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Sample records for counterfeit antiretroviral drugs

  1. Problems associated with substandard and counterfeit drugs in developing countries: a review article on global implications of counterfeit drugs in the era of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs in a free market economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsimba, Stephen E D

    2008-12-01

    To review the global implications associated with the use of substandard and or counterfeit drugs in developing and may be developed countries. The focus of this review is particularly on antiretroviral (ARVs), antimalarials and other drugs. Review of various literatures through Pub-Med, Medline, Google and Internet search to retrieve and download published materials was done by the author of this review paper. When patients receive a counterfeit medicines, they are subjected to multiple risks. They often suffer more than just an inconvenience; as they become victims of fraud medicines and are all put at risk of adverse effects from unprescribed medicines or substandard ingredients. Additionally, patients may lose confidence in health care professionals including their physician and pharmacist, and potentially modern medicine or the pharmaceutical industry in general. Counterfeit or substandard (poor quality) drugs pose threats to society; not only to the individual in terms of the health side effects experienced, but also to the public in terms of trade relations, economic implications, and the effects on global pandemics. It is vital for suppliers, providers, and patients to be aware of current trends in counterfeiting in order to best prepare for encounters with suspicious products. Furthermore, this is an issue that needs to be continually dealt with on national and international policy levels. Developing countries should try their level best to establish good laboratories for monitoring and checking quality of all pharmaceuticals manufactured locally and those imported or donated to these countries. The Ministries of Health and all stakeholders involved in this issue must ensure that all drugs meet the set or established international standards and national standards. Failure to do so will be to misuse the hard earned forex that is normally borrowed from banks for the procurement and distribution of drugs to its people. Indeed sub-standard medications do more

  2. Counterfeit and Substandard Antimalarial Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where Do You Find Them? Worldwide prevalence of counterfeit and substandard products is summarized in a Drug Quality Report matrix by the U.S. Pharmacopeia Drug Quality and Information (USP DQI) Program . ... (U.S.) issues regarding counterfeit and poor-quality drugs is provided by the ...

  3. COUNTERFEIT DRUGS: PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Surabhi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical industry is under extraordinary strain. Facing the wrath of consumers because of the cost of products, constantly answering the questions of state and federal legislators looking to control health care costs, and losing value in the marketplace, the industry’s hands are more than full. A less discussed but substantial problem impacts all of pharmaceutical industry’s other problems, counterfeiting. The World Health Organization estimates that counterfeit drugs make up about 10 percent of the global medicine market, and more than 25 percent in developing countries. With counterfeit drugs increasingly finding their way into global distribution chains and ultimately into patients' mouths, it is essential that pharmaceutical companies have effective enforcement strategies to combat the manufacture and distribution of counterfeit drugs.

  4. COUNTERFEIT DRUGS: PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Khanna Surabhi; Nasa Atul; Garg Arun

    2010-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under extraordinary strain. Facing the wrath of consumers because of the cost of products, constantly answering the questions of state and federal legislators looking to control health care costs, and losing value in the marketplace, the industry’s hands are more than full. A less discussed but substantial problem impacts all of pharmaceutical industry’s other problems, counterfeiting. The World Health Organization estimates that counterfeit drugs make up about ...

  5. Fake and Counterfeit Drug: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in counterfeit drugs appears to be widespread ... Counterfeit medicinal drugs include those with less or none of the stated ... ranging from antibiotics, through anticancer agents. The type of .... should at least contain the pharmacological name,.

  6. Health and economic consequences of counterfeit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, A

    2009-06-01

    "Counterfeit Drugs Kill" is the slogan the World Health Organization (WHO) uses in its anti-counterfeiting campaign. International organizations, governments of developed and developing countries, and the pharmaceutical industry created the IMPACT initiative (International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce) to take on the thriving illegal industry that makes profits by selling fake drugs. However, before committing resources, policy makers want to assess the burden caused by counterfeit drugs in comparison with other health problems that compete for the limited resources available.

  7. Antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  8. Counterfeit drugs: analytical techniques for their identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, R; Malet-Martino, M; Gilard, V; Balayssac, S

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, the number of counterfeit drugs has increased dramatically, including not only "lifestyle" products but also vital medicines. Besides the threat to public health, the financial and reputational damage to pharmaceutical companies is substantial. The lack of robust information on the prevalence of fake drugs is an obstacle in the fight against drug counterfeiting. It is generally accepted that approximately 10% of drugs worldwide could be counterfeit, but it is also well known that this number covers very different situations depending on the country, the places where the drugs are purchased, and the definition of what constitutes a counterfeit drug. The chemical analysis of drugs suspected to be fake is a crucial step as counterfeiters are becoming increasingly sophisticated, rendering visual inspection insufficient to distinguish the genuine products from the counterfeit ones. This article critically reviews the recent analytical methods employed to control the quality of drug formulations, using as an example artemisinin derivatives, medicines particularly targeted by counterfeiters. Indeed, a broad panel of techniques have been reported for their analysis, ranging from simple and cheap in-field ones (colorimetry and thin-layer chromatography) to more advanced laboratory methods (mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and vibrational spectroscopies) through chromatographic methods, which remain the most widely used. The conclusion section of the article highlights the questions to be posed before selecting the most appropriate analytical approach.

  9. Counterfeit drugs and medical devices in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glass BD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Beverley D GlassSchool of Pharmacy and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: The World Health Organization has reported that counterfeit medicines potentially make up more than 50% of the global drug market, with a significant proportion of these fake products being encountered in developing countries. This occurrence is attributed to a lack of effective regulation and a weak enforcement capacity existing in these countries, with an increase in this trade resulting from the growing size and sophistication of drug counterfeiters. In addition, due to both cost and lack of availability of medicines, consumers in developing countries are more likely to seek out these inexpensive options. The World Health Organization is mindful of the impact of counterfeit drugs on consumer confidence in health care systems, health professionals, the supply chain, and genuine suppliers of medicines and medical devices. Antibiotics, antituberculosis drugs, and antimalarial and antiretroviral drugs are frequently targeted, with reports of 60% of the anti-infective drugs in Asia and Africa containing active pharmaceutical ingredients outside their pharmacopoeial limits. This has obvious public health implications of increasing drug resistance and negating all the efforts that have already gone into the provision of medicines to treat these life threatening conditions in the developing world. This review, while focusing on counterfeit medicines and medical devices in developing countries, will present information on their impact and how these issues can be addressed by regulation and control of the supply chain using technology appropriate to the developing world. The complexity of the problem will also be highlighted in terms of the definition of counterfeit and substandard medicines, including gray pharmaceuticals. Although this issue presents as a global public health problem, outcomes in developing countries where counterfeit

  10. Roles for pharmacy in combatting counterfeit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziance, Ronald J

    2008-01-01

    To describe (1) the international scope of counterfeit drugs, (2) international and U.S. anticounterfeiting initiatives, and (3) the enhanced roles and challenges facing pharmaceutical organizations and individual pharmacists to thwart counterfeit drugs. PubMed and Ovid from 1970 to 2008 using the search terms counterfeit drugs, counterfeit pharmaceuticals, and counterfeit medicines, with English as the limiting term. Nonprimary literature sources included the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Web site (www.fda.gov) from 1990 to 2008 using the search term counterfeit drugs, presentations from meetings or workshops attended or accessed via the Internet, and Web sites of professional organizations. Additional resources were identified from personal bibliographies collected by the author and bibliographies of gathered articles. Counterfeit drugs--defined as those containing no active ingredient, an incorrect amount of active ingredients, incorrect ingredient, and/or unapproved labeling and packaging--represent an unquantified problem of international proportions. The existing situation has been facilitated by inconsistent national regulatory oversight, disparate unlinked databases, lack of unified anticounterfeiting actions, and inability to track the distribution of domestically produced or imported drug products between, among, and within nations. In the United States, several important anticounterfeiting initiatives announced by FDA in 2004 have been implemented but the benefits of others, such as electronic tracking of a drug's movement through the U.S. distribution chain to a dispensing pharmacy, will not be realized in the near future. The role of pharmacists as patient educators, prudent purchasers, and detectors of counterfeit drugs can typically be accomplished with minimal added expense or work; however, the impact of electronic tracking on pharmacies' expenses and workflow is unknown. Pharmacists need to be included in efforts to thwart receipt of

  11. Microbiological contamination in counterfeit and unapproved drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullirsch, Dieter; Bellemare, Julie; Hackl, Andreas; Trottier, Yvon-Louis; Mayrhofer, Andreas; Schindl, Heidemarie; Taillon, Christine; Gartner, Christian; Hottowy, Brigitte; Beck, Gerhard; Gagnon, Jacques

    2014-06-26

    Counterfeit and unapproved medicines are inherently dangerous and can cause patient injury due to ineffectiveness, chemical or biological contamination, or wrong dosage. Growth of the counterfeit medical market in developed countries is mainly attributable to life-style drugs, which are used in the treatment of non-life-threatening and non-painful conditions, such as slimming pills, cosmetic-related pharmaceuticals, and drugs for sexual enhancement. One of the main tasks of health authorities is to identify the exact active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in confiscated drugs, because wrong API compounds, wrong concentrations, and/or the presence of chemical contaminants are the main risks associated with counterfeit medicines. Serious danger may also arise from microbiological contamination. We therefore performed a market surveillance study focused on the microbial burden in counterfeit and unapproved medicines. Counterfeit and unapproved medicines confiscated in Canada and Austria and controls from the legal market were examined for microbial contaminations according to the US and European pharmacopoeia guidelines. The microbiological load of illegal and legitimate samples was statistically compared with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Microbial cultivable contaminations in counterfeit and unapproved phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors were significantly higher than in products from the legal medicines market (p product in Austria (6% of illegal products tested). Our results show that counterfeit and unapproved pharmaceuticals are not manufactured under the same hygienic conditions as legitimate products. The microbiological contamination of illegal medicinal products often exceeds USP and EP limits, representing a potential threat to consumer health.

  12. Microbiological contamination in counterfeit and unapproved drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Pullirsch, Dieter; Bellemare, Julie; Hackl, Andreas; Trottier, Yvon-Louis; Mayrhofer, Andreas; Schindl, Heidemarie; Taillon, Christine; Gartner, Christian; Hottowy, Brigitte; Beck, Gerhard; Gagnon, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background Counterfeit and unapproved medicines are inherently dangerous and can cause patient injury due to ineffectiveness, chemical or biological contamination, or wrong dosage. Growth of the counterfeit medical market in developed countries is mainly attributable to life-style drugs, which are used in the treatment of non-life-threatening and non-painful conditions, such as slimming pills, cosmetic-related pharmaceuticals, and drugs for sexual enhancement. One of the main tasks of health ...

  13. Counterfeit and substandard antimalarial drugs in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lon, C T; Tsuyuoka, R; Phanouvong, S; Nivanna, N; Socheat, D; Sokhan, C; Blum, N; Christophel, E M; Smine, A

    2006-11-01

    Counterfeit and substandard antimalarial drugs can cause death and contribute to the growing malaria drug resistance problem, particularly in Southeast Asia. Since 2003 in Cambodia the quality of antimalarial drugs both in the public and private health sector is regularly monitored in sentinel sites. We surveyed 34% of all 498 known facilities and drug outlets in four provinces. We collected 451 drug samples; 79% of these were not registered at the Cambodia Department of Drugs and Food (DDF). Twenty-seven percent of the samples failed the thin layer chromatography and disintegration tests; all of them were unregistered products. Immediate action against counterfeit drugs was taken by the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) and the DDF. They communicated with the Provincial Health Department about the presence of counterfeit antimalarial drugs through alert letters, a manual, annual malaria conferencing and other training occasions. Television campaigns to alert the population about counterfeit drugs were conducted. Moreover, the NMCP has been promoting the use of good quality antimalarial drugs of a blister co-packaged combination of artesunate and mefloquine in public and private sectors. Appropriate strategies need to be developed and implemented by relevant government agencies and stakeholders to strengthen drug quality assurance and control systems in the country.

  14. Forensic pharmacovigilance and substandard or counterfeit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labadie, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Identification of harm in the form of adverse drug reactions that are caused by counterfeit or other substandard medicinal products by application of standard pharmacovigillance methods of registration, analysis and investigation could be forensic pharmacovigillance. As recent example of this type of forensic pharmacovigilance is the discovery and investigation into the adverse drug reactions caused by contaminated heparin in the USA in 2008 is discussed.

  15. Counterfeit drugs in India: significance and impact on pharmacovigilance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehal A. Shah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Counterfeit drugs have emerged as a major global problem. This issue has been brought to the centre of the Indian media due to the death of 15 women attending a sterilization camp in Chhattisgarh. India's pharmaceutical industry exports drugs worth 15 billion dollars, which means a high prevalence of counterfeiting in India's drug industry has global repercussions. However, accurate figures on the extent of counterfeit drugs in India are not available. The scientific literature as well as media reports often quotes figures of 10-35%, though studies done by the Indian Government dispute this. Counterfeit drug numbers have been known to be under represented by Governments due to fear of undermining their economy and health systems. On the other hand, rival companies in other countries may have an incentive to over hype India's counterfeit problem to dent India's growing status as the leading global supplier of generic medicines. Lack of clear definitions and differences between laws of countries further complicate reporting. A high prevalence of counterfeit drugs has a large impact on both health and economic indicators. Additionally, counterfeit drugs provide significant challenges to Pharmacovigilance programmes. Hence, here we discuss the significance of use of counterfeit drugs in India and challenges faced by Pharmacovigilance due to the extensive use of counterfeit drugs. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2156-2160

  16. Raman Barcode for Counterfeit Drug Product Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Latevi S; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-05-03

    Potential infiltration of counterfeit drug products-containing the wrong or no active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-into the bona fide drug supply poses a significant threat to consumers worldwide. Raman spectroscopy offers a rapid, nondestructive avenue to screen a high throughput of samples. Traditional qualitative Raman identification is typically done with spectral correlation methods that compare the spectrum of a reference sample to an unknown. This is often effective for pure materials but is quite challenging when dealing with drug products that contain different formulations of active and inactive ingredients. Typically, reliable identification of drug products using common spectral correlation algorithms can only be made if the specific product under study is present in the library of reference spectra, thereby limiting the scope of products that can be screened. In this paper, we introduce the concept of the Raman barcode for identification of drug products by comparing the known peaks in the API reference spectrum to the peaks present in the finished drug product under study. This method requires the transformation of the Raman spectra of both API and finished drug products into a barcode representation by assigning zero intensity to every spectral frequency except the frequencies that correspond to Raman peaks. By comparing the percentage of nonzero overlap between the expected API barcode and finished drug product barcode, the identity of API present can be confirmed. In this study, 18 approved finished drug products and nine simulated counterfeits were successfully identified with 100% accuracy utilizing this method.

  17. [Counterfeit drugs as a gobal threat to health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golocorbin Kon, Svetlana; Mikov, Momir

    2011-01-01

    According to the World Health Organisation, counterfeit medicines are medicines that are mislabelled deliberately and fraudulently regarding their identity and/or source. All kinds of medicines have been counterfeited, both branded and generic ones. Counterfeit medicines may include products containing correct or wrong ingredients; without active or with insufficiently or over-active ingredients, or with fake packaging. Many sources of information have been explored, including reports from the national medicine regulatory authorities, pharmaceutical companies and literature data. Since the time counterfeit drugs first appeared, they have become more sophisticated and more difficult to be detected. The World Health Organisation estimate is that up to 1% of medicines available in the developed world are likely to be counterfeit. This figure rises to 10% globally, although in some developing countries it is 50%. The World Health Organisation estimate is that 50% of medicines available via the internet are counterfeit. The knowledge about counterfeit drugs should be used to educate students of pharmacy and medicine, health professionals and patients. The most important players in campaign against counterfeit medicines are health professionals. Pharmacists and doctors should stay vigilant and report suspicious products, and consider counterfeits as a possible cause of adverse reactions or therapeutic failure. Patients should inform their pharmacists and doctors if they suspect any irregularity concerning their medication, if they experience side effects or a decrease in beneficial effect. The crucial step in the prevention of counterfeit medicines is to get supplied from reliable sources, i.e. licensed pharmacies.

  18. COUNTERFEIT (FAKE DRUGS & NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO IDENTIFY IT IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gupta*, K. Singhal and A. Pandey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A counterfeit medicine is one which is deliberately and fraudulently mislabeled with respect to identity or source. Counterfeiting apply to both branded and generic product which include products with the wrong ingredients, without active ingredients, with insufficient active ingredients. According to WHO, 25% of medicines consumed in poor countries could be counterfeit or below standard.An estimate suggests that these drugs are a $200 billion industry worldwide. India could be an easy target for counterfeits, as the manufacturing costs is 40% cheaper here as compared to other countries. Deputy drug controller general of India says, counterfeit medicines often resemble the originals in chemical composition, but he thinks the biggest problem is in the packaging. A committee set up by the Indian Ministry of Health has approved a proposal to put 2D bar codes and scratch-off labels on medicines. The user scratches off the cover and tests what is underneath to a free phone number, to find out if a pill is real. Quick Response (QR codes are also being tested. These printed squares are an advanced version of the 2D bar codes. Anyone with a camera-enabled phone and web access can scan the code and be taken instantly to the pharmacy company website to authenticate the drug. The uses of holograms, tracers, traggants and inks, plastic tags, radio frequency identification, mass encryption technology are some other techniques to limit the counterfeiting of drugs.

  19. Economic analysis of use of counterfeit drugs: health impairment risk of counterfeit phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor taken as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Minoru; Miyakawa, Michiko

    2010-07-01

    The size of the market for counterfeit drugs throughout the world is considerable. Many cases of health impairment due to counterfeits have been reported. The market share of counterfeits in drug markets in developed countries is smaller than that in developing countries. However, the size of the market for counterfeits of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) used as anti-erectile-dysfunction drugs is not small. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the health impairment risk of taking the counterfeit PDE5Is and the convenience of obtaining the counterfeits in Japan, using an economic methodology in order to work out countermeasures for reducing the health impairment risk. Information was obtained by interviewing employees of pharmaceutical and chemical corporations in Japan. The size of the market for counterfeit PDE5Is in Japan was recently estimated to be about 2.5 times larger than that of genuine PDE5Is. The price of the counterfeits in their market is reported to be nearly equal to that of the genuine PDE5Is. An outbreak of severe hypoglycemia among users of counterfeit PDE5Is containing an antidiabetic drug in Singapore was reported in 2008, and seven patients remained comatose as a result of prolonged neuroglycopenia. Four of them subsequently died, so the health impairment risk due to counterfeit PDE5Is should not be ignored. In order to obtain a genuine PDE5I in Japan, a patient must be examined and have a prescription written at a medical institution, and buy it at a dispensing pharmacy. Focusing on the health impairment risk due to counterfeit PDE5Is and the convenience of obtaining the counterfeits in Japan, we analyzed the effects on the prices and quantities of PDE5Is in the market from demand and supply curves, using an economic methodology. From the analysis, it was shown that the health impairment risk due to the counterfeits is underestimated in the market in Japan. Physicians should warn their patients not to buy counterfeit

  20. Counterfeiting in performance- and image-enhancing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael R; Ryan, Paul; Baker, Julien S; Davies, Bruce; Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Evans, Peter; Easmon, Sue; Walker, Christopher J; Cowan, David; Kicman, Andrew T

    2009-03-01

    The current drastic escalation in obesity may be contributing to the exponential rise in drugs used for image enhancement. Drugs such as anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are perceived as a viable method of achieving a perfect physique. They are also the most widely abused drugs in sport. The Internet has encouraged the abuse of expensive drugs, particularly human growth hormone (hGH), resulting in increased importation for personal use. The substantial increase in this market has opened up avenues for counterfeiting, estimated as a multi-million pound business. The acute adverse effects from contaminated vials may result in a variety of pathologies including communicable diseases. In 2007, in the UK, a series of intramuscular abscesses, requiring surgical treatment, led us to study samples obtained from the underground market. The analysis of 38 parenteral samples and 19 oral samples of tablets was performed by a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) accredited laboratory, in an attempt to establish the extent of available counterfeit products. Fifty-three per cent (20) of the injectable AAS esters and 21% (4) of the oral tablets were counterfeit. Culture and sensitivity revealed the presence of skin commensal organisms, which may have contributed to the development of the abscesses. Users of AAS and hGH for sport, including bodybuilding, are currently risking their health because of counterfeit and poorly controlled products.

  1. Counterfeit drug demand: perceptions of policy makers and community pharmacists in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadl, Abubakr A; Hassali, Mohamed A; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham M

    2013-01-01

    The counterfeit drug trade has become widespread and has developed into a substantial threat to both the public's health and the pharmaceutical industry. The aim of this study was to seek insights into the determining factors of counterfeit drug purchases among health policy makers and community pharmacists in a developing country. In-depth qualitative interviews with Sudanese policy makers and community pharmacists were undertaken in 2 Sudanese states, namely Khartoum and Gadaref. A semistructured interview guide was developed by incorporating information from existing literature. A purposive sample of knowledgeable policy makers and community pharmacists was interviewed. Thematic content analysis of the interviews identified 8 major themes: understanding the term "counterfeit drug," presence of counterfeit drugs in the Sudanese market, vulnerability to counterfeit drugs, price-quality inference, awareness of societal consequences of counterfeit drugs, subjective social norms, difference in vulnerability according to demographic characteristics, and education pertaining to counterfeit drugs. Unaffordability of medicines and desperate need were emphasized by both policy makers and community pharmacists as major influencing factors that increased consumers' vulnerability to counterfeit drugs. This study concluded that high prices and the unaffordability of medicines have a major role in increasing vulnerability to counterfeit drugs, in addition to lack of knowledge about counterfeiting and the implications of use of these products. Because very limited studies have been conducted in developing countries to explore perceptions about counterfeit drugs, the present study provides information from which policy makers and key stakeholders in the supply chain can benefit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NIR spectrometry for counterfeit drug detection - A feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodionova, O.Y.; Houmøller, Lars P.; Pomerantsev, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Express-methods for detection of counterfeit drugs are of vital necessity. Visual control, dissociating tests or simple color reaction tests reveal only very rough forgeries. The feasibility of information-rich NIR-measurements as an analytical method together with multivariate calibration...... for mathematical data processing for false drugs detection is demonstrated. Also, multivariate hyperspectral image analysis is applied providing additional diagnostic information. Hyperspectral imaging is becoming a useful diagnostic tool for identifying non-homogeneous spatial regions of drug formulation. Two...... types of drugs are used to demonstrate the applicability of these approaches....

  3. An exploration of counterfeit medicine surveillance strategies guided by geospatial analysis: lessons learned from counterfeit Avastin detection in the US drug supply chain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Mackey, Tim K

    2014-01-01

    To explore healthcare policy and system improvements that would more proactively respond to future penetration of counterfeit cancer medications in the USA drug supply chain using geospatial analysis...

  4. Chemical analysis of counterfeit hepatitis C drug found in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kamakura, Hiroyuki; Masada, Sayaka; Tsujimoto, Takashi; Hosoe, Junko; Tokumoto, Hiroko; Maruyama, Takuro; Goda, Yukihiro; Hakamatsuka, Takashi

    2017-07-19

      In January 2017, counterfeits of the hepatitis C drug 'HARVONI(®) Combination Tablets' (HARVONI(®)) were found at a pharmacy chain through unlicensed suppliers in Japan. A total of five lots of counterfeit HARVONI(®) (samples 1-5) bottles were found, and the ingredients of the bottles were all in tablet form. Among them, two differently shaped tablets were present in two of the bottles (categorized as samples 2A, 2B, 4A, and 4B). We analyzed the total of seven samples by high-resolution LC-MS, GC-MS and NMR. In samples 2A, 3 and 4B, sofosbuvir, the active component of another hepatitis C drug, SOVARDI(®) Tablets 400 mg (SOVARDI(®)), was detected. In sample 4A, sofosbuvir and ledipasvir, the active components of HARVONI(®), were found. A direct comparison of the four samples and genuine products showed that three samples (2A, 3, 4B) are apparently SOVARDI(®) and that sample 2A is HARVONI(®). In samples 1 and 5, several vitamins but none of the active compounds usually found in HARVONI(®) (i.e., sofosbuvir and ledipasvir) were detected. Our additional investigation indicates that these two samples are likely to be a commercial vitamin supplement distributed in Japan. Sample 2B, looked entirely different from HARVONI(®) and contained several herbal constitutents (such as ephedrine and glycyrrhizin) that are used in Japanese Kampo formulations. A further analysis indicated that sample 2B is likely to be a Kampo extract tablet of Shoseiryuto which is distributed in Japan. Considering this case, it is important to be vigilant to prevent a recurrence of distribution of counterfeit drugs..

  5. FDA, companies test RFID tracking to prevent drug counterfeiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John S

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. has an apparently growing problem with fake, counterfeit drugs entering the mainstream drug supply, and being fraudulently sold at full price in regular pharmacies and hospitals; some have no active ingredient, or too little, or substitute a cheap drug for an expensive one. The FDA has asked drug manufacturers to develop technology to track all shipments electronically as they move through the distribution chain; currently, RFID (radio frequency identification) is the preferred method for doing so. This article explains what is happening, and why we do not believe that this use of RFID is a privacy threat--though other privacy issues are among the most important questions we face today.

  6. Drug resistance and antiretroviral drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, Robert W.; Jonathan M Schapiro

    2005-01-01

    As more drugs for treating HIV have become available, drug resistance profiles within antiretroviral drug classes have become increasingly important for researchers developing new drugs and for clinicians integrating new drugs into their clinical practice. In vitro passage experiments and comprehensive phenotypic susceptibility testing are used for the pre-clinical evaluation of drug resistance. Clinical studies are required, however, to delineate the full spectrum of mutations responsible fo...

  7. [Counterfeit and contraband drugs in Brazil: overview and prospects for preventing their use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Renato Lopes; Lasmar, Marcelo Carvalho

    2014-04-01

    The problem of counterfeit medicines is increasing rapidly, aggravated by globalization and the lure of profit from this illegal activity. Various types of drugs have been counterfeited, posing a serious public health and safety problem. The current article provides an overview of the issue in Brazil and the resulting measures taken by the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) in collaboration with the Federal Police from 2007 to March 2011. The study analyzed seizures of counterfeit drugs, arrests, and other factors. No professional pharmacist was present in 90% of the establishments were some type of crime occurred (sale of counterfeit drugs and lack of control of narcotics and other drugs). Among the products seized, most were drugs for erectile dysfunction. The study showed the importance of inter-agency collaboration for combatting this type of irregular drug sales.

  8. An exploration of counterfeit medicine surveillance strategies guided by geospatial analysis: lessons learned from counterfeit Avastin detection in the US drug supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Mackey, Tim K

    2014-12-02

    To explore healthcare policy and system improvements that would more proactively respond to future penetration of counterfeit cancer medications in the USA drug supply chain using geospatial analysis. A statistical and geospatial analysis of areas that received notices from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about the possibility of counterfeit Avastin penetrating the US drug supply chain. Data from FDA warning notices were compared to data from 44 demographic variables available from the US Census Bureau via correlation, means testing and geospatial visualisation. Results were interpreted in light of existing literature in order to recommend improvements to surveillance of counterfeit medicines. This study analysed 791 distinct healthcare provider addresses that received FDA warning notices across 30,431 zip codes in the USA. Statistical outputs were Pearson's correlation coefficients and t values. Geospatial outputs were cartographic visualisations. These data were used to generate the overarching study outcome, which was a recommendation for a strategy for drug safety surveillance congruent with existing literature on counterfeit medication. Zip codes with greater numbers of individuals age 65+ and greater numbers of ethnic white individuals were most correlated with receipt of a counterfeit Avastin notice. Geospatial visualisations designed in conjunction with statistical analysis of demographic variables appeared more capable of suggesting areas and populations that may be at risk for undetected counterfeit Avastin penetration. This study suggests that dual incorporation of statistical and geospatial analysis in surveillance of counterfeit medicine may be helpful in guiding efforts to prevent, detect and visualise counterfeit medicines penetrations in the US drug supply chain and other settings. Importantly, the information generated by these analyses could be utilised to identify at-risk populations associated with demographic characteristics

  9. [Several common types of counterfeit and inferior drugs in Chinese medicinal materials market].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimei; Chen, Keli

    2012-04-01

    Though there are many species of counterfeit and inferior drugs of Chinese Medicinal Materials in the market, the means of fabrication is common. According to our investigating and reports in the literature it is found that the counterfeits and inferior drugs exist in 4 styles: counterfeits, reused medicinal materials and their slices which have been extracted by boiling water or ethanol, medicinal materials and their slices which have been added with non-medicinal parts or chemicals, medicinal materials which have no enough growth time or have been reserved for a long time. Through summarizing the styles and their common characteristics of the counterfeits and inferior drugs,it is helpful to raise vigilance and detect them.

  10. Stable isotope-labeled excipients for drug product identification and counterfeit detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Linda A; Shah, Punit P; Sharp, Zachary; Atudorei, Viorel; Timmins, Graham S

    2011-01-01

    Counterfeit drug products have become a major problem worldwide and a number of techniques to detect counterfeit products or reduce the potential for counterfeiting have been investigated. This study examined the use of stable isotope-labeled excipients in solid dosage forms as a method to identify drug products and to detect counterfeits. (2)H- and (13)C-glucose were used as model excipients and incorporated in wet granulated formulations at a variety of different isotopic ratios. The ratios of (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C in each product were then determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated the ability to detect the isotope-labeled glucose in both granules and tablets. It was possible to use the isotope ratios to differentiate between specific batches of granules, demonstrating the potential of this technique for in-product, batch-specific identification.

  11. The Challenge of Counterfeit Drugs: A Comprehensive Review on Prevalence, Detection and Preventive Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bharat; Baldi, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Counterfeit drugs are a worldwide concern. This organized crime has deterrent effect on public health and on pharmaceutical business across the globe. Lack of comprehensive standardized definition of counterfeit drugs with global acceptance, higher benefits of cost ratio and intercomplexity of market and globalized network are the major reasons behind this. Unawareness among the stakeholders lack of intellectual property protection and social-economic factor also resulted in flourished market of fake drugs. Despite of several attempts made by global regulatory agencies, inefficient regulations, lax enforcement of existing legislation and lack of commitment by involved authorities still remain major loopholes, aggravating the serious problem of counterfeiting. Although use of techniques based on interference pattern, encryption, spectroscopy and chromatographic principles by pharmaceutical industries to authenticate genuine products has curtailed the problem to a limited extent. In order to efficiently control the organized crime of medicine counterfeiting, collective efforts of 'National Counterfeit Control Agencies', pharmaceutical industries, law regulatory agencies and public are essential. Strict legal enforcement, applications of comprehensive database, interlinked network and technological advancement are need of the hour. The purpose of this article is to overview all aspects of drug counterfeiting including current status and magnitude, effectiveness and limitation of existing technologies available to counter with particular attention to suggest possible roadmap to overcome the problem through uni-directional and focus global co-operation.

  12. Drug-laden 3D biodegradable label using QR code for anti-counterfeiting of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jie; Liu, Ran

    2016-06-01

    Wiping out counterfeit drugs is a great task for public health care around the world. The boost of these drugs makes treatment to become potentially harmful or even lethal. In this paper, biodegradable drug-laden QR code label for anti-counterfeiting of drugs is proposed that can provide the non-fluorescence recognition and high capacity. It is fabricated by the laser cutting to achieve the roughness over different surface which causes the difference in the gray levels on the translucent material the QR code pattern, and the micro mold process to obtain the drug-laden biodegradable label. We screened biomaterials presenting the relevant conditions and further requirements of the package. The drug-laden microlabel is on the surface of the troches or the bottom of the capsule and can be read by a simple smartphone QR code reader application. Labeling the pill directly and decoding the information successfully means more convenient and simple operation with non-fluorescence and high capacity in contrast to the traditional methods.

  13. Drug-drug interactions: antiretroviral drugs and recreational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staltari, Orietta; Leporini, Christian; Caroleo, Benedetto; Russo, Emilio; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are living longer, however, some patients encounter co- morbidities which sometimes require treatment. Therefore, during the treatment with ARV drugs these patients could take several recreational drugs (e.g. amphetamines, hallucinogenes, opiates, or alcohol) with a possible development of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In particular, Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) are mainly excreted through the kidney and are not substrates of the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein, therefore the DDIs during this treatment are minimal. In contrast, the other ARV drugs (i.e. non-nucleoside reversetranscriptase inhibitors, Protease inhibitors, Integrase inhibitors, chemokine receptor 5 antagonists and HIV-fusion inhibitors) are an important class of antiretroviral medications that are frequent components of HAART regimens but show several DDIs related to interaction with the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein. In this paper we will review data concerning the possibility of DDI in HIV patients treated with ARV and taking recreational drugs.

  14. The global counterfeit drug trade: patient safety and public health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2011-11-01

    Counterfeit drugs are a global problem with significant and well-documented consequences for global health and patient safety, including drug resistance and patient deaths. This multibillion-dollar industry does not respect geopolitical borders, and threatens public health in both rich and resource-poor nations alike. The epidemiology of counterfeits is also wide in breadth and scope, including thousands of counterfeit incidents per year, encompassing all types of therapeutic classes, and employing a complex global supply chain network enabling this illegal activity. In addition, information technologies available through the Internet and sales via online pharmacies have allowed the criminal element to thrive in an unregulated environment of anonymity, deception, and lack of adequate enforcement. Though recent global enforcement efforts have led to arrests of online counterfeit sellers, such actions have not stemmed supplies from illegal online sellers or kept up with their creativity in illegally selling their products. To address this issue, we propose a global policy framework utilizing public-private partnership models with centralized surveillance reporting that would enable cooperation and coordination to combat this global health crisis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  16. Substandard, Spurious, Falsely-Labelled, Falsified and Counterfeit (SSFFC Drugs: Time to Take a Bitter Pill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Mani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Substandard, Spurious, Falsely-Labelled, Falsified and Counterfeit (SSFFC drugs are an emerging public health concern in India. With one of the huge pharmaceutical sectors in the world, India has a varied prevalence of SSSFC drugs ranging from 0.04% to 34% according to various studies. Apart from severe health consequences, SSSFC drugs also weaken community's trust in the health care system. India is tackling the epidemic of SSSFC drugs through various existing and new regulatory measures. Considering the calamitous consequences of this silent epidemic, it is time to prescribe a bitter pill.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of antiretrovirals: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Laura; Khoo, Saye; Back, David

    2010-01-01

    Current antiretroviral treatment has allowed HIV infection to become a chronic manageable condition with many HIV patients living longer. However, available antiretrovirals are not without limitations, for example the development of resistance and adverse effects. Consequently, new drugs in existing and novel classes are urgently required to provide viable treatment options to patients with few remaining choices. Darunavir, etravirine, maraviroc and raltegravir have been recently approved for treatment-experienced patients and other agents such as rilpivirine, vicriviroc and elvitegravir are currently under phase III study. Clinical studies are necessary to optimise potential treatment combinations and to manage drug-drug interactions to help avoid toxicity or therapy failure. This review aims to summarise the pharmacokinetics and key drug-drug interaction studies for newly available antiretrovirals and those in development. Further information regarding drug-drug interactions of well established antiretrovirals and those recently approved are readily available online at sites such as http://www.hiv-druginteractions.org, http://www.clinicaloptions.com/hiv, http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010.

  18. Poor-Quality and Counterfeit Drugs: A Systematic Assessment of Prevalence and Risks Based on Data Published From 2007 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczwara, Andreas; Dressman, Jennifer

    2017-05-23

    Counterfeit drugs can hurt patients and harm the pharmaceutical industry. In 2006, the International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce expressed a need to generate more and better data to calculate a worldwide prevalence of counterfeiting. This review analyzes field test data that were published in the time frame January 2007 to December 2016, were accessible via Pubmed, and which addressed the prevalence of counterfeit drugs. Based on the 41 studies identified, it is still not possible to make a reliable statement about the prevalence of counterfeit drugs due to the heterogeneity of the results. To make further progress in this area, both the quantity and quality of documented field tests should be increased. Without a differentiated analysis considering therapeutic class, source, and country of counterfeit drugs, it will remain difficult to identify the root causes of market infiltration and useful points of attack to combat them. Studies with high sample power and randomized sampling, packaging inspection, and detailed chemical analysis will be necessary to correctly identify (especially professional) counterfeit samples. The classification system presented in this review should help to calculate not only the prevalence of counterfeit drugs but also the risks to the patient associated with different types of counterfeited medicines. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of hyperspectral imaging in the VNIR (400-1000nm) and SWIR range (1000-2500nm) for detecting counterfeit drugs with identical API composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Koprowski, Robert; Marmion, Mathieu; Duda, Piotr; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    The risk of death from taking counterfeit drugs is now greater than the probability of dying from malaria and AIDS combined (at least half a million deaths each year). At the same time, counterfeit medicines are falsified more and more "skillfully". According to WHO about 10% of counterfeit drugs are copies of original products. The methods of hyperspectral imaging and image analysis and processing were used to detect counterfeit drugs. Original Viagra® (Pfizer) and counterfeit tablets were compared. Hyperspectral imaging was used to acquire hyperspectral data cubes from both original and counterfeit tablets in the spectral range of 400-2500nm. Spectral parameters for both the original Viagra® and counterfeit drugs were compared. Grey-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were performed. Hyperspectral analysis of the surface of the original Viagra® and counterfeit tablets demonstrates significant differences in reflectance (maximum difference for 1619.75nm). The GLCM contrast for the falsified drug is on average higher than for the original one 16±4%. GLCM contrast analysis enables to quantify homogeneity of distribution of tablet ingredients and enables to distinguish tablets with identical chemical composition. SWIR (1000-2500nm) hyperspectral imaging has a definite advantage over imaging in VNIR (400-1000nm) - higher wavelength is less sensitive to non-uniform illumination.

  20. The role of formulation on the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, Diane E T; Cressey, Tim R; Vromans, Herman; Burger, David M

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A multitude of antiretroviral drug formulations are now available for HIV-infected adults and children. These formulations include individual and co-formulated drugs, many of which are also supplied in generic versions. Many antiretroviral drugs have a low aqueous solubility and poor b

  1. Three-dimensional quick response code based on inkjet printing of upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles for drug anti-counterfeiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Minli; Lin, Min; Wang, Shurui; Wang, Xuemin; Zhang, Ge; Hong, Yuan; Dong, Yuqing; Jin, Guorui; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Medicine counterfeiting is a serious issue worldwide, involving potentially devastating health repercussions. Advanced anti-counterfeit technology for drugs has therefore aroused intensive interest. However, existing anti-counterfeit technologies are associated with drawbacks such as the high cost, complex fabrication process, sophisticated operation and incapability in authenticating drug ingredients. In this contribution, we developed a smart phone recognition based upconversion fluorescent three-dimensional (3D) quick response (QR) code for tracking and anti-counterfeiting of drugs. We firstly formulated three colored inks incorporating upconversion nanoparticles with RGB (i.e., red, green and blue) emission colors. Using a modified inkjet printer, we printed a series of colors by precisely regulating the overlap of these three inks. Meanwhile, we developed a multilayer printing and splitting technology, which significantly increases the information storage capacity per unit area. As an example, we directly printed the upconversion fluorescent 3D QR code on the surface of drug capsules. The 3D QR code consisted of three different color layers with each layer encoded by information of different aspects of the drug. A smart phone APP was designed to decode the multicolor 3D QR code, providing the authenticity and related information of drugs. The developed technology possesses merits in terms of low cost, ease of operation, high throughput and high information capacity, thus holds great potential for drug anti-counterfeiting.Medicine counterfeiting is a serious issue worldwide, involving potentially devastating health repercussions. Advanced anti-counterfeit technology for drugs has therefore aroused intensive interest. However, existing anti-counterfeit technologies are associated with drawbacks such as the high cost, complex fabrication process, sophisticated operation and incapability in authenticating drug ingredients. In this contribution, we developed a

  2. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  3. Counterfeit pharmaceuticals: current status and future projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheimer, Albert I; Chaney, Nicole M; Santella, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    To examine the problem of counterfeit drugs and its effects around the world, to consider the likely directions the problem will take, and to propose options for controlling or mitigating the problem. Recently published clinical literature identified through review of articles abstracted at MEDLINE. Search terms were counterfeiting, counterfeit drugs, substandard drugs, fake drugs, world counterfeiting, and counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Further information was abstracted from an array of informational sources, including magazines such as Business Week, newspapers such as the International Herald Tribune, National Public Radio news reports, pharmaceutical company press releases, and information from the World Health Organization. Multiple reviewers were used to retrieve relevant and current data. Relevant data were extracted independently by multiple reviewers. Traditionally, the problem of counterfeit pharmaceuticals has been limited to developing nations in Asia and Africa. Now, drug counterfeiting is rapidly becoming a worldwide concern, and counterfeit drugs are reaching the U.S. market. This article defines the problem of counterfeit drugs in its many forms and discusses the extent of the problem, with particular attention to the respective rates of counterfeiting across the globe and the origins of counterfeit drugs. Technologic advances have worsened the counterfeit drug problem. Because drug counterfeiting is a worldwide concern, worldwide action is needed to combat the problem.

  4. Lithographically encoded polymer microtaggant using high-capacity and error-correctable QR code for anti-counterfeiting of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangkwon; Bae, Hyung Jong; Kim, Junhoi; Shin, Sunghwan; Choi, Sung-Eun; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kwon, Sunghoon; Park, Wook

    2012-11-20

    A QR-coded microtaggant for the anti-counterfeiting of drugs is proposed that can provide high capacity and error-correction capability. It is fabricated lithographically in a microfluidic channel with special consideration of the island patterns in the QR Code. The microtaggant is incorporated in the drug capsule ("on-dose authentication") and can be read by a simple smartphone QR Code reader application when removed from the capsule and washed free of drug.

  5. Rapid screening of anti-infective drug products for counterfeits using Raman spectral library-based correlation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loethen, Yvette L; Kauffman, John F; Buhse, Lucinda F; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2015-11-07

    A new spectral library-based approach that is capable of screening a diverse set of finished drug products using only an active pharmaceutical ingredient spectral library is described in this paper. This approach obviates the need for a comprehensive drug product library, thereby streamlining the use of spectral library-based tests for anti-counterfeiting efforts, specifically to target finished drug products containing the wrong active ingredient or no active ingredient at all. Both laboratory-based and portable spectrometers are used in the study to demonstrate the usefulness and transferability of the spectral correlation method for field screening. The spectral correlation between the active pharmaceutical ingredient and finished drug product spectra is calculated using both full spectral analysis and targeted spectral regions analysis of six types of antimalarial, antibiotic and antiviral products. The spectral regions were determined using a moving window spectral correlation algorithm, and the use of specific spectral regions is shown to be crucial in screening finished drug products using only the active pharmaceutical ingredient spectrum. This comprehensive screening spectral correlation method is tested on seven different validation samples from different manufacturers as those used to develop the method, as well as simulated counterfeits which were prepared to mimic falsified drugs containing no active ingredient. The spectral correlation method is successful in correctly identifying 100% of the authentic products and simulated counterfeit samples tested.

  6. Counterfeit Drug Penetration into Global Legitimate Medicine Supply Chains: A Global Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K.; Liang, Bryan A.; York, Peter; Kubic, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Counterfeit medicines are a global public health risk. We assess counterfeit reports involving the legitimate supply chain using 2009–2011 data from the Pharmaceutical Security Institute Counterfeit Incident System (PSI CIS) database that uses both open and nonpublic data sources. Of the 1,510 identified CIS reports involving counterfeits, 27.6% reported China as the source country of the incident/detection. Further, 51.3% were reported as counterfeit but the specific counterfeit subcategory was not known or verifiable. The most prevalent therapeutic category was anti-infectives (21.1%) with most reports originating from health-related government agencies. Geographically, Asian and Latin American regions and, economically, middle-income markets were most represented. A total of 127 (64.8%) of a total of 196 countries had no legitimate supply chain CIS counterfeit reports. Improvements in surveillance, including detection of security breaches, data collection, analysis, and dissemination are urgently needed to address public health needs to combat the global counterfeit medicines trade. PMID:25897059

  7. Low-cost, high-speed identification of counterfeit antimalarial drugs on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koesdjojo, Myra T; Wu, Yuanyuan; Boonloed, Anukul; Dunfield, Elizabeth M; Remcho, Vincent T

    2014-12-01

    With the emergence of artesunate antimalarial counterfeiting in Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, we present the production of a rapid, inexpensive and simple colorimetric-based testing kit for the detection of counterfeit artesunate in order to preserve life and prevent the development of multi-drug resistant malaria. The kit works based on paper microfluidics which offer several advantages over conventional microfluidics, and has great potential to generate inexpensive, easy-to-use, rapid and disposable diagnostic devices. Here, we have developed a colorimetric assay that is specific to artesunate and turns yellow upon addition of the sample. The test can be done within minutes, and allows for a semi-quantitative analysis of the artesunate tablets by comparing the developed yellow color on the paper test to a color-coded key chart that comes with the kit. A more accurate and precise analysis is done by utilizing a color analyzer on an iPhone camera that measures the color intensity of the developed color on the paper chip. A digital image of the chip was taken and analyzed by measuring the average gray intensity of the color developed on the paper circle. A plot of the artesunate concentration versus the average gray scale intensity was generated. Results show that the intensity of the yellow color developed on the paper test was consistent and proportional to the amount of artesunate present in the sample. With artesunate concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 20mg/mL, a linear calibration plot was obtained with a detection limit of 0.98 mg/mL.

  8. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendel Mombaque dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r. Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000 and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00. The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

  9. Global Pharmacovigilance for Antiretroviral Drugs: Overcoming Contrasting Priorities

    OpenAIRE

    Nyasha Bakare; Ivor Ralph Edwards; Andy Stergachis; Shanthi Pal; Holmes, Charles B; Marie Lindquist; Chris Duncombe; Alex Dodoo; Joel Novendstern; Jude Nwokike; Ricardo Kuchenbecker; Aberg, Judith A.; Veronica Miller; Jur Strobos

    2011-01-01

    Jur Strobos and colleagues describe the deliberations of a recent multi-stakeholder meeting discussing the creation of a sustainable global pharmacovigilance system for antiretroviral drugs that would be applicable in resource limited settings.

  10. Posaconazole: A Review of Drug Interactions with HIV Antiretroviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Poulakos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to examine the literature for reports of clinically significant interactions noted amongst HIV antiretroviral medications when coadministered with posaconazole. A literature search was conducted to identify studies addressing drug interactions between posaconazole and HIV antiretroviral medications. Two pharmacokinetic studies and three clinical trials involving the administration of posaconazole to HIV-infected patients were identified. The pharmacokinetic studies involved concomitant administration of either a protease inhibitor (PI or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI. Both studies showed alterations in systemic concentrations of either posaconazole or the HIV antiretroviral when administered together. Of the three clinical trials, all patients were on HIV antiretrovirals. However, their potential interaction with posaconazole was not explored. To date, there is no published literature regarding the interaction between maraviroc or elvitegravir and posaconazole. Dose adjustments for each are recommended when coadministered with strong CYP 3A4 inhibitors or inducers. Currently available literature points to the potential for clinically significant drug interactions when posaconazole is coadministered with HIV antiretrovirals, specifically NNRTIs and PIs. More studies are needed involving a wider range of HIV antiretrovirals to determine the significance of the interaction. Clinicians should be aware of this potentially significant interaction and avoid concomitant administration when possible. When available, consideration should be given to therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral serum concentrations in select patients.

  11. The dangers of sexual enhancement supplements and counterfeit drugs to “treat” erectile dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jason; Yafi, Faysal A.; Dorsey, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    Counterfeit phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE-5i) are an increasing problem. Already in widespread use, the market for PDE-5i is steadily growing as the population ages. Counterfeiters are taking advantage of this growing market by developing illicit and counterfeit PDE-5i products. Many factors are contributing to the rapid growth of the illicit market, such as the low risk of prosecution, potentially high financial reward, and ease of distribution via Internet pharmacies. Consumers of illicit PDE-5i often do not realize they are using counterfeit products and placing themselves at an unnecessary health risk. Others seek to bypass the legitimate healthcare system due to either embarrassment of the underlying condition or desire for cheaper alternatives. However, taking illicit PDE-5i may harm consumers directly, as many illicit products contain detrimental contaminants and inaccurate amounts of the active ingredient without the appropriate warnings. Bypassing the legitimate healthcare system also endangers consumers indirectly, as erectile dysfunction (ED) is often associated with other medical comorbidities that patients should be screened for. Furthermore, PDE-5i can have potentially dangerous interactions with other pharmaceuticals that are rarely warned against with counterfeit PDE-5i. This communication reviews the literature regarding counterfeit PDE-5i, and summarizes both the scope and dangers of the illicit PDE-5i market. PMID:28217446

  12. The dangers of sexual enhancement supplements and counterfeit drugs to "treat" erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jason; Yafi, Faysal A; Dorsey, Philip J; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2017-02-01

    Counterfeit phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE-5i) are an increasing problem. Already in widespread use, the market for PDE-5i is steadily growing as the population ages. Counterfeiters are taking advantage of this growing market by developing illicit and counterfeit PDE-5i products. Many factors are contributing to the rapid growth of the illicit market, such as the low risk of prosecution, potentially high financial reward, and ease of distribution via Internet pharmacies. Consumers of illicit PDE-5i often do not realize they are using counterfeit products and placing themselves at an unnecessary health risk. Others seek to bypass the legitimate healthcare system due to either embarrassment of the underlying condition or desire for cheaper alternatives. However, taking illicit PDE-5i may harm consumers directly, as many illicit products contain detrimental contaminants and inaccurate amounts of the active ingredient without the appropriate warnings. Bypassing the legitimate healthcare system also endangers consumers indirectly, as erectile dysfunction (ED) is often associated with other medical comorbidities that patients should be screened for. Furthermore, PDE-5i can have potentially dangerous interactions with other pharmaceuticals that are rarely warned against with counterfeit PDE-5i. This communication reviews the literature regarding counterfeit PDE-5i, and summarizes both the scope and dangers of the illicit PDE-5i market.

  13. Antiretroviral adverse drug reactions and their management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as first-line therapy for treatment-naïve adults starting antiretroviral .... Her particular interests are in HIV pharmacology, adherence to ART and long-term retention in care. ... LIST OF ADVERSE EFFECTS OF THESE MEDICATIONS. TDF ABC 3TC. AZT. ddI D4T. Low risk .... central obesity, a buffalo hump, and enlarged.

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  15. An Examination of Income Effect on Consumers’ Ethical Evaluation of Counterfeit Drugs Buying Behaviour: A Cross-Sectional Study in Qatar and Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadl, Abubakr Abdelraouf; Maraghi, Fatima Abdulla; Mohammad, Khadijah Shhab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are limited studies on consumer behaviour toward counterfeit products and the determining factors that motivate willingness to purchase counterfeit items. Aim This study aimed to fill this literature gap through studying differences in individual ethical evaluations of counterfeit drug purchase and whether that ethical evaluation affected by difference in income. It is hypothesized that individuals with lower/higher income make a more/less permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. Materials and Methods To empirically test the research assumption, a comparison was made between people who live in the low-income country Sudan and people who live in the high-income country Qatar. The study employed a face-to-face structured interview survey methodology to collect data from 1,170 subjects and the Sudanese and Qatari samples were compared using independent t-test at alpha level of 0.05 employing SPSS version 22.0. Results Sudanese and Qatari individuals were significantly different on all items. Sudanese individuals scored below 3 for all Awareness of Societal Consequences (ASC) items indicating that they make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. Both groups shared a basic positive moral agreement regarding subjective norm indicating that influence of income is not evident. Conclusion Findings indicate that low-income individuals make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drugs purchase when highlighting awareness of societal consequences used as a deterrent tool, while both low and high-income individuals share a basic positive moral agreement when subjective norm dimension is exploited to discourage unethical buying behaviour. PMID:27790465

  16. An Examination of Income Effect on Consumers' Ethical Evaluation of Counterfeit Drugs Buying Behaviour: A Cross-Sectional Study in Qatar and Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadl, Abubakr Abdelraouf; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Maraghi, Fatima Abdulla; Mohammad, Khadijah Shhab

    2016-09-01

    There are limited studies on consumer behaviour toward counterfeit products and the determining factors that motivate willingness to purchase counterfeit items. This study aimed to fill this literature gap through studying differences in individual ethical evaluations of counterfeit drug purchase and whether that ethical evaluation affected by difference in income. It is hypothesized that individuals with lower/higher income make a more/less permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. To empirically test the research assumption, a comparison was made between people who live in the low-income country Sudan and people who live in the high-income country Qatar. The study employed a face-to-face structured interview survey methodology to collect data from 1,170 subjects and the Sudanese and Qatari samples were compared using independent t-test at alpha level of 0.05 employing SPSS version 22.0. Sudanese and Qatari individuals were significantly different on all items. Sudanese individuals scored below 3 for all Awareness of Societal Consequences (ASC) items indicating that they make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drug purchase. Both groups shared a basic positive moral agreement regarding subjective norm indicating that influence of income is not evident. Findings indicate that low-income individuals make more permissive evaluation of ethical responsibility regarding counterfeit drugs purchase when highlighting awareness of societal consequences used as a deterrent tool, while both low and high-income individuals share a basic positive moral agreement when subjective norm dimension is exploited to discourage unethical buying behaviour.

  17. [Counterfeit medicines: a growing threat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbereau, S

    2006-12-01

    The medical drug market has undergone considerable transformation in recent years. Like other products, medicines have been affected by globalization. Free trade policies have had a number of negative effects including a reduction in quality control not only for some products but also for raw materials and finished products. The global environment has also created conditions conducive to counterfeit medicines. The term counterfeit medicine is defined differently from one country to another in terms of quality, legality and fraudulent intent. This situation prompted the WHO to propose the following definition: "A counterfeit medicine is one which is deliberately and fraudulently mislabeled with respect to identity and/or source. Counterfeiting can apply to both branded and generic products and counterfeit products may include products with the correct ingredients or with the wrong ingredients, without active ingredients, with insufficient active ingredients or with fake packaging." Weak pharmaceutical regulation often compounded by widespread corruption in developing countries has greatly facilitated the development of this illicit market with harmful and costly effects on public health. Due to the lack of pharmocovigilance accidents involving use of counterfeit drugs go unreported. For this reason it is not possible to measure the economic impact. While counterfeiting has become a major threat in developing countries, it also affects industrialized countries. Fraudulent behavior occurs all over the world.

  18. Generic antiretroviral drugs and HIV care: An economic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Y; Schwarzinger, M

    2016-03-01

    The cost of HIV care in European countries is high. Direct medical costs, in France, have been estimated at 500,000 Euros per patient's lifetime (20,000 Euros/year/patient). Overall, 73% of these costs are related to antiretroviral treatments. In the current financial crisis context, some European countries are beginning to make economic decisions on the drugs to be used. These approaches are likely to become more frequent. It is obviously essential to prescribe the most effective, appropriate, best tolerated, and easy-to-use antiretroviral treatments to patients. However, while taking the above into consideration, and if various treatment options or combinations are available, cost should also be considered in the treatment choice. One may thus reflect on the use of generic antiretroviral agents as they have just been launched in France. We aimed to review the cost and cost-effectiveness of generic antiretroviral drugs and to review treatment strategies other than generic drugs that could help reduce HIV-related costs. HIV clinicians should consider treatment costs to avoid any future coercive measures.

  19. Scale development on consumer behavior toward counterfeit drugs in a developing country: a quantitative study exploiting the tools of an evolving paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadl, Abubakr A; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham b Mohamed; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2013-09-11

    Although desperate need and drug counterfeiting are linked in developing countries, little research has been carried out to address this link, and there is a lack of proper tools and methodology. This study addresses the need for a new methodological approach by developing a scale to aid in understanding the demand side of drug counterfeiting in a developing country. The study presents a quantitative, non-representative survey conducted in Sudan. A face-to-face structured interview survey methodology was employed to collect the data from the general population (people in the street) in two phases: pilot (n = 100) and final survey (n = 1003). Data were analyzed by examining means, variances, squared multiple correlations, item-to-total correlations, and the results of an exploratory factor analysis and a confirmatory factor analysis. As an approach to scale purification, internal consistency was examined and improved. The scale was reduced from 44 to 41 items and Cronbach's alpha improved from 0.818 to 0.862. Finally, scale items were assessed. The result was an eleven-factor solution. Convergent and discriminant validity were demonstrated. The results of this study indicate that the "Consumer Behavior Toward Counterfeit Drugs Scale" is a valid, reliable measure with a solid theoretical base. Ultimately, the study offers public health policymakers a valid measurement tool and, consequently, a new methodological approach with which to build a better understanding of the demand side of counterfeit drugs and to develop more effective strategies to combat the problem.

  20. Class of Antiretroviral Drugs and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated an association between combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction. It is not clear whether this association differs according to the class of antiretroviral drugs. We conducted a study to investigate the association...... to the other drug class and established cardiovascular risk factors (excluding lipid levels), the relative rate of myocardial infarction per year of protease-inhibitor exposure was 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 1.23), whereas the relative rate per year of exposure to nonnucleoside reverse......-transcriptase inhibitors was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.13). Adjustment for serum lipid levels further reduced the effect of exposure to each drug class to 1.10 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.18) and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.93 to 1.09), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Increased exposure to protease inhibitors is associated with an increased risk...

  1. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Antiretroviral Drug Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral drug regimens has transformed HIV infection from a fatal illness into a manageable chronic condition. All patients with HIV infection should be considered for antiretroviral therapy, regardless of CD4 count or HIV viral load, for individual benefit and to prevent HIV transmission. Antiretroviral drugs affect HIV in several ways: entry inhibitors block HIV entry into CD4 T cells; nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription from RNA to DNA via chain-terminating proteins; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription through enzymatic inhibition; integrase strand transfer inhibitors block integration of viral DNA into cellular DNA; protease inhibitors block maturation and production of the virus. Current guidelines recommend six combination regimens for initial therapy. Five are based on tenofovir and emtricitabine; the other uses abacavir and lamivudine. Five include integrase strand transfer inhibitors. HIV specialists should assist with treating patients with complicated HIV infection, including patients with treatment-resistant HIV infection, coinfection with hepatitis B or C virus, pregnancy, childhood infections, severe opportunistic infections, complex drug interactions, significant drug toxicity, or comorbidities. Family physicians can treat most patients with HIV infection effectively by choosing appropriate treatment regimens, monitoring patients closely, and retaining patients in care.

  2. Evaluation of HIV/AIDS patients' knowledge on antiretroviral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Flávia de Castro Almeida

    Full Text Available Lack of information on antiretroviral drugs or the misunderstanding of available information can facilitate incorrect use of such drugs. This can result in non-adherence to the prescribed regimen, leading to a great possibility of a therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to know which information HIV/AIDS patients, who receive their medicines at the pharmacy of a reference hospital in the northeast Brazil, have on the drugs they use, the source of this information and whether there is a need for additional information. A total of 195 HIV/AIDS patients, who were using either zidovudina + lamivudina 300+150mg (AZT+3TC, efavirenz 600mg (EFZ or lopinavir/ritonavir 133.33/33mg (LPV/r, were interviewed. The mean age was 41 years (SD = 9.55 and 70.8% were males. Of the total, 55.4% didn't know the effect of the drug in the organism; 35.9% were unaware of the necessity of taking antiretroviral drugs for the rest of their lives; only 14.4% knew how to proceed when a dosage was missed; 22.1% said they could die and the same number of individuals believed in aggravation of the disease in case of treatment interruption. The majority, 68.2%, considered it very necessary to receive drug information. The results show that there is an apparent lack of general information among users of antiretroviral drugs, and at the same time a need for it. It is necessary that all professionals involved in the health care of the patients agree that an efficient supply of information on prescribed drugs is an ethical component of the treatment that favors and fosters its adherence.

  3. Evaluation of HIV/AIDS patients' knowledge on antiretroviral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Flávia de Castro Almeida

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Lack of information on antiretroviral drugs or the misunderstanding of available information can facilitate incorrect use of such drugs. This can result in non-adherence to the prescribed regimen, leading to a great possibility of a therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to know which information HIV/AIDS patients, who receive their medicines at the pharmacy of a reference hospital in the northeast Brazil, have on the drugs they use, the source of this information and whether there is a need for additional information. A total of 195 HIV/AIDS patients, who were using either zidovudina + lamivudina 300+150mg (AZT+3TC, efavirenz 600mg (EFZ or lopinavir/ritonavir 133.33/33mg (LPV/r, were interviewed. The mean age was 41 years (SD = 9.55 and 70.8% were males. Of the total, 55.4% didn't know the effect of the drug in the organism; 35.9% were unaware of the necessity of taking antiretroviral drugs for the rest of their lives; only 14.4% knew how to proceed when a dosage was missed; 22.1% said they could die and the same number of individuals believed in aggravation of the disease in case of treatment interruption. The majority, 68.2%, considered it very necessary to receive drug information. The results show that there is an apparent lack of general information among users of antiretroviral drugs, and at the same time a need for it. It is necessary that all professionals involved in the health care of the patients agree that an efficient supply of information on prescribed drugs is an ethical component of the treatment that favors and fosters its adherence.

  4. The HIV Antiretroviral Drug Efavirenz has LSD-Like Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gatch, Michael B; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Huang, Ren-Qi; Yang, Wenjuan; Nguyen, Jacques D; González-Maeso, Javier; Rice, Kenner C.; France, Charles P.; Dillon, Glenn H.; Forster, Michael J; Schetz, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports have surfaced concerning misuse of the HIV antiretroviral medication efavirenz ((4S)-6-chloro-4-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2,4-dihydro-1H-3,1-benzoxazin-2-one) by HIV patients and non-infected teens who crush the pills and smoke the powder for its psychoactive effects. Molecular profiling of the receptor pharmacology of efavirenz pinpointed interactions with multiple established sites of action for other known drugs of abuse including catecholamine and indola...

  5. The emergence of drug resistant HIV variants and novel anti-retroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koosha Paydary; Parisa Khaghani; Sahra Emamzadeh-Fard; SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi; Kazem Baesi

    2013-01-01

    After its identification in 1980s, HIV has infected more than 30 million people worldwide. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, anti-retroviral drug resistance results from insufficient anti-retroviral pressure, which may lead to treatment failure. Preliminary studies support the idea that anti-retroviral drug resistance has evolved largely as a result of low-adherence of patients to therapy and extensive use of anti-retroviral drugs in the developed world;however, a highly heterogeneous horde of viral quasi-species are currently circulating in developing nations. Thus, the prioritizing of strategies adopted in such two worlds should be quite different considering the varying anti-retroviral drug resistance prevalence. In this article, we explore differences in anti-retroviral drug resistance patterns between developed and developing countries, as they represent two distinct ecological niches of HIV from an evolutionary standpoint.

  6. First-line antiretroviral drug discontinuations in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin-de Smidt, Melony; de Waal, Reneé; Cohen, Karen; Technau, Karl-Günter; Stinson, Kathryn; Maartens, Gary; Boulle, Andrew; Igumbor, Ehimario U.; Davies, Mary-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There are a limited number of paediatric antiretroviral drug options. Characterising the long term safety and durability of different antiretrovirals in children is important to optimise management of HIV infected children and to determine the estimated need for alternative drugs in paediatric regimens. We describe first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) durability and reasons for discontinuations in children at two South African ART programmes, where lopinavir/ritonavir has been recommended for children <3 years old since 2004, and abacavir replaced stavudine as the preferred nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in 2010. Methods We included children (<16 years at ART initiation) who initiated ≥3 antiretrovirals between 2004–2014 with ≥1 follow-up visit on ART. We estimated the incidence of first antiretroviral discontinuation using Kaplan-Meier analysis. We determined the reasons for antiretroviral discontinuations using competing risks analysis. We used Cox regression to identify factors associated with treatment-limiting toxicity. Results We included 3579 children with median follow-up duration of 41 months (IQR 14–72). At ART initiation, median age was 44 months (IQR 13–89) and median CD4 percent was 15% (IQR 9–21%). At three and five years on ART, 72% and 26% of children respectively remained on their initial regimen. By five years on ART, the most common reasons for discontinuations were toxicity (32%), treatment failure (18%), treatment simplification (5%), drug interactions (3%), and other or unspecified reasons (18%). The incidences of treatment limiting toxicity were 50.6 (95% CI 46.2–55.4), 1.6 (0.5–4.8), 2.0 (1.2–3.3), and 1.3 (0.6–2.8) per 1000 patient years for stavudine, abacavir, efavirenz and lopinavir/ritonavir respectively. Conclusions While stavudine was associated with a high risk of treatment-limiting toxicity, abacavir, lopinavir/ritonavir and efavirenz were well-tolerated. This supports the World Health

  7. Combination antiretroviral drugs in PLGA nanoparticle for HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Akhilesh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination antiretroviral (AR therapy continues to be the mainstay for HIV treatment. However, antiretroviral drug nonadherence can lead to the development of resistance and treatment failure. We have designed nanoparticles (NP that contain three AR drugs and characterized the size, shape, and surface charge. Additionally, we investigated the in vitro release of the AR drugs from the NP using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Methods Poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs containing ritonavir (RTV, lopinavir (LPV, and efavirenz (EFV were fabricated using multiple emulsion-solvent evaporation procedure. The nanoparticles were characterized by electron microscopy and zeta potential for size, shape, and charge. The intracellular concentration of AR drugs was determined over 28 days from NPs incubated with PBMCs. Macrophages were imaged by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry after incubation with fluorescent NPs. Finally, macrophage cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. Results Nanoparticle size averaged 262 ± 83.9 nm and zeta potential -11.4 ± 2.4. AR loading averaged 4% (w/v. Antiretroviral drug levels were determined in PBMCs after 100 μg of NP in 75 μL PBS was added to media. Intracellular peak AR levels from NPs (day 4 were RTV 2.5 ± 1.1; LPV 4.1 ± 2.0; and EFV 10.6 ± 2.7 μg and continued until day 28 (all AR ≥ 0.9 μg. Free drugs (25 μg of each drug in 25 μL ethanol added to PBMCs served as control were eliminated by 2 days. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated phagocytosis of NP into monocytes-derived macrophages (MDMs. Cellular MTT assay performed on MDMs demonstrated that NPs are not significantly cytotoxic. Conclusion These results demonstrated AR NPs could be fabricated containing three antiretroviral drugs (RTV, LPV, EFV. Sustained release of AR from PLGA NP show high drug levels in PBMCs until day 28 without cytotoxicity.

  8. Class of Antiretroviral Drugs and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Reiss, P; Sabin, CA

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated an association between combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction. It is not clear whether this association differs according to the class of antiretroviral drugs. We conducted a study to investigate the association...... of cumulative exposure to protease inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors with the risk of myocardial infarction. METHODS: We analyzed data collected through February 2005 from our prospective observational study of 23,437 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus....... The incidence rates of myocardial infarction during the follow-up period were calculated, and the associations between myocardial infarction and exposure to protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors were determined. RESULTS: Three hundred forty-five patients had a myocardial...

  9. Possible drug-metabolism interactions of medicinal herbs with antiretroviral agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, C. van den; Koopmans, P.P.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Burger, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Herbal medicines are widely used by HIV patients. Several herbal medicines have been shown to interact with antiretroviral drugs, which might lead to drug failure. We have aimed to provide an overview of the modulating effects of Western and African herbal medicines on antiretroviral drug-metabolizi

  10. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral. Houve uma associação entre o uso de cinco ou mais medicamentos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p = 0.000), e entre o período de tempo de terapia antirretroviral acima de seis anos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p VIH que reciben terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles

  11. Is there a role for generic antiretroviral drugs in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Gary P; Lappas, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The high cost of antiretroviral drugs has limited access to treatment for some HIV-infected patients in the United States and strained public resources. With the introduction of much cheaper generic versions of some of these agents, and with more to come in the next few years, the need increases to define the role of generic antiretroviral drugs in patient management.

  12. Therapeutic drug monitoring: an aid to optimising response to antiretroviral drugs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnoutse, R.E.; Schapiro, J.M.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Hekster, Y.A.; Burger, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has been proposed as a means to optimise response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV infection. Protease inhibitors (PIs) and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) efavirenz and nevirapine satisfy many criteria for TDM. Nuc

  13. Negotiation Strategies for Antiretroviral Drug Purchasers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemayr, Sebastian; Ryan, Gery W; Karir, Veena; Liu, Jenny; Palar, Kartika

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment has transformed HIV from a death sentence to a chronic condition, allowing people with HIV to live longer and healthier lives. However, they face significant barriers to accessing and affording life-saving-but expensive-antiretroviral (ARV) medications. These barriers are particularly severe for low-income patients, and they disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minorities. High ARV prices create pressure for government insurers to contain costs either by rationing care or by restricting eligibility for public programs. Limited funding, coupled with a growing demand for HIV care and treatment, is likely to make programmatic decisions about who is covered become more difficult over time. Therefore, it is important to identify options for reducing the cost of providing ARVs to allow more people to receive treatment. This study examines a variety of options for negotiating lower ARV procurement costs in U.S. markets. A case-study approach is used to assess options that different stakeholders could use in negotiating ARV price discounts with drug manufacturers given the regulatory and market constraints that exist in the United States.

  14. Novel antiretroviral drugs and renal function monitoring of HIV patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Paolo; Montinaro, Vincenzo; Mussini, Cristina; Di Biagio, Antonio; Bellagamba, Rita; Bonfanti, Paolo; Calza, Leonardo; Cherubini, Chiara; Corsi, Paola; Gargiulo, Miriam; Montella, Francesco; Rusconi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major comorbidity in patients affected by HIV infection. In addition, the introduction of new antiretroviral agents that interact with creatinine transporters is raising some concerns. In this review we analyze the currently available data about three new antiretroviral drugs and one new pharmacokinetic enhancer. Three of them (rilpivirine, cobicistat, dolutegravir) have shown some interactions with renal function, while tenofovir alafenamide fumarate reduces the plasmatic concentration of the parent drug. The future use of tenofovir alafenamide seems to be encouraging in order to reduce the renal interaction of tenofovir. Rilpivirine, cobicistat, and dolutegravir reduce the tubular secretion of creatinine, inducing a decrease of estimated glomerular filtration rate according to creatinine. Rilpivirine and dolutegravir block the uptake of creatinine from the blood, inhibiting organic cation transporter 2, and cobicistat interacts with the efflux inhibiting multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1. This effect can then be considered a "reset" of the estimated glomerular filtration rate according to creatinine. However, clinicians should carefully monitor renal function in order to identify possible alterations suggestive of a true renal functional impairment. Owing to the interference of these drugs with creatinine secretion, an alternative way of estimation of glomerular filtration rate would be desirable. However, at the moment, other methods of direct glomerular filtration rate measurement have a high impact on the patient, are not readily available, or are not reliable in HIV patients. Consequently, use of classic formulas to estimate glomerular filtration rate is still recommended. Also, tubular function needs to be carefully monitored with simple tests such as proteinuria, phosphatemia, urinary excretion of phosphate, normoglycemic glycosuria, and excretion of uric acid.

  15. Development and validation of HPLC-UV-MS method for the control of four anti-diabetic drugs in suspected counterfeit products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiu-mei; An, Ning; Wu, Jian-min; Li, Hui-yi; Zhang, Qi-ming

    2010-03-01

    An HPLC-UV method has been developed for the determination of valibose, miglitol, voglibose and acarbose, the four anti-diabetic drugs. The separation was accomplished successfully by using reversed phase chromatography (Prevail carbohydrate column, 250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) with a gradient acetonitrile-phosphate buffer solution (pH 8.0) at a wavelength of 210 nm. Furthermore, the method of a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ESI-MS in positive ionization mode has been established. These two methods were successfully applied to the assay and qualitative detection of four alpha-glucosidase inhibitors in the potential counterfeit anti-diabetic drugs.

  16. Rates of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription among injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonner Simon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the survival benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART for the treatment of HIV infection are well established, the clinical management of HIV disease continues to present major challenges. There are particular concerns regarding access to appropriate HIV treatment among HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected IDU in Vancouver, Canada, we examined initial ART regimens vis-à-vis the provincial government's therapeutic guidelines at the time ART was initiated. Briefly, there have been four sets of guidelines: Era 1 (1992 to November 1995; double-drug (dual NRTIs ART for patients with a CD4 cell count of 350 or less; Era 2 (December 1995 to May 1996; double-drug therapy for patients with a CD4+ cell count of 500 or less; Era 3 (June 1996 to June 1997; triple-drug therapy (dual NRTIs with a PI or NNRTI for patients who had a plasma viral load of > 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; dual therapy with two NRTIs for those with a plasma viral load of 5,000 to 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; Era 4 (since July 1997; universal use of triple drug therapy as first-line treatment. Results Between May 1996 and May 2003, 431 HIV-infected individuals were enrolled into the cohort. By May 31, 2003, 291 (67.5% individuals had initiated ART. We noted instances of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription in each guideline era, with 9 (53% in Era 1, 3 (12% in Era 2, 22 (28% in Era 3, and 23 (15% in Era 4. Of the 57 subjects who received an inappropriate ART regimen initially, 14 never received the appropriate therapy; among the remaining 43, the median time to the initiation of a guideline-appropriate ART regimen was 12 months (inter-quartile range 5 – 20. Conclusion The present study identified measurable rates of guideline-inappropriate ART prescription for patients who were injection drug users. Rates were highest in the era of dual therapy, although high rates persisted into the triple

  17. Preferred antiretroviral drugs for the next decade of scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Andrieux-Meyer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Global commitments aim to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART to 15 million people living with HIV by 2015, and recent studies have demonstrated the potential for widespread ART to prevent HIV transmission. Increasingly, countries are adapting their national guidelines to start ART earlier, for both clinical and preventive benefits. To maximize the benefits of ART in resource-limited settings, six key principles need to guide ART choice: simplicity, tolerability and safety, durability, universal applicability, affordability and heat stability. Currently available drugs, combined with those in late-stage clinical development, hold great promise to simplify treatment in the short term. Over the longer term, newer technologies, such as long-acting formulations and nanotechnology, could radically alter the treatment paradigm. This commentary reviews recommendations made in an expert consultation on treatment scale up in resource-limited settings.

  18. HIV entry inhibitors: a new generation of antiretroviral drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elias KRAMBOVITIS; Filippos PORICHIS; Demetrios A SPANDIDOS

    2005-01-01

    AIDS is presently treatable, and patients can have a good prognosis due to the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but it is still not curable or preventable. High toxicity of HAART, and the emergence of drug resistance add to the imperative to continue research into new strategies and interventions.Considerable progress in the understanding of HIV attachment and entry into host cells has suggested new possibilities for rationally designing agents that interfere with this process. The approval and introduction of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) for clinical use signals a new era in AIDS therapeutics. Here we review the crucial steps the virus uses to achieve cell entry, which merit attention as potential targets, and the compounds at pre-clinical and clinical development stages, reported to effectively inhibit cell entry.

  19. Pharmaceutical counterfeiting and the RFID technology intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustasse, Alberto; Arvidson, Cody; Rutsohn, Phil

    2010-07-01

    Both nationally and internationally, pharmaceutical counterfeiting has become a problem that is threatening economic stability and public health. The purpose of the present research study review was to analyze the scope and severity of pharmaceutical counterfeiting and to establish if the implantation of the Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) model can more efficiently be used within the pharmaceutical supply chain to reduce the problem counterfeit drugs impose on public health and international economic stability. Results indicated that implementing the RFID model for tracking drugs at the item level in the pharmaceutical supply chain has potential to alleviate the scope of the counterfeit drug problem. Recommendations for how the pharmaceutical industry may sooner adopt the RFID model are made.

  20. Nanoformulated antiretroviral drug combinations extend drug release and antiretroviral responses in HIV-1-infected macrophages: implications for neuroAIDS therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacek, Ari S; McMillan, JoEllyn; Miller, Reagan; Anderson, Alec; Rabinow, Barrett; Gendelman, Howard E

    2010-12-01

    We posit that improvements in pharmacokinetics and biodistributions of antiretroviral therapies (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus type one-infected people can be achieved through nanoformulationed drug delivery systems. To this end, we manufactured nanoparticles of atazanavir, efavirenz, and ritonavir (termed nanoART) and treated human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) in combination therapies to assess antiretroviral responses. This resulted in improved drug uptake, release, and antiretroviral efficacy over monotherapy. MDM rapidly, within minutes, ingested nanoART combinations, at equal or similar rates, as individual formulations. Combination nanoART ingested by MDM facilitated individual drug release from 15 to >20 days. These findings are noteworthy as a nanoART cell-mediated drug delivery provides a means to deliver therapeutics to viral sanctuaries, such as the central nervous system during progressive human immunodeficiency virus type one infection. The work brings us yet another step closer to realizing the utility of nanoART for virus-infected people.

  1. Validated HPLC and Ultra-HPLC Methods for Determination of Dronedarone and Amiodarone Application for Counterfeit Drug Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bagary, Ramzia I; Elkady, Ehab F; Mowaka, Shereen; Attallah, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Two simple, accurate, and precise chromatographic methods have been developed and validated for the determination of dronedarone (DRO) HCl and amiodarone (AMI) HCl either alone or in binary mixtures due to the possibility of using AMI as a counterfeit of DRO because of its lower price. First, an RP-HPLC method is described for the simultaneous determination of DRO and AMI. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a BDS Hypersil C18 column (150×4.6 mm, 5 μm). Isocratic elution based on potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer with 0.1% triethylamine pH 6-methanol (10+90, v/v) at a flow rate of 2 mL/min with UV detection at 254 nm was performed. The second method is RP ultra-HPLC in which the chromatographic separation was achieved on an AcclaimTM RSLC 120 C18 column (100×2.1 mm, 2.2 μm) using isocratic elution with potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer with 0.1% triethylamine pH 6-methanol (5+95, v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min with UV detection at 254 nm. Linearity, accuracy, and precision of the two methods were found to be acceptable over the concentration ranges of 5-80 μg/mL for both DRO and AMI. The results were statistically compared using one-way analysis of variance. The optimized methods were validated and proved to be specific, robust, precise, and accurate for the QC of the drugs in their pharmaceutical preparations.

  2. TRANSPORT OF COUNTERFEIT GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Babčanová

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on a current problem of transport of counterfeit goods in the European Union. Counterfeiting has a strong influence on the distribution organizations worldwide because most of counterfeit goods threaten the health and safety of consumers. Counterfeiting is a serious problem in the world economy today. The purpose of this paper is to point out the danger of counterfeiting in connection with the transport of Intellectual Property (IP rights - infringing goods. Background of the paper’s content is based on secondary data research of publicly available sources - international statistics and world reports.

  3. 假冒伪劣常用药品的外观鉴别分析%Appearance Discriminant Analysis of Counterfeit Drugs Commonly Used

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王美菊

    2015-01-01

    药品相比其他商品是一种较为特殊的产品,药品进入市场时需严格保证其质量及对人体用药后的安全性。药品抽检为药品监督管理中一项必不可少的工作程序,药品抽检的准确度可直接影响药品监督管理工作。因此,药品抽检人员需掌握简便、无需仪器分析的鉴别方法,通过药品的外观对其进行鉴别是极为重要的,从而加强基层药品管理员鉴别假冒伪劣药品的能力及经营商、药品质检人员的查假技巧,以提高伪劣药品检出率。%Drugs compared to other commodities is a more special product, when drugs into the market need to strictly maintain its quality and on the human body after administration of security. Drug sampling is an essential working, the accuracy of sampling drugs can directly affect the drug supervision and management. Therefore, drug sampling staff need to master simple identiifcation method without instrumental analysis, by the appearance of the drug is extremely important to identify them, thereby strengthening grass-roots medicines administrator the ability to identify counterfeit drugs and operators, drug quality control personnel charles false tips to improve the detection rate of counterfeit drugs.

  4. Drug Anti-counterfeiting System Based on QR Code%基于 QR 码的药品防伪系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓庆; 陆涛; 焦强

    2015-01-01

    针对药品防伪现状,以Microsoft Visual Studio 2010为开发平台,运用C#编程语言和SQL Server 2008数据库,开发基于QR码防伪技术和加密技术的药品防伪系统。系统包括QR码生成模块、查询模块、验证模块、查询信息反馈模块、数据统计模块等。应用结果表明,消费者可以方便地查询药品的真伪,基于QR码的药品防伪系统方便实用,安全可靠。%According to current situation of drug security , using Visual Studio 2010 as software development platform , C#as the programming language , SQL Server 2008 as the database , a system based on anti-counterfeiting technology and encryption tech-nology was developed .The system includes QR code generation module , query module , test module , information feedback mod-ule, data statistics module, etc.The experimental results show that the consumers can easily query the authenticity of a drug and the drug anti-counterfeiting system is convenient , practical and reliable .

  5. Do national drug policies influence antiretroviral drug prices? Evidence from the Southern African Development community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Galárraga, Omar

    2017-03-01

    The efficacy of low- and middle-income countries’ (LMIC) national drug policies in managing antiretroviral (ARV) pharmaceutical prices is not well understood. Though ARV drug prices have been declining in LMIC over the past decade, little research has been done on the role of their national drug policies. This study aims to (i) analyse global ARV prices from 2004 to 2013 and (ii) examine the relationship of national drug policies to ARV prices. Analysis of ARV drug prices utilized data from the Global Price Reporting Mechanism from the World Health Organization (WHO). Ten of the most common ARV drugs (first-line and second-line) were selected. National drug policies were also assessed for 12 countries in the South African Development Community (SADC), which self-reported their policies through WHO surveys. The best predictor of ARV drug price was generic status—the generic versions of 8 out of 10 ARV drugs were priced lower than branded versions. However, other factors such as transaction volume, HIV prevalence, national drug policies and PEPFAR/CHAI involvement were either not associated with ARV drug price or were not consistent predictors of price across different ARV drugs. In the context of emerging international trade agreements, which aim to strengthen patent protections internationally and potentially delay the sale of generic drugs in LMIC, this study shines a spotlight on the importance of generic drugs in controlling ARV prices. Further research is needed to understand the impact of national drug policies on ARV prices.

  6. Correlates of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of HIV-positive drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, M R; Obeng-Aduasare, Y; Sheehan, H; Hong, S Y; Terrin, N; Duong, D V; Trung, N V; Wanke, C; Kinh, N V; Tang, A M

    2014-08-01

    The HIV epidemic in Vietnam is concentrated, with high prevalence estimates among injection drug users and commercial sex workers. Socio-demographics, substance use and clinical correlates of antiretroviral therapy non-adherence were studied in 100 HIV-1 infected drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months in Hanoi, Vietnam. All study participants were men with a mean age of 29.9 ± 4.9 years. The median duration on antiretroviral therapy was 16.2 ± 12.7 months; 83% reported 'very good' or 'perfect' adherence in the past 30 days on a subjective one-item Likert scale at time of study enrollment; 48% of participants reported drug use within the previous 6 months, with 22% reporting current drug use. Injection drug use with or without non-injection drug use in the past 6 months (95% C.I. 2.19, 1.30-3.69) and years on antiretroviral therapy (95% C.I. 1.43, 1.14-1.78) were correlated with suboptimal adherence. These findings support Vietnam's ongoing scale-up of harm reduction programmes for injection drug users and their integration with antiretroviral therapy delivery. Moreover, results highlight the need to identify and implement new ways to support high levels of antiretroviral therapy adherence as duration on antiretroviral therapy increases.

  7. The HIV antiretroviral drug efavirenz has LSD-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatch, Michael B; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Huang, Ren-Qi; Yang, Wenjuan; Nguyen, Jacques D; González-Maeso, Javier; Rice, Kenner C; France, Charles P; Dillon, Glenn H; Forster, Michael J; Schetz, John A

    2013-11-01

    Anecdotal reports have surfaced concerning misuse of the HIV antiretroviral medication efavirenz ((4S)-6-chloro-4-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2,4-dihydro-1H-3,1-benzoxazin-2-one) by HIV patients and non-infected teens who crush the pills and smoke the powder for its psychoactive effects. Molecular profiling of the receptor pharmacology of efavirenz pinpointed interactions with multiple established sites of action for other known drugs of abuse including catecholamine and indolamine transporters, and GABAA and 5-HT(2A) receptors. In rodents, interaction with the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a primary site of action of lysergic acid diethylamine (LSD), appears to dominate efavirenz's behavioral profile. Both LSD and efavirenz reduce ambulation in a novel open-field environment. Efavirenz occasions drug-lever responding in rats discriminating LSD from saline, and this effect is abolished by selective blockade of the 5-HT(2A) receptor. Similar to LSD, efavirenz induces head-twitch responses in wild-type, but not in 5-HT(2A)-knockout, mice. Despite having GABAA-potentiating effects (like benzodiazepines and barbiturates), and interactions with dopamine transporter, serotonin transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (like cocaine and methamphetamine), efavirenz fails to maintain responding in rats that self-administer cocaine, and it fails to produce a conditioned place preference. Although its molecular pharmacology is multifarious, efavirenz's prevailing behavioral effect in rodents is consistent with LSD-like activity mediated via the 5-HT(2A) receptor. This finding correlates, in part, with the subjective experiences in humans who abuse efavirenz and with specific dose-dependent adverse neuropsychiatric events, such as hallucinations and night terrors, reported by HIV patients taking it as a medication.

  8. Systematic review of antiretroviral-associated lipodystrophy: lipoatrophy, but not central fat gain, is an antiretroviral adverse drug reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneé de Waal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipoatrophy and/or central fat gain are observed frequently in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. Both are assumed to be antiretroviral adverse drug reactions. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to determine whether fat loss or gain was more common in HIV-infected patients on ART than in uninfected controls; was associated with specific antiretrovirals; and would reverse after switching antiretrovirals. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies met our inclusion criteria. One cohort study reported more lipoatrophy, less subcutaneous fat gain, but no difference in central fat gain in HIV-infected patients on ART than in controls. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs showed more limb fat loss (or less fat gain with the following regimens: stavudine (versus other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs; efavirenz (versus protease inhibitors (PIs; and NRTI-containing (versus NRTI-sparing. RCTs showed increased subcutaneous fat after switching to NRTI-sparing regimens or from stavudine/zidovudine to abacavir/tenofovir. There were no significant between-group differences in trunk and/or visceral fat gain in RCTs of various regimens, but results from efavirenz versus PI regimens were inconsistent. There was no significant between-group differences in central fat gain in RCTs switched to NRTI-sparing regimens, or from PI-containing regimens. CONCLUSIONS: There is clear evidence of a causal relationship between NRTIs (especially thymidine analogues and lipoatrophy, with concomitant PIs possibly having an ameliorating effect or efavirenz causing additive toxicity. By contrast, central fat gain appears to be a consequence of treating HIV infection, because it is not different from controls, is not linked to any antiretroviral class, and doesn't improve on switching.

  9. Anti-Counterfeiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyls, Pim; Guajardo, Jorge; Batina, Lejla; Kerins, Tim

    Counterfeiting of goods is becoming a very huge problem for our society. It not only has a global economic impact, but it also poses a serious threat to our global safety and health. Currently, global economic damage across all industries due to the counterfeiting of goods is estimated at over 600 billion annually [2]. In the United States, seizure of counterfeit goods has tripled in the last 5 years, and in Europe, over 100 million pirated and counterfeit goods were seized in 2004. Fake products cost businesses in the United Kingdom approximately 17 billion [2]. In India, 15% of fast-moving consumer goods and 38% of auto parts are counterfeit. Other industries in which many goods are being counterfeit are the toy industry, content and software, cosmetics, publishing, food and beverages, tobacco, apparel, sports goods, cards, and so forth.

  10. Fate of the antiretroviral drug tenofovir in agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne; Chapman, Ralph; Lapen, David R.; Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Tenofovir (9-(R)-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)-adenine) is an antiretroviral drug widely used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. Tenofovir is extensively and rapidly excreted unchanged in the urine. In the expectation that tenofovir could potentially reach agricultural lands through the application of municipal biosolids or wastewater, and in the absence of any environmental fate data, we evaluated its persistence in selected agricultural soils. Less than 10% of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir added to soils varying widely in texture (sand, loam, clay loam) was mineralized in a 2-month incubation under laboratory conditions. Tenofovir was less readily extractable from clay soils than from a loam or a sandy loam soil. Radioactive residues of tenofovir were removed from the soil extractable fraction with DT{sub 50}s ranging from 24 {+-} 2 to 67 + 22 days (first order kinetic model) or 44 + 9 to 127 + 55 days (zero order model). No extractable transformation products were detectable by HPLC. Tenofovir mineralization in the loam soil increased with temperature (range 4 {sup o}C to 30 {sup o}C), and did not occur in autoclaved soil, suggesting a microbial basis. Mineralization rates increased with soil moisture content, ranging from air-dried to saturated. In summary, tenofovir was relatively persistent in soils, there were no extractable transformation products detected, and the response of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir mineralization to soil temperature and heat sterilization indicated that the molecule was biodegraded by aerobic microorganisms. Sorption isotherms with dewatered biosolids suggested that tenofovir residues could potentially partition into the particulate fraction during sewage treatment.

  11. Antiretroviral drug supply challenges in the era of scaling up ART in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The number of people receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) has increased considerably in recent years and is expected to continue to grow in the coming years. A major challenge is to maintain uninterrupted supplies of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and prevent stock outs. This article discusses issues around the management of ARVs and prevention of stock outs in Malawi, a low-income country with a high HIV/AIDS burden, and a weak procurement and supply chain management system. This sy...

  12. On the Counterfeiting Battlefield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beukel, Karin; Rullani, Francesco

    and reputation. We describe the strategies of the firm and of the counterfeiters in these two contexts, and test our hypotheses using a unique dataset reporting 3333 battles taken by a high-tech firm against more than 2000 counterfeiters in 75 countries over a 6-year period. We find broad support for our...

  13. Falsificação de medicamentos no Brasil Falsificación de medicamentos en Brasil Counterfeiting of drugs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseane Ames

    2012-02-01

    ,9% y 5,7%, respectivamente. La mayor parte de los medicamentos falsos fue incautada en los estados Paraná, Sao Paulo y Santa Catarina, con incremento superior a 200% en el número de medicamentos inauténticos encaminados a la pericia en el período. Hubo aumento en las incautaciones de medicamentos contrabandeados arrecadados en conjunto con los falsos, 67% de las incautaciones incluyeron al menos un medicamento contrabandeado. CONCLUSIONES: La falsificación de medicamentos es un grave problema de salud pública. La identificación de las clases de medicamentos falsos en Brasil y los principales estados brasileños con esta problemática pueden facilitar acciones futuras de prevención y represión por los órganos brasileños responsables.OBJECTIVE: To identify the main counterfeit drugs seized by the Brazilian Federal Police and the states where seizures have been made. METHODS: A retrospective descriptive study on expert reports produced by criminal investigators of the Federal Police between January 2007 and September 2010, in relation to counterfeit drugs, was carried out. RESULTS: The drugs with greatest numbers of seizures were selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors that are used for treating male erectile dysfunction (Cialis® and Viagra®, mean = 66% , followed by anabolic steroids (Durateston® and Hemogenin®: 8.9% and 5.7%, respectively. The greatest proportions of the counterfeit drugs were seized in the states of Paraná, Santa Catarina (both Southeastern Brazil and São Paulo (Southeastern, and the number of non-authentic drugs sent for investigation increased by more than 200% over the study period. There were increases in seizures of smuggled drugs found together with counterfeit drugs: 67% of the seizures included at least one smuggled drug. CONCLUSIONS: Counterfeiting of drugs is a severe public health problem. Identification of the classes of counterfeit drugs present in Brazil and the main Brazilian states with this problem may facilitate

  14. Use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to simulate drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic and antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltó, José; Rajoli, Rajith; Back, David; Valle, Marta; Miranda, Cristina; Owen, Andrew; Clotet, Bonaventura; Siccardi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Co-administration of antineoplastics with ART is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, trials specifically assessing such DDIs are lacking. Our objective was to simulate DDIs between the antineoplastics erlotinib and gefitinib with key antiretroviral drugs and to predict dose adjustments using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. In vitro data describing chemical properties and pharmacokinetic processes of each drug and their effect on cytochrome P450 isoforms were obtained from the literature. Plasma drug-concentration profiles were simulated in a virtual population of 50 individuals receiving erlotinib or gefitinib alone or with darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz or etravirine. Simulated pharmacokinetic parameters and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs (midazolam, maraviroc) were compared with literature values. Erlotinib and gefitinib pharmacokinetics with and without antiretrovirals were compared and dose-adjustment strategies were evaluated. Simulated parameters of each drug and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs were in agreement with reference values. Darunavir/ritonavir increased erlotinib and gefitinib exposure, while efavirenz and etravirine decreased erlotinib and gefitinib concentrations. Based on our predictions, dose-adjustment strategies may consist of once-daily dosing erlotinib at 25 mg and gefitinib at 125 mg with darunavir/ritonavir; or erlotinib at 200 mg and gefitinib at 375 mg with etravirine. The interaction with efavirenz was not overcome even after doubling erlotinib or gefitinib doses. PBPK models predicted the in vivo pharmacokinetics of erlotinib, gefitinib and the antiretrovirals darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz and etravirine, and the DDIs between them. The simulated dose-adjustments may represent valuable strategies to optimize antineoplastic therapy in HIV-infected patients.

  15. Assessing teratogenicity of antiretroviral drugs: monitoring and analysis plan of the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Deborah L; Tilson, Hugh; Elder, Jenna; Doi, Peggy

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry's (APR) monitoring and analysis plan. APR is overseen by a committee of experts in obstetrics, pediatrics, teratology, infectious diseases, epidemiology and biostatistics from academia, government and the pharmaceutical industry. APR uses a prospective exposure-registration cohort design. Clinicians voluntarily register pregnant women with prenatal exposures to any antiretroviral therapy and provide fetal/neonatal outcomes. A birth defect is any birth outcome > or = 20 weeks gestation with a structural or chromosomal abnormality as determined by a geneticist. The prevalence is calculated by dividing the number of defects by the total number of live births and is compared to the prevalence in the CDC's population-based surveillance system. Additionally, first trimester exposures, in which organogenesis occurs, are compared with second/third trimester exposures. Statistical inference is based on exact methods for binomial proportions. Overall, a cohort of 200 exposed newborns is required to detect a doubling of risk, with 80% power and a Type I error rate of 5%. APR uses the Rule of Three: immediate review occurs once three specific defects are reported for a specific exposure. The likelihood of finding three specific defects in a cohort of < or = 600 by chance alone is less than 5% for all but the most common defects. To enhance the assurance of prompt, responsible, and appropriate action in the event of a potential signal, APR employs the strategy of 'threshold'. The threshold for action is determined by the extent of certainty about the cases, driven by statistical considerations and tempered by the specifics of the cases. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Crespo, Àngels; Llibre, Josep M; Cardona-Peitx, Glòria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals) - with a cost of 47,139.91 € - would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar), should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets.

  17. [Non-antiretroviral drugs uses among HIV-infected persons receiving antiretroviral therapy in Senegal: Costs and factors associated with prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, A; Youbong, T J; Maynart, M; Ndoye, M; Diéye, F L; Ndiaye, N A; Koita-Fall, M B; Ndiaye, B; Seydi, M

    2017-08-01

    In addition to antiretroviral therapy, non-antiretroviral drugs are necessary for the appropriate care of people living with HIV. The costs of such drugs are totally or partially supported by the people living with HIV. We aimed to evaluate the overall costs, the costs supported by the people living with HIV and factors associated with the prescription of non-antiretroviral drugs in people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy in Senegal. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 331 people living with HIV who initiated antiretroviral therapy between 2009 and 2011 and followed until March 2012. The costs of non-antiretroviral drugs were those of the national pharmacy for essential drugs; otherwise they were the lowest costs in the private pharmacies. Associated factors were identified through a logistic regression model. The study population was 61 % female. At baseline, 39 % of patients were classified at WHO clinical stage 3 and 40 % at WHO clinical stage 4. Median age, body mass index and CD4 cells count were 41 years, 18kg/m(2) and 93 cells/μL, respectively. After a mean duration of 11.4 months of antiretroviral therapy, 85 % of patients received at least one prescription for a non-antiretroviral drug. Over the entire study period, the most frequently prescribed non-antiretroviral drugs were cotrimoxazole (78.9 % of patients), iron (33.2 %), vitamins (21.1 %) and antibiotics (19.6 %). The mean cost per patient was 34 Euros and the mean cost supported per patient was 14 Euros. The most expensive drugs per treated patient were antihypertensives (168 Euros), anti-ulcer agents (12 Euros), vitamins (8.5 Euros) and antihistamines (7 Euros). The prescription for a non-antiretroviral drug was associated with advanced clinical stage (WHO clinical stage 3/4 versus stage 1/2): OR=2.25; 95 % CI=1.11-4.57 and viral type (HIV-2 versus HIV-1/HIV-1+HIV-2): OR=0.36; 95 % CI=0.14-0.89. Non-antiretroviral drugs are frequently prescribed to

  18. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreu-Crespo À

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Àngels Andreu-Crespo,1,* Josep M Llibre,2,3,* Glòria Cardona-Peitx,1 Ferran Sala-Piñol,1 Bonaventura Clotet,2,4 Xavier Bonafont-Pujol1 1Pharmacy Department, 2HIV Unit and “Lluita contra la SIDA” Foundation, University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, 3Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 4Universitat de Vic-Universitat Central de Catalunya (UVIC-UCC, Vic, Barcelona, Spain *These authors contributed equally to the work Abstract: While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals – with a cost of 47,139.91€ – would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar, should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets. Keywords: antiretroviral treatment, cost efficacy, drug packaging, treatment change

  19. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  20. Estimated glomerular filtration rate, chronic kidney disease and antiretroviral drug use in HIV-positive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mocroft; O. Kirk; P. Reiss; S. de Wit; D. Sedlacek; M. Beniowski; J. Gatell; A.N. Phillips; B. Ledergerber; J.D. Lundgren

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in HIV-positive persons might be caused by both HIV and traditional or non-HIV-related factors. Our objective was to investigate long-term exposure to specific antiretroviral drugs and CKD. Design: A cohort study including 6843 HIV-positive persons with at le

  1. Use of non-antiretroviral drugs among individuals with and without HIV-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S

    2017-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the use of non-antiretroviral drugs in the HIV-infected compared to the general population. METHODS: From the Danish HIV Cohort Study, we identified all HIV-infected individuals older than 18 years at HIV diagnosis who received care in Denmark through 1995-2013 and reported n...

  2. Assessing the problem of counterfeit medications in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, G; Patel, S; Khan, S

    2012-03-01

    Counterfeit medicines pose an ever-increasing threat to public health, although precise tracking of illegal counterfeit prescription drug activity is difficult. Available data indicate that all types of medications have been targeted. Adverse health effects, including death, have resulted from using counterfeit medications; consumers who self-medicate without appropriate interactions with the healthcare system rarely receive adequate healthcare. The Internet provides a large, convenient route for counterfeiters to reach potential buyers with unregulated, often dangerous, products. The majority of medicines purchased via unverified Internet sites are counterfeit; often, these products lack the purported drug compound or have variable concentrations of active ingredients and sometimes contain dangerous toxins. Although many consumers acknowledge some degree of risk with purchasing medications via the Internet, speed, convenience and cost often prompt these purchases. Counterfeit medications also have been detected in the legitimate supply chain, but represent a significantly smaller proportion of sales than those purchased via the Internet. Pilot programmes in Europe have demonstrated that product verification systems prevent penetration of counterfeit products into the legitimate supply chain. Significant EU legislation, including stronger penalties for counterfeiting, is in development. In the United Kingdom, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) launched an initiative against counterfeit medication. Healthcare professionals should report suspected cases of counterfeit medication to the MHRA, be alert to threats to the medicine supply, and provide practical advice to patients about ordering medications online, including avoiding unregulated Internet pharmacies, and being suspicious of sites offering substantial discounts and prescription-only medication without a prescription. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Chemical profile of counterfeit buprenorphine vials seized in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Faryadi, Mansoor; Akhgari, Maryam; Bahmanabadi, Leila

    2007-10-25

    Buprenorphine, commonly known by the trademark Temgesic, is one of the most popular drugs of abuse among the opioid-addicted young individuals in Iran. Temgesic, Bungesic, etc. are the most popular and important illicit opioid drugs in Tehran's illicit drugs black market, and are now among the most widely abused by opioid addicts. Because of this, counterfeiting of this drug has increased in Tehran. In this study, the qualitative analysis of counterfeit buprenorphine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) demonstrates the presence of diacetylmorphine, acetylcodeine and pheniramine, as well as the absence of buprenorphine. In conclusion, due to the absence of quality control and difficulties in differentiating counterfeit buprenorphine from genuine products, the use of counterfeit buprenorphine leads the opioid abusers to health risks.

  4. Antiretroviral drugs do not interfere with bryostatin-mediated HIV-1 latency reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Clemente, Maria Isabel; Álvarez, Susana; Díaz, Laura; García-Alonso, Dolores; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Ángeles

    2015-11-01

    Although an effective combination of antiretroviral therapy (cART) controls HIV-1 viraemia in infected patients, viral latency established soon after infection hinders HIV-1 eradication. It has been shown that bryostatin-1 (BRY) inhibits HIV-infection in vitro and reactivates the latent virus through the protein kinase C-NF-κB pathway. We determined the in vitro potential effect of BRY in combination with currently used antiretroviral drugs. BRY alone or in combination with maraviroc (MVC)/Atripla (ATP) was tested for its capacity to reactivate latent virus and inhibit new infections. JLTRG-R5 cells and two latent HIV-1-infected cell lines, J89GFP and THP89GFP, were used as latency models. To quantify HIV infection, the reporter cell line TZM-bl was used. We found that BRY reactivates HIV-1 even in combination with MVC or ATP. Antiretroviral combinations with BRY do not interfere with BRY activity (i.e., the reactivation of latently infected cells) or with the antiviral activity of antiretroviral drugs. In addition, BRY-mediated down-modulation of surface CD4 and CXCR4 was not affected when it was used in combination with other antiretrovirals, and no hyperactivation or high-proliferation effects were observed in primary T cells. Moreover, the BRY treatment was able to reactivate HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells from HIV-1-infected patients under cART. Thus, we propose the use of BRY to purge the viral reservoir and recommend its combination with current antiretroviral treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Strategies from the counterfeiting battlefield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beukel, Karin; Rullani, Francesco

    unexplored. Organizations protect their identity by fighting counterfeiters in their main and ancillary markets, as well as against diffusion of dangerous counterfeit products that can damage their brand and reputation. We describe the strategies of the firm and of the counterfeiters in these two contexts......Organizations experience both costs and benefits when facing counterfeits. Recent research has highlighted the differences in outcome of entry of counterfeits as being dependent on quality uncertainties, pricing, networks and non-price signaling, however, the role of organizations’ identity remains...... the difficulties firms face in protecting their main markets, and their advantages in limiting the diffusion of dangerous counterfeit products. Counterfeits can thereby be understood as a potential source for disruptive identity shifts, which explain the heterogeneous impact from counterfeits....

  6. Impact of pharmaceutical care interventions on the occurrence and resolution of drug therapy problems in antiretroviral drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwaozuzu, E.E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical care (PC has been shown to improve the outcome of drug therapy in many disease conditions.HIV/AIDS is one of the disease conditions that are fraught with many problems that can benefit from this new emphasis of pharmacy practice also known as ‘pharmacists care’. This study is designed to determine the number and types of drug therapy problems occurring in the drug therapy of HIV patients receiving treatment at a tertiary hospital in southeast Nigeria and to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care activities on the occurrence of these drug therapy problems (DTPs. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care’ was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene in the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The study showed significant reduction in the incidence of drug therapy problems following the Pharmacist’s intervention activities. The study found out that eighty-nine percent (89% of the prescriptions had potential drug therapy problems before the interventions which were reduced by 12% to seventy-seven percent (77% after the intervention. The study also identified seventeen (17 different potential drug therapy problems prior to the interventions. A re - evaluation of these potential drug therapy problems after the interventions showed the very significant percentage reductions in the occurrence of each DTP. The study showed that pharmacists’ interventions in antiretroviral drug therapy through Pharmaceutical care can significantly reduce the occurrence of drug therapy problems associated with antiretroviral drug therapy.

  7. HIV-1 genetic diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Roraima state, northern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Renato Augusto Carvalho; Granja, Fabiana; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has spread towards the Northern country region, but little is known about HIV-1 subtypes and prevalence of HIV strains with resistance mutations to antiretrovirals in some of the Northern states. HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were obtained from 73 treatment-naive and -experienced subjects followed between 2013 and 2014 at a public health reference unit from Roraima, the northernmost Brazilian state. The most prevalent HIV-1 clade observed in the study population was the subtype B (91%), followed by subtype C (9%). Among 12 HIV-1 strains from treatment-naïve patients, only one had a transmitted drug resistance mutation for NNRTI. Among 59 treatment-experienced patients, 12 (20%) harbored HIV-1 strains with acquired drug resistance mutations (ADRM) that reduce the susceptibility to two classes of antiretroviral drugs (NRTI and NNRTI or NRTI and PI), and five (8%) harbored HIV-1 strains with ADRM that reduced susceptibility to only one class of antiretroviral drugs (NNRTI or PI). No patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility to all three classes of antiretroviral drugs were detected. A substantial fraction of treatment-experienced patients with (63%) and without (70%) ADRM had undetectable plasma viral loads (<40 copies/ml) at the time of sampling. Among treatment-experienced with plasma viral loads above 2,000 copies/ml, 44% displayed no ADRM. This data showed that the HIV-1 epidemic in Roraima displayed a much lower level of genetic diversity and a lower prevalence of ADRM than that described in other Brazilian states. PMID:28301548

  8. Clinically relevant transmitted drug resistance to first line antiretroviral drugs and implications for recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Monge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim was to analyse trends in clinically relevant resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs in Spain, applying the Stanford algorithm, and to compare these results with reported Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR defined by the 2009 update of the WHO SDRM list. METHODS: We analysed 2781 sequences from ARV naive patients of the CoRIS cohort (Spain between 2007-2011. Using the Stanford algorithm "Low-level resistance", "Intermediate resistance" and "High-level resistance" categories were considered as "Resistant". RESULTS: 70% of the TDR found using the WHO list were relevant for first-line treatment according to the Stanford algorithm. A total of 188 patients showed clinically relevant resistance to first-line ARVs [6.8% (95%Confidence Interval: 5.8-7.7], and 221 harbored TDR using the WHO list [7.9% (6.9-9.0]. Differences were due to a lower prevalence in clinically relevant resistance for NRTIs [2.3% (1.8-2.9 vs. 3.6% (2.9-4.3 by the WHO list] and PIs [0.8% (0.4-1.1 vs. 1.7% (1.2-2.2], while it was higher for NNRTIs [4.6% (3.8-5.3 vs. 3.7% (3.0-4.7]. While TDR remained stable throughout the study period, clinically relevant resistance to first line drugs showed a significant trend to a decline (p = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of clinically relevant resistance to first line ARVs in Spain is decreasing, and lower than the one expected looking at TDR using the WHO list. Resistance to first-line PIs falls below 1%, so the recommendation of screening for TDR in the protease gene should be questioned in our setting. Cost-effectiveness studies need to be carried out to inform evidence-based recommendations.

  9. Prediction of phenotypic susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs using physiochemical properties of the primary enzymatic structure combined with artificial neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, J; Høj, L; Fox, Z

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Genotypic interpretation systems extrapolate observed associations in datasets to predict viral susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) for given isolates. We aimed to develop and validate an approach using artificial neural networks (ANNs) that employ descriptors...

  10. The Effects Of Antiretroviral Drugs On The Absorbance Characteristics Of Blood Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Ani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of antiretroviral drugs on the absorbance characteristics of blood components have been studied. The methodology involved the serial dilution of the five different antiretroviral drugs two HAARTFDC and three single drugs and the subsequent incubation with the blood samples collected from ten blood samples of HIV negative persons for the absorbance measurement using a digital Ultraviolet Visible MetaSpecAE1405031Pro Spectrophotometer. Reflectance Dielectric constant etc were derived from the absorbance data. For these drugs to be effective as HIV blockers they should be able to coat the surfaces of the lymphocytes. The question therefore arises as to what extent these drugs are able to coat the surfaces of the blood cells This was established using the extent of absorbance change. Models for coating effectiveness were formulated. The coating effectiveness was therefore calculated from peak absorbance values. Red blood cells were shown not to give reliable results. The results obtained however establish the fact that some coating of the drug had really occurred on the surfaces of the lymphocytes. The drug films were determined for lymphocytes and used to explain some observed clinical findings. The use of the findings of this work in drug design may be expected to yield good results.

  11. Given financial constraints, it would be unethical to divert antiretroviral drugs from treatment to prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Ruth; Cowan, Ethan

    2012-07-01

    Striking advances in HIV prevention have set the stage for renewed debate on setting priorities in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Two new prevention strategies--preexposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention--use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of HIV/AIDS in addition to treating patients. The potential for success of these new prevention strategies sets up an ethical dilemma: where resources are limited and supplies of lifesaving antiretroviral medications are insufficient to treat those currently living with HIV, how should these resources be divided between treatment and prevention? This article explores several ethical principles used in formulating public health policy. Assuming that limited resources are available for spending on drugs, we conclude that it would be unethical to watch patients with treatable AIDS worsen and die, even with supportive care, so that medications for treatment can be diverted for prevention.

  12. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    organizational structures for quality patient care and also provide ... change, improve quality of life and prevent resistance to ... development of HIV resistance to drugs and. 19, 20 ..... the problems they seek to overcome . Health care providers ...

  13. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of renally excreted antiretroviral drugs in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa Mendes, Maïlys; Hirt, Deborah; Urien, Saik; Valade, Elodie; Bouazza, Naïm; Foissac, Frantz; Blanche, Stephane; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Benaboud, Sihem

    2015-11-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy can affect drug disposition. Anticipating these changes will help to maximize drug efficacy and safety in pregnant women. Our objective was to determine if physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) can accurately predict changes in the disposition of renally excreted antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy. Whole body PBPK models were developed for three renally excreted antiretroviral drugs, tenofovir (TFV), emtricitabine (FTC) and lamivudine (3TC). To assess the impact of pregnancy on PK, time-varying pregnancy-related physiological parameters available within the p-PBPK Simcyp software package were used. Renal clearance during pregnancy followed glomerular filtration changes with or without alterations in secretion. PK profiles were simulated and compared with observed data, i.e. area under the curves (AUC), peak plasma concentrations (Cmax ) and oral clearances (CL/F). PBPK models successfully predicted TFV, FTC and 3TC disposition for non-pregnant and pregnant populations. Both renal secretion and filtration changed during pregnancy. Changes in renal clearance secretion were related to changes in renal plasma flow. The maximum clearance increases were approximately 30% (TFV 33%, FTC 31%, 3TC 29%). Pregnancy PBPK models are useful tools to quantify a priori the drug exposure changes during pregnancy for renally excreted drugs. These models can be applied to evaluate alternative dosing regimens to optimize drug therapy during pregnancy. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Detection of counterfeit currency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D.A.

    1998-05-26

    A method is disclosed of detecting counterfeit currency by contacting the currency to be tested with near infrared beams in the spectrum below 1,250 nanometers, measuring reflectance of the near infrared beams and comparing the reflectance values with those from genuine currency. 18 figs.

  15. Caveat oncologist: clinical findings and consequences of distributing counterfeit erythropoietin in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Zaina P; Norris, Leann; Sartor, Oliver; McKoy, June M; Armstrong, John; Raisch, Dennis W; Garg, Vishvas; Stafkey-Mailey, Dana; Bennett, Charles Lee

    2012-03-01

    Counterfeit pharmaceuticals pose risks domestically. Because of their cost, cancer pharmaceuticals are vulnerable. We review findings from a domestic counterfeiting episode involving erythropoietin and outline anticounterfeiting recommendations for policy makers, patients, and health care professionals. Information was obtained on patients who received counterfeit erythropoietin, its distribution, and criminal investigations into counterfeiting networks. Interview sources included a physician, an attorney, employees of the Florida Department of Health and Human Services and the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Criminal Investigation, manufacturers, and wholesalers. Other sources included the book "Dangerous Doses," LexisNexis (search terms "counterfeit" and "erythropoietin") and the FDA database. Counterfeit product consisted of 2,000 U vials with counterfeit labels denoting 40,000 U. The counterfeiters, in collaboration with a Miami pharmacy, purchased 110,000 erythropoietin 2,000 U vials and affixed counterfeit labels to each vial. Products were then sold via the pharmaceutical "gray market" to wholesalers, then pharmacy chains. Investigations by Florida government officials implicated 17 persons, all of whom were found guilty of trafficking in counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Despite the large size of the operation, the FDA received reports of only 12 patients who had received counterfeit erythropoietin and detailed information for only two individuals. A 17-year-old liver transplant recipient and a 61-year-old patient with breast cancer experienced loss of efficacy after receiving counterfeit erythropoietin. Wider use of FDA anticounterfeit initiatives, limiting pharmaceutical suppliers to reputable distributors, and educating providers and patients about signs of counterfeit drugs can improve the safety of cancer pharmaceuticals.

  16. Anti-retroviral drugs do not facilitate hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Lisa; Wilson, Matthew; Back, David; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P; Steinmann, Eike; Pietschmann, Thomas; von Hahn, Thomas; Ciesek, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    An estimated 4 to 5 million people are co-infected with HIV/HCV worldwide. Recently observed outbreaks of acute HCV infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) have been linked to behavioral factors such as high risk sexual practices and recreational drug use. However, at the molecular level, many drugs such as glucocorticoids or cyclosporine A have been found to modulate viral replication. Thus, it is conceivable that drugs used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may heighten susceptibility to HCV infection and contribute to the recent outbreaks. We therefore performed a comprehensive screen of antiretroviral drugs covering all available drug classes both individually and in typical combinations used during HAART to probe for direct effects on HCV cell entry, replication, new particle assembly and release. Importantly, no significant enhancement or inhibition of HCV cell entry, replication or new particle production was detected. While raltegravir and ritonavir boosted atazanavir reduce HCV replication, a tenfold reduction of HCVcc entry by the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc was observed. In conclusion, commonly used HAART agents do not specifically enhance HCV replication. Thus recent epidemic outbreaks of acute HCV in HIV-infected MSM are unlikely to be related to enhancing effects of HAART drugs.

  17. In-vitro photo-translocation of antiretroviral drug delivery into TZMbl cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malabi, Rudzani; Manoto, Sello; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    The current human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment regime possesses the ability to diminish the viral capacity to unnoticeable levels; however complete eradication of the virus cannot be achieved while latent HIV-1 reservoirs go unchallenged. Therapeutic targeting of HIV therefore requires further investigation and current therapies need modification in order to address HIV eradication. This deflects research towards investigating potential novel antiretroviral drug delivery systems. The use of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses in promoting targeted optical drug delivery of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) into TZMbl cells revolves around using ultrafast laser pulses that have high peak powers, which precisely disrupt the cell plasma membrane in order to allow immediate transportation and expression of exogenous material into the live mammalian cells. A photo-translocation optical setup was built and validated by characterisation of the accurate parameters such as wavelength (800 nm) and pulse duration (115 fs). Optimisation of drug translocation parameters were done by performing trypan blue translocation studies. Cellular responses were determined via cell viability (Adenosine Triphosphate activity) and cell cytotoxicity (Lactate Dehydrogenase) assays which were done to study the influence of the drugs and laser exposure on the cells. After laser irradiation, high cell viability was observed and low toxicity levels were observed after exposure of the cells to both the ARVs and the laser. Our results confirmed that, with minimal damage and high therapeutic levels of ARVs, the fs laser assisted drug delivery system is efficient with benefits of non-invasive and non-toxic treatment to the cells.

  18. Monitoring of early warning indicators for HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral therapy clinics in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzangare, J; Gonese, E; Mugurungi, O; Shamu, T; Apollo, T; Bennett, D E; Kelley, K F; Jordan, M R; Chakanyuka, C; Cham, F; Banda, R M

    2012-05-01

    Monitoring human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance (HIVDR) early warning indicators (EWIs) can help national antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs to identify clinic factors associated with HIVDR emergence and provide evidence to support national program and clinic-level adjustments, if necessary. World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR EWIs were monitored in Zimbabwe using routinely available data at selected ART clinics between 2007 and 2009. As Zimbabwe's national ART coverage increases, improved ART information systems are required to strengthen routine national ART monitoring and evaluation and facilitate scale-up of HIVDR EWI monitoring. Attention should be paid to minimizing loss to follow-up, supporting adherence, and ensuring clinic-level drug supply continuity.

  19. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  20. Determinants of virological failure and antiretroviral drug resistance in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, María; Pou, Christian; Maculuve, Sonia; Cedeño, Samandhy; Luis, Leopoldina; Rodríguez, Judith; Letang, Emilio; Moltó, José; Macete, Eusébio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Alonso, Pedro; Menéndez, Clara; Naniche, Denise; Paredes, Roger

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to inform public health actions to limit first-line ART failure and HIV drug resistance in Mozambique. This was a cross-sectional study. HIV-1-infected adults on first-line ART for at least 1 year attending routine visits in the Manhiça District Hospital, in a semi-rural area in southern Mozambique with no HIV-1 RNA monitoring available, were evaluated for clinical, socio-demographic, therapeutic, immunological and virological characteristics. Factors associated with HIV-1 RNA ≥1000 copies/mL and HIV drug resistance were determined using multivariate logistic regression. The study included 334 adults on first-line ART for a median of 3 years, of which 65% (214/332) had suppressed viraemia, 11% (37/332) had low-level viraemia (HIV-1 RNA 150-999 copies/mL) and 24% (81/332) had overt virological failure (HIV-1 RNA ≥1000 copies/mL). HIV drug resistance was detected in 89% of subjects with virological failure, but in none with low-level viraemia. Younger age [OR = 0.97 per additional year (95% CI = 0.94-1.00), P = 0.039], ART initiation at WHO stage III/IV [OR = 2.10 (95% CI = 1.23-3.57), P = 0.003] and low ART adherence [OR = 2.69 (95% CI = 1.39-5.19), P = 0.003] were associated with virological failure. Longer time on ART [OR = 1.55 per additional year (95% CI = 1.00-2.43), P = 0.052] and illiteracy [OR = 0.24 (95% CI = 0.07-0.89), P = 0.033] were associated with HIV drug resistance. Compared with HIV-1 RNA, clinician's judgement of ART failure, based on clinical and immunological outcomes, only achieved 29% sensitivity and misdiagnosed 1 out of every 4.5 subjects. Public health programmes in Mozambique should focus on early HIV diagnosis, early ART initiation and adherence support. Virological monitoring drastically improves the diagnosis of ART failure, enabling a better use of resources. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  1. Is the drugstore safe? Counterfeit diabetes products on the shelves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, May M

    2009-11-01

    It is no longer possible to identify counterfeit medical products, including medications and devices, by simply checking packaging and labeling. Improvements in technology have made it cheaper and easier to produce fake packaging and labels, making it nearly impossible for consumers and authorities to detect counterfeits without conducting tests on the products themselves, as illustrated by the sale of over one million counterfeit blood glucose test strips sold to unsuspecting U.S. consumers at drugstores in more than 35 states and in other countries around the world in the fall of 2006. The pricier the drugs, the more counterfeiters seek to mimic them to maximize returns, victimizing those patients at highest risk who rely on life-saving medications.

  2. Class of Antiretroviral Drugs and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Reiss, P; Sabin, CA

    2007-01-01

    of cumulative exposure to protease inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors with the risk of myocardial infarction. METHODS: We analyzed data collected through February 2005 from our prospective observational study of 23,437 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus...... to the other drug class and established cardiovascular risk factors (excluding lipid levels), the relative rate of myocardial infarction per year of protease-inhibitor exposure was 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 1.23), whereas the relative rate per year of exposure to nonnucleoside reverse......-transcriptase inhibitors was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.13). Adjustment for serum lipid levels further reduced the effect of exposure to each drug class to 1.10 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.18) and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.93 to 1.09), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Increased exposure to protease inhibitors is associated with an increased risk...

  3. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Li, Patrick C K; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K C; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-04-15

    Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia.

  4. HIV-1 drug resistance among antiretroviral treatment-naïve Ethiopian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mulu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many African countries, access to antiretroviral treatment (ART has been significantly scaled up over the last five years. Nevertheless, data on drug resistance mutation are scarce. The objective of the current study was to determine the predominant subtypes of HIV-1 as well as to identify baseline mutations with potential drug resistance among ART-naïve patients from Ethiopia. Methods: Genotypic drug resistance on the entire protease and partial reverse transcriptase (codons 1–335 regions of the pol gene was determined by an in-house protocol in 160 ART-naïve patients. Genotypic drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more resistance-related mutations, as specified by the consensus of the Stanford University HIV drug resistance database (HIVDB available at http://hivdb.stanford.edu/ and the 2011 International AIDS Society (IAS mutation list (http://www.iasusa.org/resistance-mutations/. Results: A predominance of HIV-1 subtype C (98.7% was observed. According to the IAS mutation list, antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in 20 patients (13%. However, the level of drug resistance is 5.2% (8/155 when the most conservative method, HIVDB algorithms were applied. In both algorithms, none had major PI mutation and mutation-conferring resistance to NRTI and NNRTI were not overlapping. Conclusions: There is strong evidence for clade homogeneity in Ethiopia and low influx of other subtypes to the country. The level of transmitted drug resistance exceeds that of WHO estimates and indicates that many HIV-infected individuals on ART are practicing risk-related behaviours. The results also show that HIV drug resistance testing should be installed in resource limited settings.

  5. Study of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Patients Receiving Free Antiretroviral Therapy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ping LI; Hai-wei ZHOU; Jiang-hong HUANG; Hong PENG; Peng-fei MA; Yi-ming SHAO; Hui XING; Zhe WANG; Xue-feng SI; Lian-en WANG; Hua CHENG; Wei-guo CUI; Shu-lin JIANG; Ling-jie LIAO

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of drug-resistance mutations, resistance to antiretroviral drugs, and the subsequent virological response to therapy in treatment-naive and antiretroviral-treated patients infected with HIV/AIDS in Henan, China, a total of 431 plasma samples were collected in Queshan county between 2003 and 2004, from patients undergoing the antiretroviral regimen Zidovudine + Didanosine + Nevirapine (Azt+Ddi+Nvp). Personal information was collected by face to face interview. Viral load and genotypic drug resistance were tested. Drug resistance mutation data were obtained by analyzing patient-derived sequences through the HIVdb Program (http://hivdb.stanford.edu). Overall, 38.5% of treatment-naive patients had undetectable plasma viral load (VL), the rate significantly increased to 61.9% in 0 to 6 months treatment patients (mean 3 months) (P<0.005) but again significantly decrease to 38.6% in 6 to 12 months treatment patients (mean 9 months) (P<0.001) and 40.0% in patients receiving more than 12 months treatment (mean 16 months) (P<0.005). The prevalence of drug resistance in patients who had a detectable VL and available sequences were 7.0%, 48.6%, 70.8%, 72.3% in treatment-na(1)ve, 0 to 6 months treatment, 6 to 12 months treatment, and treatment for greater than 12 months patients, respectively. No mutation associated with resistance to Protease inhibitor (PI) was detected in this study. Nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) mutations always emerged after non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations, and were only found in patients treated for more than 6 months, with a frequency less than 5%, with the exception of mutation T215Y (12.8%, 6/47) which occurred in patients treated for more than 12 months. NNRTI mutations emerged quickly after therapy begun, and increased significantly in patients treated for more than 6 months (P<0.005), and the most frequent mutations were K103N, V106A, Y181C, G190A. There had been optimal viral suppression in

  6. Role of the pharmacist in preventing distribution of counterfeit medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Walter G; Carroll, Wesley A; Kennedy, Daniel; Levine, Donald; Moné, Michael A; Ried, L Douglas; Shepherd, Marv; Yelvigi, Mukund

    2012-01-01

    To provide an overview of the counterfeit medication problem and recommendations of a joint American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science and APhA Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management taskforce. SciFinder and PubMed were searched from 1980 to March 2011 using the following keywords: counterfeit drug product, counterfeit medications, drug product authentication, drug product verification, and track-and-trace. Publications, presentations, and websites of organizations that research the counterfeit medication problem in the United States and other countries were reviewed. A representative from the security division of a pharmaceutical manufacturer and a representative from a supplier of anticounterfeiting technologies gave presentations to the taskforce. The taskforce recommends that pharmacists (1) purchase medications from known, reliable sources; (2) warn patients of the dangers of purchasing medications over the Internet; (3) confirm with distributors that products were purchased from manufacturers or other reliable sources; (4) monitor counterfeit product alerts; (5) examine products for suspicious appearance; (6) work with the pharmaceutical industry, distributors, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to close gaps in the supply chain, especially for drugs in short supply; (7) use scanning technology in the pharmacy as part of a prescription verification process; (8) educate themselves, coworkers, and patients about the risks of counterfeit medications; and (9) report suspicious medications to FDA, the distributor, and the manufacturer. The consequence of a patient receiving a counterfeit medication in the United States could be catastrophic, and pharmacists must play an active role in preventing such an event from occurring.

  7. The dual role of pharmacogenetics in HIV treatment: mutations and polymorphisms regulating antiretroviral drug resistance and disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Veronique; Bar-Magen, Tamara; Turgeon, Jacques; Flockhart, David; Desta, Zeruesenay; Wainberg, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    Significant intra- and interindividual variability has been observed in response to use of pharmacological agents in treatment of HIV infection. Treatment of HIV infection is limited by high rates of adverse drug reactions and development of resistance in a significant proportion of patients as a result of suboptimal drug concentrations. The efficacy of antiretroviral therapy is challenged by the emergence of resistant HIV-1 mutants with reduced susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs. Moreover, pharmacotherapy of patients infected with HIV is challenging because a great number of comorbidities increase polypharmacy and the risk for drug-drug interactions. Drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters regulate drug access to the systemic circulation, target cells, and sanctuary sites. These factors, which determine drug exposure, along with the emergence of mutations conferring resistance to HIV medications, could explain variability in efficacy and adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs. In this review, the major factors affecting the disposition of antiretroviral drugs, including key drug-metabolizing enzymes and membrane drug transporters, are outlined. Genetic polymorphisms affecting the activity and/or the expression of cytochromes P450 or UGT isozymes and membrane drug transport proteins are highlighted and include such examples as the association of neurotoxicity with efavirenz, nephrotoxicity with tenofovir, hepatotoxicity with nevirapine, and hyperbilirubinemia with indinavir and atazanavir. Mechanisms of drug resistance conferred by specific viral mutations are also reviewed, with particular attention to replicative viral fitness and transmitted HIV drug resistance with the objectives of providing a better understanding of mechanisms involved in HIV drug resistance and helping health care providers to better manage interpatient variability in drug efficacy and toxicity.

  8. Different origin of adipogenic stem cells influences the response to antiretroviral drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pisciotta, Alessandra; Bianchini, Elena; Bartolomeo, Regina [Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia School of Medicine, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Polo, Miriam [Department of Pharmacology, University of Valencia, Av.da Blasco Ibáñez 15, Valencia (Spain); FISABIO–Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Av.da Gaspar Aguilar 90, Valencia (Spain); De Pol, Anto [Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia School of Medicine, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento Sperimentale Interaziendale, Campus San Lazzaro, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Pinti, Marcello [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Cossarizza, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.cossarizza@unimore.it [Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia School of Medicine, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento Sperimentale Interaziendale, Campus San Lazzaro, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Lipodystrophy (LD) is a main side effect of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection, and can be provoked by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs). LD exists in different forms, characterized by fat loss, accumulation, or both, but its pathogenesis is still unclear. In particular, few data exist concerning the effects of antiretroviral drugs on adipocyte differentiation. Adipose tissue can arise either from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), that include bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs), or from ectodermal stem cells, that include dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To analyze whether the embryonal origin of adipocytes might impact the occurrence of different phenotypes in LD, we quantified the effects of several antiretroviral drugs on the adipogenic differentiation of hBM-MSCs and hDPSCs. hBM-MSCs and hDPSCs were isolated from healthy donors. Cells were treated with 10 and 50 μM stavudine (d4T), efavirenz (EFV), atazanavir (ATV), ritonavir (RTV), and ATV-boosted RTV. Viability and adipogenesis were evaluated by staining with propidium iodide, oil red, and adipoRed; mRNA levels of genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, i.e. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and in adipocyte functions, i.e. fatty acid synthase (FASN), fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4), perilipin-1 (PLIN1) and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase-2 (AGPAT2), were quantified by real time PCR. We found that ATV, RTV, EFV, and ATV-boosted RTV, but not d4T, caused massive cell death in both cell types. EFV and d4T affected the accumulation of lipid droplets and induced changes in mRNA levels of genes involved in adipocyte functions in hBM-MSCs, while RTV and ATV had little effects. All drugs stimulated the accumulation of lipid droplets in hDPSCs. Thus, the adipogenic differentiation of human stem cells can be influenced by antiretroviral drugs, and depends, at least in

  9. Counterfeit Avastin in India: Punish the Criminals, Not the Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael W; Narayanan, Raja; Gupta, Vishali; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Martin, Daniel F; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2016-10-01

    To report the recent controversy surrounding the intraocular use of bevacizumab in India and its relationship to the broader problems of off-label drug use, medication compounding, and drug counterfeiting. Perspective. Data for this perspective were obtained from several sources. Literature reviews for compounding-related endophthalmitis and drug counterfeiting were performed. Supplemental information was obtained through targeted Google searches for related published manuscripts. First-hand accounts of negotiations between representatives of the Vitreoretinal Society of India (VRSI) and India's Central Drugs Standards Control Organization (CDSCO) were provided by 2 of the authors (R.N., V.G.). In December, 2015, 15 cases of intraocular inflammation following injections of counterfeit bevacizumab occurred in Gujarat, India. CDSCO reacted by prohibiting the use of intraocular bevacizumab throughout the country. Intense negotiations between the VRSI and CDSCO resulted in the permission to use bevacizumab in accordance with new safety guidelines. These include an enhanced informed consent process, the stamping of the Kezzler code on all bevacizumab vials, a real-time digital verification process between the end user and Roche Pharmaceuticals, and mandatory destruction of empty drug vials. Counterfeit bevacizumab has caused outbreaks of sterile and infectious postinjection endophthalmitis in at least 3 countries during the past 5 years and has entered the supply chain in other countries. Physicians and compounding pharmacists need to be aware that international counterfeiters have targeted bevacizumab. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of new antiretroviral drugs and classes in Bahia, Brazil: a real life experience on salvage therapy of AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Carlos; Nóbrega, Isabella; Martins Netto, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly evolved in the last decade, with an increasing number of new drugs and classes. Currently, even heavily experienced patients can be successfully treated with new regimens. In Brazil, the recent incorporation of some new antiretroviral drugs made it possible to suppress HIV plasma viremia in most treated patients, with significant benefits in terms of quality of life and survival. However, little has been published on outcomes of patients under new drugs-based regimens. We reviewed the safety and efficacy of antiretroviral regimens using recently introduced drugs in Bahia. Our results confirm that patients using darunavir, raltegravir, enfuvirtide, or etravirine presented with a high rate of virological suppression without significant adverse events, after one year of follow-up.

  11. [Anti-counterfeit activities of pharmaceutical companies in Japan: for patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofuda, Ken-ichi; Aragane, Katsumi; Igari, Yasutaka; Matsumoto, Kinya; Ito, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Global spread of counterfeit medicines is an imminent threat for the patients' safety. Although major targets of counterfeits are still erectile dysfunction (ED) drugs in the industrialized countries, including Japan, anti-cancer agents and some medicines for metabolic syndromes are also being counterfeited and circulated to the market mainly through the Internet. Due to the global expansion of the business, pharmaceutical companies based in Japan are suffering from the damage of counterfeits, illegal sales including diversion, and thefts, which have never been experienced in the conventional domestic market. We, pharmaceutical companies, must be responsible for the prevention of the prevalence because our mission is to deliver effective and safe medicine to patients. For this end, we are taking necessary actions including, 1. Forestalling counterfeit, falsification and illicit trade: Measures to prevent counterfeiting are taken by introducing anti-counterfeit technologies to the packaging and tablets on a risk basis. It is also important to establish supply chain security on a global scale. 2. Finding out counterfeits and cooperating crackdown: We are conducting market and internet surveillances when high risk products are sold in high risk markets. The outcome of the criminal investigation is reported to authorities and police if necessary. 3. Conducting educational campaign to medical staff or patients: For example, four companies which manufacture and sell ED drug in Japan are collaboratively continuing activities to raise the awareness of the danger of Internet purchase. To deliver effective and safe medicines stably and globally, pharmaceutical companies extend comprehensive measures against counterfeit and illicit trading.

  12. Trends in virological and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV-1 infection and virological failure of drugs from three antiretroviral drug classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castagliola, Dominique; Ledergerber, Bruno; Torti, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Limited treatment options have been available for people with HIV who have had virological failure of the three original classes of HIV antiretroviral drugs-so-called triple-class virological failure (TCVF). However, introduction of new drugs and drug classes might have improved outcomes. We aimed...

  13. COUNTERFEITING, A PRECISE TARGET IN A LONG - TIME BATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia PASCU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the world is in the full process of evolution based on knowledge. In the new economy that puts anemphasis on the importance the information the smooth progress and capital accumulation, the information requiresaccess to everything that represents it and thus becomes an enabling tool for counterfeit products.But information ensures access to everything it represents and becomes a favored instrument for fraudulentwork of counterfeiting.Counterfeiting already represent a scourge that affects more and more domains of activity, putting in dangernot only economical activities, but also consumer’s health and safety. Among products that are more likely to becounterfeited we can identify alimentary products, drugs, automobiles, IT, electronics and house appliances, music,movies, cigarettes, textiles, cosmetics, toys, games, software etc. After integration in the European Union, Romaniamust follow the rules imposed and to fight against counterfeiting and intellectual theft. The disappearance of frontiersallowed adulterators to bring counterfeited product in most markets that in many situations generated real economicaland social catastrophes through the decline of local industries.In order to reduce substantially the international commerce with counterfeited products and to destroytransnational networks involved in this commerce, a series of measures for protection is needed at national andinternational level.

  14. [Evaluation of early warning indicators of HIV resistance to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in Ivory Coast in 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kouadio Jean; Damey, Néto Florence; Konan, Diby Jean Paul; Aka, Joseph; Aka-Konan, Sandrine; Ani, Alex; Bonle, Marguerite Te; Kouassi, Dinard

    2016-01-01

    In 2001, the United Nations recommended that antiretroviral (ARV) drugs be made available in resource-limited countries. However, the use of these large-scale drugs is associated with the development of drug-resistant virus. In Ivory Coast, several health care/treatment centres prescribe antiretroviral drugs. This study aimed to evaluate the programmatic factors associated with high risk of emergence of HIV ARV drug resistance. We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving 20 health care/treatment centres for people living with HIV. The study population consisted of patients who started HIV treatment at the health care/treatment centres in 2008-2009. Sample size calculation was based on WHO sampling method. Of the 20 health care/treatment centres, 98% of initial prescriptions were in accordance with national guidelines and 20% of health care/treatment centres had 100% of compliant prescriptions. In total, 33% of patients were lost to follow-up during the first 12 months of antiretroviral therapy and 20% of health care/treatment centres had less than 20% of patients lost to follow-up. At 12 months, 51% of patients were under appropriate first-line treatment and 11% of the health care/treatment centres reached the threshold of at least 70% of patients under appropriate first-line treatment. Only one health care/treatment centre didn't experienced an interruption in antiretroviral therapy over 12 months. Shortcomings in the treatment of people living with HIV justify the existence of a significant risk of viral resistance to antiretroviral drugs in 2008-2009. In order to minimize this risk prescribing practices should be improved, appointment reminder systems should be implemented and a constant availability of antiretroviral drugs should be ensured.

  15. Fashion Counterfeiting: Consumer Behavior Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Wanda K.; Easterling, Cynthia R.

    2008-01-01

    Counterfeiting, which has always been somewhat of a problem in several different industry settings, has recently become an epidemic in the fashion industry. Widespread and seemingly endless counterfeiting of fashion goods is costing the industry millions of dollars in lost profits and tarnishing the image of many luxury brands. This article…

  16. Fashion Counterfeiting: Consumer Behavior Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Wanda K.; Easterling, Cynthia R.

    2008-01-01

    Counterfeiting, which has always been somewhat of a problem in several different industry settings, has recently become an epidemic in the fashion industry. Widespread and seemingly endless counterfeiting of fashion goods is costing the industry millions of dollars in lost profits and tarnishing the image of many luxury brands. This article…

  17. Characterization of microorganisms isolated from counterfeit toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Jennifer L; Craft, David L

    2012-09-01

    The appearance of potentially counterfeit "Colgate" toothpaste on the American market prompted a criminal investigation by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including the collection of c. 60,000 tubes of toothpaste from retail outlets and product distributors. Microbiological testing was performed based on the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, which determined the presence and number of bacteria present in the products. Bacteria were isolated from each "Colgate" variety; up to 2 × 10(6) cfu/g were isolated from some of the product units. Using conventional microscopic and biochemical bacterial identification methods, most of the bacteria isolated from these samples were Gram-negative rods of several genera, including Pseudomonas, Serratia, and Klebsiella. Most of the organisms isolated represent opportunistic pathogens, and therefore, counterfeit "Colgate" toothpaste containing high levels of bacteria pose a human health hazard. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Morpho-anatomical characteristics of the raw material of the herbal drug Olivae folium and its counterfeits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakušić Branislava

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The olive tree leaf is a very significant plant raw material from the medical and economic points of view (Ph. Eur. 5, PDR. In the region of Southeast Europe, olive leaves are most commonly adulterated with oleander leaves and the leaves of Pittosporum tobira. This paper deals with the morphological and anatomical features of leaves of the following species: Olea europaea, Nerium oleander and Pittosporum tobira. The aim of this research was to define concrete diagnostic parameters permitting detection of adulterants in commercial samples of the herbal drug Olivae folium.

  19. The relation of price of antiretroviral drugs and foreign assistance with coverage of HIV treatment in Africa: retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendavid, Eran; Leroux, Eric; Bhattacharya, Jay; Smith, Nicole; Miller, Grant

    2010-11-18

    To determine the association of reductions in price of antiretroviral drugs and foreign assistance for HIV with coverage of antiretroviral treatment. Retrospective study. Africa. 13 African countries, 2003-8. A price index of first line antiretroviral therapy with data on foreign assistance for HIV was used to estimate the associations of prices and foreign assistance with antiretroviral coverage (percentage of people with advanced HIV infection receiving antiretroviral therapy), controlling for national public health spending, HIV prevalence, governance, and fixed effects for countries and years. Between 2003 and 2008 the annual price of first line antiretroviral therapy decreased from $1177 (£733; €844) to $96 and foreign assistance for HIV per capita increased from $0.4 to $13.8. At an annual price of $100, a $10 decrease was associated with a 0.16% adjusted increase in coverage (95% confidence interval 0.11% to 0.20%; 0.19% unadjusted, 0.14% to 0.24%). Each additional $1 per capita in foreign assistance for HIV was associated with a 1.0% adjusted increase in coverage (0.7% to 1.2%; 1.4% unadjusted, 1.1% to 1.6%). If the annual price of antiretroviral therapy stayed at $100, foreign assistance would need to quadruple to $64 per capita to be associated with universal coverage. Government effectiveness and national public health expenditures were also positively associated with increasing coverage. Reductions in price of antiretroviral drugs were important in broadening coverage of HIV treatment in Africa from 2003 to 2008, but their future role may be limited. Foreign assistance and national public health expenditures for HIV seem more important in expanding future coverage.

  20. Headspace-gas chromatographic fingerprints to discriminate and classify counterfeit medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, D; Canfyn, M; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; Apers, S; Deconinck, E

    2014-06-01

    Counterfeit medicines are a global threat to public health. These pharmaceuticals are not subjected to quality control and therefore their safety, quality and efficacy cannot be guaranteed. Today, the safety evaluation of counterfeit medicines is mainly based on the identification and quantification of the active substances present. However, the analysis of potential toxic secondary components, like residual solvents, becomes more important. Assessment of residual solvent content and chemometric analysis of fingerprints might be useful in the discrimination between genuine and counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Moreover, the fingerprint approach might also contribute in the evaluation of the health risks different types of counterfeit medicines pose. In this study a number of genuine and counterfeit Viagra(®) and Cialis(®) samples were analyzed for residual solvent content using headspace-GC-MS. The obtained chromatograms were used as fingerprints and analyzed using different chemometric techniques: Principal Component Analysis, Projection Pursuit, Classification and Regression Trees and Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy. It was tested whether these techniques can distinguish genuine pharmaceuticals from counterfeit ones and if distinct types of counterfeits could be differentiated based on health risks. This chemometric analysis showed that for both data sets PCA clearly discriminated between genuine and counterfeit drugs, and SIMCA generated the best predictive models. This technique not only resulted in a 100% correct classification rate for the discrimination between genuine and counterfeit medicines, the classification of the counterfeit samples was also superior compared to CART. This study shows that chemometric analysis of headspace-GC impurity fingerprints allows to distinguish between genuine and counterfeit medicines and to differentiate between groups of counterfeit products based on the public health risks they pose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  1. Central nervous system HIV infection in "less-drug regimen" antiretroviral therapy simplification strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gianotti, Nicola; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Less-drug regimens (LDR) refer to combinations of either two antiretroviral drugs or ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy. They may represent a simplification strategy in patients with persistently suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia, with the main benefits of reducing drug-related toxicities and costs. Systemic virological efficacy of LDR is slightly lower as compared with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but patients with failure do not usually develop drug resistance and resuppress HIV replication after reintensification. A major concern of LDR is the lower efficacy in the virus reservoirs, especially in the central nervous system (CNS), where viral compartmentalization and independent evolution of infection may lead to CNS viral escape, often associated with neurologic symptoms. The authors reviewed studies of virological and functional CNS efficacy of LDR, particularly of boosted PI monotherapy regimens, for which more information is available. Symptomatic viral CSF escape was observed mainly in PI/r monotherapy patients with plasma failure and low nadir CD4+ cell counts, and resolved upon reintroduction of triple drug cART, whereas asymptomatic viral failure in CSF was not significantly more frequent in patients on PI/r monotherapy compared with patients on standard cART. In addition, there was no difference in functional outcomes between PI monotherapy and cART patients, irrespective of CSF viral escape. More data are needed on the CNS effect of dual ART regimens and, in general, on long-term efficacy of LDR. Simplification with LDR may be an attractive option in patients with suppressed viral load, if they are well selected and monitored for potential CNS complications.

  2. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  3. Impact of pharmaceutical care interventions on the occurrence and resolution of side/adverse drug effects associated with antiretroviral drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwaozuzu, E.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical care (PC has been shown to improve the outcome of drug therapy in many disease conditions. HIV/AIDS is one of the disease conditions that are fraught with many problems that can benefit from this new emphasis of pharmacy practice also known as ‘pharmacists care’. Adverse drug reactions or effects are unintended and undesirable effects of drugs other than their known and expected actions which can be unpleasant and sometimes fatal. This study is designed to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care activities on the occurrence of side/adverse drug reactions in HIV/AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral drugs. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care’ was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene in the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The study identified about sixty (60 different types of side/adverse effects occurring among these patients through observation and patient complaints. The study also showed significant reduction in the incidence of side/adverse drug effects following the Pharmacist’s intervention activities, p ≥ 0.5. The study showed that pharmacists’ interventions in antiretroviral drug therapy through Pharmaceutical care can significantly reduce the incidence of side/adverse drug effects in HIV/AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral drugs.

  4. Impact of pharmaceutical care interventions on the CD4+ lymphocytes counts (therapeutic outcome of patients on antiretroviral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezeudo Ewuziem Nwaozuzu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CD4 count and viral load determine the progression of HIV infection. HIV actively infects and destroys CD4 cells. High viral load results in higher transmission risk and is also a sign of more severe disease. Measurements of CD4 counts can be used as an indirect means of estimating HIV viral load and as such determine disease progression and/or therapeutic outcome of antiretroviral therapy. Pharmaceutical care (PC has been shown to improve the outcome of drug therapy in many disease conditions. HIV/AIDS is one of the disease conditions that are fraught with many problems that can benefit from this new emphasis of pharmacy practice also known as ‘pharmacists care’. This study is designed to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care activities on the CD4 cell counts of HIV/AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral drugs. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care’ was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene and re-evaluate the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The results showed that that 55.2% of the patients recorded significant increases in their CD4 cells count, 14.1% of them maintained their pre - intervention CD4 cells count while 10.3% of them recorded decreases in their CD4 cell count. However, in 20.4% of the patients the CD4 cell counts could not be determined. The study showed that pharmacists’ interventions in antiretroviral drug therapy through Pharmaceutical care can significantly improve the CD4 cells counts of patients receiving antiretroviral drugs hence therapeutic outcome of antiretroviral drug therapy.

  5. Short Communication: Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in Antiretroviral-Naive Pregnant Women in North Central Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagay, Atiene S.; Chaplin, Beth; Chebu, Philippe; Musa, Jonah; Okpokwu, Jonathan; Hamel, Donald J.; Pam, Ishaya C.; Agbaji, Oche; Samuels, Jay; Meloni, Seema; Sankale, Jean-Louis; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends periodic surveillance of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in communities in which antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been scaled-up for greater than 3 years. We conducted a survey of TDR mutations among newly detected HIV-infected antiretroviral (ARV)-naive pregnant women. From May 2010 to March 2012, 38 ARV-naive pregnant women were recruited in three hospitals in Jos, Plateau state, north central Nigeria. Eligible subjects were recruited using a modified version of the binomial sequential sampling technique recommended by WHO. HIV-1 genotyping was performed and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were characterized according to the WHO 2009 surveillance drug resistance mutation (SDRM) list. HIV subtypes were determined by phylogenetic analysis. The women's median age was 25.5 years; the median CD4+ cell count was 317 cells/μl and the median viral load of 16 was 261 copies/ml. Of the 38 samples tested, 34 (89%) were successfully genotyped. The SDRM rate was <5% for all ART drug classes, with 1/34 (2.9%) for NRTIs/NNRTIs and none for protease inhibitors 0/31 (0%). The specific SDRMs detected were M41L for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and G190A for nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). HIV-1 subtypes detected were CRF02_AG (38.2%), G′ (41.2%), G (14.7%), CRF06-CPX (2.9%), and a unique AG recombinant form (2.9%). The single ARV-native pregnant woman with SDRMs was infected with HIV-1 subtype G′. Access to ART has been available in the Jos area for over 8 years. The prevalence of TDR lower than 5% suggests proper ART administration, although continued surveillance is warranted. PMID:24164431

  6. Diffusion of counterfeit drugs in developing countries and stability of galenics stored for months under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratta, Francesca; Germano, Antonio; Brusa, Paola

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the diffusion of counterfeit medicines in developing countries and to verify the stability of galenic dosage forms to determine the stability of galenics prepared and stored in developing countries. We purchased 221 pharmaceutical samples belonging to different therapeutic classes both in authorized and illegal pharmacies and subjected them to European Pharmacopoeia, 7th ed. quality tests. An UV-visible spectrophotometric assay was used to determine the galenics stability under different conditions of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH). A substantial percentage of samples was substandard (52%) and thus had to be considered as counterfeit. Stability tests for galenics showed that the tested dosage forms were stable for 24 months under "standard" (t=25±2°C, RH=50±5%) conditions. Under "accelerated" (t=40±2°C, RH=50±5%) conditions, samples were stable for 3 months provided that they were stored in glass containers. Stability results of samples stored in "accelerated" conditions were similar to those obtained by on site in tropical countries and could so supply precious information on the expected stability of galenics in tropical countries. This study gives useful information about the presence of counterfeit medicinal products in the pharmacies of many developing countries. This should serve as an alarm bell and an input for the production of galenics. We recommend setting up of galenic laboratories in developing countries around the globe.

  7. Hidden costs of HIV treatment in Spain: inefficiency of the antiretroviral drug packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llibre-Codina, Josep M; Andreu-Crespo, Angels; Cardona-Peitx, Gloria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet-Sala, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs in Spain are delivered by law only in hospital pharmacies. Commercial packages meet variable quality standards when dispensed drugs are returned due to treatment changes or adherence problems Nearly 20-25% of the initial regimens will be changed at 48 weeks for different reasons. We evaluated the economic impact on public health system of the inability of using returned drugs due to inefficient packaging. We defined socially efficient packaging as the best adapted one to being delivered in unit dose to outpatients and classified: Class A - Drug packed in unit doses with complete info (name of drug, dosage in mg, lot, and expiring date) in each unit, maintaining complete information of the drug if returned when the external package is opened. Class B - packed in blisters with complete info in the blister, but not in unit doses, without special conservation conditions (should be re-packed in unit doses in the pharmacy before its dispensation to assure a class A excellence). Class C - packed in plastic containers with complete info written only on a label over the container, would allow repackaging only before its initial delivery, but not when returned. Class D - drug packed in plastic containers with manufacturer's warning that the product cannot be placed outside of the original package due to special conditions of conservation (fridge, humidity) that doesn't allow a unit dose repackaging or reusing an opened container. We analysed a 12-month period (July 2011-June 2012) in a hospital-based HIV outpatient pharmacy that serves 2413 treated individuals. Patients generated 23,574 visits to pharmacy, and received 48,325 drug packages, with 2.529.137 pills delivered. The patients suffered 1051 treatment changes for any reason. A total amount of 122.945€ in treatment were returned to pharmacy in opened packages during the study period. 47.139.91€ would be totally lost, mainly due to being packaged in class C and D boxes, the equivalent of

  8. A systematic review of antiretroviral adherence interventions for HIV-infected people who use drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binford, Meredith Camp; Kahana, Shoshana Y; Altice, Frederick L

    2012-12-01

    HIV-infected persons who use drugs (PWUDs) are particularly vulnerable for suboptimal combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) adherence. A systematic review of interventions to improve cART adherence and virologic outcomes among HIV-infected PWUDs was conducted. Among the 45 eligible studies, randomized controlled trials suggested directly administered antiretroviral therapy, medication-assisted therapy (MAT), contingency management, and multi-component, nurse-delivered interventions provided significant improved short-term adherence and virologic outcomes, but these effects were not sustained after intervention cessation. Cohort and prospective studies suggested short-term increased cART adherence with MAT. More conclusive data regarding the efficacy on cART adherence and HIV treatment outcomes using cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, peer-driven interventions and the integration of MAT into HIV clinical care are warranted. Of great concern was the virtual lack of interventions with sustained post-intervention adherence and virologic benefits. Future research directions, including the development of interventions that promote long-term improvements in adherence and virologic outcomes, are discussed.

  9. Interaction between pharmaceutical companies and physicians who prescribe antiretroviral drugs for treating AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cesar Scheffer

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Given that Brazil has a universal public policy for supplying medications to treat HIV and AIDS, the aim here was to describe the forms of relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical companies that produce antiretrovirals (ARVs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted in the state of São Paulo. METHODS : Secondary database linkage was used, with structured interviews conducted by telephone among a sample group of 300 physicians representing 2,361 professionals who care for patients with HIV and AIDS. RESULTS : Around two thirds (64% of the physicians prescribing ARVs for HIV and AIDS treatment in the state of São Paulo who were interviewed declared that they had some form of relationship with pharmaceutical companies, of which the most frequent were receipt of publications (54%, visits by sales promoters (51% and receipt of small-value objects (47%. CONCLUSIONS: Two forms of relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and physicians who deal with HIV and AIDS can be highlighted: facilitation of professionals' access to continuing education; and antiretroviral drug brand name promotion.

  10. Antiretroviral drug resistance and HIV-1 subtypes among treatment-naive prisoners in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Tengku Ahmad Akram Tengku Mohd; Mohamad, Suharni; Yusuf, Wan Nazirah Wan; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim

    2014-08-13

    The widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and continuous reports of HIV-1 strains developing resistance to these drugs is rather alarming, as transmission of resistant viruses to newly infected persons is possible. This study aimed to determine HIV-1 subtypes and the prevalence of primary mutations associated with antiretroviral (ARV) resistance among treatment-naive prisoners on the east coast of Malaysia. Viral RNA was extracted from plasma samples of 21 treatment-naive prisoners. Protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions were amplified and sequenced. Stanford HIV database algorithms were used for interpretation of resistance, and phylogenetic analysis was performed for subtype assignment. In the PR gene, no antiviral resistance-associated mutation was detected. For RT-associated mutations, K103N was the most prevalent in sequenced samples (14.3%). Genetic subtyping on the pol gene revealed that the majority of the prisoners were infected with subtype CRF33_01B (52.4%). Continuous surveillance of newly infected individuals is required to help strategize the best antiviral treatment for these patients.

  11. AVOID BECOMING A VICTIM OF COUNTERFEIT ITEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WARRINER RD

    2011-07-13

    In today's globalized economy, we cannot live without imported products. Most people do not realize how thin the safety net of regulation and inspection really is. Less than three percent of imported products receive any form of government inspection prior to sale. Avoid flea markets, street vendors and deep discount stores. The sellers of counterfeit wares know where to market their products. They look for individuals who are hungry for a brand name item but do not want to pay a brand name price for it. The internet provides anonymity to the sellers of counterfeit products. Unlike Europe, U.S. law does not hold internet-marketing organizations, responsible for the quality of the products sold on their websites. These organizations will remove an individual vendor when a sufficient number of complaints are lodged, but they will not take responsibility for the counterfeit products you may have purchased. EBay has a number of counterfeit product guides to help you avoid being a victim of the sellers of these products. Ten percent of all medications taken worldwide are counterfeit. If you do buy medications on-line, be sure that the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites (VIPPS) recommends the pharmacy you choose to use. Inspect all medication purchases and report any change in color, shape, imprinting or odor to your pharmacist. If you take generic medications these attributes may change from one manufacturer to another. Your pharmacist should inform you of any changes when you refill your prescription. If they do not, get clarification prior to taking the medication. Please note that the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate supplements. The FDA only steps in when a specific supplement proves to cause physical harm or contains a regulated ingredient. Due to counterfeiting, Underwriters Laboratories (UL) changed their label design three times since 1996. The new gold label should be attached to the cord

  12. Stealth anti-CD4 conjugated immunoliposomes with dual antiretroviral drugs--modern Trojan horses to combat HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Lakshmi Narashimhan; Sharma, Shilpee; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Ranga, Udaykumar; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is the currently employed therapeutic intervention against AIDS where a drug combination is used to reduce the viral load. The present work envisages the development of a stealth anti-CD4 conjugated immunoliposomes containing two anti-retroviral drugs (nevirapine and saquinavir) that can selectively home into HIV infected cells through the CD4 receptor. The nanocarrier was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry, particle size and zeta potential. The cell uptake was also evaluated qualitatively using confocal microscopy and quantitatively by flow cytometry. The drug to lipid composition was optimized for maximum encapsulation of the two drugs. Both drugs were found to localize in different regions of the liposome. The release of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor was dominant during the early phases of the release while in the later phases, the protease inhibitor is the major constituent released. The drugs delivered via anti-CD4 conjugated immunoliposomes inhibited viral proliferation at a significantly lower concentration as compared to free drugs. In vitro studies of nevirapine to saquinavir combination at a ratio of 6.2:5 and a concentration as low as 5 ng/mL efficiently blocked viral proliferation suggesting that co-delivery of anti-retroviral drugs holds a greater promise for efficient management of HIV-1 infection.

  13. Quantitative analysis of antiretroviral drugs in lysates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using MALDI-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, JJ van; Burgers, P.C.; Gruters, R.A.; Osterhaus, A.D.; Groot, R. de; Luider, T.M.; Volmer, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    We report here on the use of a prototype matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for quantitative analysis of six antiretroviral drugs in lysates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Of the five investigated MALDI matrixes, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoi

  14. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

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    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  15. Factorial design studies of antiretroviral drug-loaded stealth liposomal injectable: PEGylation, lyophilization and pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Beeravelli; Krishna, Mylangam Chaitanya; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate the ritonavir-loaded stealth liposomes by using 32 factorial design and intended to delivered by parenteral delivery. Liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method using 32 factorial designs and characterized for various physicochemical parameters such as drug content, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimization process was carried out using desirability and overlay plots. The selected formulation was subjected to PEGylation using 10 % PEG-10000 solution. Stealth liposomes were characterized for the above-mentioned parameters along with surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. Stealth liposomes showed better result compared to conventional liposomes due to effect of PEG-10000. The in vivo studies revealed that stealth liposomes showed better residence time compared to conventional liposomes and pure drug solution. The conventional liposomes and pure drug showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics, whereas stealth liposomes showed long circulation half-life compared to conventional liposomes and pure ritonavir solution. The results of statistical analysis showed significance difference as the p value is (<0.05) by one-way ANOVA. The result of the present study revealed that stealth liposomes are promising tool in antiretroviral therapy.

  16. In vitro-in vivo Pharmacokinetic correlation model for quality assurance of antiretroviral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rojas Gómez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The in vitro-in vivo pharmacokinetic correlation models (IVIVC are a fundamental part of the drug discovery and development process. The ability to accurately predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of a drug based on in vitro observations can have several applications during a successful development process. Objective: To develop a comprehensive model to predict the in vivo absorption of antiretroviral drugs based on permeability studies, in vitro and in vivo solubility and demonstrate its correlation with the pharmacokinetic profile in humans. Methods: Analytical tools to test the biopharmaceutical properties of stavudine, lamivudine y zidovudine were developed. The kinetics of dissolution, permeability in caco-2 cells and pharmacokinetics of absorption in rabbits and healthy volunteers were evaluated. Results: The cumulative areas under the curve (AUC obtained in the permeability study with Caco-2 cells, the dissolution study and the pharmacokinetics in rabbits correlated with the cumulative AUC values in humans. These results demonstrated a direct relation between in vitro data and absorption, both in humans and in the in vivo model. Conclusions: The analytical methods and procedures applied to the development of an IVIVC model showed a strong correlation among themselves. These IVIVC models are proposed as alternative and cost/effective methods to evaluate the biopharmaceutical properties that determine the bioavailability of a drug and their application includes the development process, quality assurance, bioequivalence studies and pharmacosurveillance. 

  17. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  18. Application of micellar liquid chromatography for the determination of antitumoral and antiretroviral drugs in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris-Vicente, Juan; Casas-Breva, Inmaculada; Roca-Genovés, Pasqual; Esteve-Romero, Josep

    2014-01-01

    In micellar liquid chromatography, the mobile phase is made of a surfactant and, eventually, an alcohol. This article describes several methods to measure the concentration of antitumoral and antiretroviral drugs in plasma, utilizing micellar liquid chromatography. Samples can be injected after dilution with a micellar solution and filtration, because proteins and other endogenous compounds are solubilized in micellar medium. We will discuss the following optimized parameters: dilution ratio, type of column, detection conditions and mobile phase composition. This article will also cover the validation performed following the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and the results reported in the literature, indicating that the methods are useful for the routine analysis of plasma samples for clinical purposes.

  19. Antiretroviral Drug-Associated Oral Lichenoid Reaction in HIV Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratanporn Arirachakaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of HIV disease and improved quality of life in HIV patients. Incidence of an oral lichenoid drug reaction induced by zidovudine is not common. Once it occurs, it affects a patient's well being, in particular their oral functions. Here we report the first case of a 34-year-old Thai man with painful erosive lesions involving the lip and buccal mucosa. Treatment with topical fluocinolone acetonide 0.1% alleviated the patient's oral pain, but it was not until the subsequent withdrawal of zidovudine that the patient showed improvement and resolution of the lesions. Long-term follow-up was useful in the management of this patient, and no recurrence of the lesion was found during 21-month follow-up in this patient.

  20. Chromatographic determination of clopidogrel bisulfate; detection and quantification of counterfeit Plavix® tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona E. ElTantawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products is a global problem. Upon using quality-ensuring methods of international pharmacopoeias, additional impurities and the low content of the active pharmaceutical ingredients were detected. In this paper, two chromatographic HPLC and TLC-densitometric methods were proposed as fast and reliable methods for detection and quantitation of counterfeit Plavix® tablets. These tablets were chemically counterfeited by aspirin, its degradate salicylic acid and metronidazole which were separated, besides the active ingredient clopidogrel bisulfate, by the proposed methods. Also, counterfeit was in packaging, strips and tablets’ color and these could be seen by visual inspection compared to original drug. The proposed methods can easily differentiate genuine from counterfeited tablets without need of prior separation. The proposed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and applied to eleven batches, also were compared statistically with the reported one.

  1. Characterization of the structure and properties of authentic and counterfeit polypropylene surgical meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, M K; Isayeva, I S; Thomas, T M; Lee, A S; Lucas, A D; Witkowski, C N; Hutter, J C

    2006-04-01

    A counterfeit version of the Ethicon Prolene polypropylene mesh was distributed to hospitals and clinics and unintentionally implanted into patients undergoing tension-free hernia repair. On December 19, 2003, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a public health web notification indicating that the counterfeit mesh was not sterile or safe to use. To develop safety recommendations for patients with the counterfeit mesh implant, we compared the counterfeit's structural, physical, chemical and mechanical properties with polypropylene meshes previously cleared by FDA. The mesh fibers for all the products tested were found to have similar chemical and physical properties. The mechanical properties were directly related to the knitted structure (loop size, repeat distance, fabric tightness) and the porosity. Extracts from the counterfeit mesh passed cytotoxicity screening tests. The FDA further recommended that if the mesh had been inadvertently implanted, then those patients should be monitored as would be the practice for any patient with an implanted surgical mesh.

  2. Transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Sayan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out between 2009 and 2014 and antiretroviral naïve 774 HIV-1 infected patients from 19 Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Departments in Turkey were included; gender: 664 (86% male, median age: 37 (range; 1–77, median CD4+T-cell: 360 (range; 1–1320 count/mm3, median HIV-RNA load: 2.10+E6 (range; 4.2+E2–7.41+E8 IU/mL. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were detected by population based sequencing of the reverse transcriptase (codon 41–238 and protease (codon 1–99 domains of pol gene of HIV-1, and analyzed according to the criteria by the World Health Organization 2009 list of surveillance drug resistance mutations [1]. Results: The patients had TDRMs to NRTIs (K65R, M184V, NNRTIs (K101E, K103N/S, G190A/E/S, Y181I/C, Y188H/L and PIs (M46L, I54V, L76V, V82L/T, N83D, I84V, L90M. The prevalence of overall TDRMs was 6.7% (52/774. Resistance mutations were found to be 0.7% (6/774, 4.1% (32/774 and 2.1% (17/774 to NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs drug groups, respectively. Three patients had NRTIs+NNRTs resistance mutations (M184V+K103N as multi-class drug resistance. However, thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs determined two distinct genotypic profiles in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: TAM1: M41L, L210W and T215Y, and TAM2: D67N, K70R, K219E/Q, and T215F. The prevalence of TAM1 and TAM2 were 7.7% (60/774 and 4.3% (34/774, respectively. Conclusions: The TDRMs prevalence of antiretroviral naïve HIV-1 infected patients may be suggested current situation of Turkey. These long-term and large-scale results show that the resistance testing must be an integral part of the management of HIV infection in Turkey.

  3. Antiretroviral Drugs and Risk of Chronic Alanine Aminotransferase Elevation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Monoinfected Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A; Ledergerber, Bruno;

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) frequently have chronic liver enzyme elevation (cLEE), the underlying cause is often unclear. Methods.  Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) Study participants without...... a consistent association between tenofovir and cLEE emerging within the first 2 years after drug initiation. This novel tenofovir-cLEE signal should be further investigated....

  4. Increasing use of 'party drugs' in people living with HIV on antiretrovirals: a concern for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracchi, Margherita; Stuart, David; Castles, Richard; Khoo, Saye; Back, David; Boffito, Marta

    2015-08-24

    Use of 'party drugs', a particular set of recreational drugs used in the context of 'ChemSex', is frequent among MSM living with HIV. A recently published observational study showed that more than half of HIV-infected MSM interviewed reported use of illicit substances in the previous 3 months, with frequent concomitant use of three or more drugs. These substances are a combination of 'club drugs' (methylenedioxymethamphetamine, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, ketamine, benzodiazepine) and drugs that are more specifically used in a sexualized context (methamphetamine, mephedrone, poppers and erectile dysfunction agents). Although formal data on pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions between recreational drugs and antiretroviral agents are lacking, information regarding potentially toxic interactions can be theorized or sometimes conclusions may be drawn from case studies and cohort observational studies. However, the risk of coadministering party drugs and antiretrovirals should not be overestimated. The major risk for a drug-drug interaction is when using ritonavir-boosting or cobicistat-boosting agents, and maybe some nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Knowledge of the metabolic pathways of 'party drugs' may help in advising patients on which illicit substances have a high potential for drug-drug interactions, as this is not the case for all.

  5. RFID in the pharmaceutical industry: addressing counterfeits with technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    The use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in the pharmaceutical industry has grown in recent years. The technology has matured from its specialized tracking and retail uses to a systemic part of supply chain management in international pharmaceutical production and distribution. Counterfeit drugs, however, remain a significant challenge for governments, pharmaceutical companies, clinicians, and patients and the use of RFID to track these compounds represents an opportunity for development. This paper discusses the medical, technological, and economic factors that support widespread adoption of RFID technology in the pharmaceutical industry in an effort to prevent counterfeit medicines from harming patients and brand equity.

  6. Drug-resistant tuberculosis among HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Hom

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB and describe the resistance patterns in patients commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART in an HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa. DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study. METHODS: Consecutive HIV-infected adults (≥ 18y/o initiating HIV care were enrolled from May 2007-May 2008, regardless of signs or symptoms of active TB. Prior TB history and current TB treatment status were self-reported. Subjects expectorated sputum for culture (MGIT liquid and 7H11 solid medium. Positive cultures were tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line anti-tuberculous drugs. The prevalence of drug-resistant TB, stratified by prior TB history and current TB treatment status, was assessed. RESULTS: 1,035 subjects had complete culture results. Median CD4 count was 92/µl (IQR 42-150/µl. 267 subjects (26% reported a prior history of TB and 210 (20% were receiving TB treatment at enrollment; 191 (18% subjects had positive sputum cultures, among whom the estimated prevalence of resistance to any antituberculous drug was 7.4% (95% CI 4.0-12.4. Among those with prior TB, the prevalence of resistance was 15.4% (95% CI 5.9-30.5 compared to 5.2% (95% CI 2.1-8.9 among those with no prior TB. 5.1% (95% CI 2.4-9.5 had rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of TB resistance to at least one drug was 7.4% among adults with positive TB cultures initiating ART in Durban, South Africa, with 5.1% having rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. Improved tools for diagnosing TB and drug resistance are urgently needed in areas of high HIV/TB prevalence.

  7. Drug synergy of tenofovir and nanoparticle-based antiretrovirals for HIV prophylaxis.

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    Thanyanan Chaowanachan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of drug combinations has revolutionized the treatment of HIV but there is no equivalent combination product that exists for prevention, particularly for topical HIV prevention. Strategies to combine chemically incompatible agents may facilitate the discovery of unique drug-drug activities, particularly unexplored combination drug synergy. We fabricated two types of nanoparticles, each loaded with a single antiretroviral (ARV that acts on a specific step of the viral replication cycle. Here we show unique combination drug activities mediated by our polymeric delivery systems when combined with free tenofovir (TFV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles loaded with efavirenz (NP-EFV or saquinavir (NP-SQV were individually prepared by emulsion or nanoprecipitation techniques. Nanoparticles had reproducible size (d ∼200 nm and zeta potential (-25 mV. The drug loading of the nanoparticles was approximately 7% (w/w. NP-EFV and NP-SQV were nontoxic to TZM-bl cells and ectocervical explants. Both NP-EFV and NP-SQV exhibited potent protection against HIV-1 BaL infection in vitro. The HIV inhibitory effect of nanoparticle formulated ARVs showed up to a 50-fold reduction in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 compared to free drug. To quantify the activity arising from delivery of drug combinations, we calculated combination indices (CI according to the median-effect principle. NP-EFV combined with free TFV demonstrated strong synergistic effects (CI50 = 0.07 at a 1∶50 ratio of IC50 values and additive effects (CI50 = 1.05 at a 1∶1 ratio of IC50 values. TFV combined with NP-SQV at a 1∶1 ratio of IC50 values also showed strong synergy (CI50 = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: ARVs with different physicochemical properties can be encapsulated individually into nanoparticles to potently inhibit HIV. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that combining TFV with either NP-EFV or NP

  8. Explaining Counterfeit Alcohol Purchases in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Zoya

    2017-04-01

    Alcohol is a common target of counterfeiting in Russia. Counterfeit alcohol is defined here as the manufacture, distribution, unauthorized placement (forgery) of protected commodity trademarks, and infringement of the exclusive rights of the registered trademark holders of alcoholic beverages. It is often argued that the expansion of the counterfeit product market is due to the steady demand of economically disadvantaged people for low-priced goods. The situation becomes more complicated once deceptive and nondeceptive forms of counterfeiting are taken into account. This study aimed to identify markers of risky behavior associated with the purchase of counterfeit alcohol in Russia. The analysis relied on consumer self-reports of alcohol use and purchase collected nationwide by the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS-HSE) in 2012 to 2014. I used a generalized linear mixed-model logistic regression to identify predictors of risky behavior by consumers who purchased counterfeit alcohol, either knowingly or unknowingly, during the 30 days preceding the survey. Purchases of counterfeit alcohol declined slightly from 2012 to 2014, mainly due to a decrease in consumers mistakenly purchasing counterfeit products. Predictors of counterfeit alcohol purchases differed between consumers who knowingly and unknowingly purchased counterfeit products. Nondeceptive purchase of counterfeit alcohol was related primarily to an indifference to alcohol brands. Consumers with social networks that include drinkers of nonbeverage alcohol and producers of homemade alcohol were highly likely to consume counterfeit alcohol deliberately. Problem drinking was significantly associated with a higher risk of both deceptive and nondeceptive purchases of counterfeit alcohol. Poverty largely contributed to nondeceptive counterfeiting. The literature has overestimated the impact of low prices on counterfeit alcohol consumption. Problem drinking and membership in social networks of consumers

  9. Production of antiretroviral drugs in middle- and low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Eloan dos Santos; Brüning, Karin; Macedo, M Fernanda; Siani, Antonio C

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines the main issues concerning the production of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in middle- and low-income countries and the relevant political, legal and technical requirements for supporting such production. The requirements for efficient local production, including the manufacture of generic and branded products and public demand, have been considered from economic, market and socio-political perspectives. A steady and consistent government policy is crucial to success. Additional crucial factors in establishing local production are adequate infrastructure, qualified human resources in technical and managerial areas, and production-distribution logistics systems. The creation or strengthening of a national drug regulatory agency is a basic requirement. Production of ARVs relies on the structure of the international market for active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), which are highly monopolized for inclusion in branded or patented drugs, or are concentrated in a few Asian generic companies. Countries seeking to begin local production must develop strategies to overcome the various barriers. For instance, sub-Saharan African countries may benefit from developing multilateral health agreements with neighbouring countries. Such agreements are recommended and should be complemented by technology transfers, especially for the manufacture of APIs. Achieving a production level that is sustainable in the long term is crucial to maintaining patients' access to ARVs.

  10. Pharmaceutical care interventions, their outcomes and patients’ satisfaction in antiretroviral drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwaozuzu, E.E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacist’s interventions (also known as pharmaceutical care plans are means of solving the drug therapy problems identified in pharmaceutical care. Outcomes are the results of pharmacists’ intervention activities. Patients’ satisfaction refers to patients’ feeling of fulfillment, pleasure or happiness with the services they have received. This study was designed to determine the types of pharmacist interventions applied in the pharmaceutical care of HIV patients receiving treatment at a tertiary hospital in southeast Nigeria, the types of outcomes of such interventions and level of patients’ satisfaction with their drug therapy. The components of the American society of health-system pharmacists (ASHP guidelines on ‘standardized method for pharmaceutical care was used as a data collection instrument to evaluate, document and intervene in the antiretroviral therapy of about one thousand four hundred and seventy three (1,473 patients. The results showed significant reductions in the frequency of the various interventions and parameters measured after the interventions. The study concluded that pharmaceutical interventions influences patients’ adherence, optimizes their drug therapy and improves rational prescribing and care resulting in significant improvements in the outcomes of their treatment and levels of satisfaction.

  11. Derivative Spectrophotometric Method for Estimation of Antiretroviral Drugs in Fixed Dose Combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohite P.B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lamivudine is cytosine and zidovudine is cytidine and is used as an antiretroviral agents. Both drugs are available in tablet dosage forms with a dose of 150 mg for LAM and 300 mg ZID respectively. Method: The method employed is based on first order derivative spectroscopy. Wavelengths 279 nm and 300 nm were selected for the estimation of the Lamovudine and Zidovudine respectively by taking the first order derivative spectra. The conc. of both drugs was determined by proposed method. The results of analysis have been validated statistically and by recovery studies as per ICH guidelines. Result: Both the drugs obey Beer’s law in the concentration range 10-50 μg mL-1,for LAM and ZID; with regression 0.9998 and 0.9999, intercept – 0.0677 and – 0.0043 and slope 0.0457 and 0.0391 for LAM and ZID, respectively.The accuracy and reproducibility results are close to 100% with 2% RSD. Conclusion: A simple, accurate, precise, sensitive and economical procedures for simultaneous estimation of Lamovudine and Zidovudine in tablet dosage form have been developed.

  12. Expression of Genes for Drug Transporters in the Human Female Genital Tract and Modulatory Effect of Antiretroviral Drugs.

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    Karolin Hijazi

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral (ARV -based microbicides are one of the strategies pursued to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Delivery of ARV drugs to subepithelial CD4+ T cells at concentrations for protection is likely determined by drug transporters expressed in the cervicovaginal epithelium. To define the role of drug transporters in mucosal disposition of topically applied ARV-based microbicides, these must be tested in epithelial cell line-based biopharmaceutical assays factoring the effect of relevant drug transporters. We have characterised gene expression of influx and efflux drug transporters in a panel of cervicovaginal cell lines and compared this to expression in cervicovaginal tissue. We also investigated the effect of dapivirine, darunavir and tenofovir, currently at advanced stages of microbicides development, on expression of drug transporters in cell lines. Expression of efflux ABC transporters in cervical tissue was best represented in HeLa, Ect1/E6E7 and End1/E6E7 cell lines. Expression of influx OCT and ENT transporters in ectocervix matched expression in Hela while expression of influx SLCO transporters in vagina was best reflected in VK2/E6E7 cell line. Stimulation with darunavir and dapivirine upregulated MRP transporters, including MRP5 involved in transport of tenofovir. Dapivirine also significantly downregulated tenofovir substrate MRP4 in cervical cell lines. Treatment with darunavir and dapivirine showed no significant effect on expression of BCRP, MRP2 and P-glycoprotein implicated in efflux of different ARV drugs. Darunavir strongly induced expression in most cell lines of CNT3 involved in cell uptake of nucleotide/nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors and SLCO drug transporters involved in cell uptake of protease inhibitors. This study provides insight into the suitability of cervicovaginal cell lines for assessment of ARV drugs in transport kinetics studies. The modulatory effect of darunavir and dapivirine on

  13. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064.

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    Iris Chen

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral (ARV drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009-2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2% of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15% in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7% in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1-4 drugs/sample. These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals.

  14. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Iris; Clarke, William; Ou, San-San; Marzinke, Mark A.; Breaud, Autumn; Emel, Lynda M.; Wang, Jing; Hughes, James P.; Richardson, Paul; Haley, Danielle F.; Lucas, Jonathan; Rompalo, Anne; Justman, Jessica E.; Hodder, Sally L.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009–2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2%) of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15%) in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7%) in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1–4 drugs/sample). These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals. PMID:26445283

  15. Antiretroviral drug supply challenges in the era of scaling up ART in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Erik J; Jahn, Andreas; Ben-Smith, Anne; Makombe, Simon D; Harries, Anthony D; Aboagye-Nyame, Francis; Chimbwandira, Frank

    2011-07-06

    The number of people receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) has increased considerably in recent years and is expected to continue to grow in the coming years. A major challenge is to maintain uninterrupted supplies of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and prevent stock outs. This article discusses issues around the management of ARVs and prevention of stock outs in Malawi, a low-income country with a high HIV/AIDS burden, and a weak procurement and supply chain management system. This system for ARVs, paid for by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and bypassing the government Central Medical Stores, is in place, using the United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF's) procurement services. The system, managed by a handful of people who spend limited time on supply management, is characterized by a centrally coordinated quantification based on verified data from all national ART clinics, parallel procurement through UNICEF, and direct distribution to ART clinics. The model worked well in the first years of the ART programme with a single first-line ARV regimen, but with more regimens becoming available (e.g., alternative first-line, second-line and paediatric regimens), it has become more difficult to administer. Managing supplies through a parallel system has the advantage that weaknesses in the national system have limited influence on the ARV procurement and supply chain management system. However, as the current system operates without a central warehouse and national buffer stock capacity, it diminishes the ability to prevent ARV stock outs. The process of ordering ARVs, from the time that estimates are made to the arrival of supplies in health facilities, takes approximately one year. Addressing the challenges involved in maintaining ARVs through an efficient procurement and supply chain management system that prevents ARV stock outs through the establishment of a dedicated procurement team, a central warehouse and/or national buffer stock is a

  16. Antiretroviral drug supply challenges in the era of scaling up ART in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schouten Erik J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of people receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART has increased considerably in recent years and is expected to continue to grow in the coming years. A major challenge is to maintain uninterrupted supplies of antiretroviral (ARV drugs and prevent stock outs. This article discusses issues around the management of ARVs and prevention of stock outs in Malawi, a low-income country with a high HIV/AIDS burden, and a weak procurement and supply chain management system. This system for ARVs, paid for by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and bypassing the government Central Medical Stores, is in place, using the United Nations Children’s Fund’s (UNICEF’s procurement services. The system, managed by a handful of people who spend limited time on supply management, is characterized by a centrally coordinated quantification based on verified data from all national ART clinics, parallel procurement through UNICEF, and direct distribution to ART clinics. The model worked well in the first years of the ART programme with a single first-line ARV regimen, but with more regimens becoming available (e.g., alternative first-line, second-line and paediatric regimens, it has become more difficult to administer. Managing supplies through a parallel system has the advantage that weaknesses in the national system have limited influence on the ARV procurement and supply chain management system. However, as the current system operates without a central warehouse and national buffer stock capacity, it diminishes the ability to prevent ARV stock outs. The process of ordering ARVs, from the time that estimates are made to the arrival of supplies in health facilities, takes approximately one year. Addressing the challenges involved in maintaining ARVs through an efficient procurement and supply chain management system that prevents ARV stock outs through the establishment of a dedicated procurement team, a central warehouse and

  17. Hidden costs of HIV treatment in Spain: inefficiency of the antiretroviral drug packaging

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    Josep M Llibre-Codina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiretroviral drugs in Spain are delivered by law only in hospital pharmacies. Commercial packages meet variable quality standards when dispensed drugs are returned due to treatment changes or adherence problems Nearly 20–25% of the initial regimens will be changed at 48 weeks for different reasons. We evaluated the economic impact on public health system of the inability of using returned drugs due to inefficient packaging. Materials and Methods: We defined socially efficient packaging as the best adapted one to being delivered in unit dose to outpatients and classified: Class A - Drug packed in unit doses with complete info (name of drug, dosage in mg, lot, and expiring date in each unit, maintaining complete information of the drug if returned when the external package is opened. Class B - packed in blisters with complete info in the blister, but not in unit doses, without special conservation conditions (should be re-packed in unit doses in the pharmacy before its dispensation to assure a class A excellence. Class C - packed in plastic containers with complete info written only on a label over the container, would allow repackaging only before its initial delivery, but not when returned. Class D - drug packed in plastic containers with manufacturer's warning that the product cannot be placed outside of the original package due to special conditions of conservation (fridge, humidity that doesn’t allow a unit dose repackaging or reusing an opened container. We analysed a 12-month period (July 2011–June 2012 in a hospital-based HIV outpatient pharmacy that serves 2413 treated individuals. Results: Patients generated 23,574 visits to pharmacy, and received 48,325 drug packages, with 2.529.137 pills delivered. The patients suffered 1051 treatment changes for any reason. A total amount of 122.945€ in treatment were returned to pharmacy in opened packages during the study period. 47.139.91€ would be totally lost, mainly due

  18. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, R.J.; Kampen, J.J. van; Reedijk, M.L.; Scheuer, R.D.; Dekker, L.J.; Burger, D.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Osterhaus, A.D.; Luider, T.M.; Gruters, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kaletra (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used for therapeuti

  19. Highly active antiretroviral therapy induced adverse drug reactions in Indian human immunodeficiency virus positive patients (RETRACTED by plagiarism

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    Rajesh R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available THIS ARTICLE WAS RETRACTED AFTER A PLAGIARISM INVESTIGATIONObjective: To assess the incidence, severity pattern, causality, predictability and preventability of adverse drug reactions (ADRs and to identify risk factors for adverse drug reactions in highly active antiretroviral therapy.Methods: Enrolled patients were intensively monitored for ADRs to highly active antiretroviral therapy. Predictability was assessed based on history of previous exposure to the drug or literature incidence of ADRs. Preventability was assessed using Schumock and Thornton criteria and severity was assessed using modified Hartwig and Siegel scale. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs.Results: Monitoring of 130 retropositive patients by active pharmacovigilance identified 74 ADRs from 57 patients. Anemia and hepatotoxicity were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was red blood cell (21.4%.The ADRs were moderate in 77% of cases. Type A reactions (77% were more common. A total of 10.8% ADRs were definitely preventable. The incidence rate of ADRs (65.9% was highest with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. A total of 84% interruptions to highly active antiretroviral therapy were due to toxicity. CD4 less than 200 cells/µl, female gender and tuberculosis were observed as risk factors for ADRs.Conclusion: Incidence of ADRs in intensively monitored patients was found to be 43.8%. Anemia in HIV patients is an influential risk factor for occurrence of ADRs. With the increasing access to antiretroviral in India, clinicians must focus on early detection and prevention of ADRs to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  20. Pattern and Determinants of Antiretroviral Drug Adherence among Nigerian Pregnant Women

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    S. O. Ekama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The need for a high level of adherence to antiretroviral drugs has remained a major hurdle to achieving maximal benefit from its use in pregnancy. This study was designed to determine the level of adherence and identify factors that influence adherence during pregnancy. Method. This is a cross-sectional study utilizing a semistructured questionnaire. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression models were used to determine factors independently associated with good drug adherence during pregnancy. Result. 137 (80.6% of the interviewed 170 women achieved adherence level of ≥95% using 3 day recall. The desire to protect the unborn child was the greatest motivation (51.8% for good adherence. Fear of being identified as HIV positive (63.6% was the most common reason for nonadherence. Marital status, disclosure of HIV status, good knowledge of ART, and having a treatment supporter were found to be significantly associated with good adherence at bivariate analysis. However, after controlling for confounders, only HIV status disclosure and having a treatment partner retained their association with good adherence. Conclusion. Disclosure of HIV status and having treatment support are associated with good adherence. Maternal desire to protect the child was the greatest motivator for adherence.

  1. Primary HIV drug resistance and efficacy of first-line antiretroviral therapy guided by resistance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oette, Mark; Kaiser, Rolf; Däumer, Martin; Petch, Ruth; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Carls, Horst; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt; Schmalöer, Dirk; Stechel, Jürgen; Feldt, Torsten; Pfister, Herbert; Häussinger, Dieter

    2006-04-15

    Primary HIV drug resistance has been associated with poor treatment outcome of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in several trials. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of first-line HAART guided by resistance testing. In a prospective multicenter study in the state of Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, chronically HIV-infected patients underwent genotypic resistance testing and were monitored for 48 weeks after initiation of HAART. Primary drug resistance was found in 30 of 269 patients entering the study between January 2001 and December 2003 [11.2%; 95% confidence interval, 7.4-14.9]. In intent-to-treat analysis, the proportion of patients with viral load below 50 copies/mL after 24 and 48 weeks was 70.0% and 66.7%, respectively, in patients with resistance and 74.1% and 73.6%, respectively, in patients without (P = 0.66 and 0.51). In on-treatment analysis, the proportions were 80.8% and 83.3%, respectively, in patients with resistance and 81.9% and 85.0%, respectively, in patients without (P= 0.79 and 0.77). These results were also valid considering a detection limit of 400 copies/mL. The prevalence of primary drug resistance was 11.2% in chronically HIV-infected patients. HAART guided by resistance testing had similar efficacy in patients with primary drug resistance as compared with patients with wild-type virus. Based on these facts, resistance-adapted first-line HAART is suggested as routine practice.

  2. Antiretroviral salvage therapy for multiclass drug-resistant HIV-1-infected patients: from clinical trials to daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaz, Arkaitz; Falcó, Vicenç; Ribera, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the key problems in the management of long-term HIV-1-infected patients. Due to cross-resistance patterns within classes, broad resistance to the three original antiretroviral classes can develop in some patients, mainly those with extensive antiretroviral treatment experience and multiple treatment failures. Triple-class-resistant HIV-1 infection has been associated with a higher risk of clinical progression and death. Additionally, it increases the probability of transmission of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains. Over the last years, the availability of new antiretroviral agents against novel targets (integrase inhibitors and CCR5 antagonists), and new drugs within old classes (nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors) has opened a range of new therapeutic options for patients with multiclass drug-resistant HIV-1 infection and scarce therapeutic options with previous drugs. In randomized clinical trials, each of these new drugs has shown exceptional efficacy results, especially in patients who received other fully active drugs in the regimen. Indeed, in nonrandomized trials and observational studies, unprecedented rates of virologic suppression similar to those obtained in naive patients have been achieved when three of the currently available new drugs were combined, even in heavily experienced patients who had no viable salvage options with the previous classes. Thus, the goal of suppression and maintenance (plasma HIV-1 RNA infection. Treatment failure can still occur, however, and the management of patients with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection remains a challenge. Clinicians are encouraged to optimize use of the new drugs to obtain better control of HIV infection while avoiding emergence of new resistance-associated mutations. The aim of this article is to summarize current knowledge on the management of salvage therapy for patients with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection by analyzing the evidence

  3. Quantum Counterfeit Coin Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Iwama, Kazuo; Raymond, Rudy; Teruyama, Junichi

    2010-01-01

    The counterfeit coin problem requires us to find all false coins from a given bunch of coins using a balance scale. We assume that the balance scale gives us only ``balanced'' or ``tilted'' information and that we know the number k of false coins in advance. The balance scale can be modeled by a certain type of oracle and its query complexity is a measure for the cost of weighing algorithms (the number of weighings). In this paper, we study the quantum query complexity for this problem. Let Q(k,N) be the quantum query complexity of finding all k false coins from the N given coins. We show that for any k and N such that k < N/2, Q(k,N)=O(k^{1/4}), contrasting with the classical query complexity, \\Omega(k\\log(N/k)), that depends on N. So our quantum algorithm achieves a quartic speed-up for this problem. We do not have a matching lower bound, but we show some evidence that the upper bound is tight: any algorithm, including our algorithm, that satisfies certain properties needs \\Omega(k^{1/4}) queries.

  4. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes MJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria João Gomes,1 José das Neves,1,2 Bruno Sarmento1,2 1Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB, Porto, Portugal; 2Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS, Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde-Norte, CESPU, Gandra, Portugal Abstract: Antiretroviral drug therapy plays a cornerstone role in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Despite obvious advances over the past 3 decades, new approaches toward improved management of infected individuals are still required. Drug distribution to the central nervous system (CNS is required in order to limit and control viral infection, but the presence of natural barrier structures, in particular the blood–brain barrier, strongly limits the perfusion of anti-HIV compounds into this anatomical site. Nanotechnology-based approaches may help providing solutions for antiretroviral drug delivery to the CNS by potentially prolonging systemic drug circulation, increasing the crossing and reducing the efflux of active compounds at the blood–brain barrier, and providing cell/tissue-targeting and intracellular drug delivery. After an initial overview on the basic features of HIV infection of the CNS and barriers to active compound delivery to this anatomical site, this review focuses on recent strategies based on antiretroviral drug-loaded solid nanoparticles and drug nanosuspensions for the potential management of HIV infection of the CNS. Keywords: HIV/AIDS, blood–brain barrier, protease inhibitors, efflux transporters, drug targeting

  5. Drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive children newly diagnosed with HIV-1 in Manaus, Amazonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Solange Dourado de; Sabidó, Meritxell; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Benzaken, Adele Schwartz; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of drug resistance mutations (DRM), the prevalence of drug susceptibility [transmitted drug resistance (TDR)] and the prevalence of HIV-1 variants among treatment-naive HIV-infected children in Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil. Children born to HIV-infected mothers and diagnosed with HIV in an HIV reference service centre and with available pol sequence between 2010 and 2015 prior to antiretroviral initiation were included. TDR was identified using the Calibrated Population Resistance Tool. HIV-1 subtypes were defined by Rega and phylogenetic analyses. One hundred and seventeen HIV-infected children with a median age of 3.7 years were included. Among them, 28.2% had been exposed to some form of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). HIV DRM were present in 21.4% of all children. Among PMTCT-exposed children, 3% had NRTI mutations, 15.2% had NNRTI mutations and 3% had PI mutations. Among PMTCT-unexposed children, 1.2% had NRTI mutations, 21.4% had non-NNRTI mutations and 1.2% had PI mutations. The most common DRM was E138A (8.5%). The prevalence of TDR was 16.2%; 21.1% among PMTCT-exposed children and 14.3% among PMTC-unexposed children. The analysis of HIV-1 subtypes revealed that 80.2% were subtype B, 6.0% were subtype C, 3.4% were subtype F1 and 10.3% were possible unique recombinant forms (BF1, 4.3%; DB, 4.3%; BC, 0.9%; KC, 0.9%). We report a high prevalence of DRM in this population, including in almost a quarter of children with no reported PMTCT. The high prevalence of TDR observed might compromise ART effectiveness. Results show extensive HIV-1 diversity and expansion of subtype C, which highlights the need for surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes in Amazonas state.

  6. Adipose tissue as a target of HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs. Potential consequences on metabolic regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron-Debarle, Martine; Boccara, Franck; Lagathu, Claire; Antoine, Bénédicte; Cervera, Pascale; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Vigouroux, Corinne; Capeau, Jacqueline

    2010-10-01

    Adipose tissue redistribution occurred at first in HIV-infected patients about 15 years ago after initiation of combination antiretroviral treatment (ART) and the responsibility of drugs was rapidly considered. This lipodystrophic syndrome can associate lipoatrophy, affecting subcutaneous adipose tissue in priority with fat hypertrophy, in particular in the upper part of the body, and metabolic alterations, dyslipidemia and altered glucose tolerance with insulin resistance. The primary role of thymidine analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (tNRTI) in peripheral lipoatrophy has been clearly shown in vitro and in vivo, these drugs inducing a severe mitochondrial dysfunction and an increased oxidative stress together with fat inflammation leading to fat loss. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that some protease inhibitors (PI) or non-NRTIs also exert adverse effects on adipocytes and could act in synergy to amplify the effect of tNRTI. While severe lipoatrophy is now less prevalent in HIV-infected patients, fat hypertrophy is frequently observed: a role for drugs from the different classes acting in synergy to induce fat hyperplasia and hypertrophy is suggested, with milder mitochondrial dysfunction but increased inflammation and activation of the cortisol system. In addition, it is now considered that long-term viral infection, even if controlled, could induce low-grade inflammation and prepare fat to the deleterious effect of ART. Both lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy are involved in metabolic disorders and increased cardio-metabolic risk that likely participate to early aging reported in these patients. ART can also be directly responsible for metabolic alterations. Strategies to revert or reduce lipodystrophy are important to consider in these patients in addition to the required control of the metabolic disorders.

  7. Maternal and infant health is protected by antiretroviral drug strategies that preserve breastfeeding by HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Kuhn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The South African Department of Health is justified in withdrawing support for free infant formula. By so doing, it recognises that any intervention that might detract from breast feeding poses a serious threat to infant survival. Since evidence is now strong that antiretroviral drugs used during lactation prevent transmission of infection from a seropositive mother, strategies that promote breastfeeding can now be recommended for enhancing the health of mothers and infants.

  8. Risk of myocardial infarction in patients with HIV infection exposed to specific individual antiretroviral drugs from the 3 major drug classes: the data collection on adverse events of anti-HIV drugs (D:A:D) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe Westring; Sabin, Caroline; Weber, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been assessed in 13 anti-HIV drugs in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study. METHODS. Poisson regression models were adjusted for cardiovascular risk...... factors, cohort, calendar year, and use of other antiretroviral drugs and assessed the association between MI risk and cumulative (per year) or recent (current or in the past 6 months) use of antiretroviral drugs, with >30,000 person-years of exposure. RESULTS. Over 178,835 person-years, 580 patients...

  9. Characterization and identification of suspected counterfeit miltefosine capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorlo, Thomas P C; Eggelte, Teunis A; de Vries, Peter J; Beijnen, Jos H

    2012-03-07

    Recently, it was revealed that generic miltefosine capsules for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis, a fatal parasitic disease, were possibly counterfeit products. Here we report on the methods to characterize and identify miltefosine in pharmaceutical products and the procedures that were used to assess the quality of these suspected counterfeit products. Characterization and identification of miltefosine were done with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Moreover, a simple, rapid and inexpensive colorimetric test was developed and evaluated for the detection of miltefosine in pharmaceutical products that can be used in the field. The complementary analytical techniques presented here were able to determine qualitatively or (semi-)quantitatively the presence or absence of miltefosine in pharmaceutical preparations and could identify suspected counterfeit miltefosine capsules. This finding of a suspected counterfeit drug intended to treat a neglected disease in a resource-poor country emphasizes the urgent need to develop more simple inexpensive assays to evaluate drug quality for use in the field.

  10. Small-molecule inhibition of HIV pre-mRNA splicing as a novel antiretroviral therapy to overcome drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Bakkour

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises antiretroviral therapy efficacy and limits therapeutic options. Therefore, it is an ongoing task to identify new targets for antiretroviral therapy and to develop new drugs. Here, we show that an indole derivative (IDC16 that interferes with exonic splicing enhancer activity of the SR protein splicing factor SF2/ASF suppresses the production of key viral proteins, thereby compromising subsequent synthesis of full-length HIV-1 pre-mRNA and assembly of infectious particles. IDC16 inhibits replication of macrophage- and T cell-tropic laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and strains with high-level resistance to inhibitors of viral protease and reverse transcriptase. Importantly, drug treatment of primary blood cells did not alter splicing profiles of endogenous genes involved in cell cycle transition and apoptosis. Thus, human splicing factors represent novel and promising drug targets for the development of antiretroviral therapies, particularly for the inhibition of multidrug-resistant viruses.

  11. Economic evaluation of 3-drug antiretroviral regimens for the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werayingyong, Pitsaphun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkunya; Tantivess, Sripen; Kullert, Nareeluk; Tosanguan, Kakanang; Butchon, Rukmanee; Voramongkol, Nipunporn; Boonsuk, Sarawut; Pilasant, Songyot; Kulpeng, Wantanee; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2015-03-01

    The current program for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Thailand recommends a 2-drugs regimen for HIV-infected pregnant women with a CD4 count >200 cells/mm(3). This study assesses the value for money of 3 antiretroviral drugs compared with zidovudine (AZT)+single-dose nevirapine (sd-NVP). A decision tree was constructed to predict costs and outcomes using the governmental perspective for assessing cost-effectiveness of 3-drug regimens: (1) AZT, lamivudine, and efavirenz and (2) AZT, 3TC, and lopinavir/ritonavir, in comparison with the current protocol, AZT+sd-NVP. The 3-drug antiretroviral regimens yield lower costs and better health outcomes compared with AZT+sd-NVP. Although these 3-drug regimens offer higher program costs and health care costs for premature birth, they save money significantly in regard to pediatric HIV treatment and treatment costs for drug resistance in mothers. The 3-drug regimens are cost-saving interventions. The findings from this study were used to support a policy change in the national recommendation. © 2013 APJPH.

  12. Drug-Drug Interactions Between Antiretroviral and Immunosuppressive Agents in HIV-Infected Patients After Solid Organ Transplantation : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maarseveen, Erik M.; Rogers, Christin C.; Trofe-Clark, Jennifer; van Zuilen, Arjan D.; Mudrikova, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) resulting in the prolonged survival of HIV-infected patients, HIV infection is no longer considered to be a contraindication for solid organ transplantation (SOT). The combined management of antiretroviral and immunosuppressive ther

  13. Hematological alterations and thymic function in newborns of HIV-infected mothers receiving antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongnoi, Rotjanee; Penvieng, Nawaporn; Singboottra, Panthong; Kingkeow, Doungnapa; Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Sirivatanapa, Pannee; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2013-06-08

    To investigate the effects of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs on hematological parameters and thymic function in HIV-uninfected newborns of HIV-infected mothers. Cross sectional study. Chiang-Mai University Hospital, Chiang-Mai, Thailand. 49 HIV-uninfected and 26 HIV-infected pregnancies. Cord blood samples of newborns from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected mothers were collected. Hematological parameters were measured using automatic blood cell count. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) levels in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs), CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were quantified using real-time PCR.. Hemotological parameters and thymic function. Newborn of HIV-infected mother tended to have lower mean levels of hemoglobin than those of HIV-uninfected mother (137 ±22 vs 146 ±17 g/L, P = 0.05). Furthermore, mean of red blood cell (RBC) counts and hematocrit and median of TRECs in CD4+ T-cells in the newborns of the former were significantly lower than those of the latter [3.6 ±0.7 vs 4.8 ±0.6 x 1012 cells/L, P cells) in HIV-uninfected newborns of HIV-infected mothers.

  14. Estimated glomerular filtration rate, chronic kidney disease and antiretroviral drug use in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in HIV-positive persons might be caused by both HIV and traditional or non-HIV-related factors. Our objective was to investigate long-term exposure to specific antiretroviral drugs and CKD. DESIGN:: A cohort study including 6843 HIV-positive persons...... with at least three serum creatinine measurements and corresponding body weight measurements from 2004 onwards. METHODS:: CKD was defined as either confirmed (two measurements >/=3 months apart) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or below for persons with baseline eGFR of above...... 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or confirmed 25% decline in eGFR for persons with baseline eGFR of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or less, using the Cockcroft-Gault formula. Poisson regression was used to determine factors associated with CKD. RESULTS:: Two hundred and twenty-five (3.3%) persons progressed to CKD during...

  15. Patient-Initiated Repackaging of Antiretroviral Therapy, Viral Suppression and Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhani, Habib O; Muiruri, Charles; Maro, Venance P; Nyombi, Balthazar; Omondi, Michael; Mushi, Julian B; Lirhunde, Eileen S; Bartlett, John A

    2017-02-09

    Patient-initiated repackaging of antiretroviral therapy (ART) refers to removal of ART medications from their original manufacturer's containers, and putting them into alternative containers. This behavior may be triggered by stigma associated with HIV infection, and may impact patient outcomes. We assessed association between patient initiated repackaging of ART and failure to achieve viral suppression (FVS) in a sample of 450 HIV-infected adults (≥8 years) on first line ART for ≥6 months. FVS was defined as a plasma HIV RNA level ≥400 copies/mL. A total of 197 (43.7%) patients reported repackaging their ART medications. One hundred ninety-one patients (42.4%) failed to suppress and FVS was associated with medication repackaging [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 2.2; 95% CI 1.4-3.3.] Adherence to ART was also associated with FVS (aOR; 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-0.6.). Benefits of retaining drugs in their original packaging along with adherence to ART should be emphasized to reduce the risk of FVS.

  16. Coconut Oil Extract Mitigates Testicular Injury Following Adjuvant Treatment with Antiretroviral Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogedengbe, Oluwatosin O; Jegede, Ayoola I; Onanuga, Ismail O; Offor, Ugochukwu; Naidu, Edwin Cs; Peter, Aniekan I; Azu, Onyemaechi O

    2016-10-01

    Increased access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made the management of drug toxicities an increasingly crucial component of HIV. This study investigated the effects of adjuvant use of coconut oil and HAART on testicular morphology and seminal parameters in Sprague- Dawley rats. Twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 153~169 g were distributed into four groups (A-D) and treated as follows: A served as control (distilled water); B (HAART cocktail- Zidovudine, Lamivudine and Nevirapine); C (HAART + Virgin coconut oil 10 mL/kg) and D (Virgin coconut oil 10 mL/kg). After 56 days of treatment, animals were killed and laparotomy to exercise the epididymis for seminal fluid analyses done whilst testicular tissues were processed for histomorphometric studies. Result showed a significant decline in sperm motility (P coconut oil + HAART resulted in significant decrease in seminiferous tubular diameter (P coconut oil alone (which showed normal histoarchitecture levels). While derangements in testicular and seminal fluid parameters occurred following HAART, adjuvant treatment with Virgin coconut oil restored the distortions emanating thereof.

  17. [Counterfeit phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors--growing safety risks for public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijałek, Zbigniew; Sarna, Katarzyna; Błazewicz, Agata; Marin, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Counterfeit drugs, medical devises and dietary supplements are inherently dangerous and a growing problem. In Europe the growth of the counterfeit medication market is attributable in part to registration of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE-5) used for the erectile dysfunction. "Viagra, Levitra and Cialis belong to this group. It has been estimated that up to 2.5 million men in Europe are exposed to an illicit sildenafil, suggesting that there may be as many illegal as legal users of sildenafil. In Europe a strong trend is observed towards increasingly professional counterfeits and imitations of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra, with regard to the appearance of tablets, capsules and packaging. The professional presentation will deceive potential consumers into assuming these products are legal, efficacious and safe. Globally, increased obstacles for counterfeiters are necessary to combat pharmaceutical counterfeiting, including fines and penalties. The worldwide nature of the counterfeit problem requires proper coordination between countries to ensure an adequate enforcement. We described the usefulness of the time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the electrospray ionization (LC-ESI-MS-TOF) and the X-ray powder diffraction method (XRPD) for PDE-5 counterfeit screening from the Polish illegal market.

  18. Investigation into classification/sourcing of suspect counterfeit Heptodintrade mark tablets by near infrared chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marta B; Wolff, Jean-Claude

    2009-02-02

    Near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) analysis was performed on 55 counterfeit Heptodin tablets obtained from a market survey and an additional 11 authentic Heptodin tablets for comparison. The aim of the study was to investigate whether NIR-CI can be used to detect the counterfeit tablets and to classify/source them so as to understand the possible number of origins to aid investigators and authorities to shut down counterfeiting operations. NIR-CI combined with multivariate analysis is particularly suited to compare chemical and physical properties of samples, since it is a quick and non-destructive method of analysis. Counterfeit tablets were easily distinguished from the authentic ones. Principal component analysis (PCA) and k-means clustering were performed on the data set. The results from both analyses grouped the counterfeit tablets in 13 main groups. The main groups found with both methods were quite consistent. Out of the 55 tablets only 18% contained the correct active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), i.e., the anti-viral drug lamivudine. The remaining 82% of counterfeit tablets contained talc and starch as main excipients. The API containing tablets classified into three main groups, based mainly on the amount of lamivudine present in the tablet. The group which had close to the correct amount of lamivudine sub-classified into three groups. From the analysis carried out, it is likely that the counterfeit tablets originate from as many as 15 different sources.

  19. Pharmacovigilance for antiretroviral drugs in Africa, lessons from a study in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquet, Antoine; Djima, Mariam Mama; Coffie, Patrick; Kacou, Henri Die; Eholie, Serge P.; Messou, Eugene; Minga, Albert; Guehi, Calixte; Yavo, Jean Claude; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Dabis, Francois; Ekouevi, Didier K.

    2011-01-01

    Background While antiretroviral treatment (ART)-related adverse drug reactions (ADR) are documented in industrialized countries, there is no pre-existing surveillance system dedicated to ADR monitoring in most African countries. We assessed knowledge towards pharmacovigilance among ART prescribers and available capacity of HIV clinics to conduct ADR monitoring in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Methods A questionnaire was administered to ART prescribers, to assess their knowledge towards the occurrence of ADRs. A retrospective ADR survey was also conducted, based on a data query of treatment modification/interruptions in three HIV clinics. Clinical monitors went back to medical charts to review and validate the reasons of the treatment modification/interruptions. Results Of the 81 ART prescribers interviewed, 25 (31%) declared not grading ADRs and 12 (14.8%) declared notifying ADRs to the national regulatory authorities. Among 5,252 adult ART-treated patients who attended the participating clinics in 2008, 599 treatment modifications were identified. Reasons for treatment modification/interruptions identified in the electronic database were documented in the medical charts in 554 (92.5%) cases, ADR accounting for 273 (45.5%) cases. Toxicity related to ART was graded in only 58 (21%) cases in the medical charts. Discussion This study describes challenges limiting the implementation of reliable pharmacovigilance activities in HIV clinics in Côte d’Ivoire. The lack of knowledge of ART prescribers concerning ADR grading does not support the spontaneous reporting of ADRs. Using treatment modification/interruptions for ADR monitoring appears feasible but improvements are needed to respond to key questions related to drug toxicities in the context of ART scale up in Africa. PMID:21735508

  20. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  1. Clinically significant drug interactions among HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So-Ngern, Apichot; Montakantikul, Preecha; Manosuthi, Weerawat

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study of the outpatient medical records of 1000 HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2011 to determine the incidence of clinically significant drug interactions (CSDI). The severities of the CSDI were graded following the Micromedex" 2.0 database and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) 2012 HIV treatment guidelines. Three hundred thirty-five patients (34%) had 554 episodes of CSDI. Of which 337 episodes (61%), 163 episodes (29%) and 54 episodes (10%) had grades 2, 3 and 4 severity CSDI, respectively. The CSDI were caused by protease inhibitor (PI)-based drug regimens in 79%, by efavirenz-based regimens in 34% and by nevirapine-based regimens in 10% (p5 items prescribed at a time (OR 1.80; 95% CI: 1.23-2.63), seeing a doctor >4 times a year (OR 1.72; 95% CI: 1.20-2.46), having hypertension (OR 0.60; 95% CI: 0.37-0.98), having a duration of receiving ART of >5 years (OR 0.46; 95% CI: 0.28-0.77) and having a CD4 count of >200 cells/mm3 (OR 0.46; 95%CI: 0.26-0.84). CSDI were common among HIV-infected patients receiving ARV in our outpatient clinic. Patients having a low CD, count, having dyslipidemia, receiving PI-based ART, having a frequent number of visits per year and having a large number of items prescribed at each visit had a greater chance of a CSDI.

  2. Prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance among treatment-naive and treated HIV-infected patients in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rafael Rangel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An in-house, low-cost method was developed to determine the genotypic resistance of immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 isolates. All 179 Venezuelan isolates analysed belonged to subtype B. Primary drug resistance mutations were found in 11% of 63 treatment-naïve patients. The prevalence of resistance in isolates from 116 HIV-positive patients under antiretroviral treatment was 47% to protease inhibitors, 65% to nucleoside inhibitors and 38% to non-nucleoside inhibitors, respectively. Around 50% of patients in the study harboured viruses with highly reduced susceptibility to the three classical types of drugs after only five years from their initial diagnoses.

  3. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for injecting drug users in the WHO European Region 2002-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donoghoe, Martin C; Bollerup, Annemarie R; Lazarus, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Providing equitable access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to injecting drug users (IDUs) is both feasible and desirable. Given the evidence that IDUs can adhere to HAART as well as non-IDUs and the imperative to provide universal and equitable access to HIV/AIDS treatment for all...... the injecting status of those initiating HAART and the use of opioid substitution therapy among HAART patients, and discuss how HAART might be better delivered to injecting drug users. Our data adds to the evidence that IDUs in Europe have poor and inequitable access to HAART, with only a relatively small...

  4. Prevalence and type of drug-drug interactions involving antiretrovirals in patients attending a specialist outpatient clinic in Kampala, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Seden

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Scale-up of HIV services in countries such as Uganda has resulted in a rapid increase in facilities offering antiretrovirals (ARVs and an increase in healthcare workers trained to deliver care. Consequently, evaluating medication safety is increasingly important in these settings. Data from developed countries suggest that drug-drug interactions (DDIs involving ARVs are common, occurring at rates of 14–58%. Few data are available from low resource settings, however a study of 996 Kenyan patients found that 33.5% were at risk of clinically significant DDIs. We evaluated the prevalence and type of ARV DDIs and the patients most at risk in an African outpatient setting. A random sample of patients taking current ARVs and accessing care at the Infectious Diseases Institute, Makerere University, Kampala was selected from the clinic database. The most recent prescription for each patient was screened for DDIs using www.hiv-druginteractions.org. Clinical significance of DDIs was assessed by two of us using a previously developed technique evaluating: likelihood of interaction, therapeutic index of affected drug and severity of potential adverse effect. From 1000 consecutive patients 99.6% were taking≥1 co-medication alongside their ARV regimen (mean 1.89. 24.5% had≥1 potential DDI, with a total of 335 DDIs observed. Of these, 255 DDIs were considered clinically significant, affecting 18.8% of patients. Only 0.3% of DDIs involved a contraindicated combination. There was a higher rate of potential DDIs observed in patients taking TB treatment (p=0.0047, who were WHO stage 3 or 4 (p=0.001, or patients taking ≥2 co-medications alongside ARVs (p<0.0001 (Fishers exact test. Patient age, gender, CD4 count and weight did not affect risk for DDIs. Co-medications commonly associated with potential DDIs were antibiotics (6.2% of 1000 patients, anthelminthics (4.6% and antifungals (3.5%. Potential DDIs involving ARVs occur at similar rates in resource

  5. Anti-counterfeit technologies: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dipika; Malla, Swathi; Gudala, Kapil; Tiwari, Pramil

    2013-01-01

    Growth of international free trade and inadequate drug regulation have led to the expansion of trade in counterfeit drugs worldwide. Technological protection is seen to be the best way to avoid this problem. Different technologies came into existence like overt, covert, and track and trace technologies. This review emphasises ideal technological characteristics, existing anti-counterfeit technologies, and their adoption in different countries. Developed countries like the USA have implemented RFID while the European trend is towards 2D barcodes. The Indian government is getting sensitised about the extent of the problem and has formulated rules mandating barcodes. Even the pharmaceutical companies have been employing these technologies in order to detain illegitimate drugs in their supply chain.

  6. Patent Pooling for Promoting Access to Antiretroviral Drugs (ARVs) - A Strategic Option for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Kanikaram; Srivastava, Sadhana

    2010-01-19

    The current HIV/AIDS scenario in India is quite grim with an estimated 2.4 million people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) in 2008, just behind South Africa and Nigeria. The anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs) remain the main stay of global HIV/AIDS treatment. Over 30 ARVs (single and FDCs) available under six categories viz., NRTIs (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), NNRTIs (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), Protease inhibitors, the new Fusion inhibitors, Entry inhibitors-CCR5 co-receptor antagonists and HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitors. The major originator companies for these ARVs are: Abbott, Boehringer Ingelheim (BI), Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS), Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Merck, Pfizer, Roche, and Tibotec. Beginning with zidovidine in 1987, all the drugs are available in the developed countries. In India, about 30 ARVs are available as generics manufactured by Aurobindo, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh; Cipla Limited, Goa; Emcure Pharmaceuticals, Pune, Maharashtra; Hetero Drugs, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh; Macleods Pharmaceuticals, Daman; Matrix Laboratories, Nashik, Maharashtra; Ranbaxy, Sirmour, Himachal Pradesh; and Strides Arcolab, Bangalore, Karnataka. The National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) set up in 1992 by the Govt. of India provides free ARVs to HIV positive patients in India since 2004. The drugs available in India include both single drugs and FDCs covering both first line and second line ARVs. Even while there are claims of stabilization of the disease load, there is still huge gap of those who require ARVs as only about 150,000 PLHA receive the ARVs from the Govt. and other sources. Access to ARVs therefore is still a cause of serious concern ever since India became fully Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS)-complaint in 2005. Therefore, the Indian pharmaceutical companies cannot make generics for those for drugs introduced post-2005 due to product patent regime. Other concerns include heat stable

  7. Antiretroviral Therapy and Pre-exposure Prophylaxis: Combined Impact on HIV Transmission and Drug Resistance in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ume L.; Glaubius, Robert; Mubayi, Anuj; Hood, Gregory; Mellors, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The potential impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with overlapping and nonoverlapping antiretrovirals (ARVs) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and drug resistance is unknown. Methods. A detailed mathematical model was used to simulate the epidemiological impact of ART alone, PrEP alone, and combined ART + PrEP in South Africa. Results. ART alone initiated at a CD4 lymphocyte cell count years but increases drug resistance prevalence to 6.6%. PrEP alone (30% coverage and 75% effectiveness) also prevents 21% of infections but with lower resistance prevalence of 0.5%. The ratio of cumulative infections prevented to prevalent drug-resistant cases after 10 years is 7-fold higher for PrEP than for ART. Combined ART + PrEP with overlapping ARVs prevents 35% of infections but increases resistance prevalence to 8.2%, whereas ART + PrEP with nonoverlapping ARVs prevents slightly more infections (37%) and reduces resistance prevalence to 7.2%. Conclusions. Combined ART + PrEP is likely to prevent more HIV infections than either strategy alone, but with higher prevalence of drug resistance. ART is predicted to contribute more to resistance than is PrEP. Optimizing both ART and PrEP effectiveness and delivery are the keys to preventing HIV transmission and drug resistance. PMID:23570850

  8. Contra Davidson on Counterfeiting, Round Two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E. Block

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Libertarians and non libertarians alike agree that counterfeiting legitimate money owned by innocent people is illicit.  But what about counterfeiting counterfeit money owned by the guiltless? Davidson and I, both libertarians, take the position that this would be a rights violation; that this would violate the rights of innocent owners of currency, who would be victimized by such fraudulent behavior of counterfeiters, even those who limit themselves to counterfeiting counterfeit funds. But what about counterfeiting counterfeit money owned by those who are guilty of crimes? Davidson (2013 opines, in effect, that there are no such people. The counterfeiter of counterfeit money is thus himself a criminal, she avers. I argue, very much to the contrary, that the relevant population consists mostly of guilty people, and thus they are not in a logical position to object to what would otherwise be considered victimization. As for the few innocents among them, they demonstrate their innocence to a large degree by not objecting to the counterfeiting of counterfeit money. If they do object, and take actions to prevent this practice, they act in a manner incompatible with the libertarian non aggression principle (NAP and thus enter the ranks of the guilty. I find Davidson’s (2013 economic analysis impeccable; her understanding of libertarianism highly problematic.In the interests of full disclosure, I should make it clear that the present paper contains the radical suggestion that we should do away with our established monetary- and financial system. If need be, and this is by no means my first choice, we are entitled to do so by means of massive counterfeiting of established currencies (which is justified by deontological considerations and libertarian principles. Of course, this is illegal in extant nations, and I would not want to be imprisoned for committing a crime. So, for purposes of our discussion, we will be considering only the imaginary

  9. Unanticipated Effects of New Drug Availability on Antiretroviral Durability: Implications for Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Ellen F; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Burkholder, Greer A; Willig, James H; Saag, Michael S; Mugavero, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Durability of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy is associated with improved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) outcomes. Data on ARV regimen durability in recent years and clinical settings are lacking. Methods.  This retrospective follow-up study included treatment-naive HIV-infected patients initiating ARV therapy between January 2007 and December 2012 in a university-affiliated HIV clinic in the Southeastern United States. Outcome of interest was durability (time to discontinuation) of the initial regimen. Durability was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Cox proportional hazard analyses was used to evaluate the association among durability and sociodemographic, clinical, and regimen-level factors. Results.  Overall, 546 patients were analyzed. Median durability of all regimens was 39.5 months (95% confidence interval, 34.1-44.4). Commonly prescribed regimens were emtricitabine and tenofovir with efavirenz (51%; median duration = 40.1 months) and with raltegravir (14%; 47.8 months). Overall, 67% of patients had an undetectable viral load at the time of regimen cessation. Discontinuation was less likely with an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (adjusted hazards ratio [aHR] = 0.35, P = .001) or protease inhibitor-based regimen (aHR = 0.45, P = .006) and more likely with a higher pill burden (aHR = 2.25, P = .003) and a later treatment era (aHR = 1.64, P new drug availability and provider preference. Medication durability must be interpreted carefully in the context of a dynamic treatment landscape.

  10. Coconut Oil Extract Mitigates Testicular Injury Following Adjuvant Treatment with Antiretroviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogedengbe, Oluwatosin O; Jegede, Ayoola I; Onanuga, Ismail O; Offor, Ugochukwu; Naidu, Edwin CS; Peter, Aniekan I; Azu, Onyemaechi O

    2016-01-01

    Increased access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made the management of drug toxicities an increasingly crucial component of HIV. This study investigated the effects of adjuvant use of coconut oil and HAART on testicular morphology and seminal parameters in Sprague- Dawley rats. Twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 153~169 g were distributed into four groups (A–D) and treated as follows: A served as control (distilled water); B (HAART cocktail- Zidovudine, Lamivudine and Nevirapine); C (HAART + Virgin coconut oil 10 mL/kg) and D (Virgin coconut oil 10 mL/kg). After 56 days of treatment, animals were killed and laparotomy to exercise the epididymis for seminal fluid analyses done whilst testicular tissues were processed for histomorphometric studies. Result showed a significant decline in sperm motility (P < 0.05) and count (P < 0.0001) in HAART-treated animals while there was insignificant changes in other parameters in groups C and D except count that was reduced (P < 0.0001) when compared with controls. Histomorphological studies showed HAART caused disorders in seminiferous tubular architecture with significant (P < 0.01) decline in epithelial height closely mirrored by extensive reticulin framework and positive PAS cells. Adjuvant Virgin coconut oil + HAART resulted in significant decrease in seminiferous tubular diameter (P < 0.05), but other morphometric and histological parameters were similar to control or Virgin coconut oil alone (which showed normal histoarchitecture levels). While derangements in testicular and seminal fluid parameters occurred following HAART, adjuvant treatment with Virgin coconut oil restored the distortions emanating thereof. PMID:27818734

  11. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Among Antiretroviral-Naïve HIV-1–Infected Patients in Asia: Results From the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K. C.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G.; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-01-01

    (See editorial commentary by Jordan on pages 1058–1060.) Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia. PMID:21460324

  12. HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drugs in pregnant women from Buenos Aires metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Zapiola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the prevalence of antiretroviral resistance associated mutations in HIV-1 infected pregnant woman treated in Buenos Aires metropolitan area (period 2008-2014. A total of 136 women with viral load = 500 copies/ml were included: 77 (56.6% were treatment-naïve and 59 (43.4% were antiretroviral-experienced patients either with current (n: 24 or previous (n = 35 antiretroviral therapy. Genotypic baseline resistance was investigated in plasma of antiretroviral-naïve patients and antiretroviral-experienced patients. The resistance mutations were identified according to the lists of the World Health Organization and the International Antiviral Society, respectively. Frequencies of resistance associated mutations detected in 2008-2011 and 2012-2014 were compared. A total of 37 (27.2% women presented at least one resistance associated mutation: 25/94 (26.5% in 2008-2011 and 12/42 (28.5% in 2012-2014 (p > 0.05. Among naïves, 15 (19.5% had at least one mutation: 10/49 (20.4% in the period 2008-2011 and 5/28 (17.8% in 2012-2014 (p > 0.05. The resistance mutations detected in naïves were associated with non nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, being K103N the most common mutation in both periods. In antiretroviral experienced patients, 22/59 (37.3% had at least one resistance mutation. This study demonstrates a high frequency of resistance associated mutations which remained stable in the period analyzed. These levels suggest an increased circulation of HIV-1 antiretroviral resistant strains in our setting compared to previous reports from Argentina

  13. Antiretroviral drugs saquinavir and ritonavir reduce inhibitory concentration values of itraconazole against Histoplasma capsulatum strains in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira Brilhante

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies have shown that some drugs that are not routinely used to treat fungal infections have antifungal activity, such as protease inhibitor antiretroviral drugs. This study investigated the in vitro susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum to saquinavir and ritonavir, and its combination with the antifungal itraconazole. The susceptibility assay was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. All strains were inhibited by the protease inhibitor antiretroviral drugs. Saquinavir showed minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.125 to 1 μg mL−1 for both phases, and ritonavir presented minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.0312 to 4 μg mL−1and from 0.0625 to 1 μg mL−1 for filamentous and yeast phase, respectively. Concerning the antifungal itraconazole, the minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.0019 to 0.125 μg mL−1 and from 0.0039 to 0.0312 μg mL−1 for the filamentous and yeast phase, respectively. The combination of saquinavir or ritonavir with itraconazole was synergistic against H. capsulatum, with a significant reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations of both drugs against the strains (p < 0.05. These data show an important in vitro synergy between protease inhibitors and itraconazole against the fungus H. capsulatum.

  14. Potential for Drug-Drug Interactions between Antiretrovirals and HCV Direct Acting Antivirals in a Large Cohort of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Poizot-Martin

    Full Text Available Development of direct acting antivirals (DAA offers new benefits for patients with chronic hepatitis C. The combination of these drugs with antiretroviral treatment (cART is a real challenge in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to describe potential drug-drug interactions between DAAs and antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients.Cross-sectional study of all HIV/HCV coinfected patients attending at least one visit in 2012 in the multicenter French Dat'AIDS cohort. A simulation of drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral treatment and DAAs available in 2015 was performed.Of 16,634 HIV-infected patients, 2,511 had detectable anti-HCV antibodies, of whom 1,196 had a detectable HCV-RNA and were not receiving HCV treatment at the time of analysis. 97.1% of these patients were receiving cART and 81.2% had a plasma HIV RNA <50 copies/mL. cART included combinations of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a boosted protease inhibitor in 43.6%, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in 17.3%, an integrase inhibitor in 15.4% and various combinations or antiretroviral drugs in 23.7% of patients. A previous treatment against HCV had been administered in 64.4% of patients. Contraindicated associations/potential interactions were expected between cART and respectively sofosbuvir (0.2%/0%, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (0.2%/67.6%, daclatasvir (0%/49.4%, ombitasvir/boosted paritaprevir (with or without dasabuvir (34.4%/52.2% and simeprevir (78.8%/0%.Significant potential drug-drug interactions are expected between cART and the currently available DAAs in the majority of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and sofosbuvir/daclatasvir with or without ribavirin appeared the most suitable combinations in our population. A close collaboration between hepatologists and HIV/AIDS specialists appears necessary for the management of HCV treatment concomitantly to cART.

  15. Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Pharmacogenetic Profile between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Antiblastic Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Caraglia, Michele; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Zappavigna, Silvia; Lombardi, Angela; Fierro, Carla; Atripaldi, Luigi; Muto, Tommaso; Valente, Daniela; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Di Francia, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) into clinical practice has dramatically changed the natural approach of HIV-related cancers. Several studies have shown that intensive antiblastic chemotherapy (AC) is feasible in HIV-infected patients with cancer, and that the outcome is similar to that of HIV-negative patients receiving the same AC regimens. However, the concomitant use of HAART and AC can result in drug accumulation or possible toxicity with consequent decreased efficacy of one or both classes of drugs. In fact, many AC agents are preferentially metabolized by CYP450 and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with HAART are common. Therefore, it is important that HIV patients with cancer in HAART receiving AC treatment at the same time receive an individualized cancer management plan based on their liver and renal functions, their level of bone marrow suppression, their mitochondrial dysfunction, and their genotype profile. The rationale of this review is to summarize the existing data on the impact of HAART on the clinical management of cancer patients with HIV/AIDS and DDIs between antiretrovirals and AC. In addition, in order to maximize the efficacy of antiblastic therapy and minimize the risk of drug-drug interaction, a useful list of pharmacogenomic markers is provided.

  16. Counterfeit integrated circuits detection and avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Tehranipoor, Mark (Mohammad); Forte, Domenic

    2015-01-01

    This timely and exhaustive study offers a much-needed examination of the scope and consequences of the electronic counterfeit trade.  The authors describe a variety of shortcomings and vulnerabilities in the electronic component supply chain, which can result in counterfeit integrated circuits (ICs).  Not only does this book provide an assessment of the current counterfeiting problems facing both the public and private sectors, it also offers practical, real-world solutions for combatting this substantial threat.   ·      Helps beginners and practitioners in the field by providing a comprehensive background on the counterfeiting problem; ·      Presents innovative taxonomies for counterfeit types, test methods, and counterfeit defects, which allows for a detailed analysis of counterfeiting and its mitigation; ·      Provides step-by-step solutions for detecting different types of counterfeit ICs; ·      Offers pragmatic and practice-oriented, realistic solutions to counterfeit IC d...

  17. Combating the counterfeits with web portal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S. L.; Ip, W. H.

    2015-10-01

    Due to the globalisation of counterfeiting activities, the penetration of fake products in open market is growing. So far, the technologies to combat counterfeiting are mostly applied to high-value products (e.g. premium wine and branded handbags); however, in the medium- and low-value products' perspective, there is no secure way for consumers to identify whether the purchased items are genuine or not. To address the counterfeiting problems effectively, a platform for identifying authenticated products and promoting anti-counterfeit activities is very important. The aim of this paper is to design and develop an anti-counterfeit platform which includes two functions: providing customers a secure network to ascertain the genuineness of their purchased product and increasing public awareness of the current counterfeit problems and updated anti-counterfeit solutions. By combining these two functions, it enables public to fight against fake and beware of counterfeit. Results of adopting portal technology in anti-counterfeiting show high accuracy in product checking and improved creditability. This reveals that the applicability and advantage of the proposed methodology are satisfactory.

  18. Absence of antiretroviral therapy and other risk factors for morbidity and mortality in Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jeannia J; Bazazi, Alexander R; Altice, Frederick L; Mohamed, Mahmood N; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2012-01-01

    Throughout Asia, people who use drugs are confined in facilities referred to as compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers. The limited transparency and accessibility of these centers has posed a significant challenge to evaluating detainees and detention conditions directly. Despite HIV being highly prevalent in this type of confined setting, direct evaluation of detainees with HIV and their access to medical care has yet to be reported in the literature. We evaluated the health status of 100 adult male detainees with HIV and their access to medical care in the two largest Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers holding HIV-infected individuals. Approximately 80% of all detainees with HIV were surveyed in each detention center. Most participants reported multiple untreated medical conditions. None reported being able to access antiretroviral therapy during detention and only 9% reported receiving any HIV-related clinical assessment or care. Nearly a quarter screened positive for symptoms indicative of active tuberculosis, yet none reported having been evaluated for tuberculosis. Although 95% of participants met criteria for opioid dependence prior to detention, none reported being able to access opioid substitution therapy during detention, with 86% reporting current cravings for opioids and 87% anticipating relapsing to drug use after release. Fourteen percent of participants reported suicidal ideation over the previous two weeks. We identified a lack of access to antiretroviral therapy in two of the six compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers in Malaysia designated to hold HIV-infected individuals and found significant, unmet health needs among detainees with HIV. Individuals confined under such conditions are placed at considerably high risk for morbidity and mortality. Our findings underscore the urgent need for evidence-based drug policies that respect the rights of people who use drugs and seek to improve, rather

  19. Absence of antiretroviral therapy and other risk factors for morbidity and mortality in Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannia J Fu

    Full Text Available Throughout Asia, people who use drugs are confined in facilities referred to as compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers. The limited transparency and accessibility of these centers has posed a significant challenge to evaluating detainees and detention conditions directly. Despite HIV being highly prevalent in this type of confined setting, direct evaluation of detainees with HIV and their access to medical care has yet to be reported in the literature.We evaluated the health status of 100 adult male detainees with HIV and their access to medical care in the two largest Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers holding HIV-infected individuals.Approximately 80% of all detainees with HIV were surveyed in each detention center. Most participants reported multiple untreated medical conditions. None reported being able to access antiretroviral therapy during detention and only 9% reported receiving any HIV-related clinical assessment or care. Nearly a quarter screened positive for symptoms indicative of active tuberculosis, yet none reported having been evaluated for tuberculosis. Although 95% of participants met criteria for opioid dependence prior to detention, none reported being able to access opioid substitution therapy during detention, with 86% reporting current cravings for opioids and 87% anticipating relapsing to drug use after release. Fourteen percent of participants reported suicidal ideation over the previous two weeks.We identified a lack of access to antiretroviral therapy in two of the six compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers in Malaysia designated to hold HIV-infected individuals and found significant, unmet health needs among detainees with HIV. Individuals confined under such conditions are placed at considerably high risk for morbidity and mortality. Our findings underscore the urgent need for evidence-based drug policies that respect the rights of people who use drugs and seek

  20. Detection of HIV drug resistance during antiretroviral treatment and clinical progression in a large European cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Clotet, Bonaventura;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE(S): To investigate the relationship between detection of HIV drug resistance by 2 years from starting antiretroviral therapy and the subsequent risk of progression to AIDS and death. DESIGN: Virological failure was defined as experiencing two consecutive viral loads of more than 400......-up. We observed 829 AIDS events and 571 deaths during 38,814 person-years of follow-up resulting in an overall incidence of new AIDS and death of 3.6 per 100 person-years of follow-up [95% confidence interval (CI):3.4-3.8]. By 96 months from baseline, the proportion of patients with a new AIDS diagnosis...

  1. The use of dried blood spot specimens for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping in young children initiating antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimo, Anna T.; Ledwaba, Johanna; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J.; Technau, Karl-Günter; Kuhn, Louise; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    Paired plasma and dried blood spots (DBS) from 232 South African HIV-infected children initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) were genotyped for drug resistance mutations, most of who had prior exposure to ART for prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were most commonly detected in both specimen types, particularly Y181C/I and K103N/S. Resistance interpretation concordance was achieved in 97% of pairs with 7 children having mutations detected in DBS only. These results validate the preferential use of DBS specimens for HIVDR genotyping in this patient group. PMID:26192603

  2. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV transmission: potential role for people who inject drugs in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairy, Margaret L; Deryabina, Anna; Hoos, David; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2013-11-01

    Interest in the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention stems from mounting evidence from research studies demonstrating that ART is associated with a decrease in sexual HIV transmission among serodiscordant couples and, perhaps, in other populations at risk. There is paucity of data on the efficacy of ART for prevention in key populations, including persons who inject drugs (PWID). In this paper, we examine the current status of HIV services for PWID in Central Asia, the use of ART by this population and explore ART for prevention for PWID in this context. We also discuss research and implementation questions with relevance to such a strategy in the region.

  3. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub-Saharan Af......BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub...... resistance (HIVDR) was performed on patients exhibiting virological failure (>1000 copies/mL at 6 months) or slow virological response (>5000 copies/mL at 3 months and Virological failure...... was observed among 14 (5.3%) participants out of 265 patients. Twelve samples were genotyped and six had HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations at baseline. Among virological failures, 9/11 (81.8%) harbored one or more HIVDR mutations at 6 months. The most frequent mutations were K103N and M184VI. CONCLUSIONS...

  4. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub-Saharan Af......BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub...... resistance (HIVDR) was performed on patients exhibiting virological failure (>1000 copies/mL at 6 months) or slow virological response (>5000 copies/mL at 3 months and Virological failure...... was observed among 14 (5.3%) participants out of 265 patients. Twelve samples were genotyped and six had HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations at baseline. Among virological failures, 9/11 (81.8%) harbored one or more HIVDR mutations at 6 months. The most frequent mutations were K103N and M184VI. CONCLUSIONS...

  5. Effect of transmitted drug resistance on virological and immunological response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV (EuroCoord-CHAIN joint project): a European multicohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittkop, Linda; Günthard, Huldrych F; de Wolf, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The effect of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) on first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV-1 needs further study to inform choice of optimum drug regimens. We investigated the effect of TDR on outcome in the first year of cART within a large European collaboration....

  6. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub......-Saharan Africa is sparse. METHODS: HIV viral load (VL) and resistance mutations pre-ART and after 6 months were determined in a prospective cohort study of ART-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Jimma, Ethiopia. VL measurements were done at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Genotypic HIV drug...... was observed among 14 (5.3%) participants out of 265 patients. Twelve samples were genotyped and six had HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) mutations at baseline. Among virological failures, 9/11 (81.8%) harbored one or more HIVDR mutations at 6 months. The most frequent mutations were K103N and M184VI. CONCLUSIONS...

  7. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and chemometrics: An interesting tool to discriminate and characterize counterfeit medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, D; Cauwenbergh, T; Bothy, J L; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; Apers, S; Deconinck, E

    2015-08-10

    Counterfeit medicines pose a huge threat to public health worldwide. High amounts of counterfeit pharmaceuticals enter the European market and therefore detection of these products is essential. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier-Transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) might be useful for the screening of counterfeit medicines since it is easy to use and little sample preparation is required. Furthermore, this approach might be helpful to customs to obtain a first evaluation of suspected samples. This study proposes a combination of ATR-FTIR and chemometrics to discriminate and classify counterfeit medicines. A sample set, containing 209 samples in total, was analyzed using ATR-FTIR and the obtained spectra were used as fingerprints in the chemometric data-analysis which included Principal Component Analysis (PCA), k-Nearest Neighbours (k-NN), Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy (SIMCA). First it was verified whether the mentioned techniques are capable to distinguish samples containing different active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). PCA showed a clear tendency of discrimination based on the API present; k-NN, CART and SIMCA were capable to create suitable prediction models based on the presence of different APIs. However k-NN performs the least while SIMCA performs the best. Secondly, it was tested whether these three models could be expanded to discriminate between genuine and counterfeit samples as well. k-NN was not able to make the desired discrimination and therefore it was not useful. CART performed better but also this model was less suited. SIMCA, on the other hand, resulted in a model with a 100% correct discrimination between genuine and counterfeit drugs. This study shows that chemometric analysis of ATR-FTIR fingerprints is a valuable tool to discriminate genuine from counterfeit samples and to classify counterfeit medicines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Scaling up access to antiretroviral drugs in a middle-income country: public sector drug delivery in the Free State, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Francois; Schneider, Helen; Engelbrecht, Michelle C; van Rensburg-Bonthuyzen, Ega Janse; Jacobs, Nandipha; van Rensburg, Dingie H C J

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the distribution and management of drugs and supplies in scaling up access to public sector antiretroviral treatment (ART) in a middle-income country. More specifically, a case study of the Free State Province of South Africa is presented focusing on: the mobilisation and training of pharmaceutical staff for ART, processes related to the ordering, distribution and storage of medicines, continuity of ART supplies and the impact of ART delivery on other drugs and supplies. Data were obtained from longitudinal research conducted between April 2004 and July 2006 comprising three surveys of the first 20 health facilities providing ART in the province, key informant interviews and observations made of provincial ART Task Team meetings. The supply of ART in the Province was managed through the existing drug supply system but with special mechanisms to ensure integrity of ART supplies and security of stock within the existing supply system. Initial hiccups in the procurement of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for South Africa (a national function) caused delays in putting patients on ART, although these supply problems were short-lived. At provincial level, not all pharmacist posts created for the programme were filled, and pharmacists working in the rest of the health system were subsequently trained to take on ART programme functions. Electronic systems were not established at all service sites, which in part contributed to delays in the delivery of drugs and supplies to more peripheral units. Adequate space to safely store ARV drugs remained problematic. The introduction of the ART programme did not create disruptions in the supply of non-ART essential drugs, which in fact improved over the period of observation. It is concluded that despite some process, human resource and infrastructural challenges, the drug management system in the Free State succeeded in incorporating public sector ART within its existing drug distribution network and functions, at

  9. Surveillance of transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance among HIV-1 infected women attending antenatal clinics in Chitungwiza, Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mqondisi Tshabalala

    Full Text Available The rapid scale-up of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and use of single dose Nevirapine (SD NVP for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (pMTCT have raised fears about the emergence of resistance to the first line antiretroviral drug regimens. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of primary drug resistance (PDR in a cohort of young (<25 yrs HAART-naïve HIV pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Chitungwiza, Zimbabwe. Whole blood was collected in EDTA for CD4 counts, viral load, serological estimation of duration of infection using the BED Calypte assay and genotyping for drug resistance. Four hundred and seventy-one women, mean age 21 years; SD: 2.1 were enrolled into the study between 2006 and 2007. Their median CD4 count was 371cells/µL; IQR: 255-511 cells/µL. Two hundred and thirty-six samples were genotyped for drug resistance. Based on the BED assay, 27% were recently infected (RI whilst 73% had long-term infection (LTI. Median CD4 count was higher (p<0.05 in RI than in women with LTI. Only 2 women had drug resistance mutations; protease I85V and reverse transcriptase Y181C. Prevalence of PDR in Chitungwiza, 4 years after commencement of the national ART program remained below WHO threshold limit (5%. Frequency of recent infection BED testing is consistent with high HIV acquisition during pregnancy. With the scale-up of long-term ART programs, maintenance of proper prescribing practices, continuous monitoring of patients and reinforcement of adherence may prevent the acquisition and transmission of PDR.

  10. Evolution of antiretroviral drug costs in Brazil in the context of free and universal access to AIDS treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S Nunn

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the long-term drug costs associated with treating AIDS in developing countries. Brazil's AIDS treatment program has been cited widely as the developing world's largest and most successful AIDS treatment program. The program guarantees free access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART for all people living with HIV/AIDS in need of treatment. Brazil produces non-patented generic antiretroviral drugs (ARVs, procures many patented ARVs with negotiated price reductions, and recently issued a compulsory license to import one patented ARV. In this study, we investigate the drivers of recent ARV cost trends in Brazil through analysis of drug-specific prices and expenditures between 2001 and 2005.We compared Brazil's ARV prices to those in other low- and middle-income countries. We analyzed trends in drug expenditures for HAART in Brazil from 2001 to 2005 on the basis of cost data disaggregated by each ARV purchased by the Brazilian program. We decomposed the overall changes in expenditures to compare the relative impacts of changes in drug prices and drug purchase quantities. We also estimated the excess costs attributable to the difference between prices for generics in Brazil and the lowest global prices for these drugs. Finally, we estimated the savings attributable to Brazil's reduced prices for patented drugs. Negotiated drug prices in Brazil are lowest for patented ARVs for which generic competition is emerging. In recent years, the prices for efavirenz and lopinavir-ritonavir (lopinavir/r have been lower in Brazil than in other middle-income countries. In contrast, the price of tenofovir is US$200 higher per patient per year than that reported in other middle-income countries. Despite precipitous price declines for four patented ARVs, total Brazilian drug expenditures doubled, to reach US$414 million in 2005. We find that the major driver of cost increases was increased purchase quantities of six specific drugs

  11. HIV drug resistance in adults failing early antiretroviral treatment: results from the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Ou, San-San; Hart, Stephen; Wallis, Carole; Morgado, Mariza G.; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Tripathy, Srikanth; Hovind, Laura; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Sabin, Devin; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Zhang, Xinyi Cindy; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Akelo, Victor; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Santos, Breno Riegel; Godbole, Sheela V.; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Chen, Ying Q.; Cohen, Myron S.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2016-01-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces HIV transmission and has health benefits. HIV drug resistance can limit treatment options and compromise use of ART for HIV prevention. We evaluated drug resistance in 85 participants in the HPTN 052 trial who started ART at CD4 counts of 350–550 cells/mm3 and failed ART by May 2011; 8.2% had baseline resistance and 35.3% had resistance at ART failure. High baseline viral load and less education were associated with emergence of resistance at ART failure. Resistance at ART failure was observed in 7/8 (87.5%) participants who started ART at lower CD4 cell counts. PMID:26859828

  12. Retention in an antiretroviral therapy programme during an era of decreasing drug cost in Limbe, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Mosoko Jembia J; Akam Wilfred; Weidle Paul J; Brooks John T; Aweh Asabi J; Kinge Thompson N; Pals Sherri; Raghunathan Pratima L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2002, Cameroon initiated scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART); on 1 October 2004, a substantial reduction in ART cost occurred. We assessed the impact of this event and other factors on enrolment and retention in care among HIV-infected patients initiating ART from February 2002 to December 2005 at the single ART clinic serving the Southwest Region in Limbe, Cameroon. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical and pharmacy payment records of HIV-infected patients ...

  13. Prevalence of counterfeit anthelminthic medicines: a cross-sectional survey in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohiuddin Hussain; Okumura, Junko; Sovannarith, Tey; Nivanna, Nam; Akazawa, Manabu; Kimura, Kazuko

    2010-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of counterfeit anthelminthic medicines in Cambodia, and to determine influential factors. Commonly used anthelminthic medicines were collected from private drug outlets. Medicines were carefully observed including their registration labelling, and their authenticity was investigated with the manufacturers and the Medicines Regulatory Authorities. Samples were analysed by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography at the National Health Product Quality Control Centre, Cambodia. Two hundred and three samples of anthelminthics were collected from 137 drug stores. Domestic products constituted 36.9%. Of 196 samples which were verified for registration, 15.8% were not registered. Of 165 samples successfully investigated for their authenticity, 7 (4.2%) were identified as counterfeit. All of these medicines were purchased in open packs or containers, and most of them were foreign manufactured and/or without registration. The results of our survey urge strict implementation of drug registration and vigilance on the availability of unregistered medicines to combat counterfeit medicines in Cambodia.

  14. 76 FR 1182 - Determination of System Attributes for the Tracking and Tracing of Prescription Drugs; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... consumers from the threats posed by counterfeit drugs. The ability to track and trace finished drug products... the introduction of counterfeit and other substandard drugs. DATES: The public workshop will be held... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Since the formation of the first Counterfeit Drug Task Force in 2003...

  15. Paradoxes in antiretroviral treatment for injecting drug users: access, adherence and structural barriers in Asia and the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Offered proper support, injection drug users (IDUs) can achieve the same levels of adherence to and clinical benefit from antiretroviral treatment (ARV) as other patients with HIV. Nonetheless, in countries of Asia and the former Soviet Union where IDUs represent the largest share of HIV cases, IDUs have been disproportionately less likely to receive ARV. While analysis of adherence amongst IDUs has focused on individual patient ability to adhere to medical regimens, HIV treatment systems themselves are in need of examination. Structural impediments to provision of ARV for IDUs include competing, vertical systems of care; compulsory drug treatment and rehabilitation services that often offer neither ARV nor effective treatment for chemical dependence; lack of opiate substitution treatments demonstrated to increase adherence to ARV; and policies that explicitly or implicitly discourage ARV delivery to active IDUs. Labeling active drug users as socially untrustworthy or unproductive, health systems can create a series of paradoxes that ensure confirmation of these stereotypes. Needed reforms include professional education and public campaigns that emphasize IDU capacity for health protection and responsible choice; recognition that the chronic nature of injecting drug use and its links to HIV infection require development of ARV treatment delivery that includes active drug users; and integrated treatment that strengthens links between health providers and builds on, rather than seeks to bypass, IDU social networks and organizations.

  16. Scaling-up the use of generic antiretrovirals in resource-limited countries: generic drugs for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Eduard J; Passarelli, Carlos; Lui, Iris; Guichard, Anne-Claire; Simao, Mariangela; De Lay, Paul; Loures, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    The number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) continues to increase around the world because of the increasing number on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and their associated increase of life expectancy, in addition to the number of people newly infected with HIV each year. Unless a 'cure' can be found for HIV infection, PLHIV can anticipate the need to take antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) for the rest of their lives. Because ARVs are now being used for HIV prevention, as well as for therapeutic purposes, the need for effective, affordable ARVs with few adverse effects will continue to rise. It is important to note that the dramatic growth in treatment coverage of PLHIV seen during the past decade has been primarily due to the increased use of generic ARVs. Thus, there will be a need to scale-up the research and development, production, distribution and access to generic ARVs and ART regimens. However, these processes must occur within national and international regulated free-market economic systems and must deal with increasingly multifaceted patent issues affecting the price while ensuring the quality of the ARVs. National and international regulatory mechanisms will have to evolve, which will affect broader national and international economic and trade issues. Because of the complexity of these issues, the Editors of this Supplement conceived of asking experts in their fields to describe the various steps from relevant research and development, to production of generic ARVs, their delivery to countries and subsequently to PLHIV in low- and middle-income countries. A main objective was to highlight how these steps are interrelated, how the production and delivery of these drugs to PLHIV in resource-limited countries can be made more effective and efficient, and what the lessons are for the production and delivery of a broader set of drugs to people in low- and middle-income countries.

  17. Clinically significant interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs for HIV-infected children: profiling and comparison of two drug databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kazeem A Oshikoya,1 Ibrahim A Oreagba,2 Olayinka O Ogunleye,1 Saheed Lawal,2 Idowu O Senbanjo3 1Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Paediatric and Child Health, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria Background: Drug–drug interactions are an important therapeutic challenge among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Early recognition of drug–drug interactions is important, but conflicts do exist among drug compendia on drug interaction information. We aimed to evaluate the consistencies of two drug information resources with regards to the severity rating and categorization of the potential interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs. Methods: We reviewed the case files of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children who were receiving treatment at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010. All of the co-prescribed and antiretroviral drug pairs were screened for potential interactions using the Medscape Drug Interaction Checker and the Monthly Index of Medical Specialties Interaction Checker. Drug–drug interaction (DDI severity and categorization were rated on a scale of A (no known interaction; B (minor/no action needed; C (moderate/monitor therapy; D (major/therapy modification; and X (contraindicated/avoid combination. Results: A total of 280 patients were at risk of 596 potential DDIs. The databases showed discrepancies, with Medscape database identifying 504 (84.6% and USA MIMS database identifying 302 (50.7% potential DDIs. Simultaneous identification of DDIs by both databases occurred for only 275 (46.1% listed interactions. Both databases have a weak correlation on the severity rating (rs = 0.45; P < 0.001. The

  18. Transmitted drug resistant HIV-1 and association with virologic and CD4 cell count response to combination antiretroviral therapy in the EuroSIDA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (TDR) and factors associated with TDR and to compare virological and CD4 count response to combination antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: In this study, 525 mostly chronically infected EuroSIDA patients...

  19. Right to health encompasses right to access essential generic medicines: challenging the 2008 Anti-Counterfeit Act in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleche, Allan; Day, Emma

    2014-12-11

    To what extent has the right to access generic HIV medication been implemented in Kenya for the 1.6 million people living with HIV? How does this relate to the right to health under international and national law? This paper examines a constitutional challenge brought to the High Court of Kenya in 2009 (the "Anti-Counterfeit Case") against the Anti-Counterfeit Act of 2008, which the petitioners, all of whom were living with HIV, argued would affect their ability to access affordable and generic antiretroviral medication. They argued that this would amount to a violation of their right to life, dignity, and health. This case is particularly interesting because the new Kenyan Constitution came into force in 2010, after the case had been filed, and specifically provided for the right to health for all of Kenya's citizens, as well as giving direct effect to all international laws ratified by the Kenyan government. This paper follows the Anti-Counterfeit Case, which includes amendments filed by the petitioners following the new constitutional changes, the arguments by the different parties in the case, and the inappropriateness of counterfeit laws as measures to control substandard and falsified medicine. The case has resulted in the suspension of significant parts of the Anti-Counterfeit Act that would pose a challenge to parallel importation, and to the court issuing a directive that the sections be amended. The judgment is examined in detail, as are the broader implications of this case for other countries in Eastern Africa.

  20. THE EMERGENCE OF THE EUROPEAN COUNTERFEIT MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Maftei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The European market of counterfeit goods has become a subject of increasing concern for businesses, private firms and policymakers. With a growing demand in consumption for this kind of goods, each sector is damaged from the toy industries to the pharmaceuticals industry. This article is aimed to expose the dynamic of the European counterfeiting markets, to highlight the main factors of production, the main providers, the smuggling routes, the overall profit, the main counterfeit products and also to offer a general perspective on the affected European markets.

  1. [Counterfeit medicines--Japan and the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daisaku

    2014-01-01

    Circulating counterfeit medicines in the market is a public health threat. Counterfeit medicines become common problem, not only in developing countries, but also in industrialised countries, as internet has made them more accessible. In Japan, the recent survey on the medicines purchased through on-line pharmacy (targeting Japanese consumers) showed that the majority of erectile dysfunction (ED) medicines imported by individuals in Japan were counterfeit version. The survey of Japanese consumers, who privately imported medicines through on-line pharmacy, indicated that 16% of these consumers experienced adverse events associated with these products. Not only that it is just fake brand, but fake medicines may even cause health hazard. The counterfeit version of Avastin recently detected in the United States became a serious threat for those who desperately need these medicines for life-threatening disease. The Japanese regulatory authorities have provided risk information of counterfeit medicines to general public, as well as monitored on-line pharmacies and conducted enforcement action where necessary. However, more resources of compliance activity should be allocated to respond to the situation of growing threats of counterfeit medicines. Purchasing medicines from abroad through unauthorised channel is the major source of counterfeit medicines. It is essential to prevent circulation of counterfeit medicines through international collaboration of various regulatory authorities. To address these problems, the World Health Organization (WHO) has launched a new Member States Mechanism (MSM) to build network of the authorities. Also, INTERPOL (ICPO) initiated globally concerted enforcement actions (Operation Pangea) against pharmaceutical crime as well as built partnership with pharmaceutical industry to create Pharmaceutical Crime Programme. It is also necessary to prevent consumers encountering counterfeit medicines and to prevent health hazard. The Ministry of

  2. Potential drug–drug interactions in HIV-perinatally infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy in Buenos Aires, Argentina

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    Ezequiel Cordova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increasing number of treatment-experienced perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHA are being transitioned from paediatric centres to adult HIV-care [1]. Most of them had been heavily exposed to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs, harbour drug-resistant viruses and require non-antiretroviral medication due to comorbidities [2]. This may predispose for clinically significant drug–drug interactions (CSDDIs [3]. There are no studies concerning CSDDIs in PHA. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of concomitant medications and CSDDIs in PHA who were transitioned for adult HIV-care to the Infectious Diseases Unit, Cosme Argerich Hospital, Buenos Aires City, Argentina. Materials and Methods: Descriptive pilot cross-sectional study (March to June 2014. PHA under ARVs at the time of the study were assessed for concomitant medication. CSDDIs were screened and categorized using the University of Liverpool Drug Interactions Program (www.hiv-druginteractions.org [4]. Results: Forty-five patients were included. Female sex: 53%. Median (IQR age: 20 years (18–22. CDC-stage C was observed in 27 (79%; 50% had ≥1 comorbidities including 3 with HCV co-infection. Drug abuse was observed in 6 (13%. The median of prior ARV regimens was 3 (3–5. Current ARV regimen included: PI: 87%, NNRTI: 27%, INSTI: 20%, enfuvirtide: 7% and CCR5 inhibitor: 4%. Median CD4 T-cell count: 568 cells/mL (279–771. Viral load <50 copies/mL: 80%. Sixty percent (27/45 had ≥1 co-medications (median 1. The most frequent co-medications were NSAIDs (40%, hormonal therapy (19% and antimicrobials (19%. Use of herbal supplements was observed in 10 (22%. Overall, 23 (51% had ≥ 1 CSDDIs: 19/27 (70% with co-medication (orange flag=18 and red flag=1; and 2/10 (20% with herbal supplements. ARV–ARV interactions were observed in 4/45 (9%: unboosted atazanavir+tenofovir (n=2, unboosted atazanavir+efavirenz (n=1 and lopinavir/ritonavir+efavirenz (n=1 (all orange flag. Considering

  3. Central nervous system penetration effectiveness of antiretroviral drugs and neuropsychological impairment in the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhal, Adriana; Gill, M John; Letendre, Scott L; Rachlis, Anita; Bekele, Tsegaye; Raboud, Janet; Burchell, Ann; Rourke, Sean B

    2016-06-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the incidence of severe HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment has declined significantly, whereas the prevalence of the milder forms has increased. Studies suggest that better distribution of cART drugs into the CNS may be important in reducing viral replication in the CNS and in reducing HIV-related brain injury. Correlates of neuropsychological (NP) performance were determined in 417 participants of the Ontario HIV Treatment Cohort Study (OCS). All participants were on three cART drugs for at least 90 days prior to assessment. Multiple logistic and linear regression methods were used. Most participants were Caucasian men with mean age of 47 years. About two thirds had a nadir CD4+ T-cell count below 200 cells/μL and 92 % had an undetectable plasma HIV viral load. The median CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) score was 7. Sixty percent of participants had neuropsychological impairment. Higher CPE values significantly correlated with lower prevalence of impairment in bivariate and multivariate analyses. In this cross-sectional analysis of HIV+ adults who had a low prevalence of comorbidities and were taking three-drug cART regimens, greater estimated distribution of cART drugs into the CNS was associated with better NP performance.

  4. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

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    Luis E. Soto-Ramirez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study. Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2% ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent.

  5. Impact of antiretroviral therapy on lipid metabolism of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: Old and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Joel; Maselli, Luciana Morganti Ferreira; Stern, Ana Carolina Bassi; Spada, Celso; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo

    2015-05-12

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, the 1990s were marked by the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) representing a new perspective of life for these patients. The use of HAART was shown to effectively suppress the replication of HIV-1 and dramatically reduce mortality and morbidity, which led to a better and longer quality of life for HIV-1-infected patients. Apart from the substantial benefits that result from the use of various HAART regimens, laboratory and clinical experience has shown that HAART can induce severe and considerable adverse effects related to metabolic complications of lipid metabolism, characterized by signs of lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, central adiposity, dyslipidemia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease and even an increased risk of atherosclerosis. New drugs are being studied, new therapeutic strategies are being implemented, and the use of statins, fibrates, and inhibitors of intestinal cholesterol absorption have been effective alternatives. Changes in diet and lifestyle have also shown satisfactory results.

  6. Significant interaction between activated charcoal and antiretroviral therapy leading to subtherapeutic drug concentrations, virological breakthrough and development of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Alice L; la Porte, Charles; Salit, Irving E

    2013-01-01

    A 42-year-old, treatment-experienced woman, virologically suppressed on tenofovir/emtricitabine and boosted atazanavir, experienced virological breakthrough, drop in CD4(+) T-cell count and undetectable drug concentrations. Adherence to treatment was confirmed, but repeat testing yielded similar results. After 2 months, the patient stated that she had been taking activated charcoal to manage gastrointestinal symptoms associated with her combination antiretroviral therapy, but she had recently discontinued the charcoal. Atazanavir concentrations were therapeutic but the patient's viral load rebounded and genotype testing revealed new reverse transcriptase mutations. The patient was changed to zidovudine, lamivudine, and boosted darunavir and achieved viral suppression. At 1 year follow-up, her viral load remained activated charcoal and atazanavir/ritonavir leading to virological breakthrough and development of resistance.

  7. The Anti-Hepatitis B Drug Entecavir Inhibits HIV-1 Replication and Can Select HIV-1 Variants Resistant to Antiretroviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Moira A.; Jilek, Benjamin L.; Brennan, Timothy P.; Shen, Lin; Zhou, Yan; Wind-Rotolo, Megan; Xing, Sifei; Bhat, Shridhar; Hale, Braden; Hegarty, Robert; Chong, Curtis R.; Liu, Jun O.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Thio, Chloe L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We show that entecavir, an FDA-approved drug used to treat chronic hepatitis B, potently inhibits HIV replication in vitro and leads to a 1 log decline in HIV RNA in vivo. Detailed analysis of two HIV-HBV co-infected patients receiving up to seven months of entecavir monotherapy demonstrated accumulation of HIV variants with the lamivudine-resistance mutation, M184V, in one of them. In vitro experiments demonstrated that M184V confers resistance to entecavir. Thus, entecavir has clinically relevant anti-HIV activity and can select for variants resistant to anti-HIV drugs. Until more is known about HIV resistance patterns and their selection by entecavir, caution is needed when using entecavir in HIV-HBV co-infected individuals not receiving fully suppressive antiretroviral regimens. PMID:17582071

  8. 动物药残留毛的显微鉴定研究——蝉蜕及其混淆品的鉴别%Studies on Microscopic Identification of Animal Drugs' Remnant Setae——Identification of Periostracum Cicadae and Its Counterfeits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑冬敏; 康廷国

    2008-01-01

    目的 以动物药残留毛的显微特征为依据,对中药蝉蜕及其易混淆品进行鉴别.方法 对黑蚱、蟪蛄、焰螓蝉的干燥蜕壳粉末进行显微制片观察,结合图像测量软件提取刚毛的直径、长度、毛窝直径等显微特征参数,进行比较分析.结果 黑蚱、蟪蛄、焰螓蝉的虫体体表刚毛在形态、颜色、直径、长短等方面以及毛窝的形态、颜色、大小等方面均具鉴别特征,并将之汇集成蝉蜕及混淆品的刚毛鉴定检索表.结论 利用动物药残留毛的显微特征差异,可以达到蝉蜕真伪鉴别的目的 .%OBJECTIVE To identify Periostracum Cicadae and its two counterfeits by observation of microscopic characteristics of setae in animal drugs. METHODS The shapes and colors of dried exuviae powders for Cryptotympana pustulata (Fabricius), Platypleura kaempferi (Fabricius) and Tibicen flammatus (Dist.) were observed, and the diameter of trichopore length and the diameter of setae were measured and compared. RESULTS The different features of setae between genuine and counterfeits could be complied as a useful microscopic identification key of Periostracum Cicadae from its forged products. CONCLUSION The method of identifying animal drugs from their counterfeits by the remnant setae is confirmed.

  9. Study to determine the improvement in neuropsychiatric symptoms after changing the responsible antiretroviral drug to nevirapine: the RELAX study

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    E Pedrol

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Primary - evaluate the improvement in psychiatric symptoms attributable to changing the antiretroviral drug responsible for such symptoms to nevirapine (NVP. The tools used were a sleep test (the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI] and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Secondary - determine the neuropsychiatric disorders and evaluate adherence to treatment and quality of life. Methods: Prospective, observational post-authorisation study that included HIV-1 patients from 36 Spanish hospitals who satisfied the following criteria: age over 18 years; change of antiretroviral treatment to NVP due to CNS side-effects; a PSQI score >5 (significant sleep disturbance; a HADS score ≥10 on the day of starting NVP treatment; and no psychoactive drug treatment initiated during the 6 weeks prior to starting treatment with NVP. Other data gathered from the patients included clinical and demographic details and administration of the Epworth somnolence scale, the Medical Outcomes Study-short form 30 items (MOS-SF-30 quality of life scale and the Simplified Medication Adherence Questionnaire (SMAQ. Evaluations were performed at baseline, 1 and 3 months after the change. Results: 129 patients were included (73.6% men; mean age, 43.2 ± 9.8 years; 36.5% homosexual, 30.2% heterosexual; 28.7% drug users; 38% AIDS; 33.3% co-infection. The drug changed was efavirenz in 89.9% of cases. The reason for the change was sleep disturbances in 75.2%, anxiety in 65.1%, other psychiatric disturbances in 38.7%, attention disturbances in 31%, and other reasons in 31%; a mean of 2.4 neuropsychiatric disturbances were detected in each patient. CD4 rose from 582 ± 261 to 619 ± 299 (non-significant difference. Only three patients had developed an HIV viral load at the end of the study. The differences produced by the change are shown in Table 1. 29 patients withdrew from the study, for the following reasons: 9 for NVP-related toxicity (7 cases of rash

  10. The influence of oral and written information on antiretroviral drugs in the knowledge of users with HIV/AIDS - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p251

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    Regina Flávia de Castro Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of oral and written transmission of information on antiretroviral drugs in knowledge generation in their users and in the retention of information by them. Method: In the first phase, 18 individuals with HIV/AIDS treated at a referral hospital analyzed three brochures containing information on antiretroviral drugs and chose the best. In the second phase, three groups of 47 individuals with HIV/AIDS who received antiretroviral drugs in the same hospital were formed. The first group, considered the control group (group “C” received their medication at the pharmacy as usual, without any additional information; the second group (group “F” received a brochure with information about the drug in use, which should be read at that moment; and the third group (group “O” received orally, the same information detailed in the brochure. All answered a questionnaire that assessed their knowledge on the referred drug. Results: The responses of group “O” had a higher level of agreement with the information they received regarding action of the drug in the body (78.7%, duration of treatment (83%, procedure when missing a dose (91.5% and storage (95.7%. Conclusion: The transmission of information, whether oral or written, generates knowledge and the instructions and information when orally transmitted, in a detailed manner and in appropriate language, are more easily understood and assimilated. It appears also that, in the studied group, oral information resulted more immediately effective than written one.

  11. Medicines counterfeiting is a complex problem: a review of key challenges across the supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The paper begins by asking why there is a market for counterfeit medicines, which in effect creates the problem of counterfeiting itself. Contributing factors include supply chain complexity and the lack of whole-systems thinking. These two underpin the author's view that counterfeiting is a complex (i.e. wicked) problem, and that corporate, public policy and regulatory actions need to be mindful of how their actions may be causal. The paper offers a problem-based review of key components of this complexity, viz., the knowledge end-users/consumers have of medicines; whether restrictive information policies may hamper information provision to patients; the internet's direct access to consumers; internet-enabled distribution of unsafe and counterfeit medicines; whether the internet is a parallel and competitive supply chain to legitimate routes; organised crime as an emerging medicines manufacturer and supplier and whether substandard medicines is really the bigger problem. Solutions respect the perceived complexity of the supply chain challenges. The paper identifies the need to avoid technologically-driven solutions, calling for 'technological agnosticism'. Both regulation and public policy need to reflect the dynamic nature of the problem and avoid creating perverse incentives; it may be, for instance, that medicines pricing and reimbursement policies, which affect consumer/patient access may act as market signals to counterfeiters, since this creates a cash market in cheaper drugs.

  12. Understanding and fighting the medicine counterfeit market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégardin, Klara; Roggo, Yves; Margot, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Medicine counterfeiting is a serious worldwide issue, involving networks of manufacture and distribution that are an integral part of industrialized organized crime. Despite the potentially devastating health repercussions involved, legal sanctions are often inappropriate or simply not applied. The difficulty in agreeing on a definition of counterfeiting, the huge profits made by the counterfeiters and the complexity of the market are the other main reasons for the extent of the phenomenon. Above all, international cooperation is needed to thwart the spread of counterfeiting. Moreover effort is urgently required on the legal, enforcement and scientific levels. Pharmaceutical companies and agencies have developed measures to protect the medicines and allow fast and reliable analysis of the suspect products. Several means, essentially based on chromatography and spectroscopy, are now at the disposal of the analysts to enable the distinction between genuine and counterfeit products. However the determination of the components and the use of analytical data for forensic purposes still constitute a challenge. The aim of this review article is therefore to point out the intricacy of medicine counterfeiting so that a better understanding can provide solutions to fight more efficiently against it.

  13. First-line antiretroviral treatment outcome in a patient presenting an HIV-1/2 multiclass drug resistant infection

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    E Castro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the expansion of HIV-2 epidemic beyond African countries, co-infection with HIV-1 becomes a global challenge. We have recently identified an HIV-1/2 dual infection with both viruses bearing multiclass drug resistance in an untreated patient [1]. We now present the patient's combined antiretroviral treatment (cART outcome after 6 months follow-up. Patient and Methods: Clinical samples were obtained upon informed consent from a 23-year-old man living in Guinea-Bissau until March 2011 when he moved to Switzerland. As previously reported [1], HIV-1/2 co-infection was confirmed by HIV-1 PCR (21.000 copies/ml and total HIV-1/2 viremia (4.351 nU/ml by product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT assay. The patient denied previous HIV testing or exposure to antiretroviral drugs. Dual infection consisted of HIV-1 CRF02_AG bearing resistance mutations M184V/V90I and HIV-2 clade A, harboring K65R/D67N mutations as amplified from proviral-DNA. Baseline CD4 + T-cell count was 408 cell/mm3. We initiated cART in accordance to drug resistance mutations (see below. Treatment compliance was assessed with an electronic pillbox device and drug-plasma concentrations. Clinical and laboratory follow up were done at weeks 2, 4, 9, 12 and 24. Results: cART was initiated with tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC, boosted-darunavir (DRV/r and raltegravir(RAL. Treatment compliance was fluctuant during the first 3 months after which it remained stable with an average monthly intake of 92%. Antiretroviral drug-plasma concentrations were traced at percentile 25th. HIV-1 viremia became undetectable at week 12. Additionally, HIV-2 viremia was retrospectively assessed by real-time RT-PCR at two independent laboratories showing undetectable values across the study period including baseline. Thus, baseline viremia, as assessed by the PERT test for particle-associated reverse transcriptase activity was due to HIV-1 alone. CD4 + T-cell count was 559 cell/mm3 at

  14. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene of HIV-1 isolates from Northern Indian patients: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Choudhury, Shubhasree; Chaudhury, Alok K; Kalra, Rajesh; Andrabi, Raiees; Wig, Naveet; Biswas, Ashutosh; Bala, Manju; Luthra, Kalpana

    2010-04-01

    The viral reverse transcriptase gene was amplified from the plasma of 27 drug-naïve and five drug-experienced HIV patients in Northern India. Follow-up samples of naïve patients after antiretroviral therapy initiation were collected in six patients at 3 months and three patients at 6 months. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two new recombinant forms, CRF_CH and CRF_CK, and an accessory non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation E138A, not previously reported from India. The major DRMs found in two 6-month follow-up samples were absent in their baseline blood samples. This is the first follow-up study to determine anti-retroviral drug resistance mutations in Indian HIV patients.

  15. Transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance in treatment naïve HIV-infected persons in London in 2011 to 2013

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    Katie McFaul

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previously published UK data on HIV transmitted drug resistance (TDR shows that it ranges between 3 and 9.4% [1,2]. However, there are no recent data from populations where HIV transmission rates are increasing. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of TDR in untreated HIV-infected individuals attending three HIV specialist clinics under the HIV Directorate, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital and based throughout London – the Kobler Clinic, 56 Dean Street and West London Centre for Sexual Health. Methods: We included all patients with a HIV diagnosis, no history of antiretroviral therapy (ART intake, attending one of the three clinics (Kobler (K, 56 Dean Street (DS and West London (WL, between 2011 and 2013 who started antiretrovirals. Reverse transcriptase (RT and protease region sequencing was performed using Vircotype virtual phenotype resistance analysis. Drug resistance mutations were identified according to Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu/. Results: Among 1705 HIV-1-infected patients enrolled in the study, 1252 were males (919 were MSM, 107 were females and 346 had no gender recorded. Ethnicity was 51.1% white British/Irish/other, 6.1% African, 2.1% Caribbean, 2.8% Asian, 1.3% Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi, 4.2%, other, 3.2% not stated, and 29.2% unknown. 547 were from K (84.3% males, 48.3% MSM, 826 were from DS (84.3% males, 71.9% MSM, and 109 from WL (87.2% males, 56.0% MSM, 223 from other sites not specified. 77.5% (1321 of 1705 of patients had baseline viral resistance testing performed. Prevalence of primary resistance in those with a baseline viral resistance test was 13.5% overall: 19.3% in K, 14.9% in DS, and 14.7% in WL. The most common mutations detected were: NRTI: 184V, 215F, 41L; NNRTI 103N, 179D, 90I; PI 90M, 46I, and 82A. Among patients who tested with TDR, 79.1% had one single mutation, 18.7% and 2.2% exhibited dual or triple class-resistant viruses

  16. Short Communication: Limited HIV Pretreatment Drug Resistance Among Adults Attending Free Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic of Pune, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karade, Santosh; Patil, Ajit A; Ghate, Manisha; Kulkarni, Smita S; Kurle, Swarali N; Risbud, Arun R; Rewari, Bharat B; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2016-04-01

    In India, the roll out of the free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program completed a decade of its initiation in 2014. The success of first-line ART is influenced by prevalence of HIV pretreatment drug resistance (PDR) in the population. In this cross-sectional study, we sought to determine the prevalence of PDR among adults attending the state-sponsored free ART clinic in Pune in western India. Fifty-two individuals eligible for ART as per national guidelines with median CD4 cell count of 253 cells/mm(3) (inter quartile range: 149-326) were recruited between January 2014 and April 2015. Population-based sequencing of partial pol gene sequences from plasma specimen revealed predominant HIV-1 subtype C infection (96.15%) and presence of single-drug resistance mutations against non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in two sequences. The study supports the need for periodic surveillance, when offering PDR testing at individual level is not feasible.

  17. Prior illicit drug use and missed prenatal vitamins predict nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy: adherence analysis A5084.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Susan E; Umbleja, Triin; Mrus, Joseph; Bardeguez, Arlene D; Andersen, Janet W; Chesney, Margaret A

    2008-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in pregnancy is crucial to optimize its efficacy and minimize mother-to-child transmission. Our objective was to examine adherence patterns to ART and health behaviors during and after pregnancy among HIV-positive women enrolled in A5084, a prospective, observational, multisite study. Between 2002-2005, HIV-infected women between 20 and 34 weeks'gestation completed at least 1 self-reported adherence questionnaire antepartum (AP), and were followed through 12 weeks' postpartum (PP). Questionnaires also addressed tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs use. Adherence was defined as reporting not having missed any doses for more than 3 months. Exact McNemar's tests were used for paired binary data and exact logistic regression was used for predictors of nonadherence. We report on 149 women (55% black, 26% Hispanic, 32% less than 25 years, 9% with AIDS, 100% on ART). PP, 31 (21%) women stopped ART and 18 (12%) withdrew from the study. AP, 57% reported adherence to ART and PP, 45% (p = 0.03, n = 87). AP, 11% reported ongoing alcohol use and 23% tobacco use compared to 37% and 30% PP (p vitamins had 4.84 times higher odds (p = 0.001) of ART nonadherence. Women reporting a history of illicit drug use and/or having missed prenatal vitamins should be targeted for programs to enhance adherence to ART during pregnancy.

  18. Drug resistance among newly-diagnosed HIV-infected children in the era of more efficacious antiretroviral prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Louise; Hunt, Gillian; Technau, Karl-Günter; Coovadia, Ashraf; Ledwaba, Johanna; Pickerill, Sam; Penazzato, Martina; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Mellins, Claude A.; Black, Vivian; Morris, Lynn; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the era of more efficacious prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens, documenting the profile of drug resistance in HIV-infected infants and young children is critical to our efforts to improve care and treatment for children. Methods HIV drug resistance mutations in plasma virus were ascertained using population sequencing among 230 newly-diagnosed HIV-infected children under 2 years of age recruited in Johannesburg, South Africa, during 2011. By this time, more effective PMTCT regimens, including combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for pregnant women, were being implemented. Results Two-thirds (67.4%) of HIV-infected children had been exposed to some form of maternal (89%) and/or infant (97%) PMTCT. Among PMTCT-exposed, 56.8% had non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), 14.8% nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), and 1.3% protease inhibitor (PI) mutations. NNRTI mutations were strongly related to younger age. The remaining third (32.6%) had no reported or recorded PMTCT exposures but resistance to NNRTI was detected in 24.0%, NRTI in 10.7% and PI in 1.3%. Conclusion The new PMTCT strategies dramatically reduce the number of children who acquire infection but among those who do become infected, NNRTI resistance prevalence is high. In this South African setting with high PMTCT coverage, almost a quarter of children with no reported or recorded PMTCT also have drug resistance mutations. PMTCT history is an inadequate means of ruling out pre-treatment drug resistance. Our results support the use of PI-based first-line regimens in HIV-infected infants and young children regardless of PMTCT history. PMID:24785949

  19. High-intensity cannabis use and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people who use illicit drugs in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawson, Gregory; Milloy, M-J; Balneaves, Lynda; Simo, Annick; Guillemi, Silvia; Hogg, Robert; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis is increasingly prescribed clinically and utilized by people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) to address symptoms of HIV disease and to manage side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In light of concerns about the possibly deleterious effect of psychoactive drug use on adherence to ART, we sought to determine the relationship between high-intensity cannabis use and adherence to ART among a community-recruited cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users. We used data from the ACCESS study, an ongoing prospective cohort study of HIV-seropositive illicit drug users linked to comprehensive ART dispensation records in a setting of universal no-cost HIV care. We estimated the relationship between at least daily cannabis use in the last 6 months, measured longitudinally, and the likelihood of optimal adherence to ART during the same period, using a multivariate linear mixed-effects model accounting for relevant socio-demographic, behavioral, clinical and structural factors. From May 2005 to May 2012, 523 HIV-positive illicit drug users were recruited and contributed 2,430 interviews. At baseline, 121 (23.1 %) participants reported at least daily cannabis use. In bivariate and multivariate analyses we did not observe an association between using cannabis at least daily and optimal adherence to prescribed HAART (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.12, 95 % Confidence Interval [95 % CI]: 0.76-1.64, p value = 0.555.) High-intensity cannabis use was not associated with adherence to ART. These findings suggest cannabis may be utilized by PLWHA for medicinal and recreational purposes without compromising effective adherence to ART.

  20. Effect of drug efflux transporters on placental transport of antiretroviral agent abacavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumanova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Greenwood, Susan L; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2015-11-01

    Abacavir is as a frequent part of combination antiretroviral therapy used in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to investigate, using in vitro, in situ and ex vivo experimental approaches, whether the transplacental pharmacokinetics of abacavir is affected by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters functionally expressed in the placenta: P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (ABCC2) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 5 (ABCC5). In vitro transport assays revealed that abacavir is a substrate of human ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters but not of ABCC2 or ABCC5. In addition, in situ experiments using dually perfused rat term placenta confirmed interactions of abacavir with placental Abcb1/Abcg2. In contrast, uptake studies in human placental villous fragments did not reveal any interaction of abacavir with efflux transporters suggesting a large contribution of passive diffusion and/or influx mechanisms to net transplacental abacavir transfer.

  1. EDUCATING AND INFORMING THE CONSUMER IN ORDER TO FIGHT COUNTERFEITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILIA PASCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Educating the consumer and fighting against the counterfeiting phenomenon are highly important action fields in every developed country because, although there are cases in which counterfeiting is considered a victimless crime and copying is perceived as an act of recognizing true value, this vision does not fit the consequences.The impact of counterfeit products on trade owners, consumers and national economies cannot be minimized; therefore, consumers must be informed about the dangers they face by purchasing a counterfeit product. It must be said that legislation is very strict with counterfeiters.The high counterfeiting level reflects, regardless the consumers’ appetite for trademark products, the counterfeiters’ ability of adapting to market trends and huge financial profits from selling counterfeit goods; the article allows an overall look regarding the counterfeiting issues.

  2. The counterfeit self: the deceptive costs of faking it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gino, Francesca; Norton, Michael I; Ariely, Dan

    2010-05-01

    Although people buy counterfeit products to signal positive traits, we show that wearing counterfeit products makes individuals feel less authentic and increases their likelihood of both behaving dishonestly and judging others as unethical. In four experiments, participants wore purportedly fake or authentically branded sunglasses. Those wearing fake sunglasses cheated more across multiple tasks than did participants wearing authentic sunglasses, both when they believed they had a preference for counterfeits (Experiment 1a) and when they were randomly assigned to wear them (Experiment 1b). Experiment 2 shows that the effects of wearing counterfeit sunglasses extend beyond the self, influencing judgments of other people's unethical behavior. Experiment 3 demonstrates that the feelings of inauthenticity that wearing fake products engenders-what we term the counterfeit self-mediate the impact of counterfeits on unethical behavior. Finally, we show that people do not predict the impact of counterfeits on ethicality; thus, the costs of counterfeits are deceptive.

  3. Profiling of counterfeit medicines by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Frederic; Roggo, Yves; Degardin, Klara; Esseiva, Pierre; Margot, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Counterfeit pharmaceutical products have become a widespread problem in the last decade. Various analytical techniques have been applied to discriminate between genuine and counterfeit products. Among these, Near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy provided promising results. The present study offers a methodology allowing to provide more valuable information for organisations engaged in the fight against counterfeiting of medicines. A database was established by analyzing counterfeits of a particular pharmaceutical product using Near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Unsupervised chemometric techniques (i.e. principal component analysis - PCA and hierarchical cluster analysis - HCA) were implemented to identify the classes within the datasets. Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to determine the number of different chemical profiles within the counterfeits. A comparison with the classes established by NIR and Raman spectroscopy allowed to evaluate the discriminating power provided by these techniques. Supervised classifiers (i.e. k-Nearest Neighbors, Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis, Probabilistic Neural Networks and Counterpropagation Artificial Neural Networks) were applied on the acquired NIR and Raman spectra and the results were compared to the ones provided by the unsupervised classifiers. The retained strategy for routine applications, founded on the classes identified by NIR and Raman spectroscopy, uses a classification algorithm based on distance measures and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves. The model is able to compare the spectrum of a new counterfeit with that of previously analyzed products and to determine if a new specimen belongs to one of the existing classes, consequently allowing to establish a link with other counterfeits of the database. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mononuclear phagocyte intercellular crosstalk facilitates transmission of cell-targeted nanoformulated antiretroviral drugs to human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanmogne GD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Georgette D Kanmogne1, Sangya Singh1, Upal Roy1, Xinming Liu1, JoEllyn McMillan1, Santhi Gorantla1, Shantanu Balkundi1, Nathan Smith1, Yazen Alnouti2, Nagsen Gautam2, You Zhou3, Larisa Poluektova1, Alexander Kabanov2, Tatiana Bronich2, Howard E Gendelman11Departments of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; 3Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USAAbstract: Despite the successes of antiretroviral therapy (ART, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders remain prevalent in infected people. This is due, in part, to incomplete ART penetration across the blood–brain barrier (BBB and lymph nodes and to the establishment of viral sanctuaries within the central nervous system. In efforts to improve ART delivery, our laboratories developed a macrophage-carriage system for nanoformulated crystalline ART (nanoART (atazanavir, ritonavir, indinavir, and efavirenz. We demonstrate that nanoART transfer from mononuclear phagocytes (MP to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC can be realized through cell-to-cell contacts, which can facilitate drug passage across the BBB. Coculturing of donor MP containing nanoART with recipient HBMEC facilitates intercellular particle transfer. NanoART uptake was observed in up to 52% of HBMEC with limited cytotoxicity. Folate coating of nanoART increased MP to HBMEC particle transfer by up to 77%. To translate the cell assays into relevant animal models of disease, ritonavir and atazanavir nanoformulations were injected into HIV-1-infected NOD/scid-γcnull mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Atazanavir and ritonavir levels in brains of mice treated with folate-coated nanoART were three- to four-fold higher than in mice treated with noncoated particles. This was associated with decreased viral load in the spleen and

  5. Retention in an antiretroviral therapy programme during an era of decreasing drug cost in Limbe, Cameroon

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    Mosoko Jembia J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2002, Cameroon initiated scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART; on 1 October 2004, a substantial reduction in ART cost occurred. We assessed the impact of this event and other factors on enrolment and retention in care among HIV-infected patients initiating ART from February 2002 to December 2005 at the single ART clinic serving the Southwest Region in Limbe, Cameroon. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical and pharmacy payment records of HIV-infected patients initiating ART according to national guidelines. We compared two cohorts of patients, enrolled before and after 1 October 2004, to determine if price reduction was associated with enhanced enrolment. We assessed factors associated with retention and survival by Cox proportional hazards models. Retention in care implied patients who had contact with the healthcare system as of 31 December 2005 (including those who were transferred to continue care in other ART centres, although these patients may have interrupted therapy at some time. A patient who was not retained in care may have dropped out (lost to follow up or died. Results Mean enrolment rates for 2920 patients who initiated ART before and after the price reduction were 46.5 and 95.5 persons/month, respectively (p Conclusions Reducing the cost of ART increased enrolment of clients in the programme, but did not change retention in care. In a system where most clients pay for ART, an accessible clinic location may be more important than the cost of medication for retention in care. Decentralizing ART clinics might improve retention and survival among patients on ART.

  6. Neurologic Outcomes in HIV-Exposed/Uninfected Infants Exposed to Antiretroviral Drugs During Pregnancy in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Alicen B; Yu, Qilu; Civitello, Lucy; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Pinto, Jorge; Gomes, Ivete M; Alarcón, Jorge O; Siberry, George K; Harris, D Robert; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate antiretroviral (ARV) drug exposure and other factors during pregnancy that may increase the risk of neurologic conditions (NCs) in HIV-exposed/uninfected (HEU) infants. A prospective cohort study was conducted at 24 clinical sites in Latin America and the Caribbean. Data on maternal demographics, health, HIV disease status, and ARV use during pregnancy were collected. Infant data included measurement of head circumference after birth and reported medical diagnoses at birth, 6-12 weeks, and 6 months. Only infants with maternal exposure to combination ARV therapy (cART) (≥3 drugs from ≥2 drug classes) during pregnancy were included. Microcephaly, defined as head circumference for age z-score less than -2, and NC were evaluated for their association with covariates, including individual ARVs, using bivariable and logistic regression analyses. From 2002 to 2009, 1,400 HEU infants met study inclusion criteria. At least one NC was reported in 134 (9.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.1-11.2), microcephaly in 105 (7.5%; 95% CI: 6.2-9.0), and specific neurologic diagnoses in 33 (2.4%; 95% CI: 1.6-3.3) HEU infants. Microcephaly and NC were not significantly associated with any specific ARV analyzed (p > 0.05). Covariates associated with increased odds of NC included male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.8), birth weight <2.5 kg (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 2.1-4.8), 1-min Apgar score <7 (OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.4-4.4), and infant infections (OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.5-4.1). No ARV investigated was associated with adverse neurologic outcomes. Continued investigation of such associations may be warranted as new ARVs are used during pregnancy and cART exposure during the first trimester becomes increasingly common.

  7. Characterization of HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance after second-line treatment failure in Mali, a limited-resources setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, Almoustapha Issiaka; Fofana, Djeneba Bocar; Cisse, Mamadou; Diallo, Fodié; Maiga, Moussa Youssoufa; Traore, Hamar Alassane; Maiga, Issouf Alassane; Sylla, Aliou; Fofana, Dionke; Taiwo, Babafemi; Murphy, Robert; Katlama, Christine; Tounkara, Anatole; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We describe the outcomes of second-line drug resistance profiles and predict the efficacy of drugs for third-line therapy in patients monitored without the benefit of plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) or resistance testing. Methods We recruited 106 HIV-1-infected patients after second-line treatment failure in Mali. VL was determined by the Abbott RealTime system and the resistance by the ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system. The resistance testing was interpreted using the latest version of the Stanford algorithm. Results Among the 106 patients, 93 had isolates successfully sequenced. The median age, VL and CD4 cells were respectively 35 years, 72 000 copies/mL and 146 cells/mm3. Patients were exposed to a median of 4 years of treatment and to six antiretrovirals. We found 20% of wild-type viruses. Resistance to etravirine was noted in 38%, to lopinavir in 25% and to darunavir in 12%. The duration of prior nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor exposure was associated with resistance to abacavir (P < 0.0001) and tenofovir (P = 0.0001), and duration of prior protease inhibitor treatment with resistance to lopinavir (P < 0.0001) and darunavir (P = 0.06). Conclusion Long duration of therapy prior to failure was associated with high levels of resistance and is directly related to limited access to VL monitoring and delayed switches to second-line treatment, precluding efficacy of drugs for third-line therapy. This study underlines the need for governments and public health organizations to recommend the use of VL monitoring and also the availability of darunavir and raltegravir for third-line therapies in the context of limited-resource settings. PMID:22888273

  8. In-vitro photo-translocation of antiretroviral drug delivery into TZMbl cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malabi, Rudzani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available (115 fs). Optimisation of drug translocation parameters were done by performing trypan blue translocation studies. Cellular responses were determined via cell viability (Adenosine Triphosphate activity) and cell cytotoxicity (Lactate Dehydrogenase...

  9. Budget impact analysis of antiretroviral less drug regimen simplification in HIV-positive patients on the Italian National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restelli U

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Umberto Restelli,1,2 Massimo Andreoni,3 Andrea Antinori,4 Marzia Bonfanti,2 Giovanni Di Perri,5 Massimo Galli,6 Adriano Lazzarin,7 Giuliano Rizzardini,8,9 Davide Croce1,2 1Department of Community Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2Centro di Ricerca in Economia e Management in Sanità e nel Sociale (CREMS, Università Carlo Cattaneo – LIUC, Castellanza (VA, Italy; 3Clinical Infectious Diseases, Tor Vergata University (PTV, Rome, Italy; 4Clinical Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases "L. Spallanzani," Rome, Italy; 5Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, Turin, Italy; 6Third Division of Infectious Diseases, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, Milan, Italy; 7Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; 8First and Second Divisions of Infectious Diseases, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital, Milan, Italy; 9School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Background: Deintensification and less drug regimen (LDR antiretroviral therapy (ART strategies have proved to be effective in terms of maintaining viral suppression in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients, increasing tolerability, and reducing toxicity of antiretroviral drugs administered to patients. However, the economic impact of these strategies have not been widely investigated. The aim of the study is to evaluate the economic impact that ART LDR could have on the Italian National Health Service (INHS budget. Methods: A budget impact model was structured to assess the potential savings for the INHS by the use of ART LDR for HIV-positive patients with a 3 year perspective. Data concerning ART cost, patient distribution within different ARTs, and probabilities for patients to change ART on a yearly basis were collected within four Italian infectious diseases departments, providing

  10. Liquid anti-solvent recrystallization to enhance dissolution of CRS 74, a new antiretroviral drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva Lacerda, Suênia; Espitalier, Fabienne; Hoffart, Valérie; Ré, Maria Inês

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns a new compound named CRS 74 which has the property of inhibiting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) protease, an essential enzyme involved in HIV replication process. It is proved in this study that the original CRS 74 exhibits poor aqueous solubility and a very low dissolution rate, which can influence its bioavailability and clinical response. In an attempt to improve the dissolution rate, CRS 74 was recrystallized by liquid anti-solvent (LAS) crystallization. Ethanol was chosen as solvent and water as the anti-solvent. Recrystallized solids were compared with the original drug crystals in terms of physical and dissolution properties. Recrystallization without additives did not modify the CRS 74 dissolution profile compared to the original drug. CRS 74 was then recrystallized using different additives to optimize the process and formulate physicochemical properties. Steric stabilizer in organic phase ensured size-controlling effect, whereas electrostatic stabilizer in aqueous phase decreased particle agglomeration. Cationic additives avoided drug adsorption onto stainless steel T-mixer. In general, additive improved drug dissolution rate due to improvement of wetting properties by specific interactions between the drug and the additives, and ensured continuous production of CRS 74 by electrostatic repulsion.

  11. Formulation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles for an anti-retroviral drug darunavir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalekar, Mangesh; Upadhaya, Prashant; Madgulkar, Ashwini

    2017-02-01

    Darunavir, an anti-HIV drug having poor solubility in aqueous and lipid medium, illustrates degradation above its melting point, i.e. 74 °C, thus, posing a challenge to dosage formulation. Despite, the drug suffers from poor oral bioavailability (37%) owing to less permeability and being poly-glycoprotein and cyp3A metabolism substrate. The study aimed formulating a SLN system to overcome the formulation and bioavailability associated problems of the drug. Based on the drug solubility and stable dispersion findings, lipid and surfactant were chosen and nanoparticles were prepared using hot-homogenization technique. Optimization of variables such as lipid concentration, oil-surfactant and homogenization cycle was carried and their effect on particle size and entrapment efficiency was studied. Freeze-dried SLN further characterized using SEM, DSC and PXRD analysis revealed complete entrapment of the drug and amorphous nature of the SLN. In vitro pH release studies in 0.1 N HCl and 6.8 pH buffer demonstrated 84 and 80% release at the end of 12th h. The apparent permeability of the SLN across rat intestine was found to be 24 × 10-6 at 37 °C at the end of 30 min while at 4 °C the same was found to be 5.6 × 10-6 prompting involvement of endocytic processes in the uptake of SLN. Accelerated stability studies revealed no prominent changes upon storage.

  12. Relationship between food insecurity and mortality among HIV-positive injection drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy in British Columbia, Canada.

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    Aranka Anema

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the potential impact of food insecurity on mortality among people living with HIV/AIDS. We examined the potential relationship between food insecurity and all-cause mortality among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART across British Columbia (BC. METHODS: Cross-sectional measurement of food security status was taken at participant ART initiation. Participants were prospectively followed from June 1998 to September 2011 within the fully subsidized ART program. Cox proportional hazard models were used to ascertain the association between food insecurity and mortality, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: Among 254 IDU, 181 (71.3% were food insecure and 108 (42.5% were hungry. After 13.3 years of median follow-up, 105 (41.3% participants died. In multivariate analyses, food insecurity remained significantly associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.07-3.53, after adjusting for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-positive IDU reporting food insecurity were almost twice as likely to die, compared to food secure IDU. Further research is required to understand how and why food insecurity is associated with excess mortality in this population. Public health organizations should evaluate the possible role of food supplementation and socio-structural supports for IDU within harm reduction and HIV treatment programs.

  13. Combination of anti-retroviral drugs and radioimmunotherapy specifically kills infected cells from HIV infected individuals

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    Dina Tsukrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT, a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infect-ed cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely down-regulated in patients on an-tiretroviral therapy (ART, we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells us-ing both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal anti-body to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. conjugated to the human monoclonal antibody 2556, which binds to HIV gp41. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: ten on ART and five ART-naive. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART, and supports continued development of 213Bi

  14. The PHACS SMARTT Study: Assessment of the Safety of In Utero Exposure to Antiretroviral Drugs

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    Russell Barrett Van Dyke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Surveillance Monitoring for ART Toxicities (SMARTT cohort of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS includes over 3500 HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU infants and children at 22 sites in the U.S. including Puerto Rico. The goal of the study is to determine the safety of in utero exposure to antiretrovirals (ARV and to estimate the incidence of adverse events. Domains being assessed include metabolic, growth and development, cardiac, neurological, neurodevelopmental, behavior, language, and hearing. SMARTT employs an innovative trigger-based design as an efficient means to identify and evaluate adverse events. Participants who met a predefined clinical or laboratory threshold (trigger undergo additional evaluations to define their case status. After adjusting for birth cohort and other factors, there was no significant increase in the likelihood of meeting overall case status (case in any domain with exposure to combination ARVs (cARV, any ARV class, or any specific ARV. However, several individual ARVs were significantly associated with case status in individual domains, including zidovudine for a metabolic case, first trimester stavudine for a language case, and didanosine plus stavudine for a neurodevelopmental case. We found an increased rate of preterm birth with first trimester exposure to protease inhibitor-based cARV. Although there was no overall increase in congenital anomalies with first trimester cARV, a significant increase was seen with exposure to atazanavir, ritonavir, and didanosine plus stavudine. Tenofovir exposure was associated with significantly lower mean whole-body bone mineral content in the newborn period and a lower length and head circumference at 1 year of age. With neurodevelopmental testing at 1 year of age, specific ARVs (atazanavir, ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, nelfinavir, and tenofovir were associated with lower performance, although all groups were within the normal range. No ARVs or classes were

  15. A case of a potential drug interaction between clobazam and etravirine-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, Mark; Yoong, Deborah; Kovacs, Colin; Gough, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 isoforms primarily involved in clobazam metabolism are CYP3A4 and 2C19. Drugs that modulate these enzymes would then be expected to alter the exposure of clobazam and its major metabolites. Etravirine, a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor has been shown to induce CYP3A4, while inhibiting CYP2C9 and CYP2C19. We report a case in which a potential drug interaction between clobazam and etravirine may have led to increased concentrations of clobazam and its pharmacologically active metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam, causing neurotoxic symptoms.

  16. Transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance in New York State, 2006-2008: results from a new surveillance system.

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    Adam C Readhead

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV transmitted drug resistance (TDR is a public health concern because it has the potential to compromise antiretroviral therapy (ART at the population level. In New York State, high prevalence of TDR in a local cohort and a multiclass resistant case cluster led to the development and implementation of a statewide resistance surveillance system. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 13,109 cases of HIV infection that were newly diagnosed and reported in New York State between 2006 and 2008, including 4,155 with HIV genotypes drawn within 3 months of initial diagnosis and electronically reported to the new resistance surveillance system. We assessed compliance with DHHS recommendations for genotypic resistance testing and estimated TDR among new HIV diagnoses. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 13,109 new HIV diagnoses, 9,785 (75% had laboratory evidence of utilization of HIV-related medical care, and 4,155 (43% had a genotype performed within 3 months of initial diagnosis. Of these, 11.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.2%-12.1% had any evidence of TDR. The proportion with mutations associated with any antiretroviral agent in the NNRTI, NRTI or PI class was 6.3% (5.5%-7.0%, 4.3% (3.6%-4.9% and 2.9% (2.4%-3.4%, respectively. Multiclass resistance was observed in <1%. TDR did not increase significantly over time (p for trend = 0.204. Men who have sex with men were not more likely to have TDR than persons with heterosexual risk factor (OR 1.0 (0.77-1.30. TDR to EFV+TDF+FTC and LPV/r+TDF+FTC regimens was 7.1% (6.3%-7.9% and 1.4% (1.0%-1.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: TDR appears to be evenly distributed and stable among new HIV diagnoses in New York State; multiclass TDR is rare. Less than half of new diagnoses initiating care received a genotype per DHHS guidelines.

  17. Vietnamese Women's Struggle to Access Antiretroviral Drugs in a Context of Free Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Nam Thi Thu; Rasch, Vibeke; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2013-01-01

    provided, they were not always accessible for women in need. A variety of factors at the population and health system level interacted in ways that often made access to ARV drugs a complicated and time-consuming process. We have suggested changes that could be made at the health system level that may help...... facilitate women's ability to access treatment....

  18. Pretreatment HIV-drug resistance in Mexico and its impact on the effectiveness of first-line antiretroviral therapy: a nationally representative 2015 WHO survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; García-Morales, Claudia; Matías-Florentino, Margarita; Romero-Mora, Karla A; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Quiroz-Morales, Verónica S; Reyes-Gopar, Helena; Ji, Hezhao; Sandstrom, Paul; Casillas-Rodríguez, Jesús; Sierra-Madero, Juan; León-Juárez, Eddie A; Valenzuela-Lara, Marisol; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Uribe-Zuñiga, Patricia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    WHO has developed a global HIV-drug resistance surveillance strategy, including assessment of pretreatment HIV-drug resistance. We aimed to do a nationally representative survey of pretreatment HIV-drug resistance in Mexico using WHO-recommended methods. Among 161 Ministry of Health antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinics in Mexico, the largest, including 90% of ART initiators within the Ministry of Health (66 in total), were eligible for the survey. We used a probability-proportional-to-size design method to sample 25 clinics throughout the country. Consecutive ART-naive patients with HIV about to initiate treatment were invited to participate in the survey; individuals with previous exposure to ART were excluded. We assessed pretreatment HIV-drug resistance by Sanger sequencing and next-generation sequencing of viruses from plasma specimens from eligible participants with Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database methods. We obtained follow-up data for a median of 9·4 months (range 6-12) after enrolment. We investigated possible relations between demographic variables and pretreatment drug resistance with univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Between Feb 3 and July 30, 2015, we screened 288 patients in 25 clinics, from whom 264 provided successfully sequenced viruses with no evidence of current exposure to antiretroviral drugs. With the Sanger method, of these 264 participants, 41 (15·5%, 95% CI 11·4-20·5) had pretreatment resistance to any antiretroviral drug and 28 (10·6%, 7·2-15·0) had pretreatment resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). At least low-level pretreatment resistance (Stanford penalty score ≥15) was noted in 13 (4 · 9%) of participants to efavirenz and in 23 (8·7%) to the combination tenofovir plus emtricitabine plus efavirenz. With next-generation sequencing, of 264 participants, 38 (14·4%, 95% CI 10·4-19·2) had pretreatment resistance to any antiretroviral drug and 26 (9·8%, 6·5

  19. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  20. Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay Detects HIV Drug Resistance Associated with Virologic Failure among Antiretroviral-Naïve Adults in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Michael H.; Beck, Ingrid A.; Dross, Sandra; Tapia, Kenneth; Kiarie, James N.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Overbaugh, Julie; Sakr, Samah R.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is increasing in some areas of Africa. Detection of TDR may predict virologic failure of first-line non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). We evaluated the utility of a relatively inexpensive oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) to detect clinically relevant TDR at time of ART initiation. Methods Pre-ART plasmas from ART-naive Kenyans initiating an NNRTI-based fixed-dose combination ART in a randomized adherence trial conducted in 2006 were retrospectively analyzed by OLA for mutations conferring resistance to NNRTI (K103N, Y181C, and G190A) and lamivudine (M184V). Post-ART plasmas were analyzed for virologic failure (≥1,000 copies/mL) at 6 month intervals over 18-month follow-up. Pre-ART plasmas of those with virologic failure were evaluated for drug resistance by consensus and 454-pyrosequencing. Results Among 386 participants, TDR was detected by OLA in 3.89% [95% Confidence Interval (CI), 2.19-6.33], and was associated with a 10-fold higher rate of virologic failure [Hazard Ratio (HR), 10.39; 95% CI, 3.23-32.41; p<0.001) compared to those without TDR. OLA detected 24 TDR mutations (K103N, n=13; Y181C, n=5; G190A, n=3; M184V, n=3) in 15 subjects (NNRTI, n=15; 3TC, n=3). Among 51 participants who developed virologic failure, consensus sequencing did not detect additional TDR mutations conferring high-level resistance, and pyrosequencing only detected additional mutations at frequencies <2%. Mutant frequencies <2% at ART initiation were significantly less likely to be found at the time of virologic failure compared to frequencies ≥2% (22% vs. 63%; p<0.001). Conclusions Detection of TDR by a point mutation assay may prevent use of sub-optimal ART. PMID:25140907

  1. Assessing subtypes and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 infected children who failed antiretroviral therapy in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Suharni; Deris, Zakuan Zainy; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin; Ariffin, Tg Ahmad Akram Tg Mohd; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infected children. However, development of ARV resistance in these children is a major public health problem due to lack of availability of and access to new drugs. This study was conducted in order to identify circulating HIV subtypes and recombinant forms and evaluate the drug resistance mutation patterns in 18 HIV-1 infected children failing ARV treatment in Kelantan, Malaysia. Genotyping for codon 1-99 of protease (PR) and 1-250 of reverse transcriptase (RT) were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing. Subsequently, these were phylogenetically analyzed to determine the subtypes. CRF33_01B (44.4%) was found to be the predominant HIV subtype, followed by B (27.8%), CRF15_01B (16.7%) and CRF01_AE (11.1%) subtypes. The most prevalent RT mutations were T215F/V/Y (66.7%), D67G/N (55.6%), K219Q/E/R (44.4%), M184V/I (38.9%), K70R/E (27.8%) and M41L (27.8%), associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) resistance; and K103N (55.6%), G190A (33.3%), and K101P/E/H (27.8%) associated with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) resistance. The results showed a possible emergence of CRF33_01B as current predominant subtypes/circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), and a high frequency of primary mutations among HIV-1 infected children after failure of ARV therapy in Kelantan, Malaysia.

  2. [The antiretroviral agent Fullevir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, D N; Lialina, I K; Kalnina, L B; Lobach, O A; Chataeva, M S; Rasnetsov, L D

    2009-01-01

    The antiretroviral properties of Fullevir (sodium salt of fullerenepolyhydropolyaminocaproic acid) manufactured by IntelFarm Co.) were studied in the human cell culture infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The agent was ascertained to be able to protect the cell from the cytopathic action of HIV. The 90% effective concentration (EF90) was 5 microg/ml. The 50% average toxic concentration was 400 microg/ml. Testing of different (preventive and therapeutic) Fullevir dosage regimens has shown that the drug is effective when used both an hour before and an hour after infection and when administered simultaneously with cell infection. The longer contact time for the agent with the cells increased the degree of antiviral defense. Co-administration of Fullevir and the HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor Retrovir (azidothymidine) showed a synergistic antiretroviral effect. Thus, Fullevir may be regarded as a new promising antiretroviral drug for the treatment of HIV infection.

  3. Emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants after triple antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: WHO-guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings recommend complex maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis comprising antenatal zidovudine (AZT, nevirapine single-dose (NVP-SD at labor onset and AZT/lamivudine (3TC during labor and one week postpartum. Data on resistance development selected by this regimen is not available. We therefore analyzed the emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Tanzanian women following complex prophylaxis. METHOD: 1395 pregnant women were tested for HIV-1 at Kyela District Hospital, Tanzania. 87/202 HIV-positive women started complex prophylaxis. Blood samples were collected before start of prophylaxis, at birth and 1-2, 4-6 and 12-16 weeks postpartum. Allele-specific real-time PCR assays specific for HIV-1 subtypes A, C and D were developed and applied on samples of mothers and their vertically infected infants to quantify key resistance mutations of AZT (K70R/T215Y/T215F, NVP (K103N/Y181C and 3TC (M184V at detection limits of <1%. RESULTS: 50/87 HIV-infected women having started complex prophylaxis were eligible for the study. All women took AZT with a median duration of 53 days (IQR 39-64; all women ingested NVP-SD, 86% took 3TC. HIV-1 resistance mutations were detected in 20/50 (40% women, of which 70% displayed minority species. Variants with AZT-resistance mutations were found in 11/50 (22%, NVP-resistant variants in 9/50 (18% and 3TC-resistant variants in 4/50 women (8%. Three women harbored resistant HIV-1 against more than one drug. 49/50 infants, including the seven vertically HIV-infected were breastfed, 3/7 infants exhibited drug-resistant virus. CONCLUSION: Complex prophylaxis resulted in lower levels of NVP-selected resistance as compared to NVP-SD, but AZT-resistant HIV-1 emerged in a substantial proportion of women. Starting AZT in pregnancy week 14 instead of 28 as recommended by the current WHO-guidelines may further increase

  4. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance in recently infected patients in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire: A 4-year survey, 2002-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Thomas d'Aquin; Masquelier, Bernard; Minga, Albert; Anglaret, Xavier; Danel, Christine; Coulibaly, Ali; Chenal, Henri; Dabis, François; Salamon, Roger; Fleury, Hervé J

    2007-09-01

    We performed HIV-1 drug resistance genotypic analysis of viral isolates from 100 antiretroviral (ARV)-naive, recently HIV-1-infected (between 2002 and 2006) individuals from Abidjan (Côte d'Ivoire). The overall prevalence of HIV-1 variants with resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase, protease, or fusion inhibitors was 6%. The majority of isolates were CRF02_AG. Compared with a previous study carried out by our group in 2001-2002 in a similar population in Abidjan, our findings confirm the circulation and transmission of HIV-1 carrying key ARV drug resistance mutation.

  5. Smart printing technology for counterfeit deterrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Peter J.

    1996-03-01

    Smart (intelligent) printing is the creation of useful patterns beyond alphanumerics and graphics immediately obvious to the human eye. It employs smart inks, patterns, surfaces and substrates. Recent proliferation of color copiers, personal computers and scanners has facilitated a tenfold increase in counterfeiting in many countries over the past three years. Banknotes, cheques, academic certificates, art work, visitors passes, venue tickets and many other artifacts have been compromised. Paradoxically, the best counterfeits produced by some foreign governments and organized crime are rarely the main problem. The secret services of many countries use forensic science to great effect in pursuing these fairly readily identified sources of limited number. Bad counterfeits usually made on color copiers or computers, with or without color scanners, are the most difficult to combat because they are made by very large numbers of casual counterfeiters who may never commit crime again. For instance, counterfeit banknotes intercepted by the Bundesbank have been photocopies in a fluctuating range of 50 - 84% of cases in the last four reported years. Cheque and other document fraud is also inflated by these burgeoning bad copies and here we must add amateurish alterations using copiers or scanners. For instance, a better academic degree can mean a better job, an interbank transfer form can be 'raised' in value by enormous amounts. The issuer of a 'bad' counterfeit does not mind that it is usually picked up on a second transferral. They are long gone by then or, with banknotes, they can deny that they issued it. First priority in reversing the upward trend of counterfeiting must not therefore be the creation of better secret features traceable by forensic laboratories over extended periods of time. Rather we need better and more obvious optically unique features, not easily emulated, that can be spotted in the split second when several, say, banknotes are handed over in a

  6. Genotypic drug resistance and long-term mortality in patients with triple-class antiretroviral drug failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Jørgensen, Louise B; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in HIV patients with triple-drug class virological failure (TCF) and their association with long-term mortality. DESIGN: Population-based study from the Danish HIV Cohort Study (DHCS). METHODS: We included all patients...... with increased mortality (mortality rate ratio [MRR] 2.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.8]), as were the individual mutations T215Y (MRR 3.4 [95% CI 1.6-7.0]), G190A/S (MRR 3.2 [95% CI 1.6-6.6]) and V82F/A/T/S (MRR 2.5 [95% CI 1.2-5.3]). CONCLUSIONS: In HIV patients with TCF, the total number of genotypic...... resistance mutations and specific single mutations predicted mortality.OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in HIV patients with triple-drug class virological failure (TCF) and their association with long-term mortality. DESIGN: Population-based study from the Danish...

  7. Antiretrovirals: reality or illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazin, R; Zacarias, F

    1998-10-01

    The use of antiretroviral drugs and combination therapy to treat HIV disease has been widely favored, despite obstacles such as cost, difficult dosing schedules, management of side effects, and inexperience of health practitioners in customizing treatment and counseling patients on use and adherence. Several benefits of drug therapy are discussed. One benefit is that the cost of therapy is lower than the overall cost of a patient not on therapy who will need more services and hospitalizations and will have higher incidences of opportunistic infections. Drug therapy also enables individuals to continue contributing to society by slowing the development of HIV and improving the quality of life. The Pan American Health Organization and UNAIDS are investigating ways to improve access to drugs in Latin America, the Caribbean, and other countries by working with pharmaceutical companies to coordinate drug purchases or negotiate price reductions. In addition, in order for antiretroviral therapy to be most effective, treatment should also include counseling, testing, and education.

  8. Compulsory drug detention exposure is associated with not receiving antiretroviral treatment among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S G; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-05-06

    Thailand has experienced a longstanding epidemic of HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage among HIV-positive PWID has historically remained low. While ongoing drug law enforcement involving periodic police crackdowns is known to increase the risk of HIV transmission among Thai PWID, the impact of such drug policy approaches on the ART uptake has been understudied. Therefore, we sought to identify factors associated with not receiving ART among HIV-positive PWID in Bangkok, Thailand, with a focus on factors pertaining to drug law enforcement. Data were collected from a community-recruited sample of HIV-positive PWID in Bangkok who participated in the Mitsampan Community Research Project between June 2009 and October 2011. We identified factors associated with not receiving ART at the time of interview using multivariate logistic regression. In total, 128 HIV-positive PWID participated in this study, with 58 (45.3%) reporting not receiving ART at the time of interview. In multivariate analyses, completing less than secondary education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.32 ; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.48 - 7.45), daily midazolam injection (AOR: 3.22, 95% CI: 1.45 - 7.15) and exposure to compulsory drug detention (AOR: 3.36, 95% CI: 1.01 - 11.21) were independently and positively associated with not receiving ART. Accessing peer-based healthcare information or support services was independently and positively associated with receiving ART (AOR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05 - 0.84). Approximately half of our study group of HIV-positive PWID reported not receiving ART at the time of interview. Daily midazolam injectors, those with lower education attainment, and individuals who had been in compulsory drug detention were more likely to be non-recipients of ART whereas those who accessed peer-based healthcare-related services were more likely to receive ART. These findings suggest a potentially adverse impact of compulsory drug

  9. Persistence to single-tablet regimen versus less-drug regimen in treatment experienced HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Jiménez-Galán

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decreased antiretroviral therapy persistence is associated with increased rates of virologic failure, development of antiretroviral resistance, and increased morbidity and mortality. Different therapeutic strategies, such as single-tablet regimens (STR and less-drug regimens (LDR, have been developed in order to simplify antiretroviral therapy (ART and increase persistence. Objectives: The primary objective was to compare antiretroviral persistence among patients receiving STRs and patients receiving LDRs. A secondary objective was to identify factors associated with non-persistence. Methods: This was a retrospective study that included treatment- experienced HIV-infected patients who received ART based on STR or LDR. Baseline patient characteristics collected included demographic information, HIV risk transmission, substance abuse during the therapy, presence of psychiatric disorder and hepatitis B or C virus infection. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Log rank was utilized to compare persistence to STR and LDR. To identify independent predictors of non-persistence we developed a multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results: A total of 244 patients were included, 176 with STR and 68 with LDR. 60 (34.1% patients discontinued in the STR group and 13 (19.1% in the LDR group. The Cox regression model showed that the only variable associated with higher risk of non-persistence was the substance abuse (HR = 2.59; p = 0.005. Adverse events were the main reason for ART discontinuation in the STR group and virologic failure in the LDR group. Conclusions: Persistence to STR and LDR seems to be similar in pretreated HIV-infected patients. Drug abuse was the only factor identified with a higher risk of non-persistence.

  10. An exploration of compulsory licensing as an effective policy tool for antiretroviral drugs in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dipika; Darrow, Jonathan J

    2013-01-01

    Access to affordable drugs for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and other diseases is increasingly challenging in many developing countries such as Brazil, South Africa, and India. These challenges are in part the result of strengthened patent laws mandated by the 1994 Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) treaty. However, there are underutilized instruments within TRIPS that governments can use to limit the adverse effects of patent protection and thereby ensure a supply of affordable generic drugs to their people. One such instrument is compulsory licensing, which allows generic manufacturers to produce pharmaceutical products that are currently subject to patent protection. Compulsory licensing has been used by a number of countries in the last few years, including the United States, Canada, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brazil, and Thailand, and is particularly significant for countries such as India, where large numbers of people are infected with HIV. This Article explores the feasibility of compulsory licensing as a tool to facilitate access to essential medicines within the current patent regime in India, drawing on the experiences of other countries.

  11. Genotypic drug resistance and long-term mortality in patients with triple-class antiretroviral drug failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Jørgensen, Louise B; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in HIV patients with triple-drug class virological failure (TCF) and their association with long-term mortality. DESIGN: Population-based study from the Danish HIV Cohort Study (DHCS). METHODS: We included all patients...... with increased mortality (mortality rate ratio [MRR] 2.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.8]), as were the individual mutations T215Y (MRR 3.4 [95% CI 1.6-7.0]), G190A/S (MRR 3.2 [95% CI 1.6-6.6]) and V82F/A/T/S (MRR 2.5 [95% CI 1.2-5.3]). CONCLUSIONS: In HIV patients with TCF, the total number of genotypic...

  12. HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance in Honduras after a Decade of Widespread Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Avila-Ríos

    Full Text Available We assessed HIV drug resistance (DR in individuals failing ART (acquired DR, ADR and in ART-naïve individuals (pre-ART DR, PDR in Honduras, after 10 years of widespread availability of ART.365 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 381 ART-experienced Honduran individuals were enrolled in 5 reference centres in Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba, and Choluteca between April 2013 and April 2015. Plasma HIV protease-RT sequences were obtained. HIVDR was assessed using the WHO HIVDR mutation list and the Stanford algorithm. Recently infected (RI individuals were identified using a multi-assay algorithm.PDR to any ARV drug was 11.5% (95% CI 8.4-15.2%. NNRTI PDR prevalence (8.2% was higher than NRTI (2.2% and PI (1.9%, p500 vs. <350 CD4+ T cells/μL. PDR in recently infected individuals was 13.6%, showing no significant difference with PDR in individuals with longstanding infection (10.7%. The most prevalent PDR mutations were M46IL (1.4%, T215 revertants (0.5%, and K103NS (5.5%. The overall ADR prevalence in individuals with <48 months on ART was 87.8% and for the ≥48 months on ART group 81.3%. ADR to three drug families increased in individuals with longer time on ART (p = 0.0343. M184V and K103N were the most frequent ADR mutations. PDR mutation frequency correlated with ADR mutation frequency for PI and NNRTI (p<0.01, but not for NRTI. Clusters of viruses were observed suggesting transmission of HIVDR both from ART-experienced to ART-naïve individuals and between ART-naïve individuals.The global PDR prevalence in Honduras remains at the intermediate level, after 10 years of widespread availability of ART. Evidence of ADR influencing the presence of PDR was observed by phylogenetic analyses and ADR/PDR mutation frequency correlations.

  13. Income, Cultural Norms and Purchases of Counterfeits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M. Lede (Madesta)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe conjecture that individual purchases of counterfeit products could be motivated by income and prices, but that another driver is cultural norms. To put the latter conjecture to an empirical test we make use of the unique situation of Surinamese people who live in Suriname and in the

  14. Aging, Counterfeiting Configuration Control (AC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-31

    relabeled fake microcircuit chips from overseas - threaten the reliability, safety, and performance of DoD systems. These systems are vulnerable... NASA , Raytheon internal, etc. Aging, Counterfeiting Configuration Control (AC3) Page 13 of 28 are important in determining the alert’s priority

  15. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naive HIV-Infected Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Blanco-Heredia

    Full Text Available Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies.We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations.Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64% corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual or DR (median 6 pairs/individual were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001. While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient's virus (mean 68% of cases, responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002.Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides.

  16. Factors contributing to antiretroviral drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS in a Kenyan rural community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Kioko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiretroviral (ARV adherence of ≥ 95% is recommended for suppressing HIV. However, studies have shown that the ≥ 95% recommended level is rarely achieved.Objective: This cross-sectional community-based study sought to assess factors contributing to ARV drug adherence among adults living with HIV or AIDS.Setting: The study was conducted in a rural community in Machakos County, Kenya.Methods: The questions used for the study were adapted from the Patient Medicine Adherence Questionnaire (PMAQ, a tool grounded in the Health Belief Model. Adherence to ARV was measured using self-reports and pill counts. The perception social support was measured with a 5-point Likert scale, whereas the type and the number of side effects experienced were recorded using ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions. We used the chi-square test to test associations and binary logistic regression to assess factors explaining dose adherence to ARV.Results: The levels of adherence of 86% using self-reports were significantly higher (p < 0.001 than the pill count of 58.6%. The immediate family was rated high in providing social support (3.7 ± 0.6 followed by social support groups (3.1 ± 0.8. A binary logistic regression analysis was conducted to predict ARV adherence (adherent, non-adherent using social support, side effects and marital status as explanatory variables. The Wald criterion demonstrated that marital status (p = 0.019 and burden of side effects (p ≤ 0.001 made a significant contribution to the prediction of ARV adherence.Conclusion: The burden of side effects and being a divorcee are primary predictors of ARV adherence.

  17. Occurrence of intestinal parasites amongst persons on highly active antiretroviral drug therapy in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Inyang-Etoh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic and intestinal parasite infections are common health problem among HIV/AIDS patients. Early detection and treatment of these parasites are important to improve the quality of life of this category of patients. The occurrence of intestinal parasites among 400 patients on highly active anti-retroviral drug therapy (HAART aged 11-60 years was investigated. Standard parasitological techniques like direct microscopy, formol ether concentration and modified Ziehl- Neelsen staining techniques were used to analyze the stool samples. Intestinal parasite infections were positive in 116 (29% of the subjects on HAART while control subjects had 12 (12% and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. Subjects in the age group 21-30 years had the highest infection rate 54 (35.1%. There was no statistically significant difference in infection according to age (P>0.05. Females 76 (32.5% had a higher prevalence rate than males 40 (24.1%. But there was no statistically significant difference in infection according to gender (P<0.05. Patients with CD4 count of less than 200 cells/mm3 were observed to be more infected than those with CD4 count of more than 200 cells/mm3. There was a strong positive correlation (r=0.94 between CD4 count and the occurrence of intestinal parasite infection. Protozoan parasites 84 (21.0% accounted for a higher prevalence rate than helminthic parasites 32 (8.0%. These findings has revealed a high prevalence of intestinal parasite infection among patients on HAART thus the routine screening of stool samples from these category of patients for intestinal parasites is advocated for effective management of the disease.

  18. What Polish hospital healthcare workers and lay persons know about counterfeit medicine products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Wolan, Maja; Januszewicz, Paweł; Mazur, Artur; Fijalek, Zbigniew E

    2012-12-01

    To report on Polish hospital health care workers' and lay persons' knowledge about counterfeit medicine products. Cross-sectional design was used. Two types of questionnaire survey about counterfeit medicine, separate for health care professionals and lay persons were completed by 201 physicians and nurses, and 450 adult Polish residents between October 2008 and January 2009. Physicians and nurses working in hospitals are more aware of counterfeit medicine than lay persons and more often notice the presence of drugs from unknown sources. Nearly 90% of physicians, 80% of nurses, and more than 40% of representatives of the lay persons had heard about the possibility of importing illegal medicine from Ukraine or China. The majority of medical workers does not know the procedure for reporting suspicious medicine and do not warn their patients against purchasing medicine from unknown sources. Increase education of nurses and physicians about counterfeit medicine particularly including the procedure of reporting suspicious medicine from unknown sources. In practice, reinforce a role of nurses and physicians in warning their patients against purchasing medicine from unknown sources and educate them about possible health hazards and life risks.

  19. Affordable antiretroviral drugs for the under-served markets: how to expand equitable access against the backdrop of challenging scenarios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Daniele; Cao, Yunzhen; Hongzhou, Lu; Kraisintu, Krisana; Messeri, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Threats by enforced Intellectual Property (IP) rights to equitable HIV treatment access by poor populations are impending. India and China's policy directions in the field will be crucial in ultimately affecting the affordability and accessibility of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in the under-served markets. These directions, together with the exploitation level of IP-bound flexibilities and the evolutionary modelling in partnerships and trade agreements between research-based and generic pharmaceutical industry, will also affect the outcomes of self-sufficiency efforts now at their beginning in the developing world as far as domestic manufacturing of generic ARV drugs is concerned. This paper explores key issues, implications and interaction dynamics across these challenging scenarios while attempting to provide equitable solution glimpses into the near future. Access-oriented long-term drug policy strategies entitled to pass muster of governments, research-based as well as generic industries in both developed and developing countries are needed if equitable access to affordable ARV treatments by poor people has to be achieved despite enforced IP rights. Predictable dynamics between western multinationals and transitional country generic corporations let regard IP-bound Voluntary License flexibilities as a fitting measure into just mentioned needs especially if substantial incentives to generic corporations are concurrently secured. Efforts to equitably expand ARV drug access through exploiting IP opportunities should encompass attainment of self-sufficiency in domestic drug manufacturing whenever basic requirements are in place in the developing world as a whole. A credible industrial potential would act, indeed, as a boosting factor for drawing branded drug producers into technology transfer agreements, the terms of which would let all contractors enjoy substantial advantages. These perspectives consistently bind up with the foreseeable long-term trade and drug

  20. Counterfeit analysis strategy illustrated by a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégardin, Klara; Roggo, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Medicine counterfeiting is a current problem that the whole pharmaceutical field has to deal with. In 2014, counterfeits entered the legitimate supply chain in Europe. Quick and efficient action had to be taken. The aim of this paper is to explain which analytical strategy was chosen to deal with six of the cases concerned and which criteria have to be considered to provide quick and thorough information about the counterfeits. The evaluation of the packaging was performed in a first step, based on a comparison with genuine samples and evaluation of manipulation signs. Chemical methods were then used, consisting of near infrared and infrared spectroscopy, capillary zone electrophoresis and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, in order to authenticate the samples and provide the chemical composition of the confirmed counterfeits. Among the 20 samples analyzed, 17 were confirmed as counterfeits. The counterfeits were the results of the manipulation of genuine samples, and one contained totally counterfeited parts. Several manipulation signs were asserted, like the addition of glue on the boxes and the vials. Genuine stolen goods had been diluted with water, while for an isolated case, a different active ingredient had been introduced in a vial. The analytical data generated were further investigated from a forensic intelligence perspective. Links could be revealed between the analyzed counterfeits, together with some interesting information about the modus operandi of the counterfeiters. The study was performed on a limited number of cases, and therefore encourages chemical and packaging profiling of counterfeits at a bigger scale. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The economics of counterfeit Avastin: a geospatial and statistical analysis of demographic correlates to FDA warning letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Mackey, Tim K; Stigler, Paula

    2015-07-01

    In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sent warning notices to clinics and medical practitioners that may have purchased or administered counterfeited versions of the angiogenesis cancer drug Avastin Genentech, South San Francisco, California, USA. The purpose of this study was to explore potential differences in demographic, economic, and healthcare coverage characteristics between areas that received these counterfeit warning notices and those that did not receive notices. The aims of this study are to improve future counterfeit drug surveillance and better assess potential risk factors associated with counterfeit cancer drugs. Addresses for warning notices sent to healthcare practitioners were obtained from the FDA and then geocoded using arcgis. Variables chosen for statistical and geospatial analyses were then identified and assessed based on their potential association with Avastin access and affordability. These variables included demographic and economic factors (percent below the poverty line, percent uninsured, and median household income) and healthcare coverage data (percent Medicare enrollees) available from the US Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. All variables were analyzed at the US county level. Our analysis uncovered 401 distinct US counties where the FDA sent at least one counterfeit Avastin warning notice. A hot spot analysis of notices and variables was carried out using arcgis software to identify and visualize risk features with high and low values of clustering. In a multiple logistic regression model reassessing visually observed geospatial associations, the receipt of a notice was not significantly associated with percent uninsured (p = 0.3121), but was significantly associated with percent Medicare enrollees (OR = 0.874 per 10% increase; p = 0.0121), individuals below federal poverty line (OR = 2.990 per 10% increase; p economic and demographic factors are potentially associated with counterfeit Avastin

  2. Drug–Drug Interactions Based on Pharmacogenetic Profile between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Antiblastic Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Caraglia, Michele; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Zappavigna, Silvia; Lombardi, Angela; Fierro, Carla; Atripaldi, Luigi; Muto, Tommaso; Valente, Daniela; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Di Francia, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) into clinical practice has dramatically changed the natural approach of HIV-related cancers. Several studies have shown that intensive antiblastic chemotherapy (AC) is feasible in HIV-infected patients with cancer, and that the outcome is similar to that of HIV-negative patients receiving the same AC regimens. However, the concomitant use of HAART and AC can result in drug accumulation or possible toxicity with consequent decreased efficacy of one or both classes of drugs. In fact, many AC agents are preferentially metabolized by CYP450 and drug–drug interactions (DDIs) with HAART are common. Therefore, it is important that HIV patients with cancer in HAART receiving AC treatment at the same time receive an individualized cancer management plan based on their liver and renal functions, their level of bone marrow suppression, their mitochondrial dysfunction, and their genotype profile. The rationale of this review is to summarize the existing data on the impact of HAART on the clinical management of cancer patients with HIV/AIDS and DDIs between antiretrovirals and AC. In addition, in order to maximize the efficacy of antiblastic therapy and minimize the risk of drug–drug interaction, a useful list of pharmacogenomic markers is provided. PMID:27065862

  3. Surveillance of HIV-1 pol transmitted drug resistance in acutely and recently infected antiretroviral drug-naïve persons in rural western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maman, David; Auma, Erick; Were, Kennedy; Fredrick, Harrison; Owiti, Prestone; Opollo, Valarie; Etard, Jean-François; Mukui, Irene; Kim, Andrea A.; Zeh, Clement

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is of increasing public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa with the rollout of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Such data are, however, limited in Kenya, where HIV-1 drug resistance testing is not routinely performed. From a population-based household survey conducted between September and November 2012 in rural western Kenya, we retrospectively assessed HIV-1 TDR baseline rates, its determinants, and genetic diversity among drug-naïve persons aged 15–59 years with acute HIV-1 infections (AHI) and recent HIV-1 infections (RHI) as determined by nucleic acid amplification test and both Limiting Antigen and BioRad avidity immunoassays, respectively. HIV-1 pol sequences were scored for drug resistance mutations using Stanford HIVdb and WHO 2009 mutation guidelines. HIV-1 subtyping was computed in MEGA6. Eighty seven (93.5%) of the eligible samples were successfully sequenced. Of these, 8 had at least one TDR mutation, resulting in a TDR prevalence of 9.2% (95% CI 4.7–17.1). No TDR was observed among persons with AHI (n = 7). TDR prevalence was 4.6% (95% CI 1.8–11.2) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 6.9% (95% CI 3.2–14.2) for non- nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and 1.2% (95% CI 0.2–6.2) for protease inhibitors. Three (3.4% 95% CI 0.8–10.1) persons had dual-class NRTI/NNRTI resistance. Predominant TDR mutations in the reverse transcriptase included K103N/S (4.6%) and M184V (2.3%); only M46I/L (1.1%) occurred in the protease. All the eight persons were predicted to have different grades of resistance to the ARV regimens, ranging from potential low-level to high-level resistance. HIV-1 subtype distribution was heterogeneous: A (57.5%), C (6.9%), D (21.8%), G (2.3%), and circulating recombinant forms (11.5%). Only low CD4 count was associated with TDR (p = 0.0145). Our findings warrant the need for enhanced HIV-1 TDR monitoring in order to inform on population

  4. Counterfeit Electronics Detection Using Image Processing and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadizanjani, Navid; Tehranipoor, Mark; Forte, Domenic

    2017-01-01

    Counterfeiting is an increasing concern for businesses and governments as greater numbers of counterfeit integrated circuits (IC) infiltrate the global market. There is an ongoing effort in experimental and national labs inside the United States to detect and prevent such counterfeits in the most efficient time period. However, there is still a missing piece to automatically detect and properly keep record of detected counterfeit ICs. Here, we introduce a web application database that allows users to share previous examples of counterfeits through an online database and to obtain statistics regarding the prevalence of known defects. We also investigate automated techniques based on image processing and machine learning to detect different physical defects and to determine whether or not an IC is counterfeit.

  5. Alarming rates of virological failure and drug resistance in patients on long-term antiretroviral treatment in routine HIV clinics in Togo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konou, Abla A; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Vidal, Nicole; Salou, Mounerou; Adam, Zakillatou; Singo-Tokofai, Assétina; Delaporte, Eric; Prince-David, Mireille; Peeters, Martine

    2015-11-28

    Information on efficacy of long-term antiretroviral treatment (ART) exposure in resource-limited countries is still scarce. In 767 patients attending routine HIV centers in Togo and receiving first-line ART for more than four years, 42% had viral load greater than 1000 copies/ml and either were on a completely ineffective ART regime or were with only a single drug active. The actual conditions to ensure lifelong ART in resource-limited countries can have dramatic long-term outcomes.

  6. The incidence rate of HIV type-1 drug resistance in patients on antiretroviral therapy: a nationwide population-based Danish cohort study 1999-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, A.M.; Lohse, N.; Obel, N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newer antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV carry a lower risk of inducing drug resistance mutations. We estimated changes in incidence rates (IRs) of new mutations in HIV-infected individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Population-based data...... were obtained from the Danish HIV Cohort Study and the Danish HIV Sequence Database. We included treatment-naive patients initiating HAART after December 1997 and computed time to first drug resistance mutation, identified as new mutations detected within 1 year after a 60-day period of treatment.......077). The IR of PI resistance decreased from 7.5 (1.4-21.8) in 1999 to 2.9 (0.7-11.4) in 2002-2003 (P=0.148). The IRs were low for specific resistance mutations, except for M184V (IR 5.6 [4.0-7.9]) and K103N (IR 8.2 [5.6-12.0]). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of acquired drug resistance has decreased among HIV...

  7. Impact of injecting drug use on response to highly active antiretroviral treatment in HIV-1-infected patients: a nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vang; Omland, Lars; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients infected through injecting drug use (injecting drug users, IDUs) compared to patients infected via other routes (non-IDUs). We conducted...... for non-IDUs, and IDUs initiated HAART later than non-IDUs. In conclusion, more than half of the HIV-infected patients in Denmark infected through injecting drug use gained full viral suppression after initiating HAART. Absolute CD4(+) cell count was lower and mortality higher among IDUs than non-IDUs....... a nationwide population-based cohort study of all HIV-infected patients who initiated HAART during the study period of 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2007. We compared changes in CD4(+) cell counts, percentage of full viral suppression (

  8. Global HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baxter, J D; Dunn, D; White, E;

    2015-01-01

    of resistance testing in START trial participants. METHODS: In the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial, baseline genotypic resistance testing results were collected at study entry and analysed centrally to determine the prevalence of TDR in the study population. Resistance was based...

  9. HIV drug resistance and hepatitis co-infections in HIV-infected adults and children initiating antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusine-Bahunde, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART), few data have been generated on outcomes and outcome predictors of ART in adults and children in Rwanda. Equally, the extent of chronic hepatitis virus infections and their impact on the ART outcomes in the country are not known. This information

  10. HIV drug resistance and hepatitis co-infections in HIV-infected adults and children initiating antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusine-Bahunde, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART), few data have been generated on outcomes and outcome predictors of ART in adults and children in Rwanda. Equally, the extent of chronic hepatitis virus infections and their impact on the ART outcomes in the country are not known. This information i

  11. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea.

  12. Conspicuous consumption, luxury products and counterfeit market in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Huyen My Pham

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The fast growth of fashion brands and the popularity of counterfeit goods has posed certain challenges to the existing and new luxury fashion brand players. This study elaborates on the factors driving the market for counterfeit products in the UK. The data collected by means of survey questionnaires from 306 respondents and empirical techniques including descriptive and inferential statistics (correlation and multiple regression analysis, have shown that the consumers have a negative attitude towards counterfeit luxury products. However, they showed fewer tendencies to seek for a brand whose counterfeit cannot easily be found and preferred to buy a genuine rather than a counterfeit. In terms of frequency of purchase, reversion to counterfeit has negative impact, unlike the tendency to seek a brand whose counterfeit is hard to find. The overall results show that the attitude and acceptance of counterfeit do not greatly prevail in the market. However, about 27% of respondents demonstrated either a positive or a neutral tendency towards counterfeit products, which could have serious implications for the luxury goods market.

  13. Are you using "gray-market" or counterfeit dental products?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christensen, Gordon J

    2010-01-01

    .... Here, Christensen discusses the prevalence of gray-market and counterfeit products, manufacturers' concerns about them, the need for communication between the dentist and the staff member ordering...

  14. Rapid Color Test Identification System for Screening of Counterfeit Fluoroquinolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The protocol of rapid identification system consists of three chemical color reactions; two group tests for fluoroquinolone class and a compound specific test each for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and sparfloxacin. The group color reactions are based on (a Oxidizing behavior of quinolone and (b Fluorine functional groups, both of which are characteristic of fluoroquinolone class. The compound specific color reactions are developed taking into consideration unique chemical behavior of each compound. The proposed chemical color tests have high selectivity⁄specificity, are ideal for screening purpose. The color of each test was defined by two standard color systems namely CIE lab and Munsell color. A suspected counterfeit tablet of any of the above mentioned drugs can be identified within 10-15 min using this rapid identification system.

  15. Random patterns and biometrics for counterfeit deterrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolk, K.M.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working on non-counterfeitable seals, tags, and documents for over fifteen years. During that time, several technologies have been developed that can be applied to deter counterfeiting of identification documents such as ID cards, passports, and possibly credit cards. Two technologies are presented in some detail. The first is reflective particle tagging technology that was developed to help verify treaties limiting the numbers of nuclear weapons that participating parties may possess. This approach uses the random locations and orientations of reflective particles applied to the surface of an item to uniquely identify the item. The resulting tags are secure against even the most determined adversaries. The second technology uses biometric information printed on the document and public key cryptography to ensure that an adversary cannot issue identification documents to unauthorized individuals.

  16. THE ANALYSIS OF COUNTERFEITING FOOD PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula - Angela VIDRASCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue addressed in this paper makes a significant contribution to research on the effects that food tampering has at the expense of consumer health. Nowadays quality and food safety that consumers are entitled directly reflects the quality of life. In other words the present subject is of particular importance to the work of the bodies created for the purpose of protecting the health and quality of life of consumers. This study has an important role both in the short and long term through proper understanding of the terms of quality, adulteration and food safety. The essential aim of this article is played understanding and easy identification of counterfeit food. Thus the awareness of counterfeit food products consumers are becoming more aware and responsible on quality of life. Quality will always be one of the most important competitive factors of ensuring health and environmental protection.

  17. Impact of drug stock-outs on death and retention to care among HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armelle Pasquet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the type and frequency of antiretroviral drug stock-outs, and their impact on death and interruption in care among HIV-infected patients in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study of patients who initiated combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in three adult HIV clinics between February 1, 2006 and June 1, 2007. Follow-up ended on February 1, 2008. The primary outcome was cART regimen modification, defined as at least one drug substitution, or discontinuation for at least one month due to drug stock-outs at the clinic pharmacy. The secondary outcome for patients who were on cART for at least six months was interruption in care, or death. A Cox regression model with time-dependent variables was used to assess the impact of antiretroviral drug stock-outs on interruption in care or death. Overall, 1,554 adults initiated cART and were followed for a mean of 13.2 months. During this time, 72 patients discontinued treatment and 98 modified their regimen because of drug stock-outs. Stock-outs involved nevirapine and fixed-dose combination zidovudine/lamivudine in 27% and 51% of cases. Of 1,554 patients, 839 (54% initiated cART with fixed-dose stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine and did not face stock-outs during the study period. Among the 975 patients who were on cART for at least six months, stock-out-related cART discontinuations increased the risk of interruption in care or death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.83; 95%CI, 1.25-6.44 but cART modifications did not (adjusted HR, 1.21; 95%CI, 0.46-3.16. CONCLUSIONS: cART stock-outs affected at least 11% of population on treatment. Treatment discontinuations due to stock-outs were frequent and doubled the risk of interruption in care or death. These stock-outs did not involve the most common first-line regimen. As access to cART continues to increase in sub-Saharan Africa, first-line regimens should be standardized to decrease the probability of

  18. Relations of pursuance taking drug of HIV patients with the success of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Poli Serunai Hospital Dr. Achmad Muchtar Bukittinggi Year 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YELMI RENI PUTRI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Relations of pursuance taking drug of HIV patients with the success of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Poli Serunai Hospital Dr. Achmad Muchtar Bukittinggi Year 2014 Yelmi Reni Putri, AdrianiProgram Studi Ilmu Keperawatan STIKes Fort De Kock BukittinggiEmail : Yelmi.reni@gmail.com ABSTRACT1st of of December is the day each year is celebrated as a day of HIV / AIDS this year themed "prevent HIV / AIDS, protect workers, families and the nation", this is when the right moment for us health workers give a good contribution to overcome or provide suggestions for improving services to patients with HIV / AIDS. The increasing number of patients with HIV / AIDS today is not only to make our health care workers need to be vigilant, even patients and families also need to work together to overcome this proble.The purpose of this study was to identify the level of compliance of patients taking antiretroviral drugs and HIV-positive people do with the success of antiretroviral therapy, the study sample taken in accident sampling with the number of respondents 40 patients idODHA of the month from May to October 2014. The study design using qualitative and quantitative method Mix , measuring instrument used in this research is a questionnaire that contains the characteristics of patients living with HIV, guided interviews to assess the role of the KPA, manager of HIV RSAM, and people living with HIV patients themselves.The result showed 57.5% of patients did not obey, and as much as 52.5% of patients successfully in HIV treatment, but there is no relationship between adherence with therapy success with value value 0.583 and 0.677 OR it is associated with the patient's anxiety and fear to know the results of which he repeated CD4 CD4 is one measure of the success of therapy. The conclusion of this study is important to know the patients' adherence PLWHA still low this will impact on the occurrence of resistance will even increase mortality, it is recommended

  19. An investigation of the effects of antiretroviral CNS penetration effectiveness on procedural learning in HIV+ drug users

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Michael J.; Martin-Engel, Lindsay; Vassileva, Jasmin; Gonzalez, Raul; Martin, Eileen M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens with a high capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier has been associated with lower levels of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS). This study examined neurocognitive performance among a sample of 118 HIV+ substance dependent individuals (SDIs) and 310 HIV− SDIs. HIV+ participants were prescribed cART regimens with varying capacity to penetrate the CNS as indexed by the revised CNS penetra...

  20. AIDS Diarrhea and Antiretroviral Drug Concentrations: A Matched-Pair Cohort Study in Port au Prince, Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillingham, Rebecca; Leger, Paul; Beauharnais, Carole-Anne; Miller, Erica; Kashuba, Angela; Jennings, Steven; Dupnik, Kathryn; Samie, Amidou; Eyma, Etna; Guerrant, Richard; Pape, Jean; Fitzgerald, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhea in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) may cause malabsorption of medications and failure of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We prospectively evaluated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients with and without chronic diarrhea initiating ART in Haiti. We report mean plasma antiretroviral concentrations at 2 and 4 weeks. We measured plasma HIV-1 RNA levels at four points. Fifty-two HIV-1-infected patients (26 matched pairs) were enrolled. No differences in antiretroviral concentrations were detected. At week 24, 18/25 (72%) cases and 16/24 (68%) controls had undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (P = 0.69). Patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels > 50 copies/mL at week 24 had lower early efavirenz concentrations than patients with undetectable HIV-1 RNA (2,621 ng/mL versus 5,278 ng/mL; P = 0.02). Diarrhea at ART initiation does not influence plasma concentrations of the medications evaluated. Virologic outcome at Week 24 does correlate with efavirenz concentrations early in therapy but not with the presence of chronic diarrhea. PMID:21633022

  1. Prevalence of HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance and Its Impacts on HIV-1 Virological Failures in Jiangsu, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been shown to improve survival of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection and to reduce HIV-1 transmission. Therefore, the Chinese central government initiated a national program to provide ART free of charge to HIV-1 patients. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu province to determine the level of drug resistance (DR in HIV-1 infected patients and the correlates of DR in virological failures in 2012. Approximately 10.4% of the HIV-1 patients in the study experienced virological failure after one year of ART and were divided into drug sensitive and drug resistant groups based on genotype determination. The viral loads (VLs in the drug resistant group were significantly lower than the drug sensitive group. There were two independent predictors of virological failure: male gender and increasing duration of treatment. The primary mutations observed in the study were against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs which were M184V (79.45% and K103N (33.70% in nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. The overall rate of DR in Jiangsu province is still relatively low among treated patients. However, close monitoring of drug resistance in male patients in the early stages of treatment is vital to maintaining and increasing the benefits of HIV ART achieved to date.

  2. Counterfeit medicines: report of a cross-sectional retrospective study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S A R; Darbooy, Sh; Tehrani Banihashemi, S A; Naseri, S M; Dinarvand, R

    2011-03-01

    To gain insight into the pharmaceutical grey market in Iran by reviewing inspection files of the Special Inspectorate Unit, Deputy Ministry for Food and Drugs, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and to define the counterfeit pharmaceutical pattern in Iran. Cross-sectional retrospective study. In total, 382 inspection files of pharmaceutical counterfeit cases between 2007 and 2008 were reviewed. A database was constructed in Microsoft Access, and all cases of counterfeit medicines together with the details recorded in the files were entered. A primary list of all items in all files was produced (n = 7910), and this contained 716 different counterfeit medicines. This article reports the analysis of these 716 items and the outcome. Subsequently, the list of items was further filtered, and a final working list of 100 items was selected for further analysis. Drug samples of the working list were collected and checked against a modified version of the 'Checklist for the visual inspection of medicines to identify suspicious drug products' of the US Pharmacopeia Convention, Inc. and recommended by IMPACT (International Medical Products Anti-Counterfeiting Taskforce). Details of items in the working list recorded in the checklist were then entered into the database. Data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 12.0 and Microsoft Excel. Of the 716 items, 64.5% were supplements, 10.2% were analgesics, 7.8% were hormones and 3.2% were antihistamines. Unnamed items and/or items of unknown origin accounted for 2.4% of the total. Herbal medicines, drugs used in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal system and genito-urinary systems, and drugs used for cardiovascular disease and diabetes represented 1-2% of items, and other drug groups accounted for counterfeit medicines. Drugs used in professional settings accounted for 20% and drugs used in non-professional settings accounted for 15% of the 716 items. Selected items were checked

  3. Consumer Adoption of Counterfeit Products in a Developing Country

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Lede (Madesta)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ With an increase in global trade, currently involving almost all countries in the world (expect for a few autarkic ones), there is a growing interest in studying various aspects of trade in counterfeit products. As almost every type of good has been counterfeited

  4. Diffusion of Original and Counterfeit Products in a Developing Country

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M. Lede (Madesta)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe study the diffusion of original and counterfeit products in three distinct categories in a developing country. The focus is on when their diffusion processes peak, how sales of original and counterfeit products are related and how marketing efforts can influence this process. Using a

  5. 78 FR 35262 - Detection and Avoidance of Counterfeit Electronic Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Detection and Avoidance of Counterfeit Electronic Parts AGENCY... and the private sector regarding the electronic parts detection and avoidance coverage proposed to be... about the requirements for detection and avoidance of counterfeit electronic parts in DoD contracts....

  6. Testing of complementarity of PDA and MS detectors using chromatographic fingerprinting of genuine and counterfeit samples containing sildenafil citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, Deborah; Krakowska, Barbara; De Beer, Jacques O; Courselle, Patricia; Daszykowski, Michal; Apers, Sandra; Deconinck, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Counterfeit medicines are a global threat to public health. High amounts enter the European market, which is why characterization of these products is a very important issue. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array (HPLC-PDA) and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method were developed for the analysis of genuine Viagra®, generic products of Viagra®, and counterfeit samples in order to obtain different types of fingerprints. These data were included in the chemometric data analysis, aiming to test whether PDA and MS are complementary detection techniques. The MS data comprise both MS1 and MS2 fingerprints; the PDA data consist of fingerprints measured at three different wavelengths, i.e., 254, 270, and 290 nm, and all possible combinations of these wavelengths. First, it was verified if both groups of fingerprints can discriminate between genuine, generic, and counterfeit medicines separately; next, it was studied if the obtained results could be ameliorated by combining both fingerprint types. This data analysis showed that MS1 does not provide suitable classification models since several genuines and generics are classified as counterfeits and vice versa. However, when analyzing the MS1_MS2 data in combination with partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), a perfect discrimination was obtained. When only using data measured at 254 nm, good classification models can be obtained by k nearest neighbors (kNN) and soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA), which might be interesting for the characterization of counterfeit drugs in developing countries. However, in general, the combination of PDA and MS data (254 nm_MS1) is preferred due to less classification errors between the genuines/generics and counterfeits compared to PDA and MS data separately.

  7. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhra Mandal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS is still one of the world’s major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (cARV-NPs as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (<500 ng/ml and that release was sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month.

  8. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Subhra; Zhou, You; Shibata, Annemarie; Destache, Christopher J.

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs) fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still one of the world's major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV) therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (cARV-NPs) as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye) loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs) have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (<500 ng/ml) and that release was sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month.

  9. Clinical and virologic follow-up in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Madrid with triple-class antiretroviral drug-resistant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Sánchez, P; de Mulder, M; Fernandez-Cooke, E; Prieto, L; Rojo, P; Jiménez de Ory, S; José Mellado, M; Navarro, M; Tomas Ramos, J; Holguín, Á

    2015-06-01

    Drug resistance mutations compromise the success of antiretroviral treatment in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected children. We report the virologic and clinical follow-up of the Madrid cohort of perinatally HIV-infected children and adolescents after the selection of triple-class drug-resistant mutations (TC-DRM). We identified patients from the cohort carrying HIV-1 variants with TC-DRM to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors according to IAS-USA-2013. We recovered pol sequences or resistance profiles from 2000 to 2011 and clinical-immunologic-virologic data from the moment of TC-DRM detection until December 2013. Viruses harbouring TC-DRM were observed in 48 (9%) of the 534 children and adolescents from 2000 to 2011, rising to 24.4% among those 197 with resistance data. Among them, 95.8% were diagnosed before 2003, 91.7% were Spaniards, 89.6% carried HIV-1-subtype B and 75% received mono/dual therapy as first regimen. The most common TC-DRM present in ≥50% of them were D67NME, T215FVY, M41L and K103N (retrotranscriptase) and L90M (protease). The susceptibility to darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine and rilpivirine was 67.7%, 43.7%, 33.3% and 33.3%, respectively, and all reported high resistance to didanosine, abacavir and nelfinavir. Despite the presence of HIV-1 resistance mutations to the three main antiretroviral families in our paediatric cohort, some drugs maintained their susceptibility, mainly the new protease inhibitors (tipranavir and darunavir) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (etravirine and rilpivirine). These data will help to improve the clinical management of HIV-infected children with triple resistance in Spain.

  10. A humanized mouse model for HIV-2 infection and efficacy testing of a single-pill triple-drug combination anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuang; Neff, Charles Preston; Kumar, Dipu Mohan; Habu, Yuichiro; Akkina, Sarah R; Seki, Takahiro; Akkina, Ramesh

    2017-01-15

    While HIV-2 is a causative agent for AIDS in addition to the better studied HIV-1, there is currently no suitable animal model for experimental studies for HIV-2 infection and evaluating promising drugs in vivo. Here we evaluated humanized mice for their susceptibility to HIV-2 infection and tested a single-pill three drug formulation of anti-retrovirals (NRTIs abacavir and lamivudine, integrase inhibitor dolutegravir) (trade name, Triumeq(R)). Our results showed that hu-mice are susceptible to HIV-2 infection showing persistent viremia and CD4 T cell loss, key hallmarks of AIDS pathogenesis. Oral drug treatment led to full viral suppression and protection from CD4 T cell depletion. Cessation of therapy resulted in viral rebound and CD4 T cell loss. These proof-of-concept studies establish the utility of hu-mice for evaluating HIV-2 pathogenesis in more detail in the future, testing novel therapies and providing pre-clinical efficacy data of a three drug combination to treat HIV-2 infections. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Potential Impact of a Free Online HIV Treatment Response Prediction System for Reducing Virological Failures and Drug Costs after Antiretroviral Therapy Failure in a Resource-Limited Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Revell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Antiretroviral drug selection in resource-limited settings is often dictated by strict protocols as part of a public health strategy. The objective of this retrospective study was to examine if the HIV-TRePS online treatment prediction tool could help reduce treatment failure and drug costs in such settings. Methods. The HIV-TRePS computational models were used to predict the probability of response to therapy for 206 cases of treatment change following failure in India. The models were used to identify alternative locally available 3-drug regimens, which were predicted to be effective. The costs of these regimens were compared to those actually used in the clinic. Results. The models predicted the responses to treatment of the cases with an accuracy of 0.64. The models identified alternative drug regimens that were predicted to result in improved virological response and lower costs than those used in the clinic in 85% of the cases. The average annual cost saving was $364 USD per year (41%. Conclusions. Computational models that do not require a genotype can predict and potentially avoid treatment failure and may reduce therapy costs. The use of such a system to guide therapeutic decision-making could confer health economic benefits in resource-limited settings.

  12. Combining cohort analysis and monitoring of HIV early-warning indicators of drug resistance to assess antiretroviral therapy services in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Thi Nhan; Nguyen, Thi Minh Thu; Do, Mai Hoa; Masaya, Kato; Dang, Thi Bich; Pham, Thuy Linh; Yoshikawa, Kayoko; Cao, Thi Than Thuy; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Van; Bui, Duc Duong; Nguyen, Van Kinh; Nguyen, Thanh Long; Fujita, Masami

    2012-05-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) retention and 5 early-warning indicators (EWIs) of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) were abstracted at 27 adult and 4 pediatric clinics in Vietnam in 2009. Of 4531 adults and 313 children, 81.2% and 84.4% respectively were still on ART at 12 months. More than 90% of the clinics monitored achieved the World Health Organization (WHO) targets for lost-to-follow-up (LTFU), ART prescribing practices, and ARV supply continuity. Only 83.9% of the clinics met the target for first-line ART retention and 79.3% met the target for clinic appointment-keeping. Clinic factors (i.e. number of patients, administrative level, and geographical region) were associated with ART retention and LFTU. Data were useful in guiding public health action to optimize ART services.

  13. Identifying counterfeit cigarette packs using ultraviolet irradiation and light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurti, Marin; He, Yi; von Lampe, Klaus; Li, Yanlei

    2017-01-01

    Develop a method that yields high rates of sensitivity and specificity for determination of counterfeit cigarette packs for three popular brands: Newport, Marlboro ('Red') and Marlboro Gold. Using systematic keyword searches, we identified industry documents from the University of California, San Francisco's Legacy Tobacco Documents Library that describe the use of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and close examination of printing quality to distinguish between counterfeit and genuine cigarette packs. Guided by these documents, we identified six markers for counterfeit cigarettes across three popular brands using counterfeit cigarette packs (N=68) seized by law enforcement agencies in the USA. We assessed the diagnostic test accuracy of these markers and tested it against genuine packs (N=22) using receiver operating characteristic curves analysis. We find that counterfeit cigarette packs fluoresce to long-wave UV irradiation and display poor printing quality. The optimal cut-off value varies among the three brands. For example, counterfeit Newport and Marlboro packaging can be reliably classified with two of six characteristics, while Marlboro Gold requires four. Researchers who conduct littered pack and pack swap studies are urged to include this method to assess the share of counterfeit cigarettes, and compare the result against tobacco industry figures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Analysis of Antiretrovirals in Single Hair Strands for Evaluation of Drug Adherence with Infrared-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Elias P; Thompson, Corbin G; Bokhart, Mark T; Prince, Heather M A; Sykes, Craig; Muddiman, David C; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2016-01-19

    Adherence to a drug regimen can be a strong predictor of health outcomes, and validated measures of adherence are necessary at all stages of therapy from drug development to prescription. Many of the existing metrics of drug adherence (e.g., self-report, pill counts, blood monitoring) have limitations, and analysis of hair strands has recently emerged as an objective alternative. Traditional methods of hair analysis based on LC-MS/MS (segmenting strands at ≥1 cm length) are not capable of preserving a temporal record of drug intake at higher resolution than approximately 1 month. Here, we evaluated the detectability of HIV antiretrovirals (ARVs) in hair from a range of drug classes using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with 100 μm resolution. Infrared laser desorption of hair strands was shown to penetrate into the strand cortex, allowing direct measurement by MSI without analyte extraction. Using optimized desorption conditions, a linear correlation between IR-MALDESI ion abundance and LC-MS/MS response was observed for six common ARVs with estimated limits of detection less than or equal to 1.6 ng/mg hair. The distribution of efavirenz (EFV) was then monitored in a series of hair strands collected from HIV infected, virologically suppressed patients. Because of the role hair melanin plays in accumulation of basic drugs (like most ARVs), an MSI method to quantify the melanin biomarker pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (PTCA) was evaluated as a means of normalizing drug response between patients to develop broadly applicable adherence criteria.

  15. Association between medication possession ratio, virologic failure and drug resistance in HIV-1 infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messou, Eugène; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Gabillard, Delphine; Minga, Albert; Losina, Elena; Yapo, Vincent; Kouakou, Martial; Danel, Christine; Sloan, Caroline; Rouzioux, Christine; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Anglaret, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Background Adherence is a strong determinant of viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy (ART), but measuring it is challenging. Medication delivery can be measured accurately in settings with computerized prescription databases. We studied the association between Medication Possession Ratio (MPR), virologic suppression, and resistance to ART in Côte d’Ivoire. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-1 infected adults initiating ART in three clinics using computerized monitoring systems. Patients had viral load (VL) tests at month 6 (M6) and month 12 (M12) after ART initiation, and genotype tests if VL was detectable (≥300 copies/ml). MPR was defined as the number of daily doses of antiretroviral drug actually provided divided by the total number of follow-up days since ART initiation. Results Overall, 1,573 patients started ART with stavudine/zidovudine plus lamivudine plus nevirapine/efavirenz. At M6 and M12, 996 and 942 patients were in active follow-up; 20% (M6) and 25% (M12) of patients had detectable VL, including 7% (M6) and 11% (M12) with ≥1 resistance mutation. Among patients with MPR ≥95%, 80–94%, 65–79%, 50–64% and <50% at M12, the proportion with detectable VL [resistance] was 9% [4%], 17% [7%], 45% [24%], 67% [31%], and 85% [37%]. Among patients with ≥1 mutation at M12, 86% were resistant to lamivudine/emtricitabine and/or nevirapine/efavirenz but not to other drugs. Conclusion MPR was strongly associated with virologic outcomes. Half of those with detectable VL at M12 had no resistance mutations. MPR should be used at M6 to identify patients who might benefit from early interventions to reinforce adherence. PMID:21191309

  16. Determinants of immunological failure among clients on the first line treatment with highly active antiretroviral drugs in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony Kapesa; Daniel Magesa; Alexander William; John Kaswija; Jeremiah Seni; Cyprian Makwaya

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine socio-cultural, demographic and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) program-related factors associated with immunological failure (IF) among clients on HAART in Dar es Salaam care and treatment clinics. Methods:A 1:2 matched case control study was done from February to April 2012 in HIV/AIDS care and treatment clinics in Dar es Salaam. Data were collected from National AIDS Control Program (NACP) data base and patient’s charts to obtain 60 sets of study participants who were interviewed using the structured questionnaire. Data analysis was done by using EPI Info 3.5.1 version. Results:The mean age of all study participants was (42.00±9.07) years with 35% (63) being males. History of poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence due to exposure to drug holiday with loss to follow up (OR=11.96;95%CI=2.07-69.26), history of changing care and treatment clinics (OR=12.07;95%CI=2.10-69.27) and the lack of treatment supporter (OR=23.26;95%CI=1.85-291.66) were found to be strongly associated with the occurrence of first line HAART-IF. Conclusions:HAART-IF in Dar es Salaam is associated with ART programmatic and patients’ centered challenges. There is a need to review the approaches on ensuring ART adherence, clients follow up and referral system so as to reduce the incidence of IF as we move to a more decentralized peripheral drug picks clinical initiative.

  17. Identification of counterfeit medicines for erectile dysfunction from an illegal supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Sinisa; Milcić, Neven; Sokolić, Milenko; Martinac, Adrijana Ilić

    2010-03-01

    The appearance of counterfeit medicines in supply chains is a global public health problem that may seriously affect patients. Counterfeit drugs do not meet quality standards and do not declare their real composition and/or source for the purposes of fraud. They may be generic or innovative, they may contain genuine constituents in a fake packaging, or wrong ingredients, or inactive ingredients, or an incorrect quantity of the active substance. In Croatia, no cases of counterfeit medicines have been detected so far, but the Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices has received 34 samples of medicines and other products for testing from Zagreb City Police. The samples included medicines for erectile dysfunction: sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil. Twenty-three samples of tablets without marketing authorisation in Croatia were tested with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the declared sildenafil and tadalafil content. Samples labelled 1 (batch T/33), 3 (batch T/33), 5 (batch 4), 6 (batch M0016J), 10 (batch T-070235), 12 (batch T-070544), 15 (batch 314833201), 16 (batch 832718474), and 17 (batch 504830028) containing sildenafil and samples labelled 20 (batch 070356), 21 (batch 05668), and 22 (batch T 378 5) containing tadalafil did not contain the active substance within the acceptable 95 % to 105 % margin of deviation from the declared content. While most samples cannot be described as fake with a reasonable amount of certainty, there is still a suspicion of counterfeit. A correct conclusion can be drawn only with the assistance of the manufacturers and by conducting additional laboratory tests.

  18. Challenging Near InfraRed Spectroscopy discriminating ability for counterfeit pharmaceuticals detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storme-Paris, I. [Groupe de Chimie Analytique de Paris-Sud, EA 4041, IFR 141, School of Pharmacy, Univ Paris-Sud, 5 rue Jean Baptiste Clement, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Rebiere, H. [Laboratories and Control Department, French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS), 635 rue de la Garenne, 34740 Vendargues (France); Matoga, M. [Groupe de Chimie Analytique de Paris-Sud, EA 4041, IFR 141, School of Pharmacy, Univ Paris-Sud, 5 rue Jean Baptiste Clement, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Civade, C.; Bonnet, P.-A.; Tissier, M.H. [Laboratories and Control Department, French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS), 635 rue de la Garenne, 34740 Vendargues (France); Chaminade, P., E-mail: pierre.chaminade@u-psud.fr [Groupe de Chimie Analytique de Paris-Sud, EA 4041, IFR 141, School of Pharmacy, Univ Paris-Sud, 5 rue Jean Baptiste Clement, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2010-01-25

    This study was initiated by the laboratories and control department of the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS) as part of the fight against the public health problem of rising counterfeit and imitation medicines. To test the discriminating ability of Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS), worse cases scenarios were first considered for the discrimination of various pharmaceutical final products containing the same Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) with different excipients, such as generics of proprietary medicinal products (PMP). Two generic databases were explored: low active strength hard capsules of Fluoxetine and high strength tablets of Ciprofloxacin. Then 4 other cases involving suspicious samples, counterfeits and imitations products were treated. In all these cases, spectral differences between samples were studied, giving access to API or excipient contents information, and eventually allowing manufacturing site identification. A chemometric background is developed to explain the optimisation methodology, consisting in the choices of appropriate pretreatments, algorithms for data exploratory analyses (unsupervised Principal Component Analysis), and data classification (supervised cluster analysis, and Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy). Results demonstrate the high performance of NIRS, highlighting slight differences in formulations, such as 2.5% (w/w) in API strength, 1.0% (w/w) in excipient and even coating variations (<1%, w/w) with identical contents, approaching the theoretical limits of NIRS sensitivity. All the different generic formulations were correctly discriminated and foreign PMP, constituted of formulations slightly different from the calibration ones, were also all discriminated. This publication addresses the ability of NIRS to detect counterfeits and imitations and presents the NIRS as an ideal tool to master the global threat of counterfeit drugs.

  19. Impact of therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in routine clinical management of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and related health care costs: a real-life study in a large cohort of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrone V

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Valentina Perrone,1 Dario Cattaneo,1 Sonia Radice,1 Diego Sangiorgi,2 Augusto B Federici,3 Maria Rita Gismondo,4 Massimo Medaglia,5 Valeria Micheli,4 Stefania Vimercati,5 Enza Pallone,6 Luca Degli Esposti,2 Emilio Clementi1,71Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, L Sacco University Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, 2CliCon Srl, Health, Economics and Outcomes Research, Ravenna, 3Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, 4Clinical Microbiology Virology and Diagnosis of Bioemergency, 5Pharmaceutical Department, 6Quality Clinical Risk and Accreditation Unit, L Sacco University Hospital, Milan, 7Scientific Institute, IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, ItalyBackground: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has reduced morbidity and mortality in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Studies have documented high interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs, which may impair the success of HAART if not managed properly. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is a useful diagnostic tool that helps clinicians to optimize drug doses so that drug concentrations associated with the highest therapeutic efficacy are obtained with a reduced risk of concentration-dependent adverse effects. The aim of this study was to assess whether use of TDM improves clinical outcomes and cost of illness.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted at L Sacco University Hospital in Milan, Italy, in HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years with at least one prescription of antiretroviral drugs for which TDM was applied. The inclusion period was from January 2010 to December 2011, with a follow-up period of up to 12 months. Laboratory and administrative databases were analyzed and matched with each other.Results: The cohort consisted of 5,347 patients (3,861 males and 1,486 females of mean age 43.9±12.5 years. We found

  20. Automatic counterfeit protection system code classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beusekom, Joost; Schreyer, Marco; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Wide availability of cheap high-quality printing techniques make document forgery an easy task that can easily be done by most people using standard computer and printing hardware. To prevent the use of color laser printers or color copiers for counterfeiting e.g. money or other valuable documents, many of these machines print Counterfeit Protection System (CPS) codes on the page. These small yellow dots encode information about the specific printer and allow the questioned document examiner in cooperation with the manufacturers to track down the printer that was used to generate the document. However, the access to the methods to decode the tracking dots pattern is restricted. The exact decoding of a tracking pattern is often not necessary, as tracking the pattern down to the printer class may be enough. In this paper we present a method that detects what CPS pattern class was used in a given document. This can be used to specify the printer class that the document was printed on. Evaluation proved an accuracy of up to 91%.

  1. B Plant/WESF suspect/counterfeit parts identification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, D.W.

    1996-01-12

    This document describes a suspect/counterfeit parts inspection program required by DOE conducted in accordance with Internal Memo 16710-94-DWM-048, J.A. O`Brien to J. N. Nansen, B Plant Suspect/ Counterfeit Parts Action Plan, dated May 24, 1994. The program included: physical inspection of all spare parts inventories within the plant; screening of installed B Plant/WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) systems for applications where the use and subsequent potential failure of suspect/counterfeit parts could have critical consequences; and a physical inspection based upon this screening.

  2. Addressing Counterfeit Parts in the DoD Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    supply chain and affecting weapon system reliability. OTE data revealed that 39% of companies and organizations participating in the survey encountered counterfeit electronics during the four-year study period. Moreover, the frequency of detected counterfeit incidents was escalating rapidly, rising from 3,868 incidents in 2005 to 9,356 incidents in 2008. These counterfeit incidents included multiple versions of DoD qualified parts and components. Today, the DoD procures systems and products from a large network of global suppliers and manages over four million different

  3. The Decline in HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Heavily Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients Is Associated with Optimized Prescriptions in a Treatment Roll-Out Program in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva, Juan J; Larrea, Silvana; Tapia-Maltos, Marco A; Ostrosky-Frid, Mauricio; Lara, Carolina; Aguilar-Salinas, Pedro; Rivera, Héctor; Ramírez, Juan P

    2017-07-01

    A decrease in the rate of acquired antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance (ADR) over time has been documented in high-income settings, but data on the determinants of this phenomenon are lacking. We tested the hypothesis that in heavily ARV-experienced patients in the Mexican ARV therapy (ART) roll-out program, the drop in ADR would be associated with changes in ARV drug usage. Genotypic resistance tests obtained from 974 HIV-infected patients with virological failure and at least 2 previously failed ARV regimens from throughout the country were analyzed for the presence of nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitor (PI) resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Patients were divided into two groups according to their first ART start date: 488 patients initiated ART before mid-2003 (group 1) and 486 after mid-2003 (group 2). The rate of RAMs, median resistance score of several sentinel ARVs, and composition of ART drugs in patient's entire treatment history were compared between both groups. Patients in group 2 were less likely to have >3 thymidine analogue-associated mutations (TAMs) and >3 PI-mRAMs [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.37; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.25-0.54; p mRAM has significantly declined over time. This can be explained by treatment optimization in the national ART roll-out program in recent years.

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Among HIV Postive People Who Use Drugs in a Setting with a Community-Wide HIV Treatment-as-Prevention Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ryan; Kerr, Thomas; Coleman, Bill; Maher, Lisa; Milloy, M J; Small, Will

    2017-02-01

    HIV Treatment as Prevention (TasP) initiatives promote antiretroviral therapy (ART) access and optimal adherence (≥95 %) to produce viral suppression among people living with HIV (PLHIV) and prevent the onward transmission of HIV. ART treatment interruptions are common among PLHIV who use drugs and undermine the effectiveness of TasP. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 39 PLHIV who use drugs who had experienced treatment ART interruptions in a setting with a community-wide TasP initiative (Vancouver, Canada) to examine influences on these outcomes. While study participants attributed ART interruptions to "treatment fatigue," our analysis revealed individual, social, and structural influences on these events, including: (1) prior adverse ART-related experiences among those with long-term treatment histories; (2) experiences of social isolation; and, (3) breakdowns in the continuity of HIV care following disruptive events (e.g., eviction, incarceration). Findings reconceptualise 'treatment fatigue' by focusing attention on its underlying mechanisms, while demonstrating the need for comprehensive structural reforms and targeted interventions to optimize TasP among drug-using PLHIV.

  5. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounerou Salou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiretroviral treatment (ART has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods: HIV viral load (VL testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014. Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA. Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion: Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59% were adolescents and 116 (41% were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months. For 228 (80.6%, the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs (zidovudine and lamivudine and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI (nevirapine or efavirenz. Only 28 (9.9% were on a protease inhibitor (PI-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml for 102 (36%, between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4% and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%. Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%; 110/125 (88.0% were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8% to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2% to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125 of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  6. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  7. Efeito das drogas anti-retrovirais sobre as taxas de fertilidade de ratas Wistar Effects of antiretroviral drugs on fertility of Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Antonio Figueiró Filho

    2002-12-01

    írus da imunodeficiência humana.PURPOSE: to evaluate experimentally the effects of antiretroviral drugs used alone and in association upon the fertility of pregnant Wistar rats and the perinatal effects on the offspring. METHODS: adult female pregnant Wistar rats weighing 200-230 g were used. The antiretroviral drugs zidovudine (AZT, lamivudine (3TC and nelfinavir (NFV were used alone and in association at daily doses of ten times the dose normally used in pregnant women, proportionally to the animal's body weight. Seven groups were studied, including the control one. The experiment started on day 0 and the pregnant animals were sacrificed on day 21. The alive and dead fetuses, the total implantation sites and the total numbers of corporea lutea were used to calculate the fertility values. The statistical analysis was performed by Student's t test and by the Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: there were no significant statistical differences regarding preimplantation loss and implantation efficiency values of the rats treated with isolated and associated antiretroviral drugs. There was a significant increase in the postimplantation loss values (control group: 7.6%; drug groups variation: 20.2-26.7%, a decrease in the fetal viability values (control group: 92.4%, drug groups variation: 73.3-79.8%, and a decreasing number of fetuses per animal (control group: 14.7; drug groups variation: 11.1-12.7. There was a significant weight reduction of the female rats and of the offspring of animals treated with 3TC, AZT + 3TC and AZT + 3TC + NFV. CONCLUSION: with the administration of high antiretroviral doses, important fertility effects could be observed, which showed that less histotoxic antiretroviral drugs must be studied in order to warrant the safety of using these medicines in pregnant HIV-1 - infected women.

  8. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T.; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007–2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5–10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  9. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV.

  10. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naive and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxelis Mendoza

    Full Text Available The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73% to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10% to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV.

  11. The calculated genetic barrier for antiretroviral drug resistance substitutions is largely similar for different HIV-1 subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, D.A. van de; Wensing, A.M.J.; Angarano, G.; Asjo, B.; Balotta, C.; Camacho, R.; Chaix, M.; Costagliola, D.; De Luca, A.; Derdelinckx, I.; Grossman, Z.; Hamouda, O.; Hatzakis, A.; Hemmer, R.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Horban, A.; Korn, K.; Kücherer, C.; Leitner, T.; Loveday, C.; MacRae, E.; Maljkovic, I.; Mendoza, C. de; Meyer, L.; Nielsen, C.; Op de Coul, E.L.M.; Omaasen, V.; Paraskevis, D.; Perrin, L.; Puchhammer-Stöckl, E.; Salminen, M.; Schmit, J.; Scheider, F.; Schuurman, R.; Soriano, V.; Stanczak, G.; Stanojevic, M.; Vandamme, A.; Laethem, K. van; Violin, M.; Wilde, K.; Yerly, S.; Zazzi, M.; Boucher, C.A.B.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic barrier, defined as the number of mutations required to overcome drug-selective pressure, is an important factor for the development of HIV drug resistance. Because of high variability between subtypes, particular HIV-1 subtypes could have different genetic barriers for drug resistance s

  12. Development of anti-counterfeit consumer product authentication system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena V. Narimanova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the research is to develop an anti-counterfeit consumer product authentication system. The main requirements for this system are formulated, the choice of method of consumer product authentication is substantiated. The scheme of anti-counterfeit consumer product authentication system is developed basing on previously proposed method of checking the QR-code integrity and authenticity. The proposed within the system consumer product authentication technology is simple, economical for implementation, does not require the external changes of product packaging, does not affect existing production process. The technology can be recommended for the use to private businesses and government institutions that are interested in the security of their products from counterfeiting, as well as tracking and removing from circulation the counterfeit consumer products.

  13. Characterization of counterfeit artesunate antimalarial tablets from southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Krystyn Alter; Newton, Paul N; Green, Michael D; De Veij, Marleen; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pizzanelli, David; Mayxay, Mayfong; Dondorp, Arjen; Fernandez, Facundo M

    2006-11-01

    In southeast Asia, the widespread high prevalence of counterfeits tablets of the vital antimalarial artesunate is of great public health concern. To assess the seriousness of this problem, we quantified the amount of active ingredient present in artesunate tablets by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. This method, in conjunction with analysis of the packaging, classified tablets as genuine, substandard, or fake and validated results of the colorimetric Fast Red TR test. Eight (35%) of 23 fake artesunate samples contained the wrong active ingredients, which were identified as different erythromycins and paracetamol. Raman spectroscopy identified calcium carbonate as an excipient in 9 (39%) of 23 fake samples. Multivariate unsupervised pattern recognition results indicated two major clusters of artesunate counterfeits, those with counterfeit foil stickers and containing calcium carbonate, erythromycin, and paracetamol, and those with counterfeit holograms and containing starch but without evidence of erythromycin or paracetamol.

  14. Avoid Counterfeit Pesticide Products for Dogs and Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is aware of counterfeit pet pesticides designed to look like legitimately registered pesticide products. The information on this page is intended to help consumers avoid unregistered pet products.

  15. Antiretrovirals for developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, M W

    1998-01-24

    The most recent UNAIDS figures indicate that approximately 30 million people are infected with HIV worldwide, 5.8 million of whom were newly infected during 1997. At the 10th International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Africa, the President and Secretary of Health of France called upon developed countries to establish a Therapeutic Assistance Fund to make antiretrovirals available to people with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. While the annual per capita health budget in most African countries is less than US$10, triple antiretroviral therapy against AIDS in the developed world costs $12,000-14,000 per patient per year. Calculations based upon a lower per patient cost of $7000, and treating all 1.4 million African AIDS cases, would cost US$10 billion per year for drugs alone, more than 30 times the amount currently spent annually by international donors for AIDS programs in the entire developing world. Basic infrastructural requirements would have to be met were antiretrovirals made widely available, ranging from HIV screening and counseling to the provision of clean water with which to consume the required 20-30 tablets per day. High program costs will challenge long-term sustainability. Universal access to care and treatment for HIV infection and AIDS is not a reality in the developed world, let alone feasible in developing countries. Given the competing health care priorities in developing countries, the high costs of antiretroviral agents, poor infrastructure, and inability to sustain such a program, the French initiative is ill-advised and foolish public health practice.

  16. Optical forensics for tracing counterfeit recorded media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick J.; O'Doherty, Phelim; Luna, Carlos; McCarthy, Sean

    2004-12-01

    We describe an optical forensic method for tracing a CD back to the pressing machine in which it was created, and present a system we have developed which maintains a library of the 'fingerprints' of such machines and can compare sample CDs against this library. In principle, any security feature that is deliberately created can be copied by a counterfeiter. In our forensic method we concentrate on features that arise spontaneously in the manufacturing process. Such features act as a signature or 'fingerprint'. In the case of CDs we show how the moulding process leaves an imprint of an unpolished part of the 'mirror plate' on the CD surface. Using machine vision and pattern-matching, we demonstrate the use of the system to acquire a positive match of a sample against a pre-recorded library entry created using a different CD from the same mould.

  17. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  18. Impact of Non-Price Factors on Purchase Intention Counterfeits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Heidarzadeh Hanzaee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This research purposes to investigation of impact of non-price factors on consumer attitude and purchase intention counterfeits luxury brand. We used a survey with 398 students of Islamic Azad university of central unit was conducted in the Iranian students although self-questionnaire that a questionnaire was developed consisting of previously used scales and also we used the Structural Equation Modeling technique to examine the hypothesized relationships. In addition, we involved AMOS software for analysis. We found that perceived risk and subjective norms factors are most influence on attitude toward counterfeits that they are only impact antecedent’s attitude on behavioral intention. This research limited to only a city (Tehran and just dedicated to students, therefore we cannot generalize to whole consumer society and we have time and money limited. This research offer in-depth understanding from consumer attitude toward counterfeits luxury brands in Iran country and help to marketers that find strategies for preventing of purchasing counterfeit luxury brands. This research performed for first in Iran, focused of demand side`s counterfeits and investigated social and personality influences on attitude toward counterfeits that they are non-price factors.

  19. Artemether-Lumefantrine Combination Therapy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria: The Potential for Complex Interactions with Antiretroviral Drugs in HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Byakika-Kibwika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of malaria in HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART poses significant challenges. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL is one of the artemisisnin-based combination therapies recommended for treatment of malaria. The drug combination is highly efficacious against sensitive and multidrug resistant falciparum malaria. Both artemether and lumefantrine are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450 enzymes which metabolize the protease inhibitors (PIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs used for HIV treatment. Coadministration of NNRTIs and PIs with AL could potentially cause complex pharmacokinetic drug interactions. NNRTI by inducing CYP450 3A4 enzyme and PIs by inhibiting CYP450 3A4 enzymes could influence both artemether and lumefantrine concentrations and their active metabolites dihydroartemisinin and desbutyl-lumefantrine, predisposing patients to poor treatment response, toxicity, and risk for development of resistance. There are scanty data on these interactions and their consequences. Pharmacokinetic studies to evaluate these interactions in the target populations are urgently needed.

  20. Prevention of perinatal HIV I transmission by protease inhibitor based triple drug antiretroviral therapy versus nevirapine as single dose at the time of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendle, Meenakshi; Bajpai, Smrati; Choudhary, Ashwini; Pazare, Amar

    2012-12-01

    In India, parent to child transmission is the most important source of HIV infection in children below fifteen years of age. Transmission of HIV from mother to child can occur even at low or undetectable HIV virus levels. CD4 count or HIV RNA levels should not be the determining factor when deciding whether to use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. Use of single dose nevirapine during labour, in prevention of parent to child transmission (PPTCT) programme for pregnant females with CD4 count > 250 cells/cumm has less efficacy in reducing perinatal transmission. And there are high chances of development of nevirapine resistance to both mother and baby after single dose nevirapine exposure. Short course Protease inhibitor(PI) based triple drug combination ART from 28 weeks till delivery for perinatal prophylaxis is effective in reducing perinatal HIV transmission. PI's are safe in pregnancy and also have less chances of development of resistance when used for perinatal prophylaxis and stopped post delivery.Hence, it is opined that PI based combination ART should be offered to pregnant females in PPTCT programme, thereby preventing occurrence of paediatric HIV infection in India. This can have significant impact on the society at large.

  1. The opinions of injecting drug user (IDUs) HIV patients and health professionals on access to antiretroviral treatment and health services in Valencia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de la Hera, Manuela; Davo, Maria Carmen; Ballester-Añón, Rosa; Vioque, Jesus

    2011-09-01

    The benefits of HIV treatment (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy [HAART]) have been less apparent in injecting drug users (IDUs), most probably as a result of poor adherence to treatment. We explored factors related to HIV treatment adherence as reported by 23 IDU-HIV patients and nine health professionals from healthcare services in Alicante and Valencia, Spain. We carried out a qualitative study based on personal interviews. Health professionals reported the lack of coordination among hospital services and difficulties in accessibility to nonspecialized services for IDU-HIV patients as relevant factors for treatment adherence. Their perception of a patient's likelihood of treatment adherence was also considered to influence the decision to prescribe HAART. A better treatment adherence was reported by those IDU-HIV patients with a good doctor-patient relationship and by women with family responsibilities. Patients considered the side effects of HIV treatment, the lack of social support, and the active use of recreational drugs as relevant factors to explain incompliance. Interventions and training of health providers should be aimed at the reduction of barriers in patient-provider communication and the overcoming of stereotypes, thus avoiding discriminatory attitudes in treatment in this vulnerable population.

  2. [Extension of reporting AIDS cases in Catalonia: study based on requests for CD4 lymphocyte count and prescription of antiretroviral drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Olalla Rizo, P; Vall Mayans, M; Miret Mases, M; Clos Guix, R; Casabona Barbarà, J; Caylà Buqueras, J A

    1998-01-01

    To ascertain the degree to which AIDS is officially reported in Catalunya. The request for T CD4+ white blood cell counts and the prescribing of antiretroviral drugs in seven university hospitals in Catalunya from January 1, 1994 to June 31, 1994 were used as data-comparison sources. A case was considered to not have been reported when the clinical history showed a diagnosis of AIDS (according to the Europe 93 definition) and the case in question did not show up on the AIDS Registry for Catalunya. Of the 1,370 cases studied, 50 unreported AIDS cases were found. In all, 98.6% of all cases were found to have been reported, for a 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 98.2-99.0. Most of the unreported cases were males (72%) averaging 37.3 years of age (HCA: 11.8), 52% of whom were injected drug users (IDU's), extrapulmonary tuberculosis being the disease most often diagnosed (16%), 81.4% having been found to have a T CD4+ white blood cell count of 200 WBC/mm3 or below. 92% of these cases were detected based on T CD4+ white blood cell counts. The degree of completeness found is considered to be adequate. It is recommended that the white blood cell count records being used for this type of studies.

  3. Estimation of the standardized risk difference and ratio in a competing risks framework: application to injection drug use and progression to AIDS after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephen R; Lau, Bryan; Eron, Joseph J; Brookhart, M Alan; Kitahata, Mari M; Martin, Jeffrey N; Mathews, William C; Mugavero, Michael J

    2015-02-15

    There are few published examples of absolute risk estimated from epidemiologic data subject to censoring and competing risks with adjustment for multiple confounders. We present an example estimating the effect of injection drug use on 6-year risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy between 1998 and 2012 in an 8-site US cohort study with death before AIDS as a competing risk. We estimate the risk standardized to the total study sample by combining inverse probability weights with the cumulative incidence function; estimates of precision are obtained by bootstrap. In 7,182 patients (83% male, 33% African American, median age of 38 years), we observed 6-year standardized AIDS risks of 16.75% among 1,143 injection drug users and 12.08% among 6,039 nonusers, yielding a standardized risk difference of 4.68 (95% confidence interval: 1.27, 8.08) and a standardized risk ratio of 1.39 (95% confidence interval: 1.12, 1.72). Results may be sensitive to the assumptions of exposure-version irrelevance, no measurement bias, and no unmeasured confounding. These limitations suggest that results be replicated with refined measurements of injection drug use. Nevertheless, estimating the standardized risk difference and ratio is straightforward, and injection drug use appears to increase the risk of AIDS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Assessing antiretroviral adherence via electronic drug monitoring and self-report: an examination of key methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Cynthia R; Simoni, Jane M; Hoff, Peter; Kurth, Ann E; Martin, Diane P

    2007-03-01

    We explored methodological issues related to antiretroviral adherence assessment, using 6 months of data collected in a completed intervention trial involving 136 low-income HIV-positive outpatients in the Bronx, NY. Findings suggest that operationalizing adherence as a continuous (versus dichotomous) variable and averaging adherence estimates over multiple assessment points (versus using only one) explains greater variance in HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL). Self-reported estimates provided during a phone interview accounted for similar variance in VL as EDM estimates (R (2) = .17 phone versus .18 EDM). Self-reported adherence was not associated with a standard social desirability measure, and no difference in the accuracy of self-report adherence was observed for assessment periods of 1-3 days. Self-reported poor adherence was more closely associated with EDM adherence estimates than self-reported moderate and high adherence. On average across assessment points, fewer than 4% of participants who reported taking a dose of an incorrect amount of medication.

  5. An investigation of the effects of antiretroviral CNS penetration effectiveness on procedural learning in HIV+ drug users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael J.; Martin-Engel, Lindsay; Vassileva, Jasmin; Gonzalez, Raul; Martin, Eileen M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens with a high capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier has been associated with lower levels of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS). This study examined neurocognitive performance among a sample of 118 HIV+ substance dependent individuals (SDIs) and 310 HIV− SDIs. HIV+ participants were prescribed cART regimens with varying capacity to penetrate the CNS as indexed by the revised CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) scale. Participants completed the Rotary Pursuit Task (RPT) and the Weather Prediction Task (WPT)--two measures of procedural learning (PL) with known sensitivity to HIV infection--and a control task of sustained attention. HIV+ SDIs prescribed cART with relatively high CNS penetrance performed significantly more poorly on both tasks than HIV− controls. Task performance of HIV+ SDIs prescribed cART with relatively low CNS penetrance did not differ significantly from either HIV− controls or the HIV+/High CPE group, although a trend towards lower RPT performance relative to HIV− participants was observed. Between-group differences were not seen on a control task of motor impulsivity (Immediate Memory Task), indicating that the observed deficits among HIV+/High CPE SDIs may have some specificity. PMID:24079384

  6. An investigation of the effects of antiretroviral central nervous system penetration effectiveness on procedural learning in HIV+ drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael J; Martin-Engel, Lindsay; Vassileva, Jasmin; Gonzalez, Raul; Martin, Eileen M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens with a high capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier has been associated with lower levels of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS). This study examined neurocognitive performance among a sample of 118 HIV+ substance-dependent individuals (SDIs) and 310 HIV- SDIs. HIV+ participants were prescribed cART regimens with varying capacity to penetrate the CNS as indexed by the revised CNS Penetration Effectiveness (CPE) scale. Participants completed the Rotary Pursuit Task (RPT) and the Weather Prediction Task (WPT)-two measures of procedural learning (PL) with known sensitivity to HIV infection-and a control task of sustained attention. HIV+ SDIs prescribed cART with relatively high CNS penetrance performed significantly more poorly on both tasks than HIV- controls. Task performance of HIV+ SDIs prescribed cART with relatively low CNS penetrance did not differ significantly from either HIV- controls or the HIV+/high CPE group, although a trend toward lower RPT performance than that of HIV- participants was observed. Between-group differences were not seen on a control task of motor impulsivity (Immediate Memory Task), indicating that the observed deficits among HIV+/high CPE SDIs may have some specificity.

  7. HIV-1 Drug-Resistance Surveillance among Treatment-Experienced and -Naïve Patients after the Implementation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Koichi; Brandful, James A. M.; Ofori, Sampson B.; Yamaoka, Shoji; Ampofo, William K.; Sugiura, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited HIV-1 drug-resistance surveillance has been carried out in Ghana since the implementation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study sought to provide data on the profile of HIV-1 drug resistance in ART-experienced and newly diagnosed individuals in Ghana. Methods Samples were collected from 101 HIV-1-infected patients (32 ART-experienced cases with virological failure and 69 newly diagnosed ART-naïve cases, including 11 children), in Koforidua, Eastern region of Ghana, from February 2009 to January 2010. The pol gene sequences were analyzed by in-house HIV-1 drug-resistance testing. Results The most prevalent HIV-1 subtype was CRF02_AG (66.3%, 67/101) followed by unique recombinant forms (25.7%, 26/101). Among 31 ART-experienced adults, 22 (71.0%) possessed at least one drug-resistance mutation, and 14 (45.2%) had two-class-resistance to nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors used in their first ART regimen. Importantly, the number of accumulated mutations clearly correlated with the duration of ART. The most prevalent mutation was lamivudine-resistance M184V (n = 12, 38.7%) followed by efavirenz/nevirapine-resistance K103N (n = 9, 29.0%), and zidovudine/stavudine-resistance T215Y/F (n = 6, 19.4%). Within the viral protease, the major nelfinavir-resistance mutation L90M was found in one case. No transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance mutation was found in 59 ART-naïve adults, but K103N and G190S mutations were observed in one ART-naïve child. Conclusions Despite expanding accessibility to ART in Eastern Ghana, the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance presently appears to be low. As ART provision with limited options is scaled up nationwide in Ghana, careful monitoring of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is necessary. PMID:23977189

  8. Increased incidence of antiretroviral drug discontinuation among patients with viremic hepatitis C virus coinfection and high hyaluronic acid, a marker of liver fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D.; Peters, L.; Rockstroh, J. K.;

    2014-01-01

    HCV/HIV coinfected patients. Methods: EuroSIDA patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy were included. Poisson regression identified factors associated with antiretroviral treatment discontinuation. Results: A total of 9535 HIV-positive patients with known HCV status were included (6939...

  9. Results of antiretroviral treatment interruption and intensification in advanced multi-drug resistant HIV infection from the OPTIMA trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Holodniy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guidance is needed on best medical management for advanced HIV disease with multidrug resistance (MDR and limited retreatment options. We assessed two novel antiretroviral (ARV treatment approaches in this setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a 2×2 factorial randomized open label controlled trial in patients with a CD4 count≤300 cells/µl who had ARV treatment (ART failure requiring retreatment, to two options (a re-treatment with either standard (≤4 ARVs or intensive (≥5 ARVs ART and b either treatment starting immediately or after a 12-week monitored ART interruption. Primary outcome was time to developing a first AIDS-defining event (ADE or death from any cause. Analysis was by intention to treat. From 2001 to 2006, 368 patients were randomized. At baseline, mean age was 48 years, 2% were women, median CD4 count was 106/µl, mean viral load was 4.74 log(10 copies/ml, and 59% had a prior AIDS diagnosis. Median follow-up was 4.0 years in 1249 person-years of observation. There were no statistically significant differences in the primary composite outcome of ADE or death between re-treatment options of standard versus intensive ART (hazard ratio 1.17; CI 0.86-1.59, or between immediate retreatment initiation versus interruption before re-treatment (hazard ratio 0.93; CI 0.68-1.30, or in the rate of non-HIV associated serious adverse events between re-treatment options. CONCLUSIONS: We did not observe clinical benefit or harm assessed by the primary outcome in this largest and longest trial exploring both ART interruption and intensification in advanced MDR HIV infection with poor retreatment options. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00050089.

  10. HIV multi-drug resistance at first-line antiretroviral failure and subsequent virological response in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART failure often results from the development of resistance-associated mutations (RAMs. Three patterns, including thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs, 69 Insertion (69Ins and the Q151M complex, are associated with resistance to multiple-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and may compromise treatment options for second-line ART. Methods: We investigated patterns and factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure in patients from The TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance – Monitoring study (TASER-M, and evaluated their impact on virological responses at 12 months after switching to second-line ART. RAMs were compared with the IAS-USA 2013 mutations list. We defined multi-NRTI RAMs as the presence of either Q151M; 69Ins; ≥2 TAMs; or M184V+≥1 TAM. Virological suppression was defined as viral load (VL 2 years (OR=6.25, 95% CI [2.39–16.36], p<0.001. Among 87/105 patients with available VL at 12 months after switch to second-line ART, virological suppression was achieved in 85%. The median genotypic susceptibility score (GSS for the second-line regimen was 2.00. Patients with ART adherence ≥95% were more likely to be virologically suppressed (OR=9.33, 95% CI (2.43–35.81, p=0.001. Measures of patient resistance to second-line ART, including the GSS, were not significantly associated with virological outcome. Conclusions: Multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure were associated with low CD4 level and longer duration of ART. With many patients switching to highly susceptible regimens, good adherence was still crucial in achieving virological response. This emphasizes the importance of continued adherence counselling well into second-line therapy.

  11. Are counterfeit or substandard anti-infective products the cause of treatment failure in Papua New Guinea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anita; Strauch, Stefanie; Lauwo, Jackson; Jähnke, Richard W O; Dressman, Jennifer

    2011-11-01

    Counterfeit and substandard products present a big challenge to any national plan or policy devised to improve public health. Poor quality drug products are especially a problem in lower income countries where product information and drug regulation enforcement are scant or absent. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the quality of amodiaquine and amoxicillin formulations sold in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and to detect the presence of counterfeit or substandard drugs in circulation, if any. Fourteen samples, collected from five registered pharmacies in Port Moresby, PNG, were subjected to visual inspection, quality control tests, and verification of product authenticity. The quality control tests included weight variation, content uniformity, thin layer chromatography, and dissolution. None of the products complied with all of the evaluation criteria. Two products, one of which was purportedly distributed by a company which proved to be nonexistent, contained no detectable amodiaquine. The present study confirms that counterfeit and substandard amodiaquine and amoxicillin products are finding their way into the distribution chain in Port Moresby, PNG. This quality problem with anti-infective products is of great concern, as it not only exposes patients to poor quality products but also fosters the development of resistant bacterial strains. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected pregnant women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, José H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G; Velasque, Luciane S; Friedman, Ruth K; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Rodrigues-Pedro, Adriana; Oliveira, Sandra M; Currier, Judith S; Morgado, Mariza G

    2013-04-01

    Transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains has been gaining attention and is becoming a growing problem throughout the world. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) among antiretroviral (ARV)-naive HIV-infected pregnant women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ARV-naive pregnant women were recruited at Hospital Geral de Nova Iguacu (HGNI), Rio de Janeiro, from 2005 to 2008. HIV genotyping was carried out using ViroSeq (Abbott v. 2.0). TDRM were detected using the Calibrated Population Resistance Tool-CPR v. 6.0.The prevalence of mutations associated with resistance in the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the HIV genome were assessed in samples collected prior to initiation of ARV prophylaxis or treatment. Among 238 eligible specimens that were collected, 197 samples were successfully amplified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Eighty-one percent of women were infected with HIV subtype B, 10% with subtype F1 viruses, 1.0% with subtype C virus, and 8.0% with recombinant forms of the virus. The prevalence of HIV TDRM was 5.6% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 2.0% for nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and 3.0% for protease inhibitors. The overall prevalence of any drug resistance was 10.7%. There were no multiclass resistant strains identified in the analyzed samples. The prevalence of HIV TDRM among the pregnant women in our cohort was moderate. Resistance testing should be encouraged in Rio de Janeiro, among other locations, for all HIV-infected pregnant women prior to prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

  13. Comparison of cyclic fatigue resistance of original and counterfeit rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Huseyin; Capar, Ismail Davut; Arslan, Hakan; Akan, Ender

    2014-05-31

    In recent years, with the advances in counterfeiting methods, counterfeit products have reached the dental market. The purpose of this study was to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance of original and counterfeit rotary root canal instruments. The cyclic fatigue of original and counterfeit ProTaper F2 endodontic instruments was tested (n = 20) in 3 mm radius steel canals with a 60° angle of curvature. The number of cycles to fracture (NCF) was calculated, and the data were subjected to the Student's t-test (α = 0.05). The original instruments showed better cyclic fatigue resistance than the counterfeit ones (p counterfeit files. The cyclic fatigue resistance of the counterfeit instruments was very low. As a result, clinicians should be careful not to purchase counterfeit products.

  14. Absence of antiretroviral therapy and other risk factors for morbidity and mortality in Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fu, Jeannia J; Bazazi, Alexander R; Altice, Frederick L; Mohamed, Mahmood N; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2012-01-01

    .... We evaluated the health status of 100 adult male detainees with HIV and their access to medical care in the two largest Malaysian compulsory drug detention and rehabilitation centers holding HIV-infected individuals. Approximately 80...

  15. High-levels of acquired drug resistance in adult patients failing first-line antiretroviral therapy in a rural HIV treatment programme in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justen Manasa

    Full Text Available To determine the frequency and patterns of acquired antiretroviral drug resistance in a rural primary health care programme in South Africa.Cross-sectional study nested within HIV treatment programme.Adult (≥ 18 years HIV-infected individuals initially treated with a first-line stavudine- or zidovudine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART regimen and with evidence of virological failure (one viral load >1000 copies/ml were enrolled from 17 rural primary health care clinics. Genotypic resistance testing was performed using the in-house SATuRN/Life Technologies system. Sequences were analysed and genotypic susceptibility scores (GSS for standard second-line regimens were calculated using the Stanford HIVDB 6.0.5 algorithms.A total of 222 adults were successfully genotyped for HIV drug resistance between December 2010 and March 2012. The most common regimens at time of genotype were stavudine, lamivudine and efavirenz (51%; and stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine (24%. Median duration of ART was 42 months (interquartile range (IQR 32-53 and median duration of antiretroviral failure was 27 months (IQR 17-40. One hundred and ninety one (86% had at least one drug resistance mutation. For 34 individuals (15%, the GSS for the standard second-line regimen was <2, suggesting a significantly compromised regimen. In univariate analysis, individuals with a prior nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI substitution were more likely to have a GSS <2 than those on the same NRTIs throughout (odds ratio (OR 5.70, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.60-12.49.There are high levels of drug resistance in adults with failure of first-line antiretroviral therapy in this rural primary health care programme. Standard second-line regimens could potentially have had reduced efficacy in about one in seven adults involved.

  16. High HIV-1 Diversity and Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Antiretroviral-Naive HIV-Infected Pregnant Women from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatorre, Edson; Silva-de-Jesus, Carlos; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Pilotto, Jose H; Morgado, Mariza G

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may reduce the efficacy of prophylactic therapy to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and future treatment options. This study evaluated the diversity and the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions of HIV-1 pol gene among 87 ARV-naive HIV-1-infected pregnant women from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2012 and 2015. The viral diversity comprised HIV-1 subtypes B (67.8%), F1 (17.2%), and C (4.6%); the circulating recombinant forms 12_BF (2.3%), 28/29_BF, 39_BF, 02_AG (1.1% each) and unique recombinants forms (4.5%). The overall prevalence of any TDR was 17.2%, of which 5.7% for nucleoside RT inhibitors, 5.7% for non-nucleoside RT inhibitors, and 8% for PR inhibitors. The TDR prevalence found in this population may affect the virological outcome of the standard PMTCT ARV-regimens, reinforcing the importance of continuous monitoring.

  17. Low Rate of Transmitted Drug Resistance May Indicate Low Access to Antiretroviral Treatment in Maranhão State, Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Maria Edileuza Soares; da Guarda Reis, Mônica Nogueira; Lima, Yanna Andressa Ramos; Eulálio, Kelsen Dantas; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Brazilian AIDS epidemic is characterized by significant geographic contrasts: a reduction in incidence and mortality in the epicenter (southeast) and an increase in the northeast. HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and genetic diversity were investigated among 106 antiretroviral (ARV)-naive patients from Maranhão State, northeast. The HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions were sequenced; subtypes were assigned by REGA/phylogenetic analysis. TDR to the nucleoside/nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI/NNRTI) and protease inhibitor (PI) was identified by the Calibrated Population Resistance tool (Stanford). The median age was 31 years (range 18–72), with 54.7% women, 78.3% heterosexual transmission, and 17.9% men who have sex with men (MSM). Around 30% had <350 CD4+ T cells/μl and 47.2% had plasma viral loads ≤10,000 copies/ml. The TDR rate was 3.8% (4/106; CI 95%, 1.2–8.9%) (three males, two of them MSM). Only single class mutations to NRTI (M184V; T215S) or NNRTI (K103S/N) were detected. Subtype B represented 81.1% (86/106), F1 1.9% (2/106), and C 2.8% (3/106); 14.2% were mosaics: 13 BF1 and 2 BC. Surveillance of TDR and HIV-1 genetic diversity is important to improve control strategies regionally. PMID:25411830

  18. HIV multi-drug resistance at first-line antiretroviral failure and subsequent virological response in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Law, Matthew; Kantor, Rami; Praparattanapan, Jutarat; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Merati, Tuti; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Lee, Christopher KC; Ditangco, Rossana; Mustafa, Mahiran; Singtoroj, Thida; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure often results from the development of resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Three patterns, including thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), 69 Insertion (69Ins) and the Q151M complex, are associated with resistance to multiple-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and may compromise treatment options for second-line ART. Methods We investigated patterns and factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure in patients from The TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance – Monitoring study (TASER-M), and evaluated their impact on virological responses at 12 months after switching to second-line ART. RAMs were compared with the IAS-USA 2013 mutations list. We defined multi-NRTI RAMs as the presence of either Q151M; 69Ins; ≥2 TAMs; or M184V+≥1 TAM. Virological suppression was defined as viral load (VL) Thailand, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia and Philippines were included. There were 97/105 (92%) patients harbouring ≥1 RAMs at first-line failure, 39/105 with multi-NRTI RAMs: six with Q151M; 24 with ≥2 TAMs; and 32 with M184V+≥1 TAM. Factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs were CD4 ≤200 cells/µL at genotyping (OR=4.43, 95% CI [1.59–12.37], p=0.004) and ART duration >2 years (OR=6.25, 95% CI [2.39–16.36], p<0.001). Among 87/105 patients with available VL at 12 months after switch to second-line ART, virological suppression was achieved in 85%. The median genotypic susceptibility score (GSS) for the second-line regimen was 2.00. Patients with ART adherence ≥95% were more likely to be virologically suppressed (OR=9.33, 95% CI (2.43–35.81), p=0.001). Measures of patient resistance to second-line ART, including the GSS, were not significantly associated with virological outcome. Conclusions Multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure were associated with low CD4 level and longer duration of ART. With many patients switching to highly susceptible regimens, good adherence

  19. The music of gold: can gold counterfeited coins be detected by ear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manas, Arnaud

    2015-07-01

    In this paper I investigate whether it is true and to what extent counterfeit coins can be detected by their sound frequency. I describe the different types of counterfeit coins encountered and their respective characteristics. I then use the Kirchoff thin plate theory to model a coin, and confirm the validity of the theory by listening to the tone of genuine and counterfeit coins.

  20. Genetic diversity and drug resistance among newly diagnosed and antiretroviral treatment-naive HIV-infected individuals in western Yunnan: a hot area of viral recombination in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The emergence of an HIV-1 epidemic in China was first recognized in Dehong, western Yunnan. Due to its geographic location, Dehong contributed greatly in bridging HIV-1 epidemics in Southeast Asia and China through drug trafficking and injection drug use; and also extensively to the HIV genetic diversity in Yunnan and China. We attempt to monitor HIV-1 in this area by studying the HIV-1 genetic distribution and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in various at-risk populations. Methods Blood samples from a total of 320 newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals, who were antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, were collected from January 2009 to December 2010 in 2 counties in Dehong. HIV-1 subtypes and pol gene drug resistance (DR) mutations were genotyped. Results Among 299 pol sequences successfully genotyped (93.4%), subtype C accounted for 43.1% (n=129), unique recombinant forms (URFs) for 18.4% (n=55), CRF01_AE for 17.7% (n=54), B for 10.7% (n=32), CRF08_BC for 8.4% (n=25) and CRF07_BC for 1.7% (n=5). Subtype distribution in patients infected by different transmission routes varied. In contract to the previous finding of CRF01_AE predominance in 2002-2006, subtype C predominated in both injecting drug users (IDUs) and heterosexually transmitted populations in this study. Furthermore, we found a high level of BC, CRF01_AE/C and CRF01_AE/B/C recombinants suggesting the presence of active viral recombination in the area. TDR associated mutations were identified in 4.3% (n=13) individuals. A total of 1.3% of DR were related to protease inhibitors (PIs), including I85IV, M46I and L90M; 0.3% to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), including M184I; and 2.7% to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), including K103N/S, Y181C, K101E and G190A. Conclusion Our work revealed diverse HIV-1 subtype distributions and intersubtype recombinations. We also identified a low but significant TDR mutation rate among ART-naive patients. These findings

  1. Humanized mice recapitulate key features of HIV-1 infection: a novel concept using long-acting anti-retroviral drugs for treating HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Nischang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humanized mice generate a lymphoid system of human origin subsequent to transplantation of human CD34+ cells and thus are highly susceptible to HIV infection. Here we examined the efficacy of antiretroviral treatment (ART when added to food pellets, and of long-acting (LA antiretroviral compounds, either as monotherapy or in combination. These studies shall be inspiring for establishing a gold standard of ART, which is easy to administer and well supported by the mice, and for subsequent studies such as latency. Furthermore, they should disclose whether viral breakthrough and emergence of resistance occurs similar as in HIV-infected patients when ART is insufficient. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NOD/shi-scid/γ(cnull (NOG mice were used in all experimentations. We first performed pharmacokinetic studies of the drugs used, either added to food pellets (AZT, TDF, 3TC, RTV or in a LA formulation that permitted once weekly subcutaneous administration (TMC278: non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, TMC181: protease inhibitor. A combination of 3TC, TDF and TMC278-LA or 3TC, TDF, TMC278-LA and TMC181-LA suppressed the viral load to undetectable levels in 15/19 (79% and 14/14 (100% mice, respectively. In successfully treated mice, subsequent monotherapy with TMC278-LA resulted in viral breakthrough; in contrast, the two LA compounds together prevented viral breakthrough. Resistance mutations matched the mutations most commonly observed in HIV patients failing therapy. Importantly, viral rebound after interruption of ART, presence of HIV DNA in successfully treated mice and in vitro reactivation of early HIV transcripts point to an existing latent HIV reservoir. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report is a unique description of multiple aspects of HIV infection in humanized mice that comprised efficacy testing of various treatment regimens, including LA compounds, resistance mutation analysis as well as viral rebound after treatment

  2. Short Communication: Population-Based Surveillance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Cameroonian Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy According to the World Health Organization Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Désiré; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Akonie, Haniel Ze; Kouanfack, Charles; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Colizzi, Vittorio; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Ndjolo, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    With ongoing earlier enrollment on and rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cameroon, there are increasing risks of transmitted HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at population levels. We, therefore, evaluated the threshold of HIVDR in a population initiating ART, to inform on the effectiveness of first-line regimens, considering HIV-1 diversity, plasma viral load (PVL), and CD4-based disease progression. A total of 53 adults [median (interquartile range, IQR) CD4: 162 cell/mm(3) (48-284); median (IQR) PVL: 5.34 log10 RNA (4.17-6.42) copies/ml] initiating ART in 2014 at the Yaoundé Central Hospital were enrolled for HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase sequencing. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were interpreted using the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) list versus the Stanford HIVdb algorithm version 7.0. Level of DRMs was low (3.77%) versus moderate (7.55%), respectively, following the WHO list (T69D, K103N) versus Stanford HIVdb (T69D, A98G, K103N, K238T), respectively. Prevailing clade was CRF02_AG (71.70%). Based on Stanford HIVdb, a slightly higher proportion of patients with DRMs were found among ones infected with CRF02_AG than in those non-CRF02_AG infected (7.89% vs. 6.67%, p = 1.000), with lower PVL (7.69% population levels, despite scale-up of ART in the country, pending adherence, and closed virological monitoring. With an intent-to-diagnose approach, the discrepant levels of DRMs support using Stanford HIVdb to evaluate initial ART, while revising the WHO list for surveillance.

  3. Population-based Surveillance of HIV Drug Resistance Emerging on Treatment and Associated Factors at Sentinel Antiretroviral Therapy Sites in Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Steven Y.; Jonas, Anna; DeKlerk, Michael; Shiningavamwe, Andreas; Desta, Tiruneh; Badi, Alfons; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian M.; Ledwaba, Johanna; Sheehan, Heidi B.; Lau, Kiger; Trotter, Andrew; Tang, Alice M.; Wanke, Christine; Jordan, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective World Health Organization (WHO) prospective surveys of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) evaluate HIVDR emerging after the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and associated factors. Methods Consecutive ART starters in 2009 were enrolled at three sentinel sites in Namibia. Genotyping was performed at start and after 12 months in patients with HIV viral load (VL) >1000 copies/mL. HIVDR outcomes were: HIVDR Prevention (VL ≤1000 copies/mL), Possible HIVDR (VL>1000 copies/mL without detectable HIVDR or loss to follow-up (LTFU) or ART stop), and HIVDR (VL>1000 copies/mL with detectable HIVDR). Adherence was assessed using medication possession ratio (MPR). Results Of 394 starters, at 12 months 80% were on first-line ART, 1% died, 4% transferred out, 1% stopped ART, <1% switched to second-line and 15% were LTFU. Among patients on first-line, 77% had VL testing. 94% achieved VL ≤1000 copies/mL. At baseline, 7% had HIVDR. After 12 months, among patients with VL testing, 5% had HIVDR. A majority of patients failing therapy had high level resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors but none to protease inhibitors. All sites achieved WHO target of ≥70% HIVDR Prevention. Factors associated with not achieving HIVDR Prevention were: baseline resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (OR 3.0, p=0.023), WHO stage 3 or 4 at baseline (OR 2.0, p=0.012), and MPR<75% (OR 4.9, p=0.021). Conclusions Earlier ART initiation and removal of barriers to on-time drug pickups may help to prevent HIVDR. These data inform decisions at national and global levels on the effectiveness of first- and second-line regimens. PMID:25564107

  4. Drug-Drug Interaction between the Direct-Acting Antiviral Regimen of Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir plus Dasabuvir and the HIV Antiretroviral Agent Dolutegravir or Abacavir plus Lamivudine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Amit; Trinh, Roger; Zhao, Weihan; Podsadecki, Thomas; Menon, Rajeev

    2016-10-01

    The direct-acting antiviral regimen of 25 mg ombitasvir-150 mg paritaprevir-100 mg ritonavir once daily (QD) plus 250 mg dasabuvir twice daily (BID) is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection, including patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. This study was performed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, safety, and tolerability effects of coadministering the regimen of 3 direct-acting antivirals with two antiretroviral therapies (dolutegravir or abacavir plus lamivudine). Healthy volunteers (n = 24) enrolled in this phase I, single-center, open-label, multiple-dose study received 50 mg dolutegravir QD for 7 days or 300 mg abacavir plus 300 mg lamivudine QD for 4 days, the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen for 14 days, followed by the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen with dolutegravir or abacavir plus lamivudine for 10 days. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated to compare combination therapy with 3-direct-acting-antiviral or antiretroviral therapy alone, and safety/tolerability were assessed throughout the study. Coadministration of the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen increased the geometric mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) of dolutegravir by 22% (central value ratio [90% confidence intervals], 1.219 [1.153, 1.288]) and 38% (1.380 [1.295, 1.469]), respectively. Abacavir geometric mean Cmax and AUC values decreased by 13% (0.873 [0.777, 0.979]) and 6% (0.943 [0.901, 0.986]), while those for lamivudine decreased by 22% (0.778 [0.719, 0.842]) and 12% (0.876 [0.821, 0.934]). For the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen, geometric mean Cmax and AUC during coadministration were within 18% of measurements made during administration of the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen alone, although trough concentrations for paritaprevir were 34% (0.664 [0.585, 0.754]) and 27% (0.729 [0.627, 0.847]) lower with dolutegravir and abacavir-lamivudine, respectively. All study treatments were generally

  5. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Pavlos, Elizabeth J PhillipsInstitute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has evolved considerably over the last three decades. From the early days of monotherapy with high toxicities and pill burdens, through to larger pill burdens and more potent combination therapies, and finally, from 2005 and beyond where we now have the choice of low pill burdens and once-daily therapies. More convenient and less toxic regimens are also becoming available, even in resource-poor settings. An understanding of the individual variation in response to ART, both efficacy and toxicity, has evolved over this time. The strong association of the major histocompatibility class I allele HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity, and its translation and use in routine HIV clinical practice as a predictive marker with 100% negative predictive value, has been a success story and a notable example of the challenges and triumphs in bringing pharmacogenetics to the clinic. In real clinical practice, however, it is going to be the exception rather than the rule that individual biomarkers will definitively guide patient therapy. The need for individualized approaches to ART has been further increased by the importance of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV clinical practice. In the future, the ideal utilization of the individualized approach to ART will likely consist of a combined approach using a combination of knowledge of drug, virus, and host (pharmacogenetic and pharmacoecologic [factors in the individual's environment that may be dynamic over time] information to guide the truly personalized prescription. This review will focus on our knowledge of the pharmacogenetics of the efficacy and toxicity of currently available antiretroviral agents and the current and potential utility of such information and approaches in present and future HIV clinical care.Keywords: HIV

  6. Cost-effectiveness of HIV drug resistance testing to inform switching to second line antiretroviral therapy in low income settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To guide future need for cheap resistance tests for use in low income settings, we assessed cost-effectiveness of drug resistance testing as part of monitoring of people on first line ART - with switching from first to second line ART being conditional on NNRTI drug resistance mutations...... being identified. METHODS: An individual level simulation model of HIV transmission, progression and the effect of ART which accounts for adherence and resistance development was used to compare outcomes of various potential monitoring strategies in a typical low income setting in sub-Saharan Africa....... Underlying monitoring strategies considered were based on clinical disease, CD4 count or viral load. Within each we considered a strategy in which no further measures are performed, one with a viral load measure to confirm failure, and one with both a viral load measure and a resistance test. Predicted...

  7. Evaluation of a new handheld instrument for the detection of counterfeit artesunate by visual fluorescence comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Nicola; Tabernero, Patricia; Green, Michael D; Verbois, Leigh; Herrington, James; Sampson, Eric; Satzger, R Duane; Phonlavong, Chindaphone; Thao, Khamxay; Newton, Paul N; Witkowski, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need for accurate and inexpensive handheld instruments for the evaluation of medicine quality in the field. A blinded evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the Counterfeit Detection Device 3 (CD-3), developed by the US Food and Drug Administration Forensic Chemistry Center, was conducted in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. Two hundred three samples of the oral antimalarial artesunate were compared with authentic products using the CD-3 by a trainer and two trainees. The specificity (95% confidence interval [95% CI]), sensitivity (95% CI), positive predictive value (95% CI), and negative predictive value (95% CI) of the CD-3 for detecting counterfeit (falsified) artesunate were 100% (93.8-100%), 98.4% (93.8-99.7%), 100% (96.2-100%), and 97.4% (90.2-99.6%), respectively. Interobserver agreement for 203 samples of artesunate was 100%. The CD-3 holds promise as a relatively inexpensive and easy to use instrument for field evaluation of medicines, potentially empowering drug inspectors, customs agents, and pharmacists. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. What strategies to boost production of affordable fixed-dose anti-retroviral drug combinations for children in the developing world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Daniele; Gass, Robert; McDermott, Peter; Racalbuto, Vincenzo; Madeo, Marina; Braghieri, Giuseppe; Crowley, Siobhan; Pinheiro, Eloan Dos Santos; Graaff, Peter; Vasan, Ashwin; Eksaengsri, Achara; Moller, Helene; Khanna, Arun Kumar; Kraisintu, Krisana; Juneja, Sandeep; Nicolaou, Stavros; Sengupta, Aloka; Esperti, Francesco; Messeri, Daniela

    2007-03-01

    No more than 8% of HIV positive children needing treatment in low- and middle-income countries have access to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). Children presently account for about 4% of all treated patients, while for equitable access they should make up at least 13%. This study explores key issues, implications and interaction dynamics to boost production of easy-to-use and affordable fixed-dose combination (FDC) ARVs for children in the developing world. Potentials for equitable solutions are examined including priority steps and actions, appropriate treatment options and reliable forecasting methods for paediatric ARVs, as well as combination incentives to generic companies against market unattractiveness and enforced intellectual property (IP) rights. Moreover, implementation strategies to enhance the development and production of affordable ARV paediatric formulations and appropriate supply systems to ensure availability are investigated. The current market for FDC paediatric ARVs is already substantial and will only grow with improved and scaled up diagnosis and monitoring of children. This provides an argument for immediate increase of production and development of FDC ARVs for children. These formulations must be low cost and included in the list of Essential Medicines to avoid children continuing to lag behind in access to treatment. Access-oriented, long-term drug policy strategies with the ability to pass muster of governments, the UN system, as well as generic and research-based enterprises are needed to let children gain expanded and sustained access to FDC ARVs. Under the requirements listed above, IP-bound Voluntary License (VL) flexibilities do appear, if coupled with substantial combination incentives to generic firms, as a fitting tool into the needs. Policies must consider enhancing human resource capacity in the area of caregivers and social and health workers aiming to spread correct information and awareness on effectiveness and rationale of FDC

  9. HIV drug resistance testing among patients failing second line antiretroviral therapy. Comparison of in-house and commercial sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimukangara, Benjamin; Varyani, Bhavini; Shamu, Tinei; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Manasa, Justen; White, Elizabeth; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Luethy, Ruedi; Katzenstein, David

    2017-05-01

    HIV genotyping is often unavailable in low and middle-income countries due to infrastructure requirements and cost. We compared genotype resistance testing in patients with virologic failure, by amplification of HIV pol gene, followed by "in-house" sequencing and commercial sequencing. Remnant plasma samples from adults and children failing second-line ART were amplified and sequenced using in-house and commercial di-deoxysequencing, and analyzed in Harare, Zimbabwe and at Stanford, U.S.A, respectively. HIV drug resistance mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV drug resistance database. Twenty-six of 28 samples were amplified and 25 were successfully genotyped. Comparison of average percent nucleotide and amino acid identities between 23 pairs sequenced in both laboratories were 99.51 (±0.56) and 99.11 (±0.95), respectively. All pairs clustered together in phylogenetic analysis. Sequencing analysis identified 6/23 pairs with mutation discordances resulting in differences in phenotype, but these did not impact future regimens. The results demonstrate our ability to produce good quality drug resistance data in-house. Despite discordant mutations in some sequence pairs, the phenotypic predictions were not clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cellular Drug Transporters Are Associated with Intolerance to Antiretroviral Therapy in Brazilian HIV-1 Positive Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Mônica Barcellos; Campagnari, Francine; de Almeida, Tailah Bernardo; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Tanuri, Amilcar; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester

    2016-01-01

    Adverse reactions are the main cause of treatment discontinuation among HIV+ individuals. Genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) influence drug bioavailability and treatment response. We have investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 ADME genes and intolerance to therapy in a case-control study including 764 individuals. Results showed that 15 SNPs were associated with intolerance to nucleoside and 11 to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs), and 8 to protease inhibitors (PIs) containing regimens under alpha = 0.05. After Bonferroni adjustment, two associations remained statistically significant. SNP rs2712816, at SLCO2B1 was associated to intolerance to NRTIs (ORGA/AA = 2.37; p = 0.0001), while rs4148396, at ABCC2, conferred risk of intolerance to PIs containing regimens (ORCT/TT = 2.64; p = 0.00009). Accordingly, haplotypes carrying rs2712816A and rs4148396T alleles were also associated to risk of intolerance to NRTIs and PIs, respectively. Our data reinforce the role of drug transporters in response to HIV therapy and may contribute to a future development of personalized therapies. PMID:27648838

  11. Microstructure-Based Counterfeit Detection in Metal Part Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachowicz, Adam; Chaduvula, Siva Chaitanya; Atallah, Mikhail; Panchal, Jitesh H.

    2017-08-01

    Counterfeiting in metal part manufacturing has become a major global concern. Although significant effort has been made in detecting the implementation of such counterfeits, modern approaches suffer from high expense during production, invasiveness during manufacture, and unreliability in practice if parts are damaged during use. In this paper, a practical microstructure-based counterfeit detection methodology is proposed, which draws on inherent randomness present in the microstructure as a result of the manufacturing process. An optical Physically Unclonable Function (PUF) protocol is developed which takes a micrograph as input and outputs a compact, unique string representation of the micrograph. The uniqueness of the outputs and their robustness to moderate wear and tear is demonstrated by application of the methodology to brass samples. The protocol is shown to have good discriminatory power even between samples manufactured in the same batch, and runs on the order of several seconds per part on inexpensive machines.

  12. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of potential responses to future high levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral drug-naive populations beginning treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Cambiano, Valentina; Miners, Alec

    2014-01-01

    levels of transmitted drug resistance. METHODS: We created a model of HIV transmission, progression, and the effects of ART, which accounted for resistance generation, transmission, and disappearance of resistance from majority virus in the absence of drug pressure. We simulated 5000 ART programmatic...

  13. Mechanical characteristics of counterfeit Reciproc instruments: a call for attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, C S; Vieira, V T L; Antunes, H S; De-Deus, G; Elias, C N; Moreira, E J L; Silva, E J N L

    2017-05-04

    To report the main differences seen by direct visual inspection between original and counterfeit Reciproc instruments, together with an evaluation of instrument bending resistance, cyclic fatigue, surface finish, Vickers microhardness and chemical composition. The visual aspects of original Reciproc R25 (VDW, Munich, Germany) and counterfeit Reciproc R25 instruments (claimed to be original, supposedly with dimensions similar to those of Reciproc R25 files, bought at www.mercadolivre.com.br) were evaluated under direct observation, stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The flexibility of original and counterfeit Reciproc R25 was determined via 45° bending tests according to the ISO 3630-1 specification. Instruments were also subjected to cyclic fatigue resistance, measuring the time to fracture in an artificial stainless steel canal with a 60° angle and 5-mm radius of curvature. The fracture surfaces of all fragments were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Roughness of the instruments was quantified using a profilometer, and the microhardness test was carried out using a Vickers hardness tester. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) was also carried out. Results were analysed statistically using the Student's t-test at a significance level of P differences were observed such as ISO colour coding, measurement marks, stopper and morphologic characteristics. Original Reciproc instruments had significantly longer cyclic fatigue life and significantly lower bending resistance than counterfeit Reciproc instruments (P differences in the chemical composition of the instruments (P different raw material. Original Reciproc files outperformed counterfeit instruments in all tests. It is thus important that identification strategies for these counterfeit instruments be developed, thereby preventing their inadvertent use. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Determinants of HIV-1 drug resistance in treatment-naïve patients and its clinical implications in an antiretroviral treatment program in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zoufaly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Facing the rapid scale-up of antiretroviral treatment (ART programs in resource-limited settings, monitoring of treatment outcome is essential in order to timely detect and tackle drawbacks [1]. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 300 consecutive patients starting first-line ART were enrolled between 2009 and2010 in a large HIV treatment centre in rural Cameroon. Patients were followed up for 12 months. Virologic failure was defined as a VL >1000 cop/mL at month 12. Besides CD4 and viral load (VL analysis, HIV-1 drug resistance testing was performed in patients with VL>1000 copies (c/mL plasma. In those patients and controls, minority HIV-1 drug resistance mutations at baseline, and plasma drug levels were analyzed in order to identify the risk factors for virologic failure. Results: Most enrolled patients (71% were female. At baseline median CD4 cell count was 162/µL (IQR 59-259, median log10 VL was 5.4 (IQR 5.0–5.8 c/mL, and one-third of patients had World Health Organisation (WHO stage 3 or 4; 30 patients died during follow-up. Among all patients who completed follow-up 38/238 had virologic failure. These patients were younger, had lower CD4 cell counts and more often had WHO stage 3 or 4 at baseline compared to patients with VL<1000c/mL. Sixty-three percent of failing patients (24/38 had at least one mutation associated with high-level drug resistance. The M184V mutation was the most frequently detected nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI mutation (n=18 followed by TAMs (n=5 and multi-NRTI resistance mutations (n=4. The most commonly observed non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI resistance mutations were K103N (n=10, Y181C (n=7, and G190A (n=6. Drug resistance mutations at baseline were detected in 12/65 (18% patients, in 6 patients with and 6 patients without virological failure (p=0.77. Subtherapeutic NNRTI levels (OR 6.67, 95% CI 1.98–22.43, p<0.002 and poorer adherence (OR 1.54, 95% CI

  15. Switching to boosted protease inhibitor plus a second antiretroviral drug (dual therapy for treatment simplification: a multicenter analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Zaccarelli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the role of drugs used in dual therapy (DT, as cART simplification, over the risk of treatment failure. Materials and Methods: Patients starting DT regimen composed by a boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r: darunavir (DRV/r, lopinavir (LPVr or atazanavir (ATV/r plus a second drug: raltegravir (RAL, maraviroc (MRV etravirine (ETR, lamivudine (3TC or tenofovir (TDF, this one generally used in HBV co-infected patients, were included. The effect of each drug as well as other clinical and virological cofactors over treatment failure was assessed using survival analysis. Results: Overall, 480 patients from six reference Italian centres were included: all switched to DT with HIV-RNA <500 cp/µL, 376 of them at <50 cp/µL. Patients who switched at <50 cp/µL showed a significant lower risk of treatment failure (13.3% versus 23.3% at 1 year and 28.0% versus 44.6% at 3 years, p=0.005, thus the analysis was focused on this subgroup. Among the patients who switched at <50 cp/µL, the proportion of drug used in DT was: DRV/r 63.0%, RAL 53.7%, ETR 19.4%, ATV/r 18.4%, MRV 17.3%, LPV/r 12.8%, TDF 6.4% and 3TC 5.9%; DRV/r-RAL was the most widely used combination: 32.5%. Treatment failure was observed in 78 patients, of whom 38 virological and 35 for toxicity/intolerance, one patient died during follow-up and four patients interrupted for personal decision with undetectable HIV-RNA. At Cox Model, adjusted by gender, age, non-Italian origin, AIDS diagnosis, time on cART, number of regimens, CD4 nadir, baseline CD4, all the drugs had a positive effect on probability of failure (Figure, however the effect was significant for DRV/r (HR:0.21, 95% CI 0.07–0.59, p=0.03, ATV/r (0.30, 0.09–0.97, p=0.044 and RAL (0.37, 0.15–0.93, p=0.034; higher CD4 count at baseline was also associated with lower risk of failure while number of previous regimens with a higher risk. Moreover, ATV/r was found significant associated with significant higher risk of

  16. THE STUDY OF UV-PHOTOCHROMIC ANTI-COUNTERFEIT PAPER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoxiuHao; ShuhuiYang; QunceFeng; YuruZhou

    2004-01-01

    The hydrophilicity, dispersity and minuteness of UV(ultraviolet)-photochromic special function materialsand its retention and formation mechanisms in stockwere comprehensively studied, and themechanism of UV-photochromic fiberstudied.retentionwas alsoIn addition, according to the disadvantages of specialfunction materials such as big grain, badhydrophilicity, expensive price and so on, this paperdisplays our effects focused on the developing ofanti-counterfeit pigments slurry system. Moreover,the properties and anti-counterfeit mechanism of thepaper with different special function materials wereresearched by fluorescent spectrum.

  17. THE STUDY OF UV-PHOTOCHROMIC ANTI-COUNTERFEIT PAPER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxiu Hao; Shuhui Yang; Qunce Feng; Yuru Zhou

    2004-01-01

    The hydrophilicity, dispersity and minuteness of UV (ultraviolet)-photochromic special function materials and its retention and formation mechanisms in stock were comprehensively studied, and the retention mechanism of UV-photochromic fiber was also studied.In addition, according to the disadvantages of special function materials such as big grain, bad hydrophilicity, expensive price and so on, this paper displays our effects focused on the developing of anti-counterfeit pigments slurry system. Moreover,the properties and anti-counterfeit mechanism of the paper with different special function materials were researched by fluorescent spectrum.

  18. Encoded cell grating array in anti-counterfeit technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongyu Chen; N. K. Bao; Po S. Chung

    2005-01-01

    @@ The dot matrix hologram (DMH) has been widely used in anti-counterfeiting label. With the same technology and cell array configuration, we can encode to the incidence beam. These codes can be some image matrix grating with different grating gap and different grating orientation. When the multi-level phase diffractive grating is etched, the incidence beam on the cell appears as an encoding image. When the encoded grating and DMH are used in the same label synchronously, the technology of multi-encoded grating array enhances the anti-counterfeit ability.

  19. Aspects concerning counterfeiting and piracy in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global problem of counterfeiting and piracy has increased in European Union though there are special laws defending Intellectual Properties Rights. The aim of this paper is to point out the aspects on the topic of counterfeiting and piracy inside the European Union Single Market. Analysing the information gathered, we can conclude that there are evident facts of growing and increasingly dangerous phenomena in the European Union, with significant impact on the economic and social sectors. European Commission is the one that identifies strategies and effective practices to help rightful owners protect their Intellectual Property Rights.

  20. Virological failure and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among naive and antiretroviral pre-treated patients entering the ESTHER program of Calmette Hospital in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Barennes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In resource limited settings, patients entering an antiretroviral therapy (ART program comprise ART naive and ART pre-treated patients who may show differential virological outcomes. METHODS: This retrospective study, conducted in 2010-2012 in the HIV clinic of Calmette Hospital located in Phnom Penh (Cambodia assessed virological failure (VF rates and patterns of drug resistance of naive and pre-treated patients. Naive and ART pre-treated patients were included when a Viral Load (VL was performed during the first year of ART for naive subjects or at the first consultation for pre-treated individuals. Patients showing Virological failure (VF (>1,000 copies/ml underwent HIV DR genotyping testing. Interpretation of drug resistance mutations was done according to 2013 version 23 ANRS algorithms. RESULTS: On a total of 209 patients, 164 (78.4% were naive and 45 (21.5% were ART pre-treated. Their median initial CD4 counts were 74 cells/mm3 (IQR: 30-194 and 279 cells/mm3 (IQR: 103-455 (p<0.001, respectively. Twenty seven patients (12.9% exhibited VF (95% CI: 8.6-18.2%, including 10 naive (10/164, 6.0% and 17 pre-treated (17/45, 37.8% patients (p<0.001. Among these viremic patients, twenty-two (81.4% were sequenced in reverse transcriptase and protease coding regions. Overall, 19 (86.3% harbored ≥1 drug resistance mutations (DRMs whereas 3 (all belonging to pre-treated patients harbored wild-types viruses. The most frequent DRMs were M184V (86.3%, K103N (45.5% and thymidine analog mutations (TAMs (40.9%. Two (13.3% pre-treated patients harbored viruses that showed a multi-nucleos(tide resistance including Q151M, K65R, E33A/D, E44A/D mutations. CONCLUSION: In Cambodia, VF rates were low for naive patients but the emergence of DRMs to NNRTI and 3TC occurred relatively quickly in this subgroup. In pre-treated patients, VF rates were much higher and TAMs were relatively common. HIV genotypic assays before ART initiation and for ART pre

  1. Cost-effectiveness of HIV drug resistance testing to inform switching to second line antiretroviral therapy in low income settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Phillips

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To guide future need for cheap resistance tests for use in low income settings, we assessed cost-effectiveness of drug resistance testing as part of monitoring of people on first line ART - with switching from first to second line ART being conditional on NNRTI drug resistance mutations being identified. METHODS: An individual level simulation model of HIV transmission, progression and the effect of ART which accounts for adherence and resistance development was used to compare outcomes of various potential monitoring strategies in a typical low income setting in sub-Saharan Africa. Underlying monitoring strategies considered were based on clinical disease, CD4 count or viral load. Within each we considered a strategy in which no further measures are performed, one with a viral load measure to confirm failure, and one with both a viral load measure and a resistance test. Predicted outcomes were assessed over 2015-2025 in terms of viral suppression, first line failure, switching to second line regimen, death, HIV incidence, disability-adjusted-life-years averted and costs. Potential future low costs of resistance tests ($30 were used. RESULTS: The most effective strategy, in terms of DALYs averted, was one using viral load monitoring without confirmation. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for this strategy was $2113 (the same as that for viral load monitoring with confirmation. ART monitoring strategies which involved resistance testing did not emerge as being more effective or cost effective than strategies not using it. The slightly reduced ART costs resulting from use of resistance testing, due to less use of second line regimens, was of similar magnitude to the costs of resistance tests. CONCLUSION: Use of resistance testing at the time of first line failure as part of the decision whether to switch to second line therapy was not cost-effective, even though the test was assumed to be very inexpensive.

  2. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naïve HIV-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Heredia, Juan; Lecanda, Aarón; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Brander, Christian; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART) efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies. Methods We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR) positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations. Results Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64%) corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual) or DR (median 6 pairs/individual) were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001). While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient’s virus (mean 68% of cases), responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002). Conclusions Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides. PMID:26808823

  3. Prevalence and evolution of low frequency HIV drug resistance mutations detected by ultra deep sequencing in patients experiencing first line antiretroviral therapy failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Anne Vandenhende

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Clinical relevance of low-frequency HIV-1 variants carrying drug resistance associated mutations (DRMs is still unclear. We aimed to study the prevalence of low-frequency DRMs, detected by Ultra-Deep Sequencing (UDS before antiretroviral therapy (ART and at virological failure (VF, in HIV-1 infected patients experiencing VF on first-line ART. METHODS: Twenty-nine ART-naive patients followed up in the ANRS-CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, having initiated ART between 2000 and 2009 and experiencing VF (2 plasma viral loads (VL >500 copies/ml or one VL >1000 copies/ml were included. Reverse transcriptase and protease DRMs were identified using Sanger sequencing (SS and UDS at baseline (before ART initiation and VF. RESULTS: Additional low-frequency variants with PI-, NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs were found by UDS at baseline and VF, significantly increasing the number of detected DRMs by 1.35 fold (p<0.0001 compared to SS. These low-frequency DRMs modified ARV susceptibility predictions to the prescribed treatment for 1 patient at baseline, in whom low-frequency DRM was found at high frequency at VF, and 6 patients at VF. DRMs found at VF were rarely detected as low-frequency DRMs prior to treatment. The rare low-frequency NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs detected at baseline that correlated with the prescribed treatment were most often found at high-frequency at VF. CONCLUSION: Low frequency DRMs detected before ART initiation and at VF in patients experiencing VF on first-line ART can increase the overall burden of resistance to PI, NRTI and NNRTI.

  4. Evaluation of Different Antiretroviral Drug Protocols on Naturally Infected Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV Cats in the late Phase of the Asymptomatic Stage of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola B. Pisano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the antiretrovirals: Zidovudine (ZDV alone; ZDV + Recombinant Human Interferon-α (rHuIFN-α; ZDV + Lamivudine (3TC and ZDV + valproic acid (Valp on naturally feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-infected cats, in the late phase of the asymptomatic stage of infection. The follow-up was performed over one year, through clinical evaluation and the determination of viral loads and CD4+/CD8+ ratios. Neurological signs were studied by visual and auditory evoked potentials (VEP, AEP and the responses were abnormal in 80% of the FIV-infected cats. After one year, an improvement in VEP and AEP was observed in the ZDV + Valp group and a worsening in the group receiving ZDV + rHuIFN-α. The CD4+/CD8+ ratio showed a significant increase (both intra and inter-groups only in ZDV and ZDV + 3TC, between their pre-treatment and one year values, as well as among the other groups. Viral load only showed a significant decrease in ZDV and ZDV + 3TC groups, when comparing the values at one year of treatment vs. pre-treatment values and when the different groups were compared. In addition, the viral load decrease was significantly more pronounced in the ZDV + 3TC vs. ZDV group. We conclude that ZDV and ZDV + 3TC produce significant reductions in viral load and stimulate a recovery of the CD4+/CD8+ ratio, compared with the other protocols. It is clear that the addition of 3TC resulted in a greater reduction in viral load than use of ZDV as a single drug. Therefore, the combination ZDV + 3TC could be more effective than the sole use of ZDV.

  5. HIV type 1 pol gene diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, N; Mulanga, C; Bazepeo, S Edidi; Mwamba, J Kasali; Tshimpaka, J; Kashi, M; Mama, N; Valéa, D; Delaporte, E; Lepira, F; Peeters, M

    2006-02-01

    To study recombination and the natural polymorphism in pol of HIV-1 strains in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) we sequenced the protease and RT genes for 70 HIV-1 strains previously characterized in the env V3-V5 region from a sentinel surveillance study in 2002. For 41 of the 70 (58.6%) strains, the same subtype/ CRF designations were observed in pol and env. Twenty-three (32.9%) of 70 pol sequences were complex recombinants involving two to five subtypes as well as fragments that could not be classified into any of the known subtypes. All subtypes were involved in recombination events. Unclassified (U) and env subtype H strains were very likely to be recombinant strains. Overall, many minor mutations were identified in the protease sequences. Although at the time of our study ARV use was not yet widespread in DRC, three strains were identified with one major mutation associated with drug resistance: L90M and M46L in protease and K103N in RT.

  6. Role of traditional risk factors and antiretroviral drugs in the incidence of chronic kidney disease, ANRS CO3 Aquitaine cohort, France, 2004-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Morlat

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of antiretroviral drugs (ART, HIV-related and traditional risk factors on the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD in HIV-infected patients. DESIGN: Prospective hospital-based cohort of HIV-infected patients from 2004 to 2012. METHODS: CKD was defined using MDRD equation as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR less than 60 ml/mn/1.73 m(2 at 2 consecutive measurements ≥3 months apart. Poisson regression models were used to study determinants of CKD either measured at baseline or updated. ART exposure was classified as ever or never. We additionally tested the role of tenofovir (TDF, whether or not prescribed concomitantly with a Protease Inhibitor (PI, taking into account the cumulative exposure to the drug. RESULTS: 4,350 patients (74% men with baseline eGFR>60 ml/mn/1.73 m(2 were followed for a median of 5.8 years. At the end of follow-up, 96% had received ART, one third of them (35% jointly received TDF and a PI. Average incidence rate of CKD was 0.95% person-years of follow-up. Incidence of CKD was higher among women (IRR = 2.2, older patients (>60 y vs 90 and IRR = 7.1 for 70500/mm(3 (IRR = 2.5, and exposure to TDF (IRR = 2.0. Exposure to TDF was even strongly associated with CKD when co-administered with PIs (IRR = 3.1 vs 1.3 when not, p12 months [IRR = 3.0 with joint PIs vs 1.3 without (p<0.001]. A vast majority of those developing CKD (76.6% had a baseline eGFR between 60 and 80 ml/mn/1.73 m(2. CONCLUSION: In patients with eGFR between 60 and 80 mL/min/1.73 m(2, a thorough control of CKD risk factors is warranted. The use of TDF, especially when co-administered with PIs, should be mentioned as a relative contraindication in presence of at least one of these risk factors.

  7. Efficacy, adherence and tolerability of once daily tenofovir DF-containing antiretroviral therapy in former injecting drug users with HIV-1 receiving opiate treatment: results of a 48-week open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess efficacy, adherence and tolerability of once daily antiretroviral therapy containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (DF 300 mg in HIV-1-infected former injecting drug users receiving opiate treatment (IVDU. Methods European, 48-week, open-label, single-arm, multicenter study. Patients were either antiretroviral therapy-naïve, restarting therapy after treatment discontinuation without prior virological failure or switching from existing stable treatment. Results Sixty-seven patients were enrolled in the study and 41 patients completed treatment. In the primary analysis (intent-to-treat missing = failure at week 48, 34% of patients (23/67; 95% CI: 23%-47% had plasma HIV-1 RNA 3. Although self-reported adherence appeared high, there were high levels of missing data and adherence results should be treated with caution. No new safety issues were identified. Conclusions Levels of missing data were high in this difficult-to-treat population, but potent antiretroviral suppression was achieved in a substantial proportion of HIV-infected IVDU-patients.

  8. Platelet count kinetics following interruption of antiretroviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Baker, Jason V

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of platelet kinetics in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study that demonstrated excess mortality with CD4 guided episodic antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug conservation compared with continuous treatment viral suppression. Follow-up an......-up analyses of stored plasma samples demonstrated increased activation of both inflammatory and coagulation pathways after stopping ART....

  9. Comprehensive care with antiretroviral therapy for injecting-drug users associates to low community viral load and restriction of HIV outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kivelä

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of HIV was detected amongst Finnish injecting-drug users (IDUs in 1998. The outbreak was caused by CRF01-AE virus [1]. A comprehensive care programme including infectious diseases, addiction medicine, low threshold methadone program, needle exchange, accommodation and other social services started in December 2000. Funding was provided by municipalities. We have described earlier how the outbreak became geographically and socially restricted [2]. The data of newly diagnosed HIV infections in the hospital district of Helsinki and Uusimaa (Helsinki region amongst IDUs and HIV-1 subtypes were obtained from the Finnish national HIV registry. The Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH registry was used to obtain the number of IDUs in HIV care, on antiretroviral therapy (ART, and plasma HIV-1 RNA (VL amongst IDUs. The HUCH registry also includes IDUs diagnosed with HIV infection in other Finnish regions, but currently living in Helsinki region. The highest number (n=65 of newly diagnosed HIV infections among IDUs in Helsinki region was observed in 1999 (Figure 1. Between 1998 and 2011, 249 IDUs were diagnosed with HIV infection. From 1998 to 2004 the subtype was CRF01-AE in 187 (92% cases, other subtypes in 5 (2% cases and not subtyped in 11 (5% cases. From 2005 to 2011 the subtype was CRF01-AE in 25 (54% cases, other subtypes in 15 (33% cases and not subtyped in 6 (13% cases. In 2011 there were 4 IDUs diagnosed with HIV, one of them with CRF01-AE. In the Helsinki region out of 183 HIV-infected IDUs in 2005, 100 (55% had VL<50 copies/ml and out of 167 HIV-infected IDUs in 2011, 133 (80% had VL<50 copies/ml in 2011. We propose that from 2005 the low HIV-1 RNA in plasma of IDUs has contributed to the low incidence of HIV among IDUs in Helsinki region. However, the incidence of HIV started to decline before the decline of VL in the cohort (Figure 1 . This suggests that other factors besides ART may have decreased the risk of HIV infection

  10. Is it time to revise antiretrovirals dosing? a pharmacokinetic viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Dario; Baldelli, Sara; Castoldi, Simone; Charbe, Nitin; Cozzi, Valeria; Fucile, Serena; Clementi, Emilio

    2014-10-23

    We document our experience with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antiretroviral agents (1807 determinations) carried out as day-by-day clinical practice for the optimization of drug dosing in HIV-infected patients. A significant proportion of patients had lopinavir, atazanavir and nevirapine trough concentrations exceeding the upper therapeutic threshold. Further studies are needed to identify good candidates/drugs for TDM, eventually allowing the selection of patients who may benefit from TDM-driven adjustments in antiretrovirals dosage.

  11. Antiretroviral drug-related liver mortality among HIV-positive persons in the absence of hepatitis B or C virus coinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A; Ledergerber, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Liver diseases are the leading causes of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons since the widespread use of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). Most of these deaths are due to hepatitis C (HCV) or B (HBV) virus coinfections. Little is known about other causes. Prolo...

  12. Calendar time trends in the incidence and prevalence of triple-class virologic failure in antiretroviral drug-experienced people with HIV in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Lodwick, Rebecca; Costagliola, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), virologic failure of the 3 original classes [triple-class virologic failure, (TCVF)] still develops in a small minority of patients who started therapy in the triple combination ART era. Trends in the incidence and prevalence of TCVF...

  13. Peripheral neuropathy and antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    2001-03-01

    Patients treated with nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) develop a varying degree of myopathy or neuropathy after long-term therapy. Zidovudine (AZT) causes myopathy; zalcitabine (ddC), didanosine (ddl) and lamuvidine (3TC) cause neuropathy; stavudine (d4T) and fialuridine (FIAU) cause neuropathy or myopathy and lactic acidosis. The tissue distribution of phosphorylases responsible for phosphorylation of NRTIs relates to their selective tissue toxicity. The myopathy is characterized by muscle wasting, myalgia, fatigue, weakness and elevation of CK. The neuropathy is painful, sensory and axonal. In vitro, NRTIs inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase, responsible for replication of mtDNA, and cause mtDNA dysfunction. In vivo, patients treated with AZT, the best studied NRTI, develop a mitochondrial myopathy with mtDNA depletion, deficiency of COX (complex IV), intracellular fat accumulation, high lactate production and marked phosphocreatine depletion, as determined with in vivo MRS spectroscopy, due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Animals or cultured cells treated with NRTIs develop neuropathy, myopathy, or cell destruction with similar changes in the mitochondria. There is evidence that the NRTI-related neuropathy is also due to mitochondrial toxicity. The NRTIs (AZT, ddC, ddl, d4T, 3TC) contain azido groups that compete with natural thymidine triphosphate as substrates of DNA pol-gamma and terminate mtDNA synthesis. In contrast, FIAU that contains 3'-OH groups serves as an alternate substrate for thymidine triphosphate with DNA pol-gamma and is incorporated into the DNA causing permanent mtDNA dysfunction. The NRTI-induced mitochondrial dysfunction has an influence on the clinical application of these agents, especially at high doses and when combined. They have produced in humans a new category of acquired mitochondrial toxins that cause clinical manifestations resembling the genetic mitochondrial disorders.

  14. Counterfeit Electronic Parts Controls in the Department of Defense Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Incidents by Product Resale Value, OCMs (2005-2008). This graph shows the average value of individual counterfeited parts during 2005–2008. Most... counterfeited parts cost $10.00 USD or less. These are small components that are incorporated in the subsystem and system levels of products , and often go...types of counterfeiting that are prevalent for microcircuits. Note the sharp increase in products that are marked as higher grade, and the relatively

  15. Semi-automatic identification of counterfeit offers in online shopping platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Wartner, Christian; Arnold, Patrick; Rahm, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Product counterfeiting is a serious problem causing the industry estimated losses of billions of dollars every year. With the increasing spread of e-commerce, the number of counterfeit products sold online increased substantially. We propose the adoption of a semi-automatic workflow to identify likely counterfeit offers in online platforms and to present these offers to a domain expert for manual verification. The workflow includes steps to generate search queries for relevant product offers,...

  16. Vietnamese Attitudes and Behavioural Patterns towards Counterfeit Brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang Huynh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines Vietnamese female consumers’ attitudes towards counterfeit branded products; by investigating the influence of brand image, product involvement and price advantage towards decision-making processes associated with purchasing and ownership. An inductive anti-positivist approach was adopted, employing qualitative methods; drawing from in-depth interviews distilled and synthesized using Word Cloud software, as Geographic Information System (GIS based Spatial Analyses. Findings suggest that Price Advantage plays a determining and predominant role in encouraging consumers’ purchase intention of a counterfeit product. In addition, Brand Image has positive effect on the purchase intention as well; while product involvement plays no significant role in the process. Further observations point to there being paucity of literature that focuses on Vietnamese and ASEAN markets. With this is mind, a new conceptual framework was developed to reflect the nuances of the Vietnamese consumer experience; which it is suggested will be of value to scholars, practitioners and further studies.

  17. Product Piracy Prevention: Product Counterfeit Detection without Security Labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Horn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Counterfeiting is a challenge to companies, customers and markets all over the world. Besides the economic damage which affects in particular the companies and countries that use advanced production and manufacturing processes based on intensive research and development to produce high quality goods, safety standards are omitted. These standards protect usually the customer from goods which are dangerous or harzardous to health. Product piracy prevention is often followed by the application of RFID tags to supervise supply chains. The lack of robust counterfeit detection methods created a market for artificial security labels which are used to secure the product itself. The specific conditions of production, manufacturing technologies and materials generate specific features, which identify every product uniquely. The innovation of this text is the detection of these features in an automated fashion through the combination of digital sensing and machine learning, rendering the application of artificial security labels obsolete.

  18. Drug-Based Lead Discovery: The Novel Ablative Antiretroviral Profile of Deferiprone in HIV-1-Infected Cells and in HIV-Infected Treatment-Naive Subjects of a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Exploratory Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Saxena

    Full Text Available Antiretrovirals suppress HIV-1 production yet spare the sites of HIV-1 production, the HIV-1 DNA-harboring cells that evade immune detection and enable viral resistance on-drug and viral rebound off-drug. Therapeutic ablation of pathogenic cells markedly improves the outcome of many diseases. We extend this strategy to HIV-1 infection. Using drug-based lead discovery, we report the concentration threshold-dependent antiretroviral action of the medicinal chelator deferiprone and validate preclinical findings by a proof-of-concept double-blind trial. In isolate-infected primary cultures, supra-threshold concentrations during deferiprone monotherapy caused decline of HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 DNA; did not allow viral breakthrough for up to 35 days on-drug, indicating resiliency against viral resistance; and prevented, for at least 87 days off-drug, viral rebound. Displaying a steep dose-effect curve, deferiprone produced infection-independent deficiency of hydroxylated hypusyl-eIF5A. However, unhydroxylated deoxyhypusyl-eIF5A accumulated particularly in HIV-infected cells; they preferentially underwent apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Since the threshold, ascertained at about 150 μM, is achievable in deferiprone-treated patients, we proceeded from cell culture directly to an exploratory trial. HIV-1 RNA was measured after 7 days on-drug and after 28 and 56 days off-drug. Subjects who attained supra-threshold concentrations in serum and completed the protocol of 17 oral doses, experienced a zidovudine-like decline of HIV-1 RNA on-drug that was maintained off-drug without statistically significant rebound for 8 weeks, over 670 times the drug's half-life and thus clearance from circulation. The uniform deferiprone threshold is in agreement with mapping of, and crystallographic 3D-data on, the active site of deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase (DOHH, the eIF5A-hydroxylating enzyme. We propose that deficiency of hypusine-containing eIF5A impedes the translation of m

  19. Medicines informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola: counterfeit and sub-standard antimalarials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertocchi Paola

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of counterfeits and sub-standards in African medicines market is a dramatic problem that causes many deaths each year. The increase of the phenomenon of pharmaceutical counterfeiting is due to the rise of the illegal market and to the impossibility to purchase branded high cost medicines. Methods In this paper the results of a quality control on antimalarial tablet samples purchased in the informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola are reported. The quality control consisted in the assay of active substance by means of validated liquid chromatographic methods, uniformity of mass determination, disintegration and dissolution tests. Moreover, a general evaluation on label and packaging characteristics was performed. Results The results obtained on thirty antimalarial tablet samples containing chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine showed the presence of different kinds of problems: a general problem concerning the packaging (loose tablets, packaging without Producer name, Producer Country and sometimes without expiry date; low content of active substance (in one sample; different, non-declared, active substance (in one sample; sub-standard technological properties and very low dissolution profiles (in about 50% of samples. This last property could affect the bioavailability and bioequivalence in comparison with branded products and could be related to the use of different excipients in formulation or bad storage conditions. Conclusion This paper evidences that the most common quality problem in the analysed samples appears to be the low dissolution profile. Here it is remarked that the presence of the right active substance in the right quantity is not a sufficient condition for a good quality drug. Dissolution test is not less important in a quality control and often evidences in vitro possible differences in therapeutic efficacy among drugs with the same active content. Dissolution

  20. Vietnamese Attitudes and Behavioural Patterns towards Counterfeit Brands

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, Giang; Wilson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines Vietnamese female consumers' attitudes towards counterfeit branded prod- ucts; by investigating the influence of brand image, product involvement and price advantage towards decision-making processes associated with purchasing and ownership. An inductive anti-positivist approach was adopted, employing qualitative methods; drawing from in-depth interviews distilled and synthesized using Word Cloud software, as Geographic Information System (GIS) based Spatial Analyses. Find...

  1. North Korean Counterfeiting of U.S. Currency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-12

    Korean diplomats.15 Counterfeiting of foreign currency is apparently a phenomenon that is not new to the government of North Korea . Seoul’s War...Adventurism: North Korea’s Military-Diplomatic Campaigns,” Korean Journal of Defense Analysis, Vol. XVI, No.2, Fall 2004. Note that the term “Soprano State... Korean National Intelligence Service (NIS) Report to the effect that North Korea forges and circulates U.S. $100 banknotes worth $15 million a year

  2. Destruction of illegal things and devices to contrast the counterfeiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Mario Antinucci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The movement of goods illegal and counterfeit in the circuit of the economy and the labor market, has put in place of criminal policy internal supranational and a primary need of confiscation and destruction in relation to safety issues transnational linked to all forms of counterfeiting, piracy agro-food to fraud in industrial brands of high fashion et similia: from here the major node of the procedure of destruction of goods illegal and counterfeit subject to seizure and confiscation and respect of guarantees communities of the criminal process, especially in the light of the amendment of art. 260, co. 3 bis and ter, c.p.p. with the d.l. 23-5-2008, n. 92 and subsequent amendments (so-called Safety Package. In line with the criminal policy of ''security'', in l. 23-7-2009, n. 99, the so-called Decree Development, between the ''darrangements for the development and the internationalization of enterprises, as well as in the field of energy'' and  wanted to redesign, with analytical provisions of particular edge, the perimeter of the criminal-law protection ''Dei property rights industrial'' through the introduction of four new hypothesis of offenses of counterfeiting (artt. 473, 474, 474 b and c, 517 b and c, c.p. and related hypothesis of obligatory confiscation (art. 474 bis and 517 ter c.p., with implications concerning the regime differentiated penitentiary (art. 4 bis, co. 1 ter, ord. penit. in relation to the cases of belonging to criminal association aimed to commit new offenses referred to in articles 473-474 c.p. (arts. 416 bis, 6º Co., c.p. and 51, co. 3 bis, c.p.p., as well as the regulatory body containing the so-called ''responsability of administrative entities'', within the meaning of art. 19, d.lg. 8-6-2001, n. 231.

  3. Suspect/Counterfeit Items Information Guide for Subcontractors/Suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessmar, Nancy D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-18

    Counterfeiting of industrial and commercial grade items is an international problem that places worker safety, program objectives, expensive equipment, and security at risk. In order to prevent the introduction of Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI), this information sheet is being made available as a guide to assist in the implementation of S/CI awareness and controls, in conjunction with subcontractor's/supplier's quality assurance programs. When it comes to counterfeit goods, including industrial materials, items, and equipment, no market is immune. Some manufactures have been known to misrepresent their products and intentionally use inferior materials and processes to manufacture substandard items, whose properties can significantly cart from established standards and specifications. These substandard items termed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as S/CI, pose immediate and potential threats to the safety of DOE and contractor workers, the public, and the environment. Failure of certain systems and processes caused by an S/CI could also have national security implications at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Nuclear Safety Rules (federal Laws), DOE Orders, and other regulations set forth requirements for DOE contractors to implement effective controls to assure that items and services meet specified requirements. This includes techniques to implement and thereby minimizing the potential threat of entry of S/CI to LANL. As a qualified supplier of goods or services to the LANL, your company will be required to establish and maintain effective controls to prevent the introduction of S/CI to LANL. This will require that your company warrant that all items (including their subassemblies, components, and parts) sold to LANL are genuine (i.e. not counterfeit), new, and unused, and conform to the requirements of the LANL purchase orders/contracts unless otherwise approved in writing to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) contract administrator

  4. Stavudine- and nevirapine-related drug toxicity while on generic fixed-dose antiretroviral treatment: incidence, timing and risk factors in a three-year cohort in Kigali, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griensven, Johan; Zachariah, Rony; Rasschaert, Freya; Mugabo, Jules; Atté, Edi F; Reid, Tony

    2010-02-01

    This cohort study was conducted to report on the incidence, timing and risk factors for stavudine (d4T)- and nevirapine (NVP)-related severe drug toxicity (requiring substitution) with a generic fixed-dose combination under program conditions in Kigali, Rwanda. Probability of 'time to first toxicity-related drug substitution' was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox-proportional hazards modeling was used to identify risk factors. Out of 2190 adults (median follow-up: 1.5 years), d4T was replaced in 175 patients (8.0%) for neuropathy, 69 (3.1%) for lactic acidosis and 157 (7.2%) for lipoatrophy, which was the most frequent toxicity by 3 years of antiretroviral treatment (ART). NVP was substituted in 4.9 and 1.3% of patients for skin rash and hepatotoxicity, respectively. Use of d4T 40 mg was associated with increased risk of lipoatrophy and early (strategies.

  5. Rapid detection and identification of counterfeit and [corrected] adulterated products of synthetic phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors with an atmospheric solids analysis probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Marian; Skilton, St John; Fujimoto, Gordon; Ellor, Nicholas; Plumb, Robert S

    2010-02-01

    The market success of the three approved synthetic phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors for the treatment of erectile dysfunction has led to an explosion in counterfeit versions of these drugs. In parallel a large market has developed for herbal products claimed to be natural alternatives to these synthetic drugs. The herbal products are heavily advertised on the internet and are freely available to purchase without prescription. Furthermore, adulteration of these supposed natural medicines is a very common and serious phenomenon. Recent reports have shown that the adulteration has extended to the analogues of the three approved synthetic PDE-5 inhibitors. An Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe (ASAP) was used for the direct analysis of the counterfeit pharmaceuticals and herbal products. Using the ASAP combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) it was possible to detect fraudulent counterfeit tablets. The physical appearance of the pills resembled the pills from the original manufacturer but contained the wrong active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Detecting adulteration for five herbal supplements marketed as natural alternatives to PDE-5 inhibitors was also possible using the ASAP. Three types of adulteration were found in the five samples: adulteration with tadalafil or sildenafil, mixed adulteration (tadalafil and sildenafil), and adulteration with analogues of these drugs. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.A. Olowookere

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ... in Nigeria (APIN) Plus Antiretroviral Treatment Clinic & Department of Obstetrics and ... therapy (HAART) on body mass index (BMI) and immunological and ... 3 months, had their drug adherence determined using pharmacy ...

  7. 76 FR 48905 - United States Government Inter-Agency Anti-Counterfeiting Working Group: Request for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Comments Regarding Strategy to Eliminate Counterfeit Products from the United States Government Supply... significant effort to eliminate counterfeit products from the U.S. Government supply chain. In June 2010, Vice... counterfeit products entering the U.S. Government supply chain and for curbing their entry into that supply...

  8. China Customs: a wall to keep counterfeits in?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew James; Hurvitz, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes, analyses and evaluates the role and likely impact of using China trade mark and customs law and procedure in the fight against global trade in counterfeited trade mark goods. A fresh look at the geographical source of the global counterfeit industry is well timed amid legi...

  9. Trick or Treat? An Examination of Marketing Relationships in a Nondeceptive Counterfeit Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sarah Hong; Nicholson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Who is most responsible for the proliferation of counterfeit goods--the illicit purveyor of such products or the consumer who procures them? This paper seeks to address this question by presenting a behavior analysis of counterfeit marketing firms in China and the interdependent relationships between legitimate retailers, consumers, and the…

  10. Trick or Treat? An Examination of Marketing Relationships in a Nondeceptive Counterfeit Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sarah Hong; Nicholson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Who is most responsible for the proliferation of counterfeit goods--the illicit purveyor of such products or the consumer who procures them? This paper seeks to address this question by presenting a behavior analysis of counterfeit marketing firms in China and the interdependent relationships between legitimate retailers, consumers, and the…

  11. Identification of Counterfeit Alcoholic Beverages Using Cluster Analysis in Principal-Component Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodasevich, M. A.; Sinitsyn, G. V.; Gres'ko, M. A.; Dolya, V. M.; Rogovaya, M. V.; Kazberuk, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    A study of 153 brands of commercial vodka products showed that counterfeit samples could be identified by introducing a unified additive at the minimum concentration acceptable for instrumental detection and multivariate analysis of UV-Vis transmission spectra. Counterfeit products were detected with 100% probability by using hierarchical cluster analysis or the C-means method in two-dimensional principal-component space.

  12. 78 FR 28780 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Detection and Avoidance of Counterfeit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... potential for an impact on small entities in the supply chain of a prime contractor with contracts subject... suspect counterfeit parts from entering the supply chain when procuring electronic parts or end items... counterfeit electronic parts from the supply chain. Legally authorized source means the current design...

  13. Screening suspected counterfeit Viagra and imitations of Viagra with near-infrared spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenbregt, M J; Blok-Tip, L; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Barends, D M; Kaste, D de

    2006-01-01

    We describe a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method for fast-screening Viagra tablets, counterfeit Viagra tablets, and imitations of Viagra. The method can (1) check the homogeneity of a batch; (2) distinguish counterfeits and imitations from authentic Viagra; (3) screen for the presence of silde

  14. 31 CFR 100.19 - Disposition of counterfeit notes and coins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposition of counterfeit notes and coins. 100.19 Section 100.19 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN Other Information § 100.19 Disposition of counterfeit notes and...

  15. 75 FR 79069 - Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement: Request for Comments From the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES... addressing counterfeiting and piracy. USTR is requesting written comments from the public on the final text... international cooperation, enforcement practices and legal frameworks for addressing counterfeiting and...

  16. Future prospects of luminescent nanomaterial based security inks: from synthesis to anti-counterfeiting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Satbir; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Counterfeiting of valuable documents, currency and branded products is a challenging problem that has serious economic, security and health ramifications for governments, businesses and consumers all over the world. It is estimated that counterfeiting represents a multi-billion dollar underground economy with counterfeit products being produced on a large scale every year. Counterfeiting is an increasingly high-tech crime and calls for high-tech solutions to prevent and deter the acts of counterfeiting. The present review briefly outlines and addresses the key challenges in this area, including the above mentioned concerns for anti-counterfeiting applications. This article describes a unique combination of all possible kinds of security ink formulations based on lanthanide doped luminescent nanomaterials, quantum dots (semiconductor and carbon based), metal organic frameworks as well as plasmonic nanomaterials for their possible use in anti-counterfeiting applications. Moreover, in this review, we have briefly discussed and described the historical background of luminescent nanomaterials, basic concepts and detailed synthesis methods along with their characterization. Furthermore, we have also discussed the methods adopted for the fabrication and design of luminescent security inks, various security printing techniques and their anti-counterfeiting applications.

  17. Counterfeits or Shanzhai? The Role of Face and Brand Consciousness in Luxury Copycat Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Shan, Juan

    2016-08-01

    This study responds to the emergence of the Shanzhai phenomenon in the international marketplace and introduces the Shanzhai phenomenon into the consumer behavior literature by defining it and comparing it with well-known concepts like luxury counterfeits. More specifically, it examines how consumers' face and brand consciousness influence their willingness to buy luxury counterfeits rather than Shanzhai products. The results show that consumers who are more face conscious are more likely to choose luxury counterfeits than Shanzhai products. In addition, consumers' face consciousness elicits a high concern for well-known brands, which also in turn leads to a more favorable attitude toward luxury counterfeits than Shanzhai products. These findings enable researchers to better understand consumers' responses toward both Shanzhai and counterfeit products and help companies that are protecting their original brands to tailor their consumer-directed measures more effectively.

  18. Effects of antiretroviral drugs for prevention of HIV-mother-to-child transmission on hematological parameters and hemoglobin synthesis in HIV-uninfected newborns with and without thalassemia carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongnoi, Rotjanee; Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Sirivatanapa, Pannee; Phanpong, Chotiros; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2013-04-01

    The effects of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs administered to HIV-infected pregnancy on hematological parameters and hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis in ARV-exposed newborns with and without thalassemia carrier and of ARV drugs in worsening anemia in thalassemia carrier newborns are not well understood. Cord blood samples were collected from newborns of HIV-infected and -uninfected pregnancies. Hematological parameters and hemoglobin typing were analyzed by automated blood counter and capillary electrophoresis (CE), respectively. In the group of thalassemia carrier, the ARV-exposed newborns had significantly lower mean levels of red blood cell counts and hematocrit and had significantly higher mean levels of MCH than the ARV-unexposed newborns. Similar results were found in the group of newborns without thalassemia carrier. There were no statistical differences in mean levels of Hb-A₂, Hb-A, Hb-F and Hb-E (when applicable) in ARV-exposed and -unexposed newborns either with or without thalassemia carrier. However, ARV-exposed newborns who were thalassemia carriers had the lowest levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit when compared to the other groups. Therefore, ARV drugs used for prevention of HIV-mother-to-child transmission (HIV-MTCT) altered hematological parameters but did not affect hemoglobin synthesis in newborns with and without thalassemia carrier. However, thalassemia and ARV drugs might have synergetic effect in inducing severe anemia.

  19. Pregnancy may be followed by an inflexion of the immune reconstitution in HIV-infected women who receive antiretroviral drugs before conception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-Moing, Vincent; Taieb, Audrey; Longuet, Pascale; Lewden, Charlotte; Delcey, Véronique; Drobacheff, Marie Christine; Chêne, Geneviève; Leport, Catherine; the ANRS CO8 (APROCO-COPILOTE) study-group

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Whether pregnancy has an impact on evolution of CD4+ cell counts in women treated with highly potent antiretrovirals before conception remains largely unknown. Methods Among patients enrolled in the ANRS CO8 (APROCO/COPILOTE) cohort, we selected all women aged between 18 and 50 years at initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Slopes of CD4+ cell counts during follow-up were estimated using mixed longitudinal models with time-dependent indicators for pregnancy and delivery. Results Among the 260 selected HIV-infected women, a pregnancy occurred among 39 during a median follow-up of 66 months. Women who became pregnant had higher CD4+ cell count at baseline but this difference was progressively blurred during follow-up because they had a slower increase than women who did not become pregnant. The estimated slope of CD4+ cell count decreased significantly from +2.3 cells/mm3/month before pregnancy and in women who did not become pregnant to − 0.04 cells/mm3/month after delivery (p = 0.0003). Conclusion A significant increase in CD4+ cell count may be preferable before pregnancy in women treated with cART, in order to overcome the evolution observed after pregnancy. PMID:18795961

  20. Integrated circuit authentication hardware Trojans and counterfeit detection

    CERN Document Server

    Tehranipoor, Mohammad; Zhang, Xuehui

    2013-01-01

    This book describes techniques to verify the authenticity of integrated circuits (ICs). It focuses on hardware Trojan detection and prevention and counterfeit detection and prevention. The authors discuss a variety of detection schemes and design methodologies for improving Trojan detection techniques, as well as various attempts at developing hardware Trojans in IP cores and ICs. While describing existing Trojan detection methods, the authors also analyze their effectiveness in disclosing various types of Trojans, and demonstrate several architecture-level solutions. 

  1. Prevalence and effect of pre-treatment drug resistance on the virological response to antiretroviral treatment initiated in HIV-infected children - a EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC joint project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Wittkop, Linda; Judd, Ali

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated the impact of pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR) on response to combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in children. The objective of this joint EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC/PENTA project was to assess the prevalence of PDR mutations and their association...... algorithm to infer resistance to prescribed drugs. Time to virological failure (VF) was defined as the first of two consecutive HIV-RNA > 500 copies/mL after 6 months cART and was assessed by Cox proportional hazards models. All models were adjusted for baseline demographic, clinical, immunology.......7-5.7). Of 37 children (7.8 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 5.5-10.6) harboring a virus with ≥1 PDR mutations, 30 children had a virus resistant to ≥1 of the prescribed drugs. Overall, the cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for virological failure was 19.8 % (95 %CI, 16.4-23.9). Cumulative risk for VF tended...

  2. Effects of treatment with suppressive combination antiretroviral drug therapy and the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid; (SAHA on SIV-infected Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhua Ling

    Full Text Available Viral reservoirs-persistent residual virus despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART-remain an obstacle to cure of HIV-1 infection. Difficulty studying reservoirs in patients underscores the need for animal models that mimics HIV infected humans on cART. We studied SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (Ch-RM treated with intensive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART and 3 weeks of treatment with the histone deacetyalse inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA.SIVmac251 infected Ch-RM received reverse transcriptase inhibitors PMPA and FTC and integrase inhibitor L-870812 beginning 7 weeks post infection. Integrase inhibitor L-900564 and boosted protease inhibitor treatment with Darunavir and Ritonavir were added later. cART was continued for 45 weeks, with daily SAHA administered for the last 3 weeks, followed by euthanasia/necropsy. Plasma viral RNA and cell/tissue-associated SIV gag RNA and DNA were quantified by qRT-PCR/qPCR, with flow cytometry monitoring changes in immune cell populations.Upon cART initiation, plasma viremia declined, remaining <30 SIV RNA copy Eq/ml during cART, with occasional blips. Decreased viral replication was associated with decreased immune activation and partial restoration of intestinal CD4+ T cells. SAHA was well tolerated but did not result in demonstrable treatment-associated changes in plasma or cell associated viral parameters.The ability to achieve and sustain virological suppression makes cART-suppressed, SIV-infected Ch-RM a potentially useful model to evaluate interventions targeting residual virus. However, despite intensive cART over one year, persistent viral DNA and RNA remained in tissues of all three animals. While well tolerated, three weeks of SAHA treatment did not demonstrably impact viral RNA levels in plasma or tissues; perhaps reflecting dosing, sampling and assay limitations.

  3. Dynamics of counterfeit alcohol and tobacco goods in the Tatarstan Republic market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg R. Karatayev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to identify and assess the share of counterfeit products in the total volume of alcohol and tobacco products in the consumer market of Tatarstan Republic which will allow the inspection bodies to deal more effectively to prevent the spreading of counterfeit products. Methods the research proposed in this paper used methods of probability theory and mathematical statistics and the method of sampling analysis of certificates for products in accordance with applicable laws and regulations of Rosstandart. Results basing on a sampling of certificates for products directly from retail outlets analysis of the state alcohol and tobacco consumer market of Tatarstan was carried out. Improper filling of the form of the certificate for products was identified violating all existing norms and laws which are strictly prescribed in technical regulations. On the basis of these violations the validity of certificates for products was assessed and the conclusion was made about the products quality. The share of counterfeit alcohol and tobacco products in the total sales in the consumer market was assessed. The shortcomings of the inspection authorities to detect counterfeit products were identified. Scientific novelty the consumer market was researched basing on the method of sampling using probability theory and mathematical statistics to estimate the share of counterfeit alcohol and tobacco products in the consumer market of Tatarstan. The error sampling for counterfeit products in the consumer market was defined. Practical significance the obtained results will allow the inspection authorities to better and more accurately identify counterfeit goods and to restrict the access of counterfeit alcohol and tobacco products to the consumer market of Tatarstan. It is necessary to strengthen the role of state regulation of commercial activities in the consumer market of Russia to stop the flow of counterfeit alcohol and tobacco products to the consumer

  4. Analyzing factors Affecting Consumers’ Attitude & Intention to Purchase Counterfeit products of luxury Brands In clothing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Ebrahimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the world trends growing alarmingly is Producing, distributing & Consuming counterfeit goods of Credible & luxury brands & one of the industries facing this crisis increasingly is clothing industry. Based on this, the present study aims to analyze & identify factors influencing Consumers’ attitude toward counterfeit products & intention to purchase such products in clothing industry that has been done in Sari, Mazandaran. And in it, these Factors effect on attitude toward counterfeit products & then the impact of attitude toward counterfeit products on intention to buy such products have been measured. The study method is a Survey type & in order to collect study data, a questionnaire designed with a combination of different available resources in literature has been used. To achieve the study goals, 384 individuals who purchased counterfeit products intentionally were chosen from Sari. To analyze data & test hypotheses, Study model & questionnaire, Cronbach's alpha coefficient tests, Structural Equations Modeling (SEM, Confirmatory Factorial Analysis (CFA & one-way Variance analysis (ANONA have been applied & two Software Packages SPSS & LISREL were used. Through reviewing the literature available & analyzing experts’ views, generally, 11 variables have been identified: Personal gratification, Value consciousness, Price–quality inference, Social Effect, Brand prestige, Brand Loyalty, Ethical Issues, Risk averseness, Subjective norm, perceived risk, Brand consciousness, as the influencing factors on attitude toward counterfeit products. Study Findings have indicated that the factors as Personal gratification, Value consciousness, Price–quality inference, Social Effect, Ethical Issues, Subjective norm, perceived risk, Brand consciousness, have meaningful effect on attitude to counterfeit products & the impact of Brand prestige, Brand Loyalty, Risk averseness, was not meaningfull on view about counterfeit products. Besides, the

  5. Analyzing factors Affecting Consumers’ Attitude & Intention to Purchase Counterfeit products of luxury Brands In clothing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abdolhamid ebrahimi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the world trends growing alarmingly is Producing, distributing & Consuming counterfeit goods of Credible & luxury brands & one of the industries facing this crisis increasingly is clothing industry. Based on this, the present study aims to analyze & identify factors influencing Consumers’ attitude toward counterfeit products & intention to purchase such products in clothing industry that has been done in Sari, Mazandaran. And in it, these Factors effect on attitude toward counterfeit products & then the impact of attitude toward counterfeit products on intention to buy such products have been measured. The study method is a Survey type & in order to collect study data, a questionnaire designed with a combination of different available resources in literature has been used. To achieve the study goals, 384 individuals who purchased counterfeit products intentionally were chosen from Sari. To analyze data & test hypotheses, Study model & questionnaire, Cronbach's alpha coefficient tests, Structural Equations Modeling (SEM, Confirmatory Factorial Analysis (CFA & one-way Variance analysis (ANONA have been applied & two Software Packages SPSS & LISREL were used. Through reviewing the literature available & analyzing experts’ views, generally, 11 variables have been identified: Personal gratification, Value consciousness, Price–quality inference, Social Effect, Brand prestige, Brand Loyalty, Ethical Issues, Risk averseness, Subjective norm, perceived risk, Brand consciousness, as the influencing factors on attitude toward counterfeit products. Study Findings have indicated that the factors as Personal gratification, Value consciousness, Price–quality inference, Social Effect, Ethical Issues, Subjective norm, perceived risk, Brand consciousness, have meaningful effect on attitude to counterfeit products & the impact of Brand prestige, Brand Loyalty, Risk averseness, was not meaningfull on view about counterfeit products. Besides, the

  6. Morphological and microscopic identification studies of Cordyceps and its counterfeits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-juan Liu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Macroscopic and microscopic studies were applied to distinguish Cordyceps sinensis (Berk. Sacc. and its 5 common counterfeits. Transverse sections of stroma and larvae and surface sections of stroma of C. sinensis, Cordyceps gunnii, Cordyceps barnesii, Cordyceps gracilis, Cordyceps liangshanensis and Cordyceps militaris were examined and their morphological and microscopic features photographed. The main morphological and microscopic features of the 6 species of Cordyceps were basically similar except for certain diagnostic differences. These included macroscopic differences from C. sinensis as follows: the stroma of C. gunnii is stout and rough with sterile bulgy or branched apex; the larvae of C. barnesii has a pair of teeth on the head; the stroma of C. liangshanensi is thread-like; C. gracilis is without stroma; and C. militaris is without larvae. There were also microscopic differences: from C. sinensis as follows: the stroma of C. barnesii is without perithecia; C. gunnii, C. liangshanensis and C. gracilis are without bristles on the larva body. These differences allow C. sinensis and its counterfeits to be easily distinguished.

  7. An Anti-Counterfeiting RFID Privacy Protection Protocol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolan Zhang; Brian King

    2007-01-01

    The privacy problem of many RFID systems has been extensively studied. Yet integrity in RFID has notreceived much attention as regular computer systems. When we evaluate an identification protocol for an RFID system foranti-counterfeiting, it is important to consider integrity issues. Moreover, many RFID systems are accessed by multiple leveltrust parties, which makes comprehensive integrity protection even harder. In this paper, we first propose an integrity modelfor RFID protocols. Then we use the model to analyze the integrity problems in Squealing Euros protocol. Squealing Euroswas proposed by Juels and Pappu for RFID enabled banknotes that will support anti-forgery and lawful tracing yet preserveindividual's privacy. We analyze its integrity, we then discuss the problems that arise and propose some solutions to theseproblems. Then an improved protocol with integrity protection for the law enforcement is constructed, which includes anunforgeable binding between the banknote serial number and the RF ciphertext only readable to law enforcement. This sameprotocol can be applied in many other applications which require a privacy protecting anti-counterfeiting mechanism.

  8. Comparing two service delivery models for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT of HIV during transition from single-dose nevirapine to multi-drug antiretroviral regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugwaneza Placidie

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV has been eliminated from the developed world with the introduction of multi-drug antiretroviral (md-ARV regimens for the prevention of MTCT (PMTCT; but remains the major cause of HIV infection among sub-Saharan African children. This study compares two service delivery models of PMTCT interventions and documents the lessons learned and the challenges encountered during the transition from single-dose nevirapine (sd-nvp to md-ARV regimens in a resource-limited setting. Methods Program data collected from 32 clinical sites was used to describe trends and compare the performance (uptake of HIV testing, CD4 screening and ARV regimens initiated during pregnancy of sites providing PMTCT as a stand-alone service (stand-alone site versus sites providing PMTCT as well as antiretroviral therapy (ART (full package site. CD4 cell count screening, enrolment into ART services and the initiation of md-ARV regimens during pregnancy, including dual (zidovudine [AZT] +sd-nvp prophylaxis and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART were analysed. Results From July 2006 to December 2008, 1,622 pregnant women tested HIV positive (HIV+ during antenatal care (ANC. CD4 cell count screening during pregnancy increased from 60% to 70%, and the initiation of md-ARV regimens increased from 35.5% to 97% during this period. In 2008, women attending ANC at full package sites were 30% more likely to undergo CD4 cell count assessment during pregnancy than women attending stand-alone sites (relative risk (RR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.1-1.4. Enrolment of HIV+ pregnant women in ART services was almost twice as likely at full package sites than at stand-alone sites (RR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.5-2.3. However, no significant differences were detected between the two models of care in providing md-ARV (RR = 0.9; 95% CI: 0.9-1.0. Conclusions All sites successfully transitioned from sd-nvp to md-ARV regimens for PMTCT

  9. 77 FR 47652 - Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ..., protecting patients from counterfeit and other substandard drugs/supply chain threats, and others. The goal.... 112-144) and an overview of FDA's Network of Experts (public/private partnerships). The afternoon...

  10. Incidence of antiretroviral adverse drug reactions in pregnant women in two referral centers for HIV prevention of mother-to-child-transmission care and research in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Santini-Oliveira

    Full Text Available Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection remains an important cause of new HIV infections worldwide, especially in low and middle-resource limited countries. Safety data from studies involving pregnant women and prenatal antiretroviral (ARV exposure are still needed once these studies are often small and with a limited duration to assess adverse drug reactions (ADR. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of ADR related to the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART in pregnant women in two referral centers in Rio de Janeiro State. A prospective study was carried out from February 2005 to May 2006. Women were classified according to their ART status during pregnancy diagnosis: ARV-experienced (ARTexp or ARV-naïve (ARTn. Two hundred fourteen HIV-infected pregnant women were included: 36 ARTexp and 178 ARTn. ARTexp women have not experienced ADR. Among ARTn, 20.2% presented ADR. Incidence rate of ADR was 70.8 per 1000 person-months and the most common ADRs observed were: gastrointestinal (belly or abdominal cramps, diarrhea, nausea and vomit in 16.3%, cutaneous (pruritus and rash in 6.2%, anemia (2.2% and hepatitis (1.7%. The frequency of obstetrical complications, pre-term delivery, low birth weight and birth abnormalities was low in this population. ADRs ranged from mild to moderate intensity, none of them being potentially fatal. Only in a few cases it was necessary to discontinue ART. In conclusion, the high effectiveness of ARV for HIV prevention of MTCT (PMTCT overcomes the risk of ADR.

  11. Optimizing HIV drug therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Calmy, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of drugs used in HIV-infected patients has dramatically changed since triple antiretroviral combinations were introduced, albeit at the expense of some severe adverse events, in 1996. Long term complications of antiretroviral drug exposure, such as HIV lipodystrophy, as well as organ-specific disease of heart and bone are, therefore, a critical issue when designing antiretroviral regimens. Because it is difficult to predict the occurrence of lipodystrophy, and because there is no...

  12. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death Acesso de usuários de drogas injetáveis ao tratamento anti-retroviral altamente potente: aderência, resistência e mortalidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.Os usuários de drogas injetáveis (UDI ainda representam um importante grupo de risco para a infecção pelo HIV no mundo em geral, além de constituir o grupo central das epidemias de HIV na Ásia e no Leste Europeu e Rússia. Os programas de prevenção do HIV variam, desde a testagem sorológica e aconselhamento, educação, intervenções comportamentais e em redes, tratamento da dependência química, desinfecção de agulhas com água sanitária, troca de agulhas e ampliação do acesso a seringas, além da redução da transição ao uso injetável e a prevenção primária da dependência química. Com o advento da terapia anti-retroviral altamente potente (HAART, em 1996, houve uma melhora clínica dramática. Além disso, o impacto do tratamento

  13. IN IDENTIFYING FAKE AND SUBSTANDARD DRUGS IN NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control ... NAFDAC's choice of MAS as a new strategy in identifying fake and substandard drugs in. Nigeria. .... As a result, cloning of fast moving drugs is so perfect that even .... Some of the factors encouraging counterfeiting of drugs in Nigeria include:.

  14. Long-Term Durability of Tenofovir-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in Relation to the Co-Administration of Other Drug Classes in Routine Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Stefano; Madeddu, Giordano; Maggiolo, Franco; Antinori, Andrea; Galli, Massimo; Di Perri, Giovanni; Viale, Pierluigi; d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Gori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In clinical trials, toxicity leading to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) discontinuation is rare (3% by 2 years); however in clinical practice it seems to be higher, particularly when TDF is co-administered with ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/r). Aims of this study were to assess the rate of TDF discontinuations in clinical practice and to identify factors associated with the risk of stopping TDF. Methods All antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naive patients initiating a TDF-based regimen were selected from the ICONA Foundation Study cohort. The primary outcome was TDF discontinuation regardless of the reason; secondary outcome measures were TDF discontinuation due to toxicity and selective TDF discontinuation (that is, TDF discontinuation or substitution, maintaining unchanged the remaining antiretroviral treatment). Results 3,618 ART-naïve patients were included: 54% started a PI/r-based and 46% a NNRTI-based based regimen. Two-hundred-seventy-seven patients discontinued TDF and reintroduced ART within 30 days without TDF. The probability of TDF discontinuation regardless of the reason was of 7.4% (95%CI:6.4–8.5) by 2 years and 14.1% (95%CI:12.2–16.1) by 5 years. The 5-year KM estimates in the PI/r vs. NNRTI group were 20.4% vs. 7.6%, respectively (log-rank p = 0.0001), for the outcome of stopping regardless of the reason, and 10.7% vs. 4.7% (p = 0.0001) for discontinuation due to toxicity. PI/r use and lower eGFR were associated with an increased risk of discontinuing TDF. Conclusion In our cohort, the frequency of TDF discontinuations was higher than that observed in clinical trials. Co-administration of TDF with PI/r was associated with an increased rate of TDF discontinuations. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms that might have led to this outcome. PMID:27716843

  15. Future implications: Compliance and failure with antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Atul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV management is currently in an era of effective, potent antiretroviral therapy. Modern drug discovery and development have transformed HIV-1 disease into a treatable, chronic infectious disease. Complete suppression of viral replication is critical for long-term durability of antiretroviral therapy. Partial suppression, even at very low levels, is likely to lead to virologic failure and ultimately to the appearance of drug resistance. The relationship between adherence and resistance to HIV antiretroviral therapy is more complex than to state ′non-adherence increases the risk of drug resistance.′ In many patients who fail to respond to initial therapy, the primary reason for failure is their inability to take the prescribed drug regimen or nonadherence.

  16. Antiretroviral therapy supply chain quality control and assurance in improving people living with HIV therapeutic outcomes in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djobet, M P Ngogang; Singhe, David; Lohoue, Julienne; Kuaban, Christopher; Ngogang, Jeanne; Tambo, Ernest

    2017-04-04

    Evaluation of medication efficacy and safety is an essential guarantee to successful therapeutic outcome in public health practices. However, larger distribution chain supply in developing countries such as Cameroon is often challenged by counterfeit drugs, poor manufacturing, storage and degradation leading to health and patient adverse consequences. Yet, access to supply chain management in strengthening ARVs quality assurance and outcomes remains poorly documented. More than 53,000 patients have been enrolled on free ARVs medications, but little is documented on quality assurance and validity of safety for affected populations along the supply chain management since 2008. The cross sectional study was conducted in ARVs distribution units and centers in central, littoral and south west regions of Cameroon. ARVs drugs samples included Nevirapine, Efavirenz, and fixed dose combinations of Zidovudine + Lamivudine, Lamivudine + Stavudine and Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine. Drugs packaging and labeling was assessed and galenic assays were performed at National Laboratory of quality Control of Medications and Expertise (LANACOME), Yaoundé, Cameroon. The study covered 16 structures located in eight different towns including the central ARVs store, two regional pharmaceutical procurement centers and thirteen HIV approved treatment centers and management units. A total of 35 ARVs products were collected. Only eight ARVs drugs containing Lamivudine and Stavudine presented with white stains on tablets, however these drugs were standard for all other tests performed. The others 28 ARVs products were standards to all assays performed. We concluded that ARVs drugs freely accessible and distributed to PLWHA are of good quality in Cameroon. However, with the increase number of patients under HAART since 2013, adoption of "Test and Treat" approach to reach the 90-90-90 goals and with the implementation of new national antiretroviral regimen guidelines and molecules

  17. Recent developments in counterfeits and imitations of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. A 2005-2006 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venhuis BJ; Barends DM; Zwaagstra ME; Kaste D de; Douane Laboratorium; KCF

    2007-01-01

    A strong trend is observed towards increasingly professional counterfeits and imitations of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra, with regard to the appearance of tablets, capsules and packaging. The professional presentation will deceive potential consumers into assuming these products are legal, efficacious

  18. IdentificationofRhubarbandItsCounterfeitSpecies%大黄及其伪品的鉴别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏银贵; 李建; 程培秀

    2013-01-01

    Objective Discriminate and distinguish the rhubarb and its counterfeit species, guarantee the clinical medicines safety and effective. Methods Distinguish the rhubarb from the counterfeit species according to the morphological character and physicochemical characteristics. Result The rhubarb and its counterfeit species are different in either appearance characters or physicochemical characteristics. Conclusion The above methods could be used for distinguishing the genuine and counterfeit of rhubarb.%  目的鉴别大黄真伪,确保临床用药安全、有效。方法通过药材性状和理化特征进行鉴别。结果大黄及其伪品无论在外观性状还是理化反应特征方面都存在较大的差异。结论通过以上方法可以区分正品与伪品。

  19. Recent developments in counterfeits and imitations of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. A 2005-2006 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venhuis BJ; Barends DM; Zwaagstra ME; Kaste D de; Douane Laboratorium; KCF

    2007-01-01

    A strong trend is observed towards increasingly professional counterfeits and imitations of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra, with regard to the appearance of tablets, capsules and packaging. The professional presentation will deceive potential consumers into assuming these products are legal, efficacious

  20. Risk factors, management and outcomes of adverse drug reactions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors, management and outcomes of adverse drug reactions in adult patients on antiretrovirals at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. ... interventions and outcomes of documented adverse drug reaction after exposure to antiretrovirals.

  1. Investigation of lead and cadmium in counterfeit cigarettes seized in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; von Lampe, Klaus; Wood, Laura; Kurti, Marin

    2015-07-01

    Information of toxic elements such as lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) in counterfeit cigarettes offers insight on the potential public health impact of consuming counterfeit cigarettes and the technology used by counterfeiters in the illicit cigarette trade. In this study, the concentration of Pb and Cd in twenty-three packs of counterfeit cigarettes seized in the US by various law enforcement agencies were evaluated and compared with their genuine equivalents using microwave digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Both Pb and Cd concentration in counterfeit cigarettes were markedly higher than those in their genuine equivalents, and exhibited greater sample to sample variability. The average Pb and Cd mass fraction values in counterfeit cigarettes were (5.13 ± 2.50) mg/kg (n = 23) and (5.13 ± 1.95) mg/kg (n = 23) respectively, compared with (0.59 ± 0.08) mg/kg (n = 9) and (1.08 ± 0.08) mg/kg (n = 9) respectively in the genuine equivalents. Results suggest that counterfeit cigarettes may impose higher risks to public health. Studying these toxic elements could provide important information regarding the illicit trade, including the level of organization among counterfeiters, who broker between availability of supplies and consumer demand for a cheaper product that is assumed to be genuine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementation Plan for Tank Farm Transition Projects Suspect and Counterfeit Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRUE, R.R.

    2000-03-16

    This plan is designed to provide an appropriate level of confidence that Tank Farm Transition Projects (TFTP) facilities will be evaluated to assess the presence of suspect/counterfeit items. It is intended to identify suspect/counterfeit items that are presently in inventory and provide for the reporting and disposition of those items. Items which have been installed will also receive appropriate evaluation using a graded approach to achieve optimum results balanced against safety considerations and cost effectiveness.

  3. INITIATING ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    annaline

    2005-09-02

    Sep 2, 2005 ... when to initiate highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in adults is based on the 2002 WHO ... incident cases of tuberculosis, about a third of cases presented with CD4 counts > 500 ... generation. In September 2003 the ...

  4. Growth of Scytalidium sp. in a counterfeit bevacizumab bottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Garcia-Aguirre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After drawing a dose from an closed bevacizumab (Avastin bottle, a fungus-like foreign body was observed inside. Samples from the vial were cultured in Sabouraud Emmons media. Growth of multiple light brown colonies with dark pigment was observed after 10 days. The species was identified as Scytalidium sp.Vial, analysis reported that the seal was lacking proper identification measures and that the label, batch number and expiry date did not correspond to a genuine product. Chemical analysis showed no protein, but 3% of polyethylene glycol, citrate and ethanol. Counterfeit bevacizumab is a real situation that poses a significant risk for ophthalmology and oncology patients. The medical community should be aware of this situation in order to enforce adequate preventive measures.

  5. Screen-printed nanoparticles as anti-counterfeiting tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Cuerva, Carlos; Zieba, Maciej; Sebastian, Victor; Martínez, Gema; Sese, Javier; Irusta, Silvia; Contamina, Vicente; Arruebo, Manuel; Santamaria, Jesus

    2016-03-04

    Metallic nanoparticles with different physical properties have been screen printed as authentication tags on different types of paper. Gold and silver nanoparticles show unique optical signatures, including sharp emission bandwidths and long lifetimes of the printed label, even under accelerated weathering conditions. Magnetic nanoparticles show distinct physical signals that depend on the size of the nanoparticle itself. They were also screen printed on different substrates and their magnetic signals read out using a magnetic pattern recognition sensor and a vibrating sample magnetometer. The novelty of our work lies in the demonstration that the combination of nanomaterials with optical and magnetic properties on the same printed support is possible, and the resulting combined signals can be used to obtain a user-configurable label, providing a high degree of security in anti-counterfeiting applications using simple commercially-available sensors.

  6. Chemical interactions study of antiretroviral drugs efavirenz and lamivudine concerning the development of stable fixed-dose combination formulations for AIDS treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Elionai C. de L.; Mussel, Wagner N.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Yoshida, Maria I., E-mail: mirene@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Quimica; Fialho, Silvia L.; Barbosa, Jamile; Fialho, Silvia L. [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    Lamivudine and efavirenz are among the most worldwide used drugs for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatment. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo-optical analysis (TOA) were used to study possible interactions between these drugs, aiming the development of a fixed-dose drug combination. DSC and TOA have evidenced significant shifts on the melting points of both drugs in the mixture, which may be due to interaction between them. Although DSC and TOA results indicated incompatibility between the drugs, FTIR spectra were mostly unmodified due to overlapping peaks. The ssNMR analyses showed significant changes in chemical shifts values of the mixture when compared with spectra of pure drugs, especially in the signals relating to the deficient electron carbon atoms of both drugs. These results confirm the interactions suggested by DSC and TOA, which is probably due to acid-base interactions between electronegative and deficient electron atoms of both lamivudine and efavirenz. (author)

  7. Analysis of Antiretrovirals in Single Hair Strands for Evaluation of Drug Adherence with Infrared-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Elias P.; Thompson, Corbin G.; Bokhart, Mark T.; Prince, Heather M.A.; Sykes, Craig; Muddiman, David C.; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to a drug regimen can be a strong predictor of health outcomes, and validated measures of adherence are necessary at all stages of therapy from drug development to prescription. Many of the existing metrics of drug adherence (e.g., self-report, pill counts, blood monitoring) have limitations, and analysis of hair strands has recently emerged as an objective alternative. Traditional methods of hair analysis based on LC–MS/MS (segmenting strands at ≥1 cm length) are not capable of pre...

  8. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesellassie M Bezabhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Semi-structured interview