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Sample records for coupled cluster benchmarks

  1. Spin-orbit couplings within the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster framework: Theory, implementation, and benchmark calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0482 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Q-Chem Inc., 6601 Owens Drive, Suite 105, Pleasanton, California 94588 (United States); Klein, Kerstin; Gauss, Jürgen [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Stopkowicz, Stella [Department of Chemistry, Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Krylov, Anna I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0482 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    We present a formalism and an implementation for calculating spin-orbit couplings (SOCs) within the EOM-CCSD (equation-of-motion coupled-cluster with single and double substitutions) approach. The following variants of EOM-CCSD are considered: EOM-CCSD for excitation energies (EOM-EE-CCSD), EOM-CCSD with spin-flip (EOM-SF-CCSD), EOM-CCSD for ionization potentials (EOM-IP-CCSD) and electron attachment (EOM-EA-CCSD). We employ a perturbative approach in which the SOCs are computed as matrix elements of the respective part of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian using zeroth-order non-relativistic wave functions. We follow the expectation-value approach rather than the response-theory formulation for property calculations. Both the full two-electron treatment and the mean-field approximation (a partial account of the two-electron contributions) have been implemented and benchmarked using several small molecules containing elements up to the fourth row of the periodic table. The benchmark results show the excellent performance of the perturbative treatment and the mean-field approximation. When used with an appropriate basis set, the errors with respect to experiment are below 5% for the considered examples. The findings regarding basis-set requirements are in agreement with previous studies. The impact of different correlation treatment in zeroth-order wave functions is analyzed. Overall, the EOM-IP-CCSD, EOM-EA-CCSD, EOM-EE-CCSD, and EOM-SF-CCSD wave functions yield SOCs that agree well with each other (and with the experimental values when available). Using an EOM-CCSD approach that provides a more balanced description of the target states yields more accurate results.

  2. Benchmarking density-functional-theory calculations of rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities using accurate coupled-cluster calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutnaes, Ola B; Teale, Andrew M; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2009-10-14

    An accurate set of benchmark rotational g tensors and magnetizabilities are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the results obtained is established for the rotational g tensors by careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. After an analysis of the basis sets employed, extrapolation techniques are used to provide estimates of the basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. The utility of the data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of density functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the density-functional methods are competitive with the CCSD or CCSD(T) methods. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of density-functional calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. The importance of current dependence in exchange-correlation functionals is discussed in light of this comparison.

  3. Basis set effects on coupled cluster benchmarks of electronically excited states: CC3, CCSDR(3) and CC2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Schreiber, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Vertical electronic excitation energies and one-electron properties of 28 medium-sized molecules from a previously proposed benchmark set are revisited using the augmented correlation-consistent triple-zeta aug-cc-pVTZ basis set in CC2, CCSDR(3), and CC3 calculations. The results are compared...... to those obtained previously with the smaller TZVP basis set. For each of the three coupled cluster methods, a correlation coefficient greater than 0.994 is found between the vertical excitation energies computed with the two basis sets. The deviations of the CC2 and CCSDR(3) results from the CC3 reference...... values are very similar for both basis sets, thus confirming previous conclusions on the intrinsic accuracy of CC2 and CCSDR(3). This similarity justifies the use of CC2- or CCSDR(3)-based corrections to account for basis set incompleteness in CC3 studies of vertical excitation energies. For oscillator...

  4. Benchmark Applications of Variations of Multireference Equation of Motion Coupled-Cluster Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huntington, L. M.; Demel, Ondřej; Nooijen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2016), s. 114-132 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-00058Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : MR-EOM * Benchmark applications * variations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.245, year: 2016

  5. Predictive coupled-cluster isomer orderings for some Si{sub n}C{sub m} (m, n ≤ 12) clusters: A pragmatic comparison between DFT and complete basis limit coupled-cluster benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, Jason N., E-mail: byrd.jason@ensco.com [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); ENSCO, Inc., 4849 North Wickham Road, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Lutz, Jesse J., E-mail: jesse.lutz.ctr@afit.edu; Jin, Yifan; Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J., E-mail: rodbartl@ufl.edu [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Montgomery, John A. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Duan, Xiaofeng F. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory DoD Supercomputing Resource Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Burggraf, Larry W. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Sanders, Beverly A. [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2016-07-14

    The accurate determination of the preferred Si{sub 12}C{sub 12} isomer is important to guide experimental efforts directed towards synthesizing SiC nano-wires and related polymer structures which are anticipated to be highly efficient exciton materials for the opto-electronic devices. In order to definitively identify preferred isomeric structures for silicon carbon nano-clusters, highly accurate geometries, energies, and harmonic zero point energies have been computed using coupled-cluster theory with systematic extrapolation to the complete basis limit for set of silicon carbon clusters ranging in size from SiC{sub 3} to Si{sub 12}C{sub 12}. It is found that post-MBPT(2) correlation energy plays a significant role in obtaining converged relative isomer energies, suggesting that predictions using low rung density functional methods will not have adequate accuracy. Utilizing the best composite coupled-cluster energy that is still computationally feasible, entailing a 3-4 SCF and coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles extrapolation with triple-ζ (T) correlation, the closo Si{sub 12}C{sub 12} isomer is identified to be the preferred isomer in the support of previous calculations [X. F. Duan and L. W. Burggraf, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 034303 (2015)]. Additionally we have investigated more pragmatic approaches to obtaining accurate silicon carbide isomer energies, including the use of frozen natural orbital coupled-cluster theory and several rungs of standard and double-hybrid density functional theory. Frozen natural orbitals as a way to compute post-MBPT(2) correlation energy are found to be an excellent balance between efficiency and accuracy.

  6. Predictive coupled-cluster isomer orderings for some SinCm (m, n ≤ 12) clusters: A pragmatic comparison between DFT and complete basis limit coupled-cluster benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, Jason N.; Lutz, Jesse J.; Jin, Yifan; Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Montgomery, John A.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.; Sanders, Beverly A.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate determination of the preferred Si 12 C 12 isomer is important to guide experimental efforts directed towards synthesizing SiC nano-wires and related polymer structures which are anticipated to be highly efficient exciton materials for the opto-electronic devices. In order to definitively identify preferred isomeric structures for silicon carbon nano-clusters, highly accurate geometries, energies, and harmonic zero point energies have been computed using coupled-cluster theory with systematic extrapolation to the complete basis limit for set of silicon carbon clusters ranging in size from SiC 3 to Si 12 C 12 . It is found that post-MBPT(2) correlation energy plays a significant role in obtaining converged relative isomer energies, suggesting that predictions using low rung density functional methods will not have adequate accuracy. Utilizing the best composite coupled-cluster energy that is still computationally feasible, entailing a 3-4 SCF and coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles extrapolation with triple-ζ (T) correlation, the closo Si 12 C 12 isomer is identified to be the preferred isomer in the support of previous calculations [X. F. Duan and L. W. Burggraf, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 034303 (2015)]. Additionally we have investigated more pragmatic approaches to obtaining accurate silicon carbide isomer energies, including the use of frozen natural orbital coupled-cluster theory and several rungs of standard and double-hybrid density functional theory. Frozen natural orbitals as a way to compute post-MBPT(2) correlation energy are found to be an excellent balance between efficiency and accuracy.

  7. Prismatic Core Coupled Transient Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortensi, J.; Pope, M.A.; Strydom, G.; Sen, R.S.; DeHart, M.D.; Gougar, H.D.; Ellis, C.; Baxter, A.; Seker, V.; Downar, T.J.; Vierow, K.; Ivanov, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  8. Projected coupled cluster theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yiheng; Henderson, Thomas M; Zhao, Jinmo; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2017-08-14

    Coupled cluster theory is the method of choice for weakly correlated systems. But in the strongly correlated regime, it faces a symmetry dilemma, where it either completely fails to describe the system or has to artificially break certain symmetries. On the other hand, projected Hartree-Fock theory captures the essential physics of many kinds of strong correlations via symmetry breaking and restoration. In this work, we combine and try to retain the merits of these two methods by applying symmetry projection to broken symmetry coupled cluster wave functions. The non-orthogonal nature of states resulting from the application of symmetry projection operators furnishes particle-hole excitations to all orders, thus creating an obstacle for the exact evaluation of overlaps. Here we provide a solution via a disentanglement framework theory that can be approximated rigorously and systematically. Results of projected coupled cluster theory are presented for molecules and the Hubbard model, showing that spin projection significantly improves unrestricted coupled cluster theory while restoring good quantum numbers. The energy of projected coupled cluster theory reduces to the unprojected one in the thermodynamic limit, albeit at a much slower rate than projected Hartree-Fock.

  9. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Compernolle, B. van; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved

  10. Extensive regularization of the coupled cluster methods based on the generating functional formalism: Application to gas-phase benchmarks and to the SN2 reaction of CHCl3 and OH- in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, Karol; Valiev, Marat

    2009-01-01

    The recently introduced energy expansion based on the use of generating functional (GF) [K. Kowalski and P. D. Fan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 084112 (2009)] provides a way of constructing size-consistent noniterative coupled cluster (CC) corrections in terms of moments of the CC equations. To take advantage of this expansion in a strongly interacting regime, the regularization of the cluster amplitudes is required in order to counteract the effect of excessive growth of the norm of the CC wave function. Although proven to be efficient, the previously discussed form of the regularization does not lead to rigorously size-consistent corrections. In this paper we address the issue of size-consistent regularization of the GF expansion by redefining the equations for the cluster amplitudes. The performance and basic features of proposed methodology are illustrated on several gas-phase benchmark systems. Moreover, the regularized GF approaches are combined with quantum mechanical molecular mechanics module and applied to describe the S N 2 reaction of CHCl 3 and OH - in aqueous solution.

  11. Higgs pair production: choosing benchmarks with cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Dall’Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Goertz, Florian [CERN,1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gottardo, Carlo A. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn,Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Tosi, Mia [CERN,1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-20

    New physics theories often depend on a large number of free parameters. The phenomenology they predict for fundamental physics processes is in some cases drastically affected by the precise value of those free parameters, while in other cases is left basically invariant at the level of detail experimentally accessible. When designing a strategy for the analysis of experimental data in the search for a signal predicted by a new physics model, it appears advantageous to categorize the parameter space describing the model according to the corresponding kinematical features of the final state. A multi-dimensional test statistic can be used to gauge the degree of similarity in the kinematics predicted by different models; a clustering algorithm using that metric may allow the division of the space into homogeneous regions, each of which can be successfully represented by a benchmark point. Searches targeting those benchmarks are then guaranteed to be sensitive to a large area of the parameter space. In this document we show a practical implementation of the above strategy for the study of non-resonant production of Higgs boson pairs in the context of extensions of the standard model with anomalous couplings of the Higgs bosons. A non-standard value of those couplings may significantly enhance the Higgs boson pair-production cross section, such that the process could be detectable with the data that the LHC will collect in Run 2.

  12. μ-synthesis for the coupled mass benchmark problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, J.; Tøffner-Clausen, S.

    1997-01-01

    A robust controller design for the coupled mass benchmark problem is presented in this paper. The applied design method is based on a modified D-K iteration, i.e. μ-synthesis which take care of mixed real and complex perturbations sets. This μ-synthesis method for mixed perturbation sets is a str......A robust controller design for the coupled mass benchmark problem is presented in this paper. The applied design method is based on a modified D-K iteration, i.e. μ-synthesis which take care of mixed real and complex perturbations sets. This μ-synthesis method for mixed perturbation sets...

  13. Higgs Pair Production: Choosing Benchmarks With Cluster Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Dorigo, Tommaso; Goertz, Florian; Gottardo, Carlo A.; Tosi, Mia

    2016-01-01

    New physics theories often depend on a large number of free parameters. The precise values of those parameters in some cases drastically affect the resulting phenomenology of fundamental physics processes, while in others finite variations can leave it basically invariant at the level of detail experimentally accessible. When designing a strategy for the analysis of experimental data in the search for a signal predicted by a new physics model, it appears advantageous to categorize the parameter space describing the model according to the corresponding kinematical features of the final state. A multi-dimensional test statistic can be used to gauge the degree of similarity in the kinematics of different models; a clustering algorithm using that metric may then allow the division of the space into homogeneous regions, each of which can be successfully represented by a benchmark point. Searches targeting those benchmark points are then guaranteed to be sensitive to a large area of the parameter space. In this doc...

  14. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Meylianti S., Brigita

    1999-01-01

    Benchmarking has different meaning to different people. There are five types of benchmarking, namely internal benchmarking, competitive benchmarking, industry / functional benchmarking, process / generic benchmarking and collaborative benchmarking. Each type of benchmarking has its own advantages as well as disadvantages. Therefore it is important to know what kind of benchmarking is suitable to a specific application. This paper will discuss those five types of benchmarking in detail, includ...

  15. Systematic design of active spaces for multi-reference calculations of singlet-triplet gaps of organic diradicals, with benchmarks against doubly electron-attached coupled-cluster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneburner, Samuel J.; Shen, Jun; Ajala, Adeayo O.; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-10-01

    Singlet-triplet gaps in diradical organic π-systems are of interest in many applications. In this study, we calculate them in a series of molecules, including cyclobutadiene and its derivatives and cyclopentadienyl cation, by using correlated participating orbitals within the complete active space (CAS) and restricted active space (RAS) self-consistent field frameworks, followed by second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2 and RASPT2). These calculations are evaluated by comparison with the results of doubly electron-attached (DEA) equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled-cluster (CC) calculations with up to 4-particle-2-hole (4p-2h) excitations. We find active spaces that can accurately reproduce the DEA-EOMCC(4p-2h) data while being small enough to be applicable to larger organic diradicals.

  16. Performance Based Clustering for Benchmarking of Container Ports: an Application of Dea and Cluster Analysis Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The operational performance of container ports has received more and more attentions in both academic and practitioner circles, the performance evaluation and process improvement of container ports have also been the focus of several studies. In this paper, Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA, an effective tool for relative efficiency assessment, is utilized for measuring the performances and benchmarking of the 77 world container ports in 2007. The used approaches in the current study consider four inputs (Capacity of Cargo Handling Machines, Number of Berths, Terminal Area and Storage Capacity and a single output (Container Throughput. The results for the efficiency scores are analyzed, and a unique ordering of the ports based on average cross efficiency is provided, also cluster analysis technique is used to select the more appropriate targets for poorly performing ports to use as benchmarks.

  17. BCS superconductivity for weakly coupled clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedel, J.

    1992-01-01

    BCS superconductivity is expected to have fairly high critical temperatures when clusters of moderate sizes are weakly coupled to form a crystal. This remark extends to quasi zerodimensional cases, a remark initially made by Labbe for quasi one-dimensional ones and by Hirsch, Bok and Labbe for quasi twodimensional ones. Possible applications are envisaged for twodimensional clusters (fullerene) or threedimensional ones (metal clusters, Chevrel phases). Conditions for optimal applicability of the scheme are somewhat restricted. (orig.)

  18. Coupled code analysis of uncertainty and sensitivity of Kalinin-3 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasichnyk, Ihor; Zwermann, Winfried; Velkov, Kiril [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany); Nikonov, Sergey [VNIIAES, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    An uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is performed for the OECD/NEA coolant transient Benchmark (K-3) on measured data at Kalinin-3 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). A switch off of one main coolant pump (MCP) at nominal reactor power is calculated using a coupled thermohydraulic and neutron-kinetic ATHLET-PARCS code. The objectives are to study uncertainty of total reactor power and to identify the main sources of reactor power uncertainty. The GRS uncertainty and sensitivity software package XSUSA is applied to propagate uncertainties in nuclear data libraries to the full core coupled transient calculations. A set of most important thermal-hydraulic parameters of the primary circuit is identified and a total of 23 thermohydraulic parameters are statistically varied using GRS code SUSA. The ATHLET model contains also a balance-of-plant (BOP) model which is simulated using ATHLET GCSM module. In particular the operation of the main steam generator regulators is modelled in detail. A set of 200 varied coupled ATHLET-PARCS calculations is analyzed. The results obtained show a clustering effect in the behavior of global reactor parameters. It is found that the GCSM system together with varied input parameters strongly influence the overall nuclear power plant behavior and can even lead to a new scenario. Possible reasons of the clustering effect are discussed in the paper. This work is a step forward in establishing a ''best-estimate calculations in combination with performing uncertainty analysis'' methodology for coupled full core calculations.

  19. Benchmark CCSD(T) and DFT study of binding energies in Be7 - 12: in search of reliable DFT functional for beryllium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labanc, Daniel; Šulka, Martin; Pitoňák, Michal; Černušák, Ivan; Urban, Miroslav; Neogrády, Pavel

    2018-05-01

    We present a computational study of the stability of small homonuclear beryllium clusters Be7 - 12 in singlet electronic states. Our predictions are based on highly correlated CCSD(T) coupled cluster calculations. Basis set convergence towards the complete basis set limit as well as the role of the 1s core electron correlation are carefully examined. Our CCSD(T) data for binding energies of Be7 - 12 clusters serve as a benchmark for performance assessment of several density functional theory (DFT) methods frequently used in beryllium cluster chemistry. We observe that, from Be10 clusters on, the deviation from CCSD(T) benchmarks is stable with respect to size, and fluctuating within 0.02 eV error bar for most examined functionals. This opens up the possibility of scaling the DFT binding energies for large Be clusters using CCSD(T) benchmark values for smaller clusters. We also tried to find analogies between the performance of DFT functionals for Be clusters and for the valence-isoelectronic Mg clusters investigated recently in Truhlar's group. We conclude that it is difficult to find DFT functionals that perform reasonably well for both beryllium and magnesium clusters. Out of 12 functionals examined, only the M06-2X functional gives reasonably accurate and balanced binding energies for both Be and Mg clusters.

  20. Coupled Cluster Theory for Large Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudin, Pablo

    This thesis describes the development of local approximations to coupled cluster (CC) theory for large molecules. Two different methods are presented, the divide–expand–consolidate scheme (DEC), for the calculation of ground state energies, and a local framework denoted LoFEx, for the calculation...

  1. The polarizable embedding coupled cluster method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneskov, Kristian; Schwabe, Tobias; Kongsted, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a new combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method based on a self-consistent polarizable embedding (PE) scheme. For the description of the QM region, we apply the popular coupled cluster (CC) method detailing the inclusion of electrostatic and polarization effects...

  2. Benchmarking and tuning the MILC code on clusters and supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we have benchmarked and tuned the MILC code on a number of architectures including Intel Itanium and Pentium IV (PIV), dual-CPU Athlon, and the latest Compaq Alpha nodes. Results will be presented for many of these, and we shall discuss some simple code changes that can result in a very dramatic speedup of the KS conjugate gradient on processors with more advanced memory systems such as PIV, IBM SP and Alpha

  3. Benchmarking and tuning the MILC code on clusters and supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven A. Gottlieb

    2001-01-01

    Recently, we have benchmarked and tuned the MILC code on a number of architectures including Intel Itanium and Pentium IV (PIV), dual-CPU Athlon, and the latest Compaq Alpha nodes. Results will be presented for many of these, and we shall discuss some simple code changes that can result in a very dramatic speedup of the KS conjugate gradient on processors with more advanced memory systems such as PIV, IBM SP and Alpha

  4. Benchmarking and tuning the MILC code on clusters and supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Steven

    2002-03-01

    Recently, we have benchmarked and tuned the MILC code on a number of architectures including Intel Itanium and Pentium IV (PIV), dual-CPU Athlon, and the latest Compaq Alpha nodes. Results will be presented for many of these, and we shall discuss some simple code changes that can result in a very dramatic speedup of the KS conjugate gradient on processors with more advanced memory systems such as PIV, IBM SP and Alpha.

  5. Stochastic coupled cluster theory: Efficient sampling of the coupled cluster expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles J. C.; Thom, Alex J. W.

    2017-09-01

    We consider the sampling of the coupled cluster expansion within stochastic coupled cluster theory. Observing the limitations of previous approaches due to the inherently non-linear behavior of a coupled cluster wavefunction representation, we propose new approaches based on an intuitive, well-defined condition for sampling weights and on sampling the expansion in cluster operators of different excitation levels. We term these modifications even and truncated selections, respectively. Utilising both approaches demonstrates dramatically improved calculation stability as well as reduced computational and memory costs. These modifications are particularly effective at higher truncation levels owing to the large number of terms within the cluster expansion that can be neglected, as demonstrated by the reduction of the number of terms to be sampled when truncating at triple excitations by 77% and hextuple excitations by 98%.

  6. Seniority-based coupled cluster theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Stein, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI) with optimized orbitals often accurately describes strong correlations while working in a Hilbert space much smaller than that needed for full configuration interaction. However, the scaling of such calculations remains combinatorial with system size. Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) is very successful in reproducing DOCI energetically, but can do so with low polynomial scaling (N 3 , disregarding the two-electron integral transformation from atomic to molecular orbitals). We show here several examples illustrating the success of pCCD in reproducing both the DOCI energy and wave function and show how this success frequently comes about. What DOCI and pCCD lack are an effective treatment of dynamic correlations, which we here add by including higher-seniority cluster amplitudes which are excluded from pCCD. This frozen pair coupled cluster approach is comparable in cost to traditional closed-shell coupled cluster methods with results that are competitive for weakly correlated systems and often superior for the description of strongly correlated systems

  7. Single pin BWR benchmark problem for coupled Monte Carlo - Thermal hydraulics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.; Sanchez, V.; Hoogenboom, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the European NURISP research project, a single pin BWR benchmark problem was defined. The aim of this initiative is to test the coupling strategies between Monte Carlo and subchannel codes developed by different project participants. In this paper the results obtained by the Delft Univ. of Technology and Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology will be presented. The benchmark problem was simulated with the following coupled codes: TRIPOLI-SUBCHANFLOW, MCNP-FLICA, MCNP-SUBCHANFLOW, and KENO-SUBCHANFLOW. (authors)

  8. Single pin BWR benchmark problem for coupled Monte Carlo - Thermal hydraulics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.; Sanchez, V. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology, Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Herman-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hoogenboom, J. E. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the European NURISP research project, a single pin BWR benchmark problem was defined. The aim of this initiative is to test the coupling strategies between Monte Carlo and subchannel codes developed by different project participants. In this paper the results obtained by the Delft Univ. of Technology and Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology will be presented. The benchmark problem was simulated with the following coupled codes: TRIPOLI-SUBCHANFLOW, MCNP-FLICA, MCNP-SUBCHANFLOW, and KENO-SUBCHANFLOW. (authors)

  9. Seniority zero pair coupled cluster doubles theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Tamar; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2014-01-01

    Coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations accurately describes weak electron correlation but is known to fail in cases of strong static correlation. Fascinatingly, however, pair coupled cluster doubles (p-CCD), a simplified version of the theory limited to pair excitations that preserve the seniority of the reference determinant (i.e., the number of unpaired electrons), has mean field computational cost and is an excellent approximation to the full configuration interaction (FCI) of the paired space provided that the orbital basis defining the pairing scheme is adequately optimized. In previous work, we have shown that optimization of the pairing scheme in the seniority zero FCI leads to a very accurate description of static correlation. The same conclusion extends to p-CCD if the orbitals are optimized to make the p-CCD energy stationary. We here demonstrate these results with numerous examples. We also explore the contributions of different seniority sectors to the coupled cluster doubles (CCD) correlation energy using different orbital bases. We consider both Hartree-Fock and Brueckner orbitals, and the role of orbital localization. We show how one can pair the orbitals so that the role of the Brueckner orbitals at the CCD level is retained at the p-CCD level. Moreover, we explore ways of extending CCD to accurately describe strongly correlated systems

  10. NRC-BNL Benchmark Program on Evaluation of Methods for Seismic Analysis of Coupled Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokshi, N.; DeGrassi, G.; Xu, J.

    1999-01-01

    A NRC-BNL benchmark program for evaluation of state-of-the-art analysis methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of coupled structures with non-classical damping is described. The program includes a series of benchmarking problems designed to investigate various aspects of complexities, applications and limitations associated with methods for analysis of non-classically damped structures. Discussions are provided on the benchmarking process, benchmark structural models, and the evaluation approach, as well as benchmarking ground rules. It is expected that the findings and insights, as well as recommendations from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving licensing applications of these alternate methods to coupled systems

  11. Communication: A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian for polarizable embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Katharina; Klopper, Wim

    2016-01-28

    A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian, which is linear in the Lagrangian multipliers, is proposed for the coupled-cluster treatment of a quantum mechanical system in a polarizable environment. In the simplified approach, the amplitude equations are decoupled from the Lagrangian multipliers and the energy obtained from the projected coupled-cluster equation corresponds to a stationary point of the Lagrangian.

  12. Communication: A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian for polarizable embedding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Katharina; Klopper, Wim

    2016-01-01

    A simplified coupled-cluster Lagrangian, which is linear in the Lagrangian multipliers, is proposed for the coupled-cluster treatment of a quantum mechanical system in a polarizable environment. In the simplified approach, the amplitude equations are decoupled from the Lagrangian multipliers and the energy obtained from the projected coupled-cluster equation corresponds to a stationary point of the Lagrangian

  13. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Beretta Sergio; Dossi Andrea; Grove Hugh

    2000-01-01

    Due to their particular nature, the benchmarking methodologies tend to exceed the boundaries of management techniques, and to enter the territories of managerial culture. A culture that is also destined to break into the accounting area not only strongly supporting the possibility of fixing targets, and measuring and comparing the performance (an aspect that is already innovative and that is worthy of attention), but also questioning one of the principles (or taboos) of the accounting or...

  14. Recent advances in coupled-cluster methods

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, Rodney J

    1997-01-01

    Today, coupled-cluster (CC) theory has emerged as the most accurate, widely applicable approach for the correlation problem in molecules. Furthermore, the correct scaling of the energy and wavefunction with size (i.e. extensivity) recommends it for studies of polymers and crystals as well as molecules. CC methods have also paid dividends for nuclei, and for certain strongly correlated systems of interest in field theory.In order for CC methods to have achieved this distinction, it has been necessary to formulate new, theoretical approaches for the treatment of a variety of essential quantities

  15. Benchmarking Benchmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Blitz (David)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBenchmarking benchmarks is a bundle of six studies that are inspired by the prevalence of benchmarking in academic finance research as well as in investment practice. Three studies examine if current benchmark asset pricing models adequately describe the cross-section of stock returns.

  16. Computational Aspects of Nuclear Coupled-Cluster Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, David Jarvis; Hagen, Gaute; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Papenbrock, T.F.

    2008-01-01

    Coupled-cluster theory represents an important theoretical tool that we use to solve the quantum many-body problem. Coupled-cluster theory also lends itself to computation in a parallel computing environment. In this article, we present selected results from ab initio studies of stable and weakly bound nuclei utilizing computational techniques that we employ to solve coupled-cluster theory. We also outline several perspectives for future research directions in this area.

  17. Can Single-Reference Coupled Cluster Theory Describe Static Correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulik, Ireneusz W; Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2015-07-14

    While restricted single-reference coupled cluster theory truncated to singles and doubles (CCSD) provides very accurate results for weakly correlated systems, it usually fails in the presence of static or strong correlation. This failure is generally attributed to the qualitative breakdown of the reference, and can accordingly be corrected by using a multideterminant reference, including higher-body cluster operators in the ansatz, or allowing symmetry breaking in the reference. None of these solutions are ideal; multireference coupled cluster is not black box, including higher-body cluster operators is computationally demanding, and allowing symmetry breaking leads to the loss of good quantum numbers. It has long been recognized that quasidegeneracies can instead be treated by modifying the coupled cluster ansatz. The recently introduced pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) approach is one such example which avoids catastrophic failures and accurately models strong correlations in a symmetry-adapted framework. Here, we generalize pCCD to a singlet-paired coupled cluster model (CCD0) intermediate between coupled cluster doubles and pCCD, yielding a method that possesses the invariances of the former and much of the stability of the latter. Moreover, CCD0 retains the full structure of coupled cluster theory, including a fermionic wave function, antisymmetric cluster amplitudes, and well-defined response equations and density matrices.

  18. Cluster synchronization induced by one-node clusters in networks with asymmetric negative couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianbao; Ma, Zhongjun; Zhang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of cluster synchronization in networks with asymmetric negative couplings. By decomposing the coupling matrix into three matrices, and employing Lyapunov function method, sufficient conditions are derived for cluster synchronization. The conditions show that the couplings of multi-node clusters from one-node clusters have beneficial effects on cluster synchronization. Based on the effects of the one-node clusters, an effective and universal control scheme is put forward for the first time. The obtained results may help us better understand the relation between cluster synchronization and cluster structures of the networks. The validity of the control scheme is confirmed through two numerical simulations, in a network with no cluster structure and in a scale-free network

  19. Cluster synchronization induced by one-node clusters in networks with asymmetric negative couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbao; Ma, Zhongjun; Zhang, Gang

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of cluster synchronization in networks with asymmetric negative couplings. By decomposing the coupling matrix into three matrices, and employing Lyapunov function method, sufficient conditions are derived for cluster synchronization. The conditions show that the couplings of multi-node clusters from one-node clusters have beneficial effects on cluster synchronization. Based on the effects of the one-node clusters, an effective and universal control scheme is put forward for the first time. The obtained results may help us better understand the relation between cluster synchronization and cluster structures of the networks. The validity of the control scheme is confirmed through two numerical simulations, in a network with no cluster structure and in a scale-free network.

  20. Singlet-paired coupled cluster theory for open shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, John A.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-06-01

    Restricted single-reference coupled cluster theory truncated to single and double excitations accurately describes weakly correlated systems, but often breaks down in the presence of static or strong correlation. Good coupled cluster energies in the presence of degeneracies can be obtained by using a symmetry-broken reference, such as unrestricted Hartree-Fock, but at the cost of good quantum numbers. A large body of work has shown that modifying the coupled cluster ansatz allows for the treatment of strong correlation within a single-reference, symmetry-adapted framework. The recently introduced singlet-paired coupled cluster doubles (CCD0) method is one such model, which recovers correct behavior for strong correlation without requiring symmetry breaking in the reference. Here, we extend singlet-paired coupled cluster for application to open shells via restricted open-shell singlet-paired coupled cluster singles and doubles (ROCCSD0). The ROCCSD0 approach retains the benefits of standard coupled cluster theory and recovers correct behavior for strongly correlated, open-shell systems using a spin-preserving ROHF reference.

  1. Singlet-paired coupled cluster theory for open shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, John A.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Restricted single-reference coupled cluster theory truncated to single and double excitations accurately describes weakly correlated systems, but often breaks down in the presence of static or strong correlation. Good coupled cluster energies in the presence of degeneracies can be obtained by using a symmetry-broken reference, such as unrestricted Hartree-Fock, but at the cost of good quantum numbers. A large body of work has shown that modifying the coupled cluster ansatz allows for the treatment of strong correlation within a single-reference, symmetry-adapted framework. The recently introduced singlet-paired coupled cluster doubles (CCD0) method is one such model, which recovers correct behavior for strong correlation without requiring symmetry breaking in the reference. Here, we extend singlet-paired coupled cluster for application to open shells via restricted open-shell singlet-paired coupled cluster singles and doubles (ROCCSD0). The ROCCSD0 approach retains the benefits of standard coupled cluster theory and recovers correct behavior for strongly correlated, open-shell systems using a spin-preserving ROHF reference.

  2. The coupled code system DORT-TD/THERMIX and its application to the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautz, A.; Tyobeka, B.; Ivanov, K.

    2009-01-01

    In new reactor designs that are still under review such as the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), not much experimental data exists to benchmark newly developed computer codes against. Such a situation requires that nuclear engineers and designers of this novel reactor design must resort to the validation of a newly developed code through a code-to-code benchmarking exercise because there are validated codes that are currently in use to analyze this reactor design, albeit very few of them. There are numerous HTR core physics benchmarks that are currently being pursued by different organizations, for different purposes. One such benchmark exercise is the PBMR-400MW OECD/NEA coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark. In this paper, a newly developed coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics code system, DORT-TD/THERMIX with both transport and diffusion theory options, is used to simulate both the steady-state as well as several transient scenarios in this benchmark problem. (orig.)

  3. Delay-induced cluster patterns in coupled Cayley tree networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Jalan, S.

    2013-07-01

    We study effects of delay in diffusively coupled logistic maps on the Cayley tree networks. We find that smaller coupling values exhibit sensitiveness to value of delay, and lead to different cluster patterns of self-organized and driven types. Whereas larger coupling strengths exhibit robustness against change in delay values, and lead to stable driven clusters comprising nodes from last generation of the Cayley tree. Furthermore, introduction of delay exhibits suppression as well as enhancement of synchronization depending upon coupling strength values. To the end we discuss the importance of results to understand conflicts and cooperations observed in family business.

  4. Comparison of Cluster C personality disorders in couples with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of Cluster C personality disorders in couples with normal divorce. ... Also purposeful sampling was used to select individuals. ... that the personality disorder group C, there is no significant difference between men and women.

  5. Cluster synchronization modes in an ensemble of coupled chaotic oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, Vladimir N.; Belykh, Igor V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2001-01-01

    Considering systems of diffusively coupled identical chaotic oscillators, an effective method to determine the possible states of cluster synchronization and ensure their stability is presented. The method, which may find applications in communication engineering and other fields of science...

  6. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  7. Emergent organization of oscillator clusters in coupled self ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Additionally, the maps are coupled sequentially and unidirectionally, to their nearest neighbor, through the difference of their parametric variations. Interestingly we find that this model asymptotically yields clusters of superstable oscillators with different periods. We observe that the sizes of these oscillator clusters have a ...

  8. Experimental benchmark of kinetic simulations of capacitively coupled plasmas in molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkó, Z.; Derzsi, A.; Korolov, I.; Hartmann, P.; Brandt, S.; Schulze, J.; Berger, B.; Koepke, M.; Bruneau, B.; Johnson, E.; Lafleur, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Gibson, A. R.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the origin of uncertainties in the results of numerical simulations of low-temperature plasma sources, focusing on capacitively coupled plasmas. These sources can be operated in various gases/gas mixtures, over a wide domain of excitation frequency, voltage, and gas pressure. At low pressures, the non-equilibrium character of the charged particle transport prevails and particle-based simulations become the primary tools for their numerical description. The particle-in-cell method, complemented with Monte Carlo type description of collision processes, is a well-established approach for this purpose. Codes based on this technique have been developed by several authors/groups, and have been benchmarked with each other in some cases. Such benchmarking demonstrates the correctness of the codes, but the underlying physical model remains unvalidated. This is a key point, as this model should ideally account for all important plasma chemical reactions as well as for the plasma-surface interaction via including specific surface reaction coefficients (electron yields, sticking coefficients, etc). In order to test the models rigorously, comparison with experimental ‘benchmark data’ is necessary. Examples will be given regarding the studies of electron power absorption modes in O2, and CF4-Ar discharges, as well as on the effect of modifications of the parameters of certain elementary processes on the computed discharge characteristics in O2 capacitively coupled plasmas.

  9. Coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code benchmark activities at the International Nuclear Safety Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlazov, L. N.

    1998-01-01

    Two realistic benchmark problems are defined and used to assess the performance of coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes used in simulating dynamic processes in VVER-1000 and RBMK reactor systems. One of the problems simulates a design basis accident involving the ejection of three control and protection system rods from a VVER-1000 reactor. The other is based on a postulated rod withdrawal from an operating RBMK reactor. Preliminary results calculated by various codes are compared. While these results show significant differences, the intercomparisons performed so far provide a basis for further evaluation of code limitations and modeling assumptions

  10. Three-dimensional coupled kinetics/thermal- hydraulic benchmark TRIGA experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltus, Madeline Anne; Miller, William Scott

    2000-01-01

    This research project provides separate effects tests in order to benchmark neutron kinetics models coupled with thermal-hydraulic (T/H) models used in best-estimate codes such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) RELAP and TRAC code series and industrial codes such as RETRAN. Before this research project was initiated, no adequate experimental data existed for reactivity initiated transients that could be used to assess coupled three-dimensional (3D) kinetics and 3D T/H codes which have been, or are being developed around the world. Using various Test Reactor Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA) reactor core configurations at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR), it is possible to determine the level of neutronics modeling required to describe kinetics and T/H feedback interactions. This research demonstrates that the small compact PSBR TRIGA core does not necessarily behave as a point kinetics reactor, but that this TRIGA can provide actual test results for 3D kinetics code benchmark efforts. This research focused on developing in-reactor tests that exhibited 3D neutronics effects coupled with 3D T/H feedback. A variety of pulses were used to evaluate the level of kinetics modeling needed for prompt temperature feedback in the fuel. Ramps and square waves were used to evaluate the detail of modeling needed for the delayed T/H feedback of the coolant. A stepped ramp was performed to evaluate and verify the derived thermal constants for the specific PSBR TRIGA core loading pattern. As part of the analytical benchmark research, the STAR 3D kinetics code (, STAR: Space and time analysis of reactors, Version 5, Level 3, Users Guide, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, YEAC 1758, Bolton, MA) was used to model the transient experiments. The STAR models were coupled with the one-dimensional (1D) WIGL and LRA and 3D COBRA (, COBRA IIIC: A digital computer program for steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements, Battelle

  11. Antiferromagnetic exchange coupling measurements on single Co clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Leroy, D.; Portemont, C.; Brenac, A.; Morel, R.; Notin, L.; Mailly, D.

    2009-03-01

    We report on single-cluster measurements of the angular dependence of the low-temperature ferromagnetic core magnetization switching field in exchange-coupled Co/CoO core-shell clusters (4 nm) using a micro-bridge DC superconducting quantum interference device (μ-SQUID). It is observed that the coupling with the antiferromagnetic shell induces modification in the switching field for clusters with intrinsic uniaxial anisotropy depending on the direction of the magnetic field applied during the cooling. Using a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth model, it is shown that the core interacts with two weakly coupled and asymmetrical antiferromagnetic sublattices. Ref.: C. Portemont, R. Morel, W. Wernsdorfer, D. Mailly, A. Brenac, and L. Notin, Phys. Rev. B 78, 144415 (2008)

  12. Coupled fast-thermal core 'HERBE', as the benchmark experiment at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    2003-10-01

    Validation of the well-known Monte Carlo code MCNP TM against measured criticality data for the coupled fast-thermal HERBE. System at the RB research reactor is shown in this paper. Experimental data are obtained for regular HERBE core and for the cases of controlled flooding of the neutron converter zone by heavy water. Earlier calculations of these criticality parameters, done by combination of transport and diffusion codes using 2D geometry model are also compared to new calculations carried out by the MCNP code in 3D geometry, applying new detailed 3D model of the HEU fuel slug, developed recently. Satisfactory agreements in comparison of the HERBE criticality calculation results with experimental data, in spite complex heterogeneous composition of the HERBE core, are obtained and confirmed that HERBE core could be used as a criticality benchmark for coupled fast-thermal core. (author)

  13. A benchmark for coupled thermohydraulics system/three-dimensional neutron kinetics core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1999-01-01

    During the last years 3D neutron kinetics core models have been coupled to advanced thermohydraulics system codes. These coupled codes can be used for the analysis of the whole reactor system. Although the stand-alone versions of the 3D neutron kinetics core models and of the thermohydraulics system codes generally have a good verification and validation basis, there is a need for additional validation work. This especially concerns the interaction between the reactor core and the other components of a nuclear power plant (NPP). In the framework of the international 'Atomic Energy Research' (AER) association on VVER Reactor Physics and Reactor Safety, a benchmark for these code systems was defined. (orig.)

  14. Synchronization as Aggregation: Cluster Kinetics of Pulse-Coupled Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Kevin P; Krapivsky, P L; Strogatz, Steven H

    2015-08-07

    We consider models of identical pulse-coupled oscillators with global interactions. Previous work showed that under certain conditions such systems always end up in sync, but did not quantify how small clusters of synchronized oscillators progressively coalesce into larger ones. Using tools from the study of aggregation phenomena, we obtain exact results for the time-dependent distribution of cluster sizes as the system evolves from disorder to synchrony.

  15. Equation-of-motion coupled cluster perturbation theory revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus Juul; Jørgensen, Poul; Olsen, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    The equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOM-CC) framework has been used for deriving a novel series of perturbative corrections to the coupled cluster singles and doubles energy that formally con- verges towards the full configuration interaction energy limit. The series is based on a Møller-Ples......-Plesset partitioning of the Hamiltonian and thus size extensive at any order in the perturbation, thereby rem- edying the major deficiency inherent to previous perturbation series based on the EOM-CC ansatz. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4873138]...

  16. Computation of expectation values from vibrational coupled-cluster at the two-mode coupling level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoccante, Alberto; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2011-01-01

    In this work we show how the vibrational coupled-cluster method at the two-mode coupling level can be used to calculate zero-point vibrational averages of properties. A technique is presented, where any expectation value can be calculated using a single set of Lagrangian multipliers computed...

  17. Cluster synchronization in community network with hybrid coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lixin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A community network model with hybrid coupling is proposed. • Control scheme is designed via combining adaptive external coupling strength and feedback control. • The influence of topology structure on synchronization of community network is discussed. - Abstract: A general model of community network with hybrid coupling is proposed in this paper. In the community network model with hybrid coupling, the inner connections are in the same type of coupling within the same community and in different types of coupling in different communities. The connections between different pair of communities are also nonidentical. Cluster synchronization of community network with hybrid coupling is investigated via adaptive couplings control scheme. Effective controllers are designed for constructing an effective control scheme and adjusting automatically the adaptive external coupling strength by taking external coupling strength as adaptive variables on a small fraction of network edges. Moreover, the impact of the topology on the synchronizability of community network is investigated. The numerical results reveal that the number of links between communities and the degree of the connector nodes have significant effects on the synchronization performance.

  18. GPCR-Bench: A Benchmarking Set and Practitioners' Guide for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dahlia R; Bortolato, Andrea; Tehan, Benjamin; Mason, Jonathan S

    2016-04-25

    Virtual screening is routinely used to discover new ligands and in particular new ligand chemotypes for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). To prepare for a virtual screen, we often tailor a docking protocol that will enable us to select the best candidates for further screening. To aid this, we created GPCR-Bench, a publically available docking benchmarking set in the spirit of the DUD and DUD-E reference data sets for validation studies, containing 25 nonredundant high-resolution GPCR costructures with an accompanying set of diverse ligands and computational decoy molecules for each target. Benchmarking sets are often used to compare docking protocols; however, it is important to evaluate docking methods not by "retrospective" hit rates but by the actual likelihood that they will produce novel prospective hits. Therefore, docking protocols must not only rank active molecules highly but also produce good poses that a chemist will select for purchase and screening. Currently, no simple objective machine-scriptable function exists that can do this; instead, docking hit lists must be subjectively examined in a consistent way to compare between docking methods. We present here a case study highlighting considerations we feel are of importance when evaluating a method, intended to be useful as a practitioners' guide.

  19. Event-based cluster synchronization of coupled genetic regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Dandan; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Li, Tao; Liao, Rui-Quan; Liu, Feng; Lai, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the cluster synchronization of coupled genetic regulatory networks with a directed topology is studied by using the event-based strategy and pinning control. An event-triggered condition with a threshold consisting of the neighbors' discrete states at their own event time instants and a state-independent exponential decay function is proposed. The intra-cluster states information and extra-cluster states information are involved in the threshold in different ways. By using the Lyapunov function approach and the theories of matrices and inequalities, we establish the cluster synchronization criterion. It is shown that both the avoidance of continuous transmission of information and the exclusion of the Zeno behavior are ensured under the presented triggering condition. Explicit conditions on the parameters in the threshold are obtained for synchronization. The stability criterion of a single GRN is also given under the reduced triggering condition. Numerical examples are provided to validate the theoretical results.

  20. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark - Steady-state results and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Han, J.; Ivanov, K.; Sartori, E.

    2008-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated. Since only a few pebble-bed HTR experimental facilities or plant data are available the use of code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MW design and a representative set of transient cases is defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well-defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross-sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The OECD benchmark includes steady-state and transients cases. Although the focus of the benchmark is on the modelling of the transient behaviour of the PBMR core, it was also necessary to define some steady-state cases to ensure consistency between the different approaches before results of transient cases could be compared. This paper describes the status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the three steady state exercises defined as a standalone neutronics calculation, a standalone thermal-hydraulic core calculation, and a coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulic simulation. (authors)

  1. DORT-TD/THERMIX solutions for the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Pautz, Andreas; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2008-01-01

    In new reactor designs that are still under review such as the PBMR, not much experimental data exists to benchmark newly developed computer codes against. Such a situation requires that nuclear engineers and designers of this novel reactor design must resort to the validation of a newly developed code through a code-to-code benchmarking exercise because there are validated codes that are currently in use to analyze this reactor design, albeit very few of them. There are numerous HTR core physics benchmarks that are currently being pursued by different organizations, for different purposes. One such benchmark exercise is the PBMR-400 MW OECD/NEA/NSC coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark. In this paper, a newly developed coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics code system, DORT-TD/THERMIX with both transport and diffusion theory options, is used to simulate the transient scenarios in the above-mentioned benchmark problem. Steady-state calculations results are compared with selected participants' results as well as transient models in which the diffusion and transport theory solutions of the same code system are directly compared. Several sensitivity studies are also shown in order to determine how much the change in certain parameters influences the overall behaviour of a given transient. It is shown in this paper that DORT-TD/THERMIX is a versatile tool which can be deployed for design and safety analyses of high temperature reactors of pebble-bed type. (authors)

  2. Solution of the 6th dynamic AER benchmark using the coupled core DYN3D/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, A.; Kliem, S.

    2001-01-01

    The 6 th dynamic benchmark is a logical continuation of the work to validate systematically coupled neutron kinetics/thermohydraulics code systems for the estimation of the transient behaviour of WWER type nuclear power plant which was started in the 5 th dynamic benchmark. This benchmark concerns a double ended break of the main steam line (asymmetrical MSLB) in a WWER plant. The core is at the end of first cycle in full power conditions. The asymmetric leak causes a different depressurization of all steam generators. New features in comparison to the 5 th dynamic benchmark were included: asymmetric operation of the feed water system, consideration of incomplete coolant mixing in the reactor vessel, and the definition of a fixed isothermal recriticality temperature for normalising the nuclear data (Authors)

  3. Solution of the fifth dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem using the coupled code DIN3/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1998-01-01

    The fifth dynamic benchmark is the first benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three dimensional hexagonal neutron kinetic core models. In this benchmark the interaction between the components of a WWER-440 NPP with the reactor core has been investigated. The initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and the shutdown conditions with one control rod group s tucking. This break causes an overcooling of the primary circuit. During this overcooling the scram reactivity is compensated and the scrammed reactor becomes re critical. The calculation was continued until the highly-borated water from the high pressure injection system terminated the power excursion. Several aspects of the very complex and complicated benchmark problem are analyzed in detail. Sensitivity studies with different hydraulic parameters are made. The influence on the course of the transient and on the solution is discussed.(Author)

  4. Benchmark calculations on fluid coupled co-axial cylinders typical to LMFBR structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostal, M.; Descleve, P.; Gantenbein, F.; Lazzeri, L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a joint effort promoted and funded by the Commission of European Community under the umbrella of Fast Reactor Co-ordinating Committee and working group on Codes and Standards No. 2 with the purpose to test several programs currently used for dynamic analysis of fluid-coupled structures. The scope of the benchmark calculations is limited to beam type modes of vibration, small displacement of the structures and small pressure variation such as encountered in seismic or flow induced vibration problems. Five computer codes were used: ANSYS, AQUAMODE, NOVAX, MIAS/SAP4 and ZERO where each program employs a different structural-fluid formulation. The calculations were performed for four different geometrical configurations of concentric cylinders where the effect of gap size, water level, and support conditions were considered. The analytical work was accompanied by experiments carried out on a purpose-built rig. The test rig consisted of two concentric cylinders independently supported on flexible cantilevers. A geometrical simplicity and attention in the rig design to eliminate the structural coupling between the cylinders lead to unambiguous test results. Only the beam natural frequencies, in phase and out of phase were measured. The comparison of different analytical methods and experimental results is presented and discussed. The degree of agreement varied between very good and unacceptable. (orig./GL)

  5. Application of a Light-Front Coupled Cluster Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabysheva, S.S.; Hiller, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    As a test of the new light-front coupled-cluster method in a gauge theory, we apply it to the nonperturbative construction of the dressed-electron state in QED, for an arbitrary covariant gauge, and compute the electron's anomalous magnetic moment. The construction illustrates the spectator and Fock-sector independence of vertex and self-energy contributions and indicates resolution of the difficulties with uncanceled divergences that plague methods based on Fock-space truncation. (author)

  6. Comparison of the results of the fifth dynamic AER benchmark-a benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three-dimensional hexagonal kinetic core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1998-01-01

    The fifth dynamic benchmark was defined at seventh AER-Symposium, held in Hoernitz, Germany in 1997. It is the first benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three-dimensional hexagonal neutron kinetic core models. In this benchmark the interaction between the components of a WWER-440 NPP with the reactor core has been investigated. The initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one control rod group stucking. This break causes an overcooling of the primary circuit. During this overcooling the scram reactivity is compensated and the scrammed reactor becomes re critical. The calculation was continued until the highly-borated water from the high pressure injection system terminated the power excursion. Each participant used own best-estimate nuclear cross section data. Only the initial subcriticality at the beginning of the transient was given. Solutions were received from Kurchatov Institute Russia with the code BIPR8/ATHLET, VTT Energy Finland with HEXTRAN/SMABRE, NRI Rez Czech Republic with DYN3/ATHLET, KFKI Budapest Hungary with KIKO3D/ATHLET and from FZR Germany with the code DYN3D/ATHLET.In this paper the results are compared. Beside the comparison of global results, the behaviour of several thermohydraulic and neutron kinetic parameters is presented to discuss the revealed differences between the solutions.(Authors)

  7. Trace coupled with PARCS benchmark against Leibstadt plant data during the turbine trip test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekhri, Abdelkrim; Baumann, Peter, E-mail: abdelkrim.sekhri@kkl.ch, E-mail: peter.Baumann@kkl.ch [KernkraftwerkLeibstadt AG, Leibstadt (Switzerland); Hidalga, Patricio; Morera, Daniel; Miro, Rafael; Barrachina, Teresa; Verdu, Gumersindo, E-mail: pathigar@etsii.upv.es, E-mail: dmorera@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@isirym.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (ISIRYM/UPV), Valencia, (Spain). Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety

    2013-07-01

    In order to enhance the modeling of Nuclear Power Plant Leibstadt (KKL), the coupling of 3D neutron kinetics PARCS code with TRACE has been developed. To test its performance a complex transient of Turbine Trip has been simulated comparing the results with the existing plant data of Turbine Trip test. For this transient also Cross Sections have been generated and used by PARCS. The thermal-hydraulic TRACE model is retrieved from the already existing model. For the benchmarking the Turbine Trip transient has been simulated according to the test resulting in the closure of the turbine control valve (TCV) and the following opening of the bypass valve (TBV). This transient caused a pressure shock wave towards the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) which provoked the decreasing of the void level and the consequent slight power excursion. The power control capacity of the system showed a good response with the procedure of a Selected Rod Insertion (SRI) and the recirculation loops performance which resulted in the proper thermal power reduction comparable to APRM data recorder from the plant. The comparison with plant data shows good agreement in general and assesses the performance of the coupled model. Due to this, it can be concluded that the coupling of PARCS and TRACE codes in addition with the Cross Section used works successfully for simulating the behavior of the reactor core during complex plant transients. Nevertheless the TRACE model shall be improved and the core neutronics corresponding to the test shall be used in the future to allow quantitative comparison between TRACE and plant recorded data. (author)

  8. Simulation of the OECD Main-Steam-Line-Break Benchmark Exercise 3 Using the Coupled RELAP5/PANTHER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneidesch, Christophe R.; Zhang Jinzhao

    2004-01-01

    The RELAP5 best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code has been coupled with the PANTHER three-dimensional neutron kinetics code via the TALINK dynamic data exchange control and processing tool. The coupled RELAP5/PANTHER code package has been qualified and will be used at Tractebel Engineering (TE) for analyzing asymmetric pressurized water reactor (PWR) accidents with strong core-system interactions. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission PWR main-steam-line-break benchmark problem was analyzed as part of the qualification efforts to demonstrate the capability of the coupled code package of simulating such transients. This paper reports the main results of TE's contribution to the benchmark Exercise 3

  9. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  10. Geminal-spanning orbitals make explicitly correlated reduced-scaling coupled-cluster methods robust, yet simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Neese, Frank; Valeev, Edward F.

    2014-08-01

    We present a production implementation of reduced-scaling explicitly correlated (F12) coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method based on pair-natural orbitals (PNOs). A key feature is the reformulation of the explicitly correlated terms using geminal-spanning orbitals that greatly reduce the truncation errors of the F12 contribution. For the standard S66 benchmark of weak intermolecular interactions, the cc-pVDZ-F12 PNO CCSD F12 interaction energies reproduce the complete basis set CCSD limit with mean absolute error cost compared to the conventional CCSD F12.

  11. Coupled-cluster treatment of molecular strong-field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.

    2018-05-01

    Ionization rates and Stark shifts of H2, CO, O2, H2O, and CH4 in static electric fields have been computed with coupled-cluster methods in a basis set of atom-centered Gaussian functions with a complex-scaled exponent. Consideration of electron correlation is found to be of great importance even for a qualitatively correct description of the dependence of ionization rates and Stark shifts on the strength and orientation of the external field. The analysis of the second moments of the molecular charge distribution suggests a simple criterion for distinguishing tunnel and barrier suppression ionization in polyatomic molecules.

  12. High-accuracy coupled cluster calculations of atomic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borschevsky, A. [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv, Israel and Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University Auckland, Private Bag 102904, 0745 Auckland (New Zealand); Yakobi, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U. [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-01-22

    The four-component Fock-space coupled cluster and intermediate Hamiltonian methods are implemented to evaluate atomic properties. The latter include the spectra of nobelium and lawrencium (elements 102 and 103) in the range 20000-30000 cm{sup −1}, the polarizabilities of elements 112-114 and 118, required for estimating their adsorption enthalpies on surfaces used to separate them in accelerators, and the nuclear quadrupole moments of some heavy atoms. The calculations on superheavy elements are supported by the very good agreement with experiment obtained for the lighter homologues.

  13. High-accuracy coupled cluster calculations of atomic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borschevsky, A.; Yakobi, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.

    2015-01-01

    The four-component Fock-space coupled cluster and intermediate Hamiltonian methods are implemented to evaluate atomic properties. The latter include the spectra of nobelium and lawrencium (elements 102 and 103) in the range 20000-30000 cm −1 , the polarizabilities of elements 112-114 and 118, required for estimating their adsorption enthalpies on surfaces used to separate them in accelerators, and the nuclear quadrupole moments of some heavy atoms. The calculations on superheavy elements are supported by the very good agreement with experiment obtained for the lighter homologues

  14. Benchmarks solutions of the coupled systems NJOY/AMPX-II/HAMMER-TECHNION and the library JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A. dos

    1991-01-01

    Benchmarks calculations were performed with the newest released japanese nuclear data library JENDL-3. The calculations were performed with the methodology developed at IPEN/CNEN-SP based on a coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/HAMMER-TECHNION system. The analyses show that the long-standing problem of the overprediction of the epithermal U-238 neutron capture still remains. Besides that there is an indication that the fission cross section of U-238 might be underestimated. (author)

  15. Properties of coupled-cluster equations originating in excitation sub-algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karol

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss properties of single-reference coupled cluster (CC) equations associated with the existence of sub-algebras of excitations that allow one to represent CC equations in a hybrid fashion where the cluster amplitudes associated with these sub-algebras can be obtained by solving the corresponding eigenvalue problem. For closed-shell formulations analyzed in this paper, the hybrid representation of CC equations provides a natural way for extending active-space and seniority number concepts to provide an accurate description of electron correlation effects. Moreover, a new representation can be utilized to re-define iterative algorithms used to solve CC equations, especially for tough cases defined by the presence of strong static and dynamical correlation effects. We will also explore invariance properties associated with excitation sub-algebras to define a new class of CC approximations referred to in this paper as the sub-algebra-flow-based CC methods. We illustrate the performance of these methods on the example of ground- and excited-state calculations for commonly used small benchmark systems.

  16. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR 400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: transient results - 290

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strydom, G.; Reitsma, F.; Ngeleka, P.T.; Ivanov, K.N.

    2010-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated, and code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MWth design and a representative set of transient exercises are defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. This paper describes the current status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the six transient exercises, consisting of three Loss of Cooling Accidents, two Control Rod Withdrawal transients, a power load-follow transient, and a Helium over-cooling Accident. The participants' results are compared using a statistical method and possible areas of future code improvement are identified. (authors)

  17. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Aurelian F., E-mail: aurelian.badea@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Vincenz-Prießnitz-Str. 3, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cacuci, Dan G. [Center for Nuclear Science and Energy/Dept. of ME, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  18. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Aurelian F.; Cacuci, Dan G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  19. A coupled-cluster study of photodetachment cross sections of closed-shell anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Janusz; Decleva, Piero; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the performance of Stieltjes Imaging applied to Lanczos pseudo-spectra generated at the coupled cluster singles and doubles, coupled cluster singles and approximate iterative doubles and coupled cluster singles levels of theory in modeling the photodetachment cross sections of the closed shell anions H-, Li-, Na-, F-, Cl-, and OH-. The accurate description of double excitations is found to play a much more important role than in the case of photoionization of neutral species.

  20. A coupled-cluster study of photodetachment cross sections of closed-shell anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cukras, Janusz; Decleva, Piero; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the performance of Stieltjes Imaging applied to Lanczos pseudo-spectra generated at the coupled cluster singles and doubles, coupled cluster singles and approximate iterative doubles and coupled cluster singles levels of theory in modeling the photodetachment cross sections of the closed shell anions H − , Li − , Na − , F − , Cl − , and OH − . The accurate description of double excitations is found to play a much more important role than in the case of photoionization of neutral species

  1. ZZ-PBMR-400, OECD/NEA PBMR Coupled Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics Transient Benchmark - The PBMR-400 Core Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Description of benchmark: This international benchmark, concerns Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transients based on the PBMR-400 MW design. The deterministic neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and transient analysis tools and methods available to design and analyse PBMRs lag, in many cases, behind the state of the art compared to other reactor technologies. This has motivated the testing of existing methods for HTGRs but also the development of more accurate and efficient tools to analyse the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic behaviour for the design and safety evaluations of the PBMR. In addition to the development of new methods, this includes defining appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The scope of the benchmark is to establish well-defined problems, based on a common given set of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events through a set of multi-dimensional computational test problems. The benchmark exercise has the following objectives: - Establish a standard benchmark for coupled codes (neutronics/thermal-hydraulics) for PBMR design; - Code-to-code comparison using a common cross section library ; - Obtain a detailed understanding of the events and the processes; - Benefit from different approaches, understanding limitations and approximations. Major Design and Operating Characteristics of the PBMR (PBMR Characteristic and Value): Installed thermal capacity: 400 MW(t); Installed electric capacity: 165 MW(e); Load following capability: 100-40-100%; Availability: ≥ 95%; Core configuration: Vertical with fixed centre graphite reflector; Fuel: TRISO ceramic coated U-235 in graphite spheres; Primary coolant: Helium; Primary coolant pressure: 9 MPa; Moderator: Graphite; Core outlet temperature: 900 C.; Core inlet temperature: 500 C.; Cycle type: Direct; Number of circuits: 1; Cycle

  2. RUPRECHT 147: THE OLDEST NEARBY OPEN CLUSTER AS A NEW BENCHMARK FOR STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Jason L.; Wright, Jason T.; Wolfgang, Angie; Brewer, John M.; Johnson, John Asher

    2013-01-01

    Ruprecht 147 is a hitherto unappreciated open cluster that holds great promise as a standard in fundamental stellar astrophysics. We have conducted a radial velocity survey of astrometric candidates with Lick, Palomar, and MMT observatories and have identified over 100 members, including 5 blue stragglers, 11 red giants, and 5 double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s). We estimate the cluster metallicity from spectroscopic analysis, using Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), and find it to be [M/H] = +0.07 ± 0.03. We have obtained deep CFHT/MegaCam g'r'i'z' photometry and fit Padova isochrones to the (g' – i') and Two Micron All Sky Survey (J – K S ) color-magnitude diagrams, using the τ 2 maximum-likelihood procedure of Naylor, and an alternative method using two-dimensional cross-correlations developed in this work. We find best fits for Padova isochrones at age t = 2.5 ± 0.25 Gyr, m – M = 7.35 ± 0.1, and A V = 0.25 ± 0.05, with additional uncertainty from the unresolved binary population and possibility of differential extinction across this large cluster. The inferred age is heavily dependent on our choice of stellar evolution model: fitting Dartmouth and PARSEC models yield age parameters of 3 Gyr and 3.25 Gyr, respectively. At ∼300 pc and ∼3 Gyr, Ruprecht 147 is by far the oldest nearby star cluster.

  3. A NRC-BNL benchmark evaluation of seismic analysis methods for non-classically damped coupled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; DeGrassi, G.; Chokshi, N.

    2004-01-01

    Under the auspices of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a comprehensive program to evaluate state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) systems with non-classical damping. In this program, four benchmark models of coupled building-piping/equipment systems with different damping characteristics were developed and analyzed by BNL for a suite of earthquakes. The BNL analysis was carried out by the Wilson-θ time domain integration method with the system-damping matrix computed using a synthesis formulation as presented in a companion paper [Nucl. Eng. Des. (2002)]. These benchmark problems were subsequently distributed to and analyzed by program participants applying their uniquely developed methods and computer programs. This paper is intended to offer a glimpse at the program, and provide a summary of major findings and principle conclusions with some representative results. The participant's analysis results established using complex modal time history methods showed good comparison with the BNL solutions, while the analyses produced with either complex-mode response spectrum methods or classical normal-mode response spectrum method, in general, produced more conservative results, when averaged over a suite of earthquakes. However, when coupling due to damping is significant, complex-mode response spectrum methods performed better than the classical normal-mode response spectrum method. Furthermore, as part of the program objectives, a parametric assessment is also presented in this paper, aimed at evaluation of the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled NPP systems. It is believed that the findings and insights learned from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving license

  4. Analysis of the ITER computational shielding benchmark with the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} neutron gamma coupled calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yi-Kang, E-mail: yi-kang.lee@cea.fr

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Verification and validation of TRIPOLI-4 radiation transport calculations for ITER shielding benchmark. • Evaluation of CEA-V5.1.1 and FENDL-3.0 nuclear data libraries on D–T fusion neutron continuous energy transport calculations. • Advances in nuclear analyses for nuclear heating and radiation damage in iron. • This work also demonstrates that the “safety factors” concept is necessary in the nuclear analyses of ITER. - Abstract: With the growing interest in using the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo radiation transport code for ITER applications, a key issue that arises is whether or not the released TRIPOLI-4 code and its associated nuclear data libraries are verified and validated for the D–T fusion neutronics calculations. Previous published benchmark results of TRIPOLI-4 code on the ITER related activities have concentrated on the first wall loading, the reactor dosimetry, the nuclear heating, and the tritium breeding ratio. To enhance the TRIPOLI-4 verification and validation on neutron-gamma coupled calculations for fusion device application, the computational ITER shielding benchmark of M. E. Sawan was performed in this work by using the 2013 released TRIPOLI-4.9S code and the associated CEA-V5.1.1 data library. First wall, blanket, vacuum vessel and toroidal field magnet of the inboard and outboard components were fully modelled in this 1-D toroidal cylindrical benchmark. The 14.1 MeV source neutrons were sampled from a uniform isotropic distribution in the plasma zone. Nuclear responses including neutron and gamma fluxes, nuclear heating, and material damage indicator were benchmarked against previous published results. The capabilities of the TRIPOLI-4 code on the evaluation of above physics parameters were presented. The nuclear data library from the new FENDL-3.0 evaluation was also benchmarked against the CEA-V5.1.1 results for the neutron transport calculations. The results show that both data libraries

  5. Analysis of the ITER computational shielding benchmark with the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4® neutron gamma coupled calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yi-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Verification and validation of TRIPOLI-4 radiation transport calculations for ITER shielding benchmark. • Evaluation of CEA-V5.1.1 and FENDL-3.0 nuclear data libraries on D–T fusion neutron continuous energy transport calculations. • Advances in nuclear analyses for nuclear heating and radiation damage in iron. • This work also demonstrates that the “safety factors” concept is necessary in the nuclear analyses of ITER. - Abstract: With the growing interest in using the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4 ® Monte Carlo radiation transport code for ITER applications, a key issue that arises is whether or not the released TRIPOLI-4 code and its associated nuclear data libraries are verified and validated for the D–T fusion neutronics calculations. Previous published benchmark results of TRIPOLI-4 code on the ITER related activities have concentrated on the first wall loading, the reactor dosimetry, the nuclear heating, and the tritium breeding ratio. To enhance the TRIPOLI-4 verification and validation on neutron-gamma coupled calculations for fusion device application, the computational ITER shielding benchmark of M. E. Sawan was performed in this work by using the 2013 released TRIPOLI-4.9S code and the associated CEA-V5.1.1 data library. First wall, blanket, vacuum vessel and toroidal field magnet of the inboard and outboard components were fully modelled in this 1-D toroidal cylindrical benchmark. The 14.1 MeV source neutrons were sampled from a uniform isotropic distribution in the plasma zone. Nuclear responses including neutron and gamma fluxes, nuclear heating, and material damage indicator were benchmarked against previous published results. The capabilities of the TRIPOLI-4 code on the evaluation of above physics parameters were presented. The nuclear data library from the new FENDL-3.0 evaluation was also benchmarked against the CEA-V5.1.1 results for the neutron transport calculations. The results show that both data libraries can be

  6. RUPRECHT 147: THE OLDEST NEARBY OPEN CLUSTER AS A NEW BENCHMARK FOR STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Jason L.; Wright, Jason T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wolfgang, Angie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Brewer, John M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Johnson, John Asher, E-mail: jcurtis@psu.edu [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Ruprecht 147 is a hitherto unappreciated open cluster that holds great promise as a standard in fundamental stellar astrophysics. We have conducted a radial velocity survey of astrometric candidates with Lick, Palomar, and MMT observatories and have identified over 100 members, including 5 blue stragglers, 11 red giants, and 5 double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s). We estimate the cluster metallicity from spectroscopic analysis, using Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), and find it to be [M/H] = +0.07 {+-} 0.03. We have obtained deep CFHT/MegaCam g'r'i'z' photometry and fit Padova isochrones to the (g' - i') and Two Micron All Sky Survey (J - K{sub S} ) color-magnitude diagrams, using the {tau}{sup 2} maximum-likelihood procedure of Naylor, and an alternative method using two-dimensional cross-correlations developed in this work. We find best fits for Padova isochrones at age t = 2.5 {+-} 0.25 Gyr, m - M = 7.35 {+-} 0.1, and A{sub V} = 0.25 {+-} 0.05, with additional uncertainty from the unresolved binary population and possibility of differential extinction across this large cluster. The inferred age is heavily dependent on our choice of stellar evolution model: fitting Dartmouth and PARSEC models yield age parameters of 3 Gyr and 3.25 Gyr, respectively. At {approx}300 pc and {approx}3 Gyr, Ruprecht 147 is by far the oldest nearby star cluster.

  7. The coupled cluster theory of quantum lattice systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, R.; Xian, Yang

    1994-01-01

    The coupled cluster method is widely recognized nowadays as providing an ab initio method of great versatility, power, and accuracy for handling in a fully microscopic and systematic way the correlations between particles in quantum many-body systems. The number of successful applications made to date within both chemistry and physics is impressive. In this article, the authors review recent extensions of the method which now provide a unifying framework for also dealing with strongly interacting infinite quantum lattice systems described by a Hamiltonian. Such systems include both spin-lattice models (such as the anisotropic Heisenberg or XXZ model) exhibiting interesting magnetic properties, and electron lattice models (such as the tJ and Hubbard models), where the spins or fermions are localized on the sites of a regular lattice; as well as lattice gauge theories [such as the Abelian U(1) model of quantum electrodynamics and non-Abelian SU(n) models]. Illustrative results are given for both the XXZ spin lattice model and U(1) lattice gauge theory

  8. One- and two-cluster synchronized dynamics of non-diffusively coupled Tchebycheff map networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schäfer, Mirko; Greiner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We use the master stability formalism to discuss one- and two-cluster synchronization of coupled Tchebycheff map networks. For diffusively coupled map systems, the one-cluster synchronized dynamics is given by the behaviour of the individual maps, and the coupling only determines the stability of the coherent state. For the case of non-diffusive coupling and for two-cluster synchronization, the synchronized dynamics on networks is different from the behaviour of the single individual map. Depending on the coupling, we study numerically the characteristics of various forms of the resulting synchronized dynamics. The stability properties of the respective one-cluster synchronized states are discussed for arbitrary network structures. For the case of two-cluster synchronization on bipartite networks we also present analytical expressions for fixed points and zig-zag patterns, and explicitly determine the linear stability of these orbits for the special case of ring-networks.

  9. Photoionization cross section by Stieltjes imaging applied to coupled cluster Lanczos pseudo-spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cukras, Janusz; Coriani, Sonia; Decleva, Piero [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Christiansen, Ove [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Norman, Patrick [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2013-09-07

    A recently implemented asymmetric Lanczos algorithm for computing (complex) linear response functions within the coupled cluster singles (CCS), coupled cluster singles and iterative approximate doubles (CC2), and coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) is coupled to a Stieltjes imaging technique in order to describe the photoionization cross section of atoms and molecules, in the spirit of a similar procedure recently proposed by Averbukh and co-workers within the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction approach. Pilot results are reported for the atoms He, Ne, and Ar and for the molecules H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, HF, CO, and CO{sub 2}.

  10. Photoionization cross section by Stieltjes imaging applied to coupled cluster Lanczos pseudo-spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Janusz; Coriani, Sonia; Decleva, Piero; Christiansen, Ove; Norman, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    A recently implemented asymmetric Lanczos algorithm for computing (complex) linear response functions within the coupled cluster singles (CCS), coupled cluster singles and iterative approximate doubles (CC2), and coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) is coupled to a Stieltjes imaging technique in order to describe the photoionization cross section of atoms and molecules, in the spirit of a similar procedure recently proposed by Averbukh and co-workers within the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction approach. Pilot results are reported for the atoms He, Ne, and Ar and for the molecules H2, H2O, NH3, HF, CO, and CO2.

  11. Photoionization cross section by Stieltjes imaging applied to coupled cluster Lanczos pseudo-spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cukras, Janusz; Coriani, Sonia; Decleva, Piero; Christiansen, Ove; Norman, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A recently implemented asymmetric Lanczos algorithm for computing (complex) linear response functions within the coupled cluster singles (CCS), coupled cluster singles and iterative approximate doubles (CC2), and coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) is coupled to a Stieltjes imaging technique in order to describe the photoionization cross section of atoms and molecules, in the spirit of a similar procedure recently proposed by Averbukh and co-workers within the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction approach. Pilot results are reported for the atoms He, Ne, and Ar and for the molecules H 2 , H 2 O, NH 3 , HF, CO, and CO 2

  12. Energy Benchmarking in Educational Buildings through Cluster Analysis of Energy Retrofitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Marrone

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the stock of Italian educational buildings have undertaken energy retrofit interventions, thanks to European funds allocated by complex technical-administrative calls. In these projects, the suggested retrofit strategies are often selected based on the common best practices (considering average energy savings but are not supported by proper energy investigations. In this paper, Italian school buildings’ stock was analyzed by cluster analysis with the aim of providing a methodology able to identify the best energy retrofit interventions from the perspective of cost-benefit, and to correlate them with the specific characteristics of the educational buildings. This research is based on the analysis of about 80 school buildings located in central Italy and characterized by different features and construction technologies. The refurbished buildings were classified in homogeneous clusters and, for each of them, the most representative building was identified. Furthermore, for each representative building a validating procedure based on dynamic simulations and a comparison with actual energy use was performed. The two buildings thus singled out provide a model that could be developed into a useful tool for Public Administrations to suggest priorities in the planning of new energy retrofits of existing school building stocks.

  13. Calculations of non-adiabatic couplings within equation-of-motion coupled-cluster framework: Theory, implementation, and validation against multi-reference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Shirin; Matsika, Spiridoula; Krylov, Anna I.

    2018-01-01

    We report an implementation of non-adiabatic coupling (NAC) forces within the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster with single and double excitations (EOM-CCSD) framework via the summed-state approach. Using illustrative examples, we compare NAC forces computed with EOM-CCSD and multi-reference (MR) wave functions (for selected cases, we also consider configuration interaction singles). In addition to the magnitude of the NAC vectors, we analyze their direction, which is important for the calculations of the rate of non-adiabatic transitions. Our benchmark set comprises three doublet radical-cations (hexatriene, cyclohexadiene, and uracil), neutral uracil, and sodium-doped ammonia clusters. When the characters of the states agree among different methods, we observe good agreement between the respective NAC vectors, both in the Franck-Condon region and away. In the cases of large discrepancies between the methods, the disagreement can be attributed to the difference in the states' character, which, in some cases, is very sensitive to electron correlation, both within single-reference and multi-reference frameworks. The numeric results confirm that the accuracy of NAC vectors depends critically on the quality of the underlying wave functions. Within their domain of applicability, EOM-CC methods provide a viable alternative to MR approaches.

  14. Experimental benchmarks and simulation of GAMMA-T for overcooling and undercooling transients in HTGRs coupled with MED desalination plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Sik; Kim, In Hun; NO, Hee Cheon; Jin, Hyung Gon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The GAMMA-T code was well validated through benchmark experiments. ► Based on the KAIST coupling scheme, the GTHTR300 + MED systems were made. ► Safety analysis was performed for overcooling and undercooling accidents. ► In all accidents, maximum peak fuel temperatures were well below than 1600 °C. ► In all accidents, the HTGR + MED system could be operated continuously. -- Abstracts: The nuclear desalination based on the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with gas turbomachinery and multi-effect distillation (MED) is attracting attention because the coupling system can utilize the waste heat of the nuclear power system for the MED desalination system. In previous work, KAIST proposed the new HTGR + MED coupling scheme, evaluated desalination performance, and performed cost analysis for the system. In this paper, in order to confirm the safety and the performance of the coupling system, we performed the transient analysis with GAMMA-T (GAs Multidimensional Multicomponent mixture Analysis–Turbomachinery) code for the KAIST HTGR + MED systems. The experimental benchmarks of GAMMA-T code were set up before the transient analysis for several accident scenarios. The GAMMA-T code was well validated against steady state and transient scenarios of the He–Water test loop such as changes in water mass flow rate and water inlet temperatures. Then, for transient analysis, the GTHTR300 was chosen as a reference plant. The GTHTR300 + MED systems were made, based on the KAIST HTGR + MED coupling scheme. Transient analysis was performed for three kinds of accidents scenarios: (1) loss of heat rejection through MED plant, (2) loss of heat rejection through heat sink, and (3) overcooling due to abnormal cold temperature of seawater. In all kinds of accident scenarios, maximum peak fuel temperatures were well below than the fuel failure criterion, 1600 °C and the GTHTR300 + MED system could be operated continuously and safely. Specially, in the

  15. OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Transient Benchmark as a Basis for Comprehensive Qualification and Studying Best-Estimate Coupled Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Kostadin; Olson, Andy; Sartori, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    An Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored coupled-code benchmark has been initiated for a boiling water reactor (BWR) turbine trip (TT) transient. Turbine trip transients in a BWR are pressurization events in which the coupling between core space-dependent neutronic phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the available real plant experimental data make this benchmark problem very valuable. Over the course of defining and coordinating the BWR TT benchmark, a systematic approach has been established to validate best-estimate coupled codes. This approach employs a multilevel methodology that not only allows for a consistent and comprehensive validation process but also contributes to the study of different numerical and computational aspects of coupled best-estimate simulations. This paper provides an overview of the OECD/NRC BWR TT benchmark activities with emphasis on the discussion of the numerical and computational aspects of the benchmark

  16. A coupled-cluster study of photodetachment cross sections of closed-shell anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cukras, Janusz; Decleva, Piero; Coriani, Sonia, E-mail: coriani@units.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127, Trieste (Italy)

    2014-11-07

    We investigate the performance of Stieltjes Imaging applied to Lanczos pseudo-spectra generated at the coupled cluster singles and doubles, coupled cluster singles and approximate iterative doubles and coupled cluster singles levels of theory in modeling the photodetachment cross sections of the closed shell anions H{sup −}, Li{sup −}, Na{sup −}, F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, and OH{sup −}. The accurate description of double excitations is found to play a much more important role than in the case of photoionization of neutral species.

  17. Simulation of circularly polarized luminescence spectra using coupled cluster theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAlexander, Harley R.; Crawford, T. Daniel, E-mail: crawdad@vt.edu [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    We report the first computations of circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) rotatory strengths at the equation-of-motion coupled cluster singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) level of theory. Using a test set of eight chiral ketones, we compare both dipole and rotatory strengths for absorption (electronic circular dichroism) and emission to the results from time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and available experimental data for both valence and Rydberg transitions. For two of the compounds, we obtained optimized geometries of the lowest several excited states using both EOM-CCSD and TD-DFT and determined that structures and EOM-CCSD transition properties obtained with each structure were sufficiently similar that TD-DFT optimizations were acceptable for the remaining test cases. Agreement between EOM-CCSD and the Becke three-parameter exchange function and Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP) corrected using the Coulomb attenuating method (CAM-B3LYP) is typically good for most of the transitions, though agreement with the uncorrected B3LYP functional is significantly worse for all reported properties. The choice of length vs. velocity representation of the electric dipole operator has little impact on the EOM-CCSD transition strengths for nearly all of the states we examined. For a pair of closely related β, γ-enones, (1R)-7-methylenebicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one and (1S)-2-methylenebicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-7-one, we find that EOM-CCSD and CAM-B3LYP agree with the energetic ordering of the two possible excited-state conformations, resulting in good agreement with experimental rotatory strengths in both absorption and emission, whereas B3LYP yields a qualitatively incorrect result for the CPL signal of (1S)-2-methylenebicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-7-one. Finally, we predict that one of the compounds considered here, trans-bicyclo[3.3.0]octane-3,7-dione, is unique in that it exhibits an achiral ground state and a chiral first excited state, leading to a strong CPL

  18. Application of Bibliographic Coupling versus Cited Titles Words in Patent Fuzzy Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Kermani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Attribute selection is one of the steps before patent clustering. Various attributes can be used for clustering. In this study, the effect of using citation and citation title words, respectively, in form of bibliographic coupling and citation title words sharing, were measured and compared with each other, as patent attributes. This study was done in an experimental method, on a collection of 717 US Patent cited in the patents belong to 977/774 subclass of US Patent Classification. Fuzzy C-means was used for patent clustering and extended BCubed precision and extended BCubed recall were used as evaluation measure. The results showed that the clustering produced by bibliographic coupling had better performance than clustering used citation title words and existence of cluster structure were in a wider range of exhaustivity than citation title words.

  19. Statistical analysis of activation and reaction energies with quasi-variational coupled-cluster theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua A.; Knowles, Peter J.

    2018-06-01

    The performance of quasi-variational coupled-cluster (QV) theory applied to the calculation of activation and reaction energies has been investigated. A statistical analysis of results obtained for six different sets of reactions has been carried out, and the results have been compared to those from standard single-reference methods. In general, the QV methods lead to increased activation energies and larger absolute reaction energies compared to those obtained with traditional coupled-cluster theory.

  20. Noise-induced synchronization, desynchronization, and clustering in globally coupled nonidentical oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yi Ming

    2013-07-09

    We study ensembles of globally coupled, nonidentical phase oscillators subject to correlated noise, and we identify several important factors that cause noise and coupling to synchronize or desynchronize a system. By introducing noise in various ways, we find an estimate for the onset of synchrony of a system in terms of the coupling strength, noise strength, and width of the frequency distribution of its natural oscillations. We also demonstrate that noise alone can be sufficient to synchronize nonidentical oscillators. However, this synchrony depends on the first Fourier mode of a phase-sensitivity function, through which we introduce common noise into the system. We show that higher Fourier modes can cause desynchronization due to clustering effects, and that this can reinforce clustering caused by different forms of coupling. Finally, we discuss the effects of noise on an ensemble in which antiferromagnetic coupling causes oscillators to form two clusters in the absence of noise. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  1. Similarity transformed coupled cluster response (ST-CCR) theory--a time-dependent similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled cluster (STEOM-CC) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Arie

    2013-07-07

    This paper presents a new method for calculating spectroscopic properties in the framework of response theory utilizing a sequence of similarity transformations (STs). The STs are preformed using the coupled cluster (CC) and Fock-space coupled cluster operators. The linear and quadratic response functions of the new similarity transformed CC response (ST-CCR) method are derived. The poles of the linear response yield excitation-energy (EE) expressions identical to the ones in the similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled cluster (STEOM-CC) approach. ST-CCR and STEOM-CC complement each other, in analogy to the complementarity of CC response (CCR) and equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOM-CC). ST-CCR/STEOM-CC and CCR/EOM-CC yield size-extensive and size-intensive EEs, respectively. Other electronic-properties, e.g., transition dipole strengths, are also size-extensive within ST-CCR, in contrast to STEOM-CC. Moreover, analysis suggests that in comparison with CCR, the ST-CCR expressions may be confined to a smaller subspace, however, the precise scope of the truncation can only be determined numerically. In addition, reformulation of the time-independent STEOM-CC using the same parameterization as in ST-CCR, as well as an efficient truncation scheme, is presented. The shown convergence of the time-dependent and time-independent expressions displays the completeness of the presented formalism.

  2. Carbon X-ray absorption spectra of fluoroethenes and acetone: a study at the coupled cluster, density functional, and static-exchange levels of theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Thomas; Coriani, Sonia; Christiansen, Ove; Norman, Patrick

    2013-03-28

    Near carbon K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a series of fluorine-substituted ethenes and acetone have been studied using coupled cluster and density functional theory (DFT) polarization propagator methods, as well as the static-exchange (STEX) approach. With the complex polarization propagator (CPP) implemented in coupled cluster theory, relaxation effects following the excitation of core electrons are accounted for in terms of electron correlation, enabling a systematic convergence of these effects with respect to electron excitations in the cluster operator. Coupled cluster results have been used as benchmarks for the assessment of propagator methods in DFT as well as the state-specific static-exchange approach. Calculations on ethene and 1,1-difluoroethene illustrate the possibility of using nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with additional effects of electron correlation and relativity added as scalar shifts in energetics. It has been demonstrated that CPP spectra obtained with coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (CC2), CCSD, and DFT (with a Coulomb attenuated exchange-correlation functional) yield excellent predictions of chemical shifts for vinylfluoride, 1,1-difluoroethene, trifluoroethene, as well as good spectral features for acetone in the case of CCSD and DFT. Following this, CPP-DFT is considered to be a viable option for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectra of larger π-conjugated systems, and CC2 is deemed applicable for chemical shifts but not for studies of fine structure features. The CCSD method as well as the more approximate CC2 method are shown to yield spectral features relating to π∗-resonances in good agreement with experiment, not only for the aforementioned molecules but also for ethene, cis-1,2-difluoroethene, and tetrafluoroethene. The STEX approach is shown to underestimate π∗-peak separations due to spectral compressions, a characteristic which is inherent to this

  3. Benchmark of the SixTrack-Fluka Active Coupling Against the SPS Scrapers Burst Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Mereghetti, A; Cerutti, F

    2014-01-01

    The SPS scrapers are a key ingredient for the clean injection into the LHC: they cut off halo particles quite close to the beam core (e.g.~3.5 sigma) just before extraction, to minimise the risk for quenches. The improved beam parameters as envisaged by the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) Project required a revision of the present system, to assess its suitability and robustness. In particular, a burst (i.e. endurance) test of the scraper blades has been carried out, with the whole bunch train being scraped at the centre (worst working conditions). In order to take into account the effect of betatron and longitudinal beam dynamics on energy deposition patterns, and nuclear and Coulomb scattering in the absorbing medium onto loss patterns, the SixTrack and Fluka codes have been coupled, profiting from the best of the refined physical models they respectively embed. The coupling envisages an active exchange of tracked particles between the two codes at each turn, and an on-line aperture check in SixTrack, in order ...

  4. A Coupled Hidden Markov Random Field Model for Simultaneous Face Clustering and Tracking in Videos

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan

    2016-10-25

    Face clustering and face tracking are two areas of active research in automatic facial video processing. They, however, have long been studied separately, despite the inherent link between them. In this paper, we propose to perform simultaneous face clustering and face tracking from real world videos. The motivation for the proposed research is that face clustering and face tracking can provide useful information and constraints to each other, thus can bootstrap and improve the performances of each other. To this end, we introduce a Coupled Hidden Markov Random Field (CHMRF) to simultaneously model face clustering, face tracking, and their interactions. We provide an effective algorithm based on constrained clustering and optimal tracking for the joint optimization of cluster labels and face tracking. We demonstrate significant improvements over state-of-the-art results in face clustering and tracking on several videos.

  5. Emergent organization of oscillator clusters in coupled self ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dynamics, whereby at fixed intervals of time the nonlinearity parameter at each site ... The function g is the feedback adjustment function introduced in ref. ..... cluster of size c − 1) and the probability distribution of P(c), it also has power law.

  6. Strong-coupling expansion for the momentum distribution of the Bose-Hubbard model with benchmarking against exact numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Kato, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Naoki; Trivedi, Nandini

    2009-01-01

    A strong-coupling expansion for the Green's functions, self-energies, and correlation functions of the Bose-Hubbard model is developed. We illustrate the general formalism, which includes all possible (normal-phase) inhomogeneous effects in the formalism, such as disorder or a trap potential, as well as effects of thermal excitations. The expansion is then employed to calculate the momentum distribution of the bosons in the Mott phase for an infinite homogeneous periodic system at zero temperature through third order in the hopping. By using scaling theory for the critical behavior at zero momentum and at the critical value of the hopping for the Mott insulator-to-superfluid transition along with a generalization of the random-phase-approximation-like form for the momentum distribution, we are able to extrapolate the series to infinite order and produce very accurate quantitative results for the momentum distribution in a simple functional form for one, two, and three dimensions. The accuracy is better in higher dimensions and is on the order of a few percent relative error everywhere except close to the critical value of the hopping divided by the on-site repulsion. In addition, we find simple phenomenological expressions for the Mott-phase lobes in two and three dimensions which are much more accurate than the truncated strong-coupling expansions and any other analytic approximation we are aware of. The strong-coupling expansions and scaling-theory results are benchmarked against numerically exact quantum Monte Carlo simulations in two and three dimensions and against density-matrix renormalization-group calculations in one dimension. These analytic expressions will be useful for quick comparison of experimental results to theory and in many cases can bypass the need for expensive numerical simulations.

  7. Communication: A Jastrow factor coupled cluster theory for weak and strong electron correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuscamman, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We present a Jastrow-factor-inspired variant of coupled cluster theory that accurately describes both weak and strong electron correlation. Compatibility with quantum Monte Carlo allows for variational energy evaluations and an antisymmetric geminal power reference, two features not present in traditional coupled cluster that facilitate a nearly exact description of the strong electron correlations in minimal-basis N 2 bond breaking. In double-ζ treatments of the HF and H 2 O bond dissociations, where both weak and strong correlations are important, this polynomial cost method proves more accurate than either traditional coupled cluster or complete active space perturbation theory. These preliminary successes suggest a deep connection between the ways in which cluster operators and Jastrow factors encode correlation

  8. Phase correlation and clustering of a nearest neighbour coupled oscillators system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Nashar, Hassan F.

    2002-09-01

    We investigated the phases in a system of nearest neighbour coupled oscillators before complete synchronization in frequency occurs. We found that when oscillators under the influence of coupling form a cluster of the same time-average frequency, their phases start to correlate. An order parameter, which measures this correlation, starts to grow at this stage until it reaches maximum. This means that a time-average phase locked state is reached between the oscillators inside the cluster of the same time- average frequency. At this strength the cluster attracts individual oscillators or a cluster to join in. We also observe that clustering in averaged frequencies orders the phases of the oscillators. This behavior is found at all the transition points studied. (author)

  9. Phase correlation and clustering of a nearest neighbour coupled oscillators system

    CERN Document Server

    Ei-Nashar, H F

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phases in a system of nearest neighbour coupled oscillators before complete synchronization in frequency occurs. We found that when oscillators under the influence of coupling form a cluster of the same time-average frequency, their phases start to correlate. An order parameter, which measures this correlation, starts to grow at this stage until it reaches maximum. This means that a time-average phase locked state is reached between the oscillators inside the cluster of the same time- average frequency. At this strength the cluster attracts individual oscillators or a cluster to join in. We also observe that clustering in averaged frequencies orders the phases of the oscillators. This behavior is found at all the transition points studied.

  10. Investigations of the VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark phase 1 with the coupled code system RELAP5/PARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Espinoza, Victor Hugo

    2008-07-01

    As part of the reactor dynamics activities of FZK/IRS, the qualification of best-estimate coupled code systems for reactor safety evaluations is a key step toward improving their prediction capability and acceptability. The VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 1 represents an excellent opportunity to validate the simulation capability of the coupled code system RELAP5/PACRS regarding both the thermal hydraulic plant response (RELAP5) using measured data obtained during commissioning tests at the Kozloduy nuclear power plant unit 6 and the neutron kinetics models of PARCS for hexagonal geometries. The Phase 1 is devoted to the analysis of the switching on of one main coolant pump while the other three pumps are in operation. It includes the following exercises: (a) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate thermal hydraulic system code with a point kinetics model (b) analysis of the core response for given initial and transient thermal hydraulic boundary conditions using a coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics model and (c) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics. Already before the test, complex flow conditions exist within the RPV e.g. coolant mixing in the upper plenum caused by the reverse flow through the loop-3 with the stopped pump. The test is initiated by switching on the main coolant pump of loop-3 that leads to a reversal of the flow through the respective piping. After about 13 s the mass flow rate through this loop reaches values comparable with the one of the other loops. During this time period, the increased primary coolant flow causes a reduction of the core averaged coolant temperature and thus an increase of the core power. Later on, the power stabilizes at a level higher than the initial power. In this analysis, special attention is paid on the prediction of the spatial asymmetrical core cooling during the test and its effects on the

  11. Investigations of the VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark phase 1 with the coupled code system RELAP5/PARCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Espinoza, Victor Hugo

    2008-07-15

    As part of the reactor dynamics activities of FZK/IRS, the qualification of best-estimate coupled code systems for reactor safety evaluations is a key step toward improving their prediction capability and acceptability. The VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 1 represents an excellent opportunity to validate the simulation capability of the coupled code system RELAP5/PACRS regarding both the thermal hydraulic plant response (RELAP5) using measured data obtained during commissioning tests at the Kozloduy nuclear power plant unit 6 and the neutron kinetics models of PARCS for hexagonal geometries. The Phase 1 is devoted to the analysis of the switching on of one main coolant pump while the other three pumps are in operation. It includes the following exercises: (a) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate thermal hydraulic system code with a point kinetics model (b) analysis of the core response for given initial and transient thermal hydraulic boundary conditions using a coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics model and (c) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics. Already before the test, complex flow conditions exist within the RPV e.g. coolant mixing in the upper plenum caused by the reverse flow through the loop-3 with the stopped pump. The test is initiated by switching on the main coolant pump of loop-3 that leads to a reversal of the flow through the respective piping. After about 13 s the mass flow rate through this loop reaches values comparable with the one of the other loops. During this time period, the increased primary coolant flow causes a reduction of the core averaged coolant temperature and thus an increase of the core power. Later on, the power stabilizes at a level higher than the initial power. In this analysis, special attention is paid on the prediction of the spatial asymmetrical core cooling during the test and its effects on the

  12. The Verification of Coupled Neutronics Thermal-Hydraulics Code NODAL3 in the PWR Rod Ejection Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surian Pinem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled neutronics thermal-hydraulics code NODAL3 has been developed based on the few-group neutron diffusion equation in 3-dimensional geometry for typical PWR static and transient analyses. The spatial variables are treated by using a polynomial nodal method while for the neutron dynamic solver the adiabatic and improved quasistatic methods are adopted. In this paper we report the benchmark calculation results of the code against the OECD/NEA CRP PWR rod ejection cases. The objective of this work is to determine the accuracy of NODAL3 code in analysing the reactivity initiated accident due to the control rod ejection. The NEACRP PWR rod ejection cases are chosen since many organizations participated in the NEA project using various methods as well as approximations, so that, in addition to the reference solutions, the calculation results of NODAL3 code can also be compared to other codes’ results. The transient parameters to be verified are time of power peak, power peak, final power, final average Doppler temperature, maximum fuel temperature, and final coolant temperature. The results of NODAL3 code agree well with the PHANTHER reference solutions in 1993 and 1997 (revised. Comparison with other validated codes, DYN3D/R and ANCK, shows also a satisfactory agreement.

  13. Valence and charge-transfer optical properties for some SinCm (m, n ≤ 12) clusters: Comparing TD-DFT, complete-basis-limit EOMCC, and benchmarks from spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Jin, Yifan; Margraf, Johannes T.; Perera, Ajith; Burggraf, Larry W.; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate optical characterization of the closo-Si12C12 molecule is important to guide experimental efforts toward the synthesis of nano-wires, cyclic nano-arrays, and related array structures, which are anticipated to be robust and efficient exciton materials for opto-electronic devices. Working toward calibrated methods for the description of closo-Si12C12 oligomers, various electronic structure approaches are evaluated for their ability to reproduce measured optical transitions of the SiC2, Si2Cn (n = 1-3), and Si3Cn (n = 1, 2) clusters reported earlier by Steglich and Maier [Astrophys. J. 801, 119 (2015)]. Complete-basis-limit equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) results are presented and a comparison is made between perturbative and renormalized non-iterative triples corrections. The effect of adding a renormalized correction for quadruples is also tested. Benchmark test sets derived from both measurement and high-level EOMCC calculations are then used to evaluate the performance of a variety of density functionals within the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) framework. The best-performing functionals are subsequently applied to predict valence TD-DFT excitation energies for the lowest-energy isomers of SinC and Sin-1C7-n (n = 4-6). TD-DFT approaches are then applied to the SinCn (n = 4-12) clusters and unique spectroscopic signatures of closo-Si12C12 are discussed. Finally, various long-range corrected density functionals, including those from the CAM-QTP family, are applied to a charge-transfer excitation in a cyclic (Si4C4)4 oligomer. Approaches for gauging the extent of charge-transfer character are also tested and EOMCC results are used to benchmark functionals and make recommendations.

  14. Merging symmetry projection methods with coupled cluster theory: Lessons from the Lipkin model Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlen-Strothman, J. M. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Henderson, T. H. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Hermes, M. R. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Degroote, M. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Qiu, Y. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Zhao, J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Dukelsky, J. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia; Scuseria, G. E. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2018-01-03

    Coupled cluster and symmetry projected Hartree-Fock are two central paradigms in electronic structure theory. However, they are very different. Single reference coupled cluster is highly successful for treating weakly correlated systems, but fails under strong correlation unless one sacrifices good quantum numbers and works with broken-symmetry wave functions, which is unphysical for finite systems. Symmetry projection is effective for the treatment of strong correlation at the mean-field level through multireference non-orthogonal configuration interaction wavefunctions, but unlike coupled cluster, it is neither size extensive nor ideal for treating dynamic correlation. We here examine different scenarios for merging these two dissimilar theories. We carry out this exercise over the integrable Lipkin model Hamiltonian, which despite its simplicity, encompasses non-trivial physics for degenerate systems and can be solved via diagonalization for a very large number of particles. We show how symmetry projection and coupled cluster doubles individually fail in different correlation limits, whereas models that merge these two theories are highly successful over the entire phase diagram. Despite the simplicity of the Lipkin Hamiltonian, the lessons learned in this work will be useful for building an ab initio symmetry projected coupled cluster theory that we expect to be accurate in the weakly and strongly correlated limits, as well as the recoupling regime.

  15. Combining symmetry collective states with coupled-cluster theory: Lessons from the Agassi model Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Dukelsky, Jorge; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2017-06-01

    The failures of single-reference coupled-cluster theory for strongly correlated many-body systems is flagged at the mean-field level by the spontaneous breaking of one or more physical symmetries of the Hamiltonian. Restoring the symmetry of the mean-field determinant by projection reveals that coupled-cluster theory fails because it factorizes high-order excitation amplitudes incorrectly. However, symmetry-projected mean-field wave functions do not account sufficiently for dynamic (or weak) correlation. Here we pursue a merger of symmetry projection and coupled-cluster theory, following previous work along these lines that utilized the simple Lipkin model system as a test bed [J. Chem. Phys. 146, 054110 (2017), 10.1063/1.4974989]. We generalize the concept of a symmetry-projected mean-field wave function to the concept of a symmetry projected state, in which the factorization of high-order excitation amplitudes in terms of low-order ones is guided by symmetry projection and is not exponential, and combine them with coupled-cluster theory in order to model the ground state of the Agassi Hamiltonian. This model has two separate channels of correlation and two separate physical symmetries which are broken under strong correlation. We show how the combination of symmetry collective states and coupled-cluster theory is effective in obtaining correlation energies and order parameters of the Agassi model throughout its phase diagram.

  16. Electronic couplings for molecular charge transfer: Benchmarking CDFT, FODFT, and FODFTB against high-level ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubas, Adam; Blumberger, Jochen, E-mail: j.blumberger@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, Felix [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Heck, Alexander; Elstner, Marcus [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Oberhofer, Harald [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2014-03-14

    We introduce a database (HAB11) of electronic coupling matrix elements (H{sub ab}) for electron transfer in 11 π-conjugated organic homo-dimer cations. High-level ab inito calculations at the multireference configuration interaction MRCI+Q level of theory, n-electron valence state perturbation theory NEVPT2, and (spin-component scaled) approximate coupled cluster model (SCS)-CC2 are reported for this database to assess the performance of three DFT methods of decreasing computational cost, including constrained density functional theory (CDFT), fragment-orbital DFT (FODFT), and self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (FODFTB). We find that the CDFT approach in combination with a modified PBE functional containing 50% Hartree-Fock exchange gives best results for absolute H{sub ab} values (mean relative unsigned error = 5.3%) and exponential distance decay constants β (4.3%). CDFT in combination with pure PBE overestimates couplings by 38.7% due to a too diffuse excess charge distribution, whereas the economic FODFT and highly cost-effective FODFTB methods underestimate couplings by 37.6% and 42.4%, respectively, due to neglect of interaction between donor and acceptor. The errors are systematic, however, and can be significantly reduced by applying a uniform scaling factor for each method. Applications to dimers outside the database, specifically rotated thiophene dimers and larger acenes up to pentacene, suggests that the same scaling procedure significantly improves the FODFT and FODFTB results for larger π-conjugated systems relevant to organic semiconductors and DNA.

  17. Performance Characteristics of Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementations of NAS Parallel Benchmarks SP and BT on Large-Scale Multicore Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, X.; Taylor, V.

    2011-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are well-known applications with fixed algorithms for evaluating parallel systems and tools. Multicore clusters provide a natural programming paradigm for hybrid programs, whereby OpenMP can be used with the data sharing with the multicores that comprise a node, and MPI can be used with the communication between nodes. In this paper, we use Scalar Pentadiagonal (SP) and Block Tridiagonal (BT) benchmarks of MPI NPB 3.3 as a basis for a comparative approach to implement hybrid MPI/OpenMP versions of SP and BT. In particular, we can compare the performance of the hybrid SP and BT with the MPI counterparts on large-scale multicore clusters, Intrepid (BlueGene/P) at Argonne National Laboratory and Jaguar (Cray XT4/5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our performance results indicate that the hybrid SP outperforms the MPI SP by up to 20.76 %, and the hybrid BT outperforms the MPI BT by up to 8.58 % on up to 10 000 cores on Intrepid and Jaguar. We also use performance tools and MPI trace libraries available on these clusters to further investigate the performance characteristics of the hybrid SP and BT. © 2011 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Computer Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance Characteristics of Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementations of NAS Parallel Benchmarks SP and BT on Large-Scale Multicore Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, X.

    2011-07-18

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are well-known applications with fixed algorithms for evaluating parallel systems and tools. Multicore clusters provide a natural programming paradigm for hybrid programs, whereby OpenMP can be used with the data sharing with the multicores that comprise a node, and MPI can be used with the communication between nodes. In this paper, we use Scalar Pentadiagonal (SP) and Block Tridiagonal (BT) benchmarks of MPI NPB 3.3 as a basis for a comparative approach to implement hybrid MPI/OpenMP versions of SP and BT. In particular, we can compare the performance of the hybrid SP and BT with the MPI counterparts on large-scale multicore clusters, Intrepid (BlueGene/P) at Argonne National Laboratory and Jaguar (Cray XT4/5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our performance results indicate that the hybrid SP outperforms the MPI SP by up to 20.76 %, and the hybrid BT outperforms the MPI BT by up to 8.58 % on up to 10 000 cores on Intrepid and Jaguar. We also use performance tools and MPI trace libraries available on these clusters to further investigate the performance characteristics of the hybrid SP and BT. © 2011 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Computer Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure within Multilevel Coupled Cluster Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Rolf H; Coriani, Sonia; Koch, Henrik

    2016-06-14

    Core excited states are challenging to calculate, mainly because they are embedded in a manifold of high-energy valence-excited states. However, their locality makes their determination ideal for local correlation methods. In this paper, we demonstrate the performance of multilevel coupled cluster theory in computing core spectra both within the core-valence separated and the asymmetric Lanczos implementations of coupled cluster linear response theory. We also propose a visualization tool to analyze the excitations using the difference between the ground-state and excited-state electron densities.

  20. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe: Correlation energies and dipole polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, B. K.; Angom, D.; Latha, K. V. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed and systematic study of the correlation energies of inert gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe using relativistic many-body perturbation theory and relativistic coupled-cluster theory. In the relativistic coupled-cluster calculations, we implement perturbative triples and include these in the correlation energy calculations. We then calculate the dipole polarizability of the ground states using perturbed coupled-cluster theory.

  1. Phase models and clustering in networks of oscillators with delayed coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sue Ann; Wang, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    We consider a general model for a network of oscillators with time delayed coupling where the coupling matrix is circulant. We use the theory of weakly coupled oscillators to reduce the system of delay differential equations to a phase model where the time delay enters as a phase shift. We use the phase model to determine model independent existence and stability results for symmetric cluster solutions. Our results extend previous work to systems with time delay and a more general coupling matrix. We show that the presence of the time delay can lead to the coexistence of multiple stable clustering solutions. We apply our analytical results to a network of Morris Lecar neurons and compare these results with numerical continuation and simulation studies.

  2. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 coolant transient (V1000CT) benchmark - a consistent approach for assessing coupled codes for RIA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyan D Ivanov; Kostadin N Ivanov; Eric Royer; Sylvie Aniel; Nikola Kolev; Pavlin Groudev

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Rod Ejection Accident (REA) and Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) are two of the most important Design Basis Accidents (DBA) for VVER-1000 exhibiting significant localized space-time effects. A consistent approach for assessing coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics/thermal hydraulics codes for these Reactivity Insertion Accidents (RIA) is to first validate the codes using the available plant test (measured) data and after that perform cross code comparative analysis for REA and MSLB scenarios. In the framework of joint effort between the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of OECD, the United States Department of Energy (US DOE), and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), France a coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal hydraulics benchmark was defined. The benchmark is based on data from the Unit 6 of the Bulgarian Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). In performing this work the PSU, USA and CEA-Saclay, France have collaborated with Bulgarian organizations, in particular with the KNPP and the INRNE. The benchmark consists of two phases: Phase 1: Main Coolant Pump Switching On; Phase 2: Coolant Mixing Tests and MSLB. In addition to the measured (experiment) scenario, an extreme calculation scenario was defined for better testing 3-D neutronics/thermal-hydraulics techniques: rod ejection simulation with control rod being ejected in the core sector cooled by the switched on MCP. Since the previous coupled code benchmarks indicated that further development of the mixing computation models in the integrated codes is necessary, a coolant mixing experiment and MSLB transients are selected for simulation in Phase 2 of the benchmark. The MSLB event is characterized by a large asymmetric cooling of the core, stuck rods and a large primary coolant flow variation. Two scenarios are defined in Phase 2: the first scenario is taken from the current licensing practice and the second one is derived from the original one using aggravating

  3. VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark. Phase 1 (V1000CT-1). Vol. 3: summary results of exercise 2 on coupled 3-D kinetics/core thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as current applications. (authors) Recently developed best-estimate computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present volume is a follow-up to the first two volumes. While the first described the specification of the benchmark, the second presented the results of the first exercise that identified the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermal-hydraulic system modelling of the simulated transient caused by the switching on of a main coolant pump when the other three were in operation. Volume 3 summarises the results for Exercise 2 of the benchmark that identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the 3-D neutron kinetics modelling of the simulated transient. These studies are based on an experiment that was conducted by Bulgarian and Russian engineers during the plant-commissioning phase at the VVER-1000 Kozloduy Unit 6. The final volume will soon be published, completing Phase 1 of this study. (authors)

  4. Entangled states decoherence in coupled molecular spin clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Filippo; Szallas, Attila; Bellini, Valerio; Affronte, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Localized electron spins in solid-state systems are widely investigated as potential building blocks of quantum devices and computers. While most efforts in the field have been focused on semiconductor low-dimensional structures, molecular antiferromagnets were recently recognized as alternative implementations of effective few-level spin systems. Heterometallic, Cr-based spin rings behave as effective spin-1/2 systems at low temperature and show long decoherence times [1]; besides, they can be chemically linked and magnetically coupled in a controllable fascion [2]. Here, we theoretically investigate the decoherence of the Bell states in such ring dimers, resulting from hyperfine interactions with nuclear spins. Based on a microscopic description of the molecules [3], we simulate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening, spectral diffusion and electron-nuclear entanglement on the electron-spin coherence, estimating the role of the different nuclei (and of possible chemical substitutions), as well as the effect of simple spin-echo sequences. References: [1] F. Troiani, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 207208 (2005). [2] G. A. Timco, S: Carretta, F. Troiani et al., Nature Nanotech. 4, 173 (2009). [3] F. Troiani, V. Bellini, and M. Affronte, Phys. Rev. B 77, 054428 (2008).

  5. Correlation effects beyond coupled cluster singles and doubles approximation through Fock matrix dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Rahul; Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-11-28

    We present an accurate single reference coupled cluster theory in which the conventional Fock operator matrix is suitably dressed to simulate the effect of triple and higher excitations within a singles and doubles framework. The dressing thus invoked originates from a second-order perturbative approximation of a similarity transformed Hamiltonian and induces higher rank excitations through local renormalization of individual occupied and unoccupied orbital lines. Such a dressing is able to recover a significant amount of correlation effects beyond singles and doubles approximation, but only with an economic n 5 additional cost. Due to the inclusion of higher rank excitations via the Fock matrix dressing, this method is a natural improvement over conventional coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles approximation, and this method would be demonstrated via applications on some challenging systems. This highly promising scheme has a conceptually simple structure which is also easily generalizable to a multi-reference coupled cluster scheme for treating strong degeneracy. We shall demonstrate that this method is a natural lowest order perturbative approximation to the recently developed iterative n-body excitation inclusive coupled cluster singles and doubles scheme [R. Maitra et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074103 (2017)].

  6. Perturbative triples correction for explicitly correlated Mukherjee's state-specific coupled cluster method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demel, Ondřej; Kedžuch, S.; Noga, J.; Pittner, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 111, 16-17 (2013), s. 2477-2488 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP208/10/P041; GA ČR GAP208/11/2222 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : explicitly correlated * coupled cluster * multireference Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.642, year: 2013

  7. Communication: Application of state-specific multireference coupled cluster methods to core-level excitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Jiří; Bhaskaran-Neir, K.; Govind, N.; Pittner, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 17 (2012), s. 171101 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/2222 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : coupled cluster calculations * electron correlations * excited states Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.164, year: 2012

  8. A BENCHMARK PROGRAM FOR EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC RESPONSE OF COUPLED BUILDING-PIPING/EQUIPMENT WITH NON-CLASSICAL DAMPING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Degrassi, G.; Chokshi, N.

    2001-01-01

    Under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a comprehensive program to evaluate state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) systems with nonclassical damping. In this program, four benchmark models of coupled building-piping/equipment systems with different damping characteristics were analyzed for a suite of earthquakes by program participants applying their uniquely developed methods and computer programs. This paper presents the results of their analyses, and their comparison to the benchmark solutions generated by BNL using time domain direct integration methods. The participant's analysis results established using complex modal time history methods showed good comparison with the BNL solutions, while the analyses produced with either complex-mode response spectrum methods or classical normal-mode response spectrum method, in general, produced more conservative results, when averaged over a suite of earthquakes. However, when coupling due to damping is significant, complex-mode response spectrum methods performed better than the classical normal-mode response spectrum method. Furthermore, as part of the program objectives, a parametric assessment is also presented in this paper, aimed at evaluation of the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled NPP systems. It is believed that the findings and insights learned from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving licensing applications of these alternate methods to coupled systems

  9. A Coupled User Clustering Algorithm Based on Mixed Data for Web-Based Learning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Niu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Web-based learning systems, due to insufficient learning behaviors analysis and personalized study guides, a few user clustering algorithms are introduced. While analyzing the behaviors with these algorithms, researchers generally focus on continuous data but easily neglect discrete data, each of which is generated from online learning actions. Moreover, there are implicit coupled interactions among the data but are frequently ignored in the introduced algorithms. Therefore, a mass of significant information which can positively affect clustering accuracy is neglected. To solve the above issues, we proposed a coupled user clustering algorithm for Wed-based learning systems by taking into account both discrete and continuous data, as well as intracoupled and intercoupled interactions of the data. The experiment result in this paper demonstrates the outperformance of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a minimal globally coupled network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Joseph D. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Bansal, Kanika [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo, SUNY Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Murphy, Thomas E. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Roy, Rajarshi [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A “chimera state” is a dynamical pattern that occurs in a network of coupled identical oscillators when the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into synchronous and asynchronous parts. We report the experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a network of four globally coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. This is the minimal network that can support chimera states, and our study provides new insight into the fundamental mechanisms underlying their formation. We use a unified approach to determine the stability of all the observed partially synchronous patterns, highlighting the close relationship between chimera and cluster states as belonging to the broader phenomenon of partial synchronization. Our approach is general in terms of network size and connectivity. We also find that chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  11. Tensor-decomposed vibrational coupled-cluster theory: Enabling large-scale, highly accurate vibrational-structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Niels Kristian; Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Losilla, Sergio A.; Christiansen, Ove

    2018-01-01

    A new implementation of vibrational coupled-cluster (VCC) theory is presented, where all amplitude tensors are represented in the canonical polyadic (CP) format. The CP-VCC algorithm solves the non-linear VCC equations without ever constructing the amplitudes or error vectors in full dimension but still formally includes the full parameter space of the VCC[n] model in question resulting in the same vibrational energies as the conventional method. In a previous publication, we have described the non-linear-equation solver for CP-VCC calculations. In this work, we discuss the general algorithm for evaluating VCC error vectors in CP format including the rank-reduction methods used during the summation of the many terms in the VCC amplitude equations. Benchmark calculations for studying the computational scaling and memory usage of the CP-VCC algorithm are performed on a set of molecules including thiadiazole and an array of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that the reduced scaling and memory requirements of the CP-VCC algorithm allows for performing high-order VCC calculations on systems with up to 66 vibrational modes (anthracene), which indeed are not possible using the conventional VCC method. This paves the way for obtaining highly accurate vibrational spectra and properties of larger molecules.

  12. Communication: energy benchmarking with quantum Monte Carlo for water nano-droplets and bulk liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfè, D; Bartók, A P; Csányi, G; Gillan, M J

    2013-06-14

    We show the feasibility of using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) to compute benchmark energies for configuration samples of thermal-equilibrium water clusters and the bulk liquid containing up to 64 molecules. Evidence that the accuracy of these benchmarks approaches that of basis-set converged coupled-cluster calculations is noted. We illustrate the usefulness of the benchmarks by using them to analyze the errors of the popular BLYP approximation of density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate the possibility of using QMC as a routine tool for analyzing DFT errors for non-covalent bonding in many types of condensed-phase molecular system.

  13. Benchmark Comparison of Dual- and Quad-Core Processor Linux Clusters with Two Global Climate Modeling Workloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGalliard, James

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation details the science and systems environments that NASA High End computing program serves. Included is a discussion of the workload that is involved in the processing for the Global Climate Modeling. The Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) is a system of models integrated using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The GEOS-5 system was used for the Benchmark tests, and the results of the tests are shown and discussed. Tests were also run for the Cubed Sphere system, results for these test are also shown.

  14. Pulse-coupled mixed-mode oscillators: Cluster states and extreme noise sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamchandani, Avinash J.; Graham, James N.; Riecke, Hermann

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by rhythms in the olfactory system of the brain, we investigate the synchronization of all-to-all pulse-coupled neuronal oscillators exhibiting various types of mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) composed of sub-threshold oscillations (STOs) and action potentials ("spikes"). We focus particularly on the impact of the delay in the interaction. In the weak-coupling regime, we reduce the system to a Kuramoto-type equation with non-sinusoidal phase coupling and the associated Fokker-Planck equation. Its linear stability analysis identifies the appearance of various cluster states. Their type depends sensitively on the delay and the width of the pulses. Interestingly, long delays do not imply slow population rhythms, and the number of emerging clusters only loosely depends on the number of STOs. Direct simulations of the oscillator equations reveal that for quantitative agreement of the weak-coupling theory the coupling strength and the noise have to be extremely small. Even moderate noise leads to significant skipping of STO cycles, which can enhance the diffusion coefficient in the Fokker-Planck equation by two orders of magnitude. Introducing an effective diffusion coefficient extends the range of agreement significantly. Numerical simulations of the Fokker-Planck equation reveal bistability and solutions with oscillatory order parameters that result from nonlinear mode interactions. These are confirmed in simulations of the full spiking model.

  15. Communication: Relativistic Fock-space coupled cluster study of small building blocks of larger uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tecmer, Paweł; Visscher, Lucas; Severo Pereira Gomes, André; Knecht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the electronic structure of the [UO 2 ] + , [UO 2 ] 2 + , [UO 2 ] 3 + , NUO, [NUO] + , [NUO] 2 + , [NUN] − , NUN, and [NUN] + molecules with the intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster method. The accuracy of mean-field approaches based on the eXact-2-Component Hamiltonian to incorporate spin–orbit coupling and Gaunt interactions are compared to results obtained with the Dirac–Coulomb Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we assess the reliability of calculations employing approximate density functionals in describing electronic spectra and quantities useful in rationalizing Uranium (VI) species reactivity (hardness, electronegativity, and electrophilicity)

  16. Communication: Relativistic Fock-space coupled cluster study of small building blocks of larger uranium complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecmer, Paweł; Severo Pereira Gomes, André; Knecht, Stefan; Visscher, Lucas

    2014-07-01

    We present a study of the electronic structure of the [UO2]+, [UO2]2 +, [UO2]3 +, NUO, [NUO]+, [NUO]2 +, [NUN]-, NUN, and [NUN]+ molecules with the intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster method. The accuracy of mean-field approaches based on the eXact-2-Component Hamiltonian to incorporate spin-orbit coupling and Gaunt interactions are compared to results obtained with the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we assess the reliability of calculations employing approximate density functionals in describing electronic spectra and quantities useful in rationalizing Uranium (VI) species reactivity (hardness, electronegativity, and electrophilicity).

  17. Quantum optics meets quantum many-body theory: coupled cluster studies of the Rabi Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, N.J.; Quick, R.M.; Bishop, R.F.; Van der Walt, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Rabi Hamiltonian, which describes the interaction of a single mode of electromagnetic radiation with a two level system, is one of the fundamental models of quantum optics. It is also of wider interest as it provides a generic model for the interaction of bosons and fermions. To allow for a systematic analysis of the strong-coupling behaviour, we have applied the coupled cluster method (CCM) to the Rabi Hamiltonian to calculate its spectrum. We find strong evidence for the existence of a somewhat subtle quantum phase transition. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  18. Nonequilibrium dynamics of polariton entanglement in a cluster of coupled traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroga, L [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Los Andes, A.A.4976, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); Tejedor, C, E-mail: lquiroga@uniandes.edu.c [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-05-01

    We study in detail the generation and relaxation of quantum coherences (entanglement) in a system of coupled polariton traps. By exploiting a Lie algebraic based super-operator technique we provide an analytical exact solution for the Markovian dissipative dynamics (Master equation) of such system which is valid for arbitrary cluster size, polariton-polariton interaction strength, temperature and initial state. Based on the exact solution of the Master equation at T = OK, we discuss how dissipation affects the quantum entanglement dynamics of coupled polariton systems.

  19. Fourth-order perturbative extension of the single-double excitation coupled-cluster method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derevianko, Andrei; Emmons, Erik D.

    2002-01-01

    Fourth-order many-body corrections to matrix elements for atoms with one valence electron are derived. The obtained diagrams are classified using coupled-cluster-inspired separation into contributions from n-particle excitations from the lowest-order wave function. The complete set of fourth-order diagrams involves only connected single, double, and triple excitations and disconnected quadruple excitations. Approximately half of the fourth-order diagrams are not accounted for by the popular coupled-cluster method truncated at single and double excitations (CCSD). Explicit formulas are tabulated for the entire set of fourth-order diagrams missed by the CCSD method and its linearized version, i.e., contributions from connected triple and disconnected quadruple excitations. A partial summation scheme of the derived fourth-order contributions to all orders of perturbation theory is proposed

  20. Communication: Time-dependent optimized coupled-cluster method for multielectron dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi; Pathak, Himadri; Orimo, Yuki; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    2018-02-01

    Time-dependent coupled-cluster method with time-varying orbital functions, called time-dependent optimized coupled-cluster (TD-OCC) method, is formulated for multielectron dynamics in an intense laser field. We have successfully derived the equations of motion for CC amplitudes and orthonormal orbital functions based on the real action functional, and implemented the method including double excitations (TD-OCCD) and double and triple excitations (TD-OCCDT) within the optimized active orbitals. The present method is size extensive and gauge invariant, a polynomial cost-scaling alternative to the time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method. The first application of the TD-OCC method of intense-laser driven correlated electron dynamics in Ar atom is reported.

  1. Communication: Biological applications of coupled-cluster frozen-density embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Johannes; Höfener, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    We report the implementation of the Laplace-transform scaled opposite-spin (LT-SOS) resolution-of-the-identity second-order approximate coupled-cluster singles and doubles (RICC2) combined with frozen-density embedding for excitation energies and molecular properties. In the present work, we furthermore employ the Hartree-Fock density for the interaction energy leading to a simplified Lagrangian which is linear in the Lagrangian multipliers. This approximation has the key advantage of a decoupling of the coupled-cluster amplitude and multipliers, leading also to a significant reduction in computation time. Using the new simplified Lagrangian in combination with efficient wavefunction models such as RICC2 or LT-SOS-RICC2 and density-functional theory (DFT) for the environment molecules (CC2-in-DFT) enables the efficient study of biological applications such as the rhodopsin and visual cone pigments using ab initio methods as routine applications.

  2. Applying the Coupled-Cluster Ansatz to Solids and Surfaces in the Thermodynamic Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Liao, Ke; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Hummel, Felix; Grüneis, Andreas

    2018-04-01

    Modern electronic structure theories can predict and simulate a wealth of phenomena in surface science and solid-state physics. In order to allow for a direct comparison with experiment, such ab initio predictions have to be made in the thermodynamic limit, substantially increasing the computational cost of many-electron wave-function theories. Here, we present a method that achieves thermodynamic limit results for solids and surfaces using the "gold standard" coupled cluster ansatz of quantum chemistry with unprecedented efficiency. We study the energy difference between carbon diamond and graphite crystals, adsorption energies of water on h -BN, as well as the cohesive energy of the Ne solid, demonstrating the increased efficiency and accuracy of coupled cluster theory for solids and surfaces.

  3. Coupled-Cluster and Configuration-Interaction Calculations for Heavy Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horoi, M.; Gour, J. R.; Wloch, M.; Lodriguito, M. D.; Brown, B. A.; Piecuch, P.

    2007-01-01

    We compare coupled-cluster (CC) and configuration-interaction (CI) results for 56 Ni obtained in the pf-shell basis, focusing on practical CC approximations that can be applied to systems with dozens or hundreds of correlated fermions. The weight of the reference state and the strength of correlation effects are controlled by the gap between the f 7/2 orbit and the f 5/2 , p 3/2 , p 1/2 orbits. Independent of the gap, the CC method with 1p-1h and 2p-2h clusters and a noniterative treatment of 3p-3h clusters is as accurate as the more demanding CI approach truncated at the 4p-4h level

  4. Analytically continued Fock space multi-reference coupled-cluster theory: Application to the shape resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sourav; Sajeev, Y.; Vaval, Nayana

    2006-01-01

    The Fock space multi-reference coupled-cluster (FSMRCC) method is used for the study of the shape resonance energy and width in an electron-atom/molecule collision. The procedure is based upon combining a complex absorbing potential (CAP) with FSMRCC theory. Accurate resonance parameters are obtained by solving a small non-Hermitian eigen-value problem. We study the shape resonances in e - -C 2 H 4 and e - -Mg

  5. Coupled Hartree-Fock calculation of {sup 13} C shielding tensors in acetylene clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craw, John Simon; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1992-12-31

    The coupled Hartree Fock method has been used to calculate ab-initio carbon magnetic shielding tensors for small clusters of acetylene molecules. The chemical shift increases from the monomer to the dimer and trimer. This is mainly due increased diamagnetism, which is imperfectly cancelled by increased paramagnetism due to loss of axial symmetry. Anisotropic effects are shown to be small in both the dimer the and trimer. (author) 21 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. A quasiparticle-based multi-reference coupled-cluster method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolik, Zoltán; Kállay, Mihály

    2014-10-07

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a quasiparticle-based multi-reference coupled-cluster (MRCC) approach. The quasiparticles are introduced via a unitary transformation which allows us to represent a complete active space reference function and other elements of an orthonormal multi-reference (MR) basis in a determinant-like form. The quasiparticle creation and annihilation operators satisfy the fermion anti-commutation relations. On the basis of these quasiparticles, a generalization of the normal-ordered operator products for the MR case can be introduced as an alternative to the approach of Mukherjee and Kutzelnigg [Recent Prog. Many-Body Theor. 4, 127 (1995); Mukherjee and Kutzelnigg, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 432 (1997)]. Based on the new normal ordering any quasiparticle-based theory can be formulated using the well-known diagram techniques. Beyond the general quasiparticle framework we also present a possible realization of the unitary transformation. The suggested transformation has an exponential form where the parameters, holding exclusively active indices, are defined in a form similar to the wave operator of the unitary coupled-cluster approach. The definition of our quasiparticle-based MRCC approach strictly follows the form of the single-reference coupled-cluster method and retains several of its beneficial properties. Test results for small systems are presented using a pilot implementation of the new approach and compared to those obtained by other MR methods.

  7. The externally corrected coupled cluster approach with four- and five-body clusters from the CASSCF wave function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Enhua; Li, Shuhua

    2015-03-07

    An externally corrected CCSDt (coupled cluster with singles, doubles, and active triples) approach employing four- and five-body clusters from the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave function (denoted as ecCCSDt-CASSCF) is presented. The quadruple and quintuple excitation amplitudes within the active space are extracted from the CASSCF wave function and then fed into the CCSDt-like equations, which can be solved in an iterative way as the standard CCSDt equations. With a size-extensive CASSCF reference function, the ecCCSDt-CASSCF method is size-extensive. When the CASSCF wave function is readily available, the computational cost of the ecCCSDt-CASSCF method scales as the popular CCSD method (if the number of active orbitals is small compared to the total number of orbitals). The ecCCSDt-CASSCF approach has been applied to investigate the potential energy surface for the simultaneous dissociation of two O-H bonds in H2O, the equilibrium distances and spectroscopic constants of 4 diatomic molecules (F2(+), O2(+), Be2, and NiC), and the reaction barriers for the automerization reaction of cyclobutadiene and the Cl + O3 → ClO + O2 reaction. In most cases, the ecCCSDt-CASSCF approach can provide better results than the CASPT2 (second order perturbation theory with a CASSCF reference function) and CCSDT methods.

  8. Validation of the coupled neutron kinetic thermohydraulic code ATHLET/DYN3D with help of measured data of the OECD Turbine Trip Benchmarks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.

    2003-12-01

    The project consisted in the validation of the coupled neutron kinetic/thermal hydraulic code system ATHLET/DYN3D for boiling water reactors by the participation at the OECD/NRC turbine trip benchmark. The benchmark defined by the OECD and the American NRC is based on an experiment with closure of the turbine stop valve which was carried out in 1977 in the nuclear power plant Peach Bottom 2 within the framework of a series of 3 experiments. In the experiment, the closure of the valve caused a pressure wave which propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of steam in the reactor core caused by the increase of pressure lead to a positive reactivity insertion. The following rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. In the frame of the benchmark, the codes could be validated by comparisons with the measured results and the result of the other participants. The benchmark was divided into 3 phases or exercises. Phase I was used for checking the thermo-hydraulic model of the system using a given power release in the core. In phase II, three-dimensional core calculations were performed for given thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions. Coupled calculations were carried out for the selected experiment and four extreme scenarios in the phase III. In the frame of the project, FZR took part in phases II and III of the benchmark. The calculations for phase II were performed with DYN3D by using the assembly discontinuity factors (ADF) and 764 thermal-hydraulic channels (1 channel/assembly). The ATHLET input data set for the coolant system was obtained form the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). It was slightly modified for the phase III calculations carried out with the parallel coupling of ATHLET and DYN3D. For spatially averaged parameters, a good agreement with the results of measurement and the results of other codes was achieved. The influence of the different models was investigated with the

  9. Linked cluster expansion in the SU(2) lattice Higgs model at strong gauge coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, C.E.M.

    1989-01-01

    A linked cluster expansion is developed for the β=0 limit of the SU(2) Higgs model. This method, when combined with strong gauge coupling expansions, is used to obtain the phase transition surface and the behaviour of scalar and vector masses in the lattice regularized theory. The method, in spite of the low order of truncation of the series applied, gives a reasonable agreement with Monte Carlo data for the phase transition surface and a qualitatively good picture of the behaviour of Higgs, glueball and gauge vector boson masses, in the strong coupling limit. Some limitations of the method are discussed, and an intuitive picture of the different behaviour for small and large bare self-coupling λ is given. (orig.)

  10. Time-dependent risks of cancer clustering among couples: a nationwide population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Liang, Yia-Wen; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Wang, Chen-Yu

    2018-02-21

    Spousal clustering of cancer warrants attention. Whether the common environment or high-age vulnerability determines cancer clustering is unclear. The risk of clustering in couples versus non-couples is undetermined. The time to cancer clustering after the first cancer diagnosis is yet to be reported. This study investigated cancer clustering over time among couples by using nationwide data. A cohort of 5643 married couples in the 2002-2013 Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database was identified and randomly matched with 5643 non-couple pairs through dual propensity score matching. Factors associated with clustering (both spouses with tumours) were analysed by using the Cox proportional hazard model. Propensity-matched analysis revealed that the risk of clustering of all tumours among couples (13.70%) was significantly higher than that among non-couples (11.84%) (OR=1.182, 95% CI 1.058 to 1.321, P=0.0031). The median time to clustering of all tumours and of malignant tumours was 2.92 and 2.32 years, respectively. Risk characteristics associated with clustering included high age and comorbidity. Shared environmental factors among spouses might be linked to a high incidence of cancer clustering. Cancer incidence in one spouse may signal cancer vulnerability in the other spouse. Promoting family-oriented cancer care in vulnerable families and preventing shared lifestyle risk factors for cancer are suggested. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Using the latent class approach to cluster firms in benchmarking: An application to the US electricity transmission industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Llorca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we advocate using the latent class model (LCM approach to control for technological differences in traditional efficiency analysis of regulated electricity networks. Our proposal relies on the fact that latent class models are designed to cluster firms by uncovering differences in technology parameters. Moreover, it can be viewed as a supervised method for clustering data that takes into account the same (production or cost relationship that is analysed later, often using nonparametric frontier techniques. The simulation exercises show that the proposed approach outperforms other sample selection procedures. The proposed methodology is illustrated with an application to a sample of US electricity transmission firms for the period 2001–2009.

  12. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Transient Benchmark with the Coupled Thermal-Hydraulics and Neutronics Code TRAC-M/PARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deokjung; Downar, Thomas J.; Ulses, Anthony; Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip 2 (TT2) experiment has been performed using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics code TRAC-M/PARCS. The objective of the analysis was to assess the performance of TRAC-M/PARCS on a BWR transient with significance in two-phase flow and spatial variations of the neutron flux. TRAC-M/PARCS results are found to be in good agreement with measured plant data for both steady-state and transient phases of the benchmark. Additional analyses of four fictitious extreme scenarios are performed to provide a basis for code-to-code comparisons and comprehensive testing of the thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling. The obtained results of sensitivity studies on the effect of direct moderator heating on transient simulation indicate the importance of this modeling aspect

  13. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.

    2003-09-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E, Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC. (orig.)

  14. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Stueben, H.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.; Wittig, H.

    2004-01-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E; Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC

  15. Four-cluster chimera state in non-locally coupled phase oscillator systems with an external potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yun; Zheng Zhi-Gang; Yang Jun-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of a one-dimensional array of non-locally coupled Kuramoto phase oscillators with an external potential is studied. A four-cluster chimera state is observed for the moderate strength of the external potential. Different from the clustered chimera states studied before, the instantaneous frequencies of the oscillators in a synchronized cluster are different in the presence of the external potential. As the strength of the external potential increases, a bifurcation from the two-cluster chimera state to the four-cluster chimera states can be found. These phenomena are well predicted analytically with the help of the Ott—Antonsen ansatz. (general)

  16. Hydrodynamical simulations of coupled and uncoupled quintessence models - II. Galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-04-01

    We study the z = 0 properties of clusters (and large groups) of galaxies within the context of interacting and non-interacting quintessence cosmological models, using a series of adiabatic SPH simulations. Initially, we examine the average properties of groups and clusters, quantifying their differences in ΛCold Dark Matter (ΛCDM), uncoupled Dark Energy (uDE) and coupled Dark Energy (cDE) cosmologies. In particular, we focus upon radial profiles of the gas density, temperature and pressure, and we also investigate how the standard hydrodynamic equilibrium hypothesis holds in quintessence cosmologies. While we are able to confirm previous results about the distribution of baryons, we also find that the main discrepancy (with differences up to 20 per cent) can be seen in cluster pressure profiles. We then switch attention to individual structures, mapping each halo in quintessence cosmology to its ΛCDM counterpart. We are able to identify a series of small correlations between the coupling in the dark sector and halo spin, triaxiality and virialization ratio. When looking at spin and virialization of dark matter haloes, we find a weak (5 per cent) but systematic deviation in fifth force scenarios from ΛCDM.

  17. A Coupled Hidden Conditional Random Field Model for Simultaneous Face Clustering and Naming in Videos

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yifan

    2016-08-18

    For face naming in TV series or movies, a typical way is using subtitles/script alignment to get the time stamps of the names, and tagging them to the faces. We study the problem of face naming in videos when subtitles are not available. To this end, we divide the problem into two tasks: face clustering which groups the faces depicting a certain person into a cluster, and name assignment which associates a name to each face. Each task is formulated as a structured prediction problem and modeled by a hidden conditional random field (HCRF) model. We argue that the two tasks are correlated problems whose outputs can provide prior knowledge of the target prediction for each other. The two HCRFs are coupled in a unified graphical model called coupled HCRF where the joint dependence of the cluster labels and face name association is naturally embedded in the correlation between the two HCRFs. We provide an effective algorithm to optimize the two HCRFs iteratively and the performance of the two tasks on real-world data set can be both improved.

  18. Benchmarking von Krankenhausinformationssystemen – eine vergleichende Analyse deutschsprachiger Benchmarkingcluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn, Franziska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is a method of strategic information management used by many hospitals today. During the last years, several benchmarking clusters have been established within the German-speaking countries. They support hospitals in comparing and positioning their information system’s and information management’s costs, performance and efficiency against other hospitals. In order to differentiate between these benchmarking clusters and to provide decision support in selecting an appropriate benchmarking cluster, a classification scheme is developed. The classification scheme observes both general conditions and examined contents of the benchmarking clusters. It is applied to seven benchmarking clusters which have been active in the German-speaking countries within the last years. Currently, performance benchmarking is the most frequent benchmarking type, whereas the observed benchmarking clusters differ in the number of benchmarking partners and their cooperation forms. The benchmarking clusters also deal with different benchmarking subjects. Assessing costs and quality application systems, physical data processing systems, organizational structures of information management and IT services processes are the most frequent benchmarking subjects. There is still potential for further activities within the benchmarking clusters to measure strategic and tactical information management, IT governance and quality of data and data-processing processes. Based on the classification scheme and the comparison of the benchmarking clusters, we derive general recommendations for benchmarking of hospital information systems.

  19. Highly Efficient and Scalable Compound Decomposition of Two-Electron Integral Tensor and Its Application in Coupled Cluster Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo [William R. Wiley Environmental; Kowalski, Karol [William R. Wiley Environmental

    2017-08-11

    The representation and storage of two-electron integral tensors are vital in large- scale applications of accurate electronic structure methods. Low-rank representation and efficient storage strategy of integral tensors can significantly reduce the numerical overhead and consequently time-to-solution of these methods. In this paper, by combining pivoted incomplete Cholesky decomposition (CD) with a follow-up truncated singular vector decomposition (SVD), we develop a decomposition strategy to approximately represent the two-electron integral tensor in terms of low-rank vectors. A systematic benchmark test on a series of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D carbon-hydrogen systems demonstrates high efficiency and scalability of the compound two-step decomposition of the two-electron integral tensor in our implementation. For the size of atomic basis set N_b ranging from ~ 100 up to ~ 2, 000, the observed numerical scaling of our implementation shows O(N_b^{2.5~3}) versus O(N_b^{3~4}) of single CD in most of other implementations. More importantly, this decomposition strategy can significantly reduce the storage requirement of the atomic-orbital (AO) two-electron integral tensor from O(N_b^4) to O(N_b^2 log_{10}(N_b)) with moderate decomposition thresholds. The accuracy tests have been performed using ground- and excited-state formulations of coupled- cluster formalism employing single and double excitations (CCSD) on several bench- mark systems including the C_{60} molecule described by nearly 1,400 basis functions. The results show that the decomposition thresholds can be generally set to 10^{-4} to 10^{-3} to give acceptable compromise between efficiency and accuracy.

  20. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE TURN-ON AS A CHRONOMETER FOR YOUNG CLUSTERS: NGC 346 AS A BENCHMARK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cignoni, M.; Tosi, M.; Sabbi, E.; Nota, A.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Gallagher, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel approach to deriving the age of very young star clusters, by using the Turn-On (TOn). The TOn is the point in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) where the pre-main sequence (PMS) joins the main sequence (MS). In the MS luminosity function (LF) of the cluster, the TOn is identified as a peak followed by a dip. We propose that by combining the CMD analysis with the monitoring of the spatial distribution of MS stars it is possible to reliably identify the TOn in extragalactic star-forming regions. Compared to alternative methods, this technique is complementary to the turnoff dating and avoids the systematic biases affecting the PMS phase. We describe the method and its uncertainties and apply it to the star-forming region NGC 346, which has been extensively imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This study extends the LF approach in crowded extragalactic regions and opens the way for future studies with HST/WFC3, the James Webb Space Telescope and from the ground with adaptive optics.

  1. Wave failure at strong coupling in intracellular C a2 + signaling system with clustered channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wu, Yuning; Gao, Xuejuan; Cai, Meichun; Shuai, Jianwei

    2018-01-01

    As an important intracellular signal, C a2 + ions control diverse cellular functions. In this paper, we discuss the C a2 + signaling with a two-dimensional model in which the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (I P3 ) receptor channels are distributed in clusters on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The wave failure at large C a2 + diffusion coupling is discussed in detail in the model. We show that with varying model parameters the wave failure is a robust behavior with either deterministic or stochastic channel dynamics. We suggest that the wave failure should be a general behavior in inhomogeneous diffusing systems with clustered excitable regions and may occur in biological C a2 + signaling systems.

  2. Effects of Secondary Circuit Modeling on Results of Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark Calculations with New Coupled Code TRAB-3D/SMABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, Antti; Haemaelaeinen, Anitta; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta

    2003-01-01

    All of the three exercises of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Regulatory Commission pressurized water reactor main steam line break (PWR MSLB) benchmark were calculated at VTT, the Technical Research Centre of Finland. For the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetic neutronics, the thermal-hydraulics code SMABRE was used. The second exercise was calculated with the three-dimensional reactor dynamics code TRAB-3D, and the third exercise with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. VTT has over ten years' experience of coupling neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes, but this benchmark was the first time these two codes, both developed at VTT, were coupled together. The coupled code system is fast and efficient; the total computation time of the 100-s transient in the third exercise was 16 min on a modern UNIX workstation. The results of all the exercises are similar to those of the other participants. In order to demonstrate the effect of secondary circuit modeling on the results, three different cases were calculated. In case 1 there is no phase separation in the steam lines and no flow reversal in the aspirator. In case 2 the flow reversal in the aspirator is allowed, but there is no phase separation in the steam lines. Finally, in case 3 the drift-flux model is used for the phase separation in the steam lines, but the aspirator flow reversal is not allowed. With these two modeling variations, it is possible to cover a remarkably broad range of results. The maximum power level reached after the reactor trip varies from 534 to 904 MW, the range of the time of the power maximum being close to 30 s. Compared to the total calculated transient time of 100 s, the effect of the secondary side modeling is extremely important

  3. Cluster synchronization in networks of identical oscillators with α-function pulse coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bolun; Engelbrecht, Jan R; Mirollo, Renato

    2017-02-01

    We study a network of N identical leaky integrate-and-fire model neurons coupled by α-function pulses, weighted by a coupling parameter K. Studies of the dynamics of this system have mostly focused on the stability of the fully synchronized and the fully asynchronous splay states, which naturally depends on the sign of K, i.e., excitation vs inhibition. We find that there is also a rich set of attractors consisting of clusters of fully synchronized oscillators, such as fixed (N-1,1) states, which have synchronized clusters of sizes N-1 and 1, as well as splay states of clusters with equal sizes greater than 1. Additionally, we find limit cycles that clarify the stability of previously observed quasiperiodic behavior. Our framework exploits the neutrality of the dynamics for K=0 which allows us to implement a dimensional reduction strategy that simplifies the dynamics to a continuous flow on a codimension 3 subspace with the sign of K determining the flow direction. This reduction framework naturally incorporates a hierarchy of partially synchronized subspaces in which the new attracting states lie. Using high-precision numerical simulations, we describe completely the sequence of bifurcations and the stability of all fixed points and limit cycles for N=2-4. The set of possible attracting states can be used to distinguish different classes of neuron models. For instance from our previous work [Chaos 24, 013114 (2014)CHAOEH1054-150010.1063/1.4858458] we know that of the types of partially synchronized states discussed here, only the (N-1,1) states can be stable in systems of identical coupled sinusoidal (i.e., Kuramoto type) oscillators, such as θ-neuron models. Upon introducing a small variation in individual neuron parameters, the attracting fixed points we discuss here generalize to equivalent fixed points in which neurons need not fire coincidently.

  4. Accelerating the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method using the chain-of-sphere approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Neese, Frank; Izsák, Róbert

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we present a chain-of-sphere implementation of the external exchange term, the computational bottleneck of coupled-cluster calculations at the singles and doubles level. This implementation is compared to standard molecular orbital, atomic orbital and resolution of identity implementations of the same term within the ORCA package and turns out to be the most efficient one for larger molecules, with a better accuracy than the resolution-of-identity approximation. Furthermore, it becomes possible to perform a canonical CC calculation on a tetramer of nucleobases in 17 days, 20 hours.

  5. Implementation of High-Order Multireference Coupled-Cluster Methods on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprà, E; Kowalski, K

    2016-03-08

    In this paper we discuss the implementation of multireference coupled-cluster formalism with singles, doubles, and noniterative triples (MRCCSD(T)), which is capable of taking advantage of the processing power of the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. We discuss the integration of two levels of parallelism underlying the MRCCSD(T) implementation with computational kernels designed to offload the computationally intensive parts of the MRCCSD(T) formalism to Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. Special attention is given to the enhancement of the parallel performance by task reordering that has improved load balancing in the noniterative part of the MRCCSD(T) calculations. We also discuss aspects regarding efficient optimization and vectorization strategies.

  6. Study of coupled-cluster correlations on electromagnetic transitions and hyperfine structure constants of W VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmik, Anal; Majumder, Sonjoy; Roy, Sourav; Dutta, Narendra Nath

    2017-01-01

    This work presents precise calculations of important electromagnetic transition amplitudes along with details of their many-body correlations using the relativistic coupled-cluster method. Studies of hyperfine interaction constants, useful for plasma diagnostics, with this correlation exhaustive many-body approach, are another important area of this work. The calculated oscillator strengths of allowed transitions, amplitudes of forbidden transitions and lifetimes are compared with the other theoretical results wherever available and they show a good agreement. Hyperfine constants of different isotopes of W VI, presented in this paper, will be helpful in gaining an accurate picture of the abundances of this element in different astronomical bodies. (paper)

  7. Cluster Synchronization of Diffusively Coupled Nonlinear Systems: A Contraction-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzare, Zahra; Dey, Biswadip; Davison, Elizabeth N.; Leonard, Naomi Ehrich

    2018-04-01

    Finding the conditions that foster synchronization in networked nonlinear systems is critical to understanding a wide range of biological and mechanical systems. However, the conditions proved in the literature for synchronization in nonlinear systems with linear coupling, such as has been used to model neuronal networks, are in general not strict enough to accurately determine the system behavior. We leverage contraction theory to derive new sufficient conditions for cluster synchronization in terms of the network structure, for a network where the intrinsic nonlinear dynamics of each node may differ. Our result requires that network connections satisfy a cluster-input-equivalence condition, and we explore the influence of this requirement on network dynamics. For application to networks of nodes with FitzHugh-Nagumo dynamics, we show that our new sufficient condition is tighter than those found in previous analyses that used smooth or nonsmooth Lyapunov functions. Improving the analytical conditions for when cluster synchronization will occur based on network configuration is a significant step toward facilitating understanding and control of complex networked systems.

  8. Analytical Energy Gradients for Excited-State Coupled-Cluster Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladyslawski, Mark; Nooijen, Marcel

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) and similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (STEOM-CC) methods have been firmly established as accurate and routinely applicable extensions of single-reference coupled-cluster theory to describe electronically excited states. An overview of these methods is provided, with emphasis on the many-body similarity transform concept that is the key to a rationalization of their accuracy. The main topic of the paper is the derivation of analytical energy gradients for such non-variational electronic structure approaches, with an ultimate focus on obtaining their detailed algebraic working equations. A general theoretical framework using Lagrange's method of undetermined multipliers is presented, and the method is applied to formulate the EOM-CC and STEOM-CC gradients in abstract operator terms, following the previous work in [P.G. Szalay, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 55 (1995) 151] and [S.R. Gwaltney, R.J. Bartlett, M. Nooijen, J. Chem. Phys. 111 (1999) 58]. Moreover, the systematics of the Lagrange multiplier approach is suitable for automation by computer, enabling the derivation of the detailed derivative equations through a standardized and direct procedure. To this end, we have developed the SMART (Symbolic Manipulation and Regrouping of Tensors) package of automated symbolic algebra routines, written in the Mathematica programming language. The SMART toolkit provides the means to expand, differentiate, and simplify equations by manipulation of the detailed algebraic tensor expressions directly. The Lagrangian multiplier formulation establishes a uniform strategy to perform the automated derivation in a standardized manner: A Lagrange multiplier functional is constructed from the explicit algebraic equations that define the energy in the electronic method; the energy functional is then made fully variational with respect to all of its parameters, and the symbolic differentiations directly yield the explicit

  9. Library Benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiji Suwarno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The term benchmarking has been encountered in the implementation of total quality (TQM or in Indonesian termed holistic quality management because benchmarking is a tool to look for ideas or learn from the library. Benchmarking is a processof measuring and comparing for continuous business process of systematic and continuous measurement, the process of measuring and comparing for continuous business process of an organization to get information that can help these organization improve their performance efforts.

  10. Biorthogonal moment expansions in coupled-cluster theory: Review of key concepts and merging the renormalized and active-space coupled-cluster methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The key ideas behind biorthogonal moment expansions in coupled-cluster theory are discussed. Methods that enable merging active-space and renormalized coupled-cluster approaches are proposed and tested. Abstract: After reviewing recent progress in the area of the development of coupled-cluster (CC) methods for quasi-degenerate electronic states that are characterized by stronger non-dynamical correlation effects, including new generations of single- and multi-reference approaches that can handle bond breaking and excited states dominated by many-electron transitions, and after discussing the key elements of the left-eigenstate completely renormalized (CR) CC and equation-of-motion (EOM) CC methods, and the underlying biorthogonal method of moments of CC (MMCC) equations [P. Piecuch, M. Włoch, J. Chem. Phys. 123 (2005) 224105; P. Piecuch, M. Włoch, J.R. Gour, A. Kinal, Chem. Phys. Lett. 418 (2006) 467; M. Włoch, M.D. Lodriguito, P. Piecuch, J.R. Gour, Mol. Phys. 104 (2006) 2149], it is argued that it is beneficial to merge the CR-CC/EOMCC and active-space CC/EOMCC [P. Piecuch, Mol. Phys. 108 (2010) 2987, and references therein] theories into a single formalism. In order to accomplish this goal, the biorthogonal MMCC theory, which provides compact many-body expansions for the differences between the full configuration interaction and CC or, in the case of excited states, EOMCC energies, obtained using conventional truncation schemes in the cluster operator T and excitation operator R μ , is generalized, so that one can correct the CC/EOMCC energies obtained with arbitrary truncations in T and R μ for the selected many-electron correlation effects of interest. The resulting moment expansions, defining the new, Flexible MMCC (Flex-MMCC) formalism, and the ensuing CC(P; Q) hierarchy, proposed in the present work, enable one to correct energies obtained in the active-space CC and EOMCC calculations, in which one selects higher many

  11. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  12. RUNE benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo

    This report contains the description of a number of benchmarks with the purpose of evaluating flow models for near-shore wind resource estimation. The benchmarks are designed based on the comprehensive database of observations that the RUNE coastal experiment established from onshore lidar...

  13. Benchmark selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2002-01-01

    Within a production theoretic framework, this paper considers an axiomatic approach to benchmark selection. It is shown that two simple and weak axioms; efficiency and comprehensive monotonicity characterize a natural family of benchmarks which typically becomes unique. Further axioms are added...... in order to obtain a unique selection...

  14. Investigating the Correspondence Between Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Profiles Using Coupled Cluster Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Simon; Girolami, Mark; Kolch, Walter; Waters, Katrina M.; Liu, Tao; Thrall, Brian D.; Wiley, H. S.

    2008-01-01

    Modern transcriptomics and proteomics enable us to survey the expression of RNAs and proteins at large scales. While these data are usually generated and analyzed separately, there is an increasing interest in comparing and co-analyzing transcriptome and proteome expression data. A major open question is whether transcriptome and proteome expression is linked and how it is coordinated. Results: Here we have developed a probabilistic clustering model that permits analysis of the links between transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in a sensible and flexible manner. Our coupled mixture model defines a prior probability distribution over the component to which a protein profile should be assigned conditioned on which component the associated mRNA profile belongs to. By providing probabilistic assignments this approach sits between the two extremes of concatenating the data on the assumption that mRNA and protein clusters would have a one-to-one relationship, and independent clustering where the mRNA profile provides no information on the protein profile and vice-versa. We apply this approach to a large dataset of quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic expression data obtained from a human breast epithelial cell line (HMEC) stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) over a series of timepoints corresponding to one cell cycle. The results reveal a complex relationship between transcriptome and proteome with most mRNA clusters linked to at least two protein clusters, and vice versa. A more detailed analysis incorporating information on gene function from the gene ontology database shows that a high correlation of mRNA and protein expression is limited to the components of some molecular machines, such as the ribosome, cell adhesion complexes and the TCP-1 chaperonin involved in protein folding. Conclusions: The dynamic regulation of the transcriptome and proteome in mammalian cells in response to an acute mitogenic stimulus appears largely independent with very little

  15. Optimization of the Coupled Cluster Implementation in NWChem on Petascale Parallel Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimov, Victor; Bauer, Gregory H.; Chadalavada, Kalyana; Olson, Ryan M.; Glenski, Joseph W.; Kramer, William T.; Apra, Edoardo; Kowalski, Karol

    2014-09-04

    Coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) algorithm has been optimized in NWChem software package. This modification alleviated the communication bottleneck and provided from 2- to 5-fold speedup in the CCSD iteration time depending on the problem size and available memory. Sustained 0.60 petaflop/sec performance on CCSD(T) calculation has been obtained on NCSA Blue Waters. This number included all stages of the calculation from initialization till termination, iterative computation of single and double excitations, and perturbative accounting for triple excitations. In the section of perturbative triples alone, the computation maintained 1.18 petaflop/sec performance level. CCSD computations have been performed on Guanine-Cytosine deoxydinucleotide monophosphate (GC-dDMP) to probe the conformational energy difference in DNA single strand in A- and B-conformations. The computation revealed significant discrepancy between CCSD and classical force fields in prediction of relative energy of A- and B-conformations of GC-dDMP.

  16. Noniterative Multireference Coupled Cluster Methods on Heterogeneous CPU-GPU Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Ma, Wenjing; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Villa, Oreste; van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Apra, Edoardo; Kowalski, Karol

    2013-04-09

    A novel parallel algorithm for non-iterative multireference coupled cluster (MRCC) theories, which merges recently introduced reference-level parallelism (RLP) [K. Bhaskaran-Nair, J.Brabec, E. Aprà, H.J.J. van Dam, J. Pittner, K. Kowalski, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 094112 (2012)] with the possibility of accelerating numerical calculations using graphics processing unit (GPU) is presented. We discuss the performance of this algorithm on the example of the MRCCSD(T) method (iterative singles and doubles and perturbative triples), where the corrections due to triples are added to the diagonal elements of the MRCCSD (iterative singles and doubles) effective Hamiltonian matrix. The performance of the combined RLP/GPU algorithm is illustrated on the example of the Brillouin-Wigner (BW) and Mukherjee (Mk) state-specific MRCCSD(T) formulations.

  17. Low rank factorization of the Coulomb integrals for periodic coupled cluster theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Felix; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Grüneis, Andreas

    2017-03-28

    We study a tensor hypercontraction decomposition of the Coulomb integrals of periodic systems where the integrals are factorized into a contraction of six matrices of which only two are distinct. We find that the Coulomb integrals can be well approximated in this form already with small matrices compared to the number of real space grid points. The cost of computing the matrices scales as O(N 4 ) using a regularized form of the alternating least squares algorithm. The studied factorization of the Coulomb integrals can be exploited to reduce the scaling of the computational cost of expensive tensor contractions appearing in the amplitude equations of coupled cluster methods with respect to system size. We apply the developed methodologies to calculate the adsorption energy of a single water molecule on a hexagonal boron nitride monolayer in a plane wave basis set and periodic boundary conditions.

  18. Lanczos-driven coupled-cluster damped linear response theory for molecules in polarizable environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Coriani, Sonia; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    are specifically motivated by a twofold aim: (i) computation of core excitations in realistic surroundings and (ii) examination of the effect of the differential response of the environment upon excitation solely related to the CC multipliers (herein denoted the J matrix) in computations of excitation energies......We present an extension of a previously reported implementation of a Lanczos-driven coupled-cluster (CC) damped linear response approach to molecules in condensed phases, where the effects of a surrounding environment are incorporated by means of the polarizable embedding formalism. We...... and transition moments of polarizable-embedded molecules. Numerical calculations demonstrate that the differential polarization of the environment due to the first-order CC multipliers provides only minor contributions to the solvatochromic shift for all transitions considered. We thus complement previous works...

  19. Actinide chemistry using singlet-paired coupled cluster and its combinations with density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Sousa Alencar, Ana G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2015-12-01

    Singlet-paired coupled cluster doubles (CCD0) is a simplification of CCD that relinquishes a fraction of dynamic correlation in order to be able to describe static correlation. Combinations of CCD0 with density functionals that recover specifically the dynamic correlation missing in the former have also been developed recently. Here, we assess the accuracy of CCD0 and CCD0+DFT (and variants of these using Brueckner orbitals) as compared to well-established quantum chemical methods for describing ground-state properties of singlet actinide molecules. The f0 actinyl series (UO22+, NpO23+, PuO24+), the isoelectronic NUN, and thorium (ThO, ThO2+) and nobelium (NoO, NoO2) oxides are studied.

  20. Coupled cluster calculations for static and dynamic polarizabilities of C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karol; Hammond, Jeff R.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Sadlej, Andrzej J.

    2008-12-01

    New theoretical predictions for the static and frequency dependent polarizabilities of C60 are reported. Using the linear response coupled cluster approach with singles and doubles and a basis set especially designed to treat the molecular properties in external electric field, we obtained 82.20 and 83.62 Å3 for static and dynamic (λ =1064 nm) polarizabilities. These numbers are in a good agreement with experimentally inferred data of 76.5±8 and 79±4 Å3 [R. Antoine et al., J. Chem. Phys.110, 9771 (1999); A. Ballard et al., J. Chem. Phys.113, 5732 (2000)]. The reported results were obtained with the highest wave function-based level of theory ever applied to the C60 system.

  1. Equation-of-motion coupled cluster method for high spin double electron attachment calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musiał, Monika, E-mail: musial@ich.us.edu.pl; Lupa, Łukasz; Kucharski, Stanisław A. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, Szkolna 9, 40-006 Katowice (Poland)

    2014-03-21

    The new formulation of the equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled cluster (CC) approach applicable to the calculations of the double electron attachment (DEA) states for the high spin components is proposed. The new EOM equations are derived for the high spin triplet and quintet states. In both cases the new equations are easier to solve but the substantial simplification is observed in the case of quintets. Out of 21 diagrammatic terms contributing to the standard DEA-EOM-CCSDT equations for the R{sub 2} and R{sub 3} amplitudes only four terms survive contributing to the R{sub 3} part. The implemented method has been applied to the calculations of the excited states (singlets, triplets, and quintets) energies of the carbon and silicon atoms and potential energy curves for selected states of the Na{sub 2} (triplets) and B{sub 2} (quintets) molecules.

  2. Novel strategy to implement active-space coupled-cluster methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolik, Zoltán; Kállay, Mihály

    2018-03-01

    A new approach is presented for the efficient implementation of coupled-cluster (CC) methods including higher excitations based on a molecular orbital space partitioned into active and inactive orbitals. In the new framework, the string representation of amplitudes and intermediates is used as long as it is beneficial, but the contractions are evaluated as matrix products. Using a new diagrammatic technique, the CC equations are represented in a compact form due to the string notations we introduced. As an application of these ideas, a new automated implementation of the single-reference-based multi-reference CC equations is presented for arbitrary excitation levels. The new program can be considered as an improvement over the previous implementations in many respects; e.g., diagram contributions are evaluated by efficient vectorized subroutines. Timings for test calculations for various complete active-space problems are presented. As an application of the new code, the weak interactions in the Be dimer were studied.

  3. Synergy between pair coupled cluster doubles and pair density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Bulik, Ireneusz W. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Henderson, Thomas M. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Scuseria, Gustavo E. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-01-28

    Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has been recently studied as a method capable of accounting for static correlation with low polynomial cost. We present three combinations of pCCD with Kohn–Sham functionals of the density and on-top pair density (the probability of finding two electrons on top of each other) to add dynamic correlation to pCCD without double counting. With a negligible increase in computational cost, these pCCD+DFT blends greatly improve upon pCCD in the description of typical problems where static and dynamic correlations are both important. We argue that—as a black-box method with low scaling, size-extensivity, size-consistency, and a simple quasidiagonal two-particle density matrix—pCCD is an excellent match for pair density functionals in this type of fusion of multireference wavefunctions with DFT.

  4. State-selective multireference coupled-cluster theory: In pursuit of property calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, K.B.; Piecuch, P.; Pal, S.; Adamowicz, L.

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we examine the efficiency of the recently developed [P. Piecuch et al., J. Chem. Phys. 99, 6732 (1993)] state-selective (SS) multi-reference (MR) coupled-cluster (CC) method for calculation of molecular properties. In our earlier papers, we demonstrated that the SSMRCC method with inclusion of single, double, and internal and semi-internal triple excitations [SSCCSD(T) approach] is capable of providing an accurate description of the ground-state potential energy surfaces. In this paper, we present the dipole moment and polarizability values of the HF molecule at equilibrium and stretched geometries calculated using finite field technique and SSCCSD(T) ansatz. The calculations use double zeta quality basis sets with and without polarization functions. Molecular orbital basis sets include both relaxed and nonrelaxed orbitals. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  5. bcl::Cluster : A method for clustering biological molecules coupled with visualization in the Pymol Molecular Graphics System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Nathan; Woetzel, Nils; Meiler, Jens

    2011-02-01

    Clustering algorithms are used as data analysis tools in a wide variety of applications in Biology. Clustering has become especially important in protein structure prediction and virtual high throughput screening methods. In protein structure prediction, clustering is used to structure the conformational space of thousands of protein models. In virtual high throughput screening, databases with millions of drug-like molecules are organized by structural similarity, e.g. common scaffolds. The tree-like dendrogram structure obtained from hierarchical clustering can provide a qualitative overview of the results, which is important for focusing detailed analysis. However, in practice it is difficult to relate specific components of the dendrogram directly back to the objects of which it is comprised and to display all desired information within the two dimensions of the dendrogram. The current work presents a hierarchical agglomerative clustering method termed bcl::Cluster. bcl::Cluster utilizes the Pymol Molecular Graphics System to graphically depict dendrograms in three dimensions. This allows simultaneous display of relevant biological molecules as well as additional information about the clusters and the members comprising them.

  6. Similarity-transformed equation-of-motion vibrational coupled-cluster theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheaux, Jacob A.; Nooijen, Marcel; Hirata, So

    2018-02-01

    A similarity-transformed equation-of-motion vibrational coupled-cluster (STEOM-XVCC) method is introduced as a one-mode theory with an effective vibrational Hamiltonian, which is similarity transformed twice so that its lower-order operators are dressed with higher-order anharmonic effects. The first transformation uses an exponential excitation operator, defining the equation-of-motion vibrational coupled-cluster (EOM-XVCC) method, and the second uses an exponential excitation-deexcitation operator. From diagonalization of this doubly similarity-transformed Hamiltonian in the small one-mode excitation space, the method simultaneously computes accurate anharmonic vibrational frequencies of all fundamentals, which have unique significance in vibrational analyses. We establish a diagrammatic method of deriving the working equations of STEOM-XVCC and prove their connectedness and thus size-consistency as well as the exact equality of its frequencies with the corresponding roots of EOM-XVCC. We furthermore elucidate the similarities and differences between electronic and vibrational STEOM methods and between STEOM-XVCC and vibrational many-body Green's function theory based on the Dyson equation, which is also an anharmonic one-mode theory. The latter comparison inspires three approximate STEOM-XVCC methods utilizing the common approximations made in the Dyson equation: the diagonal approximation, a perturbative expansion of the Dyson self-energy, and the frequency-independent approximation. The STEOM-XVCC method including up to the simultaneous four-mode excitation operator in a quartic force field and its three approximate variants are formulated and implemented in computer codes with the aid of computer algebra, and they are applied to small test cases with varied degrees of anharmonicity.

  7. Coupled-cluster sum-frequency generation nonlinear susceptibilities of methyl (CH3) and methylene (CH2) groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsassi Feugmo, Conrard Giresse; Liégeois, Vincent; Champagne, Benoît

    2017-11-15

    The first vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra based on molecular properties calculated at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level of approximation have been simulated for interfacial model alkyl chains, providing benchmark data for comparisons with approximate methods, including density functional theory (DFT). The approach proceeds in three steps. In the first two steps, the molecular spectral properties are determined: the vibrational normal modes and frequencies and then the derivatives of the dipole moment and of the polarizability with respect to the normal coordinates. These derivatives are evaluated with a numerical differentiation approach, of which the accuracy was monitored using Romberg's procedure. Then, in the last step, a three-layer model is employed to evaluate the macroscopic second-order nonlinear optical responses and thereby the simulated SFG spectra of the alkyl interface. Results emphasize the following facts: (i) the dipole and polarizability derivatives calculated at the DFT level with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional can differ, with respect to CCSD, by as much as ±10 to 20% and ±20 to 50% for the CH 3 and CH 2 vibrations, respectively; (ii) these differences are enhanced when considering the SFG intensities as well as their variations as a function of the experimental configuration (ppp versus ssp) and as a function of the tilt and rotation angles, defining the orientation of the alkyl chain at the interface; (iii) these differences originate from both the vibrational normal coordinates and the Cartesian derivatives of the dipole moment and polarizability; (iv) freezing the successive fragments of the alkyl chain strongly modifies the SFG spectrum and enables highlighting the delocalization effects between the terminal CH 3 group and its neighboring CH 2 units; and finally (v) going from the free chain to the free methyl model, and further to C 3v constraints on leads to large variations of two ratios

  8. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, K., E-mail: karol.kowalski@pnnl.gov; Bhaskaran-Nair, K.; Shelton, W. A. [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, K8-91, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-09-07

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Green's function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N − 1 and N + 1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N − 1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the corresponding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Green's function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Green's function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating properties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response, and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. As a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Green's function defined by the CC with singles and doubles representation of the ground-state wave function.

  9. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, K. [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, K8-91, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Bhaskaran-Nair, K. [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, K8-91, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Shelton, W. A. [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, K8-91, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2014-09-07

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Green's function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N - 1 and N + 1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N - 1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the corresponding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Green's function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Green's function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating properties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response, and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. Finally, as a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Green's function defined by the CC with singles and doubles representation of the ground-state wave function.

  10. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, K.; Bhaskaran-Nair, K.; Shelton, W. A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Green's function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N − 1 and N + 1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N − 1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the corresponding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Green's function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Green's function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating properties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response, and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. As a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Green's function defined by the CC with singles and doubles representation of the ground-state wave function

  11. Solving Coupled Gross--Pitaevskii Equations on a Cluster of PlayStation 3 Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark; Heward, Jeffrey; Clark, C. W.

    2009-05-01

    At Georgia Southern University we have constructed an 8+1--node cluster of Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) computers with the intention of using this computing resource to solve problems related to the behavior of ultra--cold atoms in general with a particular emphasis on studying bose--bose and bose--fermi mixtures confined in optical lattices. As a first project that uses this computing resource, we have implemented a parallel solver of the coupled time--dependent, one--dimensional Gross--Pitaevskii (TDGP) equations. These equations govern the behavior of dual-- species bosonic mixtures. We chose the split--operator/FFT to solve the coupled 1D TDGP equations. The fast Fourier transform component of this solver can be readily parallelized on the PS3 cpu known as the Cell Broadband Engine (CellBE). Each CellBE chip contains a single 64--bit PowerPC Processor Element known as the PPE and eight ``Synergistic Processor Element'' identified as the SPE's. We report on this algorithm and compare its performance to a non--parallel solver as applied to modeling evaporative cooling in dual--species bosonic mixtures.

  12. WLUP benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA-WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP) is on the end stage. The final library will be released on 2002. It is a result of research and development made by more than ten investigators during 10 years. The organization of benchmarks for testing and choosing the best set of data has been coordinated by the author of this paper. It is presented the organization, name conventions, contents and documentation of WLUP benchmarks, and an updated list of the main parameters for all cases. First, the benchmarks objectives and types are given. Then, comparisons of results from different WIMSD libraries are included. Finally it is described the program QVALUE for analysis and plot of results. Some examples are given. The set of benchmarks implemented on this work is a fundamental tool for testing new multigroup libraries. (author)

  13. On the Coupling Time of the Heat-Bath Process for the Fortuin-Kasteleyn Random-Cluster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collevecchio, Andrea; Elçi, Eren Metin; Garoni, Timothy M.; Weigel, Martin

    2018-01-01

    We consider the coupling from the past implementation of the random-cluster heat-bath process, and study its random running time, or coupling time. We focus on hypercubic lattices embedded on tori, in dimensions one to three, with cluster fugacity at least one. We make a number of conjectures regarding the asymptotic behaviour of the coupling time, motivated by rigorous results in one dimension and Monte Carlo simulations in dimensions two and three. Amongst our findings, we observe that, for generic parameter values, the distribution of the appropriately standardized coupling time converges to a Gumbel distribution, and that the standard deviation of the coupling time is asymptotic to an explicit universal constant multiple of the relaxation time. Perhaps surprisingly, we observe these results to hold both off criticality, where the coupling time closely mimics the coupon collector's problem, and also at the critical point, provided the cluster fugacity is below the value at which the transition becomes discontinuous. Finally, we consider analogous questions for the single-spin Ising heat-bath process.

  14. Benchmark of coupling codes (ALOHA, TOPLHA and GRILL3D) with ITER-relevant Lower Hybrid antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanesio, D.; Hillairet, J.; Panaccione, L.; Maggiora, R.; Artaud, J.F.; Bae, Y.S.; Barbera, A.M.A.; Belo, J.; Berger-By, G.; Bernard, J.M.; Cara, Ph.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cesario, R.; Decker, J.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Garcia, J.; Garibaldi, P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assist the design of the future ITER Lower Hybrid launcher, coupling codes ALOHA, from CEA/IRFM, TOPLHA, from Politecnico di Torino, and GRILL3D, developed by Dr. Mikhail Irzak (A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia) and operated by ENEA Frascati, have been compared with the updated (six modules with four active waveguides per module) Passive-Active Multi-junction (PAM) Lower Hybrid antennas. Both ALOHA and GRILL3D formulate the problem in terms of rectangular waveguides modes, while TOPLHA is based on boundary-value problem with the adoption of a triangular cell-mesh to represent the relevant waveguides surfaces. Several plasma profiles, with varying edge density and density increase, have been adopted to provide a complete description of the simulated launcher in terms of reflection coefficient, computed at the beginning of each LH module, and of power spectra. Good agreement can be observed among codes for all the simulated profiles.

  15. Application of the coupled code Athlet-Quabox/Cubbox for the extreme scenarios of the OECD/NRC BWR turbine trip benchmark and its performance on multi-processor computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenbuch, S.; Schmidt, K.D.; Velkov, K.

    2003-01-01

    The OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip (TT) Benchmark is investigated to perform code-to-code comparison of coupled codes including a comparison to measured data which are available from turbine trip experiments at Peach Bottom 2. This Benchmark problem for a BWR over-pressure transient represents a challenging application of coupled codes which integrate 3-dimensional neutron kinetics into thermal-hydraulic system codes for best-estimate simulation of plant transients. This transient represents a typical application of coupled codes which are usually performed on powerful workstations using a single CPU. Nowadays, the availability of multi-CPUs is much easier. Indeed, powerful workstations already provide 4 to 8 CPU, computer centers give access to multi-processor systems with numbers of CPUs in the order of 16 up to several 100. Therefore, the performance of the coupled code Athlet-Quabox/Cubbox on multi-processor systems is studied. Different cases of application lead to changing requirements of the code efficiency, because the amount of computer time spent in different parts of the code is varying. This paper presents main results of the coupled code Athlet-Quabox/Cubbox for the extreme scenarios of the BWR TT Benchmark together with evaluations of the code performance on multi-processor computers. (authors)

  16. Explicitly-correlated ring-coupled-cluster-doubles theory: Including exchange for computations on closed-shell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Holzer, Christof; Klopper, Wim, E-mail: klopper@kit.edu

    2016-11-10

    Highlights: • Ring-coupled-cluster-doubles approach now implemented with exchange terms. • Ring-coupled-cluster-doubles approach now implemented with F12 functions. • Szabo–Ostlund scheme (SO2) implemented for use in SAPT. • Fast convergence to the limit of a complete basis. • Implementation in the TURBOMOLE program system. - Abstract: Random-phase-approximation (RPA) methods have proven to be powerful tools in electronic-structure theory, being non-empirical, computationally efficient and broadly applicable to a variety of molecular systems including small-gap systems, transition-metal compounds and dispersion-dominated complexes. Applications are however hindered due to the slow basis-set convergence of the electron-correlation energy with the one-electron basis. As a remedy, we present approximate explicitly-correlated RPA approaches based on the ring-coupled-cluster-doubles formulation including exchange contributions. Test calculations demonstrate that the basis-set convergence of correlation energies is drastically accelerated through the explicitly-correlated approach, reaching 99% of the basis-set limit with triple-zeta basis sets. When implemented in close analogy to early work by Szabo and Ostlund [36], the new explicitly-correlated ring-coupled-cluster-doubles approach including exchange has the perspective to become a valuable tool in the framework of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) for the computation of dispersion energies of molecular complexes of weakly interacting closed-shell systems.

  17. Development of New Open-Shell Perturbation and Coupled-Cluster Theories Based on Symmetric Spin Orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A new spin orbital basis is employed in the development of efficient open-shell coupled-cluster and perturbation theories that are based on a restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) reference function. The spin orbital basis differs from the standard one in the spin functions that are associated with the singly occupied spatial orbital. The occupied orbital (in the spin orbital basis) is assigned the delta(+) = 1/square root of 2(alpha+Beta) spin function while the unoccupied orbital is assigned the delta(-) = 1/square root of 2(alpha-Beta) spin function. The doubly occupied and unoccupied orbitals (in the reference function) are assigned the standard alpha and Beta spin functions. The coupled-cluster and perturbation theory wave functions based on this set of "symmetric spin orbitals" exhibit much more symmetry than those based on the standard spin orbital basis. This, together with interacting space arguments, leads to a dramatic reduction in the computational cost for both coupled-cluster and perturbation theory. Additionally, perturbation theory based on "symmetric spin orbitals" obeys Brillouin's theorem provided that spin and spatial excitations are both considered. Other properties of the coupled-cluster and perturbation theory wave functions and models will be discussed.

  18. Development and Application of Single-Referenced Perturbation and Coupled-Cluster Theories for Excited Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent work on the development of single-reference perturbation theories for the study of excited electronic states will be discussed. The utility of these methods will be demonstrated by comparison to linear-response coupled-cluster excitation energies. Results for some halogen molecules of interest in stratospheric chemistry will be presented.

  19. Bridging quantum chemistry and nuclear structure theory: Coupled-cluster calculations for closed- and open-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piecuch, Piotr; Wloch, Marta; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Dean, David J.; Papenbrock, Thomas; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten

    2005-01-01

    We review basic elements of the single-reference coupled-cluster theory and discuss large scale ab initio calculations of ground and excited states of 15O, 16O, and 17O using coupled-cluster methods and algorithms developed in quantum chemistry. By using realistic two-body interactions and the renormalized form of the Hamiltonian obtained with a no-core G-matrix approach, we obtain the converged results for 16O and promising preliminary results for 15O and 17O at the level of two-body interactions. The calculated properties other than energies include matter density, charge radius, and charge form factor. The relatively low costs of coupled-cluster calculations, which are characterized by the low-order polynomial scaling with the system size, enable us to probe large model spaces with up to 7 or 8 major oscillator shells, for which non-truncated shell-model calculations for nuclei with A = 15 17 active particles are presently not possible. We argue that the use of coupled-cluster methods and computer algorithms developed by quantum chemists to calculate properties of nuclei is an important step toward the development of accurate and affordable many-body theories that cross the boundaries of various physical sciences

  20. Bonding in Mercury Molecules Described by the Normalized Elimination of the Small Component and Coupled Cluster Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi; Filatov, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of neutral HgX and cationic HgX(+) molecules range from less than a kcal mol(-1) to as much as 60 kcal mol(-1). Using NESCICCCSD(T) [normalized elimination of the small component and coupled-cluster theory with all single and double excitations and a perturbative

  1. Towards large-scale calculations with State-Specific Multireference Coupled Cluster methods: Studies on dodecane, naphthynes, and polycarbenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Jiří; Bhaskaran-Neir, K.; Kowalski, K.; Pittner, Jiří; van Dam, H. J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 542, 23 July (2012), s. 128-133 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/2222 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : multireference Coupled Cluster (MRCC) methods * molecular systems * polycarbenes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.145, year: 2012

  2. A comparison of density functional theory and coupled cluster methods for the calculation of electric dipole polarizability gradients of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paidarová, Ivana; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have compared the performance of density functional theory (DFT) using five different exchange-correlation functionals with four coupled cluster theory based wave function methods in the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the polarizability tensor of methane. The polarizability gradient...

  3. Spectroscopic factors with coupled-cluster connecting ab initio nuclear structure to reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Oeyvind

    2011-02-01

    This thesis has two parts. Tools and theory are presented in the first part, and papers with specific applications to nuclear physics are collected in the second part. A synopsis of theoretical foundations and basic techniques for many body quantum physics is presented in the context of a computer implementation of Wick's theorem for the symbolic algebra system SymPy. A pedagogical introduction to the implemented Python module is presented, and non-trivial aspects of the implemented simplification algorithms are discussed. Computer aided manipulations of second quantization expressions relieves practitioners of laborious and error-prone hand calculations necessary for the derivation of programmable equations. Theoretical developments of the Coupled-Cluster method (CCM) at Singles- and-Doubles level (CCSD) for the calculation of spectroscopic factors (SF) and radial overlap functions are presented. Algebraic expressions are derived from novel diagram techniques. CCM is one of the most successful methods for accurate numerical quantum mechanical simulations of medium sized many-body systems studied within Chemistry and Nuclear Physics. The recently developed spherical formulation of CCM is presented and alternative coupling schemes of quantum mechanical angular momentum are discussed in the context of a computer implementation for Racah algebra with SymPy. A pedagogical introduction to this functionality is given and it is used to derive angular momentum coupled expressions for efficient calculation of the spectroscopic factor diagrams. The first research paper presents a calculation of spectroscopic factors with CCSD. Details of the calculation is presented and convergence properties, as well as the dependence on various model parameters are discussed. Interactions with different cut-offs are employed and the dependence of the SF on the interactions are studied. In the second paper we employ the angular momentum coupled SF expressions and the spherical formulation

  4. Speeding up equation of motion coupled cluster theory with the chain of spheres approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Neese, Frank; Izsák, Róbert

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, the chain of spheres exchange (COSX) approximation is applied to the highest scaling terms in the equation of motion (EOM) coupled cluster equations with single and double excitations, in particular, the terms involving integrals with four virtual labels. It is found that even the acceleration of this single term yields significant computational gains without compromising the desired accuracy of the method. For an excitation energy calculation on a cluster of five water molecules using 585 basis functions, the four virtual term is 9.4 times faster using COSX with a loose grid than using the canonical implementation, which yields a 2.6 fold acceleration for the whole of the EOM calculation. For electron attachment calculations, the four virtual term is 15 times and the total EOM calculation is 10 times faster than the canonical calculation for the same system. The accuracy of the new method was tested using Thiel’s test set for excited states using the same settings and the maximum absolute deviation over the whole test set was found to be 12.945 cm −1 (59 μHartree) for excitation energies and 6.799 cm −1 (31 μHartree) for electron attachments. Using MP2 amplitudes for the ground state in combination with the parallel evaluation of the full EOM equations in the manner discussed in this paper enabled us to perform calculations for large systems. Electron affinity values for the two lowest states of a Zn protoporphyrine model compound (224 correlated electrons and 1120 basis functions) were obtained in 3 days 19 h using 4 cores of a Xeon E5-2670 processor allocating 10 GB memory per core. Calculating the lowest two excitation energies for trans-retinal (114 correlated electrons and 539 basis functions) took 1 day 21 h using eight cores of the same processor and identical memory allocation per core

  5. Speeding up equation of motion coupled cluster theory with the chain of spheres approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Neese, Frank, E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de; Izsák, Róbert, E-mail: robert.izsak@cec.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Energiekonversion, Stiftstr. 34-36, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    In the present paper, the chain of spheres exchange (COSX) approximation is applied to the highest scaling terms in the equation of motion (EOM) coupled cluster equations with single and double excitations, in particular, the terms involving integrals with four virtual labels. It is found that even the acceleration of this single term yields significant computational gains without compromising the desired accuracy of the method. For an excitation energy calculation on a cluster of five water molecules using 585 basis functions, the four virtual term is 9.4 times faster using COSX with a loose grid than using the canonical implementation, which yields a 2.6 fold acceleration for the whole of the EOM calculation. For electron attachment calculations, the four virtual term is 15 times and the total EOM calculation is 10 times faster than the canonical calculation for the same system. The accuracy of the new method was tested using Thiel’s test set for excited states using the same settings and the maximum absolute deviation over the whole test set was found to be 12.945 cm{sup −1} (59 μHartree) for excitation energies and 6.799 cm{sup −1} (31 μHartree) for electron attachments. Using MP2 amplitudes for the ground state in combination with the parallel evaluation of the full EOM equations in the manner discussed in this paper enabled us to perform calculations for large systems. Electron affinity values for the two lowest states of a Zn protoporphyrine model compound (224 correlated electrons and 1120 basis functions) were obtained in 3 days 19 h using 4 cores of a Xeon E5-2670 processor allocating 10 GB memory per core. Calculating the lowest two excitation energies for trans-retinal (114 correlated electrons and 539 basis functions) took 1 day 21 h using eight cores of the same processor and identical memory allocation per core.

  6. Electron correlation in the interacting quantum atoms partition via coupled-cluster lagrangian densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín-Gallego, Fernando José; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; García-Revilla, Marco; Francisco, Evelio; Pendás, Ángel Martín; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2016-07-15

    The electronic energy partition established by the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) approach is an important method of wavefunction analyses which has yielded valuable insights about different phenomena in physical chemistry. Most of the IQA applications have relied upon approximations, which do not include either dynamical correlation (DC) such as Hartree-Fock (HF) or external DC like CASSCF theory. Recently, DC was included in the IQA method by means of HF/Coupled-Cluster (CC) transition densities (Chávez-Calvillo et al., Comput. Theory Chem. 2015, 1053, 90). Despite the potential utility of this approach, it has a few drawbacks, for example, it is not consistent with the calculation of CC properties different from the total electronic energy. To improve this situation, we have implemented the IQA energy partition based on CC Lagrangian one- and two-electron orbital density matrices. The development presented in this article is tested and illustrated with the H2 , LiH, H2 O, H2 S, N2 , and CO molecules for which the IQA results obtained under the consideration of (i) the CC Lagrangian, (ii) HF/CC transition densities, and (iii) HF are critically analyzed and compared. Additionally, the effect of the DC in the different components of the electronic energy in the formation of the T-shaped (H2 )2 van der Waals cluster and the bimolecular nucleophilic substitution between F(-) and CH3 F is examined. We anticipate that the approach put forward in this article will provide new understandings on subjects in physical chemistry wherein DC plays a crucial role like molecular interactions along with chemical bonding and reactivity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Higher-order equation-of-motion coupled-cluster methods for ionization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So

    2006-08-21

    Compact algebraic equations defining the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods for ionization potentials (IP-EOM-CC) have been derived and computer implemented by virtue of a symbolic algebra system largely automating these processes. Models with connected cluster excitation operators truncated after double, triple, or quadruple level and with linear ionization operators truncated after two-hole-one-particle (2h1p), three-hole-two-particle (3h2p), or four-hole-three-particle (4h3p) level (abbreviated as IP-EOM-CCSD, CCSDT, and CCSDTQ, respectively) have been realized into parallel algorithms taking advantage of spin, spatial, and permutation symmetries with optimal size dependence of the computational costs. They are based on spin-orbital formalisms and can describe both alpha and beta ionizations from open-shell (doublet, triplet, etc.) reference states into ionized states with various spin magnetic quantum numbers. The application of these methods to Koopmans and satellite ionizations of N2 and CO (with the ambiguity due to finite basis sets eliminated by extrapolation) has shown that IP-EOM-CCSD frequently accounts for orbital relaxation inadequately and displays errors exceeding a couple of eV. However, these errors can be systematically reduced to tenths or even hundredths of an eV by IP-EOM-CCSDT or CCSDTQ. Comparison of spectroscopic parameters of the FH+ and NH+ radicals between IP-EOM-CC and experiments has also underscored the importance of higher-order IP-EOM-CC treatments. For instance, the harmonic frequencies of the A 2Sigma- state of NH+ are predicted to be 1285, 1723, and 1705 cm(-1) by IP-EOM-CCSD, CCSDT, and CCSDTQ, respectively, as compared to the observed value of 1707 cm(-1). The small adiabatic energy separation (observed 0.04 eV) between the X 2Pi and a 4Sigma- states of NH+ also requires IP-EOM-CCSDTQ for a quantitative prediction (0.06 eV) when the a 4Sigma- state has the low-spin magnetic quantum number (s(z) = 1/2). When the

  8. Biorthogonal moment expansions in coupled-cluster theory: Review of key concepts and merging the renormalized and active-space coupled-cluster methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    After reviewing recent progress in the area of the development of coupled-cluster (CC) methods for quasi-degenerate electronic states that are characterized by stronger non-dynamical correlation effects, including new generations of single- and multi-reference approaches that can handle bond breaking and excited states dominated by many-electron transitions, and after discussing the key elements of the left-eigenstate completely renormalized (CR) CC and equation-of-motion (EOM) CC methods, and the underlying biorthogonal method of moments of CC (MMCC) equations [P. Piecuch, M. Włoch, J. Chem. Phys. 123 (2005) 224105; P. Piecuch, M. Włoch, J.R. Gour, A. Kinal, Chem. Phys. Lett. 418 (2006) 467; M. Włoch, M.D. Lodriguito, P. Piecuch, J.R. Gour, Mol. Phys. 104 (2006) 2149], it is argued that it is beneficial to merge the CR-CC/EOMCC and active-space CC/EOMCC [P. Piecuch, Mol. Phys. 108 (2010) 2987, and references therein] theories into a single formalism. In order to accomplish this goal, the biorthogonal MMCC theory, which provides compact many-body expansions for the differences between the full configuration interaction and CC or, in the case of excited states, EOMCC energies, obtained using conventional truncation schemes in the cluster operator T and excitation operator Rμ, is generalized, so that one can correct the CC/EOMCC energies obtained with arbitrary truncations in T and Rμ for the selected many-electron correlation effects of interest. The resulting moment expansions, defining the new, Flexible MMCC (Flex-MMCC) formalism, and the ensuing CC(P; Q) hierarchy, proposed in the present work, enable one to correct energies obtained in the active-space CC and EOMCC calculations, in which one selects higher many-body components of T and Rμ via active orbitals and which recover much of the relevant non-dynamical and some dynamical electron correlation effects in applications involving potential energy surfaces (PESs) along bond breaking coordinates, for the

  9. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  10. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  11. Combinations of coupled cluster, density functionals, and the random phase approximation for describing static and dynamic correlation, and van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Alencar, Ana G. Sousa; Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-04-01

    Contrary to standard coupled cluster doubles (CCD) and Brueckner doubles (BD), singlet-paired analogues of CCD and BD (denoted here as CCD0 and BD0) do not break down when static correlation is present, but neglect substantial amounts of dynamic correlation. In fact, CCD0 and BD0 do not account for any contributions from multielectron excitations involving only same-spin electrons at all. We exploit this feature to add - without introducing double counting, self-interaction, or increase in cost - the missing correlation to these methods via meta-GGA (generalised gradient approximation) density functionals (Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria and strongly constrained and appropriately normed). Furthermore, we improve upon these CCD0+DFT blends by invoking range separation: the short- and long-range correlations absent in CCD0/BD0 are evaluated with density functional theory and the direct random phase approximation, respectively. This corrects the description of long-range van der Waals forces. Comprehensive benchmarking shows that the combinations presented here are very accurate for weakly correlated systems, while also providing a reasonable description of strongly correlated problems without resorting to symmetry breaking.

  12. Parallel implementation of multireference coupled-cluster theories based on the reference-level parallelism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brabec, Jiri; Pittner, Jiri; van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Apra, Edoardo; Kowalski, Karol

    2012-02-01

    A novel algorithm for implementing general type of multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) theory based on the Jeziorski-Monkhorst exponential Ansatz [B. Jeziorski, H.J. Monkhorst, Phys. Rev. A 24, 1668 (1981)] is introduced. The proposed algorithm utilizes processor groups to calculate the equations for the MRCC amplitudes. In the basic formulation each processor group constructs the equations related to a specific subset of references. By flexible choice of processor groups and subset of reference-specific sufficiency conditions designated to a given group one can assure optimum utilization of available computing resources. The performance of this algorithm is illustrated on the examples of the Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee MRCC methods with singles and doubles (BW-MRCCSD and Mk-MRCCSD). A significant improvement in scalability and in reduction of time to solution is reported with respect to recently reported parallel implementation of the BW-MRCCSD formalism [J.Brabec, H.J.J. van Dam, K. Kowalski, J. Pittner, Chem. Phys. Lett. 514, 347 (2011)].

  13. Simulation of the photodetachment spectrum of HHfO- using coupled-cluster calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Daniel K. W.; Dyke, John M.; Lee, Edmond P. F.

    2016-12-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of HHfO- was simulated using restricted-spin coupled-cluster single-double plus perturbative triple {RCCSD(T)} calculations performed on the ground electronic states of HHfO and HHfO-, employing basis sets of up to quintuple-zeta quality. The computed RCCSD(T) electron affinity of 1.67 ± 0.02 eV at the complete basis set limit, including Hf 5s25p6 core correlation and zero-point energy corrections, agrees well with the experimental value of 1.70 ± 0.05 eV from a recent photodetachment study [X. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154306 (2012)]. For the simulation, Franck-Condon factors were computed which included allowances for anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation. Comparisons between simulated and experimental spectra confirm the assignments of the molecular carrier and electronic states involved but suggest that the experimental vibrational structure has suffered from poor signal-to-noise ratio. An alternative assignment of the vibrational structure to that suggested in the experimental work is presented.

  14. Symmetry broken and restored coupled-cluster theory: I. Rotational symmetry and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguet, T

    2015-01-01

    We extend coupled-cluster (CC) theory performed on top of a Slater determinant breaking rotational symmetry to allow for the exact restoration of the angular momentum at any truncation order. The main objective relates to the description of near-degenerate finite quantum systems with an open-shell character. As such, the newly developed many-body formalism offers a wealth of potential applications and further extensions dedicated to the ab initio description of, e.g., doubly open-shell atomic nuclei and molecule dissociation. The formalism, which encompasses both single-reference CC theory and projected Hartree–Fock theory as particular cases, permits the computation of usual sets of connected diagrams while consistently incorporating static correlations through the highly non-perturbative restoration of rotational symmetry. Interestingly, the yrast spectroscopy of the system, i.e. the lowest energy associated with each angular momentum, is accessed within a single calculation. A key difficulty presently overcome relates to the necessity to handle generalized energy and norm kernels for which naturally terminating CC expansions could be eventually obtained. The present work focuses on SU(2) but can be extended to any (locally) compact Lie group and to discrete groups, such as most point groups. In particular, the formalism will be soon generalized to U(1) symmetry associated with particle number conservation. This is relevant to Bogoliubov CC theory that was recently applied to singly open-shell nuclei. (paper)

  15. Cross-scale Efficient Tensor Contractions for Coupled Cluster Computations Through Multiple Programming Model Backends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Khaled Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Epifanovsky, Evgeny [Q-Chem, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Williams, Samuel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Krylov, Anna I. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-26

    Coupled-cluster methods provide highly accurate models of molecular structure by explicit numerical calculation of tensors representing the correlation between electrons. These calculations are dominated by a sequence of tensor contractions, motivating the development of numerical libraries for such operations. While based on matrix-matrix multiplication, these libraries are specialized to exploit symmetries in the molecular structure and in electronic interactions, and thus reduce the size of the tensor representation and the complexity of contractions. The resulting algorithms are irregular and their parallelization has been previously achieved via the use of dynamic scheduling or specialized data decompositions. We introduce our efforts to extend the Libtensor framework to work in the distributed memory environment in a scalable and energy efficient manner. We achieve up to 240 speedup compared with the best optimized shared memory implementation. We attain scalability to hundreds of thousands of compute cores on three distributed-memory architectures, (Cray XC30&XC40, BlueGene/Q), and on a heterogeneous GPU-CPU system (Cray XK7). As the bottlenecks shift from being compute-bound DGEMM's to communication-bound collectives as the size of the molecular system scales, we adopt two radically different parallelization approaches for handling load-imbalance. Nevertheless, we preserve a uni ed interface to both programming models to maintain the productivity of computational quantum chemists.

  16. Diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction for coupled-cluster wave-functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamasundar, K. R.

    2018-06-01

    We examine how geometry-dependent normalisation freedom of electronic wave-functions affects extraction of a meaningful diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (DBOC) to the ground-state Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface (PES). By viewing this freedom as a kind of gauge-freedom, it is shown that DBOC and the resulting associated mass-dependent adiabatic PES are gauge-invariant quantities. A sum-over-states (SOS) formula for DBOC which explicitly exhibits this invariance is derived. A biorthogonal formulation suitable for DBOC computations using standard unnormalised coupled-cluster (CC) wave-functions is presented. This is shown to lead to a biorthogonal version of SOS formula with similar properties. On this basis, different computational schemes for evaluating DBOC using approximate CC wave-functions are derived. One of this agrees with the formula used in the current literature. The connection to adiabatic-to-diabatic transformations in non-adiabatic dynamics is explored and complications arising from biorthogonal nature of CC theory are identified.

  17. Convergence of the Light-Front Coupled-Cluster Method in Scalar Yukawa Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Austin

    We use Fock-state expansions and the Light-Front Coupled-Cluster (LFCC) method to study mass eigenvalue problems in quantum field theory. Specifically, we study convergence of the method in scalar Yukawa theory. In this theory, a single charged particle is surrounded by a cloud of neutral particles. The charged particle can create or annihilate neutral particles, causing the n-particle state to depend on the n + 1 and n - 1-particle state. Fock state expansion leads to an infinite set of coupled equations where truncation is required. The wave functions for the particle states are expanded in a basis of symmetric polynomials and a generalized eigenvalue problem is solved for the mass eigenvalue. The mass eigenvalue problem is solved for multiple values for the coupling strength while the number of particle states and polynomial basis order are increased. Convergence of the mass eigenvalue solutions is then obtained. Three mass ratios between the charged particle and neutral particles were studied. This includes a massive charged particle, equal masses and massive neutral particles. Relative probability between states can also be explored for more detailed understanding of the process of convergence with respect to the number of Fock sectors. The reliance on higher order particle states depended on how large the mass of the charge particle was. The higher the mass of the charged particle, the more the system depended on higher order particle states. The LFCC method solves this same mass eigenvalue problem using an exponential operator. This exponential operator can then be truncated instead to form a finite system of equations that can be solved using a built in system solver provided in most computational environments, such as MatLab and Mathematica. First approximation in the LFCC method allows for only one particle to be created by the new operator and proved to be not powerful enough to match the Fock state expansion. The second order approximation allowed one

  18. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 coolant transient (V1000CT) benchmark for assessing coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics system codes for VVER-1000 RIA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K.; Aniel, S.; Royer, E.; Kolev, N.; Groudev, P.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the two phases of the OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark labeled as V1000CT. This benchmark is based on a data from the Bulgarian Kozloduy NPP Unit 6. The first phase of the benchmark was designed for the purpose of assessing neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic modeling for a VVER-1000 reactor, and specifically for their use in analyzing reactivity transients in a VVER-1000 reactor. Most of the results of Phase 1 will be compared against experimental data and the rest of the results will be used for code-to-code comparison. The second phase of the benchmark is planned for evaluation and improvement of the mixing computational models. Code-to-code and code-to-data comparisons will be done based on data of a mixing experiment conducted at Kozloduy-6. Main steam line break will be also analyzed in the second phase of the V1000CT benchmark. The results from it will be used for code-to-code comparison. The benchmark team has been involved in analyzing different aspects and performing sensitivity studies of the different benchmark exercises. The paper presents a comparison of selected results, obtained with two different system thermal-hydraulics codes, with the plant data for the Exercise 1 of Phase 1 of the benchmark as well as some results for Exercises 2 and 3. Overall, this benchmark has been well accepted internationally, with many organizations representing 11 countries participating in the first phase of the benchmark. (authors)

  19. Communication: spin-orbit splittings in degenerate open-shell states via Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster theory: a measure for the coupling contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-03-21

    We propose a generally applicable scheme for the computation of spin-orbit (SO) splittings in degenerate open-shell systems using multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) theory. As a specific method, Mukherjee's version of MRCC (Mk-MRCC) in conjunction with an effective mean-field SO operator is adapted for this purpose. An expression for the SO splittings is derived and implemented using Mk-MRCC analytic derivative techniques. The computed SO splittings are found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Due to the symmetry properties of the SO operator, SO splittings can be considered a quality measure for the coupling between reference determinants in Jeziorski-Monkhorst based MRCC methods. We thus provide numerical insights into the coupling problem of Mk-MRCC theory. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  20. A pair natural orbital implementation of the coupled cluster model CC2 for excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2013-08-28

    We demonstrate how to extend the pair natural orbital (PNO) methodology for excited states, presented in a previous work for the perturbative doubles correction to configuration interaction singles (CIS(D)), to iterative coupled cluster methods such as the approximate singles and doubles model CC2. The original O(N(5)) scaling of the PNO construction is reduced by using orbital-specific virtuals (OSVs) as an intermediate step without spoiling the initial accuracy of the PNO method. Furthermore, a slower error convergence for charge-transfer states is analyzed and resolved by a numerical Laplace transformation during the PNO construction, so that an equally accurate treatment of local and charge-transfer excitations is achieved. With state-specific truncated PNO expansions, the eigenvalue problem is solved by combining the Davidson algorithm with deflation to project out roots that have already been determined and an automated refresh with a generation of new PNOs to achieve self-consistency of the PNO space. For a large test set, we found that truncation errors for PNO-CC2 excitation energies are only slightly larger than for PNO-CIS(D). The computational efficiency of PNO-CC2 is demonstrated for a large organic dye, where a reduction of the doubles space by a factor of more than 1000 is obtained compared to the canonical calculation. A compression of the doubles space by a factor 30 is achieved by a unified OSV space only. Moreover, calculations with the still preliminary PNO-CC2 implementation on a series of glycine oligomers revealed an early break even point with a canonical RI-CC2 implementation between 100 and 300 basis functions.

  1. Theoretical characterization of the F(2)O(3) molecule by coupled-cluster methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Watts, John D

    2010-09-23

    Coupled-cluster calculations with extended basis sets that include noniterative connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) have been used to study the FOOOF isomer of F(2)O(3). Second-order Moller-Plessett perturbation theory (MP2) and density-functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations have also been performed for comparison. Two local minima of similar energy, namely, conformers of C(2) and C(s) symmetry have been located. Structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and standard enthalpies and free energies of formation have been calculated. The calculated bond lengths of F(2)O(3) are more characteristic of those in F(2)O and a "normal" peroxide than the unusual bond lengths in F(2)O(2). Both conformers have equal F-O and O-O bond lengths, contrary to a recent suggestion of an unsymmetrical structure. The harmonic vibrational frequencies can aid possible identification of gaseous F(2)O(3). The calculated Δ(f)H° and Δ(f)G° are 110 and 173 kJ mol(-1), respectively. These values are based on extrapolation of CCSD(T) results with augmented triple- and quadruple-ζ basis sets and are expected to be within chemical accuracy (i.e., 1 kcal mol(-1) or 4 kJ mol(-1)). F(2)O(3) is calculated to be stable to decomposition to either FO + FOO or F(2) + O(3), but unstable to decomposition to its elements, to F(2)O(2) + (1)/(2)O(2), and to F(2)O + O(2).

  2. Polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities for the atoms Al, Si, P, S, Cl, and Ar: Coupled cluster calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinetti, Concetta; Thakkar, Ajit J

    2005-01-22

    Accurate static dipole polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities are calculated for the ground states of the Al, Si, P, S, Cl, and Ar atoms. The finite-field computations use energies obtained with various ab initio methods including Moller-Plesset perturbation theory and the coupled cluster approach. Excellent agreement with experiment is found for argon. The experimental alpha for Al is likely to be in error. Only limited comparisons are possible for the other atoms because hyperpolarizabilities have not been reported previously for most of these atoms. Our recommended values of the mean dipole polarizability (in the order Al-Ar) are alpha/e(2)a(0) (2)E(h) (-1)=57.74, 37.17, 24.93, 19.37, 14.57, and 11.085 with an error estimate of +/-0.5%. The recommended values of the mean second dipole hyperpolarizability (in the order Al-Ar) are gamma/e(4)a(0) (4)E(h) (-3)=2.02 x 10(5), 4.31 x 10(4), 1.14 x 10(4), 6.51 x 10(3), 2.73 x 10(3), and 1.18 x 10(3) with an error estimate of +/-2%. Our recommended polarizability anisotropy values are Deltaalpha/e(2)a(0) (2)E(h) (-1)=-25.60, 8.41, -3.63, and 1.71 for Al, Si, S, and Cl respectively, with an error estimate of +/-1%. The recommended hyperpolarizability anisotropies are Deltagamma/e(4)a(0) (4)E(h) (-3)=-3.88 x 10(5), 4.16 x 10(4), -7.00 x 10(3), and 1.65 x 10(3) for Al, Si, S, and Cl, respectively, with an error estimate of +/-4%. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  3. A view on coupled cluster perturbation theory using a bivariational Lagrangian formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Eriksen, Janus J; Matthews, Devin A; Olsen, Jeppe; Jørgensen, Poul

    2016-02-14

    We consider two distinct coupled cluster (CC) perturbation series that both expand the difference between the energies of the CCSD (CC with single and double excitations) and CCSDT (CC with single, double, and triple excitations) models in orders of the Møller-Plesset fluctuation potential. We initially introduce the E-CCSD(T-n) series, in which the CCSD amplitude equations are satisfied at the expansion point, and compare it to the recently developed CCSD(T-n) series [J. J. Eriksen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064108 (2014)], in which not only the CCSD amplitude, but also the CCSD multiplier equations are satisfied at the expansion point. The computational scaling is similar for the two series, and both are term-wise size extensive with a formal convergence towards the CCSDT target energy. However, the two series are different, and the CCSD(T-n) series is found to exhibit a more rapid convergence up through the series, which we trace back to the fact that more information at the expansion point is utilized than for the E-CCSD(T-n) series. The present analysis can be generalized to any perturbation expansion representing the difference between a parent CC model and a higher-level target CC model. In general, we demonstrate that, whenever the parent parameters depend upon the perturbation operator, a perturbation expansion of the CC energy (where only parent amplitudes are used) differs from a perturbation expansion of the CC Lagrangian (where both parent amplitudes and parent multipliers are used). For the latter case, the bivariational Lagrangian formulation becomes more than a convenient mathematical tool, since it facilitates a different and faster convergent perturbation series than the simpler energy-based expansion.

  4. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  5. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  6. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results

  7. Polynomial Similarity Transformation Theory: A smooth interpolation between coupled cluster doubles and projected BCS applied to the reduced BCS Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degroote, M. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Henderson, T. M. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Zhao, J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Dukelsky, J. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia; Scuseria, G. E. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2018-01-03

    We present a similarity transformation theory based on a polynomial form of a particle-hole pair excitation operator. In the weakly correlated limit, this polynomial becomes an exponential, leading to coupled cluster doubles. In the opposite strongly correlated limit, the polynomial becomes an extended Bessel expansion and yields the projected BCS wavefunction. In between, we interpolate using a single parameter. The e ective Hamiltonian is non-hermitian and this Polynomial Similarity Transformation Theory follows the philosophy of traditional coupled cluster, left projecting the transformed Hamiltonian onto subspaces of the Hilbert space in which the wave function variance is forced to be zero. Similarly, the interpolation parameter is obtained through minimizing the next residual in the projective hierarchy. We rationalize and demonstrate how and why coupled cluster doubles is ill suited to the strongly correlated limit whereas the Bessel expansion remains well behaved. The model provides accurate wave functions with energy errors that in its best variant are smaller than 1% across all interaction stengths. The numerical cost is polynomial in system size and the theory can be straightforwardly applied to any realistic Hamiltonian.

  8. Two- and four-component relativistic generalized-active-space coupled cluster method: implementation and application to BiH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lasse K; Olsen, Jeppe; Fleig, Timo

    2011-06-07

    A string-based coupled-cluster method of general excitation rank and with optimal scaling which accounts for special relativity within the four-component framework is presented. The method opens the way for the treatment of multi-reference problems through an active-space inspired single-reference based state-selective expansion of the model space. The evaluation of the coupled-cluster vector function is implemented by considering contractions of elementary second-quantized operators without setting up the amplitude equations explicitly. The capabilities of the new method are demonstrated in application to the electronic ground state of the bismuth monohydride molecule. In these calculations simulated multi-reference expansions with both doubles and triples excitations into the external space as well as the regular coupled-cluster hierarchy up to full quadruples excitations are compared. The importance of atomic outer core-correlation for obtaining accurate results is shown. Comparison to the non-relativistic framework is performed throughout to illustrate the additional work of the transition to the four-component relativistic framework both in implementation and application. Furthermore, an evaluation of the highest order scaling for general-order expansions is presented. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  9. Benchmark job – Watch out!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    On 12 December 2016, in Echo No. 259, we already discussed at length the MERIT and benchmark jobs. Still, we find that a couple of issues warrant further discussion. Benchmark job – administrative decision on 1 July 2017 On 12 January 2017, the HR Department informed all staff members of a change to the effective date of the administrative decision regarding benchmark jobs. The benchmark job title of each staff member will be confirmed on 1 July 2017, instead of 1 May 2017 as originally announced in HR’s letter on 18 August 2016. Postponing the administrative decision by two months will leave a little more time to address the issues related to incorrect placement in a benchmark job. Benchmark job – discuss with your supervisor, at the latest during the MERIT interview In order to rectify an incorrect placement in a benchmark job, it is essential that the supervisor and the supervisee go over the assigned benchmark job together. In most cases, this placement has been done autom...

  10. International benchmark for coupled codes and uncertainty analysis in modelling: switching-Off of one of the four operating main circulation pumps at nominal reactor power at NPP Kalinin unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshonok, V. A.; Nikonov, S. P.; Lizorkin, M. P.; Velkov, K; Pautz, A.; Ivanov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The paper briefly describes the Specification of an international NEA/OECD benchmark based on measured plant data. During the commissioning tests for nominal power at NPP Kalinin Unit 3 a lot of measurements of neutron and thermo-hydraulic parameters have been carried out in the reactor pressure vessel, primary and the secondary circuits. One of the measured data sets for the transient 'Switching-off of one Main Circulation Pump (MCP) at nominal power' has been chosen to be applied for validation of coupled thermal-hydraulic and neutron-kinetic system codes and additionally for performing of uncertainty analyses as a part of the NEA/OECD Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling Benchmark. The benchmark is opened for all countries and institutions. The experimental data and the final specification with the cross section libraries will be provided to the participants from NEA/OECD only after official declaration of real participation in the benchmark and delivery of the simulated results of the transient for comparison. (Author)

  11. A Coupled Hidden Conditional Random Field Model for Simultaneous Face Clustering and Naming in Videos

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yifan; Tang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Baoyuan; Ji, Qiang; Lu, Hanqing

    2016-01-01

    , we divide the problem into two tasks: face clustering which groups the faces depicting a certain person into a cluster, and name assignment which associates a name to each face. Each task is formulated as a structured prediction problem and modeled

  12. Analytic energy derivatives for the calculation of the first-order molecular properties using the domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipayan; Kossmann, Simone; Neese, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CC) theory has recently emerged as an efficient and powerful quantum-chemical method for the calculation of energies of molecules comprised of several hundred atoms. It has been demonstrated that the DLPNO-CC approach attains the accuracy of a standard canonical coupled-cluster calculation to about 99.9% of the basis set correlation energy while realizing linear scaling of the computational cost with respect to system size. This is achieved by combining (a) localized occupied orbitals, (b) large virtual orbital correlation domains spanned by the projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), and (c) compaction of the virtual space through a truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) basis. In this paper, we report on the implementation of an analytic scheme for the calculation of the first derivatives of the DLPNO-CC energy for basis set independent perturbations within the singles and doubles approximation (DLPNO-CCSD) for closed-shell molecules. Perturbation-independent one-particle density matrices have been implemented in order to account for the response of the CC wave function to the external perturbation. Orbital-relaxation effects due to external perturbation are not taken into account in the current implementation. We investigate in detail the dependence of the computed first-order electrical properties (e.g., dipole moment) on the three major truncation parameters used in a DLPNO-CC calculation, namely, the natural orbital occupation number cutoff used for the construction of the PNOs, the weak electron-pair cutoff, and the domain size cutoff. No additional truncation parameter has been introduced for property calculation. We present benchmark calculations on dipole moments for a set of 10 molecules consisting of 20-40 atoms. We demonstrate that 98%-99% accuracy relative to the canonical CCSD results can be consistently achieved in these calculations. However, this comes with the price of tightening the

  13. Recognition and Matching of Clustered Mature Litchi Fruits Using Binocular Charge-Coupled Device (CCD Color Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recognition and matching of litchi fruits are critical steps for litchi harvesting robots to successfully grasp litchi. However, due to the randomness of litchi growth, such as clustered growth with uncertain number of fruits and random occlusion by leaves, branches and other fruits, the recognition and matching of the fruit become a challenge. Therefore, this study firstly defined mature litchi fruit as three clustered categories. Then an approach for recognition and matching of clustered mature litchi fruit was developed based on litchi color images acquired by binocular charge-coupled device (CCD color cameras. The approach mainly included three steps: (1 calibration of binocular color cameras and litchi image acquisition; (2 segmentation of litchi fruits using four kinds of supervised classifiers, and recognition of the pre-defined categories of clustered litchi fruit using a pixel threshold method; and (3 matching the recognized clustered fruit using a geometric center-based matching method. The experimental results showed that the proposed recognition method could be robust against the influences of varying illumination and occlusion conditions, and precisely recognize clustered litchi fruit. In the tested 432 clustered litchi fruits, the highest and lowest average recognition rates were 94.17% and 92.00% under sunny back-lighting and partial occlusion, and sunny front-lighting and non-occlusion conditions, respectively. From 50 pairs of tested images, the highest and lowest matching success rates were 97.37% and 91.96% under sunny back-lighting and non-occlusion, and sunny front-lighting and partial occlusion conditions, respectively.

  14. Dimer and cluster approach for the evaluation of electronic couplings governing charge transport: Application to two pentacene polymorphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canola, Sofia; Pecoraro, Claudia; Negri, Fabrizia

    2016-01-01

    Hole transport properties are modeled for two polymorphs of pentacene: the single crystal polymorph and the thin film polymorph relevant for organic thin-film transistor applications. Electronic couplings are evaluated in the standard dimer approach but also considering a cluster approach in which the central molecule is surrounded by a large number of molecules quantum-chemically described. The effective electronic couplings suitable for the parametrization of a tight-binding model are derived either from the orthogonalization scheme limited to HOMO orbitals and from the orthogonalization of the full basis of molecular orbitals. The angular dependent mobilities estimated for the two polymorphs using the predicted pattern of couplings display different anisotropy characteristics as suggested from experimental investigations.

  15. Dimer and cluster approach for the evaluation of electronic couplings governing charge transport: Application to two pentacene polymorphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canola, Sofia; Pecoraro, Claudia; Negri, Fabrizia

    2016-10-20

    Hole transport properties are modeled for two polymorphs of pentacene: the single crystal polymorph and the thin film polymorph relevant for organic thin-film transistor applications. Electronic couplings are evaluated in the standard dimer approach but also considering a cluster approach in which the central molecule is surrounded by a large number of molecules quantum-chemically described. The effective electronic couplings suitable for the parametrization of a tight-binding model are derived either from the orthogonalization scheme limited to HOMO orbitals and from the orthogonalization of the full basis of molecular orbitals. The angular dependent mobilities estimated for the two polymorphs using the predicted pattern of couplings display different anisotropy characteristics as suggested from experimental investigations.

  16. Qualification of coupled 3D neutron kinetic/thermal hydraulic code systems by the calculation of a VVER-440 benchmark. Re-connection of an isolated loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsarev, Alexander; Lizorkin, Mikhail [National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Bencik, Marek; Hadek, Jan [UJV Rez, a.s., Rez (Czech Republic); Kozmenkov, Yaroslav; Kliem, Soeren [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The 7th AER dynamic benchmark is a continuation of the efforts to validate the codes systematically for the estimation of the transient behavior of VVER type nuclear power plants. The main part of the benchmark is the simulation of the re-connection of an isolated circulation loop with low temperature in a VVER-440 plant. This benchmark was calculated by the National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'' (with the code ATHLET/BIPR-VVER), UJV Rez (with the code RELAP5-3D {sup copyright}) and HZDR (with the code DYN3D/ATHLET). The paper gives an overview of the behavior of the main thermal hydraulic and neutron kinetic parameters in the provided solutions.

  17. A Coupled Hidden Markov Random Field Model for Simultaneous Face Clustering and Tracking in Videos

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan; Hu, Bao-Gang; Ji, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Face clustering and face tracking are two areas of active research in automatic facial video processing. They, however, have long been studied separately, despite the inherent link between them. In this paper, we propose to perform simultaneous face

  18. The outbreak of SARS mirrored by bibliometric mapping: Combining bibliographic coupling with the complete link cluster method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jarneving

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a novel method of science mapping is presented which combines bibliographic coupling, as a measure of document-document similarity, with an agglomerative hierarchical cluster method. The focus in this study is on the mapping of so called ‘core documents’, a concept presented first in 1995 by Glänzel and Czerwon. The term ‘core document’ denote documents that have a central position in the research front in terms of many and strong bibliographic coupling links. The identification and mapping of core documents usually requires a large multidisciplinary research setting and in this study the 2003 volume of the Science Citation Index was applied. From this database, a sub-set of core documents reporting on the outbreak of SARS in 2002 was chosen for the demonstration of the application of this mapping method. It was demonstrated that the method, in this case, successfully identified interpretable research themes and that iterative clustering on two subsequent levels of cluster agglomeration may provide with useful and current information.

  19. Pair natural orbital and canonical coupled cluster reaction enthalpies involving light to heavy alkali and alkaline earth metals: the importance of sub-valence correlation

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury; Bistoni, Giovanni; Riplinger, Christoph; Auer, Alexander A.; Neese, Frank; Cavallo, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we tested canonical and domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T), respectively) for a set of 32 ligand exchange and association/dissociation reaction enthalpies involving ionic complexes

  20. Impact of cross-section generation procedures on the simulation of the VVER 1000 pump startup experiment in the OECD/DOE/CEA V1000CT benchmark by coupled 3-D thermal hydraulics/ neutron kinetics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyan D Ivanov; Kostadin N Ivanov; Sylvie Aniel; Eric Royer

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the framework of joint effort between the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of OECD, the United States Department of Energy (US DOE), and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), France a coupled 3-D thermal hydraulics/neutron kinetics benchmark was defined. The overall objective OECD/NEA V1000CT benchmark is to assess computer codes used in analysis of VVER-1000 reactivity transients where mixing phenomena (mass flow and temperature) in the reactor pressure vessel are complex. Original data from the Kozloduy-6 Nuclear Power Plant are available for the validation of computer codes: one experiment of pump start-up (V1000CT-1) and one experiment of steam generator isolation (V1000CT-2). Additional scenarios are defined for code-to-code comparison. As a 3D core model is necessary for a best-estimate computation of all the scenarios of the V1000CT benchmark, all participants were asked to develop their own core coupled 3-D thermal hydraulics/ neutron kinetics models based on the data available in the benchmark specifications. The first code to code comparisons based on the V1000CT-1 Exercise 2 specifications exhibited unacceptable discrepancies between 2 sets of results, one of them being close to experimental results. The present paper focuses first on the analysis of the observed discrepancies. The VVER 1000 3-D thermal hydraulics/neutron kinetics models are based on thermal-hydraulic and neutronic data homogenized at the assembly scale. The neutronic data, provided as part of the benchmark specifications, consist thus in a set of parametrized 2 group cross sections libraries representing the different assemblies and the reflectors. The origin of the high observed discrepancies was found to lie in the use of these neutronic libraries. The concern was then to find a way to provide neutronic data, compatible with all the benchmark participants neutronic models, that enable also comparisons with experimental results. An analysis of the

  1. Dynamical transitions in large systems of mean field-coupled Landau-Stuart oscillators: Extensive chaos and cluster states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Wai Lim; Girvan, Michelle; Ott, Edward

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study dynamical systems in which a large number N of identical Landau-Stuart oscillators are globally coupled via a mean-field. Previously, it has been observed that this type of system can exhibit a variety of different dynamical behaviors. These behaviors include time periodic cluster states in which each oscillator is in one of a small number of groups for which all oscillators in each group have the same state which is different from group to group, as well as a behavior in which all oscillators have different states and the macroscopic dynamics of the mean field is chaotic. We argue that this second type of behavior is "extensive" in the sense that the chaotic attractor in the full phase space of the system has a fractal dimension that scales linearly with N and that the number of positive Lyapunov exponents of the attractor also scales linearly with N. An important focus of this paper is the transition between cluster states and extensive chaos as the system is subjected to slow adiabatic parameter change. We observe discontinuous transitions between the cluster states (which correspond to low dimensional dynamics) and the extensively chaotic states. Furthermore, examining the cluster state, as the system approaches the discontinuous transition to extensive chaos, we find that the oscillator population distribution between the clusters continually evolves so that the cluster state is always marginally stable. This behavior is used to reveal the mechanism of the discontinuous transition. We also apply the Kaplan-Yorke formula to study the fractal structure of the extensively chaotic attractors.

  2. Communication: An improved linear scaling perturbative triples correction for the domain based local pair-natural orbital based singles and doubles coupled cluster method [DLPNO-CCSD(T)

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Yang

    2018-01-04

    In this communication, an improved perturbative triples correction (T) algorithm for domain based local pair-natural orbital singles and doubles coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD) theory is reported. In our previous implementation, the semi-canonical approximation was used and linear scaling was achieved for both the DLPNO-CCSD and (T) parts of the calculation. In this work, we refer to this previous method as DLPNO-CCSD(T0) to emphasize the semi-canonical approximation. It is well-established that the DLPNO-CCSD method can predict very accurate absolute and relative energies with respect to the parent canonical CCSD method. However, the (T0) approximation may introduce significant errors in absolute energies as the triples correction grows up in magnitude. In the majority of cases, the relative energies from (T0) are as accurate as the canonical (T) results of themselves. Unfortunately, in rare cases and in particular for small gap systems, the (T0) approximation breaks down and relative energies show large deviations from the parent canonical CCSD(T) results. To address this problem, an iterative (T) algorithm based on the previous DLPNO-CCSD(T0) algorithm has been implemented [abbreviated here as DLPNO-CCSD(T)]. Using triples natural orbitals to represent the virtual spaces for triples amplitudes, storage bottlenecks are avoided. Various carefully designed approximations ease the computational burden such that overall, the increase in the DLPNO-(T) calculation time over DLPNO-(T0) only amounts to a factor of about two (depending on the basis set). Benchmark calculations for the GMTKN30 database show that compared to DLPNO-CCSD(T0), the errors in absolute energies are greatly reduced and relative energies are moderately improved. The particularly problematic case of cumulene chains of increasing lengths is also successfully addressed by DLPNO-CCSD(T).

  3. Communication: An improved linear scaling perturbative triples correction for the domain based local pair-natural orbital based singles and doubles coupled cluster method [DLPNO-CCSD(T)

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Yang; Riplinger, Christoph; Becker, Ute; Liakos, Dimitrios G.; Minenkov, Yury; Cavallo, Luigi; Neese, Frank

    2018-01-01

    In this communication, an improved perturbative triples correction (T) algorithm for domain based local pair-natural orbital singles and doubles coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD) theory is reported. In our previous implementation, the semi-canonical approximation was used and linear scaling was achieved for both the DLPNO-CCSD and (T) parts of the calculation. In this work, we refer to this previous method as DLPNO-CCSD(T0) to emphasize the semi-canonical approximation. It is well-established that the DLPNO-CCSD method can predict very accurate absolute and relative energies with respect to the parent canonical CCSD method. However, the (T0) approximation may introduce significant errors in absolute energies as the triples correction grows up in magnitude. In the majority of cases, the relative energies from (T0) are as accurate as the canonical (T) results of themselves. Unfortunately, in rare cases and in particular for small gap systems, the (T0) approximation breaks down and relative energies show large deviations from the parent canonical CCSD(T) results. To address this problem, an iterative (T) algorithm based on the previous DLPNO-CCSD(T0) algorithm has been implemented [abbreviated here as DLPNO-CCSD(T)]. Using triples natural orbitals to represent the virtual spaces for triples amplitudes, storage bottlenecks are avoided. Various carefully designed approximations ease the computational burden such that overall, the increase in the DLPNO-(T) calculation time over DLPNO-(T0) only amounts to a factor of about two (depending on the basis set). Benchmark calculations for the GMTKN30 database show that compared to DLPNO-CCSD(T0), the errors in absolute energies are greatly reduced and relative energies are moderately improved. The particularly problematic case of cumulene chains of increasing lengths is also successfully addressed by DLPNO-CCSD(T).

  4. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 5. TMI-1 Benchmark Performed by Different Coupled Three-Dimensional Neutronics Thermal- Hydraulic Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.; Spadoni, A.; Gago, J.L.; Grgic, D.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of a double-ended main-steam-line-break (MSLB) accident assumed to have occurred in the Babcock and Wilcox Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 1 nuclear power plant (NPP) has been carried out at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione of the University of Pisa, Italy. The research has been carried out in cooperation with the University of Zagreb, Croatia, and with partial financial support from the European Union through a grant to one of the authors. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations-Nuclear Science Committee PWR MSLB Benchmark. Different code versions have been adopted in the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are described in this paper: 1. RELAP5/mod 3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics PARCS code; 2. RELAP5/mod 3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics QUABBOX code; 3. RELAP5/3D code coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics NESTLE code. Boundary and initial conditions of the system, including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by The Pennsylvania State University in cooperation with GPU Nuclear (the utility, owner of TMI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main challenge for the calculation was the prediction of the return to power (RTP) following the inlet of cold water into the core and one 'stuck-withdrawn' control rod. Non-realistic assumptions were proposed to augment the core power peak following scram. Zero-dimensional neutronics codes were capable of detecting the RTP after scram. However, the application of 3-D neutronics codes to the same scenario allowed the calculation of a similar value for overall core power peak but showed power increase occurrence in about one-tenth of the core volume. The results achieved in phase 1 of

  5. Toward enabling large-scale open-shell equation-of-motion coupled cluster calculations: triplet states of β-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hanshi; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Apra, Edoardo; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol

    2014-10-02

    In this paper we discuss the application of novel parallel implementation of the coupled cluster (CC) and equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods (EOMCC) in calculations of excitation energies of triplet states in beta-carotene. Calculated excitation energies are compared with experimental data, where available. We also provide a detailed description of the new parallel algorithms for iterative CC and EOMCC models involving single and doubles excitations.

  6. Improving the implementation of tailored expectant management in subfertile couples: protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, N.M. van den; Kersten, F.A.M.; Goddijn, M.; Bossuyt, P.M.; Veen, F. van der; Hompes, P.G.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Braat, D.D.M.; Mol, B.W.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prognostic models in reproductive medicine can help to identify subfertile couples who would benefit from fertility treatment. Expectant management in couples with a good chance of natural conception, i.e., tailored expectant management (TEM), prevents unnecessary treatment and is

  7. Improving the implementation of tailored expectant management in subfertile couples : protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Noortje M; Kersten, Fleur A M; Goddijn, Mariëtte; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; van der Veen, Fulco; Hompes, Peter G A; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Braat, Didi D M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Hoek, Annemieke

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prognostic models in reproductive medicine can help to identify subfertile couples who would benefit from fertility treatment. Expectant management in couples with a good chance of natural conception, i.e., tailored expectant management (TEM), prevents unnecessary treatment and is

  8. Chimera and phase-cluster states in populations of coupled chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Mark R.; Nkomo, Simbarashe; Showalter, Kenneth

    2012-09-01

    Populations of coupled oscillators may exhibit two coexisting subpopulations, one with synchronized oscillations and the other with unsynchronized oscillations, even though all of the oscillators are coupled to each other in an equivalent manner. This phenomenon, discovered about ten years ago in theoretical studies, was then further characterized and named the chimera state after the Greek mythological creature made up of different animals. The highly counterintuitive coexistence of coherent and incoherent oscillations in populations of identical oscillators, each with an equivalent coupling structure, inspired great interest and a flurry of theoretical activity. Here we report on experimental studies of chimera states and their relation to other synchronization states in populations of coupled chemical oscillators. Our experiments with coupled Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillators and corresponding simulations reveal chimera behaviour that differs significantly from the behaviour found in theoretical studies of phase-oscillator models.

  9. Assessment of the accuracy of coupled cluster perturbation theory for open-shell systems. I. Triples expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Janus J; Matthews, Devin A; Jørgensen, Poul; Gauss, Jürgen

    2016-05-21

    The accuracy at which total energies of open-shell atoms and organic radicals may be calculated is assessed for selected coupled cluster perturbative triples expansions, all of which augment the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) energy by a non-iterative correction for the effect of triple excitations. Namely, the second- through sixth-order models of the recently proposed CCSD(T-n) triples series [J. J. Eriksen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064108 (2014)] are compared to the acclaimed CCSD(T) model for both unrestricted as well as restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (UHF/ROHF) reference determinants. By comparing UHF- and ROHF-based statistical results for a test set of 18 modest-sized open-shell species with comparable RHF-based results, no behavioral differences are observed for the higher-order models of the CCSD(T-n) series in their correlated descriptions of closed- and open-shell species. In particular, we find that the convergence rate throughout the series towards the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and triples (CCSDT) solution is identical for the two cases. For the CCSD(T) model, on the other hand, not only its numerical consistency, but also its established, yet fortuitous cancellation of errors breaks down in the transition from closed- to open-shell systems. The higher-order CCSD(T-n) models (orders n > 3) thus offer a consistent and significant improvement in accuracy relative to CCSDT over the CCSD(T) model, equally for RHF, UHF, and ROHF reference determinants, albeit at an increased computational cost.

  10. Assessment of the accuracy of coupled cluster perturbation theory for open-shell systems. I. Triples expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksen, Janus J., E-mail: janusje@chem.au.dk; Jørgensen, Poul [qLEAP Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Matthews, Devin A. [The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Gauss, Jürgen [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-21

    The accuracy at which total energies of open-shell atoms and organic radicals may be calculated is assessed for selected coupled cluster perturbative triples expansions, all of which augment the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) energy by a non-iterative correction for the effect of triple excitations. Namely, the second- through sixth-order models of the recently proposed CCSD(T–n) triples series [J. J. Eriksen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064108 (2014)] are compared to the acclaimed CCSD(T) model for both unrestricted as well as restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (UHF/ROHF) reference determinants. By comparing UHF- and ROHF-based statistical results for a test set of 18 modest-sized open-shell species with comparable RHF-based results, no behavioral differences are observed for the higher-order models of the CCSD(T–n) series in their correlated descriptions of closed- and open-shell species. In particular, we find that the convergence rate throughout the series towards the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and triples (CCSDT) solution is identical for the two cases. For the CCSD(T) model, on the other hand, not only its numerical consistency, but also its established, yet fortuitous cancellation of errors breaks down in the transition from closed- to open-shell systems. The higher-order CCSD(T–n) models (orders n > 3) thus offer a consistent and significant improvement in accuracy relative to CCSDT over the CCSD(T) model, equally for RHF, UHF, and ROHF reference determinants, albeit at an increased computational cost.

  11. Performance of the coupled thermalhydraulics/neutron kinetics code R/P/C on workstation clusters and multiprocessor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.; Paffrath, M.; Boeer, R.; Finnemann, H.; Jackson, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The light water reactor core simulation code PANBOX has been coupled with the transient analysis code RELAP5 for the purpose of performing plant safety analyses with a three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics model. The system has been parallelized to improve the computational efficiency. The paper describes the features of this system with emphasis on performance aspects. Performance results are given for different types of parallelization, i. e. for using an automatic parallelizing compiler, using the portable PVM platform on a workstation cluster, using PVM on a shared memory multiprocessor, and for using machine dependent interfaces. (author)

  12. Direct calculation of the spin stiffness on square, triangular and cubic lattices using the coupled cluster method

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, S. E.; Darradi, R.; Richter, J.; Farnell, D. J. J

    2006-01-01

    We present a method for the direct calculation of the spin stiffness by means of the coupled cluster method. For the spin-half Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square, the triangular and the cubic lattices we calculate the stiffness in high orders of approximation. For the square and the cubic lattices our results are in very good agreement with the best results available in the literature. For the triangular lattice our result is more precise than any other result obtained so far by other a...

  13. Comparison and combination of "direct" and fragment based local correlation methods: Cluster in molecules and domain based local pair natural orbital perturbation and coupled cluster theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Becker, Ute; Neese, Frank

    2018-03-01

    Local correlation theories have been developed in two main flavors: (1) "direct" local correlation methods apply local approximation to the canonical equations and (2) fragment based methods reconstruct the correlation energy from a series of smaller calculations on subsystems. The present work serves two purposes. First, we investigate the relative efficiencies of the two approaches using the domain-based local pair natural orbital (DLPNO) approach as the "direct" method and the cluster in molecule (CIM) approach as the fragment based approach. Both approaches are applied in conjunction with second-order many-body perturbation theory (MP2) as well as coupled-cluster theory with single-, double- and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. Second, we have investigated the possible merits of combining the two approaches by performing CIM calculations with DLPNO methods serving as the method of choice for performing the subsystem calculations. Our cluster-in-molecule approach is closely related to but slightly deviates from approaches in the literature since we have avoided real space cutoffs. Moreover, the neglected distant pair correlations in the previous CIM approach are considered approximately. Six very large molecules (503-2380 atoms) were studied. At both MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory, the CIM and DLPNO methods show similar efficiency. However, DLPNO methods are more accurate for 3-dimensional systems. While we have found only little incentive for the combination of CIM with DLPNO-MP2, the situation is different for CIM-DLPNO-CCSD(T). This combination is attractive because (1) the better parallelization opportunities offered by CIM; (2) the methodology is less memory intensive than the genuine DLPNO-CCSD(T) method and, hence, allows for large calculations on more modest hardware; and (3) the methodology is applicable and efficient in the frequently met cases, where the largest subsystem calculation is too large for the canonical CCSD(T) method.

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Aespoe Task Force on Engineered Barrier System. Modelling of THM-coupled processes for benchmark 2.2 with the code GeoSys/RockFlow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Thomas; Kunz, Herbert (Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hannover (Germany))

    2010-02-15

    In 2004 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) initiated the project 'Task Force on Engineered Barrier Systems'. This project has the objective to verify the feasibility of modelling THM-coupled processes (task 1) and gas migration processes (task 2) in clay-rich buffer materials. The tasks are performed on the basis of appropriate benchmarks. This report documents the modelling results of the THM-benchmark 2.2 - the Canister Retrieval Test - using the code GeoSys/RockFlow. The Temperature Buffer Test which was performed in the immediate vicinity of the Canister Retrieval Test is included in the model. Especially the heat transport requires the handling of the problem in 3-D. Due to limitations imposed by post-processing different spatial discretisations of the model had to be used during the processing of the benchmark. The calculated temperatures agree well with measured data. Concerning hydraulic parameters the values of permeability and tortuosity were varied in the calculations. The time necessary to saturate the buffer is very sensitive to both of these values. In comparison to thermal and hydraulic processes the model only has limited capacity to predict the measured evolution of total pressure

  15. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Aespoe Task Force on Engineered Barrier System. Modelling of THM-coupled processes for benchmark 2.2 with the code GeoSys/RockFlow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Thomas; Kunz, Herbert

    2010-02-01

    In 2004 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) initiated the project 'Task Force on Engineered Barrier Systems'. This project has the objective to verify the feasibility of modelling THM-coupled processes (task 1) and gas migration processes (task 2) in clay-rich buffer materials. The tasks are performed on the basis of appropriate benchmarks. This report documents the modelling results of the THM-benchmark 2.2 - the Canister Retrieval Test - using the code GeoSys/RockFlow. The Temperature Buffer Test which was performed in the immediate vicinity of the Canister Retrieval Test is included in the model. Especially the heat transport requires the handling of the problem in 3-D. Due to limitations imposed by post-processing different spatial discretisations of the model had to be used during the processing of the benchmark. The calculated temperatures agree well with measured data. Concerning hydraulic parameters the values of permeability and tortuosity were varied in the calculations. The time necessary to saturate the buffer is very sensitive to both of these values. In comparison to thermal and hydraulic processes the model only has limited capacity to predict the measured evolution of total pressure

  16. Efficient coupling of high intensity short laser pulses into snow clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchan, T.; Pecker, S.; Henis, Z.; Eisenmann, S.; Zigler, A.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of energy absorption of high intensity laser pulses in snow clusters are reported. Targets consisting of sapphire coated with snow nanoparticles were found to absorb more than 95% of the incident light compared to 50% absorption in flat sapphire targets.

  17. Iterative universal state selective correction for the Brillouin-Wigner multireference coupled-cluster theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banik, Subrata; Ravichandran, Lalitha; Brabec, J.; Hubač, I.; Kowalski, K.; Pittner, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 11 (2015), s. 114106 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13117; GA ČR GAP208/11/2222 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : QUADRUPLY EXCITED CLUSTERS * QUASI-DEGENERATE STATES * DOUBLE-EXCITATION MODEL Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.894, year: 2015

  18. Present Status and Extensions of the Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard; Petrovic, Bojan; Martin, William R.

    2014-06-01

    The NEA Monte Carlo Performance benchmark started in 2011 aiming to monitor over the years the abilities to perform a full-size Monte Carlo reactor core calculation with a detailed power production for each fuel pin with axial distribution. This paper gives an overview of the contributed results thus far. It shows that reaching a statistical accuracy of 1 % for most of the small fuel zones requires about 100 billion neutron histories. The efficiency of parallel execution of Monte Carlo codes on a large number of processor cores shows clear limitations for computer clusters with common type computer nodes. However, using true supercomputers the speedup of parallel calculations is increasing up to large numbers of processor cores. More experience is needed from calculations on true supercomputers using large numbers of processors in order to predict if the requested calculations can be done in a short time. As the specifications of the reactor geometry for this benchmark test are well suited for further investigations of full-core Monte Carlo calculations and a need is felt for testing other issues than its computational performance, proposals are presented for extending the benchmark to a suite of benchmark problems for evaluating fission source convergence for a system with a high dominance ratio, for coupling with thermal-hydraulics calculations to evaluate the use of different temperatures and coolant densities and to study the correctness and effectiveness of burnup calculations. Moreover, other contemporary proposals for a full-core calculation with realistic geometry and material composition will be discussed.

  19. Experimental synchronization of chaos in a large ring of mutually coupled single-transistor oscillators: Phase, amplitude, and clustering effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minati, Ludovico, E-mail: lminati@ieee.org, E-mail: ludovico.minati@unitn.it [MR-Lab, Center for Mind/Brain Science, University of Trento, Italy and Scientific Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, experimental evidence of multiple synchronization phenomena in a large (n = 30) ring of chaotic oscillators is presented. Each node consists of an elementary circuit, generating spikes of irregular amplitude and comprising one bipolar junction transistor, one capacitor, two inductors, and one biasing resistor. The nodes are mutually coupled to their neighbours via additional variable resistors. As coupling resistance is decreased, phase synchronization followed by complete synchronization is observed, and onset of synchronization is associated with partial synchronization, i.e., emergence of communities (clusters). While component tolerances affect community structure, the general synchronization properties are maintained across three prototypes and in numerical simulations. The clusters are destroyed by adding long distance connections with distant notes, but are otherwise relatively stable with respect to structural connectivity changes. The study provides evidence that several fundamental synchronization phenomena can be reliably observed in a network of elementary single-transistor oscillators, demonstrating their generative potential and opening way to potential applications of this undemanding setup in experimental modelling of the relationship between network structure, synchronization, and dynamical properties.

  20. Experimental synchronization of chaos in a large ring of mutually coupled single-transistor oscillators: Phase, amplitude, and clustering effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minati, Ludovico

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, experimental evidence of multiple synchronization phenomena in a large (n = 30) ring of chaotic oscillators is presented. Each node consists of an elementary circuit, generating spikes of irregular amplitude and comprising one bipolar junction transistor, one capacitor, two inductors, and one biasing resistor. The nodes are mutually coupled to their neighbours via additional variable resistors. As coupling resistance is decreased, phase synchronization followed by complete synchronization is observed, and onset of synchronization is associated with partial synchronization, i.e., emergence of communities (clusters). While component tolerances affect community structure, the general synchronization properties are maintained across three prototypes and in numerical simulations. The clusters are destroyed by adding long distance connections with distant notes, but are otherwise relatively stable with respect to structural connectivity changes. The study provides evidence that several fundamental synchronization phenomena can be reliably observed in a network of elementary single-transistor oscillators, demonstrating their generative potential and opening way to potential applications of this undemanding setup in experimental modelling of the relationship between network structure, synchronization, and dynamical properties

  1. Spectroscopic and electric properties of the LiCs molecule: a coupled cluster study including higher excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, L. K.; Fleig, T.; Olsen, J.

    2009-08-01

    Aimed at obtaining complete and highly accurate potential energy surfaces for molecules containing heavy elements, we present a new general-order coupled cluster method which can be applied in the framework of the spin-free Dirac formalism. As an initial application we present a systematic study of electron correlation and relativistic effects on the spectroscopic and electric properties of the LiCs molecule in its electronic ground state. In particular, we closely investigate the importance of excitations higher than coupled cluster doubles, spin-free and spin-dependent relativistic effects and the correlation of outer-core electrons on the equilibrium bond length, the harmonic vibrational frequency, the dissociation energy, the dipole moment and the static electric dipole polarizability. We demonstrate that our new implementation allows for highly accurate calculations not only in the bonding region but also along the complete potential curve. The quality of our results is demonstrated by a vibrational analysis where an almost complete set of vibrational levels has been calculated accurately.

  2. Spectroscopic and electric properties of the LiCs molecule: a coupled cluster study including higher excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, L K; Fleig, T; Olsen, J

    2009-01-01

    Aimed at obtaining complete and highly accurate potential energy surfaces for molecules containing heavy elements, we present a new general-order coupled cluster method which can be applied in the framework of the spin-free Dirac formalism. As an initial application we present a systematic study of electron correlation and relativistic effects on the spectroscopic and electric properties of the LiCs molecule in its electronic ground state. In particular, we closely investigate the importance of excitations higher than coupled cluster doubles, spin-free and spin-dependent relativistic effects and the correlation of outer-core electrons on the equilibrium bond length, the harmonic vibrational frequency, the dissociation energy, the dipole moment and the static electric dipole polarizability. We demonstrate that our new implementation allows for highly accurate calculations not only in the bonding region but also along the complete potential curve. The quality of our results is demonstrated by a vibrational analysis where an almost complete set of vibrational levels has been calculated accurately.

  3. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 3. Analysis of the OECD TMI-1 Main-Steam- Line-Break Benchmark Accident Using the Coupled RELAP5/PANTHER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneidesch, C.R.; Guisset, J.P.; Zhang, J.; Bryce, P.; Parkes, M.

    2001-01-01

    The RELAP5 best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code has been coupled with the PANTHER three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics code via the TALINK dynamic data exchange control and processing tool. The coupled RELAP5/PANTHER code package is being qualified and will be used at British Energy (BE) and Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE), independently, to analyze pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients where strong core-system interactions occur. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency PWR Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark problem was performed to demonstrate the capability of the coupled code package to simulate such transients, and this paper reports the BE and TEE contributions. In the first exercise, a point-kinetics (PK) calculation is performed using the RELAP5 code. Two solutions have been derived for the PK case. The first corresponds to scenario, 1 where calculations are carried out using the original (BE) rod worth and where no significant return to power (RTP) occurs. The second corresponds to scenario 2 with arbitrarily reduced rod worth in order to obtain RTP (and was not part of the 'official' results). The results, as illustrated in Fig. 1, show that the thermalhydraulic system response and rod worth are essential in determining the core response. The second exercise consists of a 3-D neutron kinetics transient calculation driven by best-estimate time-dependent core inlet conditions on a 18 T and H zones basis derived from TRAC-PF1/MOD2 (PSU), again analyzing two scenarios of different rod worths. Two sets of PANTHER solutions were submitted for exercise 2. The first solution uses a spatial discretization of one node per assembly and 24 core axial layers for both flux and T and H mesh. The second is characterized by spatial refinement (2 x 2 nodes per assembly, 48 core layers for flux, and T and H calculation), time refinement (half-size time steps), and an increased radial discretization for solution

  4. The early phases of galaxy clusters formation in IR: coupling hydrodynamical simulations with GRASIL-3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Gian Luigi; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Obreja, Aura; Borgani, Stefano; De Lucia, Gabriella; Murante, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    We compute and study the infrared and sub-mm properties of high-redshift (z ≳ 1) simulated clusters and protoclusters. The results of a large set of hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations including active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, have been treated with the recently developed radiative transfer code GRASIL-3D, which accounts for the effect of dust reprocessing in an arbitrary geometry. Here, we have slightly generalized the code to adapt it to the present purpose. Then we have post-processed boxes of physical size 2 Mpc encompassing each of the 24 most massive clusters identified at z = 0, at several redshifts between 0.5 and 3, producing IR and sub-mm mock images of these regions and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the radiation coming out from them. While this field is in its infancy from the observational point of view, rapid development is expected in the near future thanks to observations performed in the far-IR and sub-mm bands. Notably, we find that in this spectral regime our prediction are little affected by the assumption required by this post-processing, and the emission is mostly powered by star formation (SF) rather than accretion on to super massive black hole (SMBH). The comparison with the little observational information currently available, highlights that the simulated cluster regions never attain the impressive star formation rates suggested by these observations. This problem becomes more intriguing taking into account that the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the same simulations turn out to be too massive. It seems that the interplay between the feedback schemes and the star formation model should be revised, possibly incorporating a positive feedback mode.

  5. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify usage of foodservice performance measures, important activities in foodservice benchmarking, and benchmarking attitudes, beliefs, and practices by foodservice directors...

  6. On the accuracy of density-functional theory exchange-correlation functionals for H bonds in small water clusters: Benchmarks approaching the complete basis set limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Biswajit; Michaelides, Angelos; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-11-01

    The ability of several density-functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals to describe hydrogen bonds in small water clusters (dimer to pentamer) in their global minimum energy structures is evaluated with reference to second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). Errors from basis set incompleteness have been minimized in both the MP2 reference data and the DFT calculations, thus enabling a consistent systematic evaluation of the true performance of the tested functionals. Among all the functionals considered, the hybrid X3LYP and PBE0 functionals offer the best performance and among the nonhybrid generalized gradient approximation functionals, mPWLYP and PBE1W perform best. The popular BLYP and B3LYP functionals consistently underbind and PBE and PW91 display rather variable performance with cluster size.

  7. Symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster studies of electronically excited states of copper tetrachloride and copper tetrabromide dianions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Piecuch, Piotr; Lutz, Jesse J.; Gour, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electronically excited states of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- are determined using the scalar relativistic symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster calculations. The results are compared with experimental spectra. Highlights: ► Electronic spectra of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- are examined by SAC-CI and EOMCC methods. ► Relativistic SAC-CI and EOMCC results are compared with experimental spectra. ► An assignment of bands in the CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- absorption spectra is obtained. ► Relativistic effects affect excitation energies and ground-state geometries. ► The effect of relativity on the oscillator strengths is generally small. - Abstract: The valence excitation spectra of the copper tetrachloride and copper tetrabromide open-shell dianions, CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- , respectively, are investigated by a variety of symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction (SAC-CI) and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods. The valence excited states of the CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- species that correspond to transitions from doubly occupied molecular orbitals (MOs) to a singly occupied MO (SOMO), for which experimental spectra are available, are examined with the ionized (IP) variants of the SAC-CI and EOMCC methods. The higher-energy excited states of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- that correspond to transitions from SOMO to unoccupied MOs, which have not been characterized experimentally, are determined using the electron-attached (EA) SAC-CI and EOMCC approaches. An emphasis is placed on the scalar relativistic SAC-CI and EOMCC calculations based on the spin-free part of the second-order Douglass–Kroll–Hess Hamiltonian (DKH2) and on a comparison of the results of the IP and EA SAC-CI and EOMCC calculations with up to 2-hole-1-particle (2h-1p) and 2-particle-1-hole (2p-1h) excitations, referred to as the IP-SAC-CI SD-R and IP-EOMCCSD(2h-1p) methods in the IP case and EA-SAC-CI SD-R and EA

  8. Inter-cluster coupling effects in high-spin molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affronte, M.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Sessoli, R.; Gatteschi, D.; Heath, S.L.; Fort, A.; Rettori, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report evidences of antiferromagnetic (AF) transition in Fe 19 metheidi, a new molecular nanomagnet with a total spin S=((33)/(2)), among the highest known so far. The temperature (T) dependence of specific heat (C) shows a λ-anomaly at 1.19 K and at the same temperature an anomaly is also observed in the low field (B<0.12 T) magnetization M-vs.-T curves. Since the dipolar interaction between clusters is estimated to be ∼190 mK, the origin of the AF transition is probably due to superexchange

  9. Inter-cluster coupling effects in high-spin molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affronte, M.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Sessoli, R.; Gatteschi, D.; Heath, S.L.; Fort, A. E-mail: fort@fi.infn.it; Rettori, A

    2004-05-01

    We report evidences of antiferromagnetic (AF) transition in Fe{sub 19}metheidi, a new molecular nanomagnet with a total spin S=((33)/(2)), among the highest known so far. The temperature (T) dependence of specific heat (C) shows a {lambda}-anomaly at 1.19 K and at the same temperature an anomaly is also observed in the low field (B<0.12 T) magnetization M-vs.-T curves. Since the dipolar interaction between clusters is estimated to be {approx}190 mK, the origin of the AF transition is probably due to superexchange.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic–iodine chemistry coupling: Insights gained from the SARNET benchmark on the THAI experiments Iod-11 and Iod-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G., E-mail: gunter.weber@grs.de [GRS, Garching and Cologne (Germany); Herranz, L.E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Bendiab, M. [AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany); Fontanet, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Funke, F. [AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany); Gonfiotti, B. [Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Ivanov, I. [TUS, Sofia (Bulgaria); Krajewski, S. [FZ-Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Manfredini, A.; Paci, S. [Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Pelzer, M. [GRS, Garching and Cologne (Germany); Sevón, T. [VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The I{sub 2} transport in two multi-compartment THAI tests was analyzed. • In a benchmark 4 different codes were applied by 7 organizations. • The I{sub 2} concentrations were mostly overestimated, up to a factor 100. • Inadequate iodine models and inaccurate thermal-hydraulic parameters were detected. • The user effect on the quality of the iodine results was large. - Abstract: In the SARNET2 WP8.3 THAI Benchmark the capability of current accident codes to simulate the iodine transport and behavior in sub-divided containments has been assessed. In THAI test Iod-11 and Iod-12, made available for the benchmark, the distribution of molecular iodine (I{sub 2}) in the five compartments of the 60 m{sup 3} vessel under stratified and well mixed conditions was measured. The main processes addressed are the I{sub 2} transport with the atmospheric flows and the interaction of I{sub 2} with the steel surface. During test Iod-11 the surfaces in contact with the containment atmosphere were dry. In Iod-12, steam was released, which condensed on the walls. Nine post-test calculations were conducted for Iod-11 and eight for Iod-12 by seven organizations using four different codes: ASTEC-IODE (CIEMAT, GRS and TUS), COCOSYS-AIM (AREVA, FZ-Jülich and GRS), ECART (Pisa University) and MELCOR (Pisa University and VTT). Different nodalizations of the THAI vessel with 20–65 zones were applied. Generally, for both tests the analytical thermal-hydraulic results are in a fairly good agreement with the measurements. Only the calculated local relative humidity deviates significantly from the measured values in all calculations. The results in Iod-11 for the local I{sub 2} concentration in the gaseous phase are quite diverse. Three calculations show only minor deviations from the measurement, whereas the others are substantially different from the measured I{sub 2} concentrations. For Iod-12, no calculation delivers a satisfactory evolution of the I{sub 2

  11. On the isotropic Raman spectrum of Ar2 and how to benchmark ab initio calculations of small atomic clusters: Paradox lost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysos, Michael; Dixneuf, Sophie; Rachet, Florent

    2015-07-14

    This is the long-overdue answer to the discrepancies observed between theory and experiment in Ar2 regarding both the isotropic Raman spectrum and the second refractivity virial coefficient, BR [Gaye et al., Phys. Rev. A 55, 3484 (1997)]. At the origin of this progress is the advent (posterior to 1997) of advanced computational methods for weakly interconnected neutral species at close separations. Here, we report agreement between the previously taken Raman measurements and quantum lineshapes now computed with the employ of large-scale CCSD or smartly constructed MP2 induced-polarizability data. By using these measurements as a benchmark tool, we assess the degree of performance of various other ab initio computed data for the mean polarizability α, and we show that an excellent agreement with the most recently measured value of BR is reached. We propose an even more refined model for α, which is solution of the inverse-scattering problem and whose lineshape matches exactly the measured spectrum over the entire frequency-shift range probed.

  12. On the isotropic Raman spectrum of Ar{sub 2} and how to benchmark ab initio calculations of small atomic clusters: Paradox lost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrysos, Michael, E-mail: michel.chrysos@univ-angers.fr; Rachet, Florent [LUNAM Université, Université d’Angers, CNRS UMR 6200, Laboratoire MOLTECH-Anjou, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Dixneuf, Sophie [Centre du Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique de Grenoble, Laboratoire CEA-bioMérieux, Bât 40.20, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-14

    This is the long-overdue answer to the discrepancies observed between theory and experiment in Ar{sub 2} regarding both the isotropic Raman spectrum and the second refractivity virial coefficient, B{sub R} [Gaye et al., Phys. Rev. A 55, 3484 (1997)]. At the origin of this progress is the advent (posterior to 1997) of advanced computational methods for weakly interconnected neutral species at close separations. Here, we report agreement between the previously taken Raman measurements and quantum lineshapes now computed with the employ of large-scale CCSD or smartly constructed MP2 induced-polarizability data. By using these measurements as a benchmark tool, we assess the degree of performance of various other ab initio computed data for the mean polarizability α, and we show that an excellent agreement with the most recently measured value of B{sub R} is reached. We propose an even more refined model for α, which is solution of the inverse-scattering problem and whose lineshape matches exactly the measured spectrum over the entire frequency-shift range probed.

  13. Benchmarking and Performance Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, J. Stephen

    This paper defines benchmarking and its relationship to quality management, describes a project which applied the technique in a library context, and explores the relationship between performance measurement and benchmarking. Numerous benchmarking methods contain similar elements: deciding what to benchmark; identifying partners; gathering…

  14. Massively parallel implementations of coupled-cluster methods for electron spin resonance spectra. I. Isotropic hyperfine coupling tensors in large radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Prakash; Morales, Jorge A., E-mail: jorge.morales@ttu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061 (United States); Perera, Ajith [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    Coupled cluster (CC) methods provide highly accurate predictions of molecular properties, but their high computational cost has precluded their routine application to large systems. Fortunately, recent computational developments in the ACES III program by the Bartlett group [the OED/ERD atomic integral package, the super instruction processor, and the super instruction architecture language] permit overcoming that limitation by providing a framework for massively parallel CC implementations. In that scheme, we are further extending those parallel CC efforts to systematically predict the three main electron spin resonance (ESR) tensors (A-, g-, and D-tensors) to be reported in a series of papers. In this paper inaugurating that series, we report our new ACES III parallel capabilities that calculate isotropic hyperfine coupling constants in 38 neutral, cationic, and anionic radicals that include the {sup 11}B, {sup 17}O, {sup 9}Be, {sup 19}F, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 33}S,{sup 14}N, {sup 31}P, and {sup 67}Zn nuclei. Present parallel calculations are conducted at the Hartree-Fock (HF), second-order many-body perturbation theory [MBPT(2)], CC singles and doubles (CCSD), and CCSD with perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] levels using Roos augmented double- and triple-zeta atomic natural orbitals basis sets. HF results consistently overestimate isotropic hyperfine coupling constants. However, inclusion of electron correlation effects in the simplest way via MBPT(2) provides significant improvements in the predictions, but not without occasional failures. In contrast, CCSD results are consistently in very good agreement with experimental results. Inclusion of perturbative triples to CCSD via CCSD(T) leads to small improvements in the predictions, which might not compensate for the extra computational effort at a non-iterative N{sup 7}-scaling in CCSD(T). The importance of these accurate computations of isotropic hyperfine coupling constants to elucidate

  15. Implementation of the multireference Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee’s coupled cluster methods with non-iterative triple excitations utilizing reference-level parallelism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Brabec, Jiri; Apra, Edoardo; van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Pittner, Jiri; Kowalski, Karol

    2012-09-07

    In this paper we discuss the performance of the non-iterative State-Specific Mul- tireference Coupled Cluster (SS-MRCC) methods accounting for the effect of triply excited cluster amplitudes. The corrections to the Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee MRCC models based on the manifold of singly and doubly excited cluster amplitudes (BW-MRCCSD and Mk-MRCCSD, respectively) are tested and compared with the exact full configuration interaction results (FCI) for small systems (H2O, N2, and Be3). For larger systems (naphthyne isomers and -carotene), the non-iterative BW-MRCCSD(T) and Mk-MRCCSD(T) methods are compared against the results obtained with the single reference coupled cluster methods. We also report on the parallel performance of the non-iterative implementations based on the use of pro- cessor groups.

  16. The heterogeneous response method applied to couple the average pin cell and bulk moderator in cluster geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The first step towards evaluation of the neutron flux throughout a fuel cluster usually consists of obtaining the multigroup flux distribution in the average pin cell and in the circular outside system of shroud and bulk moderator. Here, an application of the so-called heterogeneous response method (HRM) is described to find this multigroup flux. The rather complex geometry is reduced to a microsystem, the average pin cell, and the outside or macrosystem of shroud and bulk moderator. In each of these systems, collision probabilities are used to obtain their response fluxes caused by sources and in-currents. The two systems are then coupled by cosine currents across that fraction of the average pin-cell boundary, called 'window', that represents the average common boundary between pin cells and the outside system. (author)

  17. Coupled cluster evaluation of the frequency dispersion of the first and second hyperpolarizabilities of water, methanol, and dimethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujean, Pierre; Champagne, Benoît, E-mail: benoit.champagne@unamur.be [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2016-07-28

    The static and dynamic first (β{sub ‖}) and second (γ{sub ‖}) hyperpolarizabilities of water, methanol, and dimethyl ether have been evaluated within the response function approach using a hierarchy of coupled cluster levels of approximation and doubly augmented correlation consistent atomic basis sets. For the three compounds, the electronic β{sub ‖} and γ{sub ‖} values calculated at the CCSD and CC3 levels are in good agreement with gas phase electric field-induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurements. In addition, for dimethyl ether, the frequency dispersion of both properties follows closely recent experimental values [V. W. Couling and D. P. Shelton, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 224307 (2015)] demonstrating the reliability of these methods and levels of approximation. This also suggests that the vibrational contributions to the EFISHG responses of these molecules are small.

  18. Benchmarking in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In two articles an overview is given of the activities in the Dutch industry and energy sector with respect to benchmarking. In benchmarking operational processes of different competitive businesses are compared to improve your own performance. Benchmark covenants for energy efficiency between the Dutch government and industrial sectors contribute to a growth of the number of benchmark surveys in the energy intensive industry in the Netherlands. However, some doubt the effectiveness of the benchmark studies

  19. A valence-universal coupled-cluster single- and double-excitations method for atoms: Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, K.; Malinowski, P.

    1994-01-01

    To better understand the problems met when solving the equations of VU-CC approaches in the presence of intruder states, we are concerned with the following aspects of the solvability problem for sets of non-linear equations: the existence and properties of multiple solutions and the attainability of these solutions by means of various numerical methods. Our study is concentrated on the equations obtained for Be within the framework of the recently formulated atomically oriented form of the valence-universal coupled-cluster theory accounting for one- and two-electron excitations (VU-CCSD/R) and based on the complete model space (2s 2 , 2p 2 ). Six pairs of multiple solutions representing four 1 S states are found and discussed. Three of these solutions provide amplitudes describing the 2p 2 1 S state for which the intruder state problem has been considered as extremely serious. Several known numerical methods have been applied to solve the same set of non-linear equations for the two-valence cluster amplitudes. It is shown that these methods perform quite differently in the presence of intruder states, which seems to indicate that the intruder state problem for VU-CC methods is partly caused by the commonly used methods of solving the non-linear equations. (author)

  20. Designing a Scalable Fault Tolerance Model for High Performance Computational Chemistry: A Case Study with Coupled Cluster Perturbative Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Hubertus J J; Vishnu, Abhinav; de Jong, Wibe A

    2011-01-11

    In the past couple of decades, the massive computational power provided by the most modern supercomputers has resulted in simulation of higher-order computational chemistry methods, previously considered intractable. As the system sizes continue to increase, the computational chemistry domain continues to escalate this trend using parallel computing with programming models such as Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming models such as Global Arrays. The ever increasing scale of these supercomputers comes at a cost of reduced Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF), currently on the order of days and projected to be on the order of hours for upcoming extreme scale systems. While traditional disk-based check pointing methods are ubiquitous for storing intermediate solutions, they suffer from high overhead of writing and recovering from checkpoints. In practice, checkpointing itself often brings the system down. Clearly, methods beyond checkpointing are imperative to handling the aggravating issue of reducing MTBF. In this paper, we address this challenge by designing and implementing an efficient fault tolerant version of the Coupled Cluster (CC) method with NWChem, using in-memory data redundancy. We present the challenges associated with our design, including an efficient data storage model, maintenance of at least one consistent data copy, and the recovery process. Our performance evaluation without faults shows that the current design exhibits a small overhead. In the presence of a simulated fault, the proposed design incurs negligible overhead in comparison to the state of the art implementation without faults.

  1. Single reference Coupled Cluster treatment of nearly degenerate problems: Cohesive energy of antiferromagnetic lattices of spin 1 centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Lattices of antiferromagnetically coupled spins, ruled by Heisenberg Hamiltonians, are intrinsically highly degenerate systems. The present work tries to estimate the ground state energy of regular bipartite spin lattices of S = 1 sites from a single reference Coupled Cluster expansion starting from a Néel function, taken as reference. The simultaneous changes of spin momentum on adjacent sites play the role of the double excitations in molecular electronic problems. Propagation of the spin changes plays the same role as the triple excitations. The treatment takes care of the deviation of multiple excitation energies from additivity. Specific difficulties appear for 1D chains, which are not due to a near degeneracy between the reference and the vectors which directly interact with it but to the complexity of the processes which lead to the low energy configurations where a consistent reversed-Néel domain is created inside the Néel starting spin wave. Despite these difficulties a reasonable value of the cohesive energy is obtained.

  2. Single reference Coupled Cluster treatment of nearly degenerate problems: Cohesive energy of antiferromagnetic lattices of spin 1 centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Lattices of antiferromagnetically coupled spins, ruled by Heisenberg Hamiltonians, are intrinsically highly degenerate systems. The present work tries to estimate the ground state energy of regular bipartite spin lattices of S = 1 sites from a single reference Coupled Cluster expansion starting from a Néel function, taken as reference. The simultaneous changes of spin momentum on adjacent sites play the role of the double excitations in molecular electronic problems. Propagation of the spin changes plays the same role as the triple excitations. The treatment takes care of the deviation of multiple excitation energies from additivity. Specific difficulties appear for 1D chains, which are not due to a near degeneracy between the reference and the vectors which directly interact with it but to the complexity of the processes which lead to the low energy configurations where a consistent reversed-Néel domain is created inside the Néel starting spin wave. Despite these difficulties a reasonable value of the cohesive energy is obtained.

  3. Parallel β-sheet vibrational couplings revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy of an isotopically labeled macrocycle: quantitative benchmark for the interpretation of amyloid and protein infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woys, Ann Marie; Almeida, Aaron M; Wang, Lu; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; McGovern, Michael; de Pablo, Juan J; Skinner, James L; Gellman, Samuel H; Zanni, Martin T

    2012-11-21

    Infrared spectroscopy is playing an important role in the elucidation of amyloid fiber formation, but the coupling models that link spectra to structure are not well tested for parallel β-sheets. Using a synthetic macrocycle that enforces a two stranded parallel β-sheet conformation, we measured the lifetimes and frequency for six combinations of doubly (13)C═(18)O labeled amide I modes using 2D IR spectroscopy. The average vibrational lifetime of the isotope labeled residues was 550 fs. The frequencies of the labels ranged from 1585 to 1595 cm(-1), with the largest frequency shift occurring for in-register amino acids. The 2D IR spectra of the coupled isotope labels were calculated from molecular dynamics simulations of a series of macrocycle structures generated from replica exchange dynamics to fully sample the conformational distribution. The models used to simulate the spectra include through-space coupling, through-bond coupling, and local frequency shifts caused by environment electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. The calculated spectra predict the line widths and frequencies nearly quantitatively. Historically, the characteristic features of β-sheet infrared spectra have been attributed to through-space couplings such as transition dipole coupling. We find that frequency shifts of the local carbonyl groups due to nearest neighbor couplings and environmental factors are more important, while the through-space couplings dictate the spectral intensities. As a result, the characteristic absorption spectra empirically used for decades to assign parallel β-sheet secondary structure arises because of a redistribution of oscillator strength, but the through-space couplings do not themselves dramatically alter the frequency distribution of eigenstates much more than already exists in random coil structures. Moreover, solvent exposed residues have amide I bands with >20 cm(-1) line width. Narrower line widths indicate that the amide I backbone is solvent

  4. Kernel method for clustering based on optimal target vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, Leonardo; Marinazzo, Daniele; Pellicoro, Mario; Stramaglia, Sebastiano

    2006-01-01

    We introduce Ising models, suitable for dichotomic clustering, with couplings that are (i) both ferro- and anti-ferromagnetic (ii) depending on the whole data-set and not only on pairs of samples. Couplings are determined exploiting the notion of optimal target vector, here introduced, a link between kernel supervised and unsupervised learning. The effectiveness of the method is shown in the case of the well-known iris data-set and in benchmarks of gene expression levels, where it works better than existing methods for dichotomic clustering

  5. Identification of hidden relationships from the coupling of hydrophobic cluster analysis and domain architecture information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Guilhem; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2013-07-15

    Describing domain architecture is a critical step in the functional characterization of proteins. However, some orphan domains do not match any profile stored in dedicated domain databases and are thereby difficult to analyze. We present here an original novel approach, called TREMOLO-HCA, for the analysis of orphan domain sequences and inspired from our experience in the use of Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis (HCA). Hidden relationships between protein sequences can be more easily identified from the PSI-BLAST results, using information on domain architecture, HCA plots and the conservation degree of amino acids that may participate in the protein core. This can lead to reveal remote relationships with known families of domains, as illustrated here with the identification of a hidden Tudor tandem in the human BAHCC1 protein and a hidden ET domain in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Taf14p and human AF9 proteins. The results obtained in such a way are consistent with those provided by HHPRED, based on pairwise comparisons of HHMs. Our approach can, however, be applied even in absence of domain profiles or known 3D structures for the identification of novel families of domains. It can also be used in a reverse way for refining domain profiles, by starting from known protein domain families and identifying highly divergent members, hitherto considered as orphan. We provide a possible integration of this approach in an open TREMOLO-HCA package, which is fully implemented in python v2.7 and is available on request. Instructions are available at http://www.impmc.upmc.fr/∼callebau/tremolohca.html. isabelle.callebaut@impmc.upmc.fr Supplementary Data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Supercomputers using HPCC and IMB Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Subhash; Ciotti, Robert; Gunney, Brian T. N.; Spelce, Thomas E.; Koniges, Alice; Dossa, Don; Adamidis, Panagiotis; Rabenseifner, Rolf; Tiyyagura, Sunil R.; Mueller, Matthias; hide

    2006-01-01

    The HPC Challenge (HPCC) benchmark suite and the Intel MPI Benchmark (IMB) are used to compare and evaluate the combined performance of processor, memory subsystem and interconnect fabric of five leading supercomputers - SGI Altix BX2, Cray XI, Cray Opteron Cluster, Dell Xeon cluster, and NEC SX-8. These five systems use five different networks (SGI NUMALINK4, Cray network, Myrinet, InfiniBand, and NEC IXS). The complete set of HPCC benchmarks are run on each of these systems. Additionally, we present Intel MPI Benchmarks (IMB) results to study the performance of 11 MPI communication functions on these systems.

  7. Benchmark calculations of excess electrons in water cluster cavities: balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating diffuse functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-14

    Diffuse functions have been proved to be especially crucial for the accurate characterization of excess electrons which are usually bound weakly in intermolecular zones far away from the nuclei. To examine the effects of diffuse functions on the nature of the cavity-shaped excess electrons in water cluster surroundings, both the HOMO and LUMO distributions, vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and visible absorption spectra of two selected (H2O)24(-) isomers are investigated in the present work. Two main types of diffuse functions are considered in calculations including the Pople-style atom-centered diffuse functions and the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions. It is found that augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions contributes to a better description of the HOMO (corresponding to the VDE convergence), in agreement with previous studies, but also leads to unreasonable diffuse characters of the LUMO with significant red-shifts in the visible spectra, which is against the conventional point of view that the more the diffuse functions, the better the results. The issue of designing extra floating functions for excess electrons has also been systematically discussed, which indicates that the floating diffuse functions are necessary not only for reducing the computational cost but also for improving both the HOMO and LUMO accuracy. Thus, the basis sets with a combination of partial atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions are recommended for a reliable description of the weakly bound electrons. This work presents an efficient way for characterizing the electronic properties of weakly bound electrons accurately by balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions and also by balancing the computational cost and accuracy of the calculated results, and thus is very useful in the relevant calculations of various solvated electron systems and weakly bound anionic systems.

  8. Couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stošić, Dušan; Auroux, Aline

    Basic principles of calorimetry coupled with other techniques are introduced. These methods are used in heterogeneous catalysis for characterization of acidic, basic and red-ox properties of solid catalysts. Estimation of these features is achieved by monitoring the interaction of various probe molecules with the surface of such materials. Overview of gas phase, as well as liquid phase techniques is given. Special attention is devoted to coupled calorimetry-volumetry method. Furthermore, the influence of different experimental parameters on the results of these techniques is discussed, since it is known that they can significantly influence the evaluation of catalytic properties of investigated materials.

  9. Vibronic coupling in molecular crystals: A Franck-Condon Herzberg-Teller model of H-aggregate fluorescence based on quantum chemical cluster calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wykes, M., E-mail: mikewykes@gmail.com; Parambil, R.; Gierschner, J. [Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies, IMDEA Nanoscience, Calle Faraday 9, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Beljonne, D. [Laboratory for Chemistry of Novel Materials, University of Mons, Place du Parc 20, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2015-09-21

    Here, we present a general approach to treating vibronic coupling in molecular crystals based on atomistic simulations of large clusters. Such clusters comprise model aggregates treated at the quantum chemical level embedded within a realistic environment treated at the molecular mechanics level. As we calculate ground and excited state equilibrium geometries and vibrational modes of model aggregates, our approach is able to capture effects arising from coupling to intermolecular degrees of freedom, absent from existing models relying on geometries and normal modes of single molecules. Using the geometries and vibrational modes of clusters, we are able to simulate the fluorescence spectra of aggregates for which the lowest excited state bears negligible oscillator strength (as is the case, e.g., ideal H-aggregates) by including both Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic transitions. The latter terms allow the adiabatic excited state of the cluster to couple with vibrations in a perturbative fashion via derivatives of the transition dipole moment along nuclear coordinates. While vibronic coupling simulations employing FC and HT terms are well established for single-molecules, to our knowledge this is the first time they are applied to molecular aggregates. Here, we apply this approach to the simulation of the low-temperature fluorescence spectrum of para-distyrylbenzene single-crystal H-aggregates and draw comparisons with coarse-grained Frenkel-Holstein approaches previously extensively applied to such systems.

  10. Relativistic Coupled Cluster (RCC) Computation of the Electric Dipole Moment Enhancement Factor of Francium Due to the Violation of Time Reversal Symmetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mukherjee, Debashis; Sahoo, B. K.; Nataraj, H. S.; Das, B. P.

    2009-01-01

    A relativistic many-body theory for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of paramagnetic atoms arising from the electric dipole moment of the electron is presented and implemented. The relativistic coupled-cluster method with single and double excitations (RCCSD) using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian and

  11. General active space commutator-based coupled cluster theory of general excitation rank for electronically excited states: implementation and application to ScH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Olsen, Jeppe; Loras, Jessica; Fleig, Timo

    2013-11-21

    We present a new implementation of general excitation rank coupled cluster theory for electronically excited states based on the single-reference multi-reference formalism. The method may include active-space selected and/or general higher excitations by means of the general active space concept. It may employ molecular integrals over the four-component Lévy-Leblond Hamiltonian or the relativistic spin-orbit-free four-component Hamiltonian of Dyall. In an initial application to ground- and excited states of the scandium monohydride molecule we report spectroscopic constants using basis sets of up to quadruple-zeta quality and up to full iterative triple excitations in the cluster operators. Effects due to spin-orbit interaction are evaluated using two-component multi-reference configuration interaction for assessing the accuracy of the coupled cluster results.

  12. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in the...

  13. Prediction of the transition energies of atomic No and Lr by the intermediate Hamiltonian coupled cluster method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borschevsky, A.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Vilkas, M.J.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Measurements of the spectroscopic properties of the superheavy elements present a serious challenge to the experimentalist. Their short lifetimes and the low quantities of their production necessitate reliable prediction of transition energies to avoid the need for broad wavelength scans and to assist in identifying the lines. Thus, reliable high-accuracy calculations are necessary prior and parallel to experimental research. Nobelium and Lawrencium are at present the two most likely candidates for spectroscopic measurements, with the first experiments planned at GSI, Darmstadt. The intermediate Hamiltonian (IH) coupled cluster method is applied to the ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies of atomic nobelium and lawrencium. Large basis sets are used (37s31p26d21f16g11h6i). All levels of a particular atom are obtained simultaneously by diagonalizing the IH matrix. The matrix elements correspond to all excitations from correlated occupied orbitals to virtual orbitals in a large P space, and are 'dressed' by folding in excitations to higher virtual orbitals (Q space) at the coupled cluster singles-and-doubles level. Lamb-shift corrections are included. The same approach was applied to the lighter homologues of Lr and No, lutetium and ytterbium, for which many transition energies are experimentally known, in order to assess the accuracy of the calculation. The average absolute error of 20 excitation energies of Lu is 423 cm -1 , and the error limits for Lr are therefore put at 700 cm -1 . Predicted Lr excitations with large transition moments in the prime range for the planned experiment, 20,000-30,000 cm -1 , are 7p → 8s at 20,100 cm -1 and 7p →p 7d at 28,100 cm -1 . In case of Yb, the calculated ionization potential was within 20 cm -1 of the experiment, and the average error of the 20 lowest calculated excitations was about 300 cm -1 . Hence, the error limits of nobelium are set to 800 cm -1

  14. Spin-orbit splitted excited states using explicitly-correlated equation-of-motion coupled-cluster singles and doubles eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhan, Denis; Trubnikov, Dmitrii N.; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2018-04-01

    An explicitly-correlated method of calculation of excited states with spin-orbit couplings, has been formulated and implemented. Developed approach utilizes left and right eigenvectors of equation-of-motion coupled-cluster model, which is based on the linearly approximated explicitly correlated coupled-cluster singles and doubles [CCSD(F12)] method. The spin-orbit interactions are introduced by using the spin-orbit mean field (SOMF) approximation of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Numerical tests for several atoms and molecules show good agreement between explicitly-correlated results and the corresponding values, calculated in complete basis set limit (CBS); the highly-accurate excitation energies can be obtained already at triple- ζ level.

  15. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson…

  16. Role of Many-Body Effects in Describing Low-Lying Excited States of pi-Conjugated Chromophores: High-Level Equation-of-Motion Coupled-Cluster Studies of Fused Porphyrin Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Karol; Olson, Ryan M.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Tipparaju, Vinod; Apra, Edoardo

    2011-07-12

    The unusual photophysical properties of the pi-conjugated chrompohores makes them potential building blocks of various molecular devices. In particular, significant narrowing of the HOMO-LUMO gaps can be observed as an effect of functionalization chromophores with polycyclic aromatic hydrocabrons (PAHs). In this paper we present equation-of-motion coupled cluster calculations for vertical excitation energies of several functionalized forms of porphyrins. The results of free-base porphyrin (FBP) clearly demonstrate significant differences between functionalization of FBP with one- (anthracene) and two-dimensional (coronene) structures. We also compare the EOMCC results with the experimentally available results for the anthracene fused zinc porphyrin. The impact of various-type correlation effects is illustrated on several benchmark models where the comparison with the experiment is possible. In particular, we demonstrate that for all excited states considered in this paper, all of them being dominated by single excitations, the inclusion of triply excited configurations is crucial for attaining qualitative agreement with the experiment. We also demonstrate the parallel performance of the most computationally intensive part of the completely renormalized EOMCCSD(T) approach (CR-EOMCCSD(T)) across 120,000 cores.

  17. The role of many-body effects in describing low-lying excited states of pi-conjugated chromophores: high-level equation-of-motion coupled-cluster studies of fused porphyrin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Karol [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Olson, Ryan M [Cray, Inc.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Tipparaju, Vinod [ORNL; Apra, Edoardo [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The unusual photophysical properties of the {pi}-conjugated chromophores make them potential building blocks of various molecular devices. In particular, significant narrowing of the HOMO-LUMO gaps can be observed as an effect of functionalization chromophores with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this paper we present equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) calculations for vertical excitation energies of several functionalized forms of porphyrins. The results for free-base porphyrin (FBP) clearly demonstrate significant differences between functionalization of FBP with one- (anthracene) and two-dimensional (coronene) structures. We also compare the EOMCC results with the experimentally available results for anthracene fused zinc-porphyrin. The impact of various types of correlation effects is illustrated on several benchmark models, where the comparison with the experiment is possible. In particular, we demonstrate that for all excited states considered in this paper, all of them being dominated by single excitations, the inclusion of triply excited configurations is crucial for attaining qualitative agreement with experiment. We also demonstrate the parallel performance of the most computationally intensive part of the completely renormalized EOMCCSD(T) approach (CR-EOMCCSD(T)) across 120000 cores.

  18. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H., E-mail: shmushrif@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2015-05-14

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu{sub n} where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH{sub 3} and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH{sub x} (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH{sub x} have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  19. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-01-01

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu n where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH 3 and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH x (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH x have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters

  20. Scalable implementations of accurate excited-state coupled cluster theories: application of high-level methods to porphyrin based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Karol; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Olson, Ryan M.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Apra, Edoardo

    2011-11-30

    The development of reliable tools for excited-state simulations is emerging as an extremely powerful computational chemistry tool for understanding complex processes in the broad class of light harvesting systems and optoelectronic devices. Over the last years we have been developing equation of motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods capable of tackling these problems. In this paper we discuss the parallel performance of EOMCC codes which provide accurate description of the excited-state correlation effects. Two aspects are discuss in details: (1) a new algorithm for the iterative EOMCC methods based on the novel task scheduling algorithms, and (2) parallel algorithms for the non-iterative methods describing the effect of triply excited configurations. We demonstrate that the most computationally intensive non-iterative part can take advantage of 210,000 cores of the Cray XT5 system at OLCF. In particular, we demonstrate the importance of non-iterative many-body methods for achieving experimental level of accuracy for several porphyrin-based system.

  1. Application of relativistic coupled-cluster theory to electron impact excitation of Mg+ in the plasma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lalita; Sahoo, Bijaya Kumar; Malkar, Pooja; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2018-01-01

    A relativistic coupled-cluster theory is implemented to study electron impact excitations of atomic species. As a test case, the electron impact excitations of the 3 s 2 S 1/2-3 p 2 P 1/2;3/2 resonance transitions are investigated in the singly charged magnesium (Mg+) ion using this theory. Accuracies of wave functions of Mg+ are justified by evaluating its attachment energies of the relevant states and compared with the experimental values. The continuum wave function of the projectile electron are obtained by solving Dirac equations assuming distortion potential as static potential of the ground state of Mg+. Comparison of the calculated electron impact excitation differential and total cross-sections with the available measurements are found to be in very good agreements at various incident electron energies. Further, calculations are carried out in the plasma environment in the Debye-Hückel model framework, which could be useful in the astrophysics. Influence of plasma strength on the cross-sections as well as linear polarization of the photon emission in the 3 p 2 P 3/2-3 s 2 S 1/2 transition is investigated for different incident electron energies.

  2. Relativistic coupled-cluster-theory analysis of energies, hyperfine-structure constants, and dipole polarizabilities of Cd+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Bin; Yu, Yan-Mei; Sahoo, B. K.

    2018-02-01

    Roles of electron correlation effects in the determination of attachment energies, magnetic-dipole hyperfine-structure constants, and electric-dipole (E 1 ) matrix elements of the low-lying states in the singly charged cadmium ion (Cd+) have been analyzed. We employ the singles and doubles approximated relativistic coupled-cluster (RCC) method to calculate these properties. Intermediate results from the Dirac-Hartree-Fock approximation,the second-order many-body perturbation theory, and considering only the linear terms of the RCC method are given to demonstrate propagation of electron correlation effects in this ion. Contributions from important RCC terms are also given to highlight the importance of various correlation effects in the evaluation of these properties. At the end, we also determine E 1 polarizabilities (αE 1) of the ground and 5 p 2P1 /2 ;3 /2 states of Cd+ in the ab initio approach. We estimate them again by replacing some of the E 1 matrix elements and energies from the measurements to reduce their uncertainties so that they can be used in the high-precision experiments of this ion.

  3. Valence universal multireference coupled cluster calculations of the properties of indium in its ground and excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Madhulita; Chaudhuri, Rajat K; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sinha Mahapatra, Uttam

    2011-01-01

    In view of its importance in high precision spectroscopy, the valence universal multireference coupled cluster (VU-MRCC) method with four-component relativistic spinors has been applied to compute ionization potential (IP) and excitation energies (EEs) of the indium atom (In I). The effect of electron correlations on the ground and excited state properties is investigated using different levels of CC approximations and basis sets. This study reveals that for a given basis, the linearized VU-MRCC method tends to underestimate the IP, EEs and other one-electron properties such as magnetic hyperfine constant (A) compared to the full blown VU-MRCC method. Our computed results have been compared with available theoretical and experimental data. The IP, EEs, A and oscillator strengths (f) determined at the VU-MRCC level are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The properties reported here further demonstrate that a basis set with at least h-type of orbitals is ubiquitous to achieve converged results.

  4. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-01-01

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H 2 → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2) Q ] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H 2 reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface

  5. Linear response coupled cluster theory with the polarizable continuum model within the singles approximation for the solvent response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, Marco

    2018-04-01

    We report the theory and the implementation of the linear response function of the coupled cluster (CC) with the single and double excitations method combined with the polarizable continuum model of solvation, where the correlation solvent response is approximated with the perturbation theory with energy and singles density (PTES) scheme. The singles name is derived from retaining only the contribution of the CC single excitation amplitudes to the correlation density. We compare the PTES working equations with those of the full-density (PTED) method. We then test the PTES scheme on the evaluation of excitation energies and transition dipoles of solvated molecules, as well as of the isotropic polarizability and specific rotation. Our results show a negligible difference between the PTED and PTES schemes, while the latter affords a significantly reduced computational cost. This scheme is general and can be applied to any solvation model that includes mutual solute-solvent polarization, including explicit models. Therefore, the PTES scheme is a competitive approach to compute response properties of solvated systems using CC methods.

  6. Analytic energy gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with the density-fitting approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C. David

    2016-01-01

    An efficient implementation is presented for analytic gradients of the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method with the density-fitting approximation, denoted DF-CCSD. Frozen core terms are also included. When applied to a set of alkanes, the DF-CCSD analytic gradients are significantly accelerated compared to conventional CCSD for larger molecules. The efficiency of our DF-CCSD algorithm arises from the acceleration of several different terms, which are designated as the “gradient terms”: computation of particle density matrices (PDMs), generalized Fock-matrix (GFM), solution of the Z-vector equation, formation of the relaxed PDMs and GFM, back-transformation of PDMs and GFM to the atomic orbital (AO) basis, and evaluation of gradients in the AO basis. For the largest member of the alkane set (C 10 H 22 ), the computational times for the gradient terms (with the cc-pVTZ basis set) are 2582.6 (CCSD) and 310.7 (DF-CCSD) min, respectively, a speed up of more than 8-folds. For gradient related terms, the DF approach avoids the usage of four-index electron repulsion integrals. Based on our previous study [U. Bozkaya, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 124108 (2014)], our formalism completely avoids construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), using instead 2- and 3-index TPDMs. The DF approach introduces negligible errors for equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic vibrational frequencies.

  7. Benchmarking semantic web technology

    CERN Document Server

    García-Castro, R

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses the problem of benchmarking Semantic Web Technologies; first, from a methodological point of view, proposing a general methodology to follow in benchmarking activities over Semantic Web Technologies and, second, from a practical point of view, presenting two international benchmarking activities that involved benchmarking the interoperability of Semantic Web technologies using RDF(S) as the interchange language in one activity and OWL in the other.The book presents in detail how the different resources needed for these interoperability benchmarking activities were defined:

  8. Benchmarking in University Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kuźmicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of global competition and rising challenges that higher education institutions (HEIs meet, it is imperative to increase innovativeness and efficiency of their management. Benchmarking can be the appropriate tool to search for a point of reference necessary to assess institution’s competitive position and learn from the best in order to improve. The primary purpose of the paper is to present in-depth analysis of benchmarking application in HEIs worldwide. The study involves indicating premises of using benchmarking in HEIs. It also contains detailed examination of types, approaches and scope of benchmarking initiatives. The thorough insight of benchmarking applications enabled developing classification of benchmarking undertakings in HEIs. The paper includes review of the most recent benchmarking projects and relating them to the classification according to the elaborated criteria (geographical range, scope, type of data, subject, support and continuity. The presented examples were chosen in order to exemplify different approaches to benchmarking in higher education setting. The study was performed on the basis of the published reports from benchmarking projects, scientific literature and the experience of the author from the active participation in benchmarking projects. The paper concludes with recommendations for university managers undertaking benchmarking, derived on the basis of the conducted analysis.

  9. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 2. TRAB-3D/SMABRE Calculation of the OECD/ NRC PWR MSLB Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, A.; Haemaelaeinen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.

    2001-01-01

    All three exercises of the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark were calculated at VTT Energy. The SMABRE thermal-hydraulics code was used for the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetics neutronics. The second exercise was calculated with the TRAB-3D three-dimensional reactor dynamics code. The third exercise was calculated with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. Both codes have been developed at VTT Energy. The results of all the exercises agree reasonably well with those of the other participants; thus, instead of reporting the results, this paper concentrates on describing the computational aspects of the calculation with the foregoing codes and on some observations of the sensitivity of the results. In the TRAB-3D neutron kinetics, the two-group diffusion equations are solved in homogenized fuel assembly geometry with an efficient two-level nodal method. The point of the two-level iteration scheme is that only one unknown variable per node, the average neutron flux, is calculated during the inner iteration. The nodal flux shapes and cross sections are recalculated only once in the outer iteration loop. The TRAB-3D core model includes also parallel one-dimensional channel hydraulics with detailed fuel models. Advanced implicit time discretization methods are used in all submodels. SMABRE is a fast-running five-equation model completed by a drift-flux model, with a time discretization based on a non-iterative semi-implicit algorithm. For the third exercise of the benchmark, the TMI-1 models of TRAB-3D and SMABRE were coupled. This was the first time these codes were coupled together. However, similar coupling of the HEXTRAN and SMABRE codes has been shown to be stable and efficient, when used in safety analyses of Finnish and foreign VVER-type reactors. The coupling used between the two codes is called a parallel coupling. SMABRE solves the thermal hydraulics both in the cooling circuit and in the core

  10. Present status and extensions of the Monte Carlo performance benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Petrovic, B.; Martin, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    The NEA Monte Carlo Performance benchmark started in 2011 aiming to monitor over the years the abilities to perform a full-size Monte Carlo reactor core calculation with a detailed power production for each fuel pin with axial distribution. This paper gives an overview of the contributed results thus far. It shows that reaching a statistical accuracy of 1 % for most of the small fuel zones requires about 100 billion neutron histories. The efficiency of parallel execution of Monte Carlo codes on a large number of processor cores shows clear limitations for computer clusters with common type computer nodes. However, using true supercomputers the speedup of parallel calculations is increasing up to large numbers of processor cores. More experience is needed from calculations on true supercomputers using large numbers of processors in order to predict if the requested calculations can be done in a short time. As the specifications of the reactor geometry for this benchmark test are well suited for further investigations of full-core Monte Carlo calculations and a need is felt for testing other issues than its computational performance, proposals are presented for extending the benchmark to a suite of benchmark problems for evaluating fission source convergence for a system with a high dominance ratio, for coupling with thermal-hydraulics calculations to evaluate the use of different temperatures and coolant densities and to study the correctness and effectiveness of burnup calculations. Moreover, other contemporary proposals for a full-core calculation with realistic geometry and material composition will be discussed. (authors)

  11. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  12. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  13. Assessment of the accuracy of coupled cluster perturbation theory for open-shell systems. II. Quadruples expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Janus J; Matthews, Devin A; Jørgensen, Poul; Gauss, Jürgen

    2016-05-21

    We extend our assessment of the potential of perturbative coupled cluster (CC) expansions for a test set of open-shell atoms and organic radicals to the description of quadruple excitations. Namely, the second- through sixth-order models of the recently proposed CCSDT(Q-n) quadruples series [J. J. Eriksen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064108 (2014)] are compared to the prominent CCSDT(Q) and ΛCCSDT(Q) models. From a comparison of the models in terms of their recovery of total CC singles, doubles, triples, and quadruples (CCSDTQ) energies, we find that the performance of the CCSDT(Q-n) models is independent of the reference used (unrestricted or restricted (open-shell) Hartree-Fock), in contrast to the CCSDT(Q) and ΛCCSDT(Q) models, for which the accuracy is strongly dependent on the spin of the molecular ground state. By further comparing the ability of the models to recover relative CCSDTQ total atomization energies, the discrepancy between them is found to be even more pronounced, stressing how a balanced description of both closed- and open-shell species-as found in the CCSDT(Q-n) models-is indeed of paramount importance if any perturbative CC model is to be of chemical relevance for high-accuracy applications. In particular, the third-order CCSDT(Q-3) model is found to offer an encouraging alternative to the existing choices of quadruples models used in modern computational thermochemistry, since the model is still only of moderate cost, albeit markedly more costly than, e.g., the CCSDT(Q) and ΛCCSDT(Q) models.

  14. High-order coupled cluster method study of frustrated and unfrustrated quantum magnets in external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnell, D J J; Zinke, R; Richter, J; Schulenburg, J

    2009-01-01

    We apply the coupled cluster method (CCM) in order to study the ground-state properties of the (unfrustrated) square-lattice and (frustrated) triangular-lattice spin-half Heisenberg antiferromagnets in the presence of external magnetic fields. Approximate methods are difficult to apply to the triangular-lattice antiferromagnet because of frustration, and so, for example, the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method suffers from the 'sign problem'. Results for this model in the presence of magnetic field are rarer than those for the square-lattice system. Here we determine and solve the basic CCM equations by using the localized approximation scheme commonly referred to as the 'LSUBm' approximation scheme and we carry out high-order calculations by using intensive computational methods. We calculate the ground-state energy, the uniform susceptibility, the total (lattice) magnetization and the local (sublattice) magnetizations as a function of the magnetic field strength. Our results for the lattice magnetization of the square-lattice case compare well to the results from QMC approaches for all values of the applied external magnetic field. We find a value for the magnetic susceptibility of χ = 0.070 for the square-lattice antiferromagnet, which is also in agreement with the results from other approximate methods (e.g., χ = 0.0669 obtained via the QMC approach). Our estimate for the range of the extent of the (M/M s =) 1/3 magnetization plateau for the triangular-lattice antiferromagnet is 1.37 SWT = 0.0794. Higher-order calculations are thus suggested for both SWT and CCM LSUBm calculations in order to determine the value of χ for the triangular lattice conclusively.

  15. Large-scale parallel uncontracted multireference-averaged quadratic coupled cluster: the ground state of the chromium dimer revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas

    2009-11-12

    The accurate prediction of the potential energy function of the X1Sigmag+ state of Cr2 is a remarkable challenge; large differential electron correlation effects, significant scalar relativistic contributions, the need for large flexible basis sets containing g functions, the importance of semicore valence electron correlation, and its multireference nature pose considerable obstacles. So far, the only reasonable successful approaches were based on multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Recently, there was some controversy in the literature about the role of error compensation and systematic defects of various MRPT implementations that cannot be easily overcome. A detailed basis set study of the potential energy function is presented, adopting a variational method. The method of choice for this electron-rich target with up to 28 correlated electrons is fully uncontracted multireference-averaged quadratic coupled cluster (MR-AQCC), which shares the flexibility of the multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach and is, in addition, approximately size-extensive (0.02 eV in error as compared to the MRCI value of 1.37 eV for two noninteracting chromium atoms). The best estimate for De arrives at 1.48 eV and agrees well with the experimental data of 1.47 +/- 0.056 eV. At the estimated CBS limit, the equilibrium bond distance (1.685 A) and vibrational frequency (459 cm-1) are in agreement with experiment (1.679 A, 481 cm-1). Large basis sets and reference configuration spaces invariably result in huge wave function expansions (here, up to 2.8 billion configuration state functions), and efficient parallel implementations of the method are crucial. Hence, relevant details on implementation and general performance of the parallel program code are discussed as well.

  16. HYDROCOIN [HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison] Level 1: Benchmarking and verification test results with CFEST [Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport] code: Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, S.; Cole, C.; Monti, A.M.; Gupta, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Part of the safety analysis is evaluating groundwater flow through the repository and the host rock to the accessible environment by developing mathematical or analytical models and numerical computer codes describing the flow mechanisms. This need led to the establishment of an international project called HYDROCOIN (HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison) organized by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, a forum for discussing techniques and strategies in subsurface hydrologic modeling. The major objective of the present effort, HYDROCOIN Level 1, is determining the numerical accuracy of the computer codes. The definition of each case includes the input parameters, the governing equations, the output specifications, and the format. The Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code was applied to solve cases 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; the Finite Element Three-Dimensional Groundwater (FE3DGW) Flow Model was used to solve case 6. Case 3 has been ignored because unsaturated flow is not pertinent to SRP. This report presents the Level 1 results furnished by the project teams. The numerical accuracy of the codes is determined by (1) comparing the computational results with analytical solutions for cases that have analytical solutions (namely cases 1 and 4), and (2) intercomparing results from codes for cases which do not have analytical solutions (cases 2, 5, 6, and 7). Cases 1, 2, 6, and 7 relate to flow analyses, whereas cases 4 and 5 require nonlinear solutions. 7 refs., 71 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Spectroscopy of particle-phonon coupled states in $^{133}$Sb by the cluster transfer reaction of $^{132}$Sn on $^{7}$Li

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to investigate, with MINIBALL coupled to T-REX, the one-valence-proton $^{133}$Sb nucleus by the cluster transfer reaction of $^{132}$Sn on $^{7}$Li. The excited $^{133}$Sb will be populated by transfer of a triton into $^{132}$Sn, followed by the emission of an $\\alpha$-particle (detected in T-REX) and 2 neutrons. The aim of the experiment is to locate states arising from the coupling of the valence proton of $^{133}$Sb to the collective low-lying phonon excitations of $^{132}$Sn (in particular the 3$^−$). According to calculations in the weak-coupling approach, these states lie in the 4$\\, - \\,$5 MeV excitation energy region and in the spin interval 1/2$\\, - \\,$ 19/2, i.e., in the region populated by the cluster transfer reaction. The results will be used to perform advanced tests of different types of nuclear interactions, usually employed in the description of particle-phonon coupled excitations. States arising from couplings of the proton with simpler core excitations, involving few nucleons...

  18. Similarity transformed equation of motion coupled-cluster theory based on an unrestricted Hartree-Fock reference for applications to high-spin open-shell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Lee M J; Krupička, Martin; Neese, Frank; Izsák, Róbert

    2017-11-07

    The similarity transformed equation of motion coupled-cluster approach is extended for applications to high-spin open-shell systems, within the unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) formalism. An automatic active space selection scheme has also been implemented such that calculations can be performed in a black-box fashion. It is observed that both the canonical and automatic active space selecting similarity transformed equation of motion (STEOM) approaches perform about as well as the more expensive equation of motion coupled-cluster singles doubles (EOM-CCSD) method for the calculation of the excitation energies of doublet radicals. The automatic active space selecting UHF STEOM approach can therefore be employed as a viable, lower scaling alternative to UHF EOM-CCSD for the calculation of excited states in high-spin open-shell systems.

  19. Similarity transformed equation of motion coupled-cluster theory based on an unrestricted Hartree-Fock reference for applications to high-spin open-shell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Lee M. J.; Krupička, Martin; Neese, Frank; Izsák, Róbert

    2017-11-01

    The similarity transformed equation of motion coupled-cluster approach is extended for applications to high-spin open-shell systems, within the unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) formalism. An automatic active space selection scheme has also been implemented such that calculations can be performed in a black-box fashion. It is observed that both the canonical and automatic active space selecting similarity transformed equation of motion (STEOM) approaches perform about as well as the more expensive equation of motion coupled-cluster singles doubles (EOM-CCSD) method for the calculation of the excitation energies of doublet radicals. The automatic active space selecting UHF STEOM approach can therefore be employed as a viable, lower scaling alternative to UHF EOM-CCSD for the calculation of excited states in high-spin open-shell systems.

  20. Benchmarking of wind farm scale wake models in the EERA - DTOC project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Barthelmie, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    -flow to combine wind farm (micro) and cluster (meso) scale wake models. For this purpose, a benchmark campaign is organized on the existing wind farm wake models available within the project, in order to identify which model would be the most appropriate for this coupling. A number of standardized wake cases......Designing offshore wind farms next to existing or planned wind farm clusters has recently become a common practice in the North Sea. These types of projects face unprecedented challenges in term of wind energy siting. The currently ongoing European project FP7 EERA - DTOC (Design Tool for Offshore...... wind farm Clusters) is aiming at providing a new type of model work-flow to address this issue. The wake modeling part of the EERA - DTOC project is to improve the fundamental understanding of wind turbine wakes and modeling. One of these challenges is to create a new kind of wake modeling work...

  1. State-specific Brillouin-Wigner Multireference Coupled Cluster Study of the F.sub.2./sub. Molecule: Assessment of the a Posteriori Size-extensivity Correction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pittner, Jiří; Šmydke, Jan; Čársky, Petr; Hubač, I.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 547, - (2001), s. 239-244 ISSN 0166-1280 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D9.10; GA ČR GA203/99/D009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : potential curve * spectroscopic constants of F2 * multireference coupled clusters Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.919, year: 2001

  2. MCNP neutron benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Whalen, D.J.; Cardon, D.A.; Uhle, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Over 50 neutron benchmark calculations have recently been completed as part of an ongoing program to validate the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The new and significant aspects of this work are as follows: These calculations are the first attempt at a validation program for MCNP and the first official benchmarking of version 4 of the code. We believe the chosen set of benchmarks is a comprehensive set that may be useful for benchmarking other radiation transport codes and data libraries. These calculations provide insight into how well neutron transport calculations can be expected to model a wide variety of problems

  3. Relativistic Normal Coupled-Cluster Theory for Accurate Determination of Electric Dipole Moments of Atoms: First Application to the ^{199}Hg Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, B K; Das, B P

    2018-05-18

    Recent relativistic coupled-cluster (RCC) calculations of electric dipole moments (EDMs) of diamagnetic atoms due to parity and time-reversal violating (P,T-odd) interactions, which are essential ingredients for probing new physics beyond the standard model of particle interactions, differ substantially from the previous theoretical results. It is therefore necessary to perform an independent test of the validity of these results. In view of this, the normal coupled-cluster method has been extended to the relativistic regime [relativistic normal coupled-cluster (RNCC) method] to calculate the EDMs of atoms by simultaneously incorporating the electrostatic and P,T-odd interactions in order to overcome the shortcomings of the ordinary RCC method. This new relativistic method has been applied to ^{199}Hg, which currently has a lower EDM limit than that of any other system. The results of our RNCC and self-consistent RCC calculations of the EDM of this atom are found to be close. The discrepancies between these two results on the one hand and those of previous calculations on the other are elucidated. Furthermore, the electric dipole polarizability of this atom, which has computational similarities with the EDM, is evaluated and it is in very good agreement with its measured value.

  4. Relativistic Normal Coupled-Cluster Theory for Accurate Determination of Electric Dipole Moments of Atoms: First Application to the 199Hg Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.

    2018-05-01

    Recent relativistic coupled-cluster (RCC) calculations of electric dipole moments (EDMs) of diamagnetic atoms due to parity and time-reversal violating (P ,T -odd) interactions, which are essential ingredients for probing new physics beyond the standard model of particle interactions, differ substantially from the previous theoretical results. It is therefore necessary to perform an independent test of the validity of these results. In view of this, the normal coupled-cluster method has been extended to the relativistic regime [relativistic normal coupled-cluster (RNCC) method] to calculate the EDMs of atoms by simultaneously incorporating the electrostatic and P ,T -odd interactions in order to overcome the shortcomings of the ordinary RCC method. This new relativistic method has been applied to 199Hg, which currently has a lower EDM limit than that of any other system. The results of our RNCC and self-consistent RCC calculations of the EDM of this atom are found to be close. The discrepancies between these two results on the one hand and those of previous calculations on the other are elucidated. Furthermore, the electric dipole polarizability of this atom, which has computational similarities with the EDM, is evaluated and it is in very good agreement with its measured value.

  5. Reactor fuel depletion benchmark of TINDER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.J.; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Hecht, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A reactor burnup benchmark of TINDER, coupling MCNP6 to CINDER2008, was performed. • TINDER is a poor candidate for fuel depletion calculations using its current libraries. • Data library modification is necessary if fuel depletion is desired from TINDER. - Abstract: Accurate burnup calculations are key to proper nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle modeling, and disposal estimations. The TINDER code, originally designed for activation analyses, has been modified to handle full burnup calculations, including the widely used predictor–corrector feature. In order to properly characterize the performance of TINDER for this application, a benchmark calculation was performed. Although the results followed the trends of past benchmarked codes for a UO 2 PWR fuel sample from the Takahama-3 reactor, there were obvious deficiencies in the final result, likely in the nuclear data library that was used. Isotopic comparisons versus experiment and past code benchmarks are given, as well as hypothesized areas of deficiency and future work

  6. Common Nearest Neighbor Clustering—A Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lemke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cluster analyses are often conducted with the goal to characterize an underlying probability density, for which the data-point density serves as an estimate for this probability density. We here test and benchmark the common nearest neighbor (CNN cluster algorithm. This algorithm assigns a spherical neighborhood R to each data point and estimates the data-point density between two data points as the number of data points N in the overlapping region of their neighborhoods (step 1. The main principle in the CNN cluster algorithm is cluster growing. This grows the clusters by sequentially adding data points and thereby effectively positions the border of the clusters along an iso-surface of the underlying probability density. This yields a strict partitioning with outliers, for which the cluster represents peaks in the underlying probability density—termed core sets (step 2. The removal of the outliers on the basis of a threshold criterion is optional (step 3. The benchmark datasets address a series of typical challenges, including datasets with a very high dimensional state space and datasets in which the cluster centroids are aligned along an underlying structure (Birch sets. The performance of the CNN algorithm is evaluated with respect to these challenges. The results indicate that the CNN cluster algorithm can be useful in a wide range of settings. Cluster algorithms are particularly important for the analysis of molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We demonstrate how the CNN cluster results can be used as a discretization of the molecular state space for the construction of a core-set model of the MD improving the accuracy compared to conventional full-partitioning models. The software for the CNN clustering is available on GitHub.

  7. Track 3: growth of nuclear technology and research numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-I. 5. Analyses of the OECD MSLB Benchmark with the Codes DYN3D and DYN3D/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.

    2001-01-01

    The code DYN3D coupled with ATHLET was used for the analysis of the OECD Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark, which is based on real plant design and operational data of the TMI-1 pressurized water reactor (PWR). Like the codes RELAP or TRAC,ATHLET is a thermal-hydraulic system code with point or one-dimensional neutron kinetic models. ATHLET, developed by the Gesellschaft for Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, is widely used in Germany for safety analyses of nuclear power plants. DYN3D consists of three-dimensional nodal kinetic models and a thermal-hydraulic part with parallel coolant channels of the reactor core. DYN3D was coupled with ATHLET for analyzing more complex transients with interactions between coolant flow conditions and core behavior. It can be applied to the whole spectrum of operational transients and accidents, from small and intermediate leaks to large breaks of coolant loops or steam lines at PWRs and boiling water reactors. The so-called external coupling is used for the benchmark, where the thermal hydraulics is split into two parts: DYN3D describes the thermal hydraulics of the core, while ATHLET models the coolant system. Three exercises of the benchmark were simulated: Exercise 1: point kinetics plant simulation (ATHLET) Exercise 2: coupled three-dimensional neutronics/core thermal-hydraulics evaluation of the core response for given core thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions (DYN3D) Exercise 3: best-estimate coupled core-plant transient analysis (DYN3D/ATHLET). Considering the best-estimate cases (scenarios 1 of exercises 2 and 3), the reactor does not reach criticality after the reactor trip. Defining more serious tests for the codes, the efficiency of the control rods was decreased (scenarios 2 of exercises 2 and 3) to obtain recriticality during the transient. Besides the standard simulation given by the specification, modifications are introduced for sensitivity studies. The results presented here show (a) the influence of a reduced

  8. Gender-informed, psychoeducational programme for couples to prevent postnatal common mental disorders among primiparous women: cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jane; Rowe, Heather; Wynter, Karen; Tran, Thach; Lorgelly, Paula; Amir, Lisa H; Proimos, Jenny; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Hiscock, Harriet; Bayer, Jordana; Cann, Warren

    2016-03-07

    Interventions to prevent postpartum common mental disorders (PCMD) among unselected populations of women have had limited success. The aim was to determine whether What Were We Thinking (WWWT) a gender-informed, psychoeducational programme for couples and babies can prevent PCMD among primiparous women 6 months postpartum. Cluster-randomised controlled trial. 48 Maternal and Child Health Centres (MCHCs) from 6 Local Government Areas in Melbourne, Australia were allocated randomly to usual care (24) or usual care plus WWWT (24). English-speaking primiparous women receiving primary care at trial MCHCs were recruited to the intervention (204) and control (196) conditions. Of these, 187 (91.7%) and 177 (90.3%) provided complete data. WWWT is a manualised programme comprising primary care from a trained nurse, print materials and a face-to-face seminar. Data sources were standardised and study-specific measures collected in blinded computer-assisted telephone interviews at 6 and 26 weeks postpartum. The primary outcome was PCMD assessed by Composite International Diagnostic Interviews and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) Depression and Generalised Anxiety Disorder modules. In intention-to-treat analyses the adjusted OR (AOR) of PCMD in the intervention compared to the usual care group was 0.78 (95% CI 0.38 to 1.63, ns), but mild to moderate anxiety symptoms (AOR 0.58, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.97) and poor self-rated health (AOR 0.46, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.97) were significantly lower. In a per protocol analysis, comparing the full (three component) intervention and usual care groups, the AOR of PCMD was 0.36, (95% CI 0.14 to 0.95). The WWWT seminar was appraised as salient, comprehensible and useful by >85% participants. No harms were detected. WWWT is readily integrated into primary care, enables inclusion of fathers and addresses modifiable risks for PCMD directly. The full intervention appears a promising programme for preventing PCMD, optimising family functioning, and as the

  9. Multiple health behaviours among mothers and partners in England: Clustering, social patterning and intra-couple concordance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Graham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on multiple health behaviours is increasing but little is known about parental behaviours and how they covary. Our study investigates cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable (F&V consumption and physical activity among mothers and co-resident partners in England. Using the UK Household Longitudinal Study, we examined (i clustering of health behaviours using observed-expected ratios and latent class analysis (ii socio-demographic correlates of the derived latent classes and (iii intra-couple concordance of individual health behaviours and their latent classes. We identified five latent classes for mothers and partners: Never smoked drinkers (28% of mothers; 29% of partners, Abstainers (25%; 17%, Drinkers and ex-smokers (19%; 26%, Unhealthy low frequency drinkers (18%; 16% and Unhealthiest behaviour group (11%; 12%. These had distinctive social profiles. Never smoked drinkers were more likely than those in other groups to be white and socially advantaged: married, older, and with higher educational qualifications and incomes. Abstainers were non-smokers who never or occasionally drank, and were disproportionately drawn from ethnic minority groups and middle/lower income families. Drinkers and ex-smokers were the most physically active group and were more likely to be socially advantaged. Unhealthy low frequency drinkers were more likely to be disadvantaged and have a limiting long-standing illness. The Unhealthiest behaviour group had the highest proportion of smokers, heavy smokers and binge drinkers and the lowest F&V intake and physical activity levels. They were largely white and socially disadvantaged: younger, non-married and with lower educational levels. Mothers and their partners typically shared the same risk behaviours, and 44 per cent of partners and mothers belonged to the same latent class. Our findings point to the potential for a broadening of research and policy perspectives, from separate behaviours to

  10. Benchmarking af kommunernes sagsbehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    Fra 2007 skal Ankestyrelsen gennemføre benchmarking af kommuernes sagsbehandlingskvalitet. Formålet med benchmarkingen er at udvikle praksisundersøgelsernes design med henblik på en bedre opfølgning og at forbedre kommunernes sagsbehandling. Dette arbejdspapir diskuterer metoder for benchmarking...

  11. Internet based benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the design of interactive, internet based benchmarking using parametric (statistical) as well as nonparametric (DEA) models. The user receives benchmarks and improvement potentials. The user is also given the possibility to search different efficiency frontiers and hereby to explore...

  12. The Drill Down Benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); T. Rühl (Tim); F. Kwakkel

    1998-01-01

    textabstractData Mining places specific requirements on DBMS query performance that cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using existing OLAP benchmarks. The DD Benchmark - defined here - provides a practical case and yardstick to explore how well a DBMS is able to support Data Mining applications. It

  13. Benchmarking Tool Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Health Libraries Association.

    Nine Canadian health libraries participated in a pilot test of the Benchmarking Tool Kit between January and April, 1998. Although the Tool Kit was designed specifically for health libraries, the content and approach are useful to other types of libraries as well. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to…

  14. How Activists Use Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Wigan, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Non-governmental organisations use benchmarks as a form of symbolic violence to place political pressure on firms, states, and international organisations. The development of benchmarks requires three elements: (1) salience, that the community of concern is aware of the issue and views...... are put to the test. The first is a reformist benchmarking cycle where organisations defer to experts to create a benchmark that conforms with the broader system of politico-economic norms. The second is a revolutionary benchmarking cycle driven by expert-activists that seek to contest strong vested...... interests and challenge established politico-economic norms. Differentiating these cycles provides insights into how activists work through organisations and with expert networks, as well as how campaigns on complex economic issues can be mounted and sustained....

  15. EGS4 benchmark program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasu, Y.; Hirayama, H.; Namito, Y.; Yashiro, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes EGS4 Benchmark Suite which consists of three programs called UCSAMPL4, UCSAMPL4I and XYZDOS. This paper also evaluates optimization methods of recent RISC/UNIX systems, such as IBM, HP, DEC, Hitachi and Fujitsu, for the benchmark suite. When particular compiler option and math library were included in the evaluation process, system performed significantly better. Observed performance of some of the RISC/UNIX systems were beyond some so-called Mainframes of IBM, Hitachi or Fujitsu. The computer performance of EGS4 Code System on an HP9000/735 (99MHz) was defined to be the unit of EGS4 Unit. The EGS4 Benchmark Suite also run on various PCs such as Pentiums, i486 and DEC alpha and so forth. The performance of recent fast PCs reaches that of recent RISC/UNIX systems. The benchmark programs have been evaluated with correlation of industry benchmark programs, namely, SPECmark. (author)

  16. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  17. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  18. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  19. Benchmarking and the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, M; Nadin, L

    2001-01-01

    This article describes how benchmarking can be used to assess laboratory performance. Two benchmarking schemes are reviewed, the Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report and the College of American Pathologists' Q-Probes scheme. The Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report is undertaken by staff based in the clinical management unit, Keele University with appropriate input from the professional organisations within pathology. Five annual reports have now been completed. Each report is a detailed analysis of 10 areas of laboratory performance. In this review, particular attention is focused on the areas of quality, productivity, variation in clinical practice, skill mix, and working hours. The Q-Probes scheme is part of the College of American Pathologists programme in studies of quality assurance. The Q-Probes scheme and its applicability to pathology in the UK is illustrated by reviewing two recent Q-Probe studies: routine outpatient test turnaround time and outpatient test order accuracy. The Q-Probes scheme is somewhat limited by the small number of UK laboratories that have participated. In conclusion, as a result of the government's policy in the UK, benchmarking is here to stay. Benchmarking schemes described in this article are one way in which pathologists can demonstrate that they are providing a cost effective and high quality service. Key Words: benchmarking • pathology PMID:11477112

  20. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of a Gender Equity and Family Planning Intervention for Married Men and Couples in Rural India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Raj

    Full Text Available Despite ongoing recommendations to increase male engagement and gender-equity (GE counseling in family planning (FP services, few such programs have been implemented and rigorously evaluated. This study evaluates the impact of CHARM, a three-session GE+FP counseling intervention delivered by male health care providers to married men, alone (sessions 1&2 and with their wives (session 3 in India.A two-armed cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with young married couples (N = 1081 couples recruited from 50 geographic clusters (25 clusters randomized to CHARM and a control condition, respectively in rural Maharashtra, India. Couples were surveyed on demographics, contraceptive behaviors, and intimate partner violence (IPV attitudes and behaviors at baseline and 9 &18-month follow-ups, with pregnancy testing at baseline and 18-month follow-up. Outcome effects on contraceptive use and incident pregnancy, and secondarily, on contraceptive communication and men's IPV attitudes and behaviors, were assessed using logistic generalized linear mixed models. Most men recruited from CHARM communities (91.3% received at least one CHARM intervention session; 52.5% received the couple's session with their wife. Findings document that women from the CHARM condition, relative to controls, were more likely to report contraceptive communication at 9-month follow-up (AOR = 1.77, p = 0.04 and modern contraceptive use at 9 and 18-month follow-ups (AORs = 1.57-1.58, p = 0.05, and they were less likely to report sexual IPV at 18-month follow-up (AOR = 0.48, p = 0.01. Men in the CHARM condition were less likely than those in the control clusters to report attitudes accepting of sexual IPV at 9-month (AOR = 0.64, p = 0.03 and 18-month (AOR = 0.51, p = 0.004 follow-up, and attitudes accepting of physical IPV at 18-month follow-up (AOR = 0.64, p = 0.02. No significant effect on pregnancy was seen.Findings demonstrate that men can be engaged in FP programming in

  1. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  2. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  3. Collective excitations with chiral NN+3N interactions from coupled-cluster and in-medium SRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    that end, we extend the RPA formalism to include ground-state correlations from two different many-body methods, the in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG) and coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles excitations (CCSD). Both methods have been applied with great success for the calculation of ground-state energies. We develop a formalism based on density matrices for CC-RPA that enables RPA based on an CCSD ground state. The use of IM-SRG transformed matrix elements gives us the possibility to include ground-state correlations even at the level of SRPA. For both methods we observe a strong upward shift in the strength distributions, and, unexpectedly, we find a good agreement between IM-RPA and CC-RPA results. The structure of the transitions remains largely unchanged. We conclude that correlations have significant impact on the energetic positions, but not on the structure of the strength distributions. Employing IM-SRPA we find a strong downward shift in energy similar to the case of SRPA. The agreement of both methods with experiment is comparable.

  4. Collective excitations with chiral NN+3N interactions from coupled-cluster and in-medium SRG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippel, Richard

    2016-12-19

    that end, we extend the RPA formalism to include ground-state correlations from two different many-body methods, the in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG) and coupled-cluster theory with singles and doubles excitations (CCSD). Both methods have been applied with great success for the calculation of ground-state energies. We develop a formalism based on density matrices for CC-RPA that enables RPA based on an CCSD ground state. The use of IM-SRG transformed matrix elements gives us the possibility to include ground-state correlations even at the level of SRPA. For both methods we observe a strong upward shift in the strength distributions, and, unexpectedly, we find a good agreement between IM-RPA and CC-RPA results. The structure of the transitions remains largely unchanged. We conclude that correlations have significant impact on the energetic positions, but not on the structure of the strength distributions. Employing IM-SRPA we find a strong downward shift in energy similar to the case of SRPA. The agreement of both methods with experiment is comparable.

  5. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. II. Linear scaling domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Pinski, Peter; Becker, Ute; Neese, Frank; Valeev, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Domain based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single-, double-, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) is a highly efficient local correlation method. It is known to be accurate and robust and can be used in a black box fashion in order to obtain coupled cluster quality total energies for large molecules with several hundred atoms. While previous implementations showed near linear scaling up to a few hundred atoms, several nonlinear scaling steps limited the applicability of the method for very large systems. In this work, these limitations are overcome and a linear scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for closed shell systems is reported. The new implementation is based on the concept of sparse maps that was introduced in Part I of this series [P. Pinski, C. Riplinger, E. F. Valeev, and F. Neese, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 034108 (2015)]. Using the sparse map infrastructure, all essential computational steps (integral transformation and storage, initial guess, pair natural orbital construction, amplitude iterations, triples correction) are achieved in a linear scaling fashion. In addition, a number of additional algorithmic improvements are reported that lead to significant speedups of the method. The new, linear-scaling DLPNO-CCSD(T) implementation typically is 7 times faster than the previous implementation and consumes 4 times less disk space for large three-dimensional systems. For linear systems, the performance gains and memory savings are substantially larger. Calculations with more than 20 000 basis functions and 1000 atoms are reported in this work. In all cases, the time required for the coupled cluster step is comparable to or lower than for the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, even if this is carried out with the efficient resolution-of-the-identity and chain-of-spheres approximations. The new implementation even reduces the error in absolute correlation energies by about a factor of two, compared to the already accurate

  6. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  7. Benchmarking Swiss electricity grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walti, N.O.; Weber, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This extensive article describes a pilot benchmarking project initiated by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises that assessed 37 Swiss utilities. The data collected from these utilities on a voluntary basis included data on technical infrastructure, investments and operating costs. These various factors are listed and discussed in detail. The assessment methods and rating mechanisms that provided the benchmarks are discussed and the results of the pilot study are presented that are to form the basis of benchmarking procedures for the grid regulation authorities under the planned Switzerland's electricity market law. Examples of the practical use of the benchmarking methods are given and cost-efficiency questions still open in the area of investment and operating costs are listed. Prefaces by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy complete the article

  8. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    . The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  9. Financial Integrity Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of Jackson, Mississippi — This data compiles standard financial integrity benchmarks that allow the City to measure its financial standing. It measure the City's debt ratio and bond ratings....

  10. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    .... The design of this study included two parts: (1) eleven expert panelists involved in a Delphi technique to identify and rate importance of foodservice performance measures and rate the importance of benchmarking activities, and (2...

  11. MFTF TOTAL benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, J.H.

    1979-06-01

    A benchmark of the TOTAL data base management system as applied to the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) data base was implemented and run in February and March of 1979. The benchmark was run on an Interdata 8/32 and involved the following tasks: (1) data base design, (2) data base generation, (3) data base load, and (4) develop and implement programs to simulate MFTF usage of the data base

  12. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author)

  13. Shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Masayoshi; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1978-09-01

    Shielding benchmark problems were prepared by the Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Comittee on Shielding Design of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and compiled by the Shielding Laboratory of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Twenty-one kinds of shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm and the accuracy of computer codes based on the discrete ordinates method and the Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in the codes. (author)

  14. Benchmarking electricity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, K. [Department of Justice and Attorney-General, QLD (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Benchmarking has been described as a method of continuous improvement that involves an ongoing and systematic evaluation and incorporation of external products, services and processes recognised as representing best practice. It is a management tool similar to total quality management (TQM) and business process re-engineering (BPR), and is best used as part of a total package. This paper discusses benchmarking models and approaches and suggests a few key performance indicators that could be applied to benchmarking electricity distribution utilities. Some recent benchmarking studies are used as examples and briefly discussed. It is concluded that benchmarking is a strong tool to be added to the range of techniques that can be used by electricity distribution utilities and other organizations in search of continuous improvement, and that there is now a high level of interest in Australia. Benchmarking represents an opportunity for organizations to approach learning from others in a disciplined and highly productive way, which will complement the other micro-economic reforms being implemented in Australia. (author). 26 refs.

  15. The KMAT: Benchmarking Knowledge Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Martha

    Provides an overview of knowledge management and benchmarking, including the benefits and methods of benchmarking (e.g., competitive, cooperative, collaborative, and internal benchmarking). Arthur Andersen's KMAT (Knowledge Management Assessment Tool) is described. The KMAT is a collaborative benchmarking tool, designed to help organizations make…

  16. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity growth. Throughout

  17. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity

  18. Coupled-cluster calculations for ground and excited states of closed- and open-shell nuclei using methods of quantum chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wloch, Marta; Gour, Jeffrey R; Piecuch, Piotr; Dean, David J; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Papenbrock, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We discuss large-scale ab initio calculations of ground and excited states of 16 O and preliminary calculations for 15 O and 17 O using coupled-cluster methods and algorithms developed in quantum chemistry. By using realistic two-body interactions and the renormalized form of the Hamiltonian obtained with a no-core G-matrix approach, we are able to obtain the virtually converged results for 16 O and promising results for 15 O and 17 O at the level of two-body interactions. The calculated properties other than binding and excitation energies include charge radius and charge form factor. The relatively low costs of coupled-cluster calculations, which are characterized by the low-order polynomial scaling with the system size, enable us to probe large model spaces with up to seven or eight major oscillator shells, for which nontruncated shell-model calculations for nuclei with A = 15-17 active particles are presently not possible

  19. Application of the finite-field coupled-cluster method to calculate molecular properties relevant to electron electric-dipole-moment searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Prasannaa, V. S.; Das, B. P.

    2018-03-01

    Heavy polar diatomic molecules are currently among the most promising probes of fundamental physics. Constraining the electric dipole moment of the electron (e EDM ), in order to explore physics beyond the standard model, requires a synergy of molecular experiment and theory. Recent advances in experiment in this field have motivated us to implement a finite-field coupled-cluster (FFCC) approach. This work has distinct advantages over the theoretical methods that we had used earlier in the analysis of e EDM searches. We used relativistic FFCC to calculate molecular properties of interest to e EDM experiments, that is, the effective electric field (Eeff) and the permanent electric dipole moment (PDM). We theoretically determine these quantities for the alkaline-earth monofluorides (AEMs), the mercury monohalides (Hg X ), and PbF. The latter two systems, as well as BaF from the AEMs, are of interest to e EDM searches. We also report the calculation of the properties using a relativistic finite-field coupled-cluster approach with single, double, and partial triples' excitations, which is considered to be the gold standard of electronic structure calculations. We also present a detailed error estimate, including errors that stem from our choice of basis sets, and higher-order correlation effects.

  20. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Ghasemi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance incompanies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, ithas rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan’s Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aimsto share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how the projectsystematic implementation led to succes.

  1. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    OpenAIRE

    Sasan Ghasemi; Mohammad Nazemi; Mehran Nejati

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance in companies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, it has rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan's Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aims to share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how th...

  2. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC)

  3. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts as well as for current applications. Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for coupling core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present report is the second in a series of four and summarises the results of the first benchmark exercise, which identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermalhydraulic system modelling of the transient, with specified core average axial power distribution and fission power time transient history. The transient addressed is a turbine trip in a boiling water reactor, involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4) make the present benchmark particularly valuable. (author)

  4. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as for current nuclear applications Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for the purpose. The present volume describes the specification of such a benchmark. The transient addressed is a turbine trip (TT) in a BWR involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the plant make the present benchmark very valuable. The data used are from events at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4). (authors)

  5. Deviating From the Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; Carneiro, Anabela

    This paper studies three related questions: To what extent otherwise similar startups employ different quantities and qualities of human capital at the moment of entry? How persistent are initial human capital choices over time? And how does deviating from human capital benchmarks influence firm......, founders human capital, and the ownership structure of startups (solo entrepreneurs versus entrepreneurial teams). We then study the survival implications of exogenous deviations from these benchmarks, based on spline models for survival data. Our results indicate that (especially negative) deviations from...... the benchmark can be substantial, are persistent over time, and hinder the survival of firms. The implications may, however, vary according to the sector and the ownership structure at entry. Given the stickiness of initial choices, wrong human capital decisions at entry turn out to be a close to irreversible...

  6. HPCG Benchmark Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Luszczek, Piotr [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The High Performance Conjugate Gradient (HPCG) benchmark [cite SNL, UTK reports] is a tool for ranking computer systems based on a simple additive Schwarz, symmetric Gauss-Seidel preconditioned conjugate gradient solver. HPCG is similar to the High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] in its purpose, but HPCG is intended to better represent how today’s applications perform. In this paper we describe the technical details of HPCG: how it is designed and implemented, what code transformations are permitted and how to interpret and report results.

  7. Benchmarking for Best Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Zairi, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    Benchmarking for Best Practice uses up-to-the-minute case-studies of individual companies and industry-wide quality schemes to show how and why implementation has succeeded. For any practitioner wanting to establish best practice in a wide variety of business areas, this book makes essential reading. .It is also an ideal textbook on the applications of TQM since it describes concepts, covers definitions and illustrates the applications with first-hand examples. Professor Mohamed Zairi is an international expert and leading figure in the field of benchmarking. His pioneering work in this area l

  8. Benchmarking Danish Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Bentzen, Eric; Aagaard Andreassen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    compatible survey. The International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) doesbring up the question of supply chain management, but unfortunately, we did not have access to thedatabase. Data from the members of the SCOR-model, in the form of benchmarked performance data,may exist, but are nonetheless...... not public. The survey is a cooperative project "Benchmarking DanishIndustries" with CIP/Aalborg University, the Danish Technological University, the DanishTechnological Institute and Copenhagen Business School as consortia partners. The project has beenfunded by the Danish Agency for Trade and Industry...

  9. [Do you mean benchmarking?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, F; Solignac, S; Marty, J

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of benchmarking is to settle improvement processes by comparing the activities to quality standards. The proposed methodology is illustrated by benchmark business cases performed inside medical plants on some items like nosocomial diseases or organization of surgery facilities. Moreover, the authors have built a specific graphic tool, enhanced with balance score numbers and mappings, so that the comparison between different anesthesia-reanimation services, which are willing to start an improvement program, is easy and relevant. This ready-made application is even more accurate as far as detailed tariffs of activities are implemented.

  10. RB reactor benchmark cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1998-01-01

    A selected set of the RB reactor benchmark cores is presented in this paper. The first results of validation of the well-known Monte Carlo MCNP TM code and adjoining neutron cross section libraries are given. They confirm the idea for the proposal of the new U-D 2 O criticality benchmark system and support the intention to include this system in the next edition of the recent OECD/NEA Project: International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Experiment, in near future. (author)

  11. Electric-field-modulated exchange coupling within and between magnetic clusters on metal surfaces: Mn dimers on Cu(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juárez-Reyes, L; Pastor, G M; Stepanyuk, V S

    2014-01-01

    The effects of external electric fields (EFs) on the magnetic state and substrate-mediated magnetic coupling between Mn dimers on Cu(1 1 1) have been studied using a first-principles theoretical method. The calculations show that a change in the ground-state magnetic order, from antiferromagnetic (AF) to ferromagnetic (FM), can be induced within an isolated Mn 2 on Cu(1 1 1) by applying a moderately strong EF of about 1 V Å −1 . The magnetic exchange coupling between pairs of dimers displays Ruderman–Kittel–Kasuya–Yosida-like oscillations as a function of the interdimer distance, which depend significantly on the magnetic order within the dimers (FM or AF) and on their relative orientation on the surface. Moreover, it is observed that applying EFs allows modulation of the exchange coupling within and between the clusters as a function of the intercluster distance. At short distances, AF order within the dimers is favoured even in the presence of EFs, while for large distances the EF can induce a FM order. EFs pointing outwards and inwards with respect to the surface favour parallel and antiparallel magnetic alignment between the dimers, resspectively. The dependence of the substrate-mediated interaction on the magnetic state of Mn 2 is qualitatively interpreted in terms of the differences in the scattering of spin-polarized surface electrons. (paper)

  12. Effect of non-monetary incentives on uptake of couples' counselling and testing among clients attending mobile HIV services in rural Zimbabwe: a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Euphemia L; Tumushime, Mary; Mufuka, Juliet; Mavedzenge, Sue Napierala; Gudukeya, Stephano; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Hatzold, Karin; Thirumurthy, Harsha; McCoy, Sandra I; Padian, Nancy; Copas, Andrew; Cowan, Frances M

    2017-09-01

    Couples' HIV testing and counselling (CHTC) is associated with greater engagement with HIV prevention and care than individual testing and is cost-effective, but uptake remains suboptimal. Initiating discussion of CHTC might result in distrust between partners. Offering incentives for CHTC could change the focus of the pre-test discussion. We aimed to determine the impact of incentives for CHTC on uptake of couples testing and HIV case diagnosis in rural Zimbabwe. In this cluster-randomised trial, 68 rural communities (the clusters) in four districts receiving mobile HIV testing services were randomly assigned (1:1) to incentives for CHTC or not. Allocation was not masked to participants and researchers. Randomisation was stratified by district and proximity to a health facility. Within each stratum random permutation was done to allocate clusters to the study groups. In intervention communities, residents were informed that couples who tested together could select one of three grocery items worth US$1·50. Standard mobilisation for testing was done in comparison communities. The primary outcome was the proportion of individuals testing with a partner. Analysis was by intention to treat. 3 months after CHTC, couple-testers from four communities per group individually completed a telephone survey to evaluate any social harms resulting from incentives or CHTC. The effect of incentives on CHTC was estimated using logistic regression with random effects adjusting for clustering. The trial was registered with the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry, number PACTR201606001630356. From May 26, 2015, to Jan 29, 2016, of 24 679 participants counselled with data recorded, 14 099 (57·1%) were in the intervention group and 10 580 (42·9%) in the comparison group. 7852 (55·7%) testers in the intervention group versus 1062 (10·0%) in the comparison group tested with a partner (adjusted odds ratio 13·5 [95% CI 10·5-17·4]). Among 427 (83·7%) of 510 eligible

  13. Benchmarking and Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TANTAU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the chosen topic is explained by the meaning of the firm efficiency concept - the firm efficiency means the revealed performance (how well the firm performs in the actual market environment given the basic characteristics of the firms and their markets that are expected to drive their profitability (firm size, market power etc.. This complex and relative performance could be due to such things as product innovation, management quality, work organization, some other factors can be a cause even if they are not directly observed by the researcher. The critical need for the management individuals/group to continuously improve their firm/company’s efficiency and effectiveness, the need for the managers to know which are the success factors and the competitiveness determinants determine consequently, what performance measures are most critical in determining their firm’s overall success. Benchmarking, when done properly, can accurately identify both successful companies and the underlying reasons for their success. Innovation and benchmarking firm level performance are critical interdependent activities. Firm level variables, used to infer performance, are often interdependent due to operational reasons. Hence, the managers need to take the dependencies among these variables into account when forecasting and benchmarking performance. This paper studies firm level performance using financial ratio and other type of profitability measures. It uses econometric models to describe and then propose a method to forecast and benchmark performance.

  14. Surveys and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Surveys and benchmarks continue to grow in importance for community colleges in response to several factors. One is the press for accountability, that is, for colleges to report the outcomes of their programs and services to demonstrate their quality and prudent use of resources, primarily to external constituents and governing boards at the state…

  15. Coupling microscopic and mesoscopic scales to simulate chemical equilibrium between a nanometric carbon cluster and detonation products fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasseau, Emeric; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2011-04-21

    This paper presents a new method to obtain chemical equilibrium properties of detonation products mixtures including a solid carbon phase. In this work, the solid phase is modelled through a mesoparticle immersed in the fluid, such that the heterogeneous character of the mixture is explicitly taken into account. Inner properties of the clusters are taken from an equation of state obtained in a previous work, and interaction potential between the nanocluster and the fluid particles is derived from all-atoms simulations using the LCBOPII potential (Long range Carbon Bond Order Potential II). It appears that differences in chemical equilibrium results obtained with this method and the "composite ensemble method" (A. Hervouet et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2008, 112.), where fluid and solid phases are considered as non-interacting, are not significant, underlining the fact that considering the inhomogeneity of such system is crucial.

  16. Effective leaf area index retrieving from terrestrial point cloud data: coupling computational geometry application and Gaussian mixture model clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Tamura, M.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the most important structural parameters of forestry studies which manifests the ability of the green vegetation interacted with the solar illumination. Classic understanding about LAI is to consider the green canopy as integration of horizontal leaf layers. Since multi-angle remote sensing technique developed, LAI obliged to be deliberated according to the observation geometry. Effective LAI could formulate the leaf-light interaction virtually and precisely. To retrieve the LAI/effective LAI from remotely sensed data therefore becomes a challenge during the past decades. Laser scanning technique can provide accurate surface echoed coordinates with densely scanned intervals. To utilize the density based statistical algorithm for analyzing the voluminous amount of the 3-D points data is one of the subjects of the laser scanning applications. Computational geometry also provides some mature applications for point cloud data (PCD) processing and analysing. In this paper, authors investigated the feasibility of a new application for retrieving the effective LAI of an isolated broad leaf tree. Simplified curvature was calculated for each point in order to remove those non-photosynthetic tissues. Then PCD were discretized into voxel, and clustered by using Gaussian mixture model. Subsequently the area of each cluster was calculated by employing the computational geometry applications. In order to validate our application, we chose an indoor plant to estimate the leaf area, the correlation coefficient between calculation and measurement was 98.28 %. We finally calculated the effective LAI of the tree with 6 × 6 assumed observation directions.

  17. Equation of motion coupled cluster methods for electron attachment and ionization potential in fullerenes C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70802 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Kowalski, Karol, E-mail: karol.kowalski@pnnl.gov [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, K8-91, P.O.Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70802 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Shelton, William A. [Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    In both molecular and periodic solid-state systems there is a need for the accurate determination of the ionization potential and the electron affinity for systems ranging from light harvesting polymers and photocatalytic compounds to semiconductors. The development of a Green's function approach based on the coupled cluster (CC) formalism would be a valuable tool for addressing many properties involving many-body interactions along with their associated correlation functions. As a first step in this direction, we have developed an accurate and parallel efficient approach based on the equation of motion-CC technique. To demonstrate the high degree of accuracy and numerical efficiency of our approach we calculate the ionization potential and electron affinity for C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}. Accurate predictions for these molecules are well beyond traditional molecular scale studies. We compare our results with experiments and both quantum Monte Carlo and GW calculations.

  18. Using full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo in a seniority zero space to investigate the correlation energy equivalence of pair coupled cluster doubles and doubly occupied configuration interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, James J.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has shown promise for the description of strong correlation. This promise is related to its apparent ability to match results from doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), even though the latter method has exponential computational cost. Here, by modifying the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to sample only the seniority zero sector of Hilbert space, we show that the DOCI and pCCD energies are in agreement for a variety of 2D Hubbard models, including for systems well out of reach for conventional configuration interaction algorithms. Our calculations are aided by the sign problem being much reduced in the seniority zero space compared with the full space. We present evidence for this and then discuss the sign problem in terms of the wave function of the system which appears to have a simplified sign structure.

  19. Coupled cluster calculations of mean excitation energies of the noble gas atoms He, Ne and Ar and of the H2 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Ul Haq, Inam; Sabin, John R.

    2014-01-01

    by about 1%. For the two-electron systems He and H2, our CCSD results (for a Lanczos chain length equal to the full excitation space), I0 = 42:28 eV (Helium) and I0 = 19:62 eV (H2), correspond to full conguration interaction results and are therefore the exact, non-relativistic theoretical values......Using an asymmetric-Lanczos-chain algorithm for the calculation of the coupled cluster linear response functions at the CCSD and CC2 levels of approximation, we have calculated the mean excitation energies of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar, and of the hydrogen molecule H2. Convergence with respect...... for the mean excitation energy of these two systems within the Bethe theory for the chosen basis set and, in the case of H2, at the experimental equilibrium geometry....

  20. Coupled cluster valence bond theory for open-shell systems with application to very long range strong correlation in a polycarbene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-07-14

    The Coupled Cluster Valence Bond (CCVB) method, previously presented for closed-shell (CS) systems, is extended to open-shell (OS) systems. The theoretical development is based on embedding the basic OS CCVB wavefunction in a fictitious singlet super-system. This approach reveals that the OS CCVB amplitude equations are quite similar to those of CS CCVB, and thus that OS CCVB requires the same level of computational effort as CS CCVB, which is an inexpensive method. We present qualitatively correct CCVB potential energy curves for all low-lying spin states of P 2 and Mn 2 + . CCVB is successfully applied to the low-lying spin states of some model linear polycarbenes, systems that appear to be a hindrance to standard density functionals. We examine an octa-carbene dimer in a side-by-side orientation, which, in the monomer dissociation limit, exhibits maximal strong correlation over the length of the polycarbene.

  1. Dealing with chemical reaction pathways and electronic excitations in molecular systems via renormalized and active-space coupled-cluster methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piecuch, Piotr; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse J. [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Włoch, Marta [Department of Chemistry, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Gour, Jeffrey R. [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA and Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Coupled-cluster (CC) theory has become the de facto standard for high-accuracy molecular calculations, but the widely used CC and equation-of-motion (EOM) CC approaches, such as CCSD(T) and EOMCCSD, have difficulties with capturing stronger electron correlations that characterize multi-reference molecular problems. This presentation demonstrates that many of these difficulties can be addressed by exploiting the completely renormalized (CR) CC and EOMCC approaches, such as CR-CC(2,3), CR-EOMCCSD(T), and CR-EOMCC(2,3), and their local correlation counterparts applicable to systems with hundreds of atoms, and the active-space CC/EOMCC approaches, such as CCSDt and EOMCCSDt, and their extensions to valence systems via the electron-attached and ionized formalisms.

  2. An efficient formulation and implementation of the analytic energy gradient method to the single and double excitation coupled-cluster wave function - Application to Cl2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    The analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) wave function has been reformulated and implemented in a new set of programs. The reformulated set of gradient equations have a smaller computational cost than any previously published. The iterative solution of the linear equations and the construction of the effective density matrices are fully vectorized, being based on matrix multiplications. The new method has been used to investigate the Cl2O2 molecule, which has recently been postulated as an important intermediate in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. In addition to reporting computational timings, the CCSD equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and relative energetics of three isomers of Cl2O2 are presented.

  3. Nested variant of the method of moments of coupled cluster equations for vertical excitation energies and excited-state potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karol

    2009-05-21

    In this article we discuss the problem of proper balancing of the noniterative corrections to the ground- and excited-state energies obtained with approximate coupled cluster (CC) and equation-of-motion CC (EOMCC) approaches. It is demonstrated that for a class of excited states dominated by single excitations and for states with medium doubly excited component, the newly introduced nested variant of the method of moments of CC equations provides mathematically rigorous way of balancing the ground- and excited-state correlation effects. The resulting noniterative methodology accounting for the effect of triples is tested using its parallel implementation on the systems, for which iterative CC/EOMCC calculations with full inclusion of triply excited configurations or their most important subset are numerically feasible.

  4. Distinct Phosphorylation Clusters Determine the Signaling Outcome of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4/G Protein-Coupled Receptor 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Hudson, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    of these phosphoacceptor sites to alanine completely prevented phosphorylation of mFFA4 but did not limit receptor coupling to extracellular signal regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation. Rather, an inhibitor of Gq/11proteins completely prevented receptor signaling to ERK1/2. By contrast, the recruitment...... activation. These unique observations define differential effects on signaling mediated by phosphorylation at distinct locations. This hallmark feature supports the possibility that the signaling outcome of mFFA4 activation can be determined by the pattern of phosphorylation (phosphorylation barcode...

  5. Treating sub-valence correlation effects in domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster calculations: an out-of-the-box approach

    KAUST Repository

    Bistoni, Giovanni; Riplinger, Christoph; Minenkov, Yury; Cavallo, Luigi; Auer, Alexander A.; Neese, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The validity of the main approximations used in canonical and domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T), respectively) in standard chemical applications is discussed. In particular, we investigate the dependence of the results on the number of electrons included in the correlation treatment in frozen-core (FC) calculations and on the main threshold governing the accuracy of DLPNO all-electron (AE) calculations. Initially, scalar relativistic orbital energies for the ground state of the atoms from Li to Rn in the periodic table are calculated. An energy criterion is applied for determining the orbitals that can be excluded from the correlation treatment in FC coupled cluster calculations without significant loss of accuracy. The heterolytic dissociation energy (HDE) of a series of metal compounds (LiF, NaF, AlF3, CaF2, CuF, GaF3, YF3, AgF, InF3, HfF4 and AuF) is calculated at the canonical CCSD(T) level, and the dependence of the results on the number of correlated electrons is investigated. Although for many of the studied reactions sub-valence correlation effects contribute significantly to the HDE, the use of an energy criterion permits a conservative definition of the size of the core, allowing FC calculations to be performed in a black-box fashion while retaining chemical accuracy. A comparison of the CCSD and the DLPNO-CCSD methods in describing the core-core, core-valence and valence-valence components of the correlation energy is given. It is found that more conservative thresholds must be used for electron pairs containing at least one core electron in order to achieve high accuracy in AE DLPNO-CCSD calculations relative to FC calculations. With the new settings, the DLPNO-CCSD method reproduces canonical CCSD results in both AE and FC calculations with the same accuracy.

  6. Treating sub-valence correlation effects in domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster calculations: an out-of-the-box approach

    KAUST Repository

    Bistoni, Giovanni

    2017-06-12

    The validity of the main approximations used in canonical and domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T), respectively) in standard chemical applications is discussed. In particular, we investigate the dependence of the results on the number of electrons included in the correlation treatment in frozen-core (FC) calculations and on the main threshold governing the accuracy of DLPNO all-electron (AE) calculations. Initially, scalar relativistic orbital energies for the ground state of the atoms from Li to Rn in the periodic table are calculated. An energy criterion is applied for determining the orbitals that can be excluded from the correlation treatment in FC coupled cluster calculations without significant loss of accuracy. The heterolytic dissociation energy (HDE) of a series of metal compounds (LiF, NaF, AlF3, CaF2, CuF, GaF3, YF3, AgF, InF3, HfF4 and AuF) is calculated at the canonical CCSD(T) level, and the dependence of the results on the number of correlated electrons is investigated. Although for many of the studied reactions sub-valence correlation effects contribute significantly to the HDE, the use of an energy criterion permits a conservative definition of the size of the core, allowing FC calculations to be performed in a black-box fashion while retaining chemical accuracy. A comparison of the CCSD and the DLPNO-CCSD methods in describing the core-core, core-valence and valence-valence components of the correlation energy is given. It is found that more conservative thresholds must be used for electron pairs containing at least one core electron in order to achieve high accuracy in AE DLPNO-CCSD calculations relative to FC calculations. With the new settings, the DLPNO-CCSD method reproduces canonical CCSD results in both AE and FC calculations with the same accuracy.

  7. Benchmarks for multicomponent diffusion and electrochemical migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasouli, Pejman; Steefel, Carl I.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In multicomponent electrolyte solutions, the tendency of ions to diffuse at different rates results in a charge imbalance that is counteracted by the electrostatic coupling between charged species leading to a process called “electrochemical migration” or “electromigration.” Although not commonly...... not been published to date. This contribution provides a set of three benchmark problems that demonstrate the effect of electric coupling during multicomponent diffusion and electrochemical migration and at the same time facilitate the intercomparison of solutions from existing reactive transport codes...

  8. Benchmarking i den offentlige sektor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Dietrichson, Lars; Sandalgaard, Niels

    2008-01-01

    I artiklen vil vi kort diskutere behovet for benchmarking i fraværet af traditionelle markedsmekanismer. Herefter vil vi nærmere redegøre for, hvad benchmarking er med udgangspunkt i fire forskellige anvendelser af benchmarking. Regulering af forsyningsvirksomheder vil blive behandlet, hvorefter...

  9. CHARM, a gender equity and family planning intervention for men and couples in rural India: protocol for the cluster randomized controlled trial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yore, Jennifer; Dasgupta, Anindita; Ghule, Mohan; Battala, Madhusadana; Nair, Saritha; Silverman, Jay; Saggurti, Niranjan; Balaiah, Donta; Raj, Anita

    2016-02-20

    Globally, 41% of all pregnancies are unintended, increasing risk for unsafe abortion, miscarriage and maternal and child morbidities and mortality. One in four pregnancies in India (3.3 million pregnancies, annually) are unintended; 2/3 of these occur in the context of no modern contraceptive use. In addition, no contraceptive use until desired number and sex composition of children is achieved remains a norm in India. Research shows that globally and in India, the youngest and most newly married wives are least likely to use contraception and most likely to report husband's exclusive family planning decision-making control, suggesting that male engagement and family planning support is important for this group. Thus, the Counseling Husbands to Achieve Reproductive Health and Marital Equity (CHARM) intervention was developed in recognition of the need for more male engagement family planning models that include gender equity counseling and focus on spacing contraception use in rural India. For this study, a multi-session intervention delivered to men but inclusive of their wives was developed and evaluated as a two-armed cluster randomized controlled design study conducted across 50 mapped clusters in rural Maharashtra, India. Eligible rural young husbands and their wives (N = 1081) participated in a three session gender-equity focused family planning program delivered to the men (Sessions 1 and 2) and their wives (Session 3) by village health providers in rural India. Survey assessments were conducted at baseline and 9&18 month follow-ups with eligible men and their wives, and pregnancy tests were obtained from wives at baseline and 18-month follow-up. Additional in-depth understanding of how intervention impact occurred was assessed via in-depth interviews at 18 month follow-up with VHPs and a subsample of couples (n = 50, 2 couples per intervention cluster). Process evaluation was conducted to collect feedback from husbands, wives, and VHPs on program

  10. Similarity-transformed perturbation theory on top of truncated local coupled cluster solutions: Theory and applications to intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Richard Julian, E-mail: julianazar2323@berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    Your correspondents develop and apply fully nonorthogonal, local-reference perturbation theories describing non-covalent interactions. Our formulations are based on a Löwdin partitioning of the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian into a zeroth-order intramonomer piece (taking local CCSD solutions as its zeroth-order eigenfunction) plus a first-order piece coupling the fragments. If considerations are limited to a single molecule, the proposed intermolecular similarity-transformed perturbation theory represents a frozen-orbital variant of the “(2)”-type theories shown to be competitive with CCSD(T) and of similar cost if all terms are retained. Different restrictions on the zeroth- and first-order amplitudes are explored in the context of large-computation tractability and elucidation of non-local effects in the space of singles and doubles. To accurately approximate CCSD intermolecular interaction energies, a quadratically growing number of variables must be included at zeroth-order.

  11. Analytic first derivatives for a spin-adapted open-shell coupled cluster theory: Evaluation of first-order electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Dipayan, E-mail: datta@uni-mainz.de; Gauss, Jürgen, E-mail: gauss@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-09-14

    An analytic scheme is presented for the evaluation of first derivatives of the energy for a unitary group based spin-adapted coupled cluster (CC) theory, namely, the combinatoric open-shell CC (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. The widely used Lagrange multiplier approach is employed for the derivation of an analytical expression for the first derivative of the energy, which in combination with the well-established density-matrix formulation, is used for the computation of first-order electrical properties. Derivations of the spin-adapted lambda equations for determining the Lagrange multipliers and the expressions for the spin-free effective density matrices for the COSCC approach are presented. Orbital-relaxation effects due to the electric-field perturbation are treated via the Z-vector technique. We present calculations of the dipole moments for a number of doublet radicals in their ground states using restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) and quasi-restricted HF (QRHF) orbitals in order to demonstrate the applicability of our analytic scheme for computing energy derivatives. We also report calculations of the chlorine electric-field gradients and nuclear quadrupole-coupling constants for the CCl, CH{sub 2}Cl, ClO{sub 2}, and SiCl radicals.

  12. Addition by subtraction in coupled-cluster theory: a reconsideration of the CC and CI interface and the nCC hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Rodney J; Musiał, Monika

    2006-11-28

    The nCC hierarchy of coupled-cluster approximations, where n guarantees exactness for n electrons and all products of n electrons are derived and applied to several illustrative problems. The condition of exactness for n=2 defines nCCSD=2CC, with nCCSDT=3CC and nCCSDTQ=4CC being exact for three and four electrons. To achieve this, the minimum number of diagrams is evaluated, which is less than in the corresponding CC model. For all practical purposes, nCC is also the proper definition of a size-extensive CI. 2CC is also an orbitally invariant coupled electron pair approximation. The numerical results of nCC are close to those for the full CC variant, and in some cases are closer to the full CI reference result. As 2CC is exact for separated electron pairs, it is the natural zeroth-order approximation for the correlation problem in molecules with other effects introduced as these units start to interact. The nCC hierarchy of approximations has all the attractive features of CC including its size extensivity, orbital invariance, and orbital insensitivity, but in a conceptually appealing form suited to bond breaking, while being computationally less demanding. Excited states from the equation of motion (EOM-2CC) are also reported, which show results frequently approaching those of EOM-CCSDT.

  13. Cloud benchmarking for performance

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Blesson; Akgun, Ozgur; Miguel, Ian; Thai, Long; Barker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 20/09/2014 How can applications be deployed on the cloud to achieve maximum performance? This question has become significant and challenging with the availability of a wide variety of Virtual Machines (VMs) with different performance capabilities in the cloud. The above question is addressed by proposing a six step benchmarking methodology in which a user provides a set of four weights that indicate how important each of the following groups: memory, processor, computa...

  14. Mapping the Excited State Potential Energy Surface of a Retinal Chromophore Model with Multireference and Equation-of-Motion Coupled-Cluster Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozem, Samer; Melaccio, Federico; Lindh, Roland; Krylov, Anna I; Granovsky, Alexander A; Angeli, Celestino; Olivucci, Massimo

    2013-10-08

    The photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments proceeds along a complex reaction coordinate on a multidimensional surface that comprises a hydrogen-out-of-plane (HOOP) coordinate, a bond length alternation (BLA) coordinate, a single bond torsion and, finally, the reactive double bond torsion. These degrees of freedom are coupled with changes in the electronic structure of the chromophore and, therefore, the computational investigation of the photochemistry of such systems requires the use of a methodology capable of describing electronic structure changes along all those coordinates. Here, we employ the penta-2,4-dieniminium (PSB3) cation as a minimal model of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments and compare its excited state isomerization paths at the CASSCF and CASPT2 levels of theory. These paths connect the cis isomer and the trans isomer of PSB3 with two structurally and energetically distinct conical intersections (CIs) that belong to the same intersection space. MRCISD+Q energy profiles along these paths provide benchmark values against which other ab initio methods are validated. Accordingly, we compare the energy profiles of MRPT2 methods (CASPT2, QD-NEVPT2, and XMCQDPT2) and EOM-SF-CC methods (EOM-SF-CCSD and EOM-SF-CCSD(dT)) to the MRCISD+Q reference profiles. We find that the paths produced with CASSCF and CASPT2 are topologically and energetically different, partially due to the existence of a "locally excited" region on the CASPT2 excited state near the Franck-Condon point that is absent in CASSCF and that involves a single bond, rather than double bond, torsion. We also find that MRPT2 methods as well as EOM-SF-CCSD(dT) are capable of quantitatively describing the processes involved in the photoisomerization of systems like PSB3.

  15. A Benchmark and Simulator for UAV Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Mueller, Matthias; Smith, Neil; Ghanem, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new aerial video dataset and benchmark for low altitude UAV target tracking, as well as, a photorealistic UAV simulator that can be coupled with tracking methods. Our benchmark provides the first evaluation of many state-of-the-art and popular trackers on 123 new and fully annotated HD video sequences captured from a low-altitude aerial perspective. Among the compared trackers, we determine which ones are the most suitable for UAV tracking both in terms of tracking accuracy and run-time. The simulator can be used to evaluate tracking algorithms in real-time scenarios before they are deployed on a UAV “in the field”, as well as, generate synthetic but photo-realistic tracking datasets with automatic ground truth annotations to easily extend existing real-world datasets. Both the benchmark and simulator are made publicly available to the vision community on our website to further research in the area of object tracking from UAVs. (https://ivul.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/pub-benchmark-simulator-uav.aspx.). © Springer International Publishing AG 2016.

  16. A Benchmark and Simulator for UAV Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Mueller, Matthias

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, we propose a new aerial video dataset and benchmark for low altitude UAV target tracking, as well as, a photorealistic UAV simulator that can be coupled with tracking methods. Our benchmark provides the first evaluation of many state-of-the-art and popular trackers on 123 new and fully annotated HD video sequences captured from a low-altitude aerial perspective. Among the compared trackers, we determine which ones are the most suitable for UAV tracking both in terms of tracking accuracy and run-time. The simulator can be used to evaluate tracking algorithms in real-time scenarios before they are deployed on a UAV “in the field”, as well as, generate synthetic but photo-realistic tracking datasets with automatic ground truth annotations to easily extend existing real-world datasets. Both the benchmark and simulator are made publicly available to the vision community on our website to further research in the area of object tracking from UAVs. (https://ivul.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/pub-benchmark-simulator-uav.aspx.). © Springer International Publishing AG 2016.

  17. Benchmarking reference services: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J G; Buchanan, H S

    1995-01-01

    Benchmarking is based on the common sense idea that someone else, either inside or outside of libraries, has found a better way of doing certain things and that your own library's performance can be improved by finding out how others do things and adopting the best practices you find. Benchmarking is one of the tools used for achieving continuous improvement in Total Quality Management (TQM) programs. Although benchmarking can be done on an informal basis, TQM puts considerable emphasis on formal data collection and performance measurement. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to evaluate process performance. This article introduces the general concept of benchmarking, linking it whenever possible to reference services in health sciences libraries. Data collection instruments that have potential application in benchmarking studies are discussed and the need to develop common measurement tools to facilitate benchmarking is emphasized.

  18. Clustering of antibiotic resistance of E. coli in couples: suggestion for a major role of conjugal transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Baum Heike

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spread of antibiotic resistance in hospitals is a well-known problem, but studies investigating the importance of factors potentially related to the spread of resistant bacteria in outpatients are sparse. Methods Stool samples were obtained from 206 healthy couples in a community setting in Southern Germany in 2002–2003. E. coli was cultured and minimal inhibition concentrations were tested. Prevalences of E. coli resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics according to potential risk factors were ascertained. Results Prevalences of ampicillin resistance were 15.7% and 19.4% for women and men, respectively. About ten percent and 15% of all isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole and doxycycline, respectively. A partner carrying resistance was the main risk factor for being colonized with resistant E. coli. Odds ratios (95% CI for ampicillin and cotrimoxazole resistance given carriage of resistant isolates by the partner were 6.9 (3.1–15.5 and 3.3 (1.5–18.0, respectively. Conclusion Our data suggest that conjugal transmission may be more important for the spread of antibiotic resistance in the community setting than commonly suspected risk factors such as previous antibiotic intake or hospital contacts.

  19. EMACSS: Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Poul E. R.; Gieles, Mark

    2012-03-01

    The star cluster evolution code Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS (EMACSS) is a simple yet physically motivated computational model that describes the evolution of some fundamental properties of star clusters in static tidal fields. The prescription is based upon the flow of energy within the cluster, which is a constant fraction of the total energy per half-mass relaxation time. According to Henon's predictions, this flow is independent of the precise mechanisms for energy production within the core, and therefore does not require a complete description of the many-body interactions therein. Dynamical theory and analytic descriptions of escape mechanisms is used to construct a series of coupled differential equations expressing the time evolution of cluster mass and radius for a cluster of equal-mass stars. These equations are numerically solved using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration kernel; the results were benchmarked against a data base of direct N-body simulations. EMACSS is publicly available and reproduces the N-body results to within 10 per cent accuracy for the entire post-collapse evolution of star clusters.

  20. Relationship power, communication, and violence among couples: results of a cluster-randomized HIV prevention study in a South African township

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minnis AM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Alexandra M Minnis,1,2 Irene A Doherty,1,3 Tracy L Kline,1 William A Zule,1 Bronwyn Myers,4,5 Tara Carney,4 Wendee M Wechsberg1,3,6,7 1RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 3University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 4Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, 5Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; 6North Carolina State University, Raleigh, 7Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Background: Inequitable gender-based power in relationships and intimate partner violence contribute to persistently high rates of HIV infection among South African women. We examined the effects of two group-based HIV prevention interventions that engaged men and their female partners together in a couples intervention (Couples Health CoOp [CHC] and a gender-separate intervention (Men’s Health CoOp/Women’s Health CoOp [MHC/WHC] on women’s reports of power, communication, and conflict in relationships. Methods: The cluster-randomized field experiment included heterosexual couples from a high-density South African township in which neighborhoods were randomized to one of the intervention arms or a control arm that received the WHC only. Participants completed in-person study visits at baseline and 6-month follow-up. We examined group differences using one-way analysis of variance and multivariable regression models.Results: Of the 290 couples enrolled, 255 women remained in the same partnership over 6 months. Following the intervention, women in the CHC arm compared with those in the WHC arm were more likely to report an increase in relationship control (ß=0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02, 1.83, P=0.045 and gender norms supporting female autonomy in relationships (ß=0.99, 95% CI: 0.07, 1.91, P=0.035. Women in the MHC/WHC arm were more likely to report increases

  1. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care we...... document pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for assessment and benchmarking the clinical management of HIV-patients in any setting worldwide....

  2. Benchmarking Cloud Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of cloud computing, many cloud storage systems like Dropbox, Google Drive and Mega have been built to provide decentralized and reliable file storage. It is thus of prime importance to know their features, performance, and the best way to make use of them. In this context, we introduce BenchCloud, a tool designed as part of this thesis to conveniently and efficiently benchmark any cloud storage system. First, we provide a study of six commonly-used cloud storage systems to ident...

  3. The COST Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Tiesyte, Dalia; Tradisauskas, Nerius

    2006-01-01

    An infrastructure is emerging that enables the positioning of populations of on-line, mobile service users. In step with this, research in the management of moving objects has attracted substantial attention. In particular, quite a few proposals now exist for the indexing of moving objects...... takes into account that the available positions of the moving objects are inaccurate, an aspect largely ignored in previous indexing research. The concepts of data and query enlargement are introduced for addressing inaccuracy. As proof of concepts of the benchmark, the paper covers the application...

  4. Ab initio and DFT benchmarking of tungsten nanoclusters and tungsten hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoviera, J.; Novotny, M.; Cernusak, I.; Oda, T.; Louis, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present several benchmark calculations comparing wave-function based methods and density functional theory for model systems containing tungsten. They include W 4 cluster as well as W 2 , WH and WH 2 molecules. (authors)

  5. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  6. Orbitally invariant internally contracted multireference unitary coupled cluster theory and its perturbative approximation: theory and test calculations of second order approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Hoffmann, Mark R

    2012-07-07

    A unitary wave operator, exp (G), G(+) = -G, is considered to transform a multiconfigurational reference wave function Φ to the potentially exact, within basis set limit, wave function Ψ = exp (G)Φ. To obtain a useful approximation, the Hausdorff expansion of the similarity transformed effective Hamiltonian, exp (-G)Hexp (G), is truncated at second order and the excitation manifold is limited; an additional separate perturbation approximation can also be made. In the perturbation approximation, which we refer to as multireference unitary second-order perturbation theory (MRUPT2), the Hamiltonian operator in the highest order commutator is approximated by a Mo̸ller-Plesset-type one-body zero-order Hamiltonian. If a complete active space self-consistent field wave function is used as reference, then the energy is invariant under orbital rotations within the inactive, active, and virtual orbital subspaces for both the second-order unitary coupled cluster method and its perturbative approximation. Furthermore, the redundancies of the excitation operators are addressed in a novel way, which is potentially more efficient compared to the usual full diagonalization of the metric of the excited configurations. Despite the loss of rigorous size-extensivity possibly due to the use of a variational approach rather than a projective one in the solution of the amplitudes, test calculations show that the size-extensivity errors are very small. Compared to other internally contracted multireference perturbation theories, MRUPT2 only needs reduced density matrices up to three-body even with a non-complete active space reference wave function when two-body excitations within the active orbital subspace are involved in the wave operator, exp (G). Both the coupled cluster and perturbation theory variants are amenable to large, incomplete model spaces. Applications to some widely studied model systems that can be problematic because of geometry dependent quasidegeneracy, H4, P4

  7. Benchmarking multimedia performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Ahmad; Sudharsanan, Subramania I.

    1998-03-01

    With the introduction of faster processors and special instruction sets tailored to multimedia, a number of exciting applications are now feasible on the desktops. Among these is the DVD playback consisting, among other things, of MPEG-2 video and Dolby digital audio or MPEG-2 audio. Other multimedia applications such as video conferencing and speech recognition are also becoming popular on computer systems. In view of this tremendous interest in multimedia, a group of major computer companies have formed, Multimedia Benchmarks Committee as part of Standard Performance Evaluation Corp. to address the performance issues of multimedia applications. The approach is multi-tiered with three tiers of fidelity from minimal to full compliant. In each case the fidelity of the bitstream reconstruction as well as quality of the video or audio output are measured and the system is classified accordingly. At the next step the performance of the system is measured. In many multimedia applications such as the DVD playback the application needs to be run at a specific rate. In this case the measurement of the excess processing power, makes all the difference. All these make a system level, application based, multimedia benchmark very challenging. Several ideas and methodologies for each aspect of the problems will be presented and analyzed.

  8. Core Benchmarks Descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Actual regulations while designing of new fuel cycles for nuclear power installations comprise a calculational justification to be performed by certified computer codes. It guarantees that obtained calculational results will be within the limits of declared uncertainties that are indicated in a certificate issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russian Federation (GAN) and concerning a corresponding computer code. A formal justification of declared uncertainties is the comparison of calculational results obtained by a commercial code with the results of experiments or of calculational tests that are calculated with an uncertainty defined by certified precision codes of MCU type or of other one. The actual level of international cooperation provides an enlarging of the bank of experimental and calculational benchmarks acceptable for a certification of commercial codes that are being used for a design of fuel loadings with MOX fuel. In particular, the work is practically finished on the forming of calculational benchmarks list for a certification of code TVS-M as applied to MOX fuel assembly calculations. The results on these activities are presented

  9. A benchmarking study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Groessing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A benchmark study for permeability measurement is presented. In the past studies of other research groups which focused on the reproducibility of 1D-permeability measurements showed high standard deviations of the gained permeability values (25%, even though a defined test rig with required specifications was used. Within this study, the reproducibility of capacitive in-plane permeability testing system measurements was benchmarked by comparing results of two research sites using this technology. The reproducibility was compared by using a glass fibre woven textile and carbon fibre non crimped fabric (NCF. These two material types were taken into consideration due to the different electrical properties of glass and carbon with respect to dielectric capacitive sensors of the permeability measurement systems. In order to determine the unsaturated permeability characteristics as function of fibre volume content the measurements were executed at three different fibre volume contents including five repetitions. It was found that the stability and reproducibility of the presentedin-plane permeability measurement system is very good in the case of the glass fibre woven textiles. This is true for the comparison of the repetition measurements as well as for the comparison between the two different permeameters. These positive results were confirmed by a comparison to permeability values of the same textile gained with an older generation permeameter applying the same measurement technology. Also it was shown, that a correct determination of the grammage and the material density are crucial for correct correlation of measured permeability values and fibre volume contents.

  10. Benchmarking Using Basic DBMS Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain; Ghazal, Ahmad

    The TPC-H benchmark proved to be successful in the decision support area. Many commercial database vendors and their related hardware vendors used these benchmarks to show the superiority and competitive edge of their products. However, over time, the TPC-H became less representative of industry trends as vendors keep tuning their database to this benchmark-specific workload. In this paper, we present XMarq, a simple benchmark framework that can be used to compare various software/hardware combinations. Our benchmark model is currently composed of 25 queries that measure the performance of basic operations such as scans, aggregations, joins and index access. This benchmark model is based on the TPC-H data model due to its maturity and well-understood data generation capability. We also propose metrics to evaluate single-system performance and compare two systems. Finally we illustrate the effectiveness of this model by showing experimental results comparing two systems under different conditions.

  11. Benchmarking & European Sustainable Transport Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    , Benchmarking is one of the management tools that have recently been introduced in the transport sector. It is rapidly being applied to a wide range of transport operations, services and policies. This paper is a contribution to the discussion of the role of benchmarking in the future efforts to...... contribution to the discussions within the Eusponsored BEST Thematic Network (Benchmarking European Sustainable Transport) which ran from 2000 to 2003....

  12. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Plaček Michal; Ochrana František; Půček Milan

    2015-01-01

    The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Base...

  13. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  14. Tensor contraction engine: Abstraction and automated parallel implementation of configuration-interaction, coupled-cluster, and many-body perturbation theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, So

    2003-01-01

    We develop a symbolic manipulation program and program generator (Tensor Contraction Engine or TCE) that automatically derives the working equations of a well-defined model of second-quantized many-electron theories and synthesizes efficient parallel computer programs on the basis of these equations. Provided an ansatz of a many-electron theory model, TCE performs valid contractions of creation and annihilation operators according to Wick's theorem, consolidates identical terms, and reduces the expressions into the form of multiple tensor contractions acted by permutation operators. Subsequently, it determines the binary contraction order for each multiple tensor contraction with the minimal operation and memory cost, factorizes common binary contractions (defines intermediate tensors), and identifies reusable intermediates. The resulting ordered list of binary tensor contractions, additions, and index permutations is translated into an optimized program that is combined with the NWChem and UTChem computational chemistry software packages. The programs synthesized by TCE take advantage of spin symmetry, Abelian point-group symmetry, and index permutation symmetry at every stage of calculations to minimize the number of arithmetic operations and storage requirement, adjust the peak local memory usage by index range tiling, and support parallel I/O interfaces and dynamic load balancing for parallel executions. We demonstrate the utility of TCE through automatic derivation and implementation of parallel programs for various models of configuration-interaction theory (CISD, CISDT, CISDTQ), many-body perturbation theory[MBPT(2), MBPT(3), MBPT(4)], and coupled-cluster theory (LCCD, CCD, LCCSD, CCSD, QCISD, CCSDT, and CCSDTQ)

  15. Pair natural orbital and canonical coupled cluster reaction enthalpies involving light to heavy alkali and alkaline earth metals: the importance of sub-valence correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minenkov, Yury; Bistoni, Giovanni; Riplinger, Christoph; Auer, Alexander A; Neese, Frank; Cavallo, Luigi

    2017-04-05

    In this work, we tested canonical and domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T), respectively) for a set of 32 ligand exchange and association/dissociation reaction enthalpies involving ionic complexes of Li, Be, Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb(ii). Two strategies were investigated: in the former, only valence electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the computationally very efficient FC (frozen core) approach; in the latter, all non-ECP electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the AE (all electron) approach. Apart from reactions involving Li and Be, the FC approach resulted in non-homogeneous performance. The FC approach leads to very small errors (correlation effects. These large errors are reduced to a few kcal mol -1 if the AE approach is used or the sub-valence orbitals of metals are included in the correlation treatment. On the technical side, the CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T) results differ by a fraction of kcal mol -1 , indicating the latter method as the perfect choice when the CPU efficiency is essential. For completely black-box applications, as requested in catalysis or thermochemical calculations, we recommend the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method with all electrons that are not covered by effective core potentials included in the correlation treatment and correlation-consistent polarized core valence basis sets of cc-pwCVQZ(-PP) quality.

  16. Coupled cluster theory of strongly correlated spin- and electron-lattice systems: an illustration via a model exhibiting competition between magnetic order and dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Raymond F; Krueger, Sven E

    2003-01-01

    The coupled cluster method (CCM) of microscopic quantum many-body theory has become an ab initio method of first choice in quantum chemistry and many fields of nuclear, subnuclear and condensed matter physics, when results of high accuracy are required. In recent years it has begun to be applied with equal success to strongly correlated systems of electrons or quantum spins defined on a regular spatial lattice. One regularly finds that the CCM is able to describe accurately the various zero-temperature phases and the quantum phase transitions between them, even when frustration is present and other methods such as quantum Monte Carlo often fail. We illustrate the use and powerfulness of the method here by applying it to a square-lattice spin-half Heisenberg model where frustration is introduced by competing nearest neighbour bonds. The model exhibits the physically interesting phenomenon of competition between magnetic order and dimerization. Results obtained for the model with the CCM are compared with those found from spin-wave theory and from extrapolating the results of exact diagonalizations of small lattices. We show that the CCM is essentially unique among available methods in being able both to describe accurately all phases of this complex model and to provide accurate predictions of the various phase boundaries and the order of the corresponding transitions

  17. Non-iterative triple excitations in equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory for electron attachment with applications to bound and temporary anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.

    2018-01-01

    The impact of residual electron correlation beyond the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) approximation on positions and widths of electronic resonances is investigated. To establish a method that accomplishes this task in an economical manner, several approaches proposed for the approximate treatment of triple excitations are reviewed with respect to their performance in the electron attachment (EA) variant of EOM-CC theory. The recently introduced EOM-CCSD(T)(a)* method [D. A. Matthews and J. F. Stanton, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 124102 (2016)], which includes non-iterative corrections to the reference and the target states, reliably reproduces vertical attachment energies from EOM-EA-CC calculations with single, double, and full triple excitations in contrast to schemes in which non-iterative corrections are applied only to the target states. Applications of EOM-EA-CCSD(T)(a)* augmented by a complex absorbing potential (CAP) to several temporary anions illustrate that shape resonances are well described by EOM-EA-CCSD, but that residual electron correlation often makes a non-negligible impact on their positions and widths. The positions of Feshbach resonances, on the other hand, are significantly improved when going from CAP-EOM-EA-CCSD to CAP-EOM-EA-CCSD(T)(a)*, but the correct energetic order of the relevant electronic states is still not achieved.

  18. Semiconductor color-center structure and excitation spectra: Equation-of-motion coupled-cluster description of vacancy and transition-metal defect photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2018-03-01

    Valence excitation spectra are computed for deep-center silicon-vacancy defects in 3C, 4H, and 6H silicon carbide (SiC), and comparisons are made with literature photoluminescence measurements. Optimizations of nuclear geometries surrounding the defect centers are performed within a Gaussian basis-set framework using many-body perturbation theory or density functional theory (DFT) methods, with computational expenses minimized by a QM/MM technique called SIMOMM. Vertical excitation energies are subsequently obtained by applying excitation-energy, electron-attached, and ionized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods, where appropriate, as well as time-dependent (TD) DFT, to small models including only a few atoms adjacent to the defect center. We consider the relative quality of various EOMCC and TD-DFT methods for (i) energy-ordering potential ground states differing incrementally in charge and multiplicity, (ii) accurately reproducing experimentally measured photoluminescence peaks, and (iii) energy-ordering defects of different types occurring within a given polytype. The extensibility of this approach to transition-metal defects is also tested by applying it to silicon-substituted chromium defects in SiC and comparing with measurements. It is demonstrated that, when used in conjunction with SIMOMM-optimized geometries, EOMCC-based methods can provide a reliable prediction of the ground-state charge and multiplicity, while also giving a quantitative description of the photoluminescence spectra, accurate to within 0.1 eV of measurement for all cases considered.

  19. Coupled cluster and density functional theory calculations of atomic hydrogen chemisorption on pyrene and coronene as model systems for graphene hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Qian, Hu-Jun; Morokuma, Keiji; Irle, Stephan

    2012-07-05

    Ab initio coupled cluster and density functional theory studies of atomic hydrogen addition to the central region of pyrene and coronene as molecular models for graphene hydrogenation were performed. Fully relaxed potential energy curves (PECs) were computed at the spin-unrestricted B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory for the atomic hydrogen attack of a center carbon atom (site A), the midpoint of a neighboring carbon bond (site B), and the center of a central hexagon (site C). Using the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ PEC geometries, we evaluated energies at the PBE density functional, as well as ab initio restricted open-shell ROMP2, ROCCSD, and ROCCSD(T) levels of theory, employing cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets, and performed a G2MS extrapolation to the ROCCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that only site A attack leads to chemisorption. The G2MS entrance channel barrier heights, binding energies, and PEC profiles are found to agree well with a recent ab initio multireference wave function theory study (Bonfanti et al. J. Chem. Phys.2011, 135, 164701), indicating that single-reference open-shell methods including B3LYP are sufficient for the theoretical treatment of the interaction of graphene with a single hydrogen atom.

  20. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H{sub 2} → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang, E-mail: zsun@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn; Zhang, Dong H., E-mail: zsun@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-01-14

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H{sub 2} → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2){sub Q}] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H{sub 2} reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  1. Simulation of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure with Time-Dependent Equation-of-Motion Coupled-Cluster Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Daniel R; DePrince, A Eugene

    2017-07-06

    An explicitly time-dependent (TD) approach to equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD) is implemented for simulating near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure in molecular systems. The TD-EOM-CCSD absorption line shape function is given by the Fourier transform of the CCSD dipole autocorrelation function. We represent this transform by its Padé approximant, which provides converged spectra in much shorter simulation times than are required by the Fourier form. The result is a powerful framework for the blackbox simulation of broadband absorption spectra. K-edge X-ray absorption spectra for carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in several small molecules are obtained from the real part of the absorption line shape function and are compared with experiment. The computed and experimentally obtained spectra are in good agreement; the mean unsigned error in the predicted peak positions is only 1.2 eV. We also explore the spectral signatures of protonation in these molecules.

  2. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  3. MOx Depletion Calculation Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Felice, Laurence; Eschbach, Romain; Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Maryam, Seif-Eddine; Hesketh, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS) has been established to study the reactor physics, fuel performance, radiation transport and shielding, and the uncertainties associated with modelling of these phenomena in present and future nuclear power systems. The WPRS has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in these fields. The Expert Group on Reactor Physics and Advanced Nuclear Systems (EGRPANS) was created in 2011 to perform specific tasks associated with reactor physics aspects of present and future nuclear power systems. EGRPANS provides expert advice to the WPRS and the nuclear community on the development needs (data and methods, validation experiments, scenario studies) for different reactor systems and also provides specific technical information regarding: core reactivity characteristics, including fuel depletion effects; core power/flux distributions; Core dynamics and reactivity control. In 2013 EGRPANS published a report that investigated fuel depletion effects in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR). This was entitled 'International Comparison of a Depletion Calculation Benchmark on Fuel Cycle Issues' NEA/NSC/DOC(2013) that documented a benchmark exercise for UO 2 fuel rods. This report documents a complementary benchmark exercise that focused on PuO 2 /UO 2 Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel rods. The results are especially relevant to the back-end of the fuel cycle, including irradiated fuel transport, reprocessing, interim storage and waste repository. Saint-Laurent B1 (SLB1) was the first French reactor to use MOx assemblies. SLB1 is a 900 MWe PWR, with 30% MOx fuel loading. The standard MOx assemblies, used in Saint-Laurent B1 reactor, include three zones with different plutonium enrichments, high Pu content (5.64%) in the center zone, medium Pu content (4.42%) in the intermediate zone and low Pu content (2.91%) in the peripheral zone

  4. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S. Ducatman MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center ® (FPSC databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above. The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative

  5. Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  6. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  7. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  8. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  9. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. SSI and structural benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes, currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to cut-off depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils. Further, the paper presents some key aspects of the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop (NUREG/CP-0054) which was held in Bethesda, MD on June 1, 1986. Finally, recent efforts related to the task on the structural benchmarks are described

  11. ABM11 parton distributions and benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekhin, Sergey; Bluemlein, Johannes; Moch, Sven-Olaf

    2012-08-01

    We present a determination of the nucleon parton distribution functions (PDFs) and of the strong coupling constant α s at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD based on the world data for deep-inelastic scattering and the fixed-target data for the Drell-Yan process. The analysis is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for n f =3,4,5 and uses the MS scheme for α s and the heavy quark masses. The fit results are compared with other PDFs and used to compute the benchmark cross sections at hadron colliders to the NNLO accuracy.

  12. ABM11 parton distributions and benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, Sergey [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bluemlein, Johannes; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We present a determination of the nucleon parton distribution functions (PDFs) and of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD based on the world data for deep-inelastic scattering and the fixed-target data for the Drell-Yan process. The analysis is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for n{sub f}=3,4,5 and uses the MS scheme for {alpha}{sub s} and the heavy quark masses. The fit results are compared with other PDFs and used to compute the benchmark cross sections at hadron colliders to the NNLO accuracy.

  13. Inclusion of orbital relaxation and correlation through the unitary group adapted open shell coupled cluster theory using non-relativistic and scalar relativistic Hamiltonians to study the core ionization potential of molecules containing light to medium-heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sangita; Shee, Avijit; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2018-02-01

    The orbital relaxation attendant on ionization is particularly important for the core electron ionization potential (core IP) of molecules. The Unitary Group Adapted State Universal Coupled Cluster (UGA-SUMRCC) theory, recently formulated and implemented by Sen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074104 (2012)], is very effective in capturing orbital relaxation accompanying ionization or excitation of both the core and the valence electrons [S. Sen et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 2625 (2013); A. Shee et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 9, 2573 (2013)] while preserving the spin-symmetry of the target states and using the neutral closed-shell spatial orbitals of the ground state. Our Ansatz invokes a normal-ordered exponential representation of spin-free cluster-operators. The orbital relaxation induced by a specific set of cluster operators in our Ansatz is good enough to eliminate the need for different sets of orbitals for the ground and the core-ionized states. We call the single configuration state function (CSF) limit of this theory the Unitary Group Adapted Open-Shell Coupled Cluster (UGA-OSCC) theory. The aim of this paper is to comprehensively explore the efficacy of our Ansatz to describe orbital relaxation, using both theoretical analysis and numerical performance. Whenever warranted, we also make appropriate comparisons with other coupled-cluster theories. A physically motivated truncation of the chains of spin-free T-operators is also made possible by the normal-ordering, and the operational resemblance to single reference coupled-cluster theory allows easy implementation. Our test case is the prediction of the 1s core IP of molecules containing a single light- to medium-heavy nucleus and thus, in addition to demonstrating the orbital relaxation, we have addressed the scalar relativistic effects on the accuracy of the IPs by using a hierarchy of spin-free Hamiltonians in conjunction with our theory. Additionally, the contribution of the spin-free component of the two

  14. Inclusion of orbital relaxation and correlation through the unitary group adapted open shell coupled cluster theory using non-relativistic and scalar relativistic Hamiltonians to study the core ionization potential of molecules containing light to medium-heavy elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sangita; Shee, Avijit; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2018-02-07

    The orbital relaxation attendant on ionization is particularly important for the core electron ionization potential (core IP) of molecules. The Unitary Group Adapted State Universal Coupled Cluster (UGA-SUMRCC) theory, recently formulated and implemented by Sen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074104 (2012)], is very effective in capturing orbital relaxation accompanying ionization or excitation of both the core and the valence electrons [S. Sen et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 2625 (2013); A. Shee et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 9, 2573 (2013)] while preserving the spin-symmetry of the target states and using the neutral closed-shell spatial orbitals of the ground state. Our Ansatz invokes a normal-ordered exponential representation of spin-free cluster-operators. The orbital relaxation induced by a specific set of cluster operators in our Ansatz is good enough to eliminate the need for different sets of orbitals for the ground and the core-ionized states. We call the single configuration state function (CSF) limit of this theory the Unitary Group Adapted Open-Shell Coupled Cluster (UGA-OSCC) theory. The aim of this paper is to comprehensively explore the efficacy of our Ansatz to describe orbital relaxation, using both theoretical analysis and numerical performance. Whenever warranted, we also make appropriate comparisons with other coupled-cluster theories. A physically motivated truncation of the chains of spin-free T-operators is also made possible by the normal-ordering, and the operational resemblance to single reference coupled-cluster theory allows easy implementation. Our test case is the prediction of the 1s core IP of molecules containing a single light- to medium-heavy nucleus and thus, in addition to demonstrating the orbital relaxation, we have addressed the scalar relativistic effects on the accuracy of the IPs by using a hierarchy of spin-free Hamiltonians in conjunction with our theory. Additionally, the contribution of the spin-free component of the two

  15. Implementing wait-time reductions under Ontario government benchmarks (Pay-for-Results): a Cluster Randomized Trial of the Effect of a Physician-Nurse Supplementary Triage Assistance team (MDRNSTAT) on emergency department patient wait times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ivy; Lee, Jacques; Mittmann, Nicole; Tyberg, Jeffrey; Ramagnano, Sharon; Kiss, Alex; Schull, Michael; Kerr, Fergus; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2013-11-11

    Internationally, emergency departments are struggling with crowding and its associated morbidity, mortality, and decreased patient and health-care worker satisfaction. The objective was to evaluate the addition of a MDRNSTAT (Physician (MD)-Nurse (RN) Supplementary Team At Triage) on emergency department patient flow and quality of care. Pragmatic cluster randomized trial. From 131 weekday shifts (8:00-14:30) during a 26-week period, we randomized 65 days (3173 visits) to the intervention cluster with a MDRNSTAT presence, and 66 days (3163 visits) to the nurse-only triage control cluster. The primary outcome was emergency department length-of-stay (EDLOS) for patients managed and discharged only by the emergency department. Secondary outcomes included EDLOS for patients initially seen by the emergency department, and subsequently consulted and admitted, patients reaching government-mandated thresholds, time to initial physician assessment, left-without being seen rate, time to investigation, and measurement of harm. The intervention's median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted, high acuity patients was 4:05 [95th% CI: 3:58 to 4:15] versus 4:29 [95th% CI: 4:19-4:38] during comparator shifts. The intervention's median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted, low acuity patients was 1:55 [95th% CI: 1:48 to 2:05] versus 2:08 [95th% CI: 2:02-2:14]. The intervention's median physician initial assessment time was 0:55 [95th% CI: 0:53 to 0:58] versus 1:21 [95th% CI: 1:18 to 1:25]. The intervention's left-without-being-seen rate was 1.5% versus 2.2% for the control (p = 0.06). The MDRNSTAT subgroup analysis resulted in significant decreases in median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted high (4:01 [95th% CI: 3:43-4:16]) and low acuity patients (1:10 95th% CI: 0:58-1:19]), as well as physician initial assessment time (0:25 [95th% CI: 0:23-0:26]). No patients returned to the emergency department after being discharged by the MDRNSTAT at triage. The intervention reduced delays

  16. Review for session K - benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight of the papers to be considered in Session K are directly concerned, at least in part, with the Pool Critical Assembly (P.C.A.) benchmark at Oak Ridge. The remaining seven papers in this session, the subject of this review, are concerned with a variety of topics related to the general theme of Benchmarks and will be considered individually

  17. Internal Benchmarking for Institutional Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    Internal benchmarking is an established practice in business and industry for identifying best in-house practices and disseminating the knowledge about those practices to other groups in the organization. Internal benchmarking can be done with structures, processes, outcomes, or even individuals. In colleges or universities with multicampuses or a…

  18. Entropy-based benchmarking methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temurshoev, Umed

    2012-01-01

    We argue that benchmarking sign-volatile series should be based on the principle of movement and sign preservation, which states that a bench-marked series should reproduce the movement and signs in the original series. We show that the widely used variants of Denton (1971) method and the growth

  19. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J; Batstone, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to p...

  20. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  1. Benchmark for Strategic Performance Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Annette

    1997-01-01

    Explains benchmarking, a total quality management tool used to measure and compare the work processes in a library with those in other libraries to increase library performance. Topics include the main groups of upper management, clients, and staff; critical success factors for each group; and benefits of benchmarking. (Author/LRW)

  2. Benchmarking: A Process for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Thomas M.

    One problem with the outcome-based measures used in higher education is that they measure quantity but not quality. Benchmarking, or the use of some external standard of quality to measure tasks, processes, and outputs, is partially solving that difficulty. Benchmarking allows for the establishment of a systematic process to indicate if outputs…

  3. Evaluating a multicomponent social behaviour change communication strategy to reduce intimate partner violence among married couples: study protocol for a cluster randomized trial in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari Jo Clark

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV is a significant public health issue that affects 1 in 3 women globally and a similarly large number of women in Nepal. Over the past decade, important policy and programmatic steps have been taken to address violence against women in Nepal. There remains a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of primary violence prevention strategies. The Change Starts at Home study begins to fill this gap by utilizing a multi-component social behaviour change communication (SBCC strategy involving a radio drama and community mobilization to shift attitudes, norms and behaviours that underpin IPV perpetration in Nepal. Methods/Design The study uses a concurrent mixed-methods design. The quantitative aspect of the evaluation is a pair-matched, repeated cross-sectional 2-armed, single-blinded cluster trial (RCT: N = 36 clusters, 1440 individuals, comparing a social behaviour change communication (SBCC strategy to radio programming alone for its impact on physical and / or sexual IPV at the end of programming (12 months’ post-baseline and 6-months post the cessation of project activities (18-months post baseline. The qualitative aspects of the design include several longitudinal approaches to understand the impact of the intervention and to examine mechanisms of change including in-depth interviews with participants (N = 18 couples, and focus group discussions with community leaders (N = 3 groups, and family members of participants (N = 12 groups. Treatment effects will be estimated with generalized logistic mixed models specified to compare differences in primary outcome from baseline to 12-month follow-up, and baseline to 18-months follow-up in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. Discussion The study rigorously evaluates the effectiveness of a promising strategy to prevent IPV. The results of the trial will be immediately useful for governmental, nongovernmental, and donor funded

  4. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Approximate inclusion of triple excitations in combined coupled cluster/molecular mechanics: Calculations of electronic excitation energies in solution for acrolein, water, formamide, and n-methylacetamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneskov, Kristian; Gras, Eduard Matito; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    as being applicable for averaging over many solvent configurations derived from, for example, molecular simulations. We test the proposed model using as a benchmark the two lowest-lying valence singlet excitations (n → π* and π → π*) of acrolein, formamide, and N-methylacetamide in aqueous solution as well...

  6. Benchmarking school nursing practice: the North West Regional Benchmarking Group

    OpenAIRE

    Littler, Nadine; Mullen, Margaret; Beckett, Helen; Freshney, Alice; Pinder, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    It is essential that the quality of care is reviewed regularly through robust processes such as benchmarking to ensure all outcomes and resources are evidence-based so that children and young people’s needs are met effectively. This article provides an example of the use of benchmarking in school nursing practice. Benchmarking has been defined as a process for finding, adapting and applying best practices (Camp, 1994). This concept was first adopted in the 1970s ‘from industry where it was us...

  7. Pair natural orbital and canonical coupled cluster reaction enthalpies involving light to heavy alkali and alkaline earth metals: the importance of sub-valence correlation

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2017-03-07

    In this work, we tested canonical and domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T), respectively) for a set of 32 ligand exchange and association/dissociation reaction enthalpies involving ionic complexes of Li, Be, Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb(ii). Two strategies were investigated: in the former, only valence electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the computationally very efficient FC (frozen core) approach; in the latter, all non-ECP electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the AE (all electron) approach. Apart from reactions involving Li and Be, the FC approach resulted in non-homogeneous performance. The FC approach leads to very small errors (<2 kcal mol-1) for some reactions of Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb, while for a few reactions of Ca and Ba deviations up to 40 kcal mol-1 have been obtained. Large errors are both due to artificial mixing of the core (sub-valence) orbitals of metals and the valence orbitals of oxygen and halogens in the molecular orbitals treated as core, and due to neglecting core-core and core-valence correlation effects. These large errors are reduced to a few kcal mol-1 if the AE approach is used or the sub-valence orbitals of metals are included in the correlation treatment. On the technical side, the CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T) results differ by a fraction of kcal mol-1, indicating the latter method as the perfect choice when the CPU efficiency is essential. For completely black-box applications, as requested in catalysis or thermochemical calculations, we recommend the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method with all electrons that are not covered by effective core potentials included in the correlation treatment and correlation-consistent polarized core valence basis sets of cc-pwCVQZ(-PP) quality.

  8. Shape of Multireference, Equation-of-Motion Coupled-Cluster, and Density Functional Theory Potential Energy Surfaces at a Conical Intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozem, Samer; Melaccio, Federico; Valentini, Alessio; Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Ferré, Nicolas; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Angeli, Celestino; Krylov, Anna I; Granovsky, Alexander A; Lindh, Roland; Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-08-12

    We report and characterize ground-state and excited-state potential energy profiles using a variety of electronic structure methods along a loop lying on the branching plane associated with a conical intersection (CI) of a reduced retinal model, the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation (PSB3). Whereas the performance of the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster, density functional theory, and multireference methods had been tested along the excited- and ground-state paths of PSB3 in our earlier work, the ability of these methods to correctly describe the potential energy surface shape along a CI branching plane has not yet been investigated. This is the focus of the present contribution. We find, in agreement with earlier studies by others, that standard time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) does not yield the correct two-dimensional (i.e., conical) crossing along the branching plane but rather a one-dimensional (i.e., linear) crossing along the same plane. The same type of behavior is found for SS-CASPT2(IPEA=0), SS-CASPT2(IPEA=0.25), spin-projected SF-TDDFT, EOM-SF-CCSD, and, finally, for the reference MRCISD+Q method. In contrast, we found that MRCISD, CASSCF, MS-CASPT2(IPEA=0), MS-CASPT2(IPEA=0.25), XMCQDPT2, QD-NEVPT2, non-spin-projected SF-TDDFT, and SI-SA-REKS yield the expected conical crossing. To assess the effect of the different crossing topologies (i.e., linear or conical) on the PSB3 photoisomerization efficiency, we discuss the results of 100 semiclassical trajectories computed by CASSCF and SS-CASPT2(IPEA=0.25) for a PSB3 derivative. We show that for the same initial conditions, the two methods yield similar dynamics leading to isomerization quantum yields that differ by only a few percent.

  9. Control in the Rate-Determining Step Provides a Promising Strategy To Develop New Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation: A Local Pair Natural Orbital Coupled Cluster Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa

    2015-08-03

    The development of efficient catalysts with base metals for CO2 hydrogenation has always been a major thrust of interest. A series of experimental and theoretical work has revealed that the catalytic cycle typically involves two key steps, namely, base-promoted heterolytic H2 splitting and hydride transfer to CO2, either of which can be the rate-determining step (RDS) of the entire reaction. To explore the determining factor for the nature of RDS, we present herein a comparative mechanistic investigation on CO2 hydrogenation mediated by [M(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](n+) (M = Fe(II), Ru(II), and Co(III); PP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine) type complexes. In order to construct reliable free energy profiles, we used highly correlated wave function based ab initio methods of the coupled cluster type alongside the standard density functional theory. Our calculations demonstrate that the hydricity of the metal-hydride intermediate generated by H2 splitting dictates the nature of the RDS for the Fe(II) and Co(III) systems, while the RDS for the Ru(II) catalyst appears to be ambiguous. CO2 hydrogenation catalyzed by the Fe(II) complex that possesses moderate hydricity traverses an H2-splitting RDS, whereas the RDS for the high-hydricity Co(III) species is found to be the hydride transfer. Thus, our findings suggest that hydricity can be used as a practical guide in future catalyst design. Enhancing the electron-accepting ability of low-hydricity catalysts is likely to improve their catalytic performance, while increasing the electron-donating ability of high-hydricity complexes may speed up CO2 conversion. Moreover, we also established the active roles of base NEt3 in directing the heterolytic H2 splitting and assisting product release through the formation of an acid-base complex.

  10. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  11. Virtual machine performance benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steve G; French, Todd

    2011-10-01

    The attractions of virtual computing are many: reduced costs, reduced resources and simplified maintenance. Any one of these would be compelling for a medical imaging professional attempting to support a complex practice on limited resources in an era of ever tightened reimbursement. In particular, the ability to run multiple operating systems optimized for different tasks (computational image processing on Linux versus office tasks on Microsoft operating systems) on a single physical machine is compelling. However, there are also potential drawbacks. High performance requirements need to be carefully considered if they are to be executed in an environment where the running software has to execute through multiple layers of device drivers before reaching the real disk or network interface. Our lab has attempted to gain insight into the impact of virtualization on performance by benchmarking the following metrics on both physical and virtual platforms: local memory and disk bandwidth, network bandwidth, and integer and floating point performance. The virtual performance metrics are compared to baseline performance on "bare metal." The results are complex, and indeed somewhat surprising.

  12. AER benchmark specification sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the VVER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D CFD modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the 23rd cycle of the Paks NPP's Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (authors)

  13. AER Benchmark Specification Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the WWER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational fluid dynamics codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the twenty third cycle of the Paks NPPs Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (Authors)

  14. Benchmarking biofuels; Biobrandstoffen benchmarken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croezen, H.; Kampman, B.; Bergsma, G.

    2012-03-15

    A sustainability benchmark for transport biofuels has been developed and used to evaluate the various biofuels currently on the market. For comparison, electric vehicles, hydrogen vehicles and petrol/diesel vehicles were also included. A range of studies as well as growing insight are making it ever clearer that biomass-based transport fuels may have just as big a carbon footprint as fossil fuels like petrol or diesel, or even bigger. At the request of Greenpeace Netherlands, CE Delft has brought together current understanding on the sustainability of fossil fuels, biofuels and electric vehicles, with particular focus on the performance of the respective energy carriers on three sustainability criteria, with the first weighing the heaviest: (1) Greenhouse gas emissions; (2) Land use; and (3) Nutrient consumption [Dutch] Greenpeace Nederland heeft CE Delft gevraagd een duurzaamheidsmeetlat voor biobrandstoffen voor transport te ontwerpen en hierop de verschillende biobrandstoffen te scoren. Voor een vergelijk zijn ook elektrisch rijden, rijden op waterstof en rijden op benzine of diesel opgenomen. Door onderzoek en voortschrijdend inzicht blijkt steeds vaker dat transportbrandstoffen op basis van biomassa soms net zoveel of zelfs meer broeikasgassen veroorzaken dan fossiele brandstoffen als benzine en diesel. CE Delft heeft voor Greenpeace Nederland op een rijtje gezet wat de huidige inzichten zijn over de duurzaamheid van fossiele brandstoffen, biobrandstoffen en elektrisch rijden. Daarbij is gekeken naar de effecten van de brandstoffen op drie duurzaamheidscriteria, waarbij broeikasgasemissies het zwaarst wegen: (1) Broeikasgasemissies; (2) Landgebruik; en (3) Nutriëntengebruik.

  15. Benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosso, John A; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Nappi, Jean; Gubbins, Paul O; Ross, Leigh Ann

    2010-10-11

    Benchmarking in academic pharmacy, and recommendations for the potential uses of benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments are discussed in this paper. Benchmarking is the process by which practices, procedures, and performance metrics are compared to an established standard or best practice. Many businesses and industries use benchmarking to compare processes and outcomes, and ultimately plan for improvement. Institutions of higher learning have embraced benchmarking practices to facilitate measuring the quality of their educational and research programs. Benchmarking is used internally as well to justify the allocation of institutional resources or to mediate among competing demands for additional program staff or space. Surveying all chairs of academic pharmacy departments to explore benchmarking issues such as department size and composition, as well as faculty teaching, scholarly, and service productivity, could provide valuable information. To date, attempts to gather this data have had limited success. We believe this information is potentially important, urge that efforts to gather it should be continued, and offer suggestions to achieve full participation.

  16. PMLB: a large benchmark suite for machine learning evaluation and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Randal S; La Cava, William; Orzechowski, Patryk; Urbanowicz, Ryan J; Moore, Jason H

    2017-01-01

    The selection, development, or comparison of machine learning methods in data mining can be a difficult task based on the target problem and goals of a particular study. Numerous publicly available real-world and simulated benchmark datasets have emerged from different sources, but their organization and adoption as standards have been inconsistent. As such, selecting and curating specific benchmarks remains an unnecessary burden on machine learning practitioners and data scientists. The present study introduces an accessible, curated, and developing public benchmark resource to facilitate identification of the strengths and weaknesses of different machine learning methodologies. We compare meta-features among the current set of benchmark datasets in this resource to characterize the diversity of available data. Finally, we apply a number of established machine learning methods to the entire benchmark suite and analyze how datasets and algorithms cluster in terms of performance. From this study, we find that existing benchmarks lack the diversity to properly benchmark machine learning algorithms, and there are several gaps in benchmarking problems that still need to be considered. This work represents another important step towards understanding the limitations of popular benchmarking suites and developing a resource that connects existing benchmarking standards to more diverse and efficient standards in the future.

  17. Issues in Benchmark Metric Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain

    It is true that a metric can influence a benchmark but will esoteric metrics create more problems than they will solve? We answer this question affirmatively by examining the case of the TPC-D metric which used the much debated geometric mean for the single-stream test. We will show how a simple choice influenced the benchmark and its conduct and, to some extent, DBMS development. After examining other alternatives our conclusion is that the “real” measure for a decision-support benchmark is the arithmetic mean.

  18. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the

  19. A Global Vision over Benchmarking Process: Benchmarking Based Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Sitnikov, Catalina; Giurca Vasilescu, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking uses the knowledge and the experience of others to improve the enterprise. Starting from the analysis of the performance and underlying the strengths and weaknesses of the enterprise it should be assessed what must be done in order to improve its activity. Using benchmarking techniques, an enterprise looks at how processes in the value chain are performed. The approach based on the vision “from the whole towards the parts” (a fragmented image of the enterprise’s value chain) redu...

  20. Benchmarking and Learning in Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckmaster, Natalie; Mouritsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of learning-oriented benchmarking in public healthcare settings. Benchmarking is a widely adopted yet little explored accounting practice that is part of the paradigm of New Public Management. Extant studies are directed towards mandated coercive benchmarking...... applications. The present study analyses voluntary benchmarking in a public setting that is oriented towards learning. The study contributes by showing how benchmarking can be mobilised for learning and offers evidence of the effects of such benchmarking for performance outcomes. It concludes that benchmarking...... can enable learning in public settings but that this requires actors to invest in ensuring that benchmark data are directed towards improvement....

  1. Performance Targets and External Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ivar; Hansen, Allan; Vámosi, Tamás S.

    Research on relative performance measures, transfer pricing, beyond budgeting initiatives, target costing, piece rates systems and value based management has for decades underlined the importance of external benchmarking in performance management. Research conceptualises external benchmarking...... as a market mechanism that can be brought inside the firm to provide incentives for continuous improvement and the development of competitive advances. However, whereas extant research primarily has focused on the importance and effects of using external benchmarks, less attention has been directed towards...... the conditions upon which the market mechanism is performing within organizations. This paper aims to contribute to research by providing more insight to the conditions for the use of external benchmarking as an element in performance management in organizations. Our study explores a particular type of external...

  2. Benchmarking and Sustainable Transport Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Wyatt, Andrew; Gordon, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    Order to learn from the best. In 2000 the European Commission initiated research to explore benchmarking as a tool to promote policies for ‘sustainable transport’. This paper reports findings and recommendations on how to address this challenge. The findings suggest that benchmarking is a valuable...... tool that may indeed help to move forward the transport policy agenda. However, there are major conditions and limitations. First of all it is not always so straightforward to delimit, measure and compare transport services in order to establish a clear benchmark. Secondly ‘sustainable transport......’ evokes a broad range of concerns that are hard to address fully at the level of specific practices. Thirdly policies are not directly comparable across space and context. For these reasons attempting to benchmark ‘sustainable transport policies’ against one another would be a highly complex task, which...

  3. Benchmarking: contexts and details matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Siyuan

    2017-07-05

    Benchmarking is an essential step in the development of computational tools. We take this opportunity to pitch in our opinions on tool benchmarking, in light of two correspondence articles published in Genome Biology.Please see related Li et al. and Newman et al. correspondence articles: www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1256-5 and www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1257-4.

  4. Handbook of critical experiments benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

    1978-03-01

    Data from critical experiments have been collected together for use as benchmarks in evaluating calculational techniques and nuclear data. These benchmarks have been selected from the numerous experiments performed on homogeneous plutonium systems. No attempt has been made to reproduce all of the data that exists. The primary objective in the collection of these data is to present representative experimental data defined in a concise, standardized format that can easily be translated into computer code input

  5. Analysis of Benchmark 2 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacha, F.; Lefievre, B.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.

    1994-01-01

    The code GEANT315 has been compared to different codes in two benchmarks. We analyze its performances through our results, especially in the thick target case. In spite of gaps in nucleus-nucleus interaction theories at intermediate energies, benchmarks allow possible improvements of physical models used in our codes. Thereafter, a scheme of radioactive waste burning system is studied. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Benchmarks for GADRAS performance validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Rhykerd, Charles L. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) was validated by comparing GADRAS model results to experimental measurements for a series of benchmark sources. Sources for the benchmark include a plutonium metal sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, plutonium oxide in cans, a highly enriched uranium sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, a depleted uranium shell and spheres, and a natural uranium sphere. The benchmark experimental data were previously acquired and consist of careful collection of background and calibration source spectra along with the source spectra. The calibration data were fit with GADRAS to determine response functions for the detector in each experiment. A one-dimensional model (pie chart) was constructed for each source based on the dimensions of the benchmark source. The GADRAS code made a forward calculation from each model to predict the radiation spectrum for the detector used in the benchmark experiment. The comparisons between the GADRAS calculation and the experimental measurements are excellent, validating that GADRAS can correctly predict the radiation spectra for these well-defined benchmark sources.

  7. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaček Michal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Based on an analysis of the current situation and existing needs in the Czech Republic, as well as on a comparison with international experience, recommendations for public policy are made, which lie in the design of a model of a collaborative benchmarking for Czech economics and management in higher-education programs. Because the fully complex model cannot be implemented immediately – which is also confirmed by structured interviews with academics who have practical experience with benchmarking –, the final model is designed as a multi-stage model. This approach helps eliminate major barriers to the implementation of benchmarking.

  8. Discussion of OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.; Royer, E.; Gillford, J.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for best estimate calculations in nuclear reactor design and safety evaluations has increased in recent years. Uncertainty quantification has been highlighted as part of the best estimate calculations. The modelling aspects of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are to be further developed and validated on scientific grounds in support of their performance and application to multi-physics reactor simulations. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has endorsed the creation of an Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (EGUAM). Within the framework of activities of EGUAM/NSC the OECD/NEA initiated the Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling for Design, Operation, and Safety Analysis of Light Water Reactor (OECD LWR UAM benchmark). The general objective of the benchmark is to propagate the predictive uncertainties of code results through complex coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations. The benchmark is divided into three phases with Phase I highlighting the uncertainty propagation in stand-alone neutronics calculations, while Phase II and III are focused on uncertainty analysis of reactor core and system respectively. This paper discusses the progress made in Phase I calculations, the Specifications for Phase II and the incoming challenges in defining Phase 3 exercises. The challenges of applying uncertainty quantification to complex code systems, in particular the time-dependent coupled physics models are the large computational burden and the utilization of non-linear models (expected due to the physics coupling). (authors)

  9. Visualizing changes in electron distribution in coupled chains of cytochrome bc(1) by modifying barrier for electron transfer between the FeS cluster and heme c(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieluch, Ewelina; Pietryga, Krzysztof; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2010-02-01

    Cytochrome c(1) of Rhodobacter (Rba.) species provides a series of mutants which change barriers for electron transfer through the cofactor chains of cytochrome bc(1) by modifying heme c(1) redox midpoint potential. Analysis of post-flash electron distribution in such systems can provide useful information about the contribution of individual reactions to the overall electron flow. In Rba. capsulatus, the non-functional low-potential forms of cytochrome c(1) which are devoid of the disulfide bond naturally present in this protein revert spontaneously by introducing a second-site suppression (mutation A181T) that brings the potential of heme c(1) back to the functionally high levels, yet maintains it some 100 mV lower from the native value. Here we report that the disulfide and the mutation A181T can coexist in one protein but the mutation exerts a dominant effect on the redox properties of heme c(1) and the potential remains at the same lower value as in the disulfide-free form. This establishes effective means to modify a barrier for electron transfer between the FeS cluster and heme c(1) without breaking disulfide. A comparison of the flash-induced electron transfers in native and mutated cytochrome bc(1) revealed significant differences in the post-flash equilibrium distribution of electrons only when the connection of the chains with the quinone pool was interrupted at the level of either of the catalytic sites by the use of specific inhibitors, antimycin or myxothiazol. In the non-inhibited system no such differences were observed. We explain the results using a kinetic model in which a shift in the equilibrium of one reaction influences the equilibrium of all remaining reactions in the cofactor chains. It follows a rather simple description in which the direction of electron flow through the coupled chains of cytochrome bc(1) exclusively depends on the rates of all reversible partial reactions, including the Q/QH2 exchange rate to/from the catalytic sites

  10. Experiment and theory at the convergence limit: accurate equilibrium structure of picolinic acid by gas-phase electron diffraction and coupled-cluster computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Natalja; Marochkin, Ilya I; Rykov, Anatolii N

    2018-04-18

    The accurate molecular structure of picolinic acid has been determined from experimental data and computed at the coupled cluster level of theory. Only one conformer with the O[double bond, length as m-dash]C-C-N and H-O-C[double bond, length as m-dash]O fragments in antiperiplanar (ap) positions, ap-ap, has been detected under conditions of the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) experiment (Tnozzle = 375(3) K). The semiexperimental equilibrium structure, rsee, of this conformer has been derived from the GED data taking into account the anharmonic vibrational effects estimated from the ab initio force field. The equilibrium structures of the two lowest-energy conformers, ap-ap and ap-sp (with the synperiplanar H-O-C[double bond, length as m-dash]O fragment), have been fully optimized at the CCSD(T)_ae level of theory in conjunction with the triple-ζ basis set (cc-pwCVTZ). The quality of the optimized structures has been improved due to extrapolation to the quadruple-ζ basis set. The high accuracy of both GED determination and CCSD(T) computations has been disclosed by a correct comparison of structures having the same physical meaning. The ap-ap conformer has been found to be stabilized by the relatively strong NH-O hydrogen bond of 1.973(27) Å (GED) and predicted to be lower in energy by 16 kJ mol-1 with respect to the ap-sp conformer without a hydrogen bond. The influence of this bond on the structure of picolinic acid has been analyzed within the Natural Bond Orbital model. The possibility of the decarboxylation of picolinic acid has been considered in the GED analysis, but no significant amounts of pyridine and carbon dioxide could be detected. To reveal the structural changes reflecting the mesomeric and inductive effects due to the carboxylic substituent, the accurate structure of pyridine has been also computed at the CCSD(T)_ae level with basis sets from triple- to 5-ζ quality. The comprehensive structure computations for pyridine as well as for

  11. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S.; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another - from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a `lone wolf' identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds.

  12. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S.; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another – from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a ‘lone wolf'; identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds. PMID:24322528

  13. Multiscale benchmarking of drug delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Huw D; Ware, Matthew J; Majithia, Ravish; Meissner, Kenith E; Godin, Biana; Rees, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Cross-system comparisons of drug delivery vectors are essential to ensure optimal design. An in-vitro experimental protocol is presented that separates the role of the delivery vector from that of its cargo in determining the cell response, thus allowing quantitative comparison of different systems. The technique is validated through benchmarking of the dose-response of human fibroblast cells exposed to the cationic molecule, polyethylene imine (PEI); delivered as a free molecule and as a cargo on the surface of CdSe nanoparticles and Silica microparticles. The exposure metrics are converted to a delivered dose with the transport properties of the different scale systems characterized by a delivery time, τ. The benchmarking highlights an agglomeration of the free PEI molecules into micron sized clusters and identifies the metric determining cell death as the total number of PEI molecules presented to cells, determined by the delivery vector dose and the surface density of the cargo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A large-scale benchmark of gene prioritization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Dimitri; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2017-04-21

    In order to maximize the use of results from high-throughput experimental studies, e.g. GWAS, for identification and diagnostics of new disease-associated genes, it is important to have properly analyzed and benchmarked gene prioritization tools. While prospective benchmarks are underpowered to provide statistically significant results in their attempt to differentiate the performance of gene prioritization tools, a strategy for retrospective benchmarking has been missing, and new tools usually only provide internal validations. The Gene Ontology(GO) contains genes clustered around annotation terms. This intrinsic property of GO can be utilized in construction of robust benchmarks, objective to the problem domain. We demonstrate how this can be achieved for network-based gene prioritization tools, utilizing the FunCoup network. We use cross-validation and a set of appropriate performance measures to compare state-of-the-art gene prioritization algorithms: three based on network diffusion, NetRank and two implementations of Random Walk with Restart, and MaxLink that utilizes network neighborhood. Our benchmark suite provides a systematic and objective way to compare the multitude of available and future gene prioritization tools, enabling researchers to select the best gene prioritization tool for the task at hand, and helping to guide the development of more accurate methods.

  15. Dynamic benchmarking of simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Paik, C.Y.; Hauser, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Computer simulation of nuclear power plant response can be a full-scope control room simulator, an engineering simulator to represent the general behavior of the plant under normal and abnormal conditions, or the modeling of the plant response to conditions that would eventually lead to core damage. In any of these, the underlying foundation for their use in analysing situations, training of vendor/utility personnel, etc. is how well they represent what has been known from industrial experience, large integral experiments and separate effects tests. Typically, simulation codes are benchmarked with some of these; the level of agreement necessary being dependent upon the ultimate use of the simulation tool. However, these analytical models are computer codes, and as a result, the capabilities are continually enhanced, errors are corrected, new situations are imposed on the code that are outside of the original design basis, etc. Consequently, there is a continual need to assure that the benchmarks with important transients are preserved as the computer code evolves. Retention of this benchmarking capability is essential to develop trust in the computer code. Given the evolving world of computer codes, how is this retention of benchmarking capabilities accomplished? For the MAAP4 codes this capability is accomplished through a 'dynamic benchmarking' feature embedded in the source code. In particular, a set of dynamic benchmarks are included in the source code and these are exercised every time the archive codes are upgraded and distributed to the MAAP users. Three different types of dynamic benchmarks are used: plant transients; large integral experiments; and separate effects tests. Each of these is performed in a different manner. The first is accomplished by developing a parameter file for the plant modeled and an input deck to describe the sequence; i.e. the entire MAAP4 code is exercised. The pertinent plant data is included in the source code and the computer

  16. SeSBench - An initiative to benchmark reactive transport models for environmental subsurface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Diederik

    2017-04-01

    As soil functions are governed by a multitude of interacting hydrological, geochemical and biological processes, simulation tools coupling mathematical models for interacting processes are needed. Coupled reactive transport models are a typical example of such coupled tools mainly focusing on hydrological and geochemical coupling (see e.g. Steefel et al., 2015). Mathematical and numerical complexity for both the tool itself or of the specific conceptual model can increase rapidly. Therefore, numerical verification of such type of models is a prerequisite for guaranteeing reliability and confidence and qualifying simulation tools and approaches for any further model application. In 2011, a first SeSBench -Subsurface Environmental Simulation Benchmarking- workshop was held in Berkeley (USA) followed by four other ones. The objective is to benchmark subsurface environmental simulation models and methods with a current focus on reactive transport processes. The final outcome was a special issue in Computational Geosciences (2015, issue 3 - Reactive transport benchmarks for subsurface environmental simulation) with a collection of 11 benchmarks. Benchmarks, proposed by the participants of the workshops, should be relevant for environmental or geo-engineering applications; the latter were mostly related to radioactive waste disposal issues - excluding benchmarks defined for pure mathematical reasons. Another important feature is the tiered approach within a benchmark with the definition of a single principle problem and different sub problems. The latter typically benchmarked individual or simplified processes (e.g. inert solute transport, simplified geochemical conceptual model) or geometries (e.g. batch or one-dimensional, homogeneous). Finally, three codes should be involved into a benchmark. The SeSBench initiative contributes to confidence building for applying reactive transport codes. Furthermore, it illustrates the use of those type of models for different

  17. Performance Evaluation of Spectral Clustering Algorithm using Various Clustering Validity Indices

    OpenAIRE

    M. T. Somashekara; D. Manjunatha

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the popularity of spectral clustering algorithm, the evaluation procedures are still in developmental stage. In this article, we have taken benchmarking IRIS dataset for performing comparative study of twelve indices for evaluating spectral clustering algorithm. The results of the spectral clustering technique were also compared with k-mean algorithm. The validity of the indices was also verified with accuracy and (Normalized Mutual Information) NMI score. Spectral clustering algo...

  18. Benchmark calculations in multigroup and multidimensional time-dependent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.; Musso, E.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that reliable benchmarks are essential in many technical fields in order to assess the response of any approximation to the physics of the problem to be treated and to verify the performance of the numerical methods used. The best possible benchmarks are analytical solutions to paradigmatic problems where no approximations are actually introduced and the only error encountered is connected to the limitations of computational algorithms. Another major advantage of analytical solutions is that they allow a deeper understanding of the physical features of the model, which is essential for the intelligent use of complicated codes. In neutron transport theory, the need for benchmarks is particularly great. In this paper, the authors propose to establish accurate numerical solutions to some problems concerning the migration of neutron pulses. Use will be made of the space asymptotic theory, coupled with a Laplace transformation inverted by a numerical technique directly evaluating the inversion integral

  19. Numerical benchmarking of SPEEDUP trademark against point kinetics solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, M.V.

    1993-02-01

    SPEEDUP trademark is a state-of-the-art, dynamic, chemical process modeling package offered by Aspen Technology. In anticipation of new customers' needs for new analytical tools to support the site's waste management activities, SRTC has secured a multiple-user license to SPEEDUP trademark. In order to verify both the installation and mathematical correctness of the algorithms in SPEEDUP trademark, we have performed several numerical benchmarking calculations. These calculations are the first steps in establishing an on-site quality assurance pedigree for SPEEDUP trademark. The benchmark calculations consisted of SPEEDUP trademark Version 5.3L representations of five neutron kinetics benchmarks (each a mathematically stiff system of seven coupled ordinary differential equations), whose exact solutions are documented in the open literature. In all cases, SPEEDUP trademark solutions to be in excellent agreement with the reference solutions. A minor peculiarity in dealing with a non-existent discontinuity in the OPERATION section of the model made itself evident

  20. Regional restoration benchmarks for Acropora cervicornis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopmeyer, Stephanie A.; Lirman, Diego; Bartels, Erich; Gilliam, David S.; Goergen, Elizabeth A.; Griffin, Sean P.; Johnson, Meaghan E.; Lustic, Caitlin; Maxwell, Kerry; Walter, Cory S.

    2017-12-01

    Coral gardening plays an important role in the recovery of depleted populations of threatened Acropora cervicornis in the Caribbean. Over the past decade, high survival coupled with fast growth of in situ nursery corals have allowed practitioners to create healthy and genotypically diverse nursery stocks. Currently, thousands of corals are propagated and outplanted onto degraded reefs on a yearly basis, representing a substantial increase in the abundance, biomass, and overall footprint of A. cervicornis. Here, we combined an extensive dataset collected by restoration practitioners to document early (1-2 yr) restoration success metrics in Florida and Puerto Rico, USA. By reporting region-specific data on the impacts of fragment collection on donor colonies, survivorship and productivity of nursery corals, and survivorship and productivity of outplanted corals during normal conditions, we provide the basis for a stop-light indicator framework for new or existing restoration programs to evaluate their performance. We show that current restoration methods are very effective, that no excess damage is caused to donor colonies, and that once outplanted, corals behave just as wild colonies. We also provide science-based benchmarks that can be used by programs to evaluate successes and challenges of their efforts, and to make modifications where needed. We propose that up to 10% of the biomass can be collected from healthy, large A. cervicornis donor colonies for nursery propagation. We also propose the following benchmarks for the first year of activities for A. cervicornis restoration: (1) >75% live tissue cover on donor colonies; (2) >80% survivorship of nursery corals; and (3) >70% survivorship of outplanted corals. Finally, we report productivity means of 4.4 cm yr-1 for nursery corals and 4.8 cm yr-1 for outplants as a frame of reference for ranking performance within programs. Such benchmarks, and potential subsequent adaptive actions, are needed to fully assess the

  1. Regional Competitive Intelligence: Benchmarking and Policymaking

    OpenAIRE

    Huggins , Robert

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking exercises have become increasingly popular within the sphere of regional policymaking in recent years. The aim of this paper is to analyse the concept of regional benchmarking and its links with regional policymaking processes. It develops a typology of regional benchmarking exercises and regional benchmarkers, and critically reviews the literature, both academic and policy oriented. It is argued that critics who suggest regional benchmarking is a flawed concept and technique fai...

  2. Benchmarking of human resources management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Akinnusi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of human resource management (HRM which, today, plays a strategic partnership role in management. The focus of the paper is on HRM in the public sector, where much hope rests on HRM as a means of transforming the public service and achieving much needed service delivery. However, a critical evaluation of HRM practices in the public sector reveals that these services leave much to be desired. The paper suggests the adoption of benchmarking as a process to revamp HRM in the public sector so that it is able to deliver on its promises. It describes the nature and process of benchmarking and highlights the inherent difficulties in applying benchmarking in HRM. It concludes with some suggestions for a plan of action. The process of identifying “best” practices in HRM requires the best collaborative efforts of HRM practitioners and academicians. If used creatively, benchmarking has the potential to bring about radical and positive changes in HRM in the public sector. The adoption of the benchmarking process is, in itself, a litmus test of the extent to which HRM in the public sector has grown professionally.

  3. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, U; Alex, J; Batstone, D J; Benedetti, L; Comas, J; Copp, J B; Corominas, L; Flores-Alsina, X; Gernaey, K V; Nopens, I; Pons, M-N; Rodríguez-Roda, I; Rosen, C; Steyer, J-P; Vanrolleghem, P A; Volcke, E I P; Vrecko, D

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, highlighting areas where knowledge may still be deficient and where new opportunities are emerging, and to propose potential avenues for future development and application of the general benchmarking framework and its associated tools. The paper focuses on the topics of temporal and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity.

  4. Results of LWR core transient benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnemann, H.; Bauer, H.; Galati, A.; Martinelli, R.

    1993-10-01

    LWR core transient (LWRCT) benchmarks, based on well defined problems with a complete set of input data, are used to assess the discrepancies between three-dimensional space-time kinetics codes in transient calculations. The PWR problem chosen is the ejection of a control assembly from an initially critical core at hot zero power or at full power, each for three different geometrical configurations. The set of problems offers a variety of reactivity excursions which efficiently test the coupled neutronic/thermal - hydraulic models of the codes. The 63 sets of submitted solutions are analyzed by comparison with a nodal reference solution defined by using a finer spatial and temporal resolution than in standard calculations. The BWR problems considered are reactivity excursions caused by cold water injection and pressurization events. In the present paper, only the cold water injection event is discussed and evaluated in some detail. Lacking a reference solution the evaluation of the 8 sets of BWR contributions relies on a synthetic comparative discussion. The results of this first phase of LWRCT benchmark calculations are quite satisfactory, though there remain some unresolved issues. It is therefore concluded that even more challenging problems can be successfully tackled in a suggested second test phase. (authors). 46 figs., 21 tabs., 3 refs

  5. Detection of Weak Spots in Benchmarks Memory Space by using PCA and CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kareem PARCHUR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the weak spots in SPEC CPU INT 2006 Benchmarks memory space by using Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis. We used recently published SPEC CPU INT 2006 Benchmark scores of AMD Opteron 2000+ and AMD Opteron 8000+ series processors. The four most significant PCs, which are retained for 72.6% of the variance, PC2, PC3, and PC4 covers 26.5%, 2.9%, 0.91% and 0.019% variance respectively. The dendrogram is useful to identify the similarities and dissimilarities between the benchmarks in workload space. These results and analysis can be used by performance engineers, scientists and developers to better understand the benchmark behavior in workload space and to design a Benchmark Suite that covers the complete workload space.

  6. Observation of Binuclear Palladium Clusters Upon ESI-MS Monitoring of the Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Catalyzed by a Dichloro-bis(aminophosphine) Complex of Palladium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agrawal, Divya; Schröder, Detlef; Frech, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 13 (2011), s. 3579-3587 ISSN 0276-7333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : catalysis * C-C coupling * electrospray ionization * palladium * Suzuki-Miyaura coupling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.963, year: 2011

  7. ABM news and benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekhin, Sergey; Bluemlein, Johannes; Moch, Sven-Olaf

    2013-08-01

    We report on progress in the determination of the unpolarised nucleon PDFs within the ABM global fit framework. The data used in the ABM analysis are updated including the charm-production and the high-Q 2 neutral-current samples obtained at the HERA collider, as well as the LHC data on the differential Drell-Yan cross-sections. An updated set of the PDFs with improved experimental and theoretical accuracy at small x is presented. We find minimal impact of the t-quark production cross section measured at the Tevatron and the LHC on the gluon distribution and the value of the strong coupling constant α s determined from the ABM fit in the case of the t-quark running-mass definition. In particular, the value of α s (M Z )=0.1133±0.0008 is obtained from the variant of the ABM12 fit with the Tevatron and CMS t-quark production cross-section data included and the MS value of m t (m t )=162 GeV.

  8. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  9. A prescription and fast code for the long-term evolution of star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Poul E. R.; Gieles, Mark

    2012-06-01

    We introduce the star cluster evolution code Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS (EMACSS), a simple yet physically motivated computational model that describes the evolution of some fundamental properties of star clusters in static tidal fields. We base our prescription upon the flow of energy within the cluster, which is a constant fraction of the total energy per half-mass relaxation time. According to Hénon's predictions, this flow is independent of the precise mechanisms for energy production within the core, and therefore does not require a complete description of the many-body interactions therein. For a cluster of equal-mass stars, we use dynamical theory and analytic descriptions of escape mechanisms to construct a series of coupled differential equations expressing the evolution of cluster mass and radius. These equations are numerically solved using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration kernel, and the results benchmarked against a data base of direct N-body simulations. We use simulations containing a modest initial number of stars (1024 ≤N≤ 65 536) and point-mass tidal fields of various strengths. Our prescription is publicly available and reproduces the N-body results to within ˜10 per cent accuracy for the entire post-collapse evolution of star clusters.

  10. 3-D neutron transport benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ikeda, H.

    1991-03-01

    A set of 3-D neutron transport benchmark problems proposed by the Osaka University to NEACRP in 1988 has been calculated by many participants and the corresponding results are summarized in this report. The results of K eff , control rod worth and region-averaged fluxes for the four proposed core models, calculated by using various 3-D transport codes are compared and discussed. The calculational methods used were: Monte Carlo, Discrete Ordinates (Sn), Spherical Harmonics (Pn), Nodal Transport and others. The solutions of the four core models are quite useful as benchmarks for checking the validity of 3-D neutron transport codes

  11. Strategic behaviour under regulatory benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamasb, T. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Economics; Nillesen, P. [NUON NV (Netherlands); Pollitt, M. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Judge Inst. of Management

    2004-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of electricity distribution networks, some regulators have adopted incentive regulation schemes that rely on performance benchmarking. Although regulation benchmarking can influence the ''regulation game,'' the subject has received limited attention. This paper discusses how strategic behaviour can result in inefficient behaviour by firms. We then use the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method with US utility data to examine implications of illustrative cases of strategic behaviour reported by regulators. The results show that gaming can have significant effects on the measured performance and profitability of firms. (author)

  12. Atomic Energy Research benchmark activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.

    1998-01-01

    The test problems utilized in the validation and verification process of computer programs in Atomic Energie Research are collected into one bunch. This is the first step towards issuing a volume in which tests for VVER are collected, along with reference solutions and a number of solutions. The benchmarks do not include the ZR-6 experiments because they have been published along with a number of comparisons in the Final reports of TIC. The present collection focuses on operational and mathematical benchmarks which cover almost the entire range of reaktor calculation. (Author)

  13. Gatemon Benchmarking and Two-Qubit Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casparis, Lucas; Larsen, Thorvald; Olsen, Michael; Petersson, Karl; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Krogstrup, Peter; Nygard, Jesper; Marcus, Charles

    Recent experiments have demonstrated superconducting transmon qubits with semiconductor nanowire Josephson junctions. These hybrid gatemon qubits utilize field effect tunability singular to semiconductors to allow complete qubit control using gate voltages, potentially a technological advantage over conventional flux-controlled transmons. Here, we present experiments with a two-qubit gatemon circuit. We characterize qubit coherence and stability and use randomized benchmarking to demonstrate single-qubit gate errors of ~0.5 % for all gates, including voltage-controlled Z rotations. We show coherent capacitive coupling between two gatemons and coherent SWAP operations. Finally, we perform a two-qubit controlled-phase gate with an estimated fidelity of ~91 %, demonstrating the potential of gatemon qubits for building scalable quantum processors. We acknowledge financial support from Microsoft Project Q and the Danish National Research Foundation.

  14. LHC benchmarks from flavored gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ierushalmi, N.; Iwamoto, S.; Lee, G.; Nepomnyashy, V.; Shadmi, Y. [Physics Department, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology,Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-07-12

    We present benchmark points for LHC searches from flavored gauge mediation models, in which messenger-matter couplings give flavor-dependent squark masses. Our examples include spectra in which a single squark — stop, scharm, or sup — is much lighter than all other colored superpartners, motivating improved quark flavor tagging at the LHC. Many examples feature flavor mixing; in particular, large stop-scharm mixing is possible. The correct Higgs mass is obtained in some examples by virtue of the large stop A-term. We also revisit the general flavor and CP structure of the models. Even though the A-terms can be substantial, their contributions to EDM’s are very suppressed, because of the particular dependence of the A-terms on the messenger coupling. This holds regardless of the messenger-coupling texture. More generally, the special structure of the soft terms often leads to stronger suppression of flavor- and CP-violating processes, compared to naive estimates.

  15. An approach for the assessment of the statistical aspects of the SEA coupling loss factors and the vibrational energy transmission in complex aircraft structures: Experimental investigation and methods benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaj, M.; von Estorff, O.; Peiffer, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the application of Statistical Energy Analysis "SEA" to complex assembled structures, a purely predictive model often exhibits errors. These errors are mainly due to a lack of accurate modelling of the power transmission mechanism described through the Coupling Loss Factors (CLF). Experimental SEA (ESEA) is practically used by the automotive and aerospace industry to verify and update the model or to derive the CLFs for use in an SEA predictive model when analytical estimates cannot be made. This work is particularly motivated by the lack of procedures that allow an estimate to be made of the variance and confidence intervals of the statistical quantities when using the ESEA technique. The aim of this paper is to introduce procedures enabling a statistical description of measured power input, vibration energies and the derived SEA parameters. Particular emphasis is placed on the identification of structural CLFs of complex built-up structures comparing different methods. By adopting a Stochastic Energy Model (SEM), the ensemble average in ESEA is also addressed. For this purpose, expressions are obtained to randomly perturb the energy matrix elements and generate individual samples for the Monte Carlo (MC) technique applied to derive the ensemble averaged CLF. From results of ESEA tests conducted on an aircraft fuselage section, the SEM approach provides a better performance of estimated CLFs compared to classical matrix inversion methods. The expected range of CLF values and the synthesized energy are used as quality criteria of the matrix inversion, allowing to assess critical SEA subsystems, which might require a more refined statistical description of the excitation and the response fields. Moreover, the impact of the variance of the normalized vibration energy on uncertainty of the derived CLFs is outlined.

  16. Benchmarked Library Websites Comparative Study

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.; Tyhurst, Janis

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an analysis of services provided by the benchmarked library websites. The exploratory study includes comparison of these websites against a list of criterion and presents a list of services that are most commonly deployed by the selected websites. In addition to that, the investigators proposed a list of services that could be provided via the KAUST library website.

  17. Clustering Millions of Faces by Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Charles; Wang, Dayong; Jain, Anil K

    2018-02-01

    Given a large collection of unlabeled face images, we address the problem of clustering faces into an unknown number of identities. This problem is of interest in social media, law enforcement, and other applications, where the number of faces can be of the order of hundreds of million, while the number of identities (clusters) can range from a few thousand to millions. To address the challenges of run-time complexity and cluster quality, we present an approximate Rank-Order clustering algorithm that performs better than popular clustering algorithms (k-Means and Spectral). Our experiments include clustering up to 123 million face images into over 10 million clusters. Clustering results are analyzed in terms of external (known face labels) and internal (unknown face labels) quality measures, and run-time. Our algorithm achieves an F-measure of 0.87 on the LFW benchmark (13 K faces of 5,749 individuals), which drops to 0.27 on the largest dataset considered (13 K faces in LFW + 123M distractor images). Additionally, we show that frames in the YouTube benchmark can be clustered with an F-measure of 0.71. An internal per-cluster quality measure is developed to rank individual clusters for manual exploration of high quality clusters that are compact and isolated.

  18. Benchmarking CRISPR on-target sgRNA design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jifang; Chuai, Guohui; Zhou, Chi; Zhu, Chenyu; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Chao; Gu, Feng; Xu, Han; Wei, Jia; Liu, Qi

    2017-02-15

    CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-based gene editing has been widely implemented in various cell types and organisms. A major challenge in the effective application of the CRISPR system is the need to design highly efficient single-guide RNA (sgRNA) with minimal off-target cleavage. Several tools are available for sgRNA design, while limited tools were compared. In our opinion, benchmarking the performance of the available tools and indicating their applicable scenarios are important issues. Moreover, whether the reported sgRNA design rules are reproducible across different sgRNA libraries, cell types and organisms remains unclear. In our study, a systematic and unbiased benchmark of the sgRNA predicting efficacy was performed on nine representative on-target design tools, based on six benchmark data sets covering five different cell types. The benchmark study presented here provides novel quantitative insights into the available CRISPR tools. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A Benchmarking of Operational Efficiency in Asia Pacific International Cargo Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-won Chung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares operational efficiency of major cargo airports in the Asia Pacific region. The multi-dimensional scaling cluster analysis by R-square method was used as the benchmarking tool to provide airport management with a means to examine various aspects of their operational efficiency against those of other airports. Ten operational efficiency factors for the clustering and efficiency estimation of airports in the Asia Pacific region were used in a regression model to overcome the complexity of multi-dimensional scaling approach. The resulting classification is used to identify the efficiency benchmarks of leading air cargo airports which have implications for Incheon airport in Korea.

  20. Results of the GABLS3 diurnal-cycle benchmark for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Allaerts, D.; Avila, M.

    2017-01-01

    errors are used to quantify model performance. The results of the benchmark are used to discuss input uncertainties from mesoscale modelling, different meso-micro coupling strategies (online vs offline) and consistency between RANS and LES codes when dealing with boundary-layer mean flow quantities....... Overall, all the microscale simulations produce a consistent coupling with mesoscale forcings....