion splicing. The TCF stub contains a refractive index modification (RIM) region which serves as a mode-coupling window over the interface between the TCF's core and cladding. We employed femtosecond laser-based direct inscription to achieve precise position of the RIM over a chosen length close to the core-cladding interface of the TCF and ensure large and stable refractive index increase in the inscribed region. Strong coupling between core and cladding modes is generated at the RIM, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum in transmission. The transmission spectrum exhibits strong bending dependence and direction discrimination due to the azimuthally asymmetrical distribution of the RIM over the fiber's cross section. We achieved vector displacement measurement by wavelength interrogation of the interference spectrum. In the frequency spectrum, the intensity of a cladding mode resonance presents linear response to displacement as well as temperature independence.

  5. Joint weak value for all order coupling using continuous variable and qubit probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Asmita; Pan, Alok Kumar; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-11-01

    The notion of weak measurement in quantum mechanics has gained a significant and wide interest in realizing apparently counterintuitive quantum effects. In recent times, several theoretical and experimental works have been reported for demonstrating the joint weak value of two observables where the coupling strength is restricted to the second order. In this paper, we extend such a formulation by providing a complete treatment of joint weak measurement scenario for all-order-coupling for the observable satisfying A 2 = 𝕀 and A 2 = A, which allows us to reveal several hitherto unexplored features. By considering the probe state to be discrete as well as continuous variable, we demonstrate how the joint weak value can be inferred for any given strength of the coupling. A particularly interesting result we pointed out that even if the initial pointer state is uncorrelated, the single pointer displacement can provide the information about the joint weak value, if at least third order of the coupling is taken into account. As an application of our scheme, we provide an all-order-coupling treatment of the well-known Hardy paradox by considering the continuous as well as discrete meter states and show how the negative joint weak probabilities emerge in the quantum paradoxes at the weak coupling limit.

  6. Fiber-Optic Sensor Would Monitor Growth of Polymer Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamesderfer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic sensor system would measure the increase in thickness of a film of parylene (a thermoplastic polymer made from para-xylene) during growth of the film in a vapor deposition process. By enabling real-time monitoring of film thickness, the system would make it possible to identify process conditions favorable for growth and to tailor the final thickness of the film with greater precision than is now possible. The heart of the sensor would be a pair of fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometers, depicted schematically in the figure. (In principle, a single such interferometer would suffice. The proposal calls for the use of two interferometers for protective redundancy and increased accuracy.) Each interferometer would include a light source, a fiber-optic coupler, and photodetectors in a control box outside the deposition chamber. A single-mode optical fiber for each interferometer would run from inside the control box to a fused-silica faceplate in a sensor head. The sensory tips of the optical fibers would be polished flush with the free surface of the faceplate. In preparation for use, the sensor head would be mounted with a hermetic seal in a feed-through port in the deposition chamber, such that free face of the faceplate and the sensory tips of the optical fibers would be exposed to the deposition environment. During operation, light would travel along each optical fiber from the control box to the sensor head. A small portion of the light would be reflected toward the control box from the end face of each fiber. Once growth of the parylene film started, a small portion of the light would also be reflected toward the control box from the outer surface of the film. In the control box, the two reflected portions of the light beam would interfere in one of the photodetectors. The difference between the phases of the interfering reflected portions of the light beam would vary in proportion to the increasing thickness of the film and the known

  7. Modular and extensible lesson on fiber optics for youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nicholas H. L.; Tong, Amy S. K.; Posner, Matthew T.; Ravagli, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Fiber optics and its application in telecommunications are rarely encountered by students until they reach tertiary education. While some secondary/middle school curricula may include coverage of basic geometrical optics concepts such as reflection and refraction, few if any go further to elaborate on how these eventually relate to global telecommunications. One could say that the science is made accessible for early-stage students, but discussions about applications are often reserved till later stages. In working through a PhD student-led optics educational outreach program called the "Lightwave Roadshow", we have observed, via engagements with young students and the public at school visits and fairs, that many youths (as well as parents) do have a basic appreciation that the internet is somehow based on light signals. However, few know how the two are related, much less how they work. To address this, our team of `ambassadors' in the Lightwave program has designed a self-contained lesson to introduce youths, aged 11 to 18 years, to fiber optics and optical fiber communications, drawing inspiration from various educational resources such as LASER ClassroomTM and the Exploratorium(R). The lesson is modularized into several parts, starting with using light to communicate Morse code, and then going into advanced concepts, such as total internal reflection and multiuser communications based on wavelength-division multiplexing. The latter can be treated as extensions whose inclusion can be tailored based on the youths' educational levels. A feature of this lesson is that it takes amore phenomenological than theoretical approach, and uses materials that are easily obtainable or craftable as well as interesting for youths, including colored gelatin, LED sources, and water as a waveguide. We outline a lesson and pedagogical method which contains hands-on experiments that can be carried out by educators in formal or informal classes, students learning independently, or

  8. Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing in Avalanche Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerndl, Michaela; Tyler, S. W.; Hatch, C. E.; Dozier, J.; Prokop, A.

    2010-05-01

    Being a major driving force for snow metamorphism, thermal properties and temperature gradients in an alpine snow pack influence both, spatial distribution and temporal evolution of its stability throughout a winter season. In avalanche research and forecasting mainly weather station networks and models are employed for temperature-data collection and prediction. Standard temperature measurement devices used in weather stations and for model calibration typically provide point data over time. With fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) a laser is pulsed through standard telecommunications optical fibers of up to 30km in length, and uses the cables themselves as a thermometer. DTS allows for continuous observations of temperatures over large spatial scales and with high temporal resolution. Depending on the type of instrument, temperature readings can be provided every 0.25 to 2 meters along the cable and up to six times a minute. Measurement accuracies depend on integration times and can reach +/- 0.1 degrees C or better. Already well established in other environmental applications such as surface water - groundwater hydrology and soil moisture studies, this study assesses applicability and performance of DTS in snow environments and its potential benefits for avalanche research and forecasting. At the CRREL/UCSB research site on Mammoth Mountain, California, 40m fiber-optic cable loops were deployed at different depths in the snow pack to measure temperature and thermal gradient evolution over time and space. Four discrete measurement sessions of 4 to 20 days were conducted during the winter season 2008/2009. Strong horizontal spatial variability of temperatures of up to 3 degrees C within the snow pack over the 40m-sections were resolved. As expected, vertical thermal gradients were influenced by spatial location. Evolution of temperatures and gradients over time could be continuously monitored along the 40m transects during each measurement session

  9. Highly sensitive fiber-optic accelerometer by grating inscription in specific core dip fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Guo, Tuan; Bao, Weijia; Shao, Zhihua; Peng, Gang-Ding; Qiao, Xueguang

    2017-09-19

    A highly sensitive fiber-optic accelerometer based on detecting the power output of resonances from the core dip is demonstrated. The sensing probe comprises a compact structure, hereby a short section of specific core (with a significant core dip) fiber stub containing a straight fiber Bragg grating is spliced to another single-mode fiber via a core self-alignment process. The femtosecond laser side-illumination technique was utilized to ensure that the grating inscription region is precisely positioned and compact in size. Two well-defined core resonances were achieved in reflection: one originates from the core dip and the other originates from fiber core. The key point is that only one of these two reflective resonances exhibits a high sensitivity to fiber bend (and vibration), whereas the other is immune to it. For low frequency (core mode reflection. Moreover, the sensor simultaneously provides an inherent power reference to eliminate unwanted power fluctuations from the light source and transmission lines, thus providing a means of evaluating weak seismic wave at low frequency.

  10. Distinguishing tracheal and esophageal tissues with hyperspectral imaging and fiber-optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawn, Corinne D.; Souhan, Brian E.; Carter, Robert, III; Kneapler, Caitlin; Fell, Nicholas; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-11-01

    During emergency medical situations, where the patient has an obstructed airway or necessitates respiratory support, endotracheal intubation (ETI) is the medical technique of placing a tube into the trachea in order to facilitate adequate ventilation of the lungs. Complications during ETI, such as repeated attempts, failed intubation, or accidental intubation of the esophagus, can lead to severe consequences or ultimately death. Consequently, a need exists for a feedback mechanism to aid providers in performing successful ETI. Our study examined the spectral reflectance properties of the tracheal and esophageal tissue to determine whether a unique spectral profile exists for either tissue for the purpose of detection. The study began by using a hyperspectral camera to image excised pig tissue samples exposed to white and UV light in order to capture the spectral reflectance properties with high fidelity. After identifying a unique spectral characteristic of the trachea that significantly differed from esophageal tissue, a follow-up investigation used a fiber optic probe to confirm the detectability and consistency of the different reflectance characteristics in a pig model. Our results characterize the unique and consistent spectral reflectance characteristic of tracheal tissue, thereby providing foundational support for exploiting spectral properties to detect the trachea during medical procedures.

  11. Magnon sidebands and spin-charge coupling in bismuth ferrite probed by nonlinear optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M. O.; Kumar, A.; Denev, S. A.; Podraza, N. J.; Xu, X. S.; Rai, R. C.; Chu, Y. H.; Seidel, J.; Martin, L. W.; Yang, S.-Y.; Saiz, E.; Ihlefeld, J. F.; Lee, S.; Klug, J.; Cheong, S. W.; Bedzyk, M. J.; Auciello, O.; Schlom, D. G.; Ramesh, R.; Orenstein, J.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Gopalan, V.

    2009-06-01

    The interplay between spin waves (magnons) and electronic structure in materials leads to the creation of additional bands associated with electronic energy levels which are called magnon sidebands. The large difference in the energy scales between magnons (meV) and electronic levels (eV) makes this direct interaction weak and hence makes magnon sidebands difficult to probe. Linear light absorption and scattering techniques at low temperatures are traditionally used to probe these sidebands. Here we show that optical second-harmonic generation, as the lowest-order nonlinear process, can successfully probe the magnon sidebands at room temperature and up to 723 K in bismuth ferrite, associated with large wave vector multimagnon excitations which linear absorption studies are able to resolve only under high magnetic fields and low temperatures. Polarized light studies and temperature dependence of these sidebands reveal a spin-charge coupling interaction of the type PsL2 between the spontaneous polarization (Ps) and antiferromagnetic order parameter, L in bismuth ferrite, that persists with short-range correlation well into the paramagnetic phase up to high temperatures. These observations suggest a broader opportunity to probe the collective spin-charge-lattice interactions in a wide range of material systems at high temperatures and electronic energy scales using nonlinear optics.

  12. Monolithic, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Switching Array for Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II effort will develop a 1 x 10 prototype non-mechanical fiber optic switch for use with high power lasers. The proposed optical device is a...

  13. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-01-01

    ... 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference...

  14. Radiation Hardened High Speed Fiber Optic Transceivers for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program develops fiber optic transceivers that offer wide bandwidth (1 Mbps to 10 Gbps) and operate in space environments targeted by NASA for robotic...

  15. Fiber Optic Mass Flow Gauge for Liquid Cryogenic Fuel Facilities Monitoring and Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a fiber optic mass flow gauge that will aid in managing liquid hydrogen and oxygen fuel storage and transport. The increasing...

  16. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI. This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applications in fiber length and dispersion measurement, locating weak reflections along a fiber link, fiber-optic sensor multiplexing, and high-sensitivity cavity ring-down measurement. Detailed analysis of FSI system parameters is also presented.

  17. Advanced Modular, Multi-Channel, High Speed Fiber Optic Sensing System for Acoustic Emissions Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes to prove the feasibility of innovations based on ultra-light-weight, ultra-high-speed, multi-channel,...

  18. High-Frequency Flush Mounted Miniature LOX Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations is teaming with the University of Alabama, Huntsville, to develop a miniature flush-mounted fiber-optic pressure sensor that will allow accurate,...

  19. Tungsten disulfide (WS2) based all-fiber-optic humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunhan; Chen, Chaoying; Xia, Kai; Peng, Shuihua; Guan, Heyuan; Tang, Jieyuan; Lu, Huiui; Yu, Jianhui; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Zhe

    2016-04-18

    We demonstrate a novel all-fiber-optic humidity sensor comprised of a WS2 film overlay on a side polished fiber (SPF). This sensor can achieve optical power variation of up to 6 dB in a relative humidity (RH) range of 35%-85%. In particular, this novel humidity fiber sensor has a linear correlation coefficient of 99.39%, sensitivity of 0.1213 dB/%RH, and a humidity resolution of 0.475%RH. Furthermore, this sensor shows good repeatability and reversibility, and fast response to breath stimulus. This WS2 based all-fiber optic humidity sensor is easy to fabricate, is compatible with pre-established fiber optic systems, and holds great potential in photonics applications such as in all-fiber optic humidity sensing networks.

  20. High-Speed Fiber Optic Micromultiplexer for Space and Airborne Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA Earth Science Division need for high-speed fiber optic multiplexers for next generation lidar systems, Luminit proposes to develop a new Fiber...

  1. Fiber-Optic Shape Sensing for Intelligent Solar Sail Deployment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to develop a distributed fiber-optic shape sensor to provide a control system for the deployment of ultra-lightweight inflatable support...

  2. Development of a comprehensive inventory management system for underground fiber optic conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Major State Departments of Transportation operate and maintain networks of thousands of miles of conduits, many : carrying fiber optic cables that are vital to State communication systems. These conduits are located alongside or : across highways and...

  3. Sequential multi-channel OCT in the retina using high-speed fiber optic switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartak, Andreas; Augustin, Marco; Beer, Florian; Haindl, Richard; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2017-07-01

    A sequential multi-channel OCT prototype featuring high-speed fiber optical switches to enable inter A-scan (A-scan rate: 100 kHz) sample arm switching was developed and human retinal image data is presented.

  4. High-Frequency Flush Mounted Miniature LOX Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations has teamed with the University of Alabama, Huntsville, to develop a miniature flush-mounted fiber-optic pressure sensor that will allow accurate,...

  5. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  6. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhiyong; He, Kunpeng, E-mail: pengkhe@126.com; Pang, Shuwan [Department of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Xu, Dingjie [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Tian, Chunmiao [Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of “state of health” for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  7. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  8. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  9. Ultrasensitive detection system for fiber optic-based ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl-Friedrich; Belz, Mathias; Dress, Peter; Schelle, B.; Boyle, William J. O.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Franke, Hilmar

    1998-03-01

    A fiber optic based deep UV-absorption sensor system is characterized, using fibers for light delivery and a liquid core waveguide (LCW) for analyzing liquids. UN-improved fibers with 500 micrometers core diameter are capable of transmitting light intensities below 230 nm with spectral radiant powers above 500 nW/nm at 214 nm. Their short-term behavior and lifetime in respect to UV-stability have been investigated, using a broadband deuterium lamp. To raise the sensitivity of the total system, the absorption path length has been increased significantly using the lightguiding properties of the LCW consisting of a cylindrical glass tube with a Teflon AF 2400 inner coating of about 50 micrometers thickness. Due to lower refractive index of Teflon in comparison to water, the LCW concept offers significant advantages, especially for long optical pathlengths. However, the basic attenuation of the liquid in dependence on the wavelength as to be taken into account. Results on the use of such a system monitoring concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid, acetone and toluene in water are reported and discussed.

  10. McCullough to Liberty fiber optics project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to replace an existing overhead static wire with a shield wire that contains optical fibers (OPGW) on transmission lines from McCullough Substation, south of Las Vegas, Nevada, to Liberty Substation near Phoenix, Arizona. The replacement will occur on the McCullough-Davis, Davis-Parker No. 2, and Parker-Liberty No. 1 230-kV transmission lines. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the lines. Western prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) entitled ``McCullough to Liberty Fiber Optics Project`` (DOE/EA-1202). The EA contains the analysis of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the OPGW. Based on the analysis in the EA, Western finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. The preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and therefore, Western is issuing this Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  11. Flight Tests on a Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Sawatari, Takeo; Lin, Yuping; Elam, Kristie A.

    1998-01-01

    For aircraft engine control, one key parameter to detect on an airplane is the exhaust gas temperature (EGT). Presently, thermocouples are used to perform this measurement. These electrical sensors perform adequately; however, fully utilizing the benefits of optical sensors requires replacing electrical architectures with optical architectures. Part of this requires replacing electrical sensors with optical sensors, such as the EGT sensor chosen for these tests. The objective of the development and testing of this prototype sensor system was to determine the feasibility of operating an optical sensor in a hostile aircraft environment. The fiber optic sensor system was developed to measure temperatures from 20C to 600C in an aircraft environment and was utilized to monitor the EGT of an OV-10D aircraft engine. The sensor has successfully flown over 50 hours and proven to be immune to surface deterioration of the optical element (located inside the sensor head) and able to withstand and operate in normal and sustained severe flight conditions where forces on the airplane exceeded 4 g's. Potential commercial uses for this sensor include monitoring temperature for aeropropulsion system control, military vehicle and naval engine control, conventional and nuclear power plant monitoring and industrial plan monitoring where EMI issues are critical.

  12. Durability Tests of a Fiber Optic Corrosion Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively. PMID:22737030

  13. Interferometric and localized surface plasmon based fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Bano, Andon; Hjelme, Dag Roar

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel single point, multi-parameter, fiber optic sensor concept based on a combination of interferometric and plasmonic sensor modalities on an optical fiber end face. The sensor consists of a micro-Fabry-Perot interferometer in the form of a hemispherical stimuli-responsive hydrogel with immobilized gold nanoparticles. We present results of proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing of refractive index (RI) in the visible range and interferometric measurements of volumetric changes of the pH stimuli-responsive hydrogel in near infrared range. The response of LSPR to RI (Δλr/ΔRI 877nm/RI) and the free spectral range (FSR) to pH (ΔpH/ΔFSR = 0.09624/nm) were measured with LSPR relatively constant for hydrogel swelling degree and FSR relatively constant for RI. We expect this novel sensor concept to be of great value for biosensors for medical applications.

  14. Online Estimation of ARW Coefficient of Fiber Optic Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a standard method for noise analysis of fiber optic gyro (FOG, Allan variance has too large offline computational burden and data storages to be applied to online estimation. To overcome the barriers, the state space model is firstly established for FOG. Then the Sage-husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF is introduced in this field. Through recursive calculation of measurement noise covariance matrix, SHAKF can avoid the storage of large amounts of history data. However, the precision and stability of this method are still the primary matters that needed to be addressed. Based on this point, a new online method for estimation of the coefficient of angular random walk is proposed. In the method, estimator of measurement noise is constructed by the recursive form of Allan variance at the shortest sampling time. Then the estimator is embedded into the SHAKF framework resulting in a new adaptive filter. The estimations of measurement noise variance and Kalman filter are independent of each other in this method. Therefore, it can address the problem of filtering divergence and precision degrading effectively. Test results of both digital simulation and experimental data of FOG verify the validity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  15. Durability tests of a fiber optic corrosion sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kai Tai; Leung, Christopher K Y

    2012-01-01

    Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively.

  16. Fiber optical parametric amplifiers in optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhic (†), Michel E; Andrekson, Peter A; Petropoulos, Periklis; Radic, Stojan; Peucheret, Christophe; Jazayerifar, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The prospects for using fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) in optical communication systems are reviewed. Phase-insensitive amplifiers (PIAs) and phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) are considered. Low-penalty amplification at/or near 1 Tb/s has been achieved, for both wavelength- and time-division multiplexed formats. High-quality mid-span spectral inversion has been demonstrated at 0.64 Tb/s, avoiding electronic dispersion compensation. All-optical amplitude regeneration of amplitude-modulated signals has been performed, while PSAs have been used to demonstrate phase regeneration of phase-modulated signals. A PSA with 1.1-dB noise figure has been demonstrated, and preliminary wavelength-division multiplexing experiments have been performed with PSAs. 512 Gb/s have been transmitted over 6,000 km by periodic phase conjugation. Simulations indicate that PIAs could reach data rate x reach products in excess of 14,000 Tb/s × km in realistic wavelength-division multiplexed long-haul networks. Technical challenges remaining to be addressed in order for fiber OPAs to become useful for long-haul communication networks are discussed. PMID:25866588

  17. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrmann Gregory P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The metal housings were fabricated by several methods including laser micromachining, swaging, and hydroforming. Designs are presented that allow for simultaneous temperature and force measurements as well as for simultaneous resolution of multi-axis forces. The sensor was experimentally evaluated by hydrostatic loading and in vitro testing. A commercial hydraulic burst tester was used to provide uniform pressures on the sensor in order to establish the linearity, repeatability, and accuracy characteristics of the sensor. The in vitro experiments were performed in excised tendon and in a dynamic gait simulator to simulate biological conditions. In both experimental conditions, the sensor was found to be a sensitive and reliable method for acquiring minimally invasive measurements of soft tissue forces. Our results suggest that this sensor will prove useful in a variety of biomechanical measurements.

  18. ATMOSPHERE PRESSURE EFFECT ON THE FIBER OPTIC GYROSCOPE OUTPUT SYGNAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya A. Sharkov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research results of the atmospheric pressure effect on the output signal of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG. In the course of experiments, FOG was placed into a hermetic chamber. The atmosphere pressure was varying in the range from 0.8 to 1.5 atm. All the data, including the FOG output signal, temperature, and data from the pressure sensor installed inside the FOG, were synchronously registered with the computer software. The separation of scale factor change from zero offset in the experiment was carried out by setting the sensitive FOG axis at 0°, 90° and 270° relative to the East (the FOG was set perpendicular to the horizon. After the data processing it was concluded that the FOG signal error associated with the pressure affects mainly on the additive component. The pressure effect on the multiplicative component appeared to be negligible at rotational velocities used in the experiment (0 - 130 /h. At the same time, the FOG signal has a high linear correlation coefficient with the derivative of pressure over time (in some cases, more than 0.9. The experiment was repeated several times and the high degree of the drift repeatability was shown. That makes it possible to implement the compensation algorithm. Application of the simplest algorithmic compensation based on the polynomial of the first degree (ax + b enabled to reduce the root-mean-square (RMS and drift of the signal by 2-9 times.

  19. Novel adaptive fiber-optics collimator for coherent beam combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Pengfei; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2014-12-15

    In this manuscript, we experimentally validate a novel design of adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC), which utilizes two levers to enlarge the movable range of the fiber end cap. The enlargement of the range makes the new AFOC possible to compensate the end-cap/tilt aberration in fiber laser beam combining system. The new AFOC based on flexible hinges and levers was fabricated and the performance of the new AFOC was tested carefully, including its control range, frequency response and control accuracy. Coherent beam combination (CBC) of two 5-W fiber amplifiers array with simultaneously end-cap/tilt control and phase-locking control was implemented successfully with the novel AFOC. Experimental results show that the average normalized power in the bucket (PIB) value increases from 0.311 to 0.934 with active phasing and tilt aberration compensation simultaneously, and with both controls on, the fringe contrast improves to more than 82% from 0% for the case with both control off. This work presents a promising structure for tilt aberration control in high power CBC system.

  20. Seismic damage identification for steel structures using distributed fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuang; Cai, C S; Ou, Jinping

    2009-08-01

    A distributed fiber optic monitoring methodology based on optic time domain reflectometry technology is developed for seismic damage identification of steel structures. Epoxy with a strength closely associated to a specified structure damage state is used for bonding zigzagged configured optic fibers on the surfaces of the structure. Sensing the local deformation of the structure, the epoxy modulates the signal change within the optic fiber in response to the damage state of the structure. A monotonic loading test is conducted on a steel specimen installed with the proposed sensing system using selected epoxy that will crack at the designated strain level, which indicates the damage of the steel structure. Then, using the selected epoxy, a varying degree of cyclic loading amplitudes, which is associated with different damage states, is applied on a second specimen. The test results show that the specimen's damage can be identified by the optic sensors, and its maximum local deformation can be recorded by the sensing system; moreover, the damage evolution can also be identified.

  1. Lightning Current Measurement with Fiber-Optic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor is successfully developed with many potential applications for electric current measurement. Originally developed for in-flight lightning measurement, the sensor utilizes Faraday Effect in an optical fiber. The Faraday Effect causes linear light polarization in a fiber to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field. The polarization change is detected using a reflective polarimetric scheme. Forming fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation results in the determination of the total current enclosed. The sensor is conformable to complex structure geometry. It is also non-conductive and immune to electromagnetic interference, saturation or hysteresis. Installation is non-intrusive, and the sensor can be safely routed through flammable areas. Two similar sensor systems are described in this paper. The first system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and is capable of measuring approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. Laboratory validation results of aircraft lighting direct and in-direct effect current amplitudes are reported for this sensor. The second system operates at 1550nm wavelength and can measure about 400 A - 400 kA. Triggered-lightning measurement data are presented for this system. Good results are achieved in all cases.

  2. A Fiber-Optic Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed for aircraft installations. It can measure total lightning current amplitudes and waveforms, including continuing current. Additional benefits include being small, lightweight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate in presence of magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the total induced light polarization change yields the total current enclosed. The system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and can measure approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where the light polarization change is measured after a round-trip propagation through the fiber. A two-detector setup measures the two orthogonal polarizations for noise subtraction and improved dynamic range. The current response curve is non-linear and requires a simple spline-fit correction. Effects of high current were achieved in laboratory using combinations of multiple fiber and wire loops. Good result comparisons against reference sensors were achieved up to 300 kA. Accurate measurements on a simulated aircraft fuselage and an internal structure illustrate capabilities that maybe difficult with traditional sensors. Also tested at a commercial lightning test facility from 20 kA to 200 kA, accuracy within 3-10% was achieved even with non-optimum setups.

  3. Fiber optic perimeter system for security in smart city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubik, Jakub; Kepak, Stanislav; Nedoma, Jan; Fajkus, Marcel; Zboril, Ondrej; Novak, Martin; Jargus, Jan; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Protection of persons and assets is the key challenge of Smart City safeguards technologies. Conventional security technologies are often outdated and easy to breach. Therefore, new technologies that could complement existing systems or replace them are developed. The use of optical fibers and their subsequent application in sensing is a trend of recent years. This article discusses the use of fiber-optic sensors in perimeter protection. The sensor consists of optical fibers and couplers only and being constructed without wires and metal parts bring many advantages. These include an absence of interference with electromagnetic waves, system presence can be difficult to detect as well as affect its operation. Testing installation of perimeter system was carried out under reinforced concrete structure. Subjects walked over the bridge at different speeds and over the different routes. The task for the system was an absolute detection of all subjects. The proposed system should find application mainly in areas with the presence of volatile substances, strong electromagnetic fields, or in explosive areas.

  4. Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer.......Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  5. Development of a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2010-03-01

    The purpose this paper is the development a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector, using a fiber- optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer and polymeric magnetostrictive material. Metal detection is based on the straininduced optical path length change steming from the ferromagnetic material introduced in the magnetic field. Varied optical phase shifts resulted largely from different metal objects. In this paper, the preliminary results on the different metal material detection will be discussed.

  6. On-Board Fiber-Optic Network Architectures for Radar and Avionics Signal Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad F.; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Duncan, Bradley B.; Nguyen, Hung; Kunath, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Continued progress in both civil and military avionics applications is overstressing the capabilities of existing radio-frequency (RF) communication networks based on coaxial cables on board modem aircrafts. Future avionics systems will require high-bandwidth on- board communication links that are lightweight, immune to electromagnetic interference, and highly reliable. Fiber optic communication technology can meet all these challenges in a cost-effective manner. Recently, digital fiber-optic communication systems, where a fiber-optic network acts like a local area network (LAN) for digital data communications, have become a topic of extensive research and development. Although a fiber-optic system can be designed to transport radio-frequency (RF) signals, the digital fiber-optic systems under development today are not capable of transporting microwave and millimeter-wave RF signals used in radar and avionics systems on board an aircraft. Recent advances in fiber optic technology, especially wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), has opened a number of possibilities for designing on-board fiber optic networks, including all-optical networks for radar and avionics RF signal distribution. In this paper, we investigate a number of different novel approaches for fiber-optic transmission of on-board VHF and UHF RF signals using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The relative merits and demerits of each architecture are discussed, and the suitability of each architecture for particular applications is pointed out. All-optical approaches show better performance than other traditional approaches in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, power consumption, and weight requirements.

  7. DSP based coherent receiver for phase-modulated radio-over-fiber optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Peucheret, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    A novel DSP based coherent receiver for phase modulated radio-over-fiber optical links is reported. Using the proposed digital receiver, signal demodulation of 1.25 Gb/s ASK-modulated 10 GHz RF carrier is experimentally demonstrated.......A novel DSP based coherent receiver for phase modulated radio-over-fiber optical links is reported. Using the proposed digital receiver, signal demodulation of 1.25 Gb/s ASK-modulated 10 GHz RF carrier is experimentally demonstrated....

  8. Dynamic Characterization of Fiber Optical Chirped Pulse Amplification for Sub-ps Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard

    2013-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation.......We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation....

  9. Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification of Sub-Picosecond Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs.......We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs....

  10. Fiber-optic fluorometer for microscale mapping of photosynthetic pigments in microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael; Holst, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls, and bacteri......Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls...

  11. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  12. A Fundamental Study of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Fiber Optics for Remote Measurements Of Trace Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Goode; S. Michael Angel

    2004-01-20

    Develop a fiber-optic imaging probe for microanalysis of solid samples; Design a time-resolved plasma imaging system to measure the development of the LIBS signal; Setup a laboratory system capable of timing two lasers independently, for optimizing and characterizing dual-pulse LIBS; Compare the development of laser-induced plasmas generated with a single laser pulse to the development of laser-induced plasmas generated with a pre-ablation spark prior to sample ablation; Examine the effect of sample matrix on the LIBS signals of elements in different sample matrices; Investigate the effect of excitation wavelength of the ablation beam in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse LIBS experiments; Determine the effect of the physical properties of the sample on the mass of materials ablated.

  13. Measurement of magnetocaloric effect in pulsed magnetic fields with the help of infrared fiber optical temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamantsev, Alexander P.; Koledov, Victor V.; Mashirov, Alexey V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G.; Yen, N. H.; Thanh, P. T.; Quang, V. M.; Dan, N. H.; Los, Anton S.; Gilewski, Andrzej; Tereshina, Irina S.; Butvina, Leonid N.

    2017-10-01

    We present a new technique for experimental study of kinetics of phase transitions (PTs) and direct measurement of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in pulsed magnetic fields by using the fast response temperature probe with infrared fiber optical (IRFO) sensor. As demonstration of the new technique, the results are presented of MCE measurements for Gd near Curie point: ΔTad = 21.3 K under pulsed magnetic field μ0H = 12.7 T; and inverse MCE for Fe48Rh52 sample at initial temperature 305.1 K: ΔTad = -4.5 K under pulsed magnetic field μ0H = 8.5 T. Also, the energy losses on magnetization near the 1st order PT were calculated from the results of direct measurements of magnetization versus time for Fe48Rh52 sample: W = 45 J/kg.

  14. A fiber optic, ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based, two wavelength fluorometer for monitoring reactive adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granz, Christopher D.; Whitten, James E., E-mail: James-Whitten@uml.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Schindler, Bryan J. [Leidos, Inc., P.O. Box 68, Gunpowder, Maryland 21010 (United States); Peterson, Gregory W. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21010 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Construction and use of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based fluorometer for measuring photoluminescence (PL) from powder samples with a fiber optic probe is described. Fluorescence at two wavelengths is detected by miniature photomultiplier tubes, each equipped with a different band pass filter, whose outputs are analyzed by a microprocessor. Photoluminescent metal oxides and hydroxides, and other semiconducting nanoparticles, often undergo changes in their emission spectra upon exposure to reactive gases, and the ratio of the PL intensities at two wavelengths is diagnostic of adsorption. Use of this instrument for reactive gas sensing and gas filtration applications is illustrated by measuring changes in the PL ratio for zirconium hydroxide and zinc oxide particles upon exposure to air containing low concentrations of sulfur dioxide.

  15. Fiber-optic ultrasonic hydrophone using short Fabry-Perot cavity with multilayer reflectors deposited on small stub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Su; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic probe with dielectric multilayer films deposited on a small stub is studied for mega-hertz ultrasonic-wave detection in water. The small stub with a short Fabry-Perot cavity and distributed reflectors is attached on the fiber end. The structure is mechanically strong and withstands intense ultrasonic pressure. Ultrasonic waves at 1.56MHz are successfully detected in water with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The working principle and the characteristics are studied by comparing the ultrasonic sensitivity with that of a conventional piezoelectric hydrophone. The distance response and directional response are also investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  17. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2003-01-01

    coupled into the optical fiber sensor, a reflection peak will be obtained centered around a wavelength called Bragg-wavelength. The Bragg-wavelength depends on the refractive index and the period of the grating, which both change due to mechanical and thermal strain applied to the sensor. The shift in the Bragg-wavelength is directly proportional to the strain. Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  18. Controllable rotation of microsphere chain in dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinlin; Xiao, Guangzong; Han, Xiang; Xiong, Wei; Luo, Hui; Yang, Kaiyong

    2017-08-01

    Controllable rotation of the trapped microscopic objects has traditionally been thought of one of the most valuable optical manipulation techniques. The controllable rotation of a microsphere chain was achieved by the dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset. The experimental device was made up of a PDMS chip housing two counter-propagating fibers across a microfluidic flow channel. Each fiber was coupled with different laser diode source to avoid the generation of coherent interference, both operating at a wavelength of 980 nm. Each fiber was attached to a translation stage to adjust the transverse offset distance. The polystyrene microspheres with diameter of 10 μm were chosen as the trapped particles. The microfluidic flow channel of the device was flushed with the polystyrene microspheres solution by the mechanical fluid pump. At the beginning, the two fibers were strictly aligned to each other. Five microspheres were captured as a chain parallel to the axis of the fibers. When introducing a transverse offset to the counter-propagating fibers by adjusting the translation stages, the microsphere chain was observed to rotating in the trap center. When the offset distance was set as 9 μm, the rotation period is approximately 1.2s. A comprehensive analysis has been presented of the characteristics of the rotation. The functionality of rotated chain could be extended to applications requiring microfluidic mixing or to improving the reaction speed in a localized environment, and is generally applicable to biological and medical research.

  19. Development of a novel fiber-optic sensor to measure radon in the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Catarina; Guimarães, Diana; Jorge, Pedro; Barbosa, Susana

    2017-04-01

    The radon concentration in the deep ocean has gained increasing interest in the last decades. The underwater monitoring of this natural radioactive gas can give important information about submarine groundwater discharges, groundwater migration and contamination. Radon concentration has also been studied as a possible indicator of earthquake events which can have devastating consequences when the epicenter is located at the sea. In contrast with radon monitoring studies in caves, mines, and underground soil, there is an utter lack of information about radon in deep-sea. These measurements are particularly difficult to attain due to the challenges that marine-like environments post to electronic sensing devices and their maintenance over time. Gamma rays emitted by radon's progeny can be easily detected when interacting with a scintillator material. Recently, optical fiber doped with scintillating material has emerged has an alternative for gamma ray detection. The lightweight, low transmission loss, immunity to electromagnetic interference and the cost effectiveness makes optical fiber a compelling solution for radiation detection when compared to conventional sensors. In this work a compact all-fiber optical sensor is developed for continuous gamma ray detection in the deep sea. This sensor is composed by a scintillating optical fiber coupled to a polymeric optical fiber that allows the detection of low levels of radiation.

  20. Detection of wavelengths in the visible range using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Leonardo; Morales, Yailteh; Mattos, Lorenzo; Torres, Cesar O.

    2013-11-01

    This paper shows the design and implementation of a fiber optic sensor for detecting and identifying wavelengths in the visible range. The system consists of a diffuse optical fiber, a conventional laser diode 650nm, 2.5mW of power, an ambient light sensor LX1972, a PIC 18F2550 and LCD screen for viewing. The principle used in the detection of the lambda is based on specular reflection and absorption. The optoelectronic device designed and built used the absorption and reflection properties of the material under study, having as active optical medium a bifurcated optical fiber, which is optically coupled to an ambient light sensor, which makes the conversion of light signals to electricas, procedure performed by a microcontroller, which acquires and processes the signal. To verify correct operation of the assembly were utilized the color cards of sewing thread and nail polish as samples for analysis. This optoelectronic device can be used in many applications such as quality control of industrial processes, classification of corks or bottle caps, color quality of textiles, sugar solutions, polymers and food among others.

  1. Fiber-optic evanescent-field laser sensor for in-situ gas diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, Ulrike; Scheel, Dirk; Kostjucenko, Irina; Bohling, Christian; Schade, Wolfgang; Faber, Eckhard

    2002-09-01

    A compact, rugged and portable fiber-optic evanescent-field laser sensor is developed for the detection of gaseous species in harsh environments such as volcano fumaroles or industrial combustion of glass furnaces. The sensor consists of an optical multi-mode fused silica fiber with jacket and cladding removed and the bare fiber core in direct contact with the surrounding molecules. The beam of a single-mode DFB diode laser with an emission wavelength centered at 1.5705 microm is coupled into the fiber. At the other end of the fiber an infrared detector is used to record the transmitted infrared laser light intensity. Due to the frustrated total reflection (FTR) and the attenuated total reflection (ATR) the laser intensity is attenuated when passing through the fiber. The FTR is related to a change of the index of refraction while the latter one is related to a change of the absorption coefficient. While tuning the DFB laser wavelength across absorption lines of molecules surrounding the fiber a spectral intensity profile is measured. Voigt functions are fitted to the recorded intensity profiles to estimate relative molecule concentrations. In this paper results from first field measurements at the volcano site 'Solfatara' in Italy are reported that use such a sensor device for simultaneous detection of H2S, CO2 and H2O directly in the gas stream of a volcano fumarole.

  2. Quantitative real-time monitoring of dryer effluent using fiber optic near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S C; Walker, D S

    2000-09-01

    This paper describes a method for real-time quantitation of the solvents evaporating from a dryer. The vapor stream in the vacuum line of a dryer was monitored in real time using a fiber optic-coupled acousto-optic tunable filter near-infrared (AOTF-NIR) spectrometer. A balance was placed in the dryer, and mass readings were recorded for every scan of the AOTF-NIR. A partial least-squares (PLS) calibration was subsequently built based on change in mass over change in time for solvents typically used in a chemical manufacturing plant. Controlling software for the AOTF-NIR was developed. The software collects spectra, builds the PLS calibration model, and continuously fits subsequently collected spectra to the calibration, allowing the operator to follow the mass loss of solvent from the dryer. The results indicate that solvent loss can be monitored and quantitated in real time using NIR for the optimization of drying times. These time-based mass loss values have also been used to calculate "dynamic" vapor density values for the solvents. The values calculated are in agreement with values determined from the ideal gas law and could prove valuable as tools to measure temperature or pressure indirectly.

  3. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Leak Detection in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, John E.; Korman, Valentin; Hendrickson, Adam; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    A miniature fiber-optic, laser-based, interferometric leak detector is presented for application as a means to detect on-orbit gas leaks. The sensor employs a fiber-coupled modified Michelson interferometer to detect gas leaks by measuring an increase in gas density in the sensing region. Monitoring changes in the fringe pattern output by the interferometer allows for direct measurement of the gas density in the sensing region and, under the assumption of an equation of state, this can be used to obtain a pressure measurement. Measurements obtained over a pressure range from 20 mtorr to 760 torr using a prototypical interferometer on working gases of air, nitrogen, argon, and helium generally exhibit agreement with a theoretical prediction of the pressure increase required before an interference fringe completely moves over the detector. Additional measurements performed on various gases demonstrate the range of detectable species, measuring sub-torr pressure changes in the process. A high-fidelity measurement places the ultimate pressure resolution for this particular sensor configuration in the 10 mtorr range. Time-resolved data prove the capability of this sensor to detect fast gas flow phenomena associated with transients and pressure waves.

  4. Development of on-fiber optical sensors utilizing chromogenic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.

    1999-01-01

    On-fiber optical sensors, designed with chromogenic materials used as the fiber modified cladding, were developed for sensing environmental conditions. The design was based on the previously developed on-fiber devices. It is known that the light propagation characteristics in optical fibers are strongly influenced by the refractive index of the cladding materials. Thus, the idea of the on- fiber devices is based on replacing the passive optical fiber cladding with active or sensitive materials. For example, temperature sensors can be developed by replacing the fiber clad material with thermochromic materials. In this paper, segmented polyurethane-diacetylene copolymer (SPU), was selected as the thermochromic material for temperature sensors applications. This material has unique chromogenic properties as well as the required mechanical behaviors. During UV exposure and heat treatment, the color of the SPU copolymer varies with its refractive index. The boundary condition between core and cladding changes due to the change of the refractive index of the modified cladding material. The method used for the sensor development presented involves three steps: (a) removing the fiber jacket and cladding from a small region, (b) coating the chromogenic materials onto the modified region, and (c) integrating the optical fiber sensor components. The experimental set-up was established to detect the changes of the output signal based on the temperature variations. For the sensor evaluation, real-time measurements were performed under different heating-cooling cycles. Abrupt irreversible changes of the sensor output power were detected during the first heating-cooling cycle. At the same time, color changes of the SPU copolymer were observed in the modified region of the optical fiber. For the next heating-cooling cycles, however, the observed changes were almost completely reversible. This result demonstrates that a low-temperature sensor can be built by utilizing the

  5. Rockslide deformation monitoring with fiber optic strain sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Moore

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available With micro-strain resolution and the capability to sample at rates of 100 Hz and higher, fiber optic (FO strain sensors offer exciting new possibilities for in-situ landslide monitoring. Here we describe a new FO monitoring system based on long-gauge fiber Bragg grating sensors installed at the Randa Rockslide Laboratory in southern Switzerland. The new FO monitoring system can detect sub-micrometer scale deformations in both triggered-dynamic and continuous measurements. Two types of sensors have been installed: (1 fully embedded borehole sensors and (2 surface extensometers. Dynamic measurements are triggered by sensor deformation and recorded at 100 Hz, while continuous data are logged every 5 min. Deformation time series for all sensors show displacements consistent with previous monitoring. Accelerated shortening following installation of the borehole sensors is likely related to long-term shrinkage of the grout. A number of transient signals have been observed, which in some cases were large enough to trigger rapid sampling. The combination of short- and long-term observation offers new insight into the deformation process. Accelerated surface crack opening in spring is shown to have a diurnal trend, which we attribute to the effect of snowmelt seeping into the crack void space and freezing at night to generate pressure on the crack walls. Controlled-source tests investigated the sensor response to dynamic inputs, which compared an independent measure of ground motion against the strain measured across a surface crack. Low frequency signals were comparable but the FO record suffered from aliasing, where undersampling of higher frequency signals generated spectral peaks not related to ground motion.

  6. Multiparameter fiber optic sensing system for monitoring enhanced geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challener, William A

    2014-12-04

    The goal of this project was to design, fabricate and test an optical fiber cable which supports multiple sensing modalities for measurements in the harsh environment of enhanced geothermal systems. To accomplish this task, optical fiber was tested at both high temperatures and strains for mechanical integrity, and in the presence of hydrogen for resistance to darkening. Both single mode (SM) and multimode (MM) commercially available optical fiber were identified and selected for the cable based on the results of these tests. The cable was designed and fabricated using a tube-within-tube construction containing two MM fibers and one SM fiber, and without supporting gel that is not suitable for high temperature environments. Commercial fiber optic sensing instruments using Raman DTS (distributed temperature sensing), Brillouin DTSS (distributed temperature and strain sensing), and Raleigh COTDR (coherent optical time domain reflectometry) were selected for field testing. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, packaged, and calibrated for high pressure measurements at high temperatures and spliced to the cable. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor was also spliced to the cable. A geothermal well was selected and its temperature and pressure were logged. The cable was then deployed in the well in two separate field tests and measurements were made on these different sensing modalities. Raman DTS measurements were found to be accurate to ±5°C, even with some residual hydrogen darkening. Brillouin DTSS measurements were in good agreement with the Raman results. The Rayleigh COTDR instrument was able to detect some acoustic signatures, but was generally disappointing. The FBG sensor was used to determine the effects of hydrogen darkening, but drift over time made it unreliable as a temperature or pressure sensor. The MEMS sensor was found to be highly stable and accurate to better than its 0.1% calibration.

  7. Fiber-Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu. Wei

    2010-01-01

    An innovative fiber-optic sensor has been developed for low-thrust-level settled mass gauging with measurement uncertainty sensor uses a single optical fiber to measure liquid level and liquid distribution of cryogenic propellants. Every point of the sensing fiber is a point sensor that not only distinguishes liquid and vapor, but also measures temperature. This sensor is able to determine the physical location of each point sensor with 1-mm spatial resolution. Acting as a continuous array of numerous liquid/vapor point sensors, the truly distributed optical sensing fiber can be installed in a propellant tank in the same manner as silicon diode point sensor stripes using only a single feedthrough to connect to an optical signal interrogation unit outside the tank. Either water or liquid nitrogen levels can be measured within 1-mm spatial resolution up to a distance of 70 meters from the optical interrogation unit. This liquid-level sensing technique was also compared to the pressure gauge measurement technique in water and liquid nitrogen contained in a vertical copper pipe with a reasonable degree of accuracy. It has been demonstrated that the sensor can measure liquid levels in multiple containers containing water or liquid nitrogen with one signal interrogation unit. The liquid levels measured by the multiple fiber sensors were consistent with those virtually measured by a ruler. The sensing performance of various optical fibers has been measured, and has demonstrated that they can survive after immersion at cryogenic temperatures. The fiber strength in liquid nitrogen has also been measured. Multiple water level tests were also conducted under various actual and theoretical vibration conditions, and demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio under these vibration conditions, insofar as it affects measurement accuracy, is manageable and robust enough for a wide variety of spacecraft applications. A simple solution has been developed to absorb optical energy at

  8. Measurement of fumonisins in corn with a fiber optic fluoroimmunosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Maragos, Chris M.

    1997-05-01

    A fiber-optic immunosensor was used to determine concentrations of the mycotoxin fumonisin B1(FB1) in both spiked and naturally contaminated corn samples. Samples were extracted with a mixture of methanol/water. Two methods were used to prepare the methanolic corn extracts before introduction to the immunosensor: (1) simple dilution of the methanolic corn extract; or (2) affinity column cleanup. The sensor displayed an IC50 of 70 ng FB1/mL when toxin was introduced in phosphate buffered saline. Simple dilution of methanolic corn extracts yielded an assay with an IC50 equivalent to 25 (mu) gFB1/g corn and a limit of detection of 3.2 (mu) g/g corn, while affinity cleanup of corn extracts yielded an assay with an IC50 of 5 (mu) gFB1/g corn and a limit of detection of 0.4 (mu) gFB1/g corn. The difference in sensitivity between the two cleanup techniques was due to concentration of fumonisins obtained from the affinity cleanup procedure. Naturally contaminated corn samples were also analyzed after either simple dilution or affinity column cleanup. For comparison the naturally contaminated corn samples were analyzed with an HPLC method after isolation of the fumonisins with strong anion exchange (SAX) solid phase extraction cartridges. The SAX/HPLC method and the immunosensor method agreed well except when large amounts of other fumonisins (i.e. fumonisin B2) were present. This was due in part to the cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibody with other fumonisins. The immunosensor has the potential to screen individual corn samples for fumonisins within six minutes, and is among the fastest of the currently available FB1 detection methods.

  9. SU-F-T-166: On the Nature of the Background Visible Light Observed in Fiber Optic Dosimetry of Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darafsheh, A; Kassaee, A; Finlay, J [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Taleei, R [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The nature of the background visible light observed during fiber optic dosimetry of proton beams, whether it is due to Cherenkov radiation or not, has been debated in the literature recently. In this work, experimentally and by means of Monte Carlo simulations, we shed light on this problem and investigated the nature of the background visible light observed in fiber optics irradiated with proton beams. Methods: A bare silica fiber optics was embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms and irradiated with clinical proton beams with energies of 100–225 MeV at Roberts Proton Therapy Center. Luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze in detail the emission spectrum of the fiber tip across the visible range of 400–700 nm. Monte Carlo simulation was performed by using FLUKA Monte Carlo code to simulate Cherenkov light and ionizing radiation dose deposition in the fiber. Results: The experimental spectra of the irradiated silica fiber shows two distinct peaks at 450 and 650 nm, whose spectral shape is different from that of Cherenkov radiation. We believe that the nature of these peaks are connected to the point defects of silica including oxygen-deficiency center (ODC) and non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC). Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the experimental observations that Cherenkov radiation cannot be solely responsible for such a signal. Conclusion: We showed that Cherenkov radiation is not the dominant visible signal observed in bare fiber optics irradiated with proton beams. We observed two distinct peaks at 450 and 650 nm whose nature is connected with the point defects of silica fiber including oxygen-deficiency center and non-bridging oxygen hole center.

  10. The triple Higgs coupling: a new probe of low-scale seesaw models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baglio, Julien [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen,Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Weiland, Cédric [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Department of Physics, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-07

    The measure of the triple Higgs coupling is one of the major goals of the high-luminosity run of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) as well as the future colliders, either leptonic such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) or hadronic such as the 100 TeV Future Circular Collider in hadron-hadron mode (FCC-hh). We have recently proposed this observable as a test of neutrino mass generating mechanisms in a regime where heavy sterile neutrino masses are hard to be probed otherwise. We present in this article a study of the one-loop corrected triple Higgs coupling in the inverse seesaw model, taking into account all relevant constraints on the model. This is the first study of the impact on the triple Higgs coupling of heavy neutrinos in a realistic, renormalizable neutrino mass model. We obtain deviations from the Standard Model as large as to ∼+30% that are at the current limit of the HL-LHC sensitivity, but would be clearly visible at the ILC or at the FCC-hh.

  11. Indirect probes of the trilinear Higgs coupling: $gg \\to h$ and $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbahn, Martin

    2016-10-18

    In the framework of the Standard Model effective field theory, we examine the indirect constraints on the trilinear Higgs coupling $\\lambda$ that arise from Higgs production in gluon-gluon-fusion and diphoton Higgs decays. We calculate 2-loop contributions to the $gg \\to h$ and $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ amplitudes that are affected by modifications of the trilinear Higgs-boson vertex. This calculation involves both the computation of anomalous dimensions and finite matching corrections. Based on our new results, we analyse the sensitivity of present and future measurements of the $hgg$ and $h \\gamma \\gamma$ couplings to shifts in $\\lambda$. Under the assumption that $O_6 = - \\lambda \\left (H^\\dagger H \\right )^3$ is the only dimension-6 operator that alters the trilinear Higgs interactions, we find that at present the considered loop-level probes provide stronger constraints than $pp \\to 2h$. At future high-energy colliders indirect ${\\cal O} (5)$ determinations of the trilinear Higgs coupling may be possible, ma...

  12. Measurement and suppression of secondary waves caused by high-order modes in a photonic bandgap fiber-optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Gao, Fuyu; Song, Ningfang; Jin, Jing

    2016-05-16

    Air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) is a good choice for fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs) owing to the fact that it can be adapted to a wide variety of environments. However, its multimode properties are disadvantageous for the application to FOGs. An interference-based method is proposed to precisely determine the secondary waves caused by the high-order modes and their coupling. Based on the method, two groups of secondary waves have been found, having optical path differences (OPDs) of ~1.859 m and ~0.85 m, respectively, relative to the primary waves in a PBFOG that consists of a 7-cell PBF coil, approximately 180 m in length. Multi-turn bends of the PBF at both ends of the PBF coil after the fusion splicing points are shown to suppress the intensity of these secondary waves by approximately 10 dB.

  13. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  14. Modeling of Brillouin scattering in long-distance fiber optic links with bidirectional optical amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwik, Karol; Śliwczyński, Łukasz; Krehlik, Przemysław

    2017-08-01

    For the dissemination of precise signals from atomic clocks (like e.g. cesium clocks/fountains, H-masers or optical clocks) an optical link operating bi-directionally over the same fiber is essential. In such a link stimulated Brillouin scattering is one of the non-linear effects that may reduce the power of forward optical signal and convert it into the noise that propagates in the backward direction. In the link that uses a number of bi-directional optical amplifiers, the conditions that trigger the Brillouin scattering process may occur relatively easily because of large effective length for the scattering process. Thus in the design phase of the link, checking of the conditions for Brillouin scattering should be a part of optimization procedure (i.e. optimizing bi-directional amplifiers gains). In the paper we consider the mathematical model of the stimulated Brillouin scattering in the long distance, fiber optic links with multiple bidirectional optical amplifiers. The model was implemented in Matlab and consists of the coupled differential equations describing the propagation of pump and scattered signals that develops due to spontaneous scattering. The presence of bi-directional optical amplifiers is modeled as point-like discontinuity of the α parameter that is used to represent the attenuation of the fiber. These discontinuities create an extra level of difficulty when numerically solving the coupled equations (the problem is stiff) so special algorithm is presented that iteratively searches for the solution. The obtained results were compared with the measurements of the real link to confirm the correctness of the solution.

  15. Fiber optic confocal microscope: In vivo precancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kristen Dawn

    Cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide. Many cancers originate as precancerous lesions in the epithelium which, when removed in sufficient time, can prevent progression to cancer. However, current detection techniques are typically time-consuming and expensive, limiting their acceptance and accessibility. Optical techniques, such as confocal microscopy, have significant potential to provide clinicians with real-time, high-resolution images of cells and tissue without tissue removal. These images of cell morphology and tissue architecture can be used to characterize tissue and determine the presence or extent of precancer and cancer. This dissertation explores the instrumentation and application of fiber optic reflectance confocal microscopy for in vivo precancer detection. The first part of the dissertation presents in vivo imaging of suspicious lesions in the human uterine cervix and oral mucosa using a fiber bundle based confocal microscope with a complex glass miniature objective lens. Images are analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively to determine the potential of this technology in vivo. An analysis of nuclear density from images of 30 cervical epithelium sites shows differentiation between normal and precancerous sites. Similarly, images from 20 oral mucosa sites demonstrate changes in nuclear density and tissue architecture indicative of progression of precancer and cancer. In addition to this multi-fiber confocal microscope used with a glass objective lens for the clinical studies, imaging of tissue samples has been accomplished with the same confocal system using an injection molded plastic miniature objective lens demonstrating comparable optical quality for a significantly less expensive optical component. Finally, a benchtop prototype of a single fiber confocal microscope using a gimbaled two-axis MEMS scanner has been designed and constructed. Imaging of a resolution target and cellular samples demonstrates sufficient resolution and

  16. Fiber optic strain monitor for an uninhabited aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Thomas; Pesavento, Philip; Ice, Robert; Knudsen, Steven; Harrison, Mary Ann

    2006-03-01

    The Institute for Scientific Research (ISR) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) will build and operate portable real-time fiber Bragg grating interrogator systems for monitoring strain in ISR's Multi-Modal Sensor (MMS) uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV). ISR's UAV is constructed of fiberglass composites with aluminum stiffeners. The cargo bay and on-board electronics are intended to accommodate a variety of compact sensors. Because of the small size of the UAV, weight and volume are restricted, necessitating considerable redesign of laboratory interrogators to meet UAV constraints. NRL will be supplying a multiplexed interrogator for monitoring structural response rates in the UAV up to about 2 kHz, while ISR will develop an optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) for measuring lower frequency response of large numbers of gratings below about 100 Hz. The OFDR system will test a special differencing technique to separate strain induced signals from environmentally induced signals. A National Instruments CompactRIO system with a 3 million gate FPGA and a 200 MHz Pentium processor is being used for real-time data acquisition and onboard signal analysis. The CompactRIO system weighs about 1.6 kg, measures 18cm x 9cm x 9cm, consumes less than 5 W of power, and withstands over 50g of shock. Lithium polymer batteries will be used to power the system for flight times up to about one hour in the present configuration. While the near-term objective of this project is to overcome the challenges of applying fiber-optic strain monitors to aerial vehicles, the longer-term objective is to develop a system for detecting damage in aerial vehicles using chaotic attractor based methods. One of the key issues in damage detection by this means revolves around the ability to use the chaotic excitation of the airframe from random aerodynamic vortices to detect the onset of composite degradation. There is evidence that attractor based methods applied to these ambient chaotic

  17. Moire-Fringe-Based Fiber Optic Tiltmeter for Structural Health Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Hyun [Seoul National of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents a novel fiber optic tiltmeter system for the health monitoring of large-size structures. The system is composed of a sensor head, a light control unit and a signal processing unit. The sensing mechanism of the sensor head is based on a novel integration of the moire fringe phenomenon with fiber optics to achieve a robust performance in addition to its immunity to EM interference, easy ratting, and low cost. In this paper, a prototype of the fiber optic tiltmeter system has been developed successfully. A low-cost light control unit has been developed to drive the system's optic and electronic components. From an experimental test, the fiber optic tiltmeter is proven to be a prospective sensor for the monitoring of the tilting angle of civil structure with a good linearity. Finally, the test also successfully demonstrates the performance and the potential of the novel fiber optic tiltmeter system to monitor the health of civil infrastructures.

  18. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  19. Calibration and deployment of a fiber-optic sensing system for monitoring debris flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations.

  20. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Assemblies for Spaceflight Environments: Design, Manufacturing, Testing, and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. Joe; Ott, Melanie N.; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Onuma, Eleanya; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic assemblies have been used on spaceflight missions for many years as an enabling technology for routing, transmitting, and detecting optical signals. Due to the overwhelming success of NASA in implementing fiber optic assemblies on spaceflight science-based instruments, system scientists increasingly request fibers that perform in extreme environments while still maintaining very high optical transmission, stability, and reliability. Many new applications require fiber optic assemblies that will operate down to cryogenic temperatures as low as 20 Kelvin. In order for the fiber assemblies to operate with little loss in optical throughput at these extreme temperatures requires a system level approach all the way from how the fiber assembly is manufactured to how it is held, routed, and integrated. The NASA Goddard Code 562 Photonics Group has been designing, manufacturing, testing, and integrating fiber optics for spaceflight and other high reliability applications for nearly 20 years. Design techniques and lessons learned over the years are consistently applied to developing new fiber optic assemblies that meet these demanding environments. System level trades, fiber assembly design methods, manufacturing, testing, and integration will be discussed. Specific recent examples of ground support equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2); and others will be included.

  1. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucai Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0 guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  2. Local Delivery of Fluorescent Dye For Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy of the Living Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eHuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release versus foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  3. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  4. Fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model in college teaching of physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liping; Zhang, Yang; Li, Kun; Zhang, Yu

    2017-08-01

    Optical fiber sensor technology is one of the main contents of modern information technology, which has a very important position in modern science and technology. Fiber optic sensor experiment can improve students' enthusiasm and broaden their horizons in college physics experiment. In this paper the main structure and working principle of fiberoptical sensor with intensity compensation model are introduced. And thus fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model is applied to measure micro displacement of Young's modulus measurement experiment and metal linear expansion coefficient measurement experiment in the college physics experiment. Results indicate that the measurement accuracy of micro displacement is higher than that of the traditional methods using fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model. Meanwhile this measurement method makes the students understand on the optical fiber, sensor and nature of micro displacement measurement method and makes each experiment strengthen relationship and compatibility, which provides a new idea for the reform of experimental teaching.

  5. Architecture for fiber-optic sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a design for fiber-optic sensing and control in advanced aircraft Electronic Engine Control (EEC). The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pairs of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains interfaces to seven sensor groups. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide the sensing functions. Analysis revealed no strong discriminator (except reliability of laser diodes and remote electronics) on which to base a selection of preferred common interface type. A hardware test program is recommended to assess the relative maturity of the technologies and to determine real performance in the engine environment.

  6. Excitonic Coupling in Linear and Trefoil Trimer Perylenediimide Molecules Probed by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Yoo, Hyejin

    2012-10-25

    Perylenediimide (PDI) molecules are promising building blocks for photophysical studies of electronic interactions within multichromophore arrays. Such PDI arrays are important materials for fabrication of molecular nanodevices such as organic light-emitting diodes, organic semiconductors, and biosensors because of their high photostability, chemical and physical inertness, electron affinity, and high tinctorial strength over the entire visible spectrum. In this work, PDIs have been organized into linear (L3) and trefoil (T3) trimer molecules and investigated by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to probe the relationship between molecular structures and interchromophoric electronic interactions. We found a broad distribution of coupling strengths in both L3 and T3 and hence strong/weak coupling between PDI units by monitoring spectral peak shifts in single-molecule fluorescence spectra upon sequential photobleaching of each constituent chromophore. In addition, we used a wide-field defocused imaging technique to resolve heterogeneities in molecular structures of L3 and T3 embedded in a PMMA polymer matrix. A systematic comparison between the two sets of experimental results allowed us to infer the correlation between intermolecular interactions and molecular structures. Our results show control of the PDI intermolecular interactions using suitable multichromophoric structures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Probing The Three Gauge-boson Couplings in 14 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The potential for probing the Standard Model of elementary particle physics by measuring the interactions of W-bosons with Z0-bosons and photons (WW and WWZ triple gauge-boson couplings) using TeV-scale proton-proton collisions is described in the context of the ATLAS detector at the 14 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS detector and LHC are currently under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), with the first data expected in 2006. New analysis techniques are presented in this thesis: (1) A new strategy for placing limits on the consistency of measured anomalous triple gauge-boson coupling parameters with the Standard Model is presented. The strategy removes the ambiguities of form factors, by reporting the limits as a function of a cutoff operating on the diboson system invariant mass. (2) The `optimal observables' analysis strategy is investigated in the context of hadron colliders, and found to be not competitive, as compared to other strategies. (3) Techniques for ...

  8. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  9. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Lv

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  10. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  11. Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinski, Vedran; Donlagic, Denis

    2017-02-23

    Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.Invited Paper.

  12. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  13. Fiber-optic temperature sensor using a spectrum-modulating semiconductor etalon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus; Anthan, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a fiber-optic temperature sensor that uses a spectrum modulating SiC etalon. The spectral output of this type of sensor may be analyzed to obtain a temperature measurement which is largely independent of the transmission properties of the sensor's fiber-optic link. A highly precise laboratory spectrometer is described in detail, and this instrument is used to study the properties of this type of sensor. Also described are a number of different spectrum analyzers that are more suitable for use in a practical thermometer.

  14. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors in TPS: Arc Jet Model Design & Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard; Feldman, Jay; Ellerby, Donald; Monk, Joshua; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Switzer, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Techniques for using fiber optics with Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) have been developed by IFOS Corp. for use in thermal protection systems (TPS) on spacecraft heat shield materials through NASA Phase 1 and 2 SBIR efforts and have been further improved in a recent collaboration between IFOS and NASA that will be described here. Fiber optic temperature sensors offer several potential advantages over traditional thermocouple sensors including a) multiplexing many sensors in a single fiber to increase sensor density in a given array or to provide spatial resolution, b) improved thermal property match between sensor and TPS to reduce heat flow disruption, c) lack of electrical conductivity.

  15. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningfang Song

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10−5 deg/√h.

  16. Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinski, Vedran; Donlagic, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation. PMID:28241510

  17. Light Path Model of Fiber Optic Liquid Level Sensor Considering Residual Liquid Film on the Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The working principle of the refractive-type fiber optic liquid level sensor is analyzed in detail based on the light refraction principle. The optic path models are developed in consideration of common simplification and the residual liquid film on the glass tube wall. The calculating formulae for the model are derived, constraint conditions are obtained, influencing factors are discussed, and the scopes and skills of application are analyzed through instance simulations. The research results are useful in directing the correct usage of the fiber optic liquid level sensor, especially in special cases, such as those involving viscous liquid in the glass tube monitoring.

  18. An analog modulation and demodulation method employing LVDT signal conditioner for fiber-optic interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kejiang; Rao, Qi; Zhang, Minjie; Hu, Keke; Ruan, Yefeng

    2017-09-01

    An analog method to modulate and demodulate fiber-optic interferometric sensors employing a linear variable differential transformer signal conditioner to generate sine modulation wave and demodulate phase-modulated signal from the photodetector’s output is presented in this letter. No external lock-in amplifiers or digital components are used in this design. All the necessary components for signal processing are integrated in a single analog electronic microchip AD698, which reduces the system’s complexity significantly. After implementation on an interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope as an example, this method demonstrates a bias stability of 0.063 deg h-1 (i.e. 0.220 µrad).

  19. Integrating Fiber Optic Strain Sensors into Metal Using Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Norfolk, Mark; Wenning, Justin; Sheridan, John; Leser, Paul; Leser, Patrick; Newman, John A.

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing, a rather new three-dimensional (3D) printing technology, uses ultrasonic energy to produce metallurgical bonds between layers of metal foils near room temperature. This low temperature attribute of the process enables integration of temperature sensitive components, such as fiber optic strain sensors, directly into metal structures. This may be an enabling technology for Digital Twin applications, i.e., virtual model interaction and feedback with live load data. This study evaluates the consolidation quality, interface robustness, and load sensing limits of commercially available fiber optic strain sensors embedded into aluminum alloy 6061. Lastly, an outlook on the technology and its applications is described.

  20. Development and Testing of a Friction-Based Post-Installable Sensor for Subsea Fiber-Optic Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Nicole L.; Brower, David V.; Le, Suy Q.; Seaman, Calvin H.; Tang, Henry H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a friction-based coupling device for a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing subsea structures. This paper provides a summary of the design concept, prototype development, prototype performance testing, and design refinements of the device. The results of the laboratory testing of the first prototype performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are included in this paper. Limitations of the initial design were identified and future design improvements were proposed. These new features will enhance the coupling of the device and improve the monitoring system measurement capabilities. A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation monitoring system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the structure of interest for reliable measurements. Friction-based coupling devices have the potential to overcome coupling limitations caused by marine growth and soil contamination on subsea structures, flowlines or risers. The work described in this paper investigates the design of a friction-based coupling device (friction clamp), which is applicable for pipelines and structures that are suspended in the water column and those that are resting on the seabed. The monitoring elements consist of fiber-optic sensors that are bonded to a metal clamshell with a high-friction coating. The friction clamp has a single hinge design to facilitate the operation of the clamp and dual rows of opposing fasteners to distribute the clamping force on the structure. The friction clamp can be installed by divers in shallow depths or by remotely operated vehicles in deep-water applications. NASA-JSC was involved in the selection and testing of the friction coating, and in the design and testing of the prototype clamp device. Four-inch diameter and eight-inch diameter sub-scale friction clamp prototypes were built and tested to evaluate the strain