WorldWideScience

Sample records for counteracts cross-orientation contrast

  1. CONTRAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Krogsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon.......Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon....

  2. Discourse on corruption counteraction in network trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid A. Zhigun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the specific forms of corruption and promising methods to counteract corruption in network trade. Methods the combination of inductive observations comparisons generalizations facts and trends of corruption in network trade with a logical analytical deduction of economic theories and the corruption concept are the basis of the study and provide an opportunity on the one hand to assess the level of compliance of theoretical concepts of corruption with the practice and on the other handnbsp to determine their applicability to organize opposition and create conditions to prevent its occurrence to summarize the features of corruption in the form of a kickback the discourse method was applied in this work. Results on the basis of theoretical provisions and facts of corruption in trade it is proved that it has typical characteristics of corruption in commercial and nonprofit organizations. The key reasons are identified why corruption occurs in trade. Among them supply of poor quality goods at inflated prices leading to bribery in the form of laquopersonal bonusraquo to administrator of the trading organization when selling goods by an unscrupulous supplier and also supply goods to the trade organizations which will not buy without kickback. Most of these corrupt deals are carried out by natural monopolies in the form of state and municipal procurement. In some cases the kickback is the argument stimulating the decision to introduce new and advanced technologies. The factors that lead to corruption in trade are listed and reasonable methods to counteract it are grounded allowing to create conditions for its eradication in other branches of business as well. Scientific novelty for the first time a generalization has been made about the deficit as the driving force in the mechanism when the bribegivers and bribetakers change places. Practical significance the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in the

  3. Electrical stimulation counteracts muscle decline in seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Helmut; Barberi, Laura; Löfler, Stefan; Sbardella, Simona; Burggraf, Samantha; Fruhmann, Hannah; Carraro, Ugo; Mosole, Simone; Sarabon, Nejc; Vogelauer, Michael; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Cvecka, Jan; Romanello, Vanina; Pietrangelo, Laura; Protasi, Feliciano; Sandri, Marco; Zampieri, Sandra; Musaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The loss in muscle mass coupled with a decrease in specific force and shift in fiber composition are hallmarks of aging. Training and regular exercise attenuate the signs of sarcopenia. However, pathologic conditions limit the ability to perform physical exercise. We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES) is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function. We analyzed, at functional, structural, and molecular level, the effects of ES training on healthy seniors with normal life style, without routine sport activity. ES was able to improve muscle torque and functional performances of seniors and increased the size of fast muscle fibers. At molecular level, ES induced up-regulation of IGF-1 and modulation of MuRF-1, a muscle-specific atrophy-related gene. ES also induced up-regulation of relevant markers of differentiating satellite cells and of extracellular matrix remodeling, which might guarantee shape and mechanical forces of trained skeletal muscle as well as maintenance of satellite cell function, reducing fibrosis. Our data provide evidence that ES is a safe method to counteract muscle decline associated with aging.

  4. ISG15 counteracts Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Impens, Francis; Ribet, David; Quereda, Juan J; Nam Tham, To; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Bierne, Hélène; Dussurget, Olivier; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-stimulated, linear di-ubiquitin-like protein, with anti-viral activity. The role of ISG15 during bacterial infection remains elusive. We show that ISG15 expression in nonphagocytic cells is dramatically induced upon Listeria infection. Surprisingly this induction can be type I interferon independent and depends on the cytosolic surveillance pathway, which senses bacterial DNA and signals through STING, TBK1, IRF3 and IRF7. Most importantly, we observed that ISG15 expression restricts Listeria infection in vitro and in vivo. We made use of stable isotope labeling in tissue culture (SILAC) to identify ISGylated proteins that could be responsible for the protective effect. Strikingly, infection or overexpression of ISG15 leads to ISGylation of ER and Golgi proteins, which correlates with increased secretion of cytokines known to counteract infection. Together, our data reveal a previously uncharacterized ISG15-dependent restriction of Listeria infection, reinforcing the view that ISG15 is a key component of the innate immune response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06848.001 PMID:26259872

  5. Associative Interactions in Crowded Solutions of Biopolymers Counteract Depletion Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Joost; Foschepoth, David; te Brinke, Esra; Boersma, Arnold J; Imamura, Hiromi; Rivas, Germán; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2015-10-14

    The cytosol of Escherichia coli is an extremely crowded environment, containing high concentrations of biopolymers which occupy 20-30% of the available volume. Such conditions are expected to yield depletion forces, which strongly promote macromolecular complexation. However, crowded macromolecule solutions, like the cytosol, are very prone to nonspecific associative interactions that can potentially counteract depletion. It remains unclear how the cytosol balances these opposing interactions. We used a FRET-based probe to systematically study depletion in vitro in different crowded environments, including a cytosolic mimic, E. coli lysate. We also studied bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments under identical crowded conditions as a probe for depletion interactions at much larger overlap volumes of the probe molecule. The FRET probe showed a more compact conformation in synthetic crowding agents, suggesting strong depletion interactions. However, depletion was completely negated in cell lysate and other protein crowding agents, where the FRET probe even occupied slightly more volume. In contrast, bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments proceeded as readily in E. coli lysate and other protein solutions as in synthetic crowding agents. Our experimental results and model suggest that, in crowded biopolymer solutions, associative interactions counterbalance depletion forces for small macromolecules. Furthermore, the net effects of macromolecular crowding will be dependent on both the size of the macromolecule and its associative interactions with the crowded background.

  6. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Contrast Materials What are contrast materials and how do they ... material? Pregnancy and contrast materials What are contrast materials and how do they work? Contrast materials, also ...

  7. Sustainability and Counteracting Factors to Profit Rate Decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ougaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses sustainability implications of barriers to growth as specified in the theory of the long-term falling rate of profit but focusing on the counteracting factors (CFs) specified by Marx. These depend much on political processes and are important in state theory for understanding...... policies of national and international institutions. Fourteen partly overlapping factors are identified and grouped in five categories: increased pressure on labor, geographical expansion, resource efficiency, technological progress, and destruction or devaluation of capital. It is suggested...... which implies a destruction of capital that will counteract the falling rate of profit. This will require sustained political intervention....

  8. Counteracting Age Stereotypes: A Self-Awareness Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiwei; Pethtel, Olivia; Ma, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    The major goals of the present study were to (a) examine age differences in susceptibility to age stereotypes and (b) test a self-awareness manipulation in counteracting age stereotypes. Young and older adults read two sets of descriptors that only differed in the to-be-ignored age-related information. In the high self-awareness condition,…

  9. To what extent can cirrus seeding counteract global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Blaz; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-04-01

    The idea of modifying cirrus clouds to directly counteract greenhouse gas warming has gained a lot of momentum in recent years, despite large disputes over its physical feasibility. We use the ECHAM-HAM general circulation model to evaluate the temperature and precipitation responses to cirrus thinning by seeding with efficient ice nucleating particles and increasing ice crystal sedimentation velocities in a 1.5xCO2 world. The seeding scenario can counteract about 40% of the warming and precipitation increase induced by 1.5 x CO2 concentrations with respect to present day values. The idealized ice crystal sedimentation velocity increase scenario on the other hand fully restores the global annual temperature but counteracts only half of the precipitation increase. Moreover, we define a climate damage function, quadratic in temperature and precipitation anomalies to calculate the damage of the different scenarios in 21 selected land regions. Seeding can decrease about 55% of the CO2 induced damage, while the sedimentation velocity increase can counteract about 95% of the damage. A regional analysis shows the negative responses of seeding are minimal both in terms of precipitation and temperature, which makes cirrus seeding an attractive geoengineering method.

  10. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vif N-Terminal Residues Selectively Counteract Feline APOBEC3s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qinyong; Zhang, Zeli; Cano Ortiz, Lucía; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif protein counteracts feline APOBEC3s (FcaA3s) restriction factors by inducing their proteasomal degradation. The functional domains in FIV Vif for interaction with FcaA3s are poorly understood. Here, we have identified several motifs in FIV Vif that are important for selective degradation of different FcaA3s. Cats (Felis catus) express three types of A3s: single-domain A3Z2, single-domain A3Z3, and double-domain A3Z2Z3. We proposed that FIV Vif would selectively interact with the Z2 and the Z3 A3s. Indeed, we identified two N-terminal Vif motifs (12LF13 and 18GG19) that specifically interacted with the FcaA3Z2 protein but not with A3Z3. In contrast, the exclusive degradation of FcaA3Z3 was regulated by a region of three residues (M24, L25, and I27). Only a FIV Vif carrying a combination of mutations from both interaction sites lost the capacity to degrade and counteract FcaA3Z2Z3. However, alterations in the specific A3s interaction sites did not affect the cellular localization of the FIV Vif protein and binding to feline A3s. Pulldown experiments demonstrated that the A3 binding region localized to FIV Vif residues 50 to 80, outside the specific A3 interaction domain. Finally, we found that the Vif sites specific to individual A3s are conserved in several FIV lineages of domestic cat and nondomestic cats, while being absent in the FIV Vif of pumas. Our data support a complex model of multiple Vif-A3 interactions in which the specific region for selective A3 counteraction is discrete from a general A3 binding domain.

  11. Using Misperception to Counteract Noise in the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Lachlan; Korb, Kevin B.; Kopp, Carlo

    The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma is a game-theoretical model which can be identified in many repeated real-world interactions between competing entities. The Tit for Tat strategy has been identified as a successful strategy which reinforces mutual cooperation, however, it is sensitive to environmental noise which disrupts continued cooperation between players to their detriment. This paper explores whether a population of Tit for Tat players may evolve specialised individual-based noise to counteract environmental noise. We have found that when the individual-based noise acts similarly to forgiveness it can counteract the environmental noise, although excessive forgiveness invites the evolution of exploitative individual-based noise, which is highly detrimental to the population when widespread.

  12. A concept of a space hazard counteraction system: Astronomical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustov, B. M.; Rykhlova, L. V.; Kuleshov, Yu. P.; Dubov, Yu. N.; Elkin, K. S.; Veniaminov, S. S.; Borovin, G. K.; Molotov, I. E.; Naroenkov, S. A.; Barabanov, S. I.; Emel'yanenko, V. V.; Devyatkin, A. V.; Medvedev, Yu. D.; Shor, V. A.; Kholshevnikov, K. V.

    2013-07-01

    The basic science of astronomy and, primarily, its branch responsible for studying the Solar System, face the most important practical task posed by nature and the development of human civilization—to study space hazards and to seek methods of counteracting them. In pursuance of the joint Resolution of the Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and the RAS (Russian Academy of Sciences) Space Council of June 23, 2010, the RAS Institute of Astronomy in collaboration with other scientific and industrial organizations prepared a draft concept of the federal-level program targeted at creating a system of space hazard detection and counteraction. The main ideas and astronomical content of the concept are considered in this article.

  13. Tamoxifen counteracts estradiol induced effects on striatal and hypophyseal dopamine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, C.; Blengio, M.; Ghi, P.; Racca, S.; Genazzani, E.; Portaleone, P.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the ability of Tamoxifen (TAM), an antiestrogen drug, to counteract the modification induced by estrogens on dopamine (DA) receptors on striatum and on adenohypophysis of ovex female rats. Subacute treatment with 17..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) at both low (0.1 ..mu..g/kg) and high (20 ..mu..g/kg) doses confirmed its ability to increase the number of striatal /sup 3/H-Spiperone (/sup 3/H-SPI) binding sites in a dose dependent manner. By contrast in the pituitary, only high doses of estrogen were effective in reducing the number of DA receptors. We treated ovex female rats for 15 days with TAM alone or associated with E/sub 2/, to see if these estrogenic effects could be suppressed by an antiestrogenic drug. TAM did not affect the number of striatal DA receptors, but significantly increased the adenohypophy-seal DA binding sites, without varying their affinity. No changes were observed in pituitary and striatal DA receptor density, even when TAM was injected in association with estradiol. In conclusions: TAM is able to counteract the effects estrogens have on DA receptors. However there is some evidence that it could influence the pituitary DA systems independently of it antiestrogenic activity.

  14. Contrastive Lexicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  15. Spatial warping by oriented line detectors can counteract neural delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don eVaughn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The slow speed of neural transmission necessitates that cortical visual information from dynamic scenes will lag reality. The perceiving the present (PTP hypothesis suggests that the visual system can mitigate the effect of such delays by spatially warping scenes to look as they will in ~100 ms from now (Changizi, 2001. We here show that the Hering illusion, in which straight lines appear bowed, can be induced by a background of optic flow, consistent with the PTP hypothesis. However, importantly, the bowing direction is the same whether the flow is inward or outward. This suggests that if the warping is meant to counteract latencies, it is accomplished by a simple strategy that is insensitive to motion direction, and that works only under typical (forward-moving circumstances. We also find that the illusion strengthens with longer pulses of optic flow, demonstrating motion integration over ~80 ms. The illusion is identical whether optic flow precedes or follows the flashing of bars, exposing the spatial warping to be equally postdictive and predictive, i.e., peri-dictive. Additionally, the illusion is diminished by cues which suggest the bars are independent of the background movement. Collectively, our findings are consistent with a role for networks of visual orientation-tuned neurons (e.g., simple cells in primary visual cortex in spatial warping. We conclude that under the common condition of forward ego-motion, spatial warping counteracts the disadvantage of neural latencies. It is not possible to prove that this is the purpose of spatial warping, but our findings at minimum place constraints on the PTP hypothesis, demonstrating that any spatial warping for the purpose of counteracting neural delays is not a precise, on-the-fly computation, but instead a heuristic achieved by a simple mechanism that succeeds under normal circumstances.

  16. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eTan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis (CF patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM.

  17. Counteractive effect of antacid suspensions on intrinsic dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Vianna, Lídia M F F; Hara, Anderson T; do Amaral, Flávia L B; França, Fabiana M G; Basting, Roberta T

    2012-08-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the anti-erosive effect of antacid suspensions applied to enamel after exposure to hydrochloric acid (HCl). Ninety bovine enamel slabs were embedded, flattened, and polished. Reference areas were created and specimens were divided into six groups. They were exposed to 0.01 M HCl (pH 2) for 2 min, followed by immersion for 1 min in one of the following test suspensions: magnesium hydroxide, aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide/aluminum hydroxide, sodium alginate/sodium bicarbonate/calcium carbonate, or hydrated magnesium aluminate. Artificial saliva was used as a negative control. Specimens were subjected to a total of five cycles of erosion/antacid treatment. Enamel surface loss was measured (in micrometers) by optical profilometry. In addition, baseline and final surface microhardness (SMH) values of enamel were obtained. It was found that antacid suspensions significantly reduced enamel loss, and that similar protection was afforded by all formulations. No differences were observed between the final enamel SMH values among groups. Antacid suspensions counteracted HCl-induced enamel loss, although they were not effective in reducing enamel softening. Mouth rinsing with antacid suspensions after vomiting can potentially represent a promising strategy to counteract enamel loss caused by erosion.

  18. Robo 4 Counteracts Angiogenesis in Herpetic Stromal Keratitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Gimenez

    Full Text Available The cornea is a complex tissue that must preserve its transparency to maintain optimal vision. However, in some circumstances, damage to the eye can result in neovascularization that impairs vision. This outcome can occur when herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 causes the immunoinflammatory lesion stromal keratitis (SK. Potentially useful measures to control the severity of SK are to target angiogenesis which with herpetic SK invariably involves VEGF. One such way to control angiogenesis involves the endothelial receptor Robo4 (R4, which upon interaction with another protein activates an antiangiogenic pathway that counteracts VEGF downstream signaling. In this study we show that mice unable to produce R4 because of gene knockout developed significantly higher angiogenesis after HSV-1 ocular infection than did infected wild type (WT controls. Moreover, providing additional soluble R4 (sR4 protein by subconjunctival administration to R4 KO HSV-1 infected mice substantially rescued the WT phenotype. Finally, administration of sR4 to WT HSV-1 infected mice diminished the extent of corneal angiogenesis compared to WT control animals. Our results indicate that sR4 could represent a useful therapeutic tool to counteract corneal angiogenesis and help control the severity of SK.

  19. Topical legal aspects of corruption counteraction in public procurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Igorevich Zemlin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to analyze the current developments in the Russian legislation on corruption counteraction and the legislation on public procurement system on this basis to study legal conflicts and gaps and to develop proposals under the provisions of the National AntiCorruption Plan for 2014ndash2015. Methods historical formallegal logical and systemicfunctional structural and contextual approach to the study of law and theoretical propositions concerning the definition nature and characteristics of legal relations arising in the process of and relating to the corruption counteraction in the public procurement system. Results аn aggregate of theoretical conclusions and proposals aimed at perfection of anticorruption legislation and legislation on the contractual public procurement system is presented. Scientific novelty the results of the author39s interpretation of changes in the Russian anticorruption legislation and legislation on the contractual public procurement system existing legal conflicts and gaps. Practical significance developing proposals for improving the standards of anticorruption legislation and legislation on public procurement system under the provisions of the National AntiCorruption Plan for 2014ndash2015. nbsp

  20. Acidification counteracts negative effects of warming on diatom silicification

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, Alexandra

    2016-10-24

    Diatoms are a significant group contributing up to 40 % of annual primary production in the oceans. They have a special siliceous cell wall that, acting as a ballast, plays a key role in the sequestration of global carbon and silica. Diatoms dominate primary production in the Arctic Ocean, where global climate change is causing increases in water temperature and in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Here we show that as water temperature increases diatoms become stressed, grow to smaller sizes, and decrease their silicification rates. But at higher pCO2, as the pH of seawater decreases, silica incorporation rates are increased. In a future warmer Arctic ocean diatoms may have a competitive advantage under increased ocean acidification, as increased pCO2 counteracts the adverse effects of increasing temperature on silicification and buffers its consequences in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and silica.

  1. Counteracting age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus; Reitelseder, Søren; Højfeldt, Grith;

    2016-01-01

    at both societal and individual levels. Only a few longitudinal studies have been reported, but whey protein supplementation seems to improve muscle mass and function, and its combination with heavy strength training appears even more effective. However, heavy resistance training may reduce adherence...... to training, thereby attenuating the overall benefits of training. We hypothesize that light load resistance training is more efficient when both adherence and physical improvement are considered longitudinally. We launched the interdisciplinary project on Counteracting Age-related Loss of Skeletal Muscle....... Moreover, we will evaluate changes in physical performance, muscle fiber type and acute anabolic response to whey protein ingestion, sensory adaptation, gut microbiome, and a range of other measures, combined with questionnaires on life quality and qualitative interviews with selected subjects. The CALM...

  2. [Non-indicated cesarean section--does the "Golem" counteract?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Arie

    2011-11-01

    Cesarean section rate is steadily increasing and in Israel it has risen to 20%. MultipLe and different reasons have led to this phenomenon, among them are non-indicated cesarean sections. Although health care providers disagree whether this development is medically, ethically and publically justified, national associations allow it, while respecting those obstetricians who decline to do so. In Israel there are some hospitals which allow non-indicated cesarean sections, whereas others reject them. When discussing this issue with the patients, documentation is advised concerning the reasons for approval or rejection of the patients' request in order to avoid future complaints in the case of adverse outcome. Low risk vaginal delivery should be regarded as a natural process and not as a medical treatment and keeping balanced and reasonable decisions may help to contain the phenomenon and avoid a situation in which the "Golem" created by the medical system, counteracts.

  3. Plant-Derived Agents for Counteracting Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Balaji; Kurdi, Amani; Mahgoub, Eglal; Sadek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CSP) is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat a variety of malignancies. The major setback with CSP treatment is that its clinical efficacy is compromised by its induction of organ toxicity, particular to the kidneys and ears. Despite the significant strides that have been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying CSP-induced renal toxicity, advances in developing renoprotective strategies are still lacking. In addition, the renoprotective approaches described in the literature reveal partial amelioration of CSP-induced renal toxicity, stressing the need to develop potent combinatorial/synergistic agents for the mitigation of renal toxicity. However, the ideal renoprotective adjuvant should not interfere with the anticancer efficacy of CSP. In this review, we have discussed the progress made in utilizing plant-derived agents (phytochemicals) to combat CSP-induced nephrotoxicity in preclinical studies. Furthermore, we have also presented strategies to utilize phytochemicals as prototypes for the development of novel renoprotective agents for counteracting chemotherapy-induced renal damage.

  4. DMPD: An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031256 An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategie...s. Schroder M, Bowie AG. Biochem Soc Trans. 2007 Dec;35(Pt 6):1512-4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show An arms race...: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. PubmedID 18031256 Title An arms race

  5. Electrical stimulation (ES counteracts muscle decline in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut eKern

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The loss in muscle mass coupled with a decrease in specific force and shift in fiber composition are all marks of aging. Training and regular exercise attenuate the signs of sarcopenia. However, pathologic conditions limit the ability to perform physical exercise.We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function.We analyzed, at functional, structural, and molecular level, the effects of ES training on healthy seniors with normal life style, without routine sport activity.ES was able to improve muscle torque and functional performances of seniors and increased the size of fast muscle fibers. At molecular level, ES induced up-regulation of IGF-1 and modulation of MuRF1, a muscle-specific atrophy-related gene. ES also induced up-regulation of relevant markers of differentiating satellite cells and of extracellular matrix remodeling, which might guarantee shape and mechanical forces of trained skeletal muscle as well as maintenance of satellite cell function, reducing fibrosis.Our data provide evidence that ES is a safe method to counteract muscle decline associated with aging.

  6. Plant-Derived Agents for Counteracting Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreesh Ojha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CSP is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat a variety of malignancies. The major setback with CSP treatment is that its clinical efficacy is compromised by its induction of organ toxicity, particular to the kidneys and ears. Despite the significant strides that have been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying CSP-induced renal toxicity, advances in developing renoprotective strategies are still lacking. In addition, the renoprotective approaches described in the literature reveal partial amelioration of CSP-induced renal toxicity, stressing the need to develop potent combinatorial/synergistic agents for the mitigation of renal toxicity. However, the ideal renoprotective adjuvant should not interfere with the anticancer efficacy of CSP. In this review, we have discussed the progress made in utilizing plant-derived agents (phytochemicals to combat CSP-induced nephrotoxicity in preclinical studies. Furthermore, we have also presented strategies to utilize phytochemicals as prototypes for the development of novel renoprotective agents for counteracting chemotherapy-induced renal damage.

  7. Molecular chaperones as therapeutic targets to counteract proteostasis defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Monica; Dominici, Roberto; Cardano, Marina; Diaferia, Giuseppe; Rovida, Ermanna; Biunno, Ida

    2012-03-01

    The health of cells is preserved by the levels and correct folding states of the proteome, which is generated and maintained by the proteostasis network, an integrated biological system consisting of several cytoprotective and degradative pathways. Indeed, the health conditions of the proteostasis network is a fundamental prerequisite to life as the inability to cope with the mismanagement of protein folding arising from genetic, epigenetic, and micro-environment stress appears to trigger a whole spectrum of unrelated diseases. Here we describe the potential functional role of the proteostasis network in tumor biology and in conformational diseases debating on how the signaling branches of this biological system may be manipulated to develop more efficacious and selective therapeutic strategies. We discuss the dual strategy of these processes in modulating the folding activity of molecular chaperones in order to counteract the antithetic proteostasis deficiencies occurring in cancer and loss/gain of function diseases. Finally, we provide perspectives on how to improve the outcome of these disorders by taking advantage of proteostasis modeling.

  8. Subarray-based FDA radar to counteract deceptive ECM signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed; Wang, Wen-Qin; Yuan, Zhao; Mohamed, Suhad; Bin, Tang

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the frequency diverse array (FDA) radar concept has attracted extensive attention, as it may benefit from a small frequency increment, compared to the carrier frequency across the array elements and thereby achieve an array factor that is a function of the angle, the time, and the range which is superior to the conventional phase array radar (PAR). However, limited effort on the subject of FDA in electronic countermeasure scenarios, especially in the presence of mainbeam deceptive jamming, has been published. Basic FDA is not desirable for anti-jamming applications, due to the range-angle coupling response of targets. In this paper, a novel method based on subarrayed FDA signal processing is proposed to counteract deceptive ECM signals. We divide the FDA array into multiple subarrays, each of which employs a distinct frequency increment. As a result, in the subarray-based FDA, the desired target can be distinguished at subarray level in joint range-angle-Doppler domain by utilizing the fact that the jammer generates false targets with the same ranges to each subarray without reparations. The performance assessment shows that the proposed solution is effective for deceptive ECM targets suppression. The effectiveness is verified by simulation results.

  9. Sweet delusion. Glucose drinks fail to counteract ego depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Florian; Eggert, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Initial acts of self-control have repeatedly been shown to reduce individuals' performance on a consecutive self-control task. In addition, sugar containing drinks have been demonstrated to counteract this so-called ego-depletion effect, both when being ingested and when merely being sensed in the oral cavity. However, since the underlying evidence is less compelling than suggested, replications are crucially required. In Experiment 1, 70 participants consumed a drink containing either sugar or a non-caloric sweetener between two administrations of delay-discounting tasks. Experiment 2 (N=115) was designed to unravel the psychological function of oral glucose sensing by manipulating the temporal delay between a glucose mouth rinse and the administration of the consecutive self-control task. Despite applying powerful research designs, no effect of sugar sensing or ingestion on ego depletion could be detected. These findings add to previous challenges of the glucose model of self-control and highlight the need for independent replications.

  10. The beneficial effects of taurine to counteract sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicchitano, Bianca M; Sica, Gigliola

    2016-11-22

    Aging is a multifactorial process characterized by several features including low-grade inflammation, increased oxidative stress and reduced regenerative capacity, which ultimately lead to alteration in morpho-functional properties of skeletal muscle, thus promoting sarcopenia. This condition is characterized by a gradual loss of muscle mass due to an unbalance between protein synthesis and degradation, finally conveying in functional decline and disability. The development of specific therapeutic approaches able to block or reverse this condition may represent an invaluable tool for the promotion of a healthy aging among elderly. It is well established that changes in the quantity and the quality of dietary proteins, as well as the intake of specific amino acids, are able to counteract some of the physiopathological processes related to the progression of the loss of muscle mass and may have beneficial effects in improving the anabolic response of muscle in the elderly. Taurine is a non-essential amino acid expressed in high concentration in several mammalian tissues and particularly in skeletal muscle where it is involved in the modulation of intracellular calcium concentration and ion channel regulation and where it also acts as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory factor. The aim of this review is to summarize the pleiotropic effects of taurine on specific muscle targets and to discuss its role in regulating signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of muscle homeostasis. We also highlight the potential use of taurine as a therapeutic molecule for the amelioration of skeletal muscle function and performance severely compromised during aging.

  11. Targeting species D adenoviruses replication to counteract the epidemic keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, Natalia A; Speiseder, Thomas; Groitl, Peter; Spirin, Pavel V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Lebedev, Timofey D; Rubtsov, Petr M; Lam, Elena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Dobner, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2015-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses causing various infections; their pathogenicity varies dependent on virus species and type. Although acute infections can sometimes take severe courses, they are rarely fatal in immune-competent individuals. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are hyperacute and highly contagious infections of the eye caused by human adenovirus types within species D. Currently there is no causal treatment available to counteract these diseases effectively. The E2B region of the adenovirus genome encodes for the viral DNA polymerase, which is required for adenoviral DNA replication. Here we propose novel model systems to test this viral key factor, DNA polymerase, as a putative target for the development of efficient antiviral therapy based on RNA interference. Using our model cell lines we found that different small interfering RNAs mediate significant suppression (up to 90%) of expression levels of viral DNA polymerase upon transfection. Moreover, permanent expression of short hairpin RNA based on the most effective small interfering RNA led to a highly significant, more than tenfold reduction in replication for different human group D adenoviruses involved in ocular infections.

  12. Counteracting ammonia inhibition in anaerobic digestion by removal with a hollow fiber membrane contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterböck, B; Ortner, M; Haider, R; Fuchs, W

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of membrane contactors for continuous ammonia (NH₃-N) removal in an anaerobic digestion process and to counteract ammonia inhibition. Two laboratory anaerobic digesters were fed slaughterhouse wastes with ammonium (NH₄⁺) concentrations ranging from 6 to 7.4 g/L. One reactor was used as reference reactor without any ammonia removal. In the second reactor, a hollow fiber membrane contactor module was used for continuous ammonia removal. The hollow fiber membranes were directly submerged into the digestate of the anaerobic reactor. Sulfuric acid was circulated in the lumen as an adsorbent solution. Using this set up, the NH₄⁺-N concentration in the membrane reactor was significantly reduced. Moreover the extraction of ammonia lowered the pH by 0.2 units. In combination that led to a lowering of the free NH₃-N concentration by about 70%. Ammonia inhibition in the reference reactor was observed when the concentration exceeded 6 g/L NH₄⁺-N or 1-1.2 g/L NH₃-N. In contrast, in the membrane reactor the volatile fatty acid concentration, an indicator for process stability, was much lower and a higher gas yield and better degradation was observed. The chosen approach offers an appealing technology to remove ammonia directly from media having high concentrations of solids and it can help to improve process efficiency in anaerobic digestion of ammonia rich substrates.

  13. PADI4 acts as a coactivator of Tal1 by counteracting repressive histone arginine methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Stephan; Kuvardina, Olga N.; Oellerich, Thomas; Herglotz, Julia; Backert, Ingo; Kohrs, Nicole; Buscató, Estel. La; Wittmann, Sandra K.; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bonig, Halvard; Karas, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Proschak, Ewgenij; Lausen, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor Tal1 is a critical activator or repressor of gene expression in hematopoiesis and leukaemia. The mechanism by which Tal1 differentially influences transcription of distinct genes is not fully understood. Here we show that Tal1 interacts with the peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4). We demonstrate that PADI4 can act as an epigenetic coactivator through influencing H3R2me2a. At the Tal1/PADI4 target gene IL6ST the repressive H3R2me2a mark triggered by PRMT6 is counteracted by PADI4, which augments the active H3K4me3 mark and thus increases IL6ST expression. In contrast, at the CTCF promoter PADI4 acts as a repressor. We propose that the influence of PADI4 on IL6ST transcription plays a role in the control of IL6ST expression during lineage differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. These results open the possibility to pharmacologically influence Tal1 in leukaemia.

  14. Midazolam 12 mg is moderately counteracted by 250 mg caffeine in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, M J; Vainio, P; Nurminen, M L; Vanakoski, J; Seppälä, T

    2000-12-01

    Caffeine (Caf) counteracts various effects of benzodiazepines (BZDs). Since the effects of zolpidem, a short-acting atypical GABA(A)-BZD agonist, were not antagonized by Caf, we studied an interaction between Caf and midazolam (Mid) in healthy volunteers. In Study 1, 108 healthy students divided to 6 parallel groups were given Mid 12 mg (capsule) and Caf 125 and 250 mg (in decaffeinated coffee), alone and in combinations in the double-blind placebo-controlled manner. Objective and subjective tests were done before and at 45 and 90 min after intake. Ranked delta-values (changes from baseline) were analyzed by one-way contrast ANOVA and Scheffe's tests. In Study 2, six healthy subjects took Mid 15 mg (tablet) with and without Caf 300 mg. The dynamic effects were analyzed as in Study 1 and the plasma concentrations were assayed. In Study 1, learn effects after placebo (ad + 15%) were seen for letter cancellation and digit symbol substitution tests. Midazolam alone significantly (p 0.05). In conclusion, in a parallel group study, sedative effects of Mid 12 mg were only moderately antagonized by Caf 250 mg but not by Caf 125 mg. In a cross-over study, a weak interaction was found subjectively but not in objective measures.

  15. Antihypertensive efficacy of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and aspirin counteraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzi, M D; Campodonico, J; Celeste, F; Guazzi, M; Santambrogio, G; Rossi, M; Trabattoni, D; Alimento, M

    1998-01-01

    Blockade of bradykinin breakdown and enhancement of prostaglandin release probably participate in the antihypertensive activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Cyclooxygenase blockers may attenuate the efficacy of ACE inhibitors by interfering with prostaglandin synthesis, and patients taking aspirin may not benefit from ACE inhibition. This study was designed to evaluate the incidence of the counteractive phenomenon and to define minimal aspirin dosage that causes an antagonistic effect. These were 26 patients with mild to moderate hypertension (group 1) and 26 patients with severe untreated primary hypertension (group 2). Enalapril (20 mg twice a day) was used as a single drug in group 1 and was added to the combination of long-acting nifedipine (30 mg/day) and atenolol (50 mg/day) in group 2. Aspirin was tested at doses of 100 and 300 mg/day, and an attenuation of more than 20% of the mean blood pressure decrease produced by enalapril was the criteria that defined antagonism. The 100 mg dose was ineffective. However, 300 mg aspirin had an antagonistic effect in 57% of patients in group 1 and 50% of patients in group 2: mean arterial pressure was lowered by 63% and 91% less, respectively. Results were independent of the drug administration order. In "responders," aspirin significantly attenuated the renin rise associated with ACE inhibition. These findings suggest that a number of ACE-inhibited patients are susceptible to 300 mg/day aspirin, regardless of hypertension severity. Antagonism may be mediated through prostaglandin inhibition according to predominance, in an individual patient, of prostaglandin activation (also as a renin secretory stimulus) or angiotensin blockade by enalapril.

  16. RIPK1 counteracts ZBP1-mediated necroptosis to inhibit inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juan; Kumari, Snehlata; Kim, Chun; Van, Trieu-My; Wachsmuth, Laurens; Polykratis, Apostolos; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2016-12-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) regulates cell death and inflammation through kinase-dependent and -independent functions. RIPK1 kinase activity induces caspase-8-dependent apoptosis and RIPK3 and mixed lineage kinase like (MLKL)-dependent necroptosis. In addition, RIPK1 inhibits apoptosis and necroptosis through kinase-independent functions, which are important for late embryonic development and the prevention of inflammation in epithelial barriers. The mechanism by which RIPK1 counteracts RIPK3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis has remained unknown. Here we show that RIPK1 prevents skin inflammation by inhibiting activation of RIPK3-MLKL-dependent necroptosis mediated by Z-DNA binding protein 1 (ZBP1, also known as DAI or DLM1). ZBP1 deficiency inhibited keratinocyte necroptosis and skin inflammation in mice with epidermis-specific RIPK1 knockout. Moreover, mutation of the conserved RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM) of endogenous mouse RIPK1 (RIPK1(mRHIM)) caused perinatal lethality that was prevented by RIPK3, MLKL or ZBP1 deficiency. Furthermore, mice expressing only RIPK1(mRHIM) in keratinocytes developed skin inflammation that was abrogated by MLKL or ZBP1 deficiency. Mechanistically, ZBP1 interacted strongly with phosphorylated RIPK3 in cells expressing RIPK1(mRHIM), suggesting that the RIPK1 RHIM prevents ZBP1 from binding and activating RIPK3. Collectively, these results show that RIPK1 prevents perinatal death as well as skin inflammation in adult mice by inhibiting ZBP1-induced necroptosis. Furthermore, these findings identify ZBP1 as a critical mediator of inflammation beyond its previously known role in antiviral defence and suggest that ZBP1 might be implicated in the pathogenesis of necroptosis-associated inflammatory diseases.

  17. Forest management could counteract distribution retractions forced by climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Louise; Harrison, Philip J; Räty, Minna; Bärring, Lars; Strandberg, Gustav; Snäll, Tord

    2017-03-28

    Climate change is expected to drive the distribution retraction of northern species. However, particularly in regions with a history of intensive exploitation, changes in habitat management could facilitate distribution expansions counter to expectations under climate change. Here, we test the potential for future forest management to facilitate the southwards expansion of an old-forest species from the boreal region into the boreo-nemoral region, contrary to expectations under climate change. We used an ensemble of species distribution models based on citizen science data to project the response of Phellinus ferrugineofuscus, a red-listed old-growth indicator, wood-decaying fungus, to six forest management and climate change scenarios. We projected change in habitat suitability across the boreal and boreo-nemoral regions of Sweden for the period 2020-2100. Scenarios varied in the proportion of forest set-aside from production, the level of timber extraction, and the magnitude of climate change. Habitat suitabilities for the study species were projected to show larger relative increases over time in the boreo-nemoral region compared to the boreal region, under all scenarios. By 2100, mean suitabilities in set-aside forest in the boreo-nemoral region were similar to the suitabilities projected for set-aside forest in the boreal region in 2020, suggesting that occurrence in the boreo-nemoral region could be increased. However, across all scenarios, consistently higher projected suitabilities in set-aside forest in the boreal region indicated that the boreal region remained the species stronghold. Furthermore, negative effects of climate change were evident in the boreal region, and projections suggested that climatic changes may eventually counteract the positive effects of forest management in the boreo-nemoral region. Our results suggest that the current rarity of this old-growth indicator species in the boreo-nemoral region may be due to the history of intensive

  18. Definition of singularity due to Newton’s second law counteracting gravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arezu Jahanshir; Hossein Javadi; Farshid forouzbakhsh

    2013-01-01

    .... Regarding on review of Newton's second law in this paper, we have been attempted toenter to the sub-quantum space by crossing the border of quantum mechanics thento survey of counteracting Newton's...

  19. Salt Potentiates Methylamine Counteraction System to Offset the Deleterious Effects of Urea on Protein Stability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Laishram R.; Warepam, Marina; Ahmad, Faizan; Dar, Tanveer Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cellular methylamines are osmolytes (low molecular weight organic compounds) believed to offset the urea’s harmful effects on the stability and function of proteins in mammalian kidney and marine invertebrates. Although urea and methylamines are found at 2:1 molar ratio in tissues, their opposing effects on protein structure and function have been questioned on several grounds including failure to counteraction or partial counteraction. Here we investigated the possible involvement of cellular salt, NaCl, in urea-methylamine counteraction on protein stability and function. We found that NaCl mediates methylamine counteracting system from no or partial counteraction to complete counteraction of urea’s effect on protein stability and function. These conclusions were drawn from the systematic thermodynamic stability and functional activity measurements of lysozyme and RNase-A. Our results revealed that salts might be involved in protein interaction with charged osmolytes and hence in the urea-methylamine counteraction. PMID:25793733

  20. Salt potentiates methylamine counteraction system to offset the deleterious effects of urea on protein stability and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safikur Rahman

    Full Text Available Cellular methylamines are osmolytes (low molecular weight organic compounds believed to offset the urea's harmful effects on the stability and function of proteins in mammalian kidney and marine invertebrates. Although urea and methylamines are found at 2:1 molar ratio in tissues, their opposing effects on protein structure and function have been questioned on several grounds including failure to counteraction or partial counteraction. Here we investigated the possible involvement of cellular salt, NaCl, in urea-methylamine counteraction on protein stability and function. We found that NaCl mediates methylamine counteracting system from no or partial counteraction to complete counteraction of urea's effect on protein stability and function. These conclusions were drawn from the systematic thermodynamic stability and functional activity measurements of lysozyme and RNase-A. Our results revealed that salts might be involved in protein interaction with charged osmolytes and hence in the urea-methylamine counteraction.

  1. Counteraction between overshadowing and degraded contingency treatments: support for the extended comparator hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urcelay, Gonzalo P; Miller, Ralph R

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments using rats in a Pavlovian lick-suppression preparation investigated the effects of combining 2 treatments known for their response-decrementing effects, namely, overshadowing and degraded contingency. Contrary to most contemporary learning theories, the extended comparator hypothesis predicts that these 2 treatments will counteract each other, and therefore, less of a decrement in conditioned responding should be observed than with either treatment alone. Experiments 1 and 2 confirmed this prediction in first-order conditioning and sensory preconditioning preparations, respectively. Experiment 3 demonstrated that posttraining extinction of the training context resulted in a recovery from degraded contingency and reversed the counteractive effect on overshadowing. Finally, Experiment 4 demonstrated that posttraining extinction of the overshadowing stimulus resulted in recovery from simple overshadowing and also reversed the counteractive effect on degraded contingency. These results are consistent with the extended comparator hypothesis but not traditional or recent acquisition-focused models.

  2. SHP-1 phosphatase activity counteracts increased T cell receptor affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeisen, Michael; Baitsch, Lukas; Presotto, Danilo; Baumgaertner, Petra; Romero, Pedro; Michielin, Olivier; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-03-01

    Anti-self/tumor T cell function can be improved by increasing TCR-peptide MHC (pMHC) affinity within physiological limits, but paradoxically further increases (K(d) affinity for the tumor antigen HLA-A2/NY-ESO-1, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this high-affinity-associated loss of function. As compared with cells expressing TCR affinities generating optimal function (K(d) = 5 to 1 μM), those with supraphysiological affinity (K(d) = 1 μM to 15 nM) showed impaired gene expression, signaling, and surface expression of activatory/costimulatory receptors. Preferential expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) was limited to T cells with the highest TCR affinity, correlating with full functional recovery upon PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade. In contrast, upregulation of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1/PTPN6) was broad, with gradually enhanced expression in CD8(+) T cells with increasing TCR affinities. Consequently, pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 with sodium stibogluconate augmented the function of all engineered T cells, and this correlated with the TCR affinity-dependent levels of SHP-1. These data highlight an unexpected and global role of SHP-1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation and responsiveness and support the development of therapies inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatases to enhance T cell-mediated immunity.

  3. Inter-ocular contrast normalization in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Farshad; Heeger, David J

    2009-03-20

    The brain combines visual information from the two eyes and forms a coherent percept, even when inputs to the eyes are different. However, it is not clear how inputs from the two eyes are combined in visual cortex. We measured fMRI responses to single gratings presented monocularly, or pairs of gratings presented monocularly or dichoptically with several combinations of contrasts. Gratings had either the same orientation or orthogonal orientations (i.e., plaids). Observers performed a demanding task at fixation to minimize top-down modulation of the stimulus-evoked responses. Dichoptic presentation of compatible gratings (same orientation) evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating only when contrast was low (presentation of orthogonal gratings evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating for all contrasts. However, activity evoked by dichoptic plaids was equal to that evoked by monocular plaids. Introducing an onset asynchrony (stimulating one eye 500 ms before the other, which under attentive vision results in flash suppression) had no impact on the results; the responses to dichoptic and monocular plaids were again equal. We conclude that when attention is diverted, inter-ocular suppression in V1 can be explained by a normalization model in which the mutual suppression between orthogonal orientations does not depend on the eye of origin, nor on the onset times, and cross-orientation suppression is weaker than inter-ocular (same orientation) suppression.

  4. Short-Term Summer Inundation as a Measure to Counteract Acidification in Rich Fens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan S Mettrop

    Full Text Available In regions with intensive agriculture, water level fluctuation in wetlands has generally become constricted within narrow limits. Water authorities are, however, considering the re-establishment of fluctuating water levels as a management tool in biodiverse, base-rich fens ('rich fens'. This includes temporary inundation with surface water from ditches, which may play an important role in counteracting acidification in order to conserve and restore biodiversity. Inundation may result in an increased acid neutralizing capacity (ANC for two reasons: infiltration of base-rich inundation water into peat soils, and microbial alkalinity generation under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to test whether short-term (2 weeks summer inundation is more effective than short-term winter inundation to restore the ANC in the upper 10 cm of non-floating peat soils, and to explain potential differences. Large-scale field experiments were conducted for five years in base-rich fens and Sphagnum-dominated poor fens. Winter inundation did not result in increased porewater ANC, because infiltration was inhibited in the waterlogged peat and evapotranspiration rates were relatively low. Also, low temperatures limit microbial alkalinity generation. In summer, however, when temperature and evapotranspiration rates are higher, inundation resulted in increased porewater Ca and HCO3- concentrations, but only in areas with characteristic rich fen bryophytes. This increase was not only due to stronger infiltration into the soil, but also to higher microbial alkalinity generation under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, porewater ANC did not increase in Sphagnum-plots as a result of the ability of Sphagnum spp. to acidify their environment. In both rich and poor fens, flooding-induced P-mobilization remained sufficiently low to safeguard P-limited vegetation. NO3(- and NH4(+ dynamics showed no considerable changes either. In conclusion, short

  5. Maldistribution in air-water heat pump evaporators. Part 2: Economic analysis of counteracting technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Gunda; Palm, Björn; Elmegaard, Brian

    2015-01-01

    In this study a methodology is applied to quantify the effect of evaporator maldistributionon operating costs of airewater heat pumps. The approach is used to investigate the cost-effectivenessof two technologies enabling to counteract maldistribution: a flash gasbypass setup and the individual...

  6. Adipose gene expression patterns of weight gain suggest counteracting steroid hormone synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Schaap, M.M.; Pennings, J.; Hoebee, B.; Keijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    VAN SCHOTHORST, EVERT M., NICOLE FRANSSEN-VAN HAL, MIRJAM M. SCHAAP, JEROEN PENNINGS, BARBARA HOEBEE, AND JAAP KEIJER. Adipose gene expression patterns of weight gain suggest counteracting steroid hormone synthesis. Obes Res. 2005;13:1031-1041. Objective: To identify early molecular changes in weigh

  7. Allured or alarmed: Counteractive control responses to food temptations in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Kroese, F.M.; Evers, C.; Ridder, de D.T.D.

    2013-01-01

    Typically, it is believed that palatable, high caloric foods signal reward and trigger indulgent responses. However, Counteractive Control Theory suggests that, to the extent that people are concerned about their weight, a confrontation with palatable foods should also trigger ‘alarm bell responses’

  8. Vpu serine 52 dependent counteraction of tetherin is required for HIV-1 replication in macrophages, but not in ex vivo human lymphoid tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Specht Anke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Vpu protein degrades CD4 and counteracts a restriction factor termed tetherin (CD317; Bst-2 to enhance virion release. It has been suggested that both functions can be genetically separated by mutation of a serine residue at position 52. However, recent data suggest that the S52 phosphorylation site is also important for the ability of Vpu to counteract tetherin. To clarify this issue, we performed a comprehensive analysis of HIV-1 with a mutated casein kinase-II phosphorylation site in Vpu in various cell lines, primary blood lymphocytes (PBL, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and ex vivo human lymphoid tissue (HLT. Results We show that mutation of serine 52 to alanine (S52A entirely disrupts Vpu-mediated degradation of CD4 and strongly impairs its ability to antagonize tetherin. Furthermore, casein-kinase II inhibitors blocked the ability of Vpu to degrade tetherin. Overall, Vpu S52A could only overcome low levels of tetherin, and its activity decreased in a manner dependent on the amount of transiently or endogenously expressed tetherin. As a consequence, the S52A Vpu mutant virus was unable to replicate in macrophages, which express high levels of this restriction factor. In contrast, HIV-1 Vpu S52A caused CD4+ T-cell depletion and spread efficiently in ex vivo human lymphoid tissue and PBL, most likely because these cells express comparably low levels of tetherin. Conclusion Our data explain why the effect of the S52A mutation in Vpu on virus release is cell-type dependent and suggest that a reduced ability of Vpu to counteract tetherin impairs HIV-1 replication in macrophages, but not in tissue CD4+ T cells.

  9. (−)-Englerin A-evoked Cytotoxicity Is Mediated by Na+ Influx and Counteracted by Na+/K+-ATPase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Melanie J.; Gaunt, Hannah J.; Rubaiy, Hussein N.; Musialowski, Katie E.; Blythe, Nicola M.; Vasudev, Naveen S.; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Beech, David J.

    2017-01-01

    (−)-Englerin A ((−)-EA) has a rapid and potent cytotoxic effect on several types of cancer cell that is mediated by plasma membrane ion channels containing transient receptor potential canonical 4 (TRPC4) protein. Because these channels are Ca2+-permeable, it was initially thought that the cytotoxicity arose as a consequence of Ca2+ overload. Here we show that this is not the case and that the effect of (−)-EA is mediated by a heteromer of TRPC4 and TRPC1 proteins. Both TRPC4 and TRPC1 were required for (−)-EA cytotoxicity; however, although TRPC4 was necessary for the (−)-EA-evoked Ca2+ elevation, TRPC1 was not. TRPC1 either had no role or was a negative regulator of Ca2+ entry. By contrast, both TRPC4 and TRPC1 were necessary for monovalent cation entry evoked by (−)-EA, and (−)-EA-evoked cell death was dependent upon entry of the monovalent cation Na+. We therefore hypothesized that Na+/K+-ATPase might act protectively by counteracting the Na+ load resulting from sustained Na+ entry. Indeed, inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase by ouabain potently and strongly increased (−)-EA-evoked cytotoxicity. The data suggest that (−)-EA achieves cancer cell cytotoxicity by inducing sustained Na+ entry through heteromeric TRPC1/TRPC4 channels and that the cytotoxic effect of (−)-EA can be potentiated by Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition. PMID:27875305

  10. Nature gives us strength: exposure to nature counteracts ego-depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jason T; Lau, Shun

    2015-01-01

    Previous research rarely investigated the role of physical environment in counteracting ego-depletion. In the present research, we hypothesized that exposure to natural environment counteracts ego-depletion. Three experiments were conducted to test this hypothesis. In Experiment 1, initially depleted participants who viewed pictures of nature scenes showed greater persistence on a subsequent anagram task than those who were given a rest period. Experiment 2 expanded upon this finding by showing that natural environment enhanced logical reasoning performance after ego-depleting task. Experiment 3 adopted a two- (depletion vs. no-depletion) -by-two (nature exposure vs. urban exposure) factorial design. We found that nature exposure moderated the effect of depletion on anagram task performance. Taken together, the present studies offer a viable and novel strategy to mitigate the negative impacts of ego-depletion.

  11. Contrast-induced nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A. García Hernández

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced nephropathy is an important complication associated with the use of contrast media. Favoring factors for the development of contrast-induced nephronpathy have been widely described, being diabetes mellitus and previous renal disease the greatest risk. The pathophysiology is a complex process where the medullary hypoxia represents the trigger element. Previous hydration and the use of low osmolality contrast are the most recommended measures to prevent its development.

  12. The University of the Third Age as an institution counteracting marginalization of older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Marcinkiewicz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the role of the University of the Third Age in counteracting the effects of marginalization of the elderly. The history of the University of the Third Age is presented and also different models of this institution are characterized. The paper presents new trends in research conducted by participants of the U3A and shown their relation to marginalization

  13. More reflectivity for the soil to counteract the global-warming of the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Tejedor, A; Pacheco, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    It is argued that a dedicated effort to increase the reflectivity of the surface of our planet by means of, for example, metallic plates would induce an increase in the global albedo which would counteract in part the present global-warming process of the Earth. This could alleviate the urgency of reducing the CO2 emissions. The City of Zaragoza (Spain) is chosen to illustrate the likelihood of our arguments.

  14. Physical activity counteracts tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26-injected muscles: an interim report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hiroux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis.

  15. In COS cells Vpu can both stabilize tetherin expression and counteract its antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Abdul A; Kuruppu, Nishani D; Felton, Kathryn L; D'Souza, Darren; Freed, Eric O

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-inducible cellular protein tetherin (CD317/BST-2) inhibits the release of a broad range of enveloped viruses. The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu enhances virus particle release by counteracting this host restriction factor. While the antagonism of human tetherin by Vpu has been associated with both proteasomal and lysosomal degradation, the link between Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation and the ability of Vpu to counteract the antiviral activity of tetherin remains poorly understood. Here, we show that human tetherin is expressed at low levels in African green monkey kidney (COS) cells. However, Vpu markedly increases tetherin expression in this cell line, apparently by sequestering it in an internal compartment that bears lysosomal markers. This stabilization of tetherin by Vpu requires the transmembrane sequence of human tetherin. Although Vpu stabilizes human tetherin in COS cells, it still counteracts the ability of tetherin to suppress virus release. The enhancement of virus release by Vpu in COS cells is associated with a modest reduction in cell-surface tetherin expression, even though the overall expression of tetherin is higher in the presence of Vpu. This study demonstrates that COS cells provide a model system in which Vpu-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 release is uncoupled from Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation.

  16. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  17. Icaritin requires Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, Zong-Kang; Li, Jie; Liu, Jin; Baosheng GUO; Leung, Albert; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Counteracting muscle atrophy induced by mechanical unloading/inactivity is of great clinical need and challenge. A therapeutic agent that could counteract muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading in safety is desired. This study showed that natural product Icaritin (ICT) could increase the phosphorylation level of Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) at p110 catalytic subunit and promote PI3K/Akt signaling markers in C2C12 cells. This study further showed that the high dose ICT treatment...

  18. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  19. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  20. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic...... digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m2 /day and current density...

  1. Herpes simplex virus 1 counteracts viperin via its virion host shutoff protein UL41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guanghui; Wang, Kezhen; Wang, Shuai; Cai, Mingsheng; Li, Mei-li; Zheng, Chunfu

    2014-10-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible viperin protein restricts a broad range of viruses. However, whether viperin plays a role during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is poorly understood. In the present study, it was shown for the first time that wild-type (WT) HSV-1 infection couldn't induce viperin production, and ectopically expressed viperin inhibited the replication of UL41-null HSV-1 but not WT viruses. The underlying molecular mechanism is that UL41 counteracts viperin's antiviral activity by reducing its mRNA accumulation.

  2. Semi-Supervised Learning Techniques in AO Applications: A Novel Approach To Drift Counteraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, S.; Fattoruso, G.; Pardo, M.; Tortorella, F.; Di Francia, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work we proposed and tested the use of SSL techniques in the AO domain. The SSL characteristics have been exploited to reduce the need for costly supervised samples and the effects of time dependant drift of state-of-the-art statistical learning approaches. For this purpose, an on-field recorded one year long atmospheric pollution dataset has been used. The semi-supervised approach benefitted from the use of updated unlabeled samples, adapting its knowledge to the slowly changing drift effects. We expect that semi-supervised learning can provide significant advantages to the performance of sensor fusion subsystems in artificial olfaction exhibiting an interesting drift counteraction effect.

  3. Alpha-Tocopherol Counteracts the Cytotoxicity Induced by Ochratoxin A in Primary Porcine Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Elenora; Rebucci, Raffaella; Pecorini, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine the half-lethal concentration of ochratoxin A (OTA) as well as the levels of lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation induced by OTA in primary porcine fibroblasts, and to examine the role of α-tocopherol in counteracting its toxicity....... Cells showed a dose-, time- and origin-dependent (ear vs. embryo) sensitivity to ochratoxin A. Pre-incubation for 3 h with 1 nM α-tocopherol significantly (P lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA damage in both fibroblast cultures. These findings indicate that α...

  4. Describing contrast across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sohaib Ali; Iqbal, Muhammad Zafar; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin

    2017-06-01

    Due to its sensitive nature against illumination and noise distributions, contrast is not widely used for image description. On the contrary, the human perception of contrast along different spatial frequency bandwidths provides a powerful discriminator function that can be modeled in a robust manner against local illumination. Based upon this observation, a dense local contrast descriptor is proposed and its potential in different applications of computer vision is discussed. Extensive experiments reveal that this simple yet effective description performs well in comparison with state of the art image descriptors. We also show the importance of this description in multiresolution pansharpening framework.

  5. Autofrettage to Counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Mismatch in Cryogenic Pressurized Pipes with Metallic Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ed; Barbero, Ever; Tygielski, Phlip; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Composite feedlines with metal liners have the potential to reduce weight/cost while providing the same level of permeation resistance and material compatibility of all-metal feedlines carrying cryogenic propellants in spacecraft. The major technical challenges are the large difference in Coefficient of Thermal Expansion between the liner and the composite, and the manufacturing method required to make a very thin liner with the required strength and dimensional tolerance. This study investigates the use of autofrettage (compressive preload) to counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion when pre-pressurization procedures cannot be used to solve this problem. Promising materials (aluminum 2219, Inconel 718, nickel, nickel alloy) and manufacturing techniques (chemical milling, electroplating) are evaluated to determine the best liner candidates. Robust, autofrettaged feedlines with a low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion liner (Inconel 718 or nickel alloy) are shown to successfully counteract mismatch at LOX temperature. A new concept, autofrettage by temperature, is introduced for high Coefficient of Thermal Expansion materials (aluminum and pure nickel) where pressure cannot be used to add compressive preload.

  6. Rac1 GTPase silencing counteracts microgravity-induced effects on osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignandon, Alain; Faure, Céline; Neutelings, Thibaut; Rattner, Aline; Mineur, Pierre; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Laroche, Norbert; Lambert, Charles; Deroanne, Christophe; Nusgens, Betty; Demets, René; Colige, Alain; Vico, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    Bone cells exposed to real microgravity display alterations of their cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, two major mechanosensitive structures. These structures are controlled by small GTPases of the Ras homology (Rho) family. We investigated the effects of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 modulation of osteoblastic cells under microgravity conditions. Human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells silenced for RhoGTPases were cultured in the automated Biobox bioreactor (European Space Agency) aboard the Foton M3 satellite and compared to replicate ground-based controls. The cells were fixed after 69 h of microgravity exposure for postflight analysis of focal contacts, F-actin polymerization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and matrix targeting. We found that RhoA silencing did not affect sensitivity to microgravity but that Rac1 and, to a lesser extent, Cdc42 abrogation was particularly efficient in counteracting the spaceflight-related reduction of the number of focal contacts [-50% in silenced, scrambled (SiScr) controls vs. -15% for SiRac1], the number of F-actin fibers (-60% in SiScr controls vs. -10% for SiRac1), and the depletion of matrix-bound VEGF (-40% in SiScr controls vs. -8% for SiRac1). Collectively, these data point out the role of the VEGF/Rho GTPase axis in mechanosensing and validate Rac1-mediated signaling pathways as potential targets for counteracting microgravity effects. © FASEB.

  7. Piracetam counteracts the effects of amitriptyline on inhibitory avoidance in CD1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everss, Estrella; Arenas, M Carmen; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Monleón, Santiago; Parra, Andrés

    2005-04-30

    The purpose of the present work was to study the effects of amitriptyline on animal cognition in relation to some characteristics of its therapeutic effects. The modulation of acute and chronic effects of amitriptyline on inhibitory avoidance in male and female mice by piracetam was investigated. In Experiment 1, mice were subjected to the training phase of inhibitory avoidance conditioning 60 min after acute piracetam (100 mg/kg) or physiological saline administration. Immediately after the behavioural task, they received a single injection of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (30 mg/kg) or physiological saline. Twenty-four hours later, subjects were tested for avoidance. In Experiment 2, the same doses of amitriptyline and piracetam were chronically administered. Mice were subjected to the training phase of inhibitory avoidance on the 22nd day, and to the test phase 24 h later. Forty-five minutes after test, subjects explored the elevated plus-maze for 5 min in order to assess whether the effects of amitriptyline on avoidance performance may reflect general behavioural changes. Results obtained were that: (a) acute and chronic amitriptyline impaired inhibitory avoidance of male and female mice, (b) piracetam counteracted the effect of acutely administered amitriptyline on inhibitory avoidance, and (c) piracetam counteracted the effects of chronically administered amitriptyline in males but not females in the same learning task. These effects do not seem to be mediated by non-specific drug effects on spontaneous motor activity or anxiety.

  8. Effect of IR Laser on Myoblasts: Prospects of Application for Counteracting Microgravity-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Rizzo, Angela Maria; Caselli, Anna; Ranaldi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Microgravity-induced muscle atrophy is a problem of utmost importance for the impact it may have on the health and performance of astronauts. Therefore, appropriate countermeasures are needed to prevent disuse atrophy and favour muscle recovery. Muscle atrophy is characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, and a shift in substrate utilization from fat to glucose, that leads to a reduced metabolic efficiency and enhanced fatigability. Laser therapy is already used in physical medicine and rehabilitation to accelerate muscle recovery and in sports medicine to prevent damages produced by metabolic disturbances and inflammatory reactions after heavy exercise. The aim of the research we present was to get insights on possible benefits deriving from the application of an advanced infrared laser system to counteract deficits of muscle energy metabolism and stimulate the recovery of the hypotrophic tissue. The source used was a Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser, which combines continuous and pulsed emissions at 808 nm and 905 nm, respectively. We studied the effect of MLS treatment on morphology and energy metabolism of C2C12 cells, a widely accepted myoblast model, previously exposed to microgravity conditions modelled by a Random Positioning Machine. The MLS laser treatment was able to restore basal levels of serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity and to counteract cytoskeletal alterations and increase in glycolytic enzymes activity that occurred following the exposure to modelled microgravity. In conclusion, the results provide interesting insights for the application of infrared laser in the treatment of muscle atrophy.

  9. Ghrelin counteracts insulin-induced activation of vagal afferent neurons via growth hormone secretagogue receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yusaku; Dezaki, Katsuya; Kumari, Parmila; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-08-01

    Vagal afferent nerves sense meal-related gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones and convey their information to the brain, thereby regulating brain functions including feeding. We have recently demonstrated that postprandial insulin directly acts on the vagal afferent neurons. Plasma concentrations of orexigenic ghrelin and anorexigenic insulin show reciprocal dynamics before and after meals. The present study examined interactive effects of ghrelin and insulin on vagal afferent nerves. Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in isolated nodose ganglion (NG) neurons was measured to monitor their activity. Insulin at 10(-7)M increased [Ca(2+)]i in NG neurons, and the insulin-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was inhibited by treatment with ghrelin at 10(-8)M. This inhibitory effect of ghrelin was attenuated by [D-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6, an antagonist of growth hormone-secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Des-acyl ghrelin had little effect on insulin-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in NG neurons. Ghrelin did not affect [Ca(2+)]i increases in response to cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone that inhibits feeding via vagal afferent neurons, indicating that ghrelin selectively counteracts the insulin action. These results demonstrate that ghrelin via GHSR suppresses insulin-induced activation of NG neurons. The action of ghrelin to counteract insulin effects on NG might serve to efficiently inform the brain of the systemic change between fasting-associated ghrelin-dominant and fed-associated insulin-dominant states for the homeostatic central regulation of feeding and metabolism.

  10. Leishmania amazonensis exhibits phosphatidylserine-dependent procoagulant activity, a process that is counteracted by sandfly saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cadaxo Rochael

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania parasites expose phosphatidylserine (PS on their surface, a process that has been associated with regulation of host's immune responses. In this study we demonstrate that PS exposure by metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis favours blood coagulation. L. amazonensis accelerates in vitro coagulation of human plasma. In addition, L. amazonensis supports the assembly of the prothrombinase complex, thus promoting thrombin formation. This process was reversed by annexin V which blocks PS binding sites. During blood meal, Lutzomyia longipalpis sandfly inject saliva in the bite site, which has a series of pharmacologically active compounds that inhibit blood coagulation. Since saliva and parasites are co-injected in the host during natural transmission, we evaluated the anticoagulant properties of sandfly saliva in counteracting the procoagulant activity of L. amazonensis . Lu. longipalpis saliva reverses plasma clotting promoted by promastigotes. It also inhibits thrombin formation by the prothrombinase complex assembled either in phosphatidylcholine (PC/PS vesicles or in L. amazonensis . Sandfly saliva inhibits factor X activation by the intrinsic tenase complex assembled on PC/PS vesicles and blocks factor Xa catalytic activity. Altogether our results show that metacyclic promastigotes of L. amazonensis are procoagulant due to PS exposure. Notably, this effect is efficiently counteracted by sandfly saliva.

  11. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 counteracts glucolipotoxicity in the pancreatic β-cell line INS-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong-wei; ZHU Han-yu; WANG Jian-zhong; FU Bo; L(U) Yang; HONG Quan; XIE Yuan-sheng; CHEN Xiang-mei

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucolipotoxicity might play an important role in the β cell decompensation stage during the development of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes.Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) inhibits matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and regulates proliferation and apoptosis of a variety of cell types,including pancreatic β-cells.In the present study,we investigated whether TIMP-1 counteracts glucolipotoxicity in the pancreatic β-cell line INS-1.Methods INS-1 cells were incubated in normal or high glucose,with or without palmitate (0.4 mmol/L),in the presence of TIMP-1 or MMP inhibitor GM60001.In some experiments,cells were pretreated with phosphatidylinositol-3 (Pl-3) kinase inhibitor,LY294002 or wortmannin.The amount of dead INS-1 cells was determined by HO342 and propidium iodide staining.Akt phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blotting analysis to investigate a possible mechanism of TIMP-1's action.Results TIMP-1 protected INS-1 cells from glucolipotoxicity independent of MMP inhibition.TIMP-1 stimulated Akt phosphorylation.Inhibition of the PI-3 kinase pathway abolished the survival effect of TIMP-1.Conclusion TIMP-1 may counteract glucolipotoxicity induced β-cell death via a PI-3 kinase pathway.

  12. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Li, Ying-Yi [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Matsugo, Seiichi [School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sasaki, Soichiro [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: mukaida@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2015-03-06

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization.

  13. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...... (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than...... efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, and can even enable a Reverse Phase Contrast mode where intensity patterns are converted into a phase modulation....

  14. Generalized Phase Contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  15. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...... (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than...... the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light...

  16. Anisotropic Contrast Optical Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Peev, D; Kananizadeh, N; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-01-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by mea...

  17. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Padmore, H A; Parkinson, D Y; Pien, J; Schirotzek, A; Yang, C; 10.1117/12.861946

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  18. Counteracting the climate effects of volcanic eruptions using short-lived greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestvedt, Jan S.; Samset, Bjørn H.; Shine, Keith P.

    2014-12-01

    A large volcanic eruption might constitute a climate emergency, significantly altering global temperature and precipitation for several years. Major future eruptions will occur, but their size or timing cannot be predicted. We show, for the first time, that it may be possible to counteract these climate effects through deliberate emissions of short-lived greenhouse gases, dampening the abrupt impact of an eruption. We estimate an emission pathway countering a hypothetical eruption 3 times the size of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. We use a global climate model to evaluate global and regional responses to the eruption, with and without counteremissions. We then raise practical, financial, and ethical questions related to such a strategy. Unlike the more commonly discussed geoengineering to mitigate warming from long-lived greenhouse gases, designed emissions to counter temporary cooling would not have the disadvantage of needing to be sustained over long periods. Nevertheless, implementation would still face significant challenges.

  19. In-vivo experimental demonstration that hyperhistaminism counteracts tumor-growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellarovere, F; Broccio, G; Granata, A; Fimiani, V

    1994-01-01

    Induction of hyperhistaminism in peritoneum of rats by daily intraperitoneal supply of 0.005 mu g of histamine, counteracts the growth of 10(3) Yoshida ascite sarcoma cells only if administration precedes inoculation of tumor cells and has a long duration. Treating animals for two weeks before tumor cell inoculation we observed significant 70% survival, that was increased to 80% continuing the supply for 20-days after the inoculation; treatment for 3 days before or 20 days after the inoculation did not show significant results. The condition created in rat peritoneum is similar to that in allergic people, and our data in animals confirm statistical data observed in allergic people showing decreased incidence of neoplastic disease due to histamine, that appears to be integrated in a highly potent immunoregulatory circuit.

  20. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-01

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience. PMID:25663734

  1. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-02

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

  2. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel.

  3. Disentangling the counteracting effects of water content and carbon mass on zooplankton growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcconville, Kristian; Atkinson, Angus; Fileman, Elaine S.

    2017-01-01

    Zooplankton vary widely in carbon percentage (carbon mass as a percentage of wet mass), but are often described as either gelatinous or non-gelatinous. Here we update datasets of carbon percentage and growth rate to investigate whether carbon percentage is a continuous trait, and whether its...... time series at station L4 off Plymouth, UK. This showed separate biomass peaks for gelatinous and crustacean taxa, however, carbon percentage varied 8-fold within the gelatinous group. Species with high carbon mass had lower carbon percentage, allowing separation of the counteracting effects...... of these two variables on growth rate. Specific growth rates, g (d -1) were negatively related to carbon percentage and carbon mass, even in the gelatinous taxa alone, suggesting that the trend is not driven by a categorical difference between these groups. The addition of carbon percentage doubled...

  4. A Single Pair of Serotonergic Neurons Counteracts Serotonergic Inhibition of Ethanol Attraction in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; He, Jianzheng; Kaiser, Andrea; Gräber, Nikolas; Schläger, Laura; Ritze, Yvonne; Scholz, Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Attraction to ethanol is common in both flies and humans, but the neuromodulatory mechanisms underlying this innate attraction are not well understood. Here, we dissect the function of the key regulator of serotonin signaling-the serotonin transporter-in innate olfactory attraction to ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster. We generated a mutated version of the serotonin transporter that prolongs serotonin signaling in the synaptic cleft and is targeted via the Gal4 system to different sets of serotonergic neurons. We identified four serotonergic neurons that inhibit the olfactory attraction to ethanol and two additional neurons that counteract this inhibition by strengthening olfactory information. Our results reveal that compensation can occur on the circuit level and that serotonin has a bidirectional function in modulating the innate attraction to ethanol. Given the evolutionarily conserved nature of the serotonin transporter and serotonin, the bidirectional serotonergic mechanisms delineate a basic principle for how random behavior is switched into targeted approach behavior.

  5. Sorbitol production in the lens: a means of counteracting glucose-derived osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylack, L T; Tung, W; Harding, R

    1986-01-01

    Heretofore, the intracellular accumulation of sorbitol has been associated exclusively with deleterious (cataractogenic) changes in the lens. This study demonstrates a beneficial role for the sorbitol pathway in the rabbit lens, namely that of counteracting extracellular, glucose-derived, osmotic stress with the intracellular production of osmotically active sorbitol. Large and sudden increases in the extracellular glucose concentration lead to dehydration of the lens, a response that can be diminished by intracellular sorbitol and fructose production. These results are discussed in light of the impact (beneficial/detrimental) of aldose reductase inhibitors on the lens. Sugar cataract formation appears to result from continuous, rather than cyclical, activity of a pathway which normally may have a protective function in the lens.

  6. Agrin promotes synaptic differentiation by counteracting an inhibitory effect of neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misgeld, Thomas; Kummer, Terrance T; Lichtman, Jeff W; Sanes, Joshua R

    2005-08-02

    Synaptic organizing molecules and neurotransmission regulate synapse development. Here, we use the skeletal neuromuscular junction to assess the interdependence of effects evoked by an essential synaptic organizing protein, agrin, and the neuromuscular transmitter, acetylcholine (ACh). Mice lacking agrin fail to maintain neuromuscular junctions, whereas neuromuscular synapses differentiate extensively in the absence of ACh. We now demonstrate that agrin's action in vivo depends critically on cholinergic neurotransmission. Using double-mutant mice, we show that synapses do form in the absence of agrin provided that ACh is also absent. We provide evidence that ACh destabilizes nascent postsynaptic sites, and that one major physiological role of agrin is to counteract this "antisynaptogenic" influence. Similar interactions between neurotransmitters and synaptic organizing molecules may operate at synapses in the central nervous system.

  7. Stevioside counteracts the alpha-cell hypersecretion caused by long-term palmitate exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, J; Chen, L; Jeppesen, P B;

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to fatty acids impairs beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes, but little is known about the chronic effects of fatty acids on alpha-cells. We therefore studied the prolonged impact of palmitate on alpha-cell function and on the expression of genes related to fuel metabolism. We......-activated receptor-gamma, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene expressions in the presence of palmitate (Pacids leads to a hypersecretion of glucagon and an accumulation of TG content in clonal alpha-TC1-6 cells. Stevioside was able to counteract the alpha......-cell hypersecretion caused by palmitate and enhanced the expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. This indicates that stevioside may be a promising antidiabetic agent in treatment of type 2 diabetes....

  8. Voluntary exercise counteracts Aβ25-35-induced memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Xu, Zhiqiang; Tang, Jinrong; Sun, Jianguo; Gao, Junying; Wu, Ting; Xiao, Ming

    2013-11-01

    Exercise has been shown to enhance hippocampus-related cognition and slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether voluntary exercise directly decreases the neurotoxicity of amyloid peptide (Aβ) needs to be determined. In the present study, two-month old male C57bl/6 mice were intracerebroventricularly injected with Aβ25-35, and then allowed for voluntary exercise for 12 days. Y-maze test revealed that voluntary exercise mitigated spatial memory impairment induced by Aβ25-35. Consistently, Aβ25-35 treated mice with exercise showed reduced neuronal degeneration and synaptic protein loss in the hippocampus compared with sedentary controls. Moreover, voluntary exercise significantly ameliorated oxidative stress markers and increased vessel branches in the hippocampus of Aβ25-35 treated mice. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise counteracts the neurotoxicity of Aβ by reducing oxidative stress and increasing angiogenesis, which may underlie the beneficial effect of exercise on AD.

  9. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in counteracting chemotherapy-induced adverse effects: an exploratory review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Cannabinoids (the active constituents of Cannabis sativa) and their derivatives have got intense attention during recent years because of their extensive pharmacological properties. Cannabinoids first developed as successful agents for alleviating chemotherapy associated nausea and vomiting. Recent investigations revealed that cannabinoids have a wide range of therapeutic effects such as appetite stimulation, inhibition of nausea and emesis, suppression of chemotherapy or radiotherapy-associated bone loss, chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity, pain relief, mood amelioration, and last but not the least relief from insomnia. In this exploratory review, we scrutinize the potential of cannabinoids to counteract chemotherapy-induced side effects. Moreover, some novel and yet important pharmacological aspects of cannabinoids such as antitumoral effects will be discussed.

  10. Extending the GMR Current Measurement Range with a Counteracting Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Yan Poon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, current transformers are often used for current measurement in low voltage (LV electrical networks. They have a large physical size and are not designed for use with power electronic circuits. Semiconductor-based current sensing devices such as the Hall sensor and Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR sensor are advantageous in terms of small size, high sensitivity, wide frequency range, low power consumption, and relatively low cost. Nevertheless, the operational characteristics of these devices limit their current measurement range. In this paper, a design based on using counteracting magnetic field is introduced for extending the GMR current measurement range from 9 A (unipolar to ±45 A. A prototype has been implemented to verify the design and the linear operation of the circuit is demonstrated by experimental results. A microcontroller unit (MCU is used to provide an automatic scaling function to optimize the performance of the proposed current sensor.

  11. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Scioli

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery.We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, placental growth factor (PlGF and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4 expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Antioxidant therapy and

  12. Impulse control in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex counteracts post-diet weight regain in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weygandt, Martin; Mai, Knut; Dommes, Esther; Ritter, Kerstin; Leupelt, Verena; Spranger, Joachim; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2015-04-01

    A variety of studies suggest that efficient treatments to induce short-term dietary success in obesity exist. However, sustained maintenance of reduced weight is rare as a large proportion of patients start to regain weight when treatment is discontinued. Thus, from a clinical perspective, it would be desirable to identify factors that counteract post-diet weight regain across longer time-scales. To address this question, we extended our previous work on neural impulse control mechanisms of short-term dietary success in obesity and now investigated the mechanisms counteracting long-term weight regain after a diet. Specifically, we measured neural impulse control during a delay discounting task with fMRI at two time points, i.e. the beginning ('T0') and the end ('T12') of a one-year follow-up interval after a 12-week diet. Then, we tested whether activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) at T0 and whether activity changes across the follow-up period (T0-T12) are linked to success in weight maintenance. The analyses conducted show that control-related DLPFC activity at T0 was coupled to the degree of success in weight maintenance. Consistently, also behavioral measures of control were linked to the degree of success in maintenance. A direct comparison of neural and behavioral control parameters for prognostic weight change modeling revealed that neural signals were more informative. Taken together, neural impulse control in the DLPFC measured with fMRI directly after a diet predicts real-world diet success in obese patients across extended time periods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Postactivation potentiation can counteract declines in force and power that occur after stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, J; Kramer, A; Cronin, N J; Gruber, M

    2016-12-09

    Stretching can decrease a muscle's maximal force, whereas short but intense muscle contractions can increase it. We hypothesized that when combined, postactivation potentiation induced by reactive jumps would counteract stretch-induced decrements in drop jump (DJ) performance. Moreover, we measured changes in muscle twitch forces and ankle joint stiffness (KAnkle ) to examine underlying mechanisms. Twenty subjects completed three DJs and 10 electrically evoked muscle twitches of the triceps surae subsequent to four different conditioning activities and control. The conditioning activities were 10 hops, 20s of static stretching of the triceps surae muscle, 20s of stretching followed by 10 hops, and vice versa. After 10 hops, twitch peak torque (TPT) was 20% and jump height 5% higher compared with control with no differences in KAnkle . After stretching, TPT and jump height were both 9% and KAnkle 6% lower. When hops and stretching were combined as conditioning activities, jump height was not different compared with control but significantly higher (11% and 8%) compared with stretching. TPTs were 16% higher compared with control when the hops were performed after stretching and 9% higher compared with the reverse order. KAnkle was significantly lower when stretching was performed after the hops (6%) compared with control, but no significant difference was observed when hops were performed after stretching. These results demonstrate that conditioning hops can counteract stretch-related declines in DJ performance. Furthermore, the differences in TPTs and KAnkle between combined conditioning protocols indicate that the order of conditioning tasks might play an important role at the muscle-tendon level. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Arsenic-induced micronuclei formation in mammalian cells and its counteraction by tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dona; Roy, Madhumita; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Bhattacharya, Rathin K

    2005-01-01

    The Gangetic plain of West Bengal, India, has been engulfed by a disastrous environmental calamity of arsenic contamination of the ground water. Chronic arsenic toxicity caused by drinking arsenic-contaminated water has been one of the worst health hazards gradually affecting nine districts of West Bengal since the early 1980s. Over and above hyperpigmentation and keratosis,weakness, burning sensation of the eyes, swelling of the legs, liver fibrosis, chronic lung disease, gangrene of the toes, neuropathy, and skin cancer are other manifestations. Induction of cancer is frequently associated with DNA damage, changes in ploidy of cells, and non-random chromosome aberrations. Counteraction of these genotoxic and cytogenetic abnormalities with natural dietary polyphenols could be a useful strategy to combat arsenic-induced DNA damage and thereby cancer. A review of the literature showed that it is the antioxidant property of tea polyphenols that affords protection against various types of cancer. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the extracts of green tea and black tea (Darjeeling and Assam) as well as their polyphenols could ameliorate this arsenic-induced genotoxicity. The normal mammalian cell culture derived from male Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells (V79) was used as the test system to assess the genotoxicity by micronucleus assay. The results showed that both green tea and black tea extracts have equal potential in modulating the arsenic-induced genotoxicity. This effect was perhaps induced by the constituent polyphenols present in green and black tea. In addition, the repair activity of the damaged cells was enhanced when treated with these tea extracts and their polyphenols. Thus, tea and its polyphenols may have a promising role in counteracting the devastating effects of arsenic.

  15. Docosahexaenoic acid counteracts attenuation of CD95-induced cell death by inorganic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Randall [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit MI (United States); Lanni, Lydia; Jen, K.-L. Catherine [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit MI (United States); McCabe, Michael J. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester NY (United States); Rosenspire, Allen, E-mail: arosenspire@wayne.edu [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit MI (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the United States the principal environmental exposure to mercury is through dietary consumption of sea food. Although the mechanism by which low levels of mercury affect the nervous system is not well established, epidemiological studies suggest that low level exposure of pregnant women to dietary mercury can adversely impact cognitive development in their children, but that Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most prominent n-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-PUFA) present in fish may counteract negative effects of mercury on the nervous system. Aside from effects on the nervous system, epidemiological and animal studies have also suggested that low level mercury exposure may be a risk factor for autoimmune disease. However unlike the nervous system where a mechanism linking mercury to impaired cognitive development remains elusive, we have previously suggested a potential mechanism linking low level mercury exposures to immune system dysfunction and autoimmunity. In the immune system it is well established that disruption of CD95 mediated apoptosis leads to autoimmune disease. We have previously shown in vitro as well as in vivo that in lymphocytes burdened with low levels of mercury, CD95 mediated cell death is impaired. In this report we now show that DHA counteracts the negative effect of mercury on CD95 signaling in T lymphocytes. T cells which have been pre-exposed to DHA are able to cleave pro-caspase 3 and efficiently signal programmed cell death through the CD95 signaling pathway, whether or not they are burdened with low levels of mercury. Thus DHA may lower the risk of autoimmune disease after low level mercury exposures. - Highlights: • Inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) interferes with CD95 mediated cell death in Jurkat T cells • DHA restores the ability of CD95 to signal cell death in Hg{sup 2+} intoxicated T cells • The restoration of CD95 mediated cell death by DHA is correlated with increased activation of Caspase 3.

  16. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A., E-mail: king@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Reischig, P. [Xnovo Technology ApS, 4600 Køge (Denmark); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands); Adrien, J. [MATEIS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Peetermans, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ludwig, W. [MATEIS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  17. Contrastive topics decomposed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of contrastive topics introduced in Büring 1997b and further developed in Büring 2003 relies on distinguishing two types of constituents that introduce alternatives: the sentence focus, which is marked by a FOC feature, and the contrastive topic, which is marked by a CT feature. A non-compositional rule of interpretation that refers to these features is used to derive a topic semantic value, a nested set of sets of propositions. This paper presents evidence for a correlation between the restrictive syntax of nested focus operators and the syntax of contrastive topics, a correlation which is unexpected under this analysis. A compositional analysis is proposed that only makes use of the flatter focus semantic values introduced by focus operators. The analysis aims at integrating insights from the original analysis while at the same time capturing the observed syntactic restrictions. http://dx.doi.org/10.3765/sp.5.8 BibTeX info

  18. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  19. Non-endothelial endothelin counteracts hypoxic vasodilation in porcine large coronary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröbert Ole

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systemic vascular response to hypoxia is vasodilation. However, reports suggest that the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1 is released from the vasculature during hypoxia. ET-1 is reported to augment superoxide anion generation and may counteract nitric oxide (NO vasodilation. Moreover, ET-1 was proposed to contribute to increased vascular resistance in heart failure by increasing the production of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA. We investigated the role of ET-1, the NO pathway, the potassium channels and radical oxygen species in hypoxia-induced vasodilation of large coronary arteries. Results In prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, 10 μM-contracted segments with endothelium, gradual lowering of oxygen tension from 95 to 1% O2 resulted in vasodilation. The vasodilation to O2 lowering was rightward shifted in segments without endothelium at all O2 concentrations except at 1% O2. The endothelin receptor antagonist SB217242 (10 μM markedly increased hypoxic dilation despite the free tissue ET-1 concentration in the arterial wall was unchanged in 1% O2 versus 95% O2. Exogenous ET-1 reversed hypoxic dilation in segments with and without endothelium, and the hypoxic arteries showed an increased sensitivity towards ET-1 compared to the normoxic controls. Without affecting basal NO, hypoxia increased NO concentration in PGF2α-contracted arteries, and an NO synthase inhibitor, L-NOARG,(300 μM, NG-nitro-L-Arginine reduced hypoxic vasodilation. NO-induced vasodilation was reduced in endothelin-contracted preparations. Arterial wall ADMA concentrations were unchanged by hypoxia. Blocking of potassium channels with TEA (tetraethylammounium chloride(10 μM inhibited vasodilation to O2 lowering as well as to NO. The superoxide scavenger tiron (10 μM and the putative NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 μM leftward shifted concentration-response curves for O2 lowering without changing vasodilation to 1% O2. PEG (polyethylene

  20. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes counteracting effects on hindlimb vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Joseph M; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2005-12-01

    Our previous studies concluded that stimulation of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) A2a receptors evokes preferential hindlimb vasodilation mainly via inducing increases in preganglionic sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) directed to the adrenal medulla. This increase in pre-ASNA causes the release of epinephrine and subsequent activation of beta-adrenergic receptors that are preferentially located in the skeletal muscle vasculature. Selective activation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes variable, mostly pressor effects and increases pre-ASNA, as well as lumbar sympathetic activity, which is directed to the hindlimb. These counteracting factors may have opposite effects on the hindlimb vasculature resulting in mixed vascular responses. Therefore, in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized rats, we evaluated the contribution of vasodilator versus vasoconstrictor effects of stimulation of NTS A1 receptors on the hindlimb vasculature. We compared the changes in iliac vascular conductance evoked by microinejctions into the NTS of the selective A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (330 pmol in 50 nl volume) in intact animals with the responses evoked after beta-adrenergic blockade, bilateral adrenalectomy, bilateral lumbar sympathectomy, and combined adrenalectomy + lumbar sympathectomy. In intact animals, stimulation of NTS A1 receptors evoked variable effects: increases and decreases in mean arterial pressure and iliac conductance with prevailing pressor and vasoconstrictor effects. Peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor blockade and bilateral adrenalectomy eliminated the depressor component of the responses, markedly potentiated iliac vasoconstriction, and tended to increase the pressor responses. Lumbar sympathectomy tended to decrease the pressor and vasoconstrictor responses. After bilateral adrenalectomy plus lumbar sympathectomy, a marked vasoconstriction in iliac vascular bed still persisted, suggesting that the vasoconstrictor component of the

  1. High Contrast CRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    r AD’ A076 235 WATKINS—JOHNSON Co SCOTYS VAL LEY CA F/S 9/5 N HIGH CONTRAST CRT.CU) AUG 79 6 A HOLNQUIST DAABO7—77—C—263 9 UNCLASSIFIED DEL.ET—TR—77...Air Force Systems Command A t t n : l) l . CA 2w) U I f iee ’ of \\ iva l Re ’~.ea r ch Andr ews AFI4 ( • ~~ii 4.~7 001 Washington , l ) .C. 20331

  2. Dynein, Lis1 and CLIP-170 counteract Eg5-dependent centrosome separation during bipolar spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Macůrek, Libor; Galjart, Niels; Medema, René H

    2008-12-17

    Bipolar spindle assembly critically depends on the microtubule plus-end-directed motor Eg5 that binds antiparallel microtubules and slides them in opposite directions. As such, Eg5 can produce the necessary outward force within the spindle that drives centrosome separation and inhibition of this antiparallel sliding activity results in the formation of monopolar spindles. Here, we show that upon depletion of the minus-end-directed motor dynein, or the dynein-binding protein Lis1, bipolar spindles can form in human cells with substantially less Eg5 activity, suggesting that dynein and Lis1 produce an inward force that counteracts the Eg5-dependent outward force. Interestingly, we also observe restoration of spindle bipolarity upon depletion of the microtubule plus-end-tracking protein CLIP-170. This function of CLIP-170 in spindle bipolarity seems to be mediated through its interaction with dynein, as loss of CLIP-115, a highly homologous protein that lacks the dynein-dynactin interaction domain, does not restore spindle bipolarity. Taken together, these results suggest that complexes of dynein, Lis1 and CLIP-170 crosslink and slide microtubules within the spindle, thereby producing an inward force that pulls centrosomes together.

  3. RA-RAR-β counteracts myelin-dependent inhibition of neurite outgrowth via Lingo-1 repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttagunta, Radhika; Schmandke, André; Floriddia, Elisa; Gaub, Perrine; Fomin, Natalie; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2011-06-27

    After an acute central nervous system injury, axonal regeneration is limited as the result of a lack of neuronal intrinsic competence and the presence of extrinsic inhibitory signals. The injury fragments the myelin neuronal insulating layer, releasing extrinsic inhibitory molecules to signal through the neuronal membrane-bound Nogo receptor (NgR) complex. In this paper, we show that a neuronal transcriptional pathway can interfere with extrinsic inhibitory myelin-dependent signaling, thereby promoting neurite outgrowth. Specifically, retinoic acid (RA), acting through the RA receptor β (RAR-β), inhibited myelin-activated NgR signaling through the transcriptional repression of the NgR complex member Lingo-1. We show that suppression of Lingo-1 was required for RA-RAR-β to counteract extrinsic inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we confirm in vivo that RA treatment after a dorsal column overhemisection injury inhibited Lingo-1 expression, specifically through RAR-β. Our findings identify a novel link between RA-RAR-β-dependent proaxonal outgrowth and inhibitory NgR complex-dependent signaling, potentially allowing for the development of molecular strategies to enhance axonal regeneration after a central nervous system injury.

  4. Probiotics to counteract biofilm-associated infections:promising and conflicting data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Vuotto; Francesca Longo; Gianfranco Donelli

    2014-01-01

    Altered bowel flora is currently thought to play a role in a variety of disease conditions, and the use of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. as probiotics has been demonstrated to be health-promoting, even if the success of their administration depends on the applied bacterial strain(s) and the targeted disease. In the last few decades, specific probiotics have been shown to be effective in the treatment or the prevention of acute viral gastroenteritis, pediatric post-antibiotic-associated diarrhea, some pediatric allergic disorders, necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants, inflammatory bowel diseases and postsurgical pouchitis. The potential application of probiotics is continuously widening, with new evidence accumulating to support their effect on the prevention and treatment of other disease conditions, including several oral diseases, such as dental caries, periodontal diseases and oral malodor, as well as genitourinary and wound infections. Considering the increasingly widespread ability of pathogens to generate persistent biofilm-related infections, an even more attractive proposal is to administer probiotics to prevent or counteract biofilm development. The response of biofilm-based oral, intestinal, vaginal and wound infections to probiotics treatment will be reviewed here in light of the most recent results obtained in this field.

  5. Discussing the undiscussable with the powerful: why and how faculty must learn to counteract organizational silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankoski, Mary E; Bickel, Janet; Gusic, Maryellen E

    2014-12-01

    Dialogue is essential for transforming institutions into learning organizations, yet many well-known characteristics of academic health centers (AHCs) interfere with open discussion. Rigid hierarchies, intense competition for resources, and the power of peer review in advancement processes all hamper difficult conversations, thereby contributing to organizational silence, and at great cost to the institution. Information necessary for critical decisions is not shared, individuals and the organization do not learn from mistakes, and diverse perspectives from those with less power are not entertained, or worse, are suppressed. When leaders become more skilled at inviting multiple perspectives and faculty more adept at broaching difficult conversations with those in power, differences are more effectively addressed and conflicts resolved. In this article, the authors frame why this skill is an essential competency for faculty and leaders alike and provide the following recommendations to institutions for increasing capacity in this area: (1) develop leaders to counteract organizational silence, (2) develop faculty members' skills in raising difficult issues with those in positions of power, and (3) train mentors to coach others in raising difficult conversations. The vitality of AHCs requires that faculty and institutional leaders develop relational communication skills and partner in learning through challenging conversations.

  6. HSV-1 ICP0: An E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Counteracts Host Intrinsic and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Perusina Lanfranca

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0, is required for efficient lytic viral replication and regulates the switch between the lytic and latent states of HSV-1. As an E3 ubiquitin ligase, ICP0 directs the proteasomal degradation of several cellular targets, allowing the virus to counteract different cellular intrinsic and innate immune responses. In this review, we will focus on how ICP0’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity inactivates the host intrinsic defenses, such as nuclear domain 10 (ND10, SUMO, and the DNA damage response to HSV-1 infection. In addition, we will examine ICP0’s capacity to impair the activation of interferon (innate regulatory mediators that include IFI16 (IFN γ-inducible protein 16, MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88, and Mal (MyD88 adaptor-like protein. We will also consider how ICP0 allows HSV-1 to evade activation of the NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B inflammatory signaling pathway. Finally, ICP0’s paradoxical relationship with USP7 (ubiquitin specific protease 7 and its roles in intrinsic and innate immune responses to HSV-1 infection will be discussed.

  7. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m(2) /day and current density of 4.33 A/m(2) were achieved at steady-state condition. As a result, 112% extra biogas was produced due to ammonia recovery by the SMDC. High-throughput sequencing showed that ammonia recovery had an impact on the microbial community structures in the SMDC and CSTR. Considering the additional economic benefits of biogas enhancement and possible wastewater treatment, the SMDC may represent a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for waste resources recovery and biomethanation of ammonia-rich residues.

  8. Cyclophilin D, a target for counteracting skeletal muscle dysfunction in mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gineste, Charlotte; Hernandez, Andres; Ivarsson, Niklas; Cheng, Arthur J; Naess, Karin; Wibom, Rolf; Lesko, Nicole; Bruhn, Helene; Wedell, Anna; Freyer, Christoph; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Carlström, Mattias; Lanner, Johanna T; Andersson, Daniel C; Bruton, Joseph D; Wredenberg, Anna; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-01

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance are hallmark symptoms in mitochondrial disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to impaired skeletal muscle function and ultimately muscle weakness in these patients. In a mouse model of lethal mitochondrial myopathy, the muscle-specific Tfam knock-out (KO) mouse, we previously demonstrated an excessive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in isolated muscle fibers that could be inhibited by the cyclophilin D (CypD) inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). Here we show that the Tfam KO mice have increased CypD levels, and we demonstrate that this increase is a common feature in patients with mitochondrial myopathy. We tested the effect of CsA treatment on Tfam KO mice during the transition from a mild to terminal myopathy. CsA treatment counteracted the development of muscle weakness and improved muscle fiber Ca(2+) handling. Importantly, CsA treatment prolonged the lifespan of these muscle-specific Tfam KO mice. These results demonstrate that CsA treatment is an efficient therapeutic strategy to slow the development of severe mitochondrial myopathy.

  9. Personal values that support and counteract utilization of a screening test for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aavik, Toivo; Aavik, Anu; Punab, Margus

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the current research was to discover the personal values that may support men's prostate cancer screening decisions in the future. We asked for participants' past behavior and future behavioral intentions, and also considered their real-life behavior. The sample consisted of 371 men, of which 93 were first-time patients at the Andrology Unit. The results show that Security value was related to past participation, while Achievement, Stimulation, and Traditions counteracted this. Present prostate-testing behavior was related only to higher Security values. Predictors of future behavioral intentions were Security, Self-direction, and Benevolence, which described 21% of the total variability. Considering informed decision-making processes, our results suggest that men who hold Security, Self-direction, and Benevolence values are more likely to participate in office-based initial screening. The study indicates the need to offer office-based initial screening to those age-eligible men whose values do not support participation.

  10. Resveratrol counteracts lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behaviors via enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Zhang, Qin; Cai, Yulong; Sun, Dayu; He, Xie; Wang, Lian; Yu, Dan; Li, Xin; Xiong, Xiaoyi; Xu, Haiwei; Yang, Qingwu; Fan, Xiaotang

    2016-01-01

    Radial glial-like cells (RGLs) in the adult dentate gyrus (DG) function as progenitor cells for adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process involved in the stress-related pathophysiology and treatment efficiency of depression. Resveratrol (RSV) has been demonstrated to be a potent activator of neurogenesis. The present study investigated whether chronic RSV treatment has antidepressant potential in relation to hippocampal neurogenesis. Mice received two weeks of RSV (20 mg/kg) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) treatment, followed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 mg/kg) or saline injections for 5 days. We found that RSV treatment abrogated the increased immobility in the forced swimming test and tail suspension test induced by LPS. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that RSV treatment reversed the increase in microglial activation and the inhibition in DG neurogenesis. RSV treatment also attenuated LPS-induced defects in the expanding of RGLs through promoting symmetric division. In addition, RSV ameliorated LPS-induced NF-κB activation in the hippocampus coincides with the up-regulation levels of Sirt1 and Hes1. Taken together, these data indicated that RSV-induced Sirt1 activation counteracts LPS-induced depression-like behaviors via a neurogenic mechanism. A new model to understand the role of RSV in treating depression may result from these findings. PMID:27517628

  11. Limpets counteract ocean acidification induced shell corrosion by thickening of aragonitic shell layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Langer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the patellogastropod limpet Patella caerulea were collected within (pHlow-shells and outside (pHn-shells a CO2 vent site at Ischia, Italy. Four pHlow-shells and four pHn-shells were sectioned transversally and scanned for polymorph distribution by means of confocal Raman microscopy. The pHlow-shells displayed a twofold increase in aragonite area fraction and size normalised aragonite area. Size normalised calcite area was halved in pHlow-shells. Taken together with the increased apical and the decreased flank size normalised thickness of the pHlow-shells, these data led us to conclude that low pH exposed P. caerulea specimens counteract shell dissolution by enhanced shell production. The latter is different from normal elongation growth and proceeds through addition of aragonitic layers only, while the production of calcitic layers is confined to elongation growth. Therefore aragonite cannot be regarded as a per se disadvantageous polymorph under ocean acidification conditions.

  12. Limpets counteract ocean acidification induced shell corrosion by thickening of aragonitic shell layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, G.; Nehrke, G.; Baggini, C.; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R.; Hall-Spencer, J. M.; Bijma, J.

    2014-12-01

    Specimens of the patellogastropod limpet Patella caerulea were collected within (pHlow-shells) and outside (pHn-shells) a CO2 vent site at Ischia, Italy. Four pHlow-shells and four pHn-shells were sectioned transversally and scanned for polymorph distribution by means of confocal Raman microscopy. The pHlow-shells displayed a twofold increase in aragonite area fraction and size-normalised aragonite area. Size-normalised calcite area was halved in pHlow-shells. Taken together with the increased apical and the decreased flank size-normalised thickness of the pHlow-shells, these data led us to conclude that low-pH-exposed P. caerulea specimens counteract shell dissolution by enhanced shell production. This is different from normal elongation growth and proceeds through addition of aragonitic parts only, while the production of calcitic parts is confined to elongation growth. Therefore, aragonite cannot be regarded as a disadvantageous polymorph per se under ocean acidification conditions.

  13. Counteracting Rotor Imbalance in a Bearingless Motor System with Feedforward Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, Peter Eugene; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, Timothy; Nagorny, Aleksandr; Loparo, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    In standard motor applications, traditional mechanical bearings represent the most economical approach to rotor suspension. However, in certain high performance applications, rotor suspension without bearing contact is either required or highly beneficial. Such applications include very high speed, extreme environment, or limited maintenance access applications. This paper extends upon a novel bearingless motor concept, in which full five-axis levitation and rotation of the rotor is achieved using two motors with opposing conical air-gaps. By leaving the motors' pole-pairs unconnected, different d-axis flux in each pole-pair is created, generating a flux imbalance which creates lateral force. Note this is approach is different than that used in previous bearingless motors, which use separate windings for levitation and rotation. This paper will examine the use of feedforward control to counteract synchronous whirl caused by rotor imbalance. Experimental results will be presented showing the performance of a prototype bearingless system, which was sized for a high speed flywheel energy storage application, with and without feedforward control.

  14. Counteracting Activities of OCT4 and KLF4 during Reprogramming to Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Tiemann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs after overexpressing four transcription factors, of which Oct4 is essential. To elucidate the role of Oct4 during reprogramming, we investigated the immediate transcriptional response to inducible Oct4 overexpression in various somatic murine cell types using microarray analysis. By downregulating somatic-specific genes, Oct4 induction influenced each transcriptional program in a unique manner. A significant upregulation of pluripotent markers could not be detected. Therefore, OCT4 facilitates reprogramming by interfering with the somatic transcriptional network rather than by directly initiating a pluripotent gene-expression program. Finally, Oct4 overexpression upregulated the gene Mgarp in all the analyzed cell types. Strikingly, Mgarp expression decreases during the first steps of reprogramming due to a KLF4-dependent inhibition. At later stages, OCT4 counteracts the repressive activity of KLF4, thereby enhancing Mgarp expression. We show that this temporal expression pattern is crucial for the efficient generation of iPSCs.

  15. VEGF receptor-2 (Flk-1 overexpression in mice counteracts focal epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litsa Nikitidou

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was first described as an angiogenic agent, but has recently also been shown to exert various neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in the nervous system. These effects of VEGF are mainly mediated by its receptor, VEGFR-2, which is also referred to as the fetal liver kinase receptor 1 (Flk-1. VEGF is up-regulated in neurons and glial cells after epileptic seizures and counteracts seizure-induced neurodegeneration. In vitro, VEGF administration suppresses ictal and interictal epileptiform activity caused by AP4 and 0 Mg(2+ via Flk-1 receptor. We therefore explored whether increased VEGF signaling through Flk-1 overexpression may regulate epileptogenesis and ictogenesis in vivo. To this extent, we used transgenic mice overexpressing Flk-1 postnatally in neurons. Intriguingly, Flk-1 overexpressing mice were characterized by an elevated threshold for seizure induction and a decreased duration of focal afterdischarges, indicating anti-ictal action. On the other hand, the kindling progression in these mice was similar to wild-type controls. No significant effects on blood vessels or glia cells, as assessed by Glut1 and GFAP immunohistochemistry, were detected. These results suggest that increased VEGF signaling via overexpression of Flk-1 receptors may directly affect seizure activity even without altering angiogenesis. Thus, Flk-1 could be considered as a novel target for developing future gene therapy strategies against ictal epileptic activity.

  16. Magnetite nanoparticles induced adaptive mechanisms counteract cell death in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Mihaela; Dinu, Diana; Sima, Cornelia; Burlacu, Radu; Hermenean, Anca; Ardelean, Aurel; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-10-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) have attracted great interest for biomedical applications due to their unique chemical and physical properties, but the MNP impact on human health is not fully known. Consequently, our study proposes to highlight the biochemical mechanisms that underline the toxic effects of MNP on a human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). The cytotoxicity generated by MNP in MRC-5 cells was dose and time-dependent. MNP-treated MRC-5 cells accumulated large amount of iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exhibited elevated antioxidant scavenger enzymes. Reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion and enhanced lipid peroxidation (LPO) processes were also observed. The cellular capacity to counteract the oxidative damage was sustained by high levels of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a protein that confers resistance against ROS attack and inhibition of cell death. While significant augmentations in nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) levels were detected after 72 h of MNP-exposure only, caspase-1 was activated earlier starting with 24h post-treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that MRC-5 cells have the capacity to develop cell protection mechanisms against MNP. Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms induced by MNP in cell culture could be essential for their prospective use in various in vivo biochemical applications.

  17. Counteracting geometrical attacks on robust image watermarking by constructing a deformable pyramid transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuntao; Ni, Jiangqun; Zhang, Dong

    2013-12-01

    Counteracting geometrical attacks remains one of the most challenging problems in robust watermarking. In this paper, we resist rotation, scaling, and translation (RST) by constructing a kind of deformable pyramid transform (DPT) that is shift-invariant, steerable, and scalable. The DPT is extended from a closed-form polar-separable steerable pyramid transform (SPT). The radial component of the SPT's basis filters is taken as the kernel of the scalable basis filters, and the angular component is used for the steerable basis filters. The shift-invariance is inherited from the SPT by retaining undecimated high-pass and band-pass subbands. Based on the designed DPT, we theoretically derive interpolation functions for steerability and scalability and synchronization mechanisms for translation, rotation, and scaling. By exploiting the preferable characteristics of DPT, we develop a new template-based robust image watermarking scheme that is resilient to RST. Translation invariance is achieved by taking the Fourier magnitude of the cover image as the DPT's input. The resilience to rotation and scaling is obtained using the synchronization mechanisms for rotation and scaling, for which an efficient template-matching algorithm has been devised. Extensive simulations show that the proposed scheme is highly robust to geometrical attacks, such as RST, cropping, and row/column line removal, as well as common signal processing attacks such as JPEG compression, additive white Gaussian noise, and median filtering.

  18. P-cadherin counteracts myosin II-B function: implications in melanoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Wever Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant transformation of melanocytes is frequently attended by a switch in cadherin expression profile as shown for E- and N-cadherin. For P-cadherin, downregulation in metastasizing melanoma has been demonstrated, and over-expression of P-cadherin in melanoma cell lines has been shown to inhibit invasion. The strong invasive and metastatic nature of cutaneous melanoma implies a deregulated interplay between intercellular adhesion and migration-related molecules Results In this study we performed a microarray analysis to compare the mRNA expression profile of an invasive BLM melanoma cell line (BLM LIE and the non-invasive P-cadherin over-expression variant (BLM P-cad. Results indicate that nonmuscle myosin II-B is downregulated in BLM P-cad. Moreover, myosin II-B plays a major role in melanoma migration and invasiveness by retracting the tail during the migratory cycle, as shown by the localization of myosin II-B stress fibers relative to Golgi and the higher levels of phosphorylated myosin light chain. Analysis of P-cadherin and myosin II-B in nodular melanoma sections and in a panel of melanoma cell lines further confirmed that there is an inverse relationship between both molecules. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that P-cadherin counteracts the expression and function of myosin II-B, resulting in the suppression of the invasive and migratory behaviour of BLM melanoma cells

  19. Protein Phosphatase 1 Recruitment by Rif1 Regulates DNA Replication Origin Firing by Counteracting DDK Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoushka Davé

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The firing of eukaryotic origins of DNA replication requires CDK and DDK kinase activities. DDK, in particular, is involved in setting the temporal program of origin activation, a conserved feature of eukaryotes. Rif1, originally identified as a telomeric protein, was recently implicated in specifying replication timing in yeast and mammals. We show that this function of Rif1 depends on its interaction with PP1 phosphatases. Mutations of two PP1 docking motifs in Rif1 lead to early replication of telomeres in budding yeast and misregulation of origin firing in fission yeast. Several lines of evidence indicate that Rif1/PP1 counteract DDK activity on the replicative MCM helicase. Our data suggest that the PP1/Rif1 interaction is downregulated by the phosphorylation of Rif1, most likely by CDK/DDK. These findings elucidate the mechanism of action of Rif1 in the control of DNA replication and demonstrate a role of PP1 phosphatases in the regulation of origin firing.

  20. Interleukin-35 administration counteracts established murine type 1 diabetes--possible involvement of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kailash; Kadesjö, Erik; Lindroos, Julia; Hjort, Marcus; Lundberg, Marcus; Espes, Daniel; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Sandler, Stellan; Thorvaldson, Lina

    2015-07-30

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 is produced by regulatory T (Treg) cells to suppress autoimmune and inflammatory responses. The role of IL-35 in type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains to be answered. To elucidate this, we investigated the kinetics of Treg cell response in the multiple low dose streptozotocin induced (MLDSTZ) T1D model and measured the levels of IL-35 in human T1D patients. We found that Treg cells were increased in MLDSTZ mice. However, the Treg cells showed a decreased production of anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-35, TGF-β) and increased pro-inflammatory (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17) cytokines, indicating a phenotypic shift of Treg cells under T1D condition. IL-35 administration effectively both prevented development of, and counteracted established MLDSTZ T1D, seemingly by induction of Eos expression and IL-35 production in Treg cells, thus reversing the phenotypic shift of the Treg cells. IL-35 administration reversed established hyperglycemia in NOD mouse model of T1D. Moreover, circulating IL-35 levels were decreased in human T1D patients compared to healthy controls. These findings suggest that insufficient IL-35 levels play a pivotal role in the development of T1D and that treatment with IL-35 should be investigated in treatment of T1D and other autoimmune diseases.

  1. Coumestrol Counteracts Interleukin-1β-Induced Catabolic Effects by Suppressing Inflammation in Primary Rat Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae-Seek; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; Oh, Ji-Su; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-catabolic effects of coumestrol, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, against interleukin-1β-induced cartilage degeneration in primary rat chondrocytes and articular cartilage. Coumestrol did not affect the viability of human normal oral keratinocytes and primary rat chondrocytes treated for 24 h and 21 days, respectively. Although coumestrol did not significantly increase the proteoglycan contents in long-term culture, it abolished the interleukin-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans in primary rat chondrocytes and knee articular cartilage. Furthermore, coumestrol suppressed the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase-13, -3, and -1 in primary rat chondrocytes stimulated with interleukin-1β. Moreover, the expression of catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, and inflammatory cytokines in interleukin-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes was suppressed by coumestrol. In summary, these results indicate that coumestrol counteracts the catabolic effects induced by interleukin-1β through the suppression of inflammation. Therefore, based on its biological activity and safety profile, coumestrol could be used as a potential anti-catabolic biomaterial for osteoarthritis.

  2. URGENT DESTABILIZERS OF PUBLIC AND STATE SECURITY, TACTICS OF COUNTERACTION TO IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Marinkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At creation of civil society in any constitutional state there is a crime counteraction problem. In the modern Russian Federation safety problems from the negative social phenomena and processes force scientists, public agents and ordinary citizens to investigate constantly such determinants and the reasons (destabilizers of safety of society and the constitutional state, to eliminate their consequences. Such problems as are urgent now: increase in information on ways and consequences of violence in the mass media (MM, the Internet, computer games, traditional physical abuse. The number of questions and assessment by citizens of consequences of the conducted terrorist attacks and infringement of life of citizens causes. The accounting of the specified problems and versions of decisions in law-enforcement practice, will allow to promote as a result efficiency of prevention of offenses and crimes and will bring closer modern Russia to ideal model of the constitutional state with real civil society. In article the author designates a number of the legal and social destabilizers of safety existing now in the Russian society and the state, proposes the solution of their negative impact on society within tactics of crime control.

  3. MyT1 Counteracts the Neural Progenitor Program to Promote Vertebrate Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca F. Vasconcelos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neurons from neural stem cells requires large-scale changes in gene expression that are controlled to a large extent by proneural transcription factors, such as Ascl1. While recent studies have characterized the differentiation genes activated by proneural factors, less is known on the mechanisms that suppress progenitor cell identity. Here, we show that Ascl1 induces the transcription factor MyT1 while promoting neuronal differentiation. We combined functional studies of MyT1 during neurogenesis with the characterization of its transcriptional program. MyT1 binding is associated with repression of gene transcription in neural progenitor cells. It promotes neuronal differentiation by counteracting the inhibitory activity of Notch signaling at multiple levels, targeting the Notch1 receptor and many of its downstream targets. These include regulators of the neural progenitor program, such as Hes1, Sox2, Id3, and Olig1. Thus, Ascl1 suppresses Notch signaling cell-autonomously via MyT1, coupling neuronal differentiation with repression of the progenitor fate.

  4. Green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate counteracts daytime overeating induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyu; Kek, Huiling Calvina; Lim, Joy; Gelling, Richard Wayne; Han, Weiping

    2016-12-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) induces overeating and obesity. Green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) reduces HFD-induced body weight and body fat gain mainly through increased lipid metabolism and fat oxidation. However, little is known about its effect on HFD-induced alterations in feeding behavior. Three diet groups of wildtype C57B/6j male mice at 5 months old were fed on normal chow diet, 1 week of HFD (60% of energy) and 3 months of HFD (diet-induced obesity (DIO)) prior to EGCG supplement in respective diet. EGCG had no effect on feeding behavior in normal chow diet group. Increased daytime feeding induced by HFD was selectively corrected by EGCG treatment in HFD groups, including reversed food intake, feeding frequency and meal size in HFD + EGCG group, and reduced food intake and feeding frequency in DIO + EGCG group. Moreover, EGCG treatment altered diurnally oscillating expression pattern of key appetite-regulating genes, including AGRP, POMC, and CART, and key circadian genes Clock and Bmal1 in hypothalamus of DIO mice, indicating its central effect on feeding regulation. Our study demonstrates that EGCG supplement specifically counteracts daytime overeating induced by HFD in mice, suggesting its central role in regulating feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Positive Alpha and Negative Beta (A Strategy for Counteracting Systematic Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Sonne Noddeboe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Undiversifiable (or systematic risk has long been an enemy of investors. Many countercyclical strategies have been developed to counter this. However, like all insurance types, these strategies are generally costly to implement, and over time can significantly reduce portfolio returns in long and extended bull markets. In this paper, we discuss an alternative technique, founded on the premise of physiological bias and risk-aversion. We take a behavioral discussion in order to contextualize the insurance like characteristics of option pricing and discuss how this can lead to a mispricing of the asymmetric relationship between the VIX and the S&P 500. To test this, we perform studies in which we find statistical inefficiencies, thereby making it possible to implement a method of hedging index option premium in a way that has displayed no monthly drawdowns in bullish periods, while still providing large returns in major sell-offs. The three versions of the strategy discussed have negative betas to the S&P 500, while exhibiting similar risk-adjusted excess returns over both bull and bear markets. Further, the performance generated over the entire period, for all three strategies, is highly statistically significant. The results challenge the weak form of the Efficient Market Hypothesis and provide evidence that the methods of hedging could be a valuable addition to an equity rich portfolio for the purpose of counteracting systematic risk.

  6. Developing Tools to Counteract and Prevent Suicide Bomber Incidents: A Case Study in Value Sensitive Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royakkers, Lambèr; Steen, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Developers and designers make all sorts of moral decisions throughout an innovation project. In this article, we describe how teams of developers and designers engaged with ethics in the early phases of innovation based on case studies in the SUBCOP project (SUBCOP stands for 'SUicide Bomber COunteraction and Prevention'). For that purpose, Value Sensitive Design (VSD) will be used as a reference. Specifically, we focus on the following two research questions: How can researchers/developers learn about users' perspectives and values during the innovation process? and How can researchers/developers take into account these values, and related design criteria, in their decision-making during the innovation process? Based on a case study of several innovation processes in this project, we conclude the researchers/developers involved are able to do something similar to VSD (without them knowing about VSD or calling it 'VSD'), supported by relatively simple exercises in the project, e.g., meetings with potential end-users and discussions with members of the Ethical Advisory Board of the project. Furthermore, we also found-possibly somewhat counterintuitively-that a commercial, with its focus on understanding and satisfying customers' needs, can promote VSD.

  7. MiR-298 Counteracts Mutant Androgen Receptor Toxicity in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshafie, Naemeh; Lee, Philip R; Chen, Ke-Lian; Harmison, George G; Bott, Laura C; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Burnett, Barrington G; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Rinaldi, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a currently untreatable adult-onset neuromuscular disease caused by expansion of a polyglutamine repeat in the androgen receptor (AR). In SBMA, as in other polyglutamine diseases, a toxic gain of function in the mutant protein is an important factor in the disease mechanism; therefore, reducing the mutant protein holds promise as an effective treatment strategy. In this work, we evaluated a microRNA (miRNA) to reduce AR expression. From a list of predicted miRNAs that target human AR, we selected microRNA-298 (miR-298) for its ability to downregulate AR mRNA and protein levels when transfected in cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant AR and in SBMA patient-derived fibroblasts. We showed that miR-298 directly binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the human AR transcript, and counteracts AR toxicity in vitro. Intravenous delivery of miR-298 with adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector resulted in efficient transduction of muscle and spinal cord and amelioration of the disease phenotype in SBMA mice. Our findings support the development of miRNAs as a therapeutic strategy for SBMA and other neurodegenerative disorders caused by toxic proteins.

  8. Phase Contrast Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    with a simple one-to-one mapping between resolution elements of a spatial phase modulator and resolution elements of the generated intensity pattern is provided. According to the invention a method is provided for synthesizing an intensity pattern with low loss of electromagnetic energy, comprising spatial...... modulation of electromagnetic radiation with a spatial phase mask for modulation of the phase of the incident eletromagnetic radiation by phasor values of individual resolution elements of the spatial phase mask, each phasor value being determined in such a way that the values of the Fourier transformed......The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...

  9. Brain catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibition by tolcapone counteracts recognition memory deficits in normal and chronic phencyclidine-treated rats and in COMT-Val transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrait, Eric R; Carr, Greg V; Weinberger, Daniel R; Lamberty, Yves

    2016-08-01

    The critical involvement of dopamine in cognitive processes has been well established, suggesting that therapies targeting dopamine metabolism may alleviate cognitive dysfunction. Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) is a catecholamine-degrading enzyme, the substrates of which include dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. The present work illustrates the potential therapeutic efficacy of COMT inhibition in alleviating cognitive impairment. A brain-penetrant COMT inhibitor, tolcapone, was tested in normal and phencyclidine-treated rats and COMT-Val transgenic mice. In a novel object recognition procedure, tolcapone counteracted a 24-h-dependent forgetting of a familiar object as well as phencyclidine-induced recognition deficits in the rats at doses ranging from 7.5 to 30 mg/kg. In contrast, entacapone, a COMT inhibitor that does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier, failed to show efficacy at doses up to 30 mg/kg. Tolcapone at a dose of 30 mg/kg also improved novel object recognition performance in transgenic mice, which showed clear recognition deficits. Complementing earlier studies, our results indicate that central inhibition of COMT positively impacts recognition memory processes and might constitute an appealing treatment for cognitive dysfunction related to neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi counteract the Janzen-Connell effect of soil pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Etienne, Rampal S; Huang, Fengmin; Wang, Yongfan; Yu, Shixiao

    2015-01-01

    Soilborne pathogens can contribute to diversity maintenance in tree communities through the Janzen-Connell effect, whereby the pathogenic reduction of seedling performance attenuates with distance from conspecifics. By contrast, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been reported to promote seedli

  11. Candida utilis and Chlorella vulgaris counteract intestinal inflammation in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Grammes

    Full Text Available Intestinal inflammation, caused by impaired intestinal homeostasis, is a serious condition in both animals and humans. The use of conventional extracted soybean meal (SBM in diets for Atlantic salmon and several other fish species is known to induce enteropathy in the distal intestine, a condition often referred to as SBM induced enteropathy (SBMIE. In the present study, we investigated the potential of different microbial ingredients to alleviate SBMIE in Atlantic salmon, as a model of feed-induced inflammation. The dietary treatments consisted of a negative control based on fish meal (FM, a positive control based on 20% SBM, and four experimental diets combining 20% SBM with either one of the three yeasts Candida utilis (CU, Kluyveromyces marxianus (KM, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC or the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (CV. Histopathological examination of the distal intestine showed that all fish fed the SC or SBM diets developed characteristic signs of SBMIE, while those fed the FM, CV or CU diets showed a healthy intestine. Fish fed the KM diet showed intermediate signs of SBMIE. Corroborating results were obtained when measuring the relative length of PCNA positive cells in the crypts of the distal intestine. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed decreased expression of amino acid, fat and drug metabolism pathways as well as increased expression of the pathways for NOD-like receptor signalling and chemokine signalling in both the SC and SBM groups while CV and CU were similar to FM and KM was intermediate. Gene expression of antimicrobial peptides was reduced in the groups showing SBMIE. The characterisation of microbial communities using PCR-DGGE showed a relative increased abundance of Firmicutes bacteria in fish fed the SC or SBM diets. Overall, our results show that both CU and CV were highly effective to counteract SBMIE, while KM had less effect and SC had no functional effects.

  12. Housing in Pyramid Counteracts Neuroendocrine and Oxidative Stress Caused by Chronic Restraint in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Surekha Bhat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  13. MECHANISMS OF COUNTERACTING FLAP-VALVE BRONCHIAL OBSTRUCTION IN CASE OF OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Tetenev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research goal was to formulate and substantiate the hypothesis explaining support for an expiratory air flow in case of pulmonary emphysema. The research method consisted in comparing the mechanical properties of lungs in practically healthy individuals (37 individuals, mean age – (30.4 ± 1.7 y.o. and COPD patients with pronounced lung emphysema (30 patients, mean age – (52.1 ± 2.3 y.o. as well as those of isolated normal lungs (n = 14 and isolated lungs of patients who died of COPD (n = 5. Pulmo-nary mechanics was studied via the simultaneous measurement of transpulmonary pressure and lung ven-tilation volume. General lung hysteresis and elastic lung hysteresis were calculated. The mechanical properties of isolated lungs were studied using passive ventilation under the Donders bell. The air flow was interrupted in order to measure alveolar pressure and develop an elastic lung hysteresis curve. Pres-sure in the Donders bell was changed by means of a special pump in automatic and manual modes. The research has not revealed any fundamental differences between the mechanical properties of the normal and emphysematous lungs. A minimum increase in the pressure inside the Donders bell over atmospheric pressure used to stop air ejection in both normal and the emphysematous lungs as the result of flap-valve bronchial obstruction. In living beings, air is ejected from lungs with an increase in pressure under the conditions of forced expiration. Pressure increases up to (38.6 ± 2.71 cm H2O in healthy individuals and up to (20.5 ± 1.86 cm H2O in COPD patients. Probably, an expiratory air flow is supported by active expiratory bronchial dilatation that counteracts flap-valve bronchial obstruction. The hypothesis is based on the confirmed ability of the lungs to perform inspiratory actions (in addition to the action of respiratory muscles and the theory of mechanical lung activity.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Alleviates Wheat Seed Germination Inhibition and Counteracts Lipid Peroxidation Mediated by Salinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Xu; Zhi-Sheng Sa; Ze-Yu Cao; Wei Xuan; Ben-Kai Huang; Teng-Fang Ling; Qiong-Ying Hu; Wen-Biao Shen

    2006-01-01

    Recently in animals, endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide, was implicated as another important physiological messenger or bioactive molecule. However, little information is known about the physiological roles of CO in the whole plant. In the present study, we report that different concentrations of the CO donor hematin (0.1,1.0 and 10.0μmol/L) alleviated wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Yangmai 158) seed germination inhibition caused by 250 mmol/L NaCl stress in a dose-dependent manner. These responses were also proved by the addition of different gaseous CO aqueous solutions from 0.1% to 100.0% of saturation.Among these treatments, the effect of 1.0 μmol/L hematin and 1.0% saturation of CO aqueous solution were the most obvious. Furthermore, compared with non-hematin treatment, the degradation of storage reserves In wheat seeds was also accelerated. Time-course analyses showed that application of hematin dose-dependently increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and guaiacol peroxidase activities, thus decreasing the lipid peroxidation in germinating wheat seed subjected to saltstress. Meanwhile, the responses of hematin were specific for CO because the addition of the CO scavenger hemoglobin (0.2 g/L) blocked the various actions of 1.0 μ mol/L hematin. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that CO, at a Iow concentration, is able to attenuate the seed germination inhibition produced by salinity stress and counteract the lipid peroxidation in germinating wheat seeds.

  15. Muscle cell atrophy induced by HSP gene silencing was counteracted by HSP overexpression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Joo-Hee; Nikawa, Takeshi; Gwag, Taesik; Park, Kyoungsook; Park, Junsoo

    Heat shock proteins (HSP), as molecular chaperones, are known to assist protein quality control under various stresses. Although overexpression of HSP70 was found to contribute to muscle size retention under an unloading condition, it remains largely unclarified whether muscle atrophy is induced by active suppression of HSP expression. In this study, we pre-treated Hsp70 siRNA to rat L6 cells for the HSP gene silencing, and determined myotube diameter, HSP72 expression and anabolic and catabolic signaling activities in the absence or presence of triterpene celastrol (CEL), the HSP70 inducer. Relative to a negative control (NC), muscle cell diameter was reduced 0.89-fold in the siRNA-treated group, increased 1.2-fold in the CEL-treated group and retained at the size of NC in the siRNA+CEL group. HSP72 expression was decreased 0.35-fold by siRNA whereas the level was increased 6- to 8-fold in the CEL and siRNA+CEL groups. Expression of FoxO3 and atrogin-1 was increased 1.8- to 4.8-fold by siRNA, which was abolished by CEL treatment. Finally, phosphorylation of Akt1, S6K and ERK1/2 was not affected by siRNA, but was elevated 2- to 6-fold in the CEL and siRNA+CEL groups. Taken together, HSP downregulation by Hsp gene silencing led to muscle cell atrophy principally via increases in catabolic activities and that such anti-atrophic effect was counteracted by HSP overexpression.

  16. High brachytherapy doses can counteract hypoxia in cervical cancer—a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru; Beskow, Catharina; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2017-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia is a well-known adverse factor for the outcome of radiotherapy. For cervical tumours in particular, several studies indicate large variability in tumour oxygenation. However, clinical evidence shows that the management of cervical cancer including brachytherapy leads to high rate of success. It was the purpose of this study to investigate whether the success of brachytherapy for cervical cancer, seemingly regardless of oxygenation status, could be explained by the characteristics of the brachytherapy dose distributions. To this end, a previously used in silico model of tumour oxygenation and radiation response was further developed to simulate the treatment of cervical cancer employing a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. Using a clinically-derived brachytherapy dose distribution and assuming a homogeneous dose delivered by external radiotherapy, cell survival was assessed on voxel level by taking into account the variation of sensitivity with oxygenation as well as the effects of repair, repopulation and reoxygenation during treatment. Various scenarios were considered for the conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the hypoxic region in the target. By using the clinically-prescribed brachytherapy dose distribution and varying the total dose delivered with external beam radiotherapy in 25 fractions, the resulting values of the dose for 50% tumour control, D 50, were in agreement with clinically-observed values for high cure rates if fast reoxygenation was assumed. The D 50 was furthermore similar for the different degrees of conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the tumour, regardless of whether the hypoxic fraction was 10%, 25%, or 40%. To achieve 50% control with external RT only, a total dose of more than 70 Gy in 25 fractions would be required for all cases considered. It can thus be concluded that the high doses delivered in brachytherapy can counteract the increased

  17. Thermal analysis on the EAST tungsten plasma facing components with shaping structure counteracting the misalignment issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoguo, Wang; Dahuan, Zhu; Rui, Ding; Junling, Chen

    2017-02-01

    Tungsten monoblock type tiles with ITER dimensions along with supporting cassette components were installed at EAST’s upper diverter during 2014 and EAST’s lower diverter will also be upgraded in the future. These cassette structures pose critical issues on the high cumulative incident heat flux due to the leading edges and misalignments (0 ˜ 1.5 mm), which may result in the destruction or even melting of the tungsten tile. The present work summarizes the thermal analysis using ANSYS multiphysics software 15.0 performed on the actively cooled W tiles to evaluate the shaping effect on surface temperature. In the current heat flux conditions (Q|| ˜ 100 MW m-2), the adopted chamfer shaping (1 × 1 mm) can only reduce the maximum temperature by about 14%, but it also has a melting risk at the maximum misalignment of 1.5 mm. The candidate shaping solutions elliptical (round) edge, dome and fish-scale are analyzed for comparison and are identified not as good as the dual chamfer structure. A relatively good dual chamfer (2 × 13 mm) shaping forming a symmetrical sloping roof structure can effectively counteract the 1.5 mm misalignment, reducing the maximum temperature by up to 50%. However, in the future heat flux conditions (Q|| ˜ 287 MW m-2), it may only endure about 0.5 mm misalignment. Moreover, no proper shaping solution has been found that can avoid melting at the maximum misalignment of 1.5 mm. Thus, the engineering misalignment has to be limited to an acceptable level. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB107004 and 2013GB105003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405209).

  18. Housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, M Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2007-03-01

    The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC) housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups) subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC) having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP) being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS) in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  19. Red Seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) Extracts Counteracting Azoxymethane-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim Waly, Mostafa; Al Alawi, Ahmed Ali; Al Marhoobi, Insaaf Mohammad; Rahman, Mohammad Shafiur

    2016-12-01

    Background: Azoxymethane (AOM) is a well-known colon cancer-inducing agent in experimental animals via mechanisms that include oxidative stress in rat colon and liver tissue. Few studies have investigated AOM-induced oxidative stress in rat liver tissue. Red seaweeds of the genera Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis are rich in polyphenolic compounds that may suppress cancer through antioxidant properties, yet limited research has been carried out to investigate their anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant influence against AOM-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Objective: This study aims to determine protective effects of red seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) extracts against AOM-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injections of AOM, 15 mg/kg body weight, once a week for two consecutive weeks and then orally administered red seaweed (100 mg/kg body-weight) extracts for sixteen weeks. At the end of the experiment all animals were overnight fasted then sacrificed and blood and liver tissues were collected. Results: AOM treatment significantly decreased serum liver markers and induced hepatic oxidative stress as evidenced by increased liver tissue homogenate levels of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, decreased total antioxidant capacity and glutathione, and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and superoxide dismutase). Both red seaweed extracts abolished the AOM-associated oxidative stress and protected against liver injury as evidenced by increased serum levels of liver function markers. In addition, histological findings confirmed protective effects of the two red seaweed extracts against AOM-induced liver injury. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that red seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) extracts counteracted oxidative stress-induced hepatotoxicity in a

  20. Definition of singularity due to Newton’s second law counteracting gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezu Jahanshir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With several issuesbeing raised in the late twentieth century, modern physics was challenged andwhile quantum mechanics and relativity did not have the ability to respond andresolve issues also they cannot do it todays.Despite such problems, physicists are trying to find an appropriate andconvincing response only on the scope of quantum physics and relativity and inthis respect need topay attention to the classical mechanics.Series of failures exist in some categories of these theories, that prior totheir use, they should be clarified and resolved. Regarding on review of Newton's second law in this paper, we have been attempted toenter to the sub-quantum space by crossing the border of quantum mechanics thento survey of counteracting Newton's second law and the universal gravitationlaw and finally we can be analyzed and investigated the results. Insub-quantum space, we passed across the black hole and reach the formation ofthe absolute black hole (a new term that has been presented for the first time in astrophysics by the authors by specifying the limits of Newton's second lawand gravitation law, then the singularity will be explained in the explosion of an absolute black hole. In thisreview we will be forced to change their attitude towards the singularity andthe general conclusion in the singularity state is: volume will not be zero, densitywill be limited, the time is not a physical quantity (absolute or relative anda human as an observer (who is not neutral has invented the time just forusing it to the explain the ticking clock. We use the time just for the clockticking and in different physical situations we can only examine the working of the clocks or compare them to each other.

  1. A type IV translocated Legionella cysteine phytase counteracts intracellular growth restriction by phytate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stephen; Stirnimann, Christian U; Wieser, Mara; Frey, Daniel; Meier, Roger; Engelhardt, Sabrina; Li, Xiaodan; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-12-05

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila, colonizes diverse environmental niches, including biofilms, plant material, and protozoa. In these habitats, myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) is prevalent and used as a phosphate storage compound or as a siderophore. L. pneumophila replicates in protozoa and mammalian phagocytes within a unique "Legionella-containing vacuole." The bacteria govern host cell interactions through the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system (T4SS) and ∼300 different "effector" proteins. Here we characterize a hitherto unrecognized Icm/Dot substrate, LppA, as a phytate phosphatase (phytase). Phytase activity of recombinant LppA required catalytically essential cysteine (Cys(231)) and arginine (Arg(237)) residues. The structure of LppA at 1.4 Å resolution revealed a mainly α-helical globular protein stabilized by four antiparallel β-sheets that binds two phosphate moieties. The phosphates localize to a P-loop active site characteristic of dual specificity phosphatases or to a non-catalytic site, respectively. Phytate reversibly abolished growth of L. pneumophila in broth, and growth inhibition was relieved by overproduction of LppA or by metal ion titration. L. pneumophila lacking lppA replicated less efficiently in phytate-loaded Acanthamoeba castellanii or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the intracellular growth defect was complemented by the phytase gene. These findings identify the chelator phytate as an intracellular bacteriostatic component of cell-autonomous host immunity and reveal a T4SS-translocated L. pneumophila phytase that counteracts intracellular bacterial growth restriction by phytate. Thus, bacterial phytases might represent therapeutic targets to combat intracellular pathogens.

  2. Acute caloric restriction counteracts hepatic bile acid and cholesterol deficiency in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straniero, S; Rosqvist, F; Edholm, D; Ahlström, H; Kullberg, J; Sundbom, M; Risérus, U; Rudling, M

    2017-05-01

    Bile acid (BA) synthesis is regulated by BA signalling in the liver and by fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), synthesized and released from the intestine. In morbid obesity, faecal excretion and hepatic synthesis of BAs and cholesterol are strongly induced and caloric restriction reduces their faecal excretion considerably. We hypothesized that the high intestinal food mass in morbidly obese subjects promotes faecal excretion of BAs and cholesterol, thereby creating a shortage of both BAs and cholesterol in the liver. Ten morbidly obese women (BMI 42 ± 2.6 kg m(-2) ) were monitored on days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after beginning a low-calorie diet (800-1100 kcal day(-1) ). Serum was collected and liver size and fat content determined. Synthesis of BAs and cholesterol was evaluated from serum markers, and the serum levels of lipoproteins, BAs, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), insulin, glucose and FGF19 were monitored. Fifty-four nonobese women (BMI cholesterol and serum levels of BAs and PCSK9 were elevated in the obese group compared to controls. Already after 3 days on a low-calorie diet, BA and cholesterol synthesis and serum BA and PCSK9 levels normalized, whereas LDL cholesterol increased. FGF19 and triglyceride levels were unchanged, and liver volume was reduced by 10%. The results suggest that hepatic BAs and cholesterol are deficient in morbid obesity. Caloric restriction rapidly counteracts these deficiencies, normalizing BA and cholesterol synthesis and circulating PCSK9 levels, indicating that overproduction of cholesterol in enlarged peripheral tissues cannot explain this phenotype. We propose that excessive food intake promotes faecal loss of BAs and cholesterol contributing to their hepatic deficiencies. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  3. Exercise counteracts fatty liver disease in rats fed on fructose-rich diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltarelli Fabrício A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to analyze the effects of exercise at the aerobic/anaerobic transition on the markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, insulin sensitivity and the blood chemistry of rats kept on a fructose-rich diet. Methods We separated 48 Wistar rats into two groups according to diet: a control group (balanced diet AIN-93 G and a fructose-rich diet group (60% fructose. The animals were tested for maximal lactate-steady state (MLSS in order to identify the aerobic/anaerobic metabolic transition during swimming exercises at 28 and 90 days of age. One third of the animals of each group were submitted to swimming training at an intensity equivalent to the individual MLSS for 1 hours/day, 5 days/week from 28 to 120 days (early protocol. Another third were submitted to the training from 90 to 120 days (late protocol, and the others remained sedentary. The main assays performed included an insulin tolerance test (ITT and tests of serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] and aspartate aminotransferase [AST] activities, serum triglyceride concentrations [TG] and liver total lipid concentrations. Results The fructose-fed rats showed decreased insulin sensitivity, and the late-exercise training protocol counteracted this alteration. There was no difference between the groups in levels of serum ALT, whereas AST and liver lipids increased in the fructose-fed sedentary group when compared with the other groups. Serum triglycerides concentrations were higher in the fructose-fed trained groups when compared with the corresponding control group. Conclusions The late-training protocol was effective in restoring insulin sensitivity to acceptable standards. Considering the markers here evaluated, both training protocols were successful in preventing the emergence of non-alcoholic fatty liver status disease.

  4. Sulforaphane counteracts aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer driven by dysregulated Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyao; Isayev, Orkhan; Heilmann, Katharina; Schoensiegel, Frank; Liu, Li; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Labsch, Sabrina; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Juergen; Gladkich, Jury; Giese, Nathalia; Werner, Jens; Schemmer, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M.; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Schaefer, Michael; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The extreme aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has been associated with blocked gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). We examined whether disturbed GJIC is responsible for a CSC phenotype in established and primary cancer cells and patient tissue of PDA using interdisciplinary methods based in physiology, cell and molecular biology, histology and epigenetics. Flux of fluorescent dyes and gemcitabine through gap junctions (GJs) was intact in less aggressive cells but not in highly malignant cells with morphological dysfunctional GJs. Among several connexins, only Cx43 was expressed on the cell surface of less aggressive and GJIC-competent cells, whereas Cx43 surface expression was absent in highly malignant, E-cadherin-negative and GJIC-incompetent cells. The levels of total Cx43 protein and Cx43 phosphorylated at Ser368 and Ser279/282 were high in normal tissue but low to absent in malignant tissue. si-RNA-mediated inhibition of Cx43 expression in GJIC-competent cells prevented GJIC and induced colony formation and the expression of stem cell-related factors. The bioactive substance sulforaphane enhanced Cx43 and E-cadherin levels, inhibited the CSC markers c-Met and CD133, improved the functional morphology of GJs and enhanced GJIC. Sulforaphane altered the phosphorylation of several kinases and their substrates and inhibition of GSK3, JNK and PKC prevented sulforaphane-induced CX43 expression. The sulforaphane-mediated expression of Cx43 was not correlated with enhanced Cx43 RNA expression, acetylated histone binding and Cx43 promoter de-methylation, suggesting that posttranslational phosphorylation is the dominant regulatory mechanism. Together, the absence of Cx43 prevents GJIC and enhances aggressiveness, whereas sulforaphane counteracts this process, and our findings highlight dietary co-treatment as a viable treatment option for PDA. PMID:24742583

  5. S100b Counteracts Neurodegeneration of Rat Cholinergic Neurons in Brain Slices after Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

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    Daniela Serbinek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a severe chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by beta-amyloid plaques, tau pathology, cerebrovascular damage, inflammation, reactive gliosis, and cell death of cholinergic neurons. The aim of the present study is to test whether the glia-derived molecule S100b can counteract neurodegeneration of cholinergic neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in organotypic brain slices of basal nucleus of Meynert. Our data showed that 3 days of OGD induced a marked decrease of cholinergic neurons (60% of control, which could be counteracted by 50 μg/mL recombinant S100b. The effect was dose and time dependent. Application of nerve growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 was less protective. C-fos-like immunoreactivity was enhanced 3 hours after OGD indicating metabolic stress. We conclude that S100b is a potent neuroprotective factor for cholinergic neurons during ischemic events.

  6. Success Counteracting Tobacco Company Interference in Thailand: An Example of FCTC Implementation for Low- and Middle-income Countries

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    Stephen L. Hamann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs interfere regularly in policymaking in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. The WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control provides mechanisms and guidance for dealing with TTC interference, but many countries still face ‘how to’ challenges of implementation. For more than two decades, Thailand’s public health community has been developing a system for identifying and counteracting strategies TTCs use to derail, delay and undermine tobacco control policymaking. Consequently, Thailand has already implemented most of the FCTC guidelines for counteracting TTC interference. In this study, our aims are to describe strategies TTCs have used in Thailand to interfere in policymaking, and to examine how the public health community in Thailand has counteracted TTC interference. We analyzed information reported by three groups with a stake in tobacco control policies: Thai tobacco control advocates, TTCs, and international tobacco control experts. To identify TTC viewpoints and strategies, we also extracted information from internal tobacco industry documents. We synthesized these data and identified six core strategies TTCs use to interfere in tobacco control policymaking: (1 doing business with ‘two faces’, (2 seeking to influence people in high places, (3 ‘buying’ advocates in grassroots organizations, (4 putting up a deceptive front, (5 intimidation, and (6 undermining controls on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. We present three case examples showing where TTCs have employed multiple interference strategies simultaneously, and showing how Thai tobacco control advocates have successfully counteracted those strategies by: (1 conducting vigilant surveillance, (2 excluding tobacco companies from policymaking, (3 restricting tobacco company sales, (4 sustaining pressure, and (5 dedicating resources to the effective enforcement of regulations. Policy implications from this study are

  7. Success counteracting tobacco company interference in Thailand: an example of FCTC implementation for low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenca, Naowarut; Mock, Jeremiah; Kungskulniti, Nipapun; Preechawong, Sunida; Kojetin, Nicholas; Hamann, Stephen L

    2012-04-01

    Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) interfere regularly in policymaking in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control provides mechanisms and guidance for dealing with TTC interference, but many countries still face 'how to' challenges of implementation. For more than two decades, Thailand's public health community has been developing a system for identifying and counteracting strategies TTCs use to derail, delay and undermine tobacco control policymaking. Consequently, Thailand has already implemented most of the FCTC guidelines for counteracting TTC interference. In this study, our aims are to describe strategies TTCs have used in Thailand to interfere in policymaking, and to examine how the public health community in Thailand has counteracted TTC interference. We analyzed information reported by three groups with a stake in tobacco control policies: Thai tobacco control advocates, TTCs, and international tobacco control experts. To identify TTC viewpoints and strategies, we also extracted information from internal tobacco industry documents. We synthesized these data and identified six core strategies TTCs use to interfere in tobacco control policymaking: (1) doing business with 'two faces', (2) seeking to influence people in high places, (3) 'buying' advocates in grassroots organizations, (4) putting up a deceptive front, (5) intimidation, and (6) undermining controls on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. We present three case examples showing where TTCs have employed multiple interference strategies simultaneously, and showing how Thai tobacco control advocates have successfully counteracted those strategies by: (1) conducting vigilant surveillance, (2) excluding tobacco companies from policymaking, (3) restricting tobacco company sales, (4) sustaining pressure, and (5) dedicating resources to the effective enforcement of regulations. Policy implications from this study are that tobacco control

  8. Influence of Mn and Fe Counteraction on Rice (Oryza Sativa L.) Oranging Physiological Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAOZHONG-WEN; LINDONG-JIAO; 等

    1994-01-01

    Mn and Fe are two important micronutrients of paddy soils derived from red earths.Rice(Oryza sativa L.)oranging physiological diease in newly reclaimed red rarths is related to Fe toxicity.There have been considerable studies on Mn and Fe counteraction,but influence of Mn and Fe counteration on rice oranging physiological disease still remains unknown.This paper is to study,using two soils from USA and China respectively,the relationship between Nn and Fe counteraction and the physiological disease.Analysis for water soluble and extractable Fe and Mn showed that Mn/Fe ratios of the red earths were lower than those of the paddy soils.Fertilizing with Mn raised Mn/Fe and reduced oranging leaves,improved growth and increased yields.Analysis with electron probe showed that Mn treatment had less Fe deposit in root epidermis and more Ca and Si in roots.The results indicated that fertilizing with Mn could correct Fe toxicity.How to apply Mn and Fe counteraction in practice is worth further studying.

  9. Adaptive brain shut-down counteracts neuroinflammation in the near-term ovine fetus

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    Alex eXU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Repetitive umbilical cord occlusions (UCOs in ovine fetus leading to severe acidemia result in adaptive shut-down of electrocortical activity (ECOG as well as systemic and brain inflammation. We hypothesized that the fetuses with earlier ECOG shut-down as a neuroprotective mechanism in response to repetitive UCOs will show less brain inflammation and, moreover, that chronic hypoxia will impact this relationship.Methods: Near term fetal sheep were chronically instrumented with ECOG leads, vascular catheters and a cord occluder and then underwent repetitive UCOs for up to 4 hours or until fetal arterial pH was < 7.00. Eight animals, hypoxic prior to the UCOs (SaO2< 55%, were allowed to recover 24 hours post insult, while 14 animals, five of whom also were chronically hypoxic, were allowed to recover 48 hours post insult, after which brains were perfusion-fixed. Time of ECOG shut-down and corresponding pH were noted, as well as time to then reach pH<7.00 (ΔT. Microglia (MG were counted as a measure of inflammation in grey matter layers 4-6 (GM4-6 where most ECOG activity is generated. Results are reported as mean±SEM for p<0.05.Results: Repetitive UCOs resulted in worsening acidosis over 3 to 4 hours with arterial pH decreasing to 6.97±0.02 all UCO groups’ animals, recovering to baseline by 24 hours. ECOG shut-down occurred 52±7 min before reaching pH < 7.00 at pH 7.23±0.02 across the animal groups. MG counts were inversely correlated to ΔT in 24 hours recovery animals (R=-0.84, as expected. This was not the case in normoxic 48 hours recovery animals, and, surprisingly, in hypoxic 48 hours recovery animals this relationship was reversed (R=0.90.Conclusion: Adaptive brain shut-down during labour-like worsening acidemia counteracts neuroinflammation in a hypoxia- and time-dependent manner.

  10. Dexamethasone counteracts the effect of prolactin on islet function: implications for islet regulation in late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhaus, A J; Bhagroo, N V; Brelje, T C; Sorenson, R L

    2000-04-01

    Islets undergo a number of up-regulatory changes to meet the increased demand for insulin during pregnancy, including increased insulin secretion and beta-cell proliferation. It has been shown that elevated lactogenic hormone is directly responsible for these changes, which occur in a phasic pattern, peaking on day 15 of pregnancy and returning to control levels by day 20 (term). As placental lactogen levels remain elevated through late gestation, it was of interest to determine whether glucocorticoids (which increase during late gestation) could counteract the effects of lactogens on insulin secretion, beta-cell proliferation, and apoptosis. We found that insulin secretion measured over 24 h in culture and acute secretion measured over 1 h in response to high glucose were increased at least 2-fold by PRL treatment after 6 days in culture. Dexamethasone (DEX) treatment had a significant inhibitory effect on secretion in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations greater than 1 nM. At 100 nM, a concentration equivalent to the plasma corticosteroid level during late pregnancy, DEX inhibited secretion to below control levels. The addition of DEX (>1 nM) inhibited secretion from PRL-treated islets to levels similar to those produced by DEX treatment alone. Bromodeoxyuridine (10 microM) staining for the final 24 h of a 6-day culture showed that PRL treatment increased cell proliferation 6-fold over the control level. DEX treatment alone (1-1000 nM) did not reduce cell division below the control level, but significantly inhibited the rate of division in PRL-treated islets. YoYo-1, an ultrasensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, was added (1 microM; 8 h) to the medium after 1-3 days of culture to examine cell death. Islets examined under confocal microscopy showed that DEX treatment (100 nM) increased the number of cells with apoptotic nuclear morphologies. This was quantified by counting the number of YoYo-labeled nuclei per islet under conventional epifluorescence

  11. By counteracting gravity, triceps surae sets both kinematics and kinetics of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco; Gagey, Oliver; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2014-02-01

    In the single-stance phase of gait, gravity acting on the center of mass (CoM) causes a disequilibrium torque, which generates propulsive force. Triceps surae activity resists gravity by restraining forward tibial rotation thereby tuning CoM momentum. We hypothesized that time and amplitude modulation of triceps surae activity determines the kinematics (step length and cadence) and kinetics of gait. Nineteen young subjects participated in two experiments. In the gait initiation (GI) protocol, subjects deliberately initiated walking at different velocities for the same step length. In the balance-recovery (BR) protocol, subjects executed steps of different length after being unexpectedly released from an inclined posture. Ground reaction force was recorded by a large force platform and electromyography of soleus, gastrocnemius medialis and lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles was collected by wireless surface electrodes. In both protocols, the duration of triceps activity was highly correlated with single-stance duration (GI, R (2) = 0.68; BR, R (2) = 0.91). In turn, step length was highly correlated with single-stance duration (BR, R (2) = 0.70). Control of CoM momentum was obtained by decelerating the CoM fall via modulation of amplitude of triceps activity. By modulation of triceps activity, the central nervous system (CNS) varied the position of CoM with respect to the center of pressure (CoP). The CoM-CoP gap in the sagittal plane was determinant for setting the disequilibrium torque and thus walking velocity. Thus, by controlling the gap, CNS-modified walking velocity (GI, R (2) = 0.86; BR, R (2) = 0.92). This study is the first to highlight that by merely counteracting gravity, triceps activity sets the kinematics and kinetics of gait. It also provides evidence that the surge in triceps activity during fast walking is due to the increased requirement of braking the fall of CoM in late stance in order to perform a smoother step-to-step transition.

  12. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  13. AAV-mediated pancreatic overexpression of Igf1 counteracts progression to autoimmune diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallol, Cristina; Casana, Estefania; Jimenez, Veronica; Casellas, Alba; Haurigot, Virginia; Jambrina, Claudia; Sacristan, Victor; Morró, Meritxell; Agudo, Judith; Vilà, Laia; Bosch, Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of β-cells leading to severe insulin deficiency. Although many improvements have been made in recent years, exogenous insulin therapy is still imperfect; new therapeutic approaches, focusing on preserving/expanding β-cell mass and/or blocking the autoimmune process that destroys islets, should be developed. The main objective of this work was to test in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes, the effects of local expression of Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), a potent mitogenic and pro-survival factor for β-cells with immunomodulatory properties. Transgenic NOD mice overexpressing IGF1 specifically in β-cells (NOD-IGF1) were generated and phenotyped. In addition, miRT-containing, IGF1-encoding adeno-associated viruses (AAV) of serotype 8 (AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT) were produced and administered to 4- or 11-week-old non-transgenic NOD females through intraductal delivery. Several histological, immunological, and metabolic parameters were measured to monitor disease over a period of 28-30 weeks. In transgenic mice, local IGF1 expression led to long-term suppression of diabetes onset and robust protection of β-cell mass from the autoimmune insult. AAV-mediated pancreatic-specific overexpression of IGF1 in adult animals also dramatically reduced diabetes incidence, both when vectors were delivered before pathology onset or once insulitis was established. Transgenic NOD-IGF1 and AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT-treated NOD animals had much less islet infiltration than controls, preserved β-cell mass, and normal insulinemia. Transgenic and AAV-treated islets showed less expression of antigen-presenting molecules, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines important for tissue-specific homing of effector T cells, suggesting IGF1 modulated islet autoimmunity in NOD mice. Local expression of Igf1 by AAV-mediated gene transfer counteracts progression to diabetes in NOD mice. This study suggests a

  14. The Value of Contrast Echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon C. Treiber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is much evidence-based research proving the effectiveness of contrast echocardiography, but there are still questions and concerns about its specific uses. This study tested the effectiveness of contrast echocardiography in defining the left ventricular endocardial border. Methods: From 30 patients, a total of 60 echocardiograms –– 30 with and 30 without use of contrast –– were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded cardiologists with advanced training in echocardiography. No single cardiologist reviewed contrast and noncontrast images of the same patient. Each set of 30 echocardiograms was then studied for wall-motion scoring. Visualization of left ventricular wall segments and a global visualization confidence level of interpretation were recorded. Results: Of all wall segments (N = 510, 91% were visualized in echocardiograms with use of contrast, whereas 75% of the walls were visualized in echocardiograms without contrast (P < 0.001. Of 30 examinations, 17 contrast echocardiograms were read with high confidence compared to 6 without contrast use (P = 0.004. The number of walls visualized with contrast was increased in 18 patients (60%, whereas noncontrast echocardiograms yielded more visualized walls in 6 patients (20%, P = 0.002. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that contrast is valuable to echocardiographic imaging. Its use should be supported throughout echocardiography clinics and encouraged in certain patients for whom resting and stress echocardiography results without contrast often prove uninterpretable.

  15. Postconditioning with inhaled carbon monoxide counteracts apoptosis and neuroinflammation in the ischemic rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Schallner

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R of neuronal structures and organs is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due to neuronal cell death. We hypothesized that inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO after I/R injury ('postconditioning' would protect retinal ganglion cells (RGC. METHODS: Retinal I/R injury was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 by increasing ocular pressure (120 mmHg, 1 h. Rats inhaled room air or CO (250 ppm for 1 h immediately following ischemia or with 1.5 and 3 h latency. Retinal tissue was harvested to analyze Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, HO-1 expression and phosphorylation of the nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB, p38 and ERK-1/2 MAPK. NF-κB activation was determined and inhibition of ERK-1/2 was performed using PD98059 (2 mg/kg. Densities of fluorogold prelabeled RGC were analyzed 7 days after injury. Microglia, macrophage and Müller cell activation and proliferation were evaluated by Iba-1, GFAP and Ki-67 staining. RESULTS: Inhalation of CO after I/R inhibited Bax and Caspase-3 expression (Bax: 1.9 ± 0.3 vs. 1.4 ± 0.2, p = 0.028; caspase-3: 2.0 ± 0.2 vs. 1.5 ± 0.1, p = 0.007; mean ± S.D., fold induction at 12 h, while expression of Bcl-2 was induced (1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 1.6 ± 0.2, p = 0.001; mean ± S.D., fold induction at 12 h. CO postconditioning suppressed retinal p38 phosphorylation (p = 0.023 at 24 h and induced the phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 (p<0.001 at 24 h. CO postconditioning inhibited the expression of HO-1. The activation of NF-κB, microglia and Müller cells was potently inhibited by CO as well as immigration of proliferative microglia and macrophages into the retina. CO protected I/R-injured RGC with a therapeutic window at least up to 3 h (n = 8; RGC/mm(2; mean ± S.D.: 1255 ± 327 I/R only vs. 1956 ± 157 immediate CO treatment, vs. 1830 ± 109 1.5 h time lag and vs. 1626 ± 122 3 h time lag; p<0.001. Inhibition of ERK-1/2 did not counteract the CO effects (RGC/mm(2: 1956 ± 157 vs

  16. rgs-CaM Detects and Counteracts Viral RNA Silencing Suppressors in Plant Immune Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Jin; Tadamura, Kazuki; Murakami, Taiki; Inaba, Jun-Ichi; Kim, Bo Min; Sato, Masako; Atsumi, Go; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Masuta, Chikara; Nakahara, Kenji S

    2017-10-01

    -plant resistance against secondary infection with pathogens; this so-called systemic acquired resistance (SAR) has been known for more than half a century and continues to be extensively studied. SAR-induced plants strongly and rapidly express a number of antibiotics and pathogenesis-related proteins targeted against secondary infection, which can account for enhanced resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens but are not thought to control viral infection. This study showed that enhanced resistance against cucumber mosaic virus is caused by a tobacco calmodulin-like protein, rgs-CaM, which detects and counteracts the major viral virulence factor (RNA silencing suppressor) after SAR induction. rgs-CaM-mediated SAR illustrates the growth versus defense trade-off in plants, as it targets the major virulence factor only under specific biotic stress conditions, thus avoiding the cost of constitutive activation while reducing the damage from virus infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncica, Ana Maria; Saftoiu, Adrian;

    2011-01-01

    agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...... sonography to depict tumor neovascularization can be increased by contrast agents. Contrast-enhanced harmonic imaging is a useful aid in identifying the tumor vasculature and studying pancreatic microperfusion. In the future, these techniques could potentially be used to quantify tumor perfusion, to assess...

  18. Methylene blue counteracts H2S toxicity-induced cardiac depression by restoring L-type Ca channel activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Sonobe, Takashi; Song, Jianliang; Rannals, Matthew D.; Wang, JuFang; Tubbs, Nicole; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Haouzi, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that methylene blue (MB) can counteract hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication-induced circulatory failure. Because of the multifarious effects of high concentrations of H2S on cardiac function, as well as the numerous properties of MB, the nature of this interaction, if any, remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify 1) the effects of MB on H2S-induced cardiac toxicity and 2) whether L-type Ca2+ channels, one of the targets of H2S, could transduce some of the counteracting effects of MB. In sedated rats, H2S infused at a rate that would be lethal within 5 min (24 μM·kg−1·min−1), produced a rapid fall in left ventricle ejection fraction, determined by echocardiography, leading to a pulseless electrical activity. Blood concentrations of gaseous H2S reached 7.09 ± 3.53 μM when cardiac contractility started to decrease. Two to three injections of MB (4 mg/kg) transiently restored cardiac contractility, blood pressure, and V̇o2, allowing the animals to stay alive until the end of H2S infusion. MB also delayed PEA by several minutes following H2S-induced coma and shock in unsedated rats. Applying a solution containing lethal levels of H2S (100 μM) on isolated mouse cardiomyocytes significantly reduced cell contractility, intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) transient amplitudes, and L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa) within 3 min of exposure. MB (20 mg/l) restored the cardiomyocyte function, ([Ca2+]i) transient, and ICa. The present results offer a new approach for counteracting H2S toxicity and potentially other conditions associated with acute inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:26962024

  19. Methylene blue counteracts H2S toxicity-induced cardiac depression by restoring L-type Ca channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judenherc-Haouzi, Annick; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Sonobe, Takashi; Song, Jianliang; Rannals, Matthew D; Wang, JuFang; Tubbs, Nicole; Cheung, Joseph Y; Haouzi, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We have previously reported that methylene blue (MB) can counteract hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication-induced circulatory failure. Because of the multifarious effects of high concentrations of H2S on cardiac function, as well as the numerous properties of MB, the nature of this interaction, if any, remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify 1) the effects of MB on H2S-induced cardiac toxicity and 2) whether L-type Ca(2+) channels, one of the targets of H2S, could transduce some of the counteracting effects of MB. In sedated rats, H2S infused at a rate that would be lethal within 5 min (24 μM·kg(-1)·min(-1)), produced a rapid fall in left ventricle ejection fraction, determined by echocardiography, leading to a pulseless electrical activity. Blood concentrations of gaseous H2S reached 7.09 ± 3.53 μM when cardiac contractility started to decrease. Two to three injections of MB (4 mg/kg) transiently restored cardiac contractility, blood pressure, and V̇o2, allowing the animals to stay alive until the end of H2S infusion. MB also delayed PEA by several minutes following H2S-induced coma and shock in unsedated rats. Applying a solution containing lethal levels of H2S (100 μM) on isolated mouse cardiomyocytes significantly reduced cell contractility, intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) transient amplitudes, and L-type Ca(2+) currents (ICa) within 3 min of exposure. MB (20 mg/l) restored the cardiomyocyte function, ([Ca(2+)]i) transient, and ICa The present results offer a new approach for counteracting H2S toxicity and potentially other conditions associated with acute inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Discourse Theory and "Contrastive Rhetoric."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Lev, Zev

    1986-01-01

    Appraises R. Kaplan's "contrastic rhetoric" in the light of a multilanguage research project on discourse structure. Concludes that Kaplan's specific analyses are in need of substantive revision. (FL)

  1. Fuzzy-Contextual Contrast Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Anil; Verma, Om; Khanna, Chintan

    2017-02-08

    This paper presents contrast enhancement algorithms based on fuzzy contextual information of the images. We introduce fuzzy similarity index and fuzzy contrast factor to capture the neighborhood characteristics of a pixel. A new histogram, using fuzzy contrast factor of each pixel is developed, and termed as the fuzzy dissimilarity histogram (FDH). A cumulative distribution function (CDF) is formed with normalized values of FDH and used as a transfer function to obtain the contrast enhanced image. The algorithm gives good contrast enhancement and preserves the natural characteristic of the image. In order to develop a contextual intensity transfer function, we introduce a fuzzy membership function based on fuzzy similarity index and coefficient of variation of the image. The contextual intensity transfer function is designed using the fuzzy membership function to achieve final contrast enhanced image. The overall algorithm is referred as the fuzzy contextual contrast-enhancement (FCCE) algorithm. The proposed algorithms are compared with conventional and state-of-art contrast enhancement algorithms. The quantitative and visual assessment of the results is performed. The results of quantitative measures are statistically analyzed using t-test. The exhaustive experimentation and analysis show the proposed algorithm efficiently enhances contrast and yields in natural visual quality images.

  2. A result on the acoustic characteristics of the Mixture of Counter-phase Counteract and Split-gas Rushing muffler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Ying-li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The exhaust noise, which falls into low-frequency noise, is the dominant noise source of a diesel engines and tractors. The traditional exhaust silencers, which are normally constructed by combination of expansion chamber, and perforated pipe or perforated board, are with high exhaust resistance, but poor noise reduction especially for the low-frequency band noise. For this reason, a new theory of exhaust muffler of diesel engine based on counter-phase counteracts has been proposed. The mathematical model and the corresponding experimental validation for the new exhaust muffler based on this theory were performed.

  3. An Anti-apoE4 Specific Monoclonal Antibody Counteracts the Pathological Effects of apoE4 In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Ishai; Liraz, Ori; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-06-02

    ApolipoproteinE4 (apoE4) is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and as such is a promising therapeutic target. This study examined the extent to which the pathological effects of apoE4 can be counteracted in vivo utilizing an immunological approach in which anti-apoE4 antibodies are applied peripherally by i.p. injections into apoE4-targeted replacement mice. Prerequisites for the successful pursuit of this objective are the availability of antibodies that specifically bind brain apoE4 and not apoE3, and demonstrating that direct application of these antibodies into the brain can counteract the effects of apoE4. Accordingly, it was shown that the antiapoE4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 9D11 binds specifically to brain apoE4 and not apoE3. Direct i.c.v. application of mAb 9D11 prevented the apoE4-driven accumulation of Aβ in hippocampal neurons following activation of the amyloid cascade by inhibiting the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin. These findings provide a proof-of-concept that anti-apoE4 mAb 9D11, when introduced into the brain, can counteract the apoE4 effects in vivo. Subsequent experiments, utilizing repeated i.p. injections of mAb 9D11, resulted in the formation of apoE/IgG complexes specifically in apoE4 mice. This was associated with reversal of the cognitive impairments of apoE4 in the Morris water maze and the novel object recognition test as well as with reversal of key apoE4-driven pathologies including the hyperphosphorylated tau and the reduced levels of the apoER2 receptor. These results indicate that anti-apoE4 immunotherapy counteracts the cognitive and brain pathological effects of apoE4, and suggest that such an approach could also benefit human apoE4 carriers.

  4. Low-intensity electrical stimulation counteracts the effects of ovariectomy on bone tissue of rats: effects on bone microarchitecture, viability of osteocytes, and nitric oxide expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirani-Galvão, A P R; Chavassieux, P; Portero-Muzy, N; Bergamaschi, C T; Silva, O L; Carvalho, A B; Lazaretti-Castro, M; Delmas, P D

    2009-06-01

    Low Intensity Electrical Stimulation (LIES) has been used for bone repair, but little is known about its effects on bone after menopause. Osteocytes probably play a role in mediating this physical stimulus and they could act as transducers through the release of biochemical signals, such as nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of LIES on bone structure and remodeling, NOS expression and osteocyte viability in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Thirty rats (200-220 g) were divided into 3 groups: SHAM, OVX, and OVX subjected to LIES (OVX + LIES) for 12 weeks. Following the protocol, rats were sacrificed and tibias were collected for histomorphometric analysis and immunohistochemical detection of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and osteocyte apoptosis (caspase-3 and TUNEL). OVX rats showed significant (p bone volume (10% vs. 25%) and trabecular number (1.7 vs. 3.9), and increased eroded surfaces (4.7% vs. 3.2%) and mineralization surfaces (15.9% vs. 7.7%). In contrast, after LIES, all these parameters were significantly different from OVX but not different from SHAM. eNOS and iNOS were similarly expressed in subperiosteal regions of tibiae cortices of SHAM, not expressed in OVX, and similarly expressed in OVX + LIES when compared to SHAM. In OVX, the percentage of apoptotic osteocytes (24%) was significantly increased when compared to SHAM (11%) and OVX + LIES (8%). Our results suggest that LIES counteracts some effects of OVX on bone tissue preserving bone structure and microarchitecture, iNOS and eNOS expression, and osteocyte viability.

  5. Cellular responses of Candida albicans to phagocytosis and the extracellular activities of neutrophils are critical to counteract carbohydrate starvation, oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramón, Pedro; Dunker, Christine; Windecker, Hanna; Bohovych, Iryna M; Brown, Alistair J P; Kurzai, Oliver; Hube, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are key players during Candida albicans infection. However, the relative contributions of neutrophil activities to fungal clearance and the relative importance of the fungal responses that counteract these activities remain unclear. We studied the contributions of the intra- and extracellular antifungal activities of human neutrophils using diagnostic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-marked C. albicans strains. We found that a carbohydrate starvation response, as indicated by up-regulation of glyoxylate cycle genes, was only induced upon phagocytosis of the fungus. Similarly, the nitrosative stress response was only observed in internalised fungal cells. In contrast, the response to oxidative stress was observed in both phagocytosed and non-phagocytosed fungal cells, indicating that oxidative stress is imposed both intra- and extracellularly. We assessed the contributions of carbohydrate starvation, oxidative and nitrosative stress as antifungal activities by analysing the resistance to neutrophil killing of C. albicans mutants lacking key glyoxylate cycle, oxidative and nitrosative stress genes. We found that the glyoxylate cycle plays a crucial role in fungal resistance against neutrophils. The inability to respond to oxidative stress (in cells lacking superoxide dismutase 5 or glutathione reductase 2) renders C. albicans susceptible to neutrophil killing, due to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also show that neutrophil-derived nitric oxide is crucial for the killing of C. albicans: a yhb1Δ/Δ mutant, unable to detoxify NO•, was more susceptible to neutrophils, and this phenotype was rescued by the nitric oxide scavenger carboxy-PTIO. The stress responses of C. albicans to neutrophils are partially regulated via the stress regulator Hog1 since a hog1Δ/Δ mutant was clearly less resistant to neutrophils and unable to respond properly to neutrophil-derived attack. Our data indicate that an appropriate fungal response to all

  6. Contrast discrimination at high contrasts reveals the influence of local light adaptation on contrast processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdom, F A; Whittle, P

    1996-03-01

    Previous measurements of contrast discrimination threshold, delta C, as a function of pedestal contrast, C, for sine-wave gratings have shown a power law relationship between delta C and C at suprathreshold levels of C. However, these studies have rarely used contrasts greater than 50%. Whittle (1986), using incremental and decremental patches, found that delta C increased with C only up to about 50%. At higher contrasts it decreased. Since a periodic stimulus can be considered to be composed of increments and decrements, we thought we might find such an inverse U-shaped function for gratings if we used contrasts up to 100%. We tested this for both sine-wave and square-wave stimuli at spatial frequencies from 0.0625 to 8.0 c/deg. We found that for frequencies up to 0.5 c/deg, delta C in nearly all cases 'dipped down' after about C = 50% contrast. At 4.0 and 8.0 c/deg, however, no dip-down occurred. Additional experiments showed that the dip-down was unlikely to be due to cortical long-term adaptation and most likely an effect of localized light adaptation to the dark bars. We argue that the absence of dip-down at high spatial frequencies was mainly due to the attenuation of contrast by the optics of the eye. As for the results of Whittle (1986), a Weber's Law in W = (Lmax-Lmin)/Lmin describes the inverse U-shaped contrast discrimination function well. Two other contrast expressions also linearize the data on log-log plots. We show how some familiar notions about the physiological operation of localized light adaptation can easily account for the form of the contrast discrimination function. Finally we estimate the number of discriminable steps in contrast from detection threshold to maximum contrast for the various spatial frequencies tested.

  7. Nonlinear intravascular ultrasound contrast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, David E.; Frijlink, Martijn E.; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, Antonius F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear contrast agent imaging with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is investigated using a prototype IVUS system and an experimental small bubble contrast agent. The IVUS system employed a mechanically scanned single element transducer and was operated at a 20 MHz transmit frequency (F20) for

  8. Contrast enhancement in light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst Keller, H; Watkins, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The optical microscope is a fundamental component of an image cytometry system. This unit covers the basic concepts of light microscopy, including Köhler illumination, resolution, contrast, and numerical aperture, and reviews the many types of instruments and techniques for contrast enhancement.

  9. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast...

  10. Subthreshold α2-Adrenergic Activation Counteracts Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Potentiation of Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglin Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic β cell harbors α2-adrenergic and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptors on its plasma membrane to sense the corresponding ligands adrenaline/noradrenaline and GLP-1 to govern glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether these two signaling systems interact to gain the adequate and timely control of insulin release in response to glucose. The present work shows that the α2-adrenergic agonist clonidine concentration-dependently depresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. On the contrary, GLP-1 concentration-dependently potentiates insulin secretory response to glucose. Importantly, the present work reveals that subthreshold α2-adrenergic activation with clonidine counteracts GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. This counteractory process relies on pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive Gi proteins since it no longer occurs following PTX-mediated inactivation of Gi proteins. The counteraction of GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by subthreshold α2-adrenergic activation is likely to serve as a molecular mechanism for the delicate regulation of insulin release.

  11. Oxidation-induced loss of the ability of HDL to counteract the inhibitory effect of oxidized LDL on vasorelaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perségol, Laurence; Brindisi, Marie-Claude; Rageot, David; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Monier, Serge; Vergès, Bruno; Duvillard, Laurence

    2015-11-01

    Several current diseases are associated with an increase in the oxidation of HDL, which is likely to impair their functionality. Our aim was to identify whether oxidation could change the protective effect of HDL against the deleterious effect on vasoreactivity induced by oxidative stress. HDL from healthy subjects were oxidized in vitro by Cu(2+), and the ability of oxidized HDL to counteract the inhibitory effect of oxidized LDL on acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was tested on isolated rabbit aorta rings. Oxidation of HDL was evidenced by the increase in the 7-oxysterols/cholesterol ratio (3.20 ± 1.12 vs 0.02 ± 0.01 % in native HDL, p HDL counteracted this inhibition (E max = 72.4 ± 4.8 vs 50.2 ± 5.0 % p HDL had no effect on oxidized LDL-induced inhibition on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation (E max = 53.7 ± 4.8 vs 50.2 ± 5.0 %, NS). HDL oxidation is associated with a decreased ability of HDL to remove 7-oxysterols from oxidized LDL. In conclusion, these results show that oxidation of HDL induces the loss of their protective effect against endothelial dysfunction, which could promote atherosclerosis in diseases associated with increased oxidative stress.

  12. Confrontation of Major Counteracting Forces in the Globalized Market as a Process of Resolving / Intensifying its Contradictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyneka Tetyana A.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to study the process of resolving/intensifying the contradictions of the contemporary globalized market by means of identifying the counteracting forces that are critical for the period of the formation of post-industrial relations. It is proved that in the context of globalization and gradual establishment of principles of the post-industrial economy, the confrontation of major counteracting market forces is undergoing changes, which is manifested through the processes of resolving/ intensifying the market contradictions. There identified the content of these changes, in particular: if at early stages of the market development the confrontation «state—market» was of decisive importance, at the present time it is the confrontation «civil society – TNCs». There described a multivariate character of the interaction between the major market forces — states, international organizations, TNCs, civil society (both with the effect of achieving community of their interests and with the effect of their disunity. It is proved that the confrontation between the civil society and international corporations objectifies in the globalized economy a new form of contradiction between labor and capital that corresponds to the post-industrial content of economic relations and, in particular the content of property relations

  13. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Yousef W. [Dept. of Radiology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Bispebjerg, Bispebjerg (Denmark)], e-mail: ywnielsen@gmail.com; Thomsen, Henrik S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Herlev, Herlev (Denmark)

    2012-09-15

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  14. Multimodal nanoparticulate bioimaging contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Parvesh; Singh, Amit; Brown, Scott C; Bengtsson, Niclas; Walter, Glenn A; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Iwakuma, Nobutaka; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Scott, Edward W; Moudgil, Brij M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of bioimaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed X-ray tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography) are commonly employed for clinical diagnostics and scientific research. While all of these methods use a characteristic "energy-matter" interaction to provide specific details about biological processes, each modality differs from another in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, anatomical and molecular details, imaging depth, as well as the desirable material properties of contrast agents needed for augmented imaging. On many occasions, it is advantageous to apply multiple complimentary imaging modalities for faster and more accurate prognosis. Since most imaging modalities employ exogenous contrast agents to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, the development and use of multimodal contrast agents is considered to be highly advantageous for obtaining improved imagery from sought-after imaging modalities. Multimodal contrast agents offer improvements in patient care, and at the same time can reduce costs and enhance safety by limiting the number of contrast agent administrations required for imaging purposes. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanoparticulate-based multimodal contrast agent for noninvasive bioimaging using MRI, optical, and photoacoustic tomography (PAT)-imaging modalities. The synthesis of these agents is described using microemulsions, which enable facile integration of the desired diversity of contrast agents and material components into a single entity.

  15. Forms of the criminal environment counteraction to performing the function of state protection of participants in criminal proceedings and measures of its neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubonosov E.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Criminal environment’s counteraction is considered as purposeful, active and intentional influence of its representatives on participants in criminal proceedings. It is directed at persons who, due to their professional duties, are involved in detection and investigation of crimes as well as court proceedings, or who possess evidentiary information (witnesses, victims, etc.. Counteraction may be expressed in different ways: discrediting operatives, investigators and judges; pressure on persons involved in the investigation and the trial through bribery, blackmail, threats to life and health of themselves and their family, etc. The administration of justice becomes inefficient due to the variety of forms and purposes of counteraction. The importance of operational units’ awareness of the activities of criminal environment representatives is shown. The importance of revealing the facts of unlawful influence on witnesses and victims of crime, who subsequently acquire procedural status of witnesses and victims, in order to prevent such facts is also stressed. It is proposed to suppress the counteraction of criminal environment by following ways: 1 identifying (with the help of informants and by crime detection actions the persons attempting to influence the preliminary investigation; 2 documenting the suspects actions aimed at illegal influence on participants in criminal proceedings for the purpose of conducting the procedural actions and decision making; 3 “in cell” (using an agent crime detection actions against detainees and arrestees throughout the whole process of covert operation; 4 creating investigative team to develop a common mechanism to neutralize criminal environment’s counteraction to crime investigation.

  16. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  17. Contrast induced nephropathy in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viji Samuel Thomson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous contrast agents have a distinct role in urological imaging: to study precise anatomical delineation, vascularity, and to assess the function of the renal unit. Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN is a known adverse effect of intravenous contrast administration. The literature on incidence, pathophysiology, clinical features, and current preventive strategies available for CIN relevant to urologists was reviewed. A search of the PubMed database was done using the keywords nephropathy and media, prevention and control or prevention Contrast media (explode, all adverse effects, and kidney diseases (explode. An online search of the EMBASE database for the time ranging from 1977 to February 2009 was performed using the keywords ionic contrast medium, adverse drug reaction, major or controlled clinical study, human, nephrotoxicity, and kidney disease. Current publications and data most relevant to urologists were examined. CIN was the third most common cause of hospital-acquired renal failure. The incidence is less common with intravenous contrast administration as compared with intra-arterial administration. The pathogenesis of contrast mediated nephropathy is due to a combination of toxic injury to renal tubules and medullary ischemic injury mediated by reactive oxygen species. CIN most commonly manifests as a nonoliguric and asymptomatic transient decline in renal function. Patients who developed CIN were found to have increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and complicated clinical course. An overview of risk factors and risk prediction score for prognostication of CIN are elaborated. Preventive strategies including choice of contrast agents, maximum tolerated dose, role of hydration, hydration regime, etc. are discussed. The role of N- acetyl cysteine, Theophylline, Fenoldapam, Endothelin receptor antagonists, iloprost, atrial natriuretic peptide, and newer therapies such as targeted renal therapy (TRT are discussed. A working

  18. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nischita K Reddy; Ana Maria Ioncic(a); Adrian S(a)ftoiu; Peter Vilmann; Manoop S Bhutani

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest,to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures.We review the mechanisms of action of first,second and third generation contrast agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract.Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy,assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal,gastric and gall bladder cancers and visualization of the portal venous system and esophageal varices.In addition,contrast agents can be used to differentiate pancreatic lesions.The use of color Doppler further increases the ability to diagnose and differentiate various pancreatic malignancies.The sensitivity of power Doppler sonography to depict tumor neovascularization can be increased by contrast agents.Contrast-enhanced harmonic imaging is a useful aid in identifying the tumor vasculature and studying pancreatic microperfusion.In the future,these techniques could potentially be used to quantify tumor perfusion,to assess and monitor the efficacy of antiangiogenic agents,to assist targeted drug delivery and allow molecular imaging.

  19. A theory of behavioral contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Peter R

    2014-11-01

    The reinforcers that maintain target instrumental responses also reinforce other responses that compete with them for expression. This competition, and its imbalance at points of transition between different schedules of reinforcement, causes behavioral contrast. The imbalance is caused by differences in the rates at which different responses come under the control of component stimuli. A model for this theory of behavioral contrast is constructed by expanding the coupling coefficient of MPR (Killeen, 1994). The coupling coefficient gives the degree of association of a reinforcer with the target response (as opposed to other competing responses). Competing responses, often identified as interim or adjunctive or superstitious behavior, are intrinsic to reinforcement schedules, especially interval schedules. In addition to that base-rate of competition, additional competing responses may spill over from the prior component, causing initial contrast; and they may be modulated by conditioned reinforcement or punishment from stimuli associated with subsequent component change, causing terminal contrast. A formalization of these hypotheses employed (a) a hysteresis model of off-target responses giving rise to initial contrast, and (b) a competing traces model of the suppression or enhancement of ongoing competitive responses by signals of following-schedule transition. The theory was applied to transient contrast, the following schedule effect, and the component duration effect.

  20. Renewable Energy Production from Waste to Mitigate Climate Change and Counteract Soil Degradation - A Spatial Explicit Assessment for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxner, Florian; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Leduc, Sylvain; Fuss, Sabine; Aoki, Kentaro; Yamagata, Yoshiki

    2014-05-01

    Waste production from urban areas is growing faster than urbanization itself, while at the same time urban areas are increasingly contributing substantial emissions causing climate change. Estimates indicate for urban residents a per capita solid waste (MSW) production of 1.2 kg per day, subject to further increase to 1.5 kg beyond 2025. Waste water and sewage production is estimated at about 260 liters per capita and day, also at increasing rates. Based on these figures, waste - including e.g. MSW, sewage and animal manure - can generally be assumed as a renewable resource with varying organic components and quantity. This paper demonstrates how new and innovative technologies in the field of Waste-to-Green Products can help in various ways not only to reduce costs for waste treatment, reduce the pressure on largely overloaded dump sites, and reduce also the effect of toxic materials at the landfill site and by that i.e. protect the groundwater. Moreover, Waste-to-Green Products can contribute actively to mitigating climate change through fossil fuel substitution and carbon sequestration while at the same time counteracting negative land use effects from other types of renewable energy and feedstock production through substitution. At the same time, the co-production and recycling of fertilizing elements and biochar can substantially counteract soil degradation and improve the soil organic carbon content of different land use types. The overall objective of this paper is to assess the total climate change mitigation potential of MSW, sewage and animal manure for Japan. A techno-economic approach is used to inform the policy discussion on the suitability of this substantial and sustainable mitigation option. We examine the spatial explicit technical mitigation potential from e.g. energy substitution and carbon sequestration through biochar in rural and urban Japan. For this exercise, processed information on respective Japanese waste production, energy demand

  1. Meditation and successful aging: can meditative practices counteract age-related cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperduti, Marco; Makowski, Dominique; Blondé, Philippe; Piolino, Pascale

    2017-06-01

    Life expectancy is constantly increasing in the developed countries due to medical, hygiene and socio-economic advances. Unfortunately, a longer life not always corresponds to a healthier life. Indeed, aging is associated with growing risk factors for illness associated with societal conditions (isolation, maltreatment), and neurodegenerative diseases. Even normal aging is associated with a cognitive decline that can hinder independence and quality of life of elderly. Thus, one major societal challenge is to build policies that support people of all ages to maintain a maximum health and functional capacity throughout their lives. Meditation could be a promising intervention in contrasting the negative effects of aging. Indeed, it has been shown to enhance cognitive efficiency in several domains, such as attention and executive functions in young adults. Nevertheless, whether these effects extend to old participants is still a matter of debate. Few studies have directly investigated this issue, reporting encouraging results in a large panel of cognitive functions, such as: attention, executive functions and memory. However, a final conclusion about the causal role of meditation and the generalization of these results is made difficult due to several methodological limitations. We propose a roadmap for future studies to pass these limitations with the hope that the present work would contribute to the development of the young research field of meditation in gerontology.

  2. Predation may counteract climatic change as a driving force for movements of mountain ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Francesco; Lovari, Sandro

    2016-08-01

    Temperature variations are expected to influence altitudinal movements of mountain herbivores and, in turn, those of their predators, but relevant information is scarce. We evaluated monthly relationships between temperature and altitude used by a large mountain-dwelling herbivore, the Himalayan tahr Hemitragus jemlahicus, and its main predator, the snow leopard Panthera uncia, in an area of central Himalaya for five consecutive years (2006-2010). In contrast to expectations, there was no significant direct relationship between altitude of tahr sightings and temperature. The mean altitude of tahr sightings decreased by c. 200m throughout our study. As expected, snow leopard movements tracked those of tahr, although the core area of the snow leopard did not move downwards. Tahr remained the staple of the snow leopard diet: we suggest that the former did not move upwards in reaction to higher temperature to avoid encounters with the latter. Avoidance of competition with the larger common leopard Panthera pardus at lower altitudes could explain why snow leopards did not shift their core area downwards. Apparently, interspecific interactions (predation; competition) influenced movements of Himalayan tahr and snow leopards more than climatic variations.

  3. Teacher’s Generosity as the Counteraction to the Young People’s Hardening Pedagogic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Akimova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the growing tendency for young people’s harden- ing. According to the authors that phenomenon is caused by such current trends as the language degradation, the militaristic and alienation vocabulary predominance re- sulting in disdainful attitude towards the surrounding people. As a pedagogic counter- action to such trends, the authors consider the revival of the forgotten domestic moral values in educational sphere. Their objective is to contemplate the necessity of enrich- ing the educational institutions by means of the national moral and cultural potential.The research methodology basis is defined as the axiology principle substantiat- ing the humanistic importance of the specifics of teachers’ vocabulary. To demonstrate the advantages of the humanistic vocabulary educational potential the authors com- pare the specifics of such notions as generosity and tolerance. They prove that the teacher’s tolerant attitude to students deforms both the pedagogic theory and educa- tional practice. In contrast, the generous attitude favors the student’s, as well as teacher’s moral development. The process of the youth refinement can be facilitated by the large-scale revival of half-forgotten national humanistic values and the vocabulary reflecting such values. 

  4. Feeling happy and thinking about food. Counteractive effects of mood and memory on food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca; Stafford, Lorenzo D

    2015-01-01

    Separate lines of research have demonstrated the role of mood and memory in the amount of food we consume. However, no work has examined these factors in a single study and given their combined effects beyond food research, this would seem important. In this study, the interactive effect of these factors was investigated. Unrestrained female participants (n = 64) were randomly assigned to either a positive or neutral mood induction, and were subject to a lunch cue (recalling their previously eaten meal) or no lunch cue, followed by a snack taste/intake test. We found that in line with prediction that food intake was lower in the lunch cue versus no cue condition and in contrast, food intake was higher in the positive versus neutral mood condition. We also found that more food was consumed in the lunch cue/positive mood compared to lunch cue/neutral mood condition. This suggests that positive mood places additional demands on attentional resources and thereby reduces the inhibitory effect of memory on food consumption. These findings confirm that memory cue and positive mood exert opposing effects on food consumption and highlight the importance of both factors in weight control interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytokines can counteract the inhibitory effect of MEK-i on NK-cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, Claudia; Venè, Roberta; Cossu, Irene; Gualco, Marina; Zupo, Simonetta; Dono, Mariella; Spagnolo, Francesco; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Pietra, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-targeted therapies based on mutated BRAF- and/or MEK-specific inhibitors have been developed for melanoma treatment. Although these drugs induce tumor regression in a high percentage of patients, clinical responses are frequently limited in time and tumors often recur. Recent studies suggested that the combination of BRAF/MEK inhibition with immunotherapy could represent a promising strategy for the cure of melanoma. NK cells are suitable effectors for tumor immunotherapy. Here we show that PLX4032 (a mutant BRAFV600 inhibitor) had no effect on the functional properties of NK cells cultured in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15. In contrast, PD0325901 (a MEK inhibitor) induced the down-regulation of the main activating NK receptors and inhibited NK cell function. Importantly, PD0325901 did not affect the anti-tumor activity of NK cells that had been exposed to a combination of IL-15 and IL-18. In addition, both PLX4032 and PD0325901 did not exert any inhibitory effect on in vitro IL-2 or IL-15 pre-activated NK cells. Our data may provide a rationale for future clinical protocols that combine IL-15/IL-18 cytokine administration with MEK inhibitors. In addition, they suggest that oncogene-targeting drugs are compatible with NK-based adoptive therapy. PMID:27563819

  6. CD55 is a key complement regulatory protein that counteracts complement-mediated inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Cotter, Christopher R; Cheng, Xing; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is being developed as an oncolytic virus for virotherapy. In this study we analysed the regulation of complement-mediated inactivation of a recombinant NDV in different host cells. NDV grown in human cells was less sensitive to complement-mediated virus inactivation than NDV grown in embryonated chicken eggs. Additionally, NDV produced from HeLa-S3 cells is more resistant to complement than NDV from 293F cells, which correlated with higher expression and incorporation of complement regulatory proteins (CD46, CD55 and CD59) into virions from HeLa-S3 cells. Further analysis of the recombinant NDVs individually expressing the three CD molecules showed that CD55 is the most potent in counteracting complement-mediated virus inactivation. The results provide important information on selecting NDV manufacture substrate to mitigate complement-mediated virus inactivation.

  7. Doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress in rats is efficiently counteracted by dietary anthocyanin differently enriched strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Jacopo; Mezzetti, Bruno; Giampieri, Francesca; Alvarez-Suarez, José M; Quiles, José L; Gonzalez-Alonso, Adrian; Ramirez-Tortosa, Maria del Carmen; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Gonzáles-Paramás, Ana M; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Battino, Maurizio

    2014-05-07

    This study investigated the effects of two different strawberry cultivars, Adria and Sveva, against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced toxicity in rats. A controlled dietary intervention was conducted over 16 weeks with four groups: (i) normal diet; (ii) normal diet + DOX injection; (iii) Adria supplementation + DOX injection; and (iv) Sveva supplementation + DOX injection. Sveva presented higher total antioxidant capacity value and phenol and and vitamin C levels than Adria, which in turn presented higher anthocyanin contents. DOX drastically increased lymphocyte DNA damage, liver biomarkers of protein and lipid oxidation, and mitochondrial ROS content and markedly decreased plasma retinol level, liver antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial functionality. After 2 months of strawberry supplementation, rats presented a significant reduction of DNA damage and ROS concentration and a significant improvement of oxidative stress biomarkers, antioxidant enzyme activities, and mitochondrial performance. These results suggest that strawberry supplementation can counteract DOX toxicity, confirming the potential health benefit of strawberry in vivo against oxidative stress.

  8. Haloperidol counteracts the ketamine-induced disruption of processing negativity, but not that of the P300 amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oranje, Bob; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; Westenberg, Herman G M

    2009-01-01

    Antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors such as ketamine, induce abnormalities in healthy subjects similar to those found in schizophrenia. However, recent evidence, suggests that most of the currently known NMDA antagonists have a broader receptor profile than originally thought....... Besides exerting an antagonistic effect on NMDA receptors, they have agonistic effects on dopamine D2 receptors. Can haloperidol (D2 antagonist) counteract the disruptive effects of ketamine on psychophysiological parameters of human attention? In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment...... 18 healthy male volunteers received placebo/placebo, placebo/ketamine (0.3 mg/kg i.v.) and haloperidol (2 mg)/ketamine (0.3 mg/kg i.v.) on three separate test days, after which they were tested in an auditory selective-attention paradigm. Haloperidol/ketamine reduced task performance compared...

  9. Role of FEN1 S187 phosphorylation in counteracting oxygen-induced stress and regulating postnatal heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lina; Dai, Huifang; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Mian; Yuan, Hua; Du, Juan; Yang, Lu; Wu, Xiwei; Xu, Hong; Hua, Yuejin; Xu, Jian; Zheng, Li; Shen, Binghui

    2017-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) phosphorylation is proposed to regulate the action of FEN1 in DNA repair as well as Okazaki fragment maturation. However, the biologic significance of FEN1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage remains unknown. Here, we report an in vivo role for FEN1 phosphorylation, using a mouse line carrying S187A FEN1, which abolishes FEN1 phosphorylation. Although S187A mouse embryonic fibroblast cells showed normal proliferation under low oxygen levels (2%), the mutant cells accumulated oxidative DNA damage, activated DNA damage checkpoints, and showed G1-phase arrest at atmospheric oxygen levels (21%). This suggests an essential role for FEN1 phosphorylation in repairing oxygen-induced DNA damage and maintaining proper cell cycle progression. Consistently, the mutant cardiomyocytes showed G1-phase arrest due to activation of the p53-mediated DNA damage response at the neonatal stage, which reduces the proliferation potential of the cardiomyocytes and impairs heart development. Nearly 50% of newborns with the S187A mutant died in the first week due to failure to undergo the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling-dependent switch from glycolysis to fatty acid oxidation. The adult mutant mice developed dilated hearts and showed significantly shorter life spans. Altogether, our results reveal an important role of FEN1 phosphorylation to counteract oxygen-induced stress in the heart during the fetal-to-neonatal transition.-Zhou, L., Dai, H., Wu, J., Zhou, M., Yuan, H., Du, J., Yang, L., Wu, X., Xu, H., Hua, Y., Xu, J., Zheng, L., Shen, B. Role of FEN1 S187 phosphorylation in counteracting oxygen-induced stress and regulating postnatal heart development. © FASEB.

  10. Ash1l methylates Lys36 of histone H3 independently of transcriptional elongation to counteract polycomb silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Miyazaki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms for the establishment of transcriptional memory are poorly understood. 5,6-dichloro-1-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB is a P-TEFb kinase inhibitor that artificially induces the poised RNA polymerase II (RNAPII, thereby manifesting intermediate steps for the establishment of transcriptional activation. Here, using genetics and DRB, we show that mammalian Absent, small, or homeotic discs 1-like (Ash1l, a member of the trithorax group proteins, methylates Lys36 of histone H3 to promote the establishment of Hox gene expression by counteracting Polycomb silencing. Importantly, we found that Ash1l-dependent Lys36 di-, tri-methylation of histone H3 in a coding region and exclusion of Polycomb group proteins occur independently of transcriptional elongation in embryonic stem (ES cells, although both were previously thought to be consequences of transcription. Genome-wide analyses of histone H3 Lys36 methylation under DRB treatment have suggested that binding of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR to a certain genomic region promotes trimethylation in the RAR-associated gene independent of its ongoing transcription. Moreover, DRB treatment unveils a parallel response between Lys36 methylation of histone H3 and occupancy of either Tip60 or Mof in a region-dependent manner. We also found that Brg1 is another key player involved in the response. Our results uncover a novel regulatory cascade orchestrated by Ash1l with RAR and provide insights into mechanisms underlying the establishment of the transcriptional activation that counteracts Polycomb silencing.

  11. Phenylbutyrate counteracts Shigella mediated downregulation of cathelicidin in rabbit lung and intestinal epithelia: a potential therapeutic strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protim Sarker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cathelicidins and defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs that are downregulated in the mucosal epithelia of the large intestine in shigellosis. Oral treatment of Shigella infected rabbits with sodium butyrate (NaB reduces clinical severity and counteracts the downregulation of cathelicidin (CAP-18 in the large intestinal epithelia. AIMS: To develop novel regimen for treating infectious diseases by inducing innate immunity, we selected sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PB, a registered drug for a metabolic disorder as a potential therapeutic candidate in a rabbit model of shigellosis. Since acute respiratory infections often cause secondary complications during shigellosis, the systemic effect of PB and NaB on CAP-18 expression in respiratory epithelia was also evaluated. METHODS: The readouts were clinical outcomes, CAP-18 expression in mucosa of colon, rectum, lung and trachea (immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR and release of the CAP-18 peptide/protein in stool (Western blot. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Significant downregulation of CAP-18 expression in the epithelia of rectum and colon, the site of Shigella infection was confirmed. Interestingly, reduced expression of CAP-18 was also noticed in the epithelia of lung and trachea, indicating a systemic effect of the infection. This suggests a causative link to acute respiratory infections during shigellosis. Oral treatment with PB resulted in reduced clinical illness and upregulation of CAP-18 in the epithelium of rectum. Both PB and NaB counteracted the downregulation of CAP-18 in lung epithelium. The drug effect is suggested to be systemic as intravenous administration of NaB could also upregulate CAP-18 in the epithelia of lung, rectum and colon. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that PB has treatment potential in human shigellosis. Enhancement of CAP-18 in the mucosal epithelia of the respiratory tract by PB or NaB is a novel discovery. This could mediate protection from

  12. Sexual stigma and symbolic violence experienced, enacted, and counteracted in young Africans' writing about same-sex attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winskell, Kate; Sabben, Gaëlle

    2016-07-01

    There is growing recognition of the health disparities faced by sexual minority populations and the critical role played by sexual stigma in increasing their vulnerability. Experienced, anticipated, and internalized, stigma based on sexual orientation reduces access to HIV/STI prevention and treatment services among African men who have sex with men and has been linked to compromised mental health, risk-taking, and HIV status. It is likely that similar processes undermine the health of sexual minority African women and transgender and non-binary people. There is a need for increased understanding of both the contextual factors and the cultural meanings, or symbolic violence, that inform sexual stigma and harmful stigma management strategies in contexts that are culturally and socio-politically oppressive for sexual and gender minorities. Using thematic data analysis and narrative-based methodologies, we analyzed narratives and essays on same-sex attraction contributed by young people aged 13-24 from ten African countries to a Spring 2013 scriptwriting competition on HIV, sexuality, and related themes. Submitted by 27 male and 29 female authors, the texts were written in response to a prompt inviting participants to "Tell a story about someone who is attracted to people of the same sex". We analyzed the ways in which sexual stigma and its effects are described, enacted, and counteracted in the texts. The data provide insights into the social and symbolic processes that create and sustain sexual stigma in the context of broader transnational discourses. The data shed light on psychosocial challenges faced by sexual minority youth and identify both rhetoric, stereotypes, and discourse that devalue them and representations that counteract this symbolic violence. We share our findings in the hope they may inform education and communication programming as part of multi-level efforts to improve the health and human rights of sexual minority populations in sub

  13. How to misuse echo contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Missios Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary intracardiac tumours are rare, there are however several entities that can mimic tumours. Contrast echocardiography has been suggested to aid the differentiation of various suspected masses. We present a case where transthoracic echocardiography completely misdiagnosed a left atrial mass, partly due to use of echo contrast. Case presentation An 80 year-old woman was referred for transthoracic echocardiography because of one-month duration of worsening of dyspnoea. Transthoracic echocardiography displayed a large echodense mass in the left atrium. Intravenous injection of contrast (SonoVue, Bracco Inc., It indicated contrast-enhancement of the structure, suggesting tumour. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed, however, a completely normal finding in the left atrium. Subsequent gastroscopy examination showed a hiatal hernia. Conclusion It is noteworthy that the transthoracic echocardiographic exam completely misdiagnosed what seemed like a left atrial mass, which in part was an effect of the use of echo contrast. This example highlights that liberal use of transoesophageal echocardiography is often warranted if optimal display of cardiac structures is desired.

  14. Counteracting quasispecies adaptability: extinction of a ribavirin-resistant virus mutant by an alternative mutagenic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Perales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction promoted by mutagen-induced elevation of mutation rates of viruses, may meet with the problem of selection of mutagen-resistant variants, as extensively documented for standard, non-mutagenic antiviral inhibitors. Previously, we characterized a mutant of foot-and-mouth disease virus that included in its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase replacement M296I that decreased the sensitivity of the virus to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Replacement M296I in the viral polymerase impedes the extinction of the mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus by elevated concentrations of ribavirin. In contrast, wild type virus was extinguished by the same ribavirin treatment and, interestingly, no mutants resistant to ribavirin were selected from the wild type populations. Decreases of infectivity and viral load of the ribavirin-resistant M296I mutant were attained with a combination of the mutagen 5-fluorouracil and the non-mutagenic inhibitor guanidine hydrocloride. However, extinction was achieved with a sequential treatment, first with ribavirin, and then with a minimal dose of 5-fluorouracil in combination with guanidine hydrochloride. Both, wild type and ribavirin-resistant mutant M296I exhibited equal sensitivity to this combination, indicating that replacement M296I in the polymerase did not confer a significant cross-resistance to 5-fluorouracil. We discuss these results in relation to antiviral designs based on lethal mutagenesis. CONCLUSIONS: (i When dominant in the population, a mutation that confers partial resistance to a mutagenic agent can jeopardize virus extinction by elevated doses of the same mutagen. (ii A wild type virus, subjected to identical high mutagenic treatment, need not select a mutagen-resistant variant, and the population can be extinguished. (iii Extinction of the mutagen-resistant variant can be achieved by a sequential treatment of a

  15. Albedo enhancement of marine clouds to counteract global warming: impacts on the hydrological cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, G. [Indian Institute of Science, Divecha Center for Climate Change, Bangalore (India); Indian Institute of Science, Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Bangalore (India); Caldeira, Ken; Cao, Long; Ban-Weiss, George; Shin, Ho-Jeong [Carnegie Institution, Department of Global Ecology, Stanford, CA (United States); Nemani, Rama [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Recent studies have shown that changes in solar radiation affect the hydrological cycle more strongly than equivalent CO{sub 2} changes for the same change in global mean surface temperature. Thus, solar radiation management ''geoengineering'' proposals to completely offset global mean temperature increases by reducing the amount of absorbed sunlight might be expected to slow the global water cycle and reduce runoff over land. However, proposed countering of global warming by increasing the albedo of marine clouds would reduce surface solar radiation only over the oceans. Here, for an idealized scenario, we analyze the response of temperature and the hydrological cycle to increased reflection by clouds over the ocean using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed layer ocean model. When cloud droplets are reduced in size over all oceans uniformly to offset the temperature increase from a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, the global-mean precipitation and evaporation decreases by about 1.3% but runoff over land increases by 7.5% primarily due to increases over tropical land. In the model, more reflective marine clouds cool the atmospheric column over ocean. The result is a sinking motion over oceans and upward motion over land. We attribute the increased runoff over land to this increased upward motion over land when marine clouds are made more reflective. Our results suggest that, in contrast to other proposals to increase planetary albedo, offsetting mean global warming by reducing marine cloud droplet size does not necessarily lead to a drying, on average, of the continents. However, we note that the changes in precipitation, evaporation and P-E are dominated by small but significant areas, and given the highly idealized nature of this study, a more thorough and broader assessment would be required for proposals of altering marine cloud properties on a large scale. (orig.)

  16. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  17. Subharmonic imaging of contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, F; Shi, W T; Goldberg, B B

    2000-03-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents promise to improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic ultrasound imaging. It is of great importance to adapt ultrasound equipment for optimal use with contrast agents e.g., by exploiting the nonlinear properties of the contrast microbubbles. Harmonic imaging is one technique that has been extensively studied and is commercially available. However, harmonic imaging is associated with problems, due to second harmonic generation and accumulation within the tissue itself. Given the lack of subharmonic generation in tissue, one alternative is the creation of subharmonic images by transmitting at the fundamental frequency (fo) and receiving at the subharmonic (fo/2). Subharmonic imaging should have a much better lateral resolution and may be suitable for scanning deep-lying structures owing to the higher transmit frequency and the much smaller attenuation of scattered subharmonic signals. In this paper, we will review different aspects of subharmonic imaging including implementation, in-vitro gray-scale imaging and subharmonic aided pressure estimation.

  18. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncică, Ana Maria; Săftoiu, Adrian;

    2011-01-01

    cancers and visualization of the portal venous system and esophageal varices. In addition, contrast agents can be used to differentiate pancreatic lesions. The use of color Doppler further increases the ability to diagnose and differentiate various pancreatic malignancies. The sensitivity of power Doppler...

  19. Testing the ability of non-methylamine osmolytes present in kidney cells to counteract the deleterious effects of urea on structure, stability and function of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeza Khan

    Full Text Available Human kidney cells are under constant urea stress due to its urine concentrating mechanism. It is believed that the deleterious effect of urea is counteracted by methylamine osmolytes (glycine betaine and glycerophosphocholine present in kidney cells. A question arises: Do the stabilizing osmolytes, non-methylamines (myo-inositol, sorbitol and taurine present in the kidney cells also counteract the deleterious effects of urea? To answer this question, we have measured structure, thermodynamic stability (ΔG D (o and functional activity parameters (K m and k cat of different model proteins in the presence of various concentrations of urea and each non-methylamine osmolyte alone and in combination. We observed that (i for each protein myo-inositol provides perfect counteraction at 1∶2 ([myo-inositol]:[urea] ratio, (ii any concentration of sorbitol fails to refold urea denatured proteins if it is six times less than that of urea, and (iii taurine regulates perfect counteraction in a protein specific manner; 1.5∶2.0, 1.2∶2.0 and 1.0∶2.0 ([taurine]:[urea] ratios for RNase-A, lysozyme and α-lactalbumin, respectively.

  20. Testing the Ability of Non-Methylamine Osmolytes Present in Kidney Cells to Counteract the Deleterious Effects of Urea on Structure, Stability and Function of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sheeza; Bano, Zehra; Singh, Laishram R.; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2013-01-01

    Human kidney cells are under constant urea stress due to its urine concentrating mechanism. It is believed that the deleterious effect of urea is counteracted by methylamine osmolytes (glycine betaine and glycerophosphocholine) present in kidney cells. A question arises: Do the stabilizing osmolytes, non-methylamines (myo-inositol, sorbitol and taurine) present in the kidney cells also counteract the deleterious effects of urea? To answer this question, we have measured structure, thermodynamic stability (ΔGDo) and functional activity parameters (Km and kcat) of different model proteins in the presence of various concentrations of urea and each non-methylamine osmolyte alone and in combination. We observed that (i) for each protein myo-inositol provides perfect counteraction at 1∶2 ([myo-inositol]:[urea]) ratio, (ii) any concentration of sorbitol fails to refold urea denatured proteins if it is six times less than that of urea, and (iii) taurine regulates perfect counteraction in a protein specific manner; 1.5∶2.0, 1.2∶2.0 and 1.0∶2.0 ([taurine]:[urea]) ratios for RNase-A, lysozyme and α-lactalbumin, respectively. PMID:24039776

  1. Toxin-antitoxin loci as stress-response-elements: ChpAK/MazF and ChpBK cleave translated RNAs and are counteracted by tmRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.K.; Pedersen, K.; Hansen, Flemming G.;

    2003-01-01

    . coli. We show that both proteins inhibit translation by inducing cleavage of translated mRNAs. Consistently, the inhibitory effect of the proteins was counteracted by tmRNA. Amino acid starvation induced strong transcription of chpA that depended on Lon protease but not on ppGpp. Simultaneously, Chp...

  2. High-contrast imaging testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  3. Osmolality of nonionic contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklautz, H; Fichte, K; Wegscheider, K

    1989-01-01

    Solutions of different low osmolar contrast media (CM) obviously show clinically relevant differences in the osmolality despite equal iodine concentrations and similar molecular structure. To obtain precise and comparable data, the osmolality of five batches (usually) each of contrast media, iopamidol, iohexol, iopromide, and ioxaglate-all preparations commercially available-were measured by means of the vapor pressure method. The osmolality of the solutions of sodium meglumine ioxaglate with the same iodine concentration is lower than that of the nonionic CM examined. Iopromide showed the lowest osmolality and iohexol the highest value of the nonionic preparations. The differences are statistically significant as a rule. They are attributed to a varying association and hydration of the CM molecules in the solution.

  4. Intracerebroventricular urocortin 3 counteracts central acyl ghrelin-induced hyperphagic and gastroprokinetic effects via CRF receptor 2 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chun Yeh,1 Ching-Heng Ting,2 Ming-Luen Doong,3 Chin-Wen Chi,4,5 Shou-Dong Lee,1 Chih-Yen Chen6–8 1Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cheng-Hsin General Hospital, 2Department of Pathology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Physiology, 4Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, 5Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 6Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 7Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, 8Taiwan Association for the Study of Small Intestinal Diseases, Guishan, Taiwan Purpose: Urocortin 3 is a key neuromodulator in the regulation of stress, anxiety, food intake, gut motility, and energy homeostasis, while ghrelin elicits feeding behavior and enhances gastric emptying, adiposity, and positive energy balance. However, the interplays between urocortin 3 and ghrelin on food intake and gastric emptying remain uninvestigated.Methods: We examined the differential effects of central O-n-octanoylated ghrelin, des-Gln14-ghrelin, and urocortin 3 on food intake, as well as on charcoal nonnutrient semiliquid gastric emptying in conscious rats that were chronically implanted with intracerebroventricular (ICV catheters. The functional importance of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF receptor 2 in urocortin 3-induced responses was examined by ICV injection of the selective CRF receptor 2 antagonist, astressin2-B.Results: ICV infusion of urocortin 3 opposed central acyl ghrelin-elicited hyperphagia via CRF receptor 2 in satiated rats. ICV injection of O-n-octanoylated ghrelin and des-Gln14-ghrelin were equally potent in accelerating gastric emptying in fasted rats, whereas ICV administration of urocortin 3 delayed gastric emptying. In addition, ICV infusion of urocortin 3 counteracted central acyl ghrelin-induced gastroprokinetic effects via CRF receptor 2

  5. Celecoxib-induced gastrointestinal, liver and brain lesions in rats, counteraction by BPC 157 or L-arginine, aggravation by L-NAME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmic, Domagoj; Kolenc, Danijela; Ilic, Spomenko; Bauk, Lara; Sever, Marko; Zenko Sever, Anita; Luetic, Kresimir; Suran, Jelena; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2017-08-07

    To counteract/reveal celecoxib-induced toxicity and NO system involvement. Celecoxib (1 g/kg b.w. ip) was combined with therapy with stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (known to inhibit these lesions, 10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg, or 1 ng/kg ip) and L-arginine (100 mg/kg ip), as well as NOS blockade [N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)] (5 mg/kg ip) given alone and/or combined immediately after celecoxib. Gastrointestinal, liver, and brain lesions and liver enzyme serum values in rats were assessed at 24 h and 48 h thereafter. This high-dose celecoxib administration, as a result of NO system dysfunction, led to gastric, liver, and brain lesions and increased liver enzyme serum values. The L-NAME-induced aggravation of the lesions was notable for gastric lesions, while in liver and brain lesions the beneficial effect of L-arginine was blunted. L-arginine counteracted gastric, liver and brain lesions. These findings support the NO system mechanism(s), both NO system agonization (L-arginine) and NO system antagonization (L-NAME), that on the whole are behind all of these COX phenomena. An even more complete antagonization was identified with BPC 157 (at both 24 h and 48 h). A beneficial effect was evident on all the increasingly negative effects of celecoxib and L-NAME application and in all the BPC 157 groups (L-arginine + BPC 157; L-NAME + BPC 157; L-NAME + L-arginine + BPC 157). Thus, these findings demonstrated that BPC 157 may equally counteract both COX-2 inhibition (counteracting the noxious effects of celecoxib on all lesions) and additional NOS blockade (equally counteracting the noxious effects of celecoxib + L-NAME). BPC 157 and L-arginine alleviate gastrointestinal, liver and brain lesions, redressing NSAIDs' post-surgery application and NO system involvement.

  6. Contrast-enhanced digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)], E-mail: dromain@igr.fr; Balleyguier, Corinne; Adler, Ghazal [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Garbay, Jean Remi [Department of Surgery, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Delaloge, Suzette [Department of Medicine, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    CEDM is a recent development of digital mammography using the intra-venous injection of an iodinated contrast agent in conjunction with a mammography examination. Two techniques have been developed to perform CEDM examinations: the temporal subtraction technique with acquisition of high-energy images before and after contrast medium injection and the dual energy technique with acquisition of a pair of low and high-energy images only after contrast medium injection. The temporal subtraction technique offered the possibility to analyze the kinetic curve of enhancement of breast lesions, similarly to breast MRI. The dual energy technique do not provide information about the kinetic of tumor enhancement but allows the acquisition of multiples views of the same breast or bilateral examination and is less sensitive to patient motion than temporal CEDM. Initial clinical experience has shown the ability of CEDM to map the distribution of neovasculature induced by cancer using mammography. Moreover, previous studies have shown a superiority of MX + CEDM, either for the assessment of the probability of malignancy than for BIRADS assessment comparing to MX alone. The potential clinical applications are the clarification of mammographically equivocal lesions, the detection of occult lesions on standard mammography, particularly in dense breast, the determination of the extent of disease, the assessment of recurrent disease and the monitoring of the response to chemotherapy. CEDM should result in a simple way to enhance the detection and the characterization of breast lesions.

  7. Electrofluidic systems for contrast management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Keith J.; Maranchi, Jeffrey P.; Tiffany, Jason E.; Brown, Christopher Y.; Maisano, Adam J.; Hagedon, Matthew A.; Heikenfeld, Jason C.

    2012-06-01

    Operating in dynamic lighting conditions and in greatly varying backgrounds is challenging. Current paints and state-ofthe- art passive adaptive coatings (e.g. photochromics) are not suitable for multi- environment situations. A semi-active, low power, skin is needed that can adapt its reflective properties based on the background environment to minimize contrast through the development and incorporation of suitable pigment materials. Electrofluidic skins are a reflective display technology for electronic ink and paper applications. The technology is similar to that in E Ink but makes use of MEMS based microfluidic structures, instead of simple black and white ink microcapsules dispersed in clear oil. Electrofluidic skin's low power operation and fast switching speeds (~20 ms) are an improvement over current state-ofthe- art contrast management technologies. We report on a microfluidic display which utilizes diffuse pigment dispersion inks to change the contrast of the underlying substrate from 5.8% to 100%. Voltage is applied and an electromechanical pressure is used to pull a pigment dispersion based ink from a hydrophobic coated reservoir into a hydrophobic coated surface channel. When no voltage is applied, the Young-Laplace pressure pushes the pigment dispersion ink back down into the reservoir. This allows the pixel to switch from the on and off state by balancing the two pressures. Taking a systems engineering approach from the beginning of development has enabled the technology to be integrated into larger systems.

  8. Sorbitol counteracts temperature- and chemical-induced denaturation of a recombinant α-amylase from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. TS-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Meng-Chun; Wu, Tai-Jung; Chen, Hsing-Ling; Lo, Huei-Fen; Lin, Long-Liu

    2012-12-01

    Enzymes are highly complex systems with a substantial degree of structural variability in their folded state. In the presence of cosolvents, fluctuations among vast numbers of folded and unfolded conformations occur via many different pathways; alternatively, certain conformations can be stabilized or destabilized. To understand the contribution of osmolytes to the stabilization of structural changes and enzymatic activity of a truncated Bacillus sp. TS-23 α-amylase (BACΔNC), we monitored amylolytic activity, circular dichroism, and fluorescence as a function of osmolytes. In the presence of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and sorbitol, BACΔNC activity was retained significantly at elevated temperatures. As compared to the control, the secondary structures of this enzyme were essentially conserved upon the addition of these two kinds of osmolytes. Fluorescence results revealed that the temperature-induced conformational change of BACΔNC was prevented by TMAO and sorbitol. However, glycerol did not provide profound protection against thermal denaturation of the enzyme. Sorbitol was further found to counteract guanidine hydrochloride- and SDS-induced denaturation of BACΔNC. Thus, some well-known naturally occurring osmolytes make a dominant contribution to the stabilization of BACΔNC.

  9. Counteracting foaming caused by lipids or proteins in biogas reactors using rapeseed oil or oleic acid as antifoaming agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Einarsdottir, E S; Angelidaki, I

    2015-08-01

    Foaming is one of the major operational problems in biogas plants, and dealing with foaming incidents is still based on empirical practices. Various types of antifoams are used arbitrarily to combat foaming in biogas plants, but without any scientific support this action can lead to serious deterioration of the methanogenic process. Many commercial antifoams are derivatives of fatty acids or oils. However, it is well known that lipids can induce foaming in manure based biogas plants. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of rapeseed oil and oleic acid on foam reduction and process performance in biogas reactors fed with protein or lipid rich substrates. The results showed that both antifoams efficiently suppressed foaming. Moreover rapeseed oil resulted in stimulation of the biogas production. Finally, it was reckoned that the chemical structure of lipids, and more specifically their carboxylic ends, is responsible for their foam promoting or foam counteracting behaviour. Thus, it was concluded that the fatty acids and oils could suppress foaming, while salt of fatty acids could generate foam.

  10. Counteraction of Trehalose on N, N-Dimethylformamide-Induced Candida rugosa Lipase Denaturation: Spectroscopic Insight and Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    Full Text Available Candida rugosa lipase (CRL has been widely used as a biocatalyst for non-aqueous synthesis in biotechnological applications, which, however, often suffers significant loss of activity in organic solvent. Experimental results show that trehalose could actively counteract the organic-solvent-induced protein denaturation, while the molecular mechanisms still don't unclear. Herein, CRL was used as a model enzyme to explore the effects of trehalose on the retention of enzymatic activity upon incubation in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF. Results showed that both catalytic activity and conformation changes of CRL influenced by DMF solvent were inhibited by trehalose in a dose-dependent fashion. The simulations further indicated that the CRL protein unfolded in binary DMF solution, but retained the native state in the ternary DMF/trehalose system. Trehalose as the second osmolyte added into binary DMF solution decreased DMF-CRL hydrogen bonds efficiently, whereas increased the intermolecular hydrogen bondings between DMF and trehalose. Thus, the origin of its denaturing effects of DMF on protein is thought to be due to the preferential exclusion of trehalose as well as the intermolecular hydrogen bondings between trehalose and DMF. These findings suggest that trehalose protect the CRL protein from DMF-induced unfolding via both indirect and direct interactions.

  11. The counteracting effect of potassium cyanide in sodium azide-inhibited germination of Paulownia tomentosa  Steud. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Suzana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of some respiratory inhibitors on light-induced Paulownia tomentosa Steud. seed germination was studied. Millimolar solution of sodium azide was sufficient to completely prevent germination induced by a 5-min red light pulse. The inhibitory effect of azide was absent if seeds were rinsed before phytochrome activation by light. Sodium azide was effective only if present in the period of Pfr activity. The escape time from azide inhibition compared to the escape from far-red light action, was delayed for about 24 hours. When azide was applied after phytochrome activation, its effect depended on how long it was present in the incubation medium. The removal of azide allowed full restoration of germination by another red light pulse and the far-red escape time did not differ from the escape of untreated, i.e. water-imbibed seeds. Potassium cyanide alone did not produce any effect in light-stimulated germination of these seeds. However, it counteracted the inhibitory effect of azide in light-stimulated germination, if applied simultaneously at a concentration three times higher.

  12. The novel dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) derivative BNN27 counteracts delay-dependent and scopolamine-induced recognition memory deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsikas, Nikolaos; Gravanis, Achille

    2017-04-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the neurosteroids dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) are involved in cognition. BNN27 is a novel 17C spiroepoxy-DHEA derivative, which devoid of steroidogenic activity. The neuroprotective effects of BNN27 have been recently reported. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of BNN27 on recognition memory in rats. For this purpose, the novel object task (NOT), a procedure assessing non-spatial recognition memory and the novel location task (NLT), a procedure evaluating spatial recognition memory were used. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of BNN27 (3 and 10mg/kg) antagonized delay-dependent deficits in the NOT in the normal rat, suggesting that this DHEA derivative affected acquisition, storage and retrieval of information. In addition, BNN27 (3 and 10mg/kg, i.p.) counteracted the scopolamine [0.2mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)]-induced non-spatial and spatial recognition memory deficits. These findings suggest that BNN27 may modulate different aspects of recognition memory, potentially interacting with the cholinergic system, relevant to cognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ghrelin counteracts salt-induced hypertension via promoting diuresis and renal nitric oxide production in Dahl rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hirotaka; Nakata, Masanori; Dezaki, Katsuya; Lu, Ming; Gantulga, Darambazar; Yamamoto, Keiji; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kario, Kazuomi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone-secretagogue receptor expressed in various tissues including the heart, blood vessels and kidney. This study sought to determine the effects of long-term treatment with ghrelin (10 nmol/kg, twice a day, intraperitoneally) on the hypertension induced by high salt (8.0% NaCl) diet in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive (DS) rats. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured by a tail cuff method. During the treatment period for 3 weeks, high salt diet increased blood pressure compared to normal salt (0.3% NaCl) diet, and this hypertension was partly but significantly (P<0.01) attenuated by simultaneous treatment with ghrelin. Ghrelin significantly increased urine volume and tended to increase urine Na⁺ excretion. Furthermore, ghrelin increased urine nitric oxide (NO) excretion and tended to increase renal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA expression. Ghrelin did not alter the plasma angiotensin II level and renin activity, nor urine catecholamine levels. Furthermore, ghrelin prevented the high salt-induced increases in heart thickness and plasma ANP mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that long-term ghrelin treatment counteracts salt-induced hypertension in DS rats primarily through diuretic action associated with increased renal NO production, thereby exerting cardio-protective effects.

  14. ASK1 restores the antiviral activity of APOBEC3G by disrupting HIV-1 Vif-mediated counteraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Kei; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Morishita, Ryo; Kudoh, Ayumi; Shindo, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Kimura, Hirokazu; Tamura, Tomohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ichijo, Hidenori; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-04-22

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is an innate antiviral restriction factor that strongly inhibits the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vif, hijacks the host ubiquitin-proteasome system to execute A3G degradation. Identification of the host pathways that obstruct the action of Vif could provide a new strategy for blocking viral replication. We demonstrate here that the host protein ASK1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1) interferes with the counteraction by Vif and revitalizes A3G-mediated viral restriction. ASK1 binds the BC-box of Vif, thereby disrupting the assembly of the Vif-ubiquitin ligase complex. Consequently, ASK1 stabilizes A3G and promotes its incorporation into viral particles, ultimately reducing viral infectivity. Furthermore, treatment with the antiretroviral drug AZT (zidovudine) induces ASK1 expression and restores the antiviral activity of A3G in HIV-1-infected cells. This study thus demonstrates a distinct function of ASK1 in restoring the host antiviral system that can be enhanced by AZT treatment.

  15. Mammalian ribosomal and chaperone protein RPS3A counteracts α-synuclein aggregation and toxicity in a yeast model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graeve, Stijn; Marinelli, Sarah; Stolz, Frank; Hendrix, Jelle; Vandamme, Jurgen; Engelborghs, Yves; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of aggregated forms of αSyn (α-synuclein) into Lewy bodies is a known hallmark associated with neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. When expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, αSyn interacts with the plasma membrane, forms inclusions and causes a concentration-dependent growth defect. We have used a yeast mutant, cog6Δ, which is particularly sensitive to moderate αSyn expression, for screening a mouse brain-specific cDNA library in order to identify mammalian proteins that counteract αSyn toxicity. The mouse ribosomal and chaperone protein RPS3A was identified as a suppressor of αSyn [WT (wild-type) and A53T] toxicity in yeast. We demonstrated that the 50 N-terminal amino acids are essential for this function. The yeast homologues of RPS3A were not effective in suppressing the αSyn-induced growth defect, illustrating the potential of our screening system to identify modifiers that would be missed using yeast gene overexpression as the first screening step. Co-expression of mouse RPS3A delayed the formation of αSyn-GFP inclusions in the yeast cells. The results of the present study suggest that the recently identified extraribosomal chaperonin function of RPS3A also acts on the neurodegeneration-related protein αSyn and reveal a new avenue for identifying promising candidate mammalian proteins involved in αSyn functioning.

  16. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng (NIBS-China); (Zhejiang)

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  17. Model Dependency of TMAO's Counteracting Effect Against Action of Urea: Kast Model versus Osmotic Model of TMAO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgohain, Gargi; Paul, Sandip

    2016-03-10

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation of GB1 peptide (a 16-residue β-hairpin) in different osmotic environments is studied. Urea is used for denaturation of the peptide, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is used to offset the effect of urea. Protein-urea electrostatic interactions are found to play a major role in protein-denaturation. To emphasize on protein protecting action of TMAO against urea, two different models of TMAO are used, viz., the Kast model and the Osmotic model. We observe that the Osmotic model of TMAO gives the best protection to counteract urea's action when used in ratio 1:2 of urea:TMAO (i.e., reverse ratio). This is because the presence of TMAO makes urea-protein electrostatic interactions more unfavorable. Preferential solvation of TMAO molecules by urea (and water) molecules is also observed, which causes depletion in the number of urea molecules in the vicinity of the protein. The calculations of intraprotein hydrogen bonds between different residues of protein further reveal the breaking of backbone hydrogen bonds of residues 2 and 15 in the presence of urea, and the same is preserved in the presence of TMAO. Free energy landscapes show that the narrowest distribution is obtained for the osmotic TMAO model when used in reverse ratio.

  18. Can a reduction of solar irradiance counteract CO2-induced climate change? – Results from four Earth system models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compare the response of four state-of-the-art Earth system models to climate engineering under scenario G1 of the GeoMIP and IMPLICC model intercomparison projects. In G1, the radiative forcing from an instantaneous quadrupling of the CO2 concentration, starting from the preindustrial level, is balanced by a reduction of the solar constant. Model responses to the two counteracting forcings in G1 are compared to the preindustrial climate in terms of global means and regional patterns and their robustness. While the global mean surface air temperature in G1 remains almost unchanged, the meridional temperature gradient is reduced in all models compared to the control simulation. Another robust response is the global reduction of precipitation with strong effects in particular over North and South America and northern Eurasia. It is shown that this reduction is only partly compensated by a reduction in evaporation so that large continental regions are drier in the engineered climate. In comparison to the climate response to a quadrupling of CO2 alone the temperature responses are small in experiment G1. Precipitation responses are, however, of comparable magnitude but in many regions of opposite sign.

  19. Implications of sit-stand and active workstations to counteract the adverse effects of sedentary work: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, Sohit; Robertson, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary work is associated with many adverse health outcomes, and sit-stand workstations in offices have emerged as a way to counteract sedentary work. This paper reviews the existing knowledge on sit-stand workstations, treadmill workstations and bicycle workstations. The inclusion/exclusion criteria were: 1) empirical research examining the effectiveness of sit-stand workstations in lab or field studies, 2) working adult population, 3) sit-stand workstation interventions where workers performed the same task from a seated or standing position, 4) outcomes measures of discomfort (comfort), performance, sit-stand behaviors, user satisfaction, kinematic and physiological measures. Search terms were: sit-stand, treadmill, bicycle, workstations, sedentary behavior, office ergonomics, and comfort. Many studies considered productivity, comfort and physiological measures as important outcomes to assess the efficacy of sit-stand workstations and the experimental design was variable. Preliminary data suggests that some amount of standing during an 8-hour workday could be beneficial without compromising user comfort or productivity; however, there is very little data on the efficacy of treadmill and bicycle workstations. Based on these preliminary data from 26 studies, conducting large scale randomized controlled trials with ergonomic training as their essential component is recommended to understand the benefits of sit-stand workstations for prevention of sedentary work.

  20. How hepatitis C virus counteracts the interferon response: the jury is still out on NS5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S L; Katze, M G

    2001-05-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce an antiviral state in the cell through complex and indirect mechanisms, which culminate in a direct inhibition of viral replication and stimulation of the host adaptive responses. Viruses often counteract with elaborate strategies to interfere with the induction as well as action of IFN effector molecules. This evolutionary battle between viruses and IFN components is a subject of intense research aimed at understanding the immunopathogenesis of viruses and the molecular basis of IFN signaling and action. In the case with hepatitis C virus (HCV), this may have profound implications for the therapeutic use of recombinant IFN in treating chronic hepatitis C. Depending on the subtype of HCV, current IFN-based treatment regimens are effective for only a small subset of chronic hepatitis C patients. Thus, one of the Holy Grails in HCV research is to understand the mechanisms by which the virus may evade IFN antiviral surveillance and establish persistent infection, which may eventually provide insights into new avenues for better antiviral therapy. Despite the lack of an efficient tissue culture system and an appropriate animal model for HCV infection, several mechanisms have been proposed based on clinical studies and in vitro experiments. This minireview focuses on the HCV NS5A nonstructural protein, which is implicated in playing a role in HCV tolerance to IFN treatment, possibly in part through its ability to inhibit the cellular IFN-induced PKR protein kinase.

  1. Contrasting strategic and Milan therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, L

    1983-12-01

    Three related models of therapy are often grouped together as the strategic therapies. These are brief therapy model associated with the Mental Research Institute, approaches developed by Jay Haley and Cloë Madanes, and the model developed by the Milan associates. Controversy exists, however, as to whether the Milan model should be included as a strategic therapy. It appears that the similarities among the three models can mask deeper differences, thus confounding the confusion. This paper contrast the models in their development, theory, and practice.

  2. Document delivery services contrasting views

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    Design and maintain document delivery services that are ideal for academic patrons! In Document Delivery Services: Contrasting Views, you'll visit four university library systems to discover the considerations and challenges each library faced in bringing document delivery to its clientele. This book examines the questions about document delivery that are most pressing in the profession of library science. Despite their own unique experiences, you'll find common practices among all four?including planning, implementation of service, and evaluation of either user satisfaction and/or vendor per

  3. The Generalised Phase Contrast Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    . Optimal conditions for visibility, peak irradiance and accuracy are derived and shown to be perfectly in line with empirical results from the literature. New graphic methods for advanced analysis purposes are demonstrated supporting these conclusions as well as providing new tools for innovative filter...... designs and parameter settings. Finally, a number of original applications facilitated by the parallel light-beam encoding of the Generalised Phase Contrast method are briefly outlined. These include among others, wavefront sensing and generation, advanced usercontrolled optical micro......-manipulation, optical phase-only encryption/decryption and fully integrated micro-optical implementations....

  4. Counteracting Hypertension with weightlessness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Many of us have been told to lose weight to lower our blood pressure, but going weightless? Studies of astronauts show that gravity does contribute to cardiovascular stress......Many of us have been told to lose weight to lower our blood pressure, but going weightless? Studies of astronauts show that gravity does contribute to cardiovascular stress...

  5. Contrastive tone in Kalam Kohistani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan L.G. Baart

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been observed that tonal phenomena occur in quite a few Indo-Aryan languages in the northwestern corner of the South-Asian subcontinent. This paper presents a study of the tone system of one of these languages, Kalam Kohistani. After establishing that Kalam Kohistani has five contrastive surface tones—a high tone, a low tone, a rising tone, and two types of falling tone—I propose an analysis of these tones in terms of Autosegmental Phonology. Furthermore, some observations are made on the relation between aspiration and tone, and on the functional load of tone in Kalam Kohistani. Its relatively rich inventory of tones makes Kalam Kohistani, along with two of its close neighbors, stand out as unique among the Indo-Aryan languages.

  6. Analog CMOS contrastive Hebbian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Card, Howard

    1992-09-01

    CMOS VLSI circuits implementing an analog neural network with on-chip contrastive Hebbian learning and capacitive synaptic weight storage have been designed and fabricated. Weights are refreshed by periodic repetition of the training data. To evaluate circuit performance in a medium-sized system, these circuits were used to build a 132 synapse neural network. An adaptive neural system, such as the one described in this paper, can compensate for imperfections in the components from which it is constructed, and thus it is possible to build this type of system using simple, silicon area-efficient analog circuits. Because these analog VLSI circuits are far more compact than their digital counterparts, analog VLSI neural network implementations are potentially more efficient than digital ones.

  7. The Method of Culture Contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine; Trentemøller, Stine; Motzkau, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    the researcher's cultural background (i.e., emic categorisations) in the analysis of cross-cultural comparisons we suggest that the categorisations the researcher use in her tests and fieldwork descriptions are taken to be part of the research itself, rather than simply being an underlying (taken for granted......In this article, we suggest that research is a practical activity building on local category systems belonging specifically to research (etic categories) as well as categories belonging specifically to the national culture of the researcher (emic categories) (Pike 1967). Much cross-cultural......) framework on which the research is conducted. First we present a recent study of European universities as culturally diverse working places and we present an approach in which the researcher's emic and etic categorisations can be challenged when contrasted with each other (Hasse & Trentemøller 2008). Second...

  8. Octopaminergic modulation of contrast sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel ede Haan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensory systems adapt to prolonged stimulation by decreasing their response to prevailing stimulus conditions. Whereas visual motion adaptation has traditionally been studied in immobilized animals, recent work indicates that the animal’s behavioral state influences the response properties of higher-order motion vision-sensitive neurons. During insect flight octopamine is released, and pharmacological octopaminergic activation can induce a fictive locomotor state. In the insect optic ganglia, lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs spatially pool input from local elementary motion detectors (EMDs that correlate luminosity changes from two spatially discrete inputs after delaying the signal from one. The LPTC velocity optimum thereby depends on the spatial separation of the inputs and on the EMD’s delay properties. Recently it was shown that behavioral activity increases the LPTC velocity optimum, with modeling suggesting this to originate in the EMD’s temporal delay filters. However, behavior induces an additional post-EMD effect: the LPTC membrane conductance increases in flying flies. To physiologically investigate the degree to which activity causes presynaptic and postsynaptic effects, we conducted intracellular recordings of Eristalis horizontal system neurons. We constructed contrast response functions before and after adaptation at different temporal frequencies, with and without the octopamine receptor agonist chlordimeform (CDM. We extracted three motion adaptation components, where two are likely generated presynaptically of the LPTCs, and one within them. We found that CDM affected the early, EMD associated contrast gain reduction, temporal frequency dependently. However, a CDM-induced change of the HS membrane conductance disappeared during and after visual stimulation. This suggests that physical activity mainly affects motion adaptation presynaptically of LPTCs, whereas post-EMD effects have a minimal effect.

  9. Listening to Music during Warming-Up Counteracts the Negative Effects of Ramadan Observance on Short-Term Maximal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti, Hana; Chtourou, Hamdi; Driss, Tarak; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to examine whether listening to music during warming-up might influence short-term maximal performance (STMP), cognitive anxiety, self-confidence, and enjoyment during Ramadan, and whether these affects might predict STMP. Methods Nine male physical education students (age: 21 ± 1.1 years; height: 1.8 ± 0.04 m; body mass: 83 ± 5 kg) volunteered to participate in the present study. A within-subjects design consisted of four experimental sessions: Two sessions occurred one week before Ramadan and two others took place during Ramadan. They were scheduled at 5 p.m. and were conducted as follows: After a 10-minute warm-up either with or without listening to music, each participant performed a 5-m multiple shuttle run test, after which he was asked to answer items intended to assess his affective state during the experimental task. Results Our findings revealed that STMP was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the no-music condition. Additionally, it was found that STMP was higher in the music condition than in the no-music condition during Ramadan, and that STMP measured before Ramadan did not differ from that measured during Ramadan in the music condition. Regarding affects, the findings revealed that enjoyment was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the music condition, and that cognitive anxiety was lower in the music condition than in the no-music condition before Ramadan. Self-confidence was not influenced by the experimental conditions. Conclusion This study showed that listening to music during warming-up not only would be beneficial for STMP in Ramadan fasters, but also would counteract the negative effects of Ramadan observance on STMP. PMID:26301508

  10. The role of physical activity in counteracting age-related sarcopenia and cancer cachexia: A brief literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalabrin Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle tissue plays several important health functions . In addition to the important mechanical functions, it represents the biggest reserve of body proteins and it is also able to produce several myokines that are able to induce important beneficial effects, through the interaction with different organs. The loss of muscle mass has a tremendous impact on health and it is not surprising that a great interest has raised on two degenerative, irreversible and unstoppable conditions known as sarcopenia and cachexia. Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass, is not a disease or a syndrome, it is not even a medical sign sometimes. Indeed, a general consensus among scientists does not exist regarding the definition and the identification criteria of this condition. On the other hand, cachexia is a wasting syndrome characterized by an uncontrolled and unstoppable loss of muscle mass, associated with fatigue and weakness. It is often associated with a disease like cancer, AIDS, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, multiple sclerosis, tuberculosis etc. Given the complexity of these muscle conditions and considering that during aging and cancer there is an increased risk of comorbidities, regular physical activity might be a crucial point to be carefully evaluated on a single patient basis. The aim of this review is to highlight the impact on society and the etiology of sarcopenia and cancer cachexia, with particular regard to the role played by physical activity in preventing and counteracting these muscle-wasting conditions, focusing attention also on the limitation factors that must be considered during the prescription of physical activity to sarcopenic and cachectic patients.

  11. Botulinum neurotoxin type A counteracts neuropathic pain and facilitates functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, S; Luvisetto, S; Cobianchi, S; Makuch, W; Obara, I; Mezzaroma, E; Caruso, M; Straface, E; Przewlocka, B; Pavone, F

    2010-11-24

    A growing interest was recently focused on the use of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) for fighting pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of BoNT/A on neuropathic pain. It was observed that BoNT/A is able to counteract neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve both in mice and in rats. This effect is already present after a single intraplantar (i.pl.) or intrathecal (i.t.) neurotoxin administration that significantly reduces the sciatic nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia in mice and rats and thermal hyperalgesia in rats. This effect was evident starting 24 h after the administration of BoNT/A and it was long-lasting, being present 81 or 25 days after i.pl. injection of the higher dose in mice (15 pg/paw) and rats (75 pg/paw), respectively, and 35 days after i.t. injection in rats (75 pg/rat). Moreover, BoNT/A-injected mice showed a quicker recovery of the walking pattern and weight bearing compared to control groups. The behavioral improvement was accompanied by structural modifications, as revealed by the expression of cell division cycle 2 (Cdc2) and growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43) regeneration associated proteins, investigated by immunofluorescence and Western blotting in the sciatic nerve, and by the immunofluorescence expression of S100β and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) Schwann cells proteins. In conclusion, the present research demonstrate long-lasting anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of BoNT/A in animal models of neuropathic pain together with an acceleration of regenerative processes in the injured nerve, as evidenced by both behavioral and immunohistochemistry/blotting analysis. These results may have important implications in the therapy of neuropathic pain.

  12. Improvement of alveolar-capillary membrane diffusing capacity with enalapril in chronic heart failure and counteracting effect of aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzi, M; Marenzi, G; Alimento, M; Contini, M; Agostoni, P

    1997-04-01

    KII ACE, the enzyme that converts angiotensin I and inactivates bradykinin, is highly concentrated in the lungs; its blockade reduces exposure to angiotensin II and enhances exposure to prostaglandins generated by local kinin hyperconcentration. Our hypothesis is that ACE inhibitors improve pulmonary function in chronic heart failure (CHF) by readjusting lung vessel tone and permeability or alveolar-capillary membrane diffusion. In 16 CHF patients and 16 normal volunteers or mild untreated hypertensives, pulmonary function and exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis were assessed on placebo, enalapril (10 mg BID), enalapril plus aspirin (325 mg/d), or aspirin, in random order and double blind, for 15 days each. In CHF, enalapril increased pulmonary carbon monoxide diffusion (DLCO), oxygen consumption (VO2), and exercise tolerance and reduced the ratio of dead space to tidal volume (VD/VT) and the ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2). On enalapril, VO2 (r = .80, P < .0001) and VD/VT (r = -.69, P = .003) changes from placebo correlated with those in DLCO. These effects were inhibited by aspirin and were absent in control subjects. In 8 additional patients, hydralazine-isosorbide dinitrate, as an alternative treatment for reducing pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and increasing exercise capacity, were more effective than enalapril for the PCWP but did not affect DLCO and VE/VCO2; amelioration in VO2 and VD/VT was unrelated to DLCO and was not modified by aspirin. ACE inhibition improved pulmonary diffusion in CHF. Hydralazine-isosorbide dinitrate failed to provide this result. Counteraction by aspirin, a prostaglandin inhibitor, bespeaks prostaglandin participation while on enalapril that might readjust capillary permeability or alveolar-capillary membrane diffusion.

  13. Angiotensin II counteracts the effects of cAMP/PKA on NHE3 activity and phosphorylation in proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crajoinas, Renato O; Polidoro, Juliano Z; Carneiro de Morais, Carla P A; Castelo-Branco, Regiane C; Girardi, Adriana C C

    2016-11-01

    Binding of angiotensin II (ANG II) to the AT1 receptor (AT1R) in the proximal tubule stimulates Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) activity through multiple signaling pathways. However, the effects of ANG II/AT1R-induced inihibitory G protein (Gi) activation and subsequent decrease in cAMP accumulation on NHE3 regulation are not well established. We therefore tested the hypothesis that ANG II reduces cAMP/PKA-mediated phosphorylation of NHE3 on serine 552 and, in doing so, stimulates NHE3 activity. Under basal conditions, ANG II stimulated NHE3 activity but did not affect PKA-mediated NHE3 phosphorylation at serine 552 in opossum kidney (OKP) cells. However, in the presence of the cAMP-elevating agent forskolin (FSK), ANG II blocked FSK-induced NHE3 inhibition, reduced intracellular cAMP concentrations, lowered PKA activity, and prevented the FSK-mediated increase in NHE3 serine 552 phosphorylation. All effects of ANG II were blocked by pretreating OKP cells with the AT1R antagonist losartan, highlighting the contribution of the AT1R/Gi pathway in ANG II-mediated NHE3 upregulation under cAMP-elevating conditions. Accordingly, Gi inhibition by pertussis toxin treatment decreased NHE3 activity both in vitro and in vivo and, more importantly, prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II on NHE3 activity in rat proximal tubules. Collectively, our results suggest that ANG II counteracts the effects of cAMP/PKA on NHE3 phosphorylation and inhibition by activating the AT1R/Gi pathway. Moreover, these findings support the notion that NHE3 dephosphorylation at serine 552 may represent a key event in the regulation of renal proximal tubule sodium handling by ANG II in the presence of natriuretic hormones that promote cAMP accumulation and transporter phosphorylation.

  14. Glutamate Counteracts Dopamine/PKA Signaling via Dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 Ser-97 and Alteration of Its Cytonuclear Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Akinori; Matamales, Miriam; Musante, Veronica; Valjent, Emmanuel; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Kitahara, Yosuke; Rebholz, Heike; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Nairn, Angus C

    2017-01-27

    The interaction of glutamate and dopamine in the striatum is heavily dependent on signaling pathways that converge on the regulatory protein DARPP-32. The efficacy of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling is regulated by DARPP-32 phosphorylated at Thr-34 (the PKA site), a process that inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and potentiates PKA action. Activation of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling also leads to dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 (the CK2 site), leading to localization of phospho-Thr-34 DARPP-32 in the nucleus where it also inhibits PP1. In this study the role of glutamate in the regulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at four major sites was further investigated. Experiments using striatal slices revealed that glutamate decreased the phosphorylation states of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 as well as Thr-34, Thr-75, and Ser-130 by activating NMDA or AMPA receptors in both direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons. The effect of glutamate in decreasing Ser-97 phosphorylation was mediated by activation of PP2A. In vitro phosphatase assays indicated that the PP2A/PR72 heterotrimer complex was likely responsible for glutamate/Ca(2+)-regulated dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97. As a consequence of Ser-97 dephosphorylation, glutamate induced the nuclear localization in cultured striatal neurons of dephospho-Thr-34/dephospho-Ser-97 DARPP-32. It also reduced PKA-dependent DARPP-32 signaling in slices and in vivo Taken together, the results suggest that by inducing dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 and altering its cytonuclear distribution, glutamate may counteract dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling at multiple cellular levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. N-Acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase inhibition increases colon N-palmitoylethanolamine levels and counteracts murine colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhouayek, Mireille; Bottemanne, Pauline; Subramanian, Kumar V.; Lambert, Didier M.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Cani, Patrice D.; Muccioli, Giulio G.

    2015-01-01

    N-Palmitoylethanolamine or palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an anti-inflammatory compound that was recently shown to exert peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-dependent beneficial effects on colon inflammation. The actions of PEA are terminated following hydrolysis by 2 enzymes: fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and the less-studied N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA). This study aims to investigate the effects of inhibiting the enzymes responsible for PEA hydrolysis in colon inflammation in order to propose a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Two murine models of IBD were used to assess the effects of NAAA inhibition, FAAH inhibition, and PEA on macroscopic signs of colon inflammation, macrophage/neutrophil infiltration, and the expression of proinflammatory mediators in the colon, as well as on the colitis-related systemic inflammation. NAAA inhibition increases PEA levels in the colon and reduces colon inflammation and systemic inflammation, similarly to PEA. FAAH inhibition, however, does not increase PEA levels in the colon and does not affect the macroscopic signs of colon inflammation or immune cell infiltration. This is the first report of an anti-inflammatory effect of a systemically administered NAAA inhibitor. Because NAAA is the enzyme responsible for the control of PEA levels in the colon, we put forth this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target in chronic inflammation in general and IBD in particular.—Alhouayek, M., Bottemanne, P., Subramanian, K. V., Lambert, D. M., Makriyannis, A., Cani, P. D., and Muccioli, G. G. N-Acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase inhibition increases colon N-palmitoylethanolamine levels and counteracts murine colitis. PMID:25384424

  16. Listening to Music during Warming-Up Counteracts the Negative Effects of Ramadan Observance on Short-Term Maximal Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Asma; Briki, Walid; Baklouti, Hana; Chtourou, Hamdi; Driss, Tarak; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether listening to music during warming-up might influence short-term maximal performance (STMP), cognitive anxiety, self-confidence, and enjoyment during Ramadan, and whether these affects might predict STMP. Nine male physical education students (age: 21 ± 1.1 years; height: 1.8 ± 0.04 m; body mass: 83 ± 5 kg) volunteered to participate in the present study. A within-subjects design consisted of four experimental sessions: Two sessions occurred one week before Ramadan and two others took place during Ramadan. They were scheduled at 5 p.m. and were conducted as follows: After a 10-minute warm-up either with or without listening to music, each participant performed a 5-m multiple shuttle run test, after which he was asked to answer items intended to assess his affective state during the experimental task. Our findings revealed that STMP was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the no-music condition. Additionally, it was found that STMP was higher in the music condition than in the no-music condition during Ramadan, and that STMP measured before Ramadan did not differ from that measured during Ramadan in the music condition. Regarding affects, the findings revealed that enjoyment was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the music condition, and that cognitive anxiety was lower in the music condition than in the no-music condition before Ramadan. Self-confidence was not influenced by the experimental conditions. This study showed that listening to music during warming-up not only would be beneficial for STMP in Ramadan fasters, but also would counteract the negative effects of Ramadan observance on STMP.

  17. Prevalence and effects of mycotoxins on poultry health and performance, and recent development in mycotoxin counteracting strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, G R; Ledoux, D R; Naehrer, K; Berthiller, F; Applegate, T J; Grenier, B; Phillips, T D; Schatzmayr, G

    2015-06-01

    Extensive research over the last couple of decades has made it obvious that mycotoxins are commonly prevalent in majority of feed ingredients. A worldwide mycotoxin survey in 2013 revealed 81% of around 3,000 grain and feed samples analyzed had at least 1 mycotoxin, which was higher than the 10-year average (from 2004 to 2013) of 76% in a total of 25,944 samples. The considerable increase in the number of positive samples in 2013 may be due to the improvements in detection methods and their sensitivity. The recently developed liquid chromatography coupled to (tandem) mass spectrometry allows the inclusion of a high number of analytes and is the most selective, sensitive, and accurate of all the mycotoxin analytical methods. Mycotoxins can affect the animals either individually or additively in the presence of more than 1 mycotoxin, and may affect various organs such as gastrointestinal tract, liver, and immune system, essentially resulting in reduced productivity of the birds and mortality in extreme cases. While the use of mycotoxin binding agents has been a commonly used counteracting strategy, considering the great diversity in the chemical structures of mycotoxins, it is very obvious that there is no single method that can be used to deactivate mycotoxins in feed. Therefore, different strategies have to be combined in order to specifically target individual mycotoxins without impacting the quality of feed. Enzymatic or microbial detoxification, referred to as "biotransformation" or "biodetoxification," utilizes microorganisms or purified enzymes thereof to catabolize the entire mycotoxin or transform or cleave it to less or non-toxic compounds. However, the awareness on the prevalence of mycotoxins, available modern techniques to analyze them, the effects of mycotoxicoses, and the recent developments in the ways to safely eliminate the mycotoxins from the feed are very minimal among the producers. This symposium review paper comprehensively discusses the above

  18. Identification of an unintended consequence of Nrf2-directed cytoprotection against a key tobacco carcinogen plus a counteracting chemopreventive intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Joseph D; Ding, Yi; Randall, Kristen L; Munday, Rex; Argoti, Dayana; Vouros, Paul; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2011-06-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a major cytoprotective gene and is a key chemopreventive target against cancer and other diseases. Here we show that Nrf2 faces a dilemma in defense against 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), a major human bladder carcinogen from tobacco smoke and other environmental sources. Although Nrf2 protected mouse liver against ABP (which is metabolically activated in liver), the bladder level of N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), the predominant ABP-DNA adduct formed in bladder cells and tissues, was markedly higher in Nrf2(+/+) mice than in Nrf2(-/-) mice after ABP exposure. Notably, Nrf2 protected bladder cells against ABP in vitro. Mechanistic investigations showed that the dichotomous effects of Nrf2 could be explained at least partly by upregulation of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Nrf2 promoted conjugation of ABP with glucuronic acid in the liver, increasing urinary excretion of the conjugate. Although glucuronidation of ABP and its metabolites is a detoxification process, these conjugates, which are excreted in urine, are known to be unstable in acidic urine, leading to delivery of the parent compounds to bladder. Hence, although higher liver UGT activity may protect the liver against ABP, it increases bladder exposure to ABP. These findings raise concerns of potential bladder toxicity when Nrf2-activating chemopreventive agents are used in humans exposed to ABP, especially in smokers. We further show that 5,6-dihydrocyclopenta[c][1,2]-dithiole-3(4H)-thione (CPDT) significantly inhibits dG-C8-ABP formation in bladder cells and tissues but does not seem to significantly modulate ABP-catalyzing UGT in liver. Thus, CPDT exemplifies a counteracting solution to the dilemma posed by Nrf2.

  19. Listening to Music during Warming-Up Counteracts the Negative Effects of Ramadan Observance on Short-Term Maximal Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Aloui

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine whether listening to music during warming-up might influence short-term maximal performance (STMP, cognitive anxiety, self-confidence, and enjoyment during Ramadan, and whether these affects might predict STMP.Nine male physical education students (age: 21 ± 1.1 years; height: 1.8 ± 0.04 m; body mass: 83 ± 5 kg volunteered to participate in the present study. A within-subjects design consisted of four experimental sessions: Two sessions occurred one week before Ramadan and two others took place during Ramadan. They were scheduled at 5 p.m. and were conducted as follows: After a 10-minute warm-up either with or without listening to music, each participant performed a 5-m multiple shuttle run test, after which he was asked to answer items intended to assess his affective state during the experimental task.Our findings revealed that STMP was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the no-music condition. Additionally, it was found that STMP was higher in the music condition than in the no-music condition during Ramadan, and that STMP measured before Ramadan did not differ from that measured during Ramadan in the music condition. Regarding affects, the findings revealed that enjoyment was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the music condition, and that cognitive anxiety was lower in the music condition than in the no-music condition before Ramadan. Self-confidence was not influenced by the experimental conditions.This study showed that listening to music during warming-up not only would be beneficial for STMP in Ramadan fasters, but also would counteract the negative effects of Ramadan observance on STMP.

  20. Metabolic adaptations may counteract ventilatory adaptations of intermittent hypoxic exposure during submaximal exercise at altitudes up to 4000 m.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Faulhaber

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE has been shown to induce aspects of altitude acclimatization which affect ventilatory, cardiovascular and metabolic responses during exercise in normoxia and hypoxia. However, knowledge on altitude-dependent effects and possible interactions remains scarce. Therefore, we determined the effects of IHE on cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses at different simulated altitudes in the same healthy subjects. Eight healthy male volunteers participated in the study and were tested before and 1 to 2 days after IHE (7 × 1 hour at 4500 m. The participants cycled at 2 submaximal workloads (corresponding to 40% and 60% of peak oxygen uptake at low altitude at simulated altitudes of 2000 m, 3000 m, and 4000 m in a randomized order. Gas analysis was performed and arterial oxygen saturation, blood lactate concentrations, and blood gases were determined during exercise. Additionally baroreflex sensitivity, hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory response were determined before and after IHE. Hypoxic ventilatory response was increased after IHE (p<0.05. There were no altitude-dependent changes by IHE in any of the determined parameters. However, blood lactate concentrations and carbon dioxide output were reduced; minute ventilation and arterial oxygen saturation were unchanged, and ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide was increased after IHE irrespective of altitude. Changes in hypoxic ventilatory response were associated with changes in blood lactate (r = -0.72, p<0.05. Changes in blood lactate correlated with changes in carbon dioxide output (r = 0.61, p<0.01 and minute ventilation (r = 0.54, p<0.01. Based on the present results it seems that the reductions in blood lactate and carbon dioxide output have counteracted the increased hypoxic ventilatory response. As a result minute ventilation and arterial oxygen saturation did not increase during submaximal exercise at simulated altitudes between 2000 m and 4000 m.

  1. Ultra-small lipid nanoparticles promote the penetration of coenzyme Q10 in skin cells and counteract oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Silke B; Bauersachs, Sonja; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Baisaeng, Nuttakorn; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H; Witte, Ellen; Wolk, Kerstin; Hackbarth, Steffen; Röder, Beate; Lademann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    UV irradiation leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An imbalance between the antioxidant system and ROS can lead to cell damage, premature skin aging or skin cancer. To counteract these processes, antioxidants such as coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) are contained in many cosmetics. To improve and optimize cell/tissue penetration properties of the lipophilic CoQ10, ultra-small lipid nanoparticles (usNLC) were developed. The antioxidant effectiveness of CoQ10-loaded usNLC compared to conventional nanocarriers was investigated in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy investigations of the carriers additionally loaded with nile red showed a clear uptake into cells and their distribution within the cytoplasm. By use of the XTT cell viability test, CoQ10 concentrations of 10-50 μg/ml were shown to be non-toxic, and the antioxidant potential of 10 μg/ml CoQ10 loaded usNLC in the HaCaT cells was analyzed via electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy after cellular exposure to UVA (1J/cm(2)) and UVB (18 mJ/cm(2)) irradiation. In comparison with the CoQ10-loaded conventional carriers, usNLC-CoQ10 demonstrated the strongest reduction of the radical formation; reaching up to 23% compared to control cells without nanocarrier treatment. Therefore, usNLC-CoQ10 are very suitable to increase the antioxidant potential of skin.

  2. The intestinotrophic peptide, GLP-2, counteracts the gastrointestinal atrophy in mice induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, erlotinib, and cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Andreas Rosén; Viby, Niels-Erik; Hare, Kristine Juul;

    2010-01-01

    Erlotinib, an epidermal-growth-factor receptor inhibitor, belongs to a new generation of targeted cancer therapeutics. Gastrointestinal side-effects are common and have been markedly aggravated when erlotinib is combined with cytostatics. We examined the effects of erlotinib alone and combined wi...... with the cytostatic, cisplatin, on the gastrointestinal tract and examined whether glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), an intestinal hormone with potent intestinotrophic properties, might counteract the possible damaging effects of the treatments....

  3. Integral equations with contrasting kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Burton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study integral equations of the form $x(t=a(t-\\int^t_0 C(t,sx(sds$ with sharply contrasting kernels typified by $C^*(t,s=\\ln (e+(t-s$ and $D^*(t,s=[1+(t-s]^{-1}$. The kernel assigns a weight to $x(s$ and these kernels have exactly opposite effects of weighting. Each type is well represented in the literature. Our first project is to show that for $a\\in L^2[0,\\infty$, then solutions are largely indistinguishable regardless of which kernel is used. This is a surprise and it leads us to study the essential differences. In fact, those differences become large as the magnitude of $a(t$ increases. The form of the kernel alone projects necessary conditions concerning the magnitude of $a(t$ which could result in bounded solutions. Thus, the next project is to determine how close we can come to proving that the necessary conditions are also sufficient. The third project is to show that solutions will be bounded for given conditions on $C$ regardless of whether $a$ is chosen large or small; this is important in real-world problems since we would like to have $a(t$ as the sum of a bounded, but badly behaved function, and a large well behaved function.

  4. Using Contrastive Rhetoric in the ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Contrastive rhetoric studies the writing of second language learners to understand how it is affected by their first language and culture. The field of contrastive rhetoric is as multidimensional as second language writing is complex. It draws on the work of contrastive analysis, anthropology, linguistics, pedagogy, culture studies, translation…

  5. Spatial contrast sensitivity in clinical neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1988-01-01

    We studied contrast sensitivity function in normal subjects and in three illustrative cases with various neurological disorders. This was done by measuring contrast sensitivity over a range of spatial frequencies for vertical sinewave grating stimuli. It is demonstrated that contrast sensitivity function can give information about visual function not obtainable by conventional test procedures.

  6. Internal polarization limits coronagraph contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, James Bernard; Lam, Wai Sze T.; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-08-01

    The performance of exoplanet imaging coronagraphs is limited by internal polarization. The point spread function (PSF) of these systems is determined by the details of the opto-mechanical layout selected to package the system and by the highly reflective metal thin films needed to maintain high optical system transmittance. To obtain the high contrast levels needed for terrestrial exoplanet science requires a comprehensive understanding of the vector electromagnetic wave from the source through the system. The literature contains many studies of polarization transmissivity of telescopes and instruments for the purpose of photo-polarimetry. Here we report for the first time the effects of polarization on high-performance image quality.We modeled a typical 2.4-meter Cassegrain telescope system with one 90-degree fold mirror and analyzed the system for polarization aberrations.We find: 1. The image plane irradiance distribution is the linear superposition of four PSF images: One for each of the two orthogonal polarizations and one for each of two cross-product polarization terms. 2. The PSF image is brighter by 9% for one polarization component compared to its orthogonal state. 3. The image of the PSF for orthogonal components are shifted across the focal plane with respect to each other, causing the PSF image for astronomical sources (polarized or unpolarized) to become slightly elongated (elliptical) with a centroid separation of about 0.6 masec. 4. The orthogonally polarized components of unpolarized sources contain different wavefront aberrations, which are separated by approximately 32 milliwaves. This implies that a wavefront correction system cannot optimally correct the aberrations for all polarizations simultaneously. 5. The polarization aberrations couple small parts (~1E-5) of each polarization component of the light into the orthogonal polarization to create highly distorted secondary, or “ghost” PSF image.. The radius of the spatial extent of the 90

  7. [Physiopathology of nephropathy studied with contrast media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Buenrostro, L E; Tellez Zenteno, J F; Torre Delgadillo, A

    2000-01-01

    For the technological advances in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, the use of intravenous contrast media in the hospital is more and more frequent. It can produce acute renal failure secondary to its nephrotoxicity known as contrast media nephropathy. This review describes the pathophysiologic mechanisms of contrast media injury, including cytotoxicity caused by hyperosmoloarity of contrast media, the hemodynamic factors and the role of the renin-angiotensin system, prostaglandins, oxygen free radicals, endothelin-1, adenosine, nitric oxide and others. The understanding of this information is of vital importance for the development of prophylactic strategies for contrast media nephropathy.

  8. Contrast Enhanced US in the Abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Ki Whang [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Contrast enhanced ultrasound, which was introduced in 1996, has been widely used in Europe and Eastern Asia. Ultrasound contrast agent can be classified as first generation and second generation, depending on the gas within the microbubble. With the first generation contrast agent, the high MI technique was used, and only intermittent scanning was possible due to destruction of the microbubble during scanning. Use of the second generation contrast agent with the low MI technique makes continuous scanning possible. Contrast enhanced US can be used in detection and differentiation of focal liver lesions. It is also helpful for monitoring of radiofrequency ablation and for targeting of US guided biopsy. Currently, because morphologic criteria alone may not reflect the response of the tumor to treatment, new criteria are needed for treatment evaluation after administration of anti-angiogenic agents. Contrast enhanced US could provide quantitative markers for evaluation of the response to treatment via use of dynamic contrast enhanced US. Due to cost-effectiveness, contrast enhanced US is not yet widely used in Korea; however, considering recent issues regarding contrast agent related adverse reaction, such as contrast induced nephropathy and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and radiation exposure, contrast enhanced US might be more widely used in Korea, as an alternative imaging modality in the future.

  9. Contrast adaptation contributes to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning of primate V1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel G Nowak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies in rodents and carnivores have shown that orientation tuning width of single neurons does not change when stimulus contrast is modified. However, in these studies, stimuli were presented for a relatively long duration (e. g., 4 seconds, making it possible that contrast adaptation contributed to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Our first purpose was to determine, in marmoset area V1, whether orientation tuning is still contrast-invariant with the stimulation duration is comparable to that of a visual fixation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed extracellular recordings and examined orientation tuning of single-units using static sine-wave gratings that were flashed for 200 msec. Sixteen orientations and three contrast levels, representing low, medium and high values in the range of effective contrasts for each neuron, were randomly intermixed. Contrast adaptation being a slow phenomenon, cells did not have enough time to adapt to each contrast individually. With this stimulation protocol, we found that the tuning width obtained at intermediate contrast was reduced to 89% (median, and that at low contrast to 76%, of that obtained at high contrast. Therefore, when probed with briefly flashed stimuli, orientation tuning is not contrast-invariant in marmoset V1. Our second purpose was to determine whether contrast adaptation contributes to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Stationary gratings were presented, as previously, for 200 msec with randomly varying orientations, but the contrast was kept constant within stimulation blocks lasting >20 sec, allowing for adaptation to the single contrast in use. In these conditions, tuning widths obtained at low contrast were still significantly less than at high contrast (median 85%. However, tuning widths obtained with medium and high contrast stimuli no longer differed significantly. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Orientation tuning does not appear to be contrast

  10. Pharmacological strategies to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and metabolic adverse effects in schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuya; Suzuki, Takefumi; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mimura, Masaru; Fleischhacker, Walter Wolfgang; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    Antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities are often difficult to manage. Using concomitant medications to counteract these adversities may be a rational option. To systematically determine the effectiveness of medications to counteract antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities in patients with schizophrenia. Published articles until November 2013 were searched using 5 electronic databases. Clinical trial registries were searched for unpublished trials. Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials focusing on patients with schizophrenia were included if they evaluated the effects of concomitant medications on antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities as a primary outcome. Variables relating to participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study design were extracted. The primary outcome was change in body weight. Secondary outcomes included clinically relevant weight change, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, fasting insulin, insulin resistance, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Forty trials representing 19 unique interventions were included in this meta-analysis. Metformin was the most extensively studied drug in regard to body weight, the mean difference amounting to -3.17 kg (95% CI: -4.44 to -1.90 kg) compared to placebo. Pooled effects for topiramate, sibutramine, aripiprazole, and reboxetine were also different from placebo. Furthermore, metformin and rosiglitazone improved insulin resistance, while aripiprazole, metformin, and sibutramine decreased blood lipids. When nonpharmacological strategies alone are insufficient, and switching antipsychotics to relatively weight-neutral agents is not feasible, the literature supports the use of concomitant metformin as first choice among pharmacological interventions to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and other metabolic adversities in schizophrenia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For

  11. Flash Infrared Thermography Contrast Data Analysis Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast versus time evolutions from the flash thermography inspection infrared video data. The analysis calculates thermal measurement features from the contrast evolution. In addition, simulation of the contrast evolution is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat-bottom holes in the subject material. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography data in order to characterize delamination-like anomalies. The thermal measurement features relate to the anomaly characteristics. The contrast evolution simulation is matched to the measured contrast evolution over an anomaly to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width which correspond to the depth and diameter of the equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) similar to that used as input to the simulation. A similar analysis, in terms of diameter and depth of an equivalent uniform gap (EUG) providing a best match with the measured contrast evolution, is also provided. An edge detection technique called the half-max is used to measure width and length of the anomaly. Results of the half-max width and the EFBH/EUG diameter are compared to evaluate the anomaly. The information provided here is geared towards explaining the IR Contrast technique. Results from a limited amount of validation data on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) hardware are included in this paper.

  12. What patients do to counteract the symptoms of Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED: Effect of gender and severity of illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was carried out to assess different counteracting strategies used by patients with idiopathic Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED. Whether these strategies were influenced by gender or disease severity was also assessed. Materials and Methods: A total of 173 patients of idiopathic RLS/WED were included in this study. Their demographic data was recorded. Details regarding the RLS/WED and strategies that they used to counteract the symptoms were asked. The severity of RLS/WED was measured with the help of the Hindi version of international restless legs syndrome severity rating scale. They were asked to provide the details regarding the relief obtained from all the strategies they used on three-point scale: no relief, some relief, and complete relief. Results: Of the patients, 72% were females. Mean age of the subjects in this study was 39.6 ± 12.6 years, and male subjects were older than females. Four common strategies were reported by the patients to counter the sensations of RLS/WED: moving legs while in bed (85.5%, asking somebody to massage their legs or massaging legs themselves (76.9%, walking (53.2%, and tying a cloth/rope tightly on the legs (39.3%. Of all the patients who moved their legs, 6.7% did not experience any relief, 64.2% reported some relief, and 28.4% reported complete relief. Similarly, of all the patients who used "walking" to counteract symptoms, 50% reported complete relief, 44.5% reported some relief, and the rest did not experience any relief. Many of these patients reported that massage and tying a cloth/rope on legs brought greater relief than any of these strategies. Tying cloth on the leg was more common among females as compared to males (45.9% females vs. 23.5% males; χ2 = 7.54; P = 0.006, while patients with moderately severe to severe RLS/WED reported "moving legs in bed" (79.3% in mild to moderate RLS/WED; 91.8% in severe to very severe RLS; χ2 = 5.36; P = 0.02. Conclusion: Patients with RLS

  13. What patients do to counteract the symptoms of Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED): Effect of gender and severity of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Goel, Deepak; Ahmed, Sohaib; Dhar, Minakshi; Lahan, Vivekananda

    2014-10-01

    This study was carried out to assess different counteracting strategies used by patients with idiopathic Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). Whether these strategies were influenced by gender or disease severity was also assessed. A total of 173 patients of idiopathic RLS/WED were included in this study. Their demographic data was recorded. Details regarding the RLS/WED and strategies that they used to counteract the symptoms were asked. The severity of RLS/WED was measured with the help of the Hindi version of international restless legs syndrome severity rating scale. They were asked to provide the details regarding the relief obtained from all the strategies they used on three-point scale: no relief, some relief, and complete relief. Of the patients, 72% were females. Mean age of the subjects in this study was 39.6 ± 12.6 years, and male subjects were older than females. Four common strategies were reported by the patients to counter the sensations of RLS/WED: moving legs while in bed (85.5%), asking somebody to massage their legs or massaging legs themselves (76.9%), walking (53.2%), and tying a cloth/rope tightly on the legs (39.3%). Of all the patients who moved their legs, 6.7% did not experience any relief, 64.2% reported some relief, and 28.4% reported complete relief. Similarly, of all the patients who used "walking" to counteract symptoms, 50% reported complete relief, 44.5% reported some relief, and the rest did not experience any relief. Many of these patients reported that massage and tying a cloth/rope on legs brought greater relief than any of these strategies. Tying cloth on the leg was more common among females as compared to males (45.9% females vs. 23.5% males; χ(2) = 7.54; P = 0.006), while patients with moderately severe to severe RLS/WED reported "moving legs in bed" (79.3% in mild to moderate RLS/WED; 91.8% in severe to very severe RLS; χ(2) = 5.36; P = 0.02). Patients with RLS/WED use a variety of strategies to counteract symptoms. These

  14. The metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 counteracted ketamine-and apomorphine-induced performance deficits in the object recognition task, but not object location task, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsikas, Nikolaos; Markou, Athina

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the non competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine and the mixed dopamine (DA) D1/D2 receptor agonist apomorphine induce schizophrenia-like symptoms in rodents, including cognitive deficits. Activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptors reduces the excessive glutamate release that is hypothesized to be associated with psychiatric disorders. Thus, mGlu2/3 receptor agonists may reverse deficits induced by excessive glutamate or DA release induced by administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and DA receptor agonists, respectively, and potentially those seen in schizophrenia. LY379268 is a selective mGlu2/3 receptor agonist that has shown to be effective in several animal models of stroke, epilepsy, and drug abuse. The present study investigated whether LY379268 antagonizes non-spatial and spatial recognition memory deficits induced by ketamine and apomorphine administration in rats. To assess the effects of the compounds on non-spatial and spatial recognition memory, the object recognition task and object location task were used. Post-training administration of LY379268 (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) counteracted ketamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced performance deficits in the object recognition task. In contrast, LY379268 (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.) did not attenuate spatial recognition memory deficits produced by ketamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or apomorphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in the object location task. The present data show that the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 reversed non-spatial, but not spatial, recognition memory deficits induced by NMDA receptor blockade or DA receptor agonism in rodents. Thus, such mGlu2/3 receptor agonists may be efficacious in reversing some memory deficits seen in schizophrenia patients.

  15. Stimulus Contrast and Retinogeniculate Signal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, Daniel L; Alitto, Henry J; Warland, David K; Usrey, W Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal signals conveying luminance contrast play a key role in nearly all aspects of perception, including depth perception, texture discrimination, and motion perception. Although much is known about the retinal mechanisms responsible for encoding contrast information, relatively little is known about the relationship between stimulus contrast and the processing of neuronal signals between visual structures. Here, we describe simultaneous recordings from monosynaptically connected retinal ganglion cells and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) neurons in the cat to determine how stimulus contrast affects the communication of visual signals between the two structures. Our results indicate that: (1) LGN neurons typically reach their half-maximal response at lower contrasts than their individual retinal inputs and (2) LGN neurons exhibit greater contrast-dependent phase advance (CDPA) than their retinal inputs. Further analyses suggests that increased sensitivity relies on spatial convergence of multiple retinal inputs, while increased CDPA is achieved, in part, on temporal summation of arriving signals.

  16. Stimulus contrast and retinogeniculate signal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Llewellyn Rathbun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal signals conveying luminance contrast play a key role in nearly all aspects of perception, including depth perception, texture discrimination, and motion perception. Although much is known about the retinal mechanisms responsible for encoding contrast information, relatively little is known about the relationship between stimulus contrast and the processing of neuronal signals between visual structures. Here we describe simultaneous recordings from monosynaptically connected retinal ganglion cells and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN neurons in the cat to determine how stimulus contrast affects the communication of visual signals between the two structures. Our results indicate that 1 LGN neurons typically reach their half-maximal response at lower contrasts than their individual retinal inputs, and 2 LGN neurons exhibit greater contrast-dependent phase advance (CDPA than their retinal inputs. Further analyses suggests that increased sensitivity relies on spatial convergence of multiple retinal inputs, while increased CDPA is achieved, in part, on temporal summation of arriving signals.

  17. Iodinated contrast media and the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    One of the principal complications of radiographic procedures utilizing intravascular iodinated contrast media is acute kidney injury. Although several clinical and procedural factors impact a patient's risk for contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI), substantial attention has been focused on the relationship between the type of contrast agent used and renal injury. Multiple contrast agents are available for clinical use, each defined by a series of physicochemical properties. The evolution from high osmolal to low osmolal and, more recently, iso-osmolal contrast media has led to several clinical trials and meta-analyses comparing the nephrotoxicity of different contrast agents. This article summarizes the physicochemical properties that define and differentiate iodinated contrast media, discusses the purported relationship between these properties and kidney injury, and describes the salient findings of clinical trials and meta-analyses that have compared the nephrotoxic effects of contrast agents. Although ongoing and future studies will further elucidate our understanding of the relationship between iodinated contrast and risk for CIAKI, a sound understanding of the currently available data will help inform evidence-based decisions on the use of these agents in clinical practice.

  18. CHANGE DETECTION VIA SELECTIVE GUIDED CONTRASTING FILTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Vizilter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Change detection scheme based on guided contrasting was previously proposed. Guided contrasting filter takes two images (test and sample as input and forms the output as filtered version of test image. Such filter preserves the similar details and smooths the non-similar details of test image with respect to sample image. Due to this the difference between test image and its filtered version (difference map could be a basis for robust change detection. Guided contrasting is performed in two steps: at the first step some smoothing operator (SO is applied for elimination of test image details; at the second step all matched details are restored with local contrast proportional to the value of some local similarity coefficient (LSC. The guided contrasting filter was proposed based on local average smoothing as SO and local linear correlation as LSC. In this paper we propose and implement new set of selective guided contrasting filters based on different combinations of various SO and thresholded LSC. Linear average and Gaussian smoothing, nonlinear median filtering, morphological opening and closing are considered as SO. Local linear correlation coefficient, morphological correlation coefficient (MCC, mutual information, mean square MCC and geometrical correlation coefficients are applied as LSC. Thresholding of LSC allows operating with non-normalized LSC and enhancing the selective properties of guided contrasting filters: details are either totally recovered or not recovered at all after the smoothing. These different guided contrasting filters are tested as a part of previously proposed change detection pipeline, which contains following stages: guided contrasting filtering on image pyramid, calculation of difference map, binarization, extraction of change proposals and testing change proposals using local MCC. Experiments on real and simulated image bases demonstrate the applicability of all proposed selective guided contrasting filters. All

  19. Change Detection via Selective Guided Contrasting Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizilter, Y. V.; Rubis, A. Y.; Zheltov, S. Y.

    2017-05-01

    Change detection scheme based on guided contrasting was previously proposed. Guided contrasting filter takes two images (test and sample) as input and forms the output as filtered version of test image. Such filter preserves the similar details and smooths the non-similar details of test image with respect to sample image. Due to this the difference between test image and its filtered version (difference map) could be a basis for robust change detection. Guided contrasting is performed in two steps: at the first step some smoothing operator (SO) is applied for elimination of test image details; at the second step all matched details are restored with local contrast proportional to the value of some local similarity coefficient (LSC). The guided contrasting filter was proposed based on local average smoothing as SO and local linear correlation as LSC. In this paper we propose and implement new set of selective guided contrasting filters based on different combinations of various SO and thresholded LSC. Linear average and Gaussian smoothing, nonlinear median filtering, morphological opening and closing are considered as SO. Local linear correlation coefficient, morphological correlation coefficient (MCC), mutual information, mean square MCC and geometrical correlation coefficients are applied as LSC. Thresholding of LSC allows operating with non-normalized LSC and enhancing the selective properties of guided contrasting filters: details are either totally recovered or not recovered at all after the smoothing. These different guided contrasting filters are tested as a part of previously proposed change detection pipeline, which contains following stages: guided contrasting filtering on image pyramid, calculation of difference map, binarization, extraction of change proposals and testing change proposals using local MCC. Experiments on real and simulated image bases demonstrate the applicability of all proposed selective guided contrasting filters. All implemented

  20. Motion contrast using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingler, Jeffrey Paul

    Diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases like age-related macular degeneration is very important for treatment of the disease as well as the development of future treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical interference technique which can measure the three-dimensional structural information of the reflecting layers within a sample. In retinal imaging, OCT is used as the primary diagnostic tool for structural abnormalities such as retinal holes and detachments. The contrast within the images of this technique is based upon reflectivity changes from different regions of the retina. This thesis demonstrates the developments of methods used to produce additional contrast to the structural OCT images based on the tiny fluctuations of motion experienced by the mobile scatterers within a sample. Motion contrast was observed for motions smaller than 50 nm in images of a variety of samples. Initial contrast method demonstrations used Brownian motion differences to separate regions of a mobile Intralipid solution from a static agarose gel, chosen in concentration to minimize reflectivity contrast. Zebrafish embryos in the range of 3-4 days post fertilization were imaged using several motion contrast methods to determine the capabilities of identifying regions of vascular flow. Vasculature identification was demonstrated in zebrafish for blood vessels of all orientations as small as 10 microns in diameter. Mouse retinal imaging utilized the same motion contrast methods to determine the contrast capabilities for motions associated with vasculature within the retina. Improved contrast imaging techniques demonstrated comparable images to fluorescein angiography, the gold standard of retinal vascular imaging. Future studies can improve the demonstrated contrast analysis techniques and apply them towards human retinal motion contrast imaging for ophthalmic diagnostic purposes.

  1. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Role of sperimidine in counteracting the destabilizing effect of mescaline of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1971-11-01

    1. The effect of spermidine on the mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes was studied by adding spermidine during the treatment of goat brain-cortex slices with mescaline. 2. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices removed a portion of the endogenous spermidine from ribosomes and this removal was significantly prevented when spermidine was present during mescaline treatment. 3. Spermidine present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices counteracted, to some extent, the destabilizing effect of mescaline on ribosomes with respect to heat denaturation. 4. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices made ribosomes more susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein and RNA, and resulting in loss of ribosomal enzymic activities. However, spermidine present during mescaline treatment counteracted moderately the mescaline-induced ribosomal susceptibility to breakdown and ribosomal loss of enzymic activities. 5. Ribosomes of mescaline-treated cortex slices were rapidly degraded by ribonuclease and trypsin. However, if spermidine was present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices the rates of degradation diminished.

  2. Compensatory up-regulation of cardiac SR Ca2+-pump by heat-shock counteracts SR Ca2+-channel activation by ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P J; Li, G O; Locke, M; Klabunde, R E; Ianuzzo, C D

    1997-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that heat-shock protected myocardial Ca2+-cycling by sarcoplasmic reticulum from ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. Twenty-four hours after increasing body temperature to 42 degrees C for 15 min, rat hearts were isolated, Langendorff-perfused, and subjected to 30 min ischemia then 30 min reperfusion. Left ventricles were homogenized and their ionized Ca2+ concentration monitored with indo- during Ca2+-uptake in the presence and absence of the Ca2+-release channel (CRC) modulator ryanodine. Tissue content of heat-shock protein 72 (HSP 72) was analyzed. Exposure to I/R resulted in a 37% enhancement of CRC activity but no effect on Ca2+-pumping activity, resulting in 25% decreased net Ca2+-uptake activity. Pre-exposure to heat-shock resulted in a 10-fold increase in HSP 72, and a 25% enhancement of maximal Ca2+-pumping activity which counteracted the effect of I/R on CRC and net Ca2+-uptake activities. This protection of SR Ca2+-cycling was associated with partial protection of myocardial physiological performance. Net Ca2+-uptake activity was correlated with the left ventricular developed pressure and its rate of change. We conclude that one of the mechanisms by which heat-shock protects myocardium from I/R injury is to upregulate SR Ca2+-pumping activity to counteract the enhanced SR Ca2+-release produced by I/R.

  3. The Deubiquitinase USP47 Stabilizes MAPK by Counteracting the Function of the N-end Rule ligase POE/UBR4 in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton-Beaucage, Dariel; Lemieux, Caroline; Udell, Christian M; Sahmi, Malha; Rochette, Samuel; Therrien, Marc

    2016-08-01

    RAS-induced MAPK signaling is a central driver of the cell proliferation apparatus. Disruption of this pathway is widely observed in cancer and other pathologies. Consequently, considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the mechanistic aspects of RAS-MAPK signal transmission and regulation. While much information has been garnered on the steps leading up to the activation and inactivation of core pathway components, comparatively little is known on the mechanisms controlling their expression and turnover. We recently identified several factors that dictate Drosophila MAPK levels. Here, we describe the function of one of these, the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP47. We found that USP47 acts post-translationally to counteract a proteasome-mediated event that reduces MAPK half-life and thereby dampens signaling output. Using an RNAi-based genetic interaction screening strategy, we identified UBC6, POE/UBR4, and UFD4, respectively, as E2 and E3 enzymes that oppose USP47 activity. Further characterization of POE-associated factors uncovered KCMF1 as another key component modulating MAPK levels. Together, these results identify a novel protein degradation module that governs MAPK levels. Given the role of UBR4 as an N-recognin ubiquitin ligase, our findings suggest that RAS-MAPK signaling in Drosophila is controlled by the N-end rule pathway and that USP47 counteracts its activity.

  4. Contrast harmonic TEE: A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouakaz, Ayache; Krenning, Boudewijn; Biagini, Elena; Galema, Tjebbe; ten Cate, Folkert; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) contrast agents serve as tracers for the noninvasive quantification of blood flow, and many of them are now approved for left ventricular opacification and for enhanced endocardial border delineation. The availability of more stable contrast bubbles has stimulated many new classes of

  5. Perception of familiar contrasts in unfamiliar positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the perception of non-native phoneme contrasts which exist in the native language, but not in the position tested. Like English, Dutch contrasts voiced and voiceless obstruents. Unlike English, Dutch allows only voiceless obstruents in word-final position. Dutch and English

  6. Discrimination of Arabic Contrasts by American Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mahmoud, Mahmoud S.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on second language perception of non-native contrasts. The study specifically tests the perceptual assimilation model (PAM) by examining American learners' ability to discriminate Arabic contrasts. Twenty two native American speakers enrolled in a university level Arabic language program took part in a forced choice AXB…

  7. Lesion Contrast Enhancement in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.; Macovski, A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of low-contrast lesions in medical ultrasound imaging are described. Differences in the frequency spectra and amplitude distributions of the lesion and its surroundings can be used to increase the CNR of the lesion relative to the background...

  8. Towards Dynamic Contrast Specific Ultrasound Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    We report on the first study demonstrating the ability of a recently-developed, contrast-enhanced, ultrasound imaging method, referred to as cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI), to image and quantify ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) kinetics. Unlike standard ultrasound tomography, which exploits changes in speed of sound and attenuation, CPDI is based on a marker specific to UCAs, thus enabling dynamic contrast-specific ultrasound tomography (DCS-UST). For breast imaging, DCS-UST will lead to a more practical, faster, and less operator-dependent imaging procedure compared to standard echo-contrast, while preserving accurate imaging of contrast kinetics. Moreover, a linear relation between CPD values and ultrasound second-harmonic intensity was measured (coefficient of determination = 0.87). DCS-UST can find clinical applications as a diagnostic method for breast cancer localization, adding important features to multi-parametric ultrasound tomography of the breast.

  9. PTH (1–34), but not strontium ranelate counteract loss of trabecular thickness and bone strength in disuse osteopenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüel, Annemarie; Vegger, Jens Bay; Raffalt, Anders Christer;

    2013-01-01

    +PTH+SrR (n=12 in each group). PTH was given as injections (SC) at a dosage of 60 μg/kg/d, and SrR as 900 mg/kg/d in the diet. The experiment lasted for 4weeks.BTX resulted in lower trabecular bone formation rate (−68%) and periosteal bone formation rate (−91%), and a higher fraction of osteoclast......) and periosteal (5-fold increase vs. BTX) bone formation rate, trabecular thickness (+25% vs. BTX) and femoral neck strength (+24% vs. BTX). In contrast, SrR did not influence BTX-induced loss of bone formation rate, trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, or bone strength. Finally, no additive...

  10. Comparison of counteract compression properties of different ceramic crowns for implant abutment%不同基底材料的瓷修复体用于种植修复时抵抗压力载荷的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖剑锐; 韩小宪; 林雪梅; 陈宇轩; 孔亮

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the counteract compression properties of different ceramic crowns for implant abutment. Methods Co-Cr alloy ceramic crowns, Titanium ceramic crowns, gold alloy ceramic crowns and whole ceramic crowns were made for the Ti-abutment and the abutment tooth in vitro (the control group). Cyclic loads were applied on the crowns and the Max loading frequencies were recorded when the ceramic showed cracks.Results The Max loading frequency in the abutment tooth crowns were 159.3±6.7,147.7±2.4,149.5±3.3 and 138.6±7.1 respectively, and those were 167.6±2.7,149.7±6.5,152.8±4.3 and 122.0±4.6 in the Ti-abutmenl crowns. The Co-Cr alloy ceramic crowns in Ti-abutment could endure more loading frequencies than in the abutment tooth (P<0.05), and the whole ceramic crowns showed the contrast (P<0.05). In the Ti-abutment, Co-Cr alloy ceramic crowns endured most loading frequencies, and the whole ceramic crowns showed the least (P<0.05). Conclusion For Ti-abutment, Co-Cr alloy ceramic crown showed the best counteract compression properties and whole ceramic crowns showed the worst.%目的 比较不同基底材料的瓷修复体用于种植修复时的抗压强度.方法 分别基于离体牙(对照组)和种植基台制作钴铬合金烤瓷、钛烤瓷、贵金属烤瓷(75%Au合金)和全瓷修复体,粘接后在咬合面进行循环加载,直至出现修复体瓷层破坏,记录最大加载次数.结果 四种修复体,用于离体基牙时出现破坏的最大加载次数(万次)分别为159.3±6.7,147.7±2.4,149.5±3.3和138.6±7.1;用于种植基台时分别为167.6±2.7,149.7±6.5,152.8±4.3和122.0±4.6.钴铬烤瓷修复用于种植基台时比用于离体基牙时可承受更多的加载次数(P<0.05),而全瓷修复体则相反(P<0.05);用于种植基台修复时,钴铬烤瓷承受加载次数较多,而全瓷修复体可承受的加载次数最少,均有统计学意义(P<0.05),钛烤瓷及贵金属烤瓷居中.结论 针对种植体基

  11. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Săftoiu, A; Dietrich, C F; Vilmann, P

    2012-01-01

    Second-generation intravenous blood-pool ultrasound contrast agents are increasingly used in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for characterization of microvascularization, differential diagnosis of benign and malignant focal lesions, and improving staging and guidance of therapeutic procedures. Although...... contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS based on a very low mechanical index (0.08 - 0.12). Quantification techniques based on dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound have been recommended for perfusion imaging and monitoring of anti-angiogenic treatment, mainly based on time-intensity curve analysis. Most...

  12. Contrast-induced transient cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parth R; Yohendran, Jayshan; Parker, Geoffrey D; McCluskey, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    We present a case of transient cortical blindness secondary to contrast medium toxicity. A 58-year-old man had successful endovascular coiling of a right posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm but became confused and unable to see after the procedure. His visual acuity was no light perception bilaterally. Clinically, there was no new intra-ocular pathology. An urgent non-contrast computed tomography scan of the brain showed cortical hyperdensity in both parieto-occipital cortices, consistent with contrast medium leakage through the blood-brain barrier from the coiling procedure. The man remained completely blind for 72 hours, after which his visual acuity improved gradually back to his baseline level.

  13. Compressed sensing for phase contrast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaass, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noeel, Peter B.; Tapfer, Arne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Department of Physics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Department of Radiology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2012-07-31

    Modern x-ray techniques opened the possibility to retrieve phase information. Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) has the potential to significantly improve soft tissue contrast. Radiation dose, however, continues to be an issue when moving from bench to bedside. Dose reduction in this work is achieved by sparsely acquiring PCCT data. To compensate for appearing aliasing artifacts we introduce a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework. We present the feasibility of CS on PCCT with numerical as well as measured phantom data. The results proof that CS compensates for under-sampling artifacts and maintains the superior soft tissue contrast and detail visibility in the reconstructed images.

  14. Compressed sensing for phase contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaass, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noël, Peter B.; Tapfer, Arne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Haase, Axel

    2012-07-01

    Modern x-ray techniques opened the possibility to retrieve phase information. Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) has the potential to significantly improve soft tissue contrast. Radiation dose, however, continues to be an issue when moving from bench to bedside. Dose reduction in this work is achieved by sparsely acquiring PCCT data. To compensate for appearing aliasing artifacts we introduce a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework. We present the feasibility of CS on PCCT with numerical as well as measured phantom data. The results proof that CS compensates for under-sampling artifacts and maintains the superior soft tissue contrast and detail visibility in the reconstructed images.

  15. Contrast data mining concepts, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Guozhu

    2012-01-01

    A Fruitful Field for Researching Data Mining Methodology and for Solving Real-Life Problems Contrast Data Mining: Concepts, Algorithms, and Applications collects recent results from this specialized area of data mining that have previously been scattered in the literature, making them more accessible to researchers and developers in data mining and other fields. The book not only presents concepts and techniques for contrast data mining, but also explores the use of contrast mining to solve challenging problems in various scientific, medical, and business domains. Learn from Real Case Studies

  16. The hidden effects of recalling secrets: Assimilation, contrast, and the burdens of secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Michael L; Masicampo, E J; Galinsky, Adam D

    2016-08-01

    Three high-power studies (N = 3,000 total) demonstrated that asking participants to recall an experience as a manipulation can have unintended consequences. Participants who recalled preoccupying secrets made more extreme judgments of an external environment, supporting the notion that secrecy is burdensome. This influence was found, however, only among a subset of participants (i.e., participants who successfully recalled secrets that corresponded to their condition). We introduce the concept of manipulation correspondence to understand these patterns of results. Without taking into account whether participants' recalled secrets corresponded to their manipulation, there was no main effect of the recall manipulation on hill slant judgments. Among participants whose secrets did not correspond with the manipulation, a contrast effect emerged (i.e., influences on perceptual judgments opposite to the intention of the recall prompts). Moreover, the very process of recalling a secret in response to a prompt can lead to contrast from that prompt. Exposing participants to extreme exemplar secrets can experimentally produce, or counteract, this contrast effect. Preoccupying secrets are burdensome but tests of this phenomenon must take into account whether participants are actually preoccupied with their secrets (i.e., whether their recalled secrets correspond with the experimental manipulation), or experimentally ensure that participants judge their secrets as in line with the manipulation. More broadly, the current research speaks to a fundamental principle of recall manipulations; when recalling a particular experience, correspondence with the manipulation will determine its effects, and the process of recalling an experience (and comparing it to a prompt) might change how one perceives that experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Contrast-to-noise in X-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, K.J.; Geller, D.; Koehler, T.; Martens, G.; Schusser, S.; Vogtmeier, G.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative theory for the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) is proposed and compared to that of images derived from classical absorption contrast imaging (ACI). Most prominently, the CNR for DPCI contains the reciprocal of thespatial wavelength to be ima

  18. Contrast data mining: concepts, algorithms, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong, Guozhu; Bailey, James

    2013-01-01

    .... Contrasting involves the comparison of one dataset against another. The datasets may represent data of different time periods, spatial locations, or classes, or they may represent data satisfying different conditions...

  19. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C. (X-Ray Science Division); (Northwestern Univ.); (Diamond Light Source, Ltd.)

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  20. Contrast-induced nephropathy after computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano da Silva Selistre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast induced nephropathy is the third most prevalent preventable cause of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients. It defined as an absolute increase in serum creatinine ≥ 0.5 mg/dL and relative ≥ 25% increase. Objective: We studied the risk factors to intravenous injection contrast nephropathy after computed tomography. Methods: We studied 400 patients prospectively. Results: The incidence of contrast induced nephropathy, with an absolute or a relative increase were 4.0% and 13.9%, respectively. Diabetes and cardiac failure were independent risk factors for CIN a relative increase de serum creatinine (O.R.: 3.5 [95% CI: 1.92-6.36], p < 0.01, 2.61 [95% CI: 1.14-6.03%], p < 0.05, respectively. Conclusions: We showed association between uses of intravenous injection contrast after computed tomography with acute injury renal, notably with diabetes and heart failure.

  1. Application of Contrast Echocardiography in Invasive Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrast echocardiography by rendering better imaging of the borders of cardiac chambers is a useful tool for evaluating cardiac function, mass, myocardial vascularization, microvascular structure (small vessel vasculature and viability. Contrast was first started to be used for patients with suboptimal image quality. It can be used in detecting defects in myocardial blood supply in patients with chest pain and determining the success of interventionalprocedures. It can also be of help in demonstrating myocardial viability after reperfusion treatment in patients who had myocardial infarction. It is expected to be used more widely in invasive cardiology for decision making, guiding and determining the success of the procedures. Advances in imaging techniques , development of contrast materials for evaluation of left system, contrast echocardiography may become a routine clinical practice.

  2. Contrast-Induced Neurotoxicity following Cardiac Catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Law

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of probable contrast-induced neurotoxicity that followed a technically challenging cardiac catheterization in a 69-year-old woman. The procedure had involved the administration of a large cumulative dose of an iodinated, nonionic contrast medium into the innominate artery: twelve hours following the catheterization, the patient developed a seizure followed by a left hemiplegia, and an initial computed tomography (CT scan showed sulcal effacement in the right cerebral hemisphere due to cerebral swelling. The patient’s clinical symptoms resolved within 24 hours, and magnetic resonance imaging at 32 hours showed resolution of swelling. Contrast-induced neurotoxicity should be found in the differential diagnosis of acute neurological deficits occurring after radiological procedures involving iodinated contrast media, whether ionic or nonionic.

  3. A contrasting study: cliff and bank swallows

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project was to contrast as population of Cliff Swallows and a population of Bank Swallows. Both populations had nests located in a gravel pit near...

  4. CONTRASTIVE NOTES ON SOME ENGLISH IDIOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin MANEA

    2009-01-01

    The contrastive and didactic analysis conducted by the author of the present paper concentrates on idiomaticity, comparing meaning, expression, usage and degree of awareness. In the paper, contrastivity was intended to offer some individual notes and clues meant to benefit both EFL teachers and translators in this country. The idioms are analysed from the angle of both their literality, referentiality, specific “scenario”, and expressive power. A modest final proposal is made to the effect th...

  5. Contrast induced hyperthyroidism due to iodine excess

    OpenAIRE

    Mushtaq, Usman; Price, Timothy; Laddipeerla, Narsing; Townsend, Amanda; Broadbridge, Vy

    2009-01-01

    Iodine induced hyperthyroidism is a thyrotoxic condition caused by exposure to excessive iodine. Historically this type of hyperthyroidism has been described in areas of iodine deficiency. With advances in medicine, iodine induced hyperthyroidism has been observed following the use of drugs containing iodine—for example, amiodarone, and contrast agents used in radiological imaging. In elderly patients it is frequently difficult to diagnose and control contrast related hyperthyroidism, as most...

  6. NASA High Contrast Imaging for Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Described is NASA's ongoing program for the detection and characterization of exosolar planets via high-contrast imaging. Some of the more promising proposed techniques under assessment may enable detection of life outside our solar system. In visible light terrestrial planets are approximately 10(exp -10) dimmer than the parent star. Issues such as diffraction, scatter, wavefront, amplitude and polarization all contribute to a reduction in contrast. An overview of the techniques will be discussed.

  7. Application of Contrast Echocardiography in Invasive Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Contrast echocardiography by rendering better imaging of the borders of cardiac chambers is a useful tool for evaluating cardiac function, mass, myocardial vascularization, microvascular structure (small vessel vasculature) and viability. Contrast was first started to be used for patients with suboptimal image quality. It can be used in detecting defects in myocardial blood supply in patients with chest pain and determining the success of interventionalprocedures. It can also be of help in de...

  8. Anti-genotoxic ability of α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin to counteract fish DNA damage induced by musk xylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Lucia; Mottola, Filomena; Santonastaso, Marianna; Saputo, Valentina; Cusano, Elena; Costagliola, Domenico; Suero, Teresa; Pacifico, Severina; Stingo, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Many compounds released into the environment are able to interact with genetic material. The main purpose of genetic toxicology is to investigate the adverse effects of genotoxic molecules such as reduced fitness, changes in gene frequencies and their impact on genetic diversity in populations following genotoxic exposure. However, the ecological effects of many genotoxic compounds remain poorly understood. The aim of this research was to evaluate the genotoxic activity of an artificial musk (musk xylene, MX) and the potential anti-genotoxicity against this chemical compound of two antioxidant substances (α-tocopherol and an anthocyanins enriched extract). The studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro, using the teleost Danio rerio and the DLEC (Dicentrarchus labrax embryonic cells) cell line. We carried out the exposure to these substances at different times. DNA and cell damage and their possible repair were detected by various experimental approaches: DNA strand breaks (Comet Assay), degree of apoptosis (Diffusion Assay) and molecular alterations at the genomic level (RAPD-PCR technique). Data were collected and analyzed for statistical significance using the Student's t test. The results of this study showed that MX exhibited a genotoxic activity even after short exposure times. The anti-genotoxicity experiments evidenced that both α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin were able to contrast the genotoxic effects induced by MX, both in vivo and in vitro.

  9. Perceptual Contrast Enhancement with Dynamic Range Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Yuecheng; Chen, Hao; Yuan, Ding; Sun, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Recent years, although great efforts have been made to improve its performance, few Histogram equalization (HE) methods take human visual perception (HVP) into account explicitly. The human visual system (HVS) is more sensitive to edges than brightness. This paper proposes to take use of this nature intuitively and develops a perceptual contrast enhancement approach with dynamic range adjustment through histogram modification. The use of perceptual contrast connects the image enhancement problem with the HVS. To pre-condition the input image before the HE procedure is implemented, a perceptual contrast map (PCM) is constructed based on the modified Difference of Gaussian (DOG) algorithm. As a result, the contrast of the image is sharpened and high frequency noise is suppressed. A modified Clipped Histogram Equalization (CHE) is also developed which improves visual quality by automatically detecting the dynamic range of the image with improved perceptual contrast. Experimental results show that the new HE algorithm outperforms several state-of-the-art algorithms in improving perceptual contrast and enhancing details. In addition, the new algorithm is simple to implement, making it suitable for real-time applications. PMID:24339452

  10. The influence of the time of antidotal treatment administration on the potency of newly developed oximes to counteract acute toxic effects of tabun in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Jirí

    2005-01-01

    (1) The influence of the time of administration of antidotal treatment consisting of anticholinergic drug (atropine) and newly developed oxime (K027 or K048) on its effectiveness to eliminate tabun-induced lethal toxic effects was studied in mice. (2) The therapeutic efficacy of antidotal treatment of tabun-induced acute poisoning depends on the time of its administration regardless of the choice of the oxime. (3) Our results show that both oximes studied (K027, K048) are able to sufficiently eliminate lethal effects of tabun. Nevertheless, their efficacy significantly decreases when they were administered 5 min after tabun poisoning. (4) The findings support the hypothesis that both newly developed oximes appear to be suitable oximes to counteract acute toxicity of tabun although their ability to eliminate lethal toxic effects of tabun significantly decreases with prolonged time interval between tabun challenge and antidotal treatment administration.

  11. Anthocyanins and phenolic acids from a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) powder counteract lipid accumulation in THP-1-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Blueberries are a rich source of anthocyanins (ACNs) and phenolic acids (PA), which are hypothesized to protect against development of atherosclerosis. The present study examined the effect of an ACN- and PA-rich fractions, obtained from a wild blueberry powder, on the capacity...... to counteract lipid accumulation in macrophages derived from monocytic THP-1 cells. In addition, we tested the capacity of pure ACNs and their metabolites to alter lipid accumulation. METHODS: THP-1-derived macrophages were incubated with fatty acids (500 μM oleic/palmitic acid, 2:1 ratio) and different...... concentrations (from 0.05 to 10 μg mL(-1)) of ACN- and PA-rich fractions, pure ACN standards (malvidin, delphinidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside), and metabolites (syringic, gallic and protocatechuic acids). Lipid accumulation was quantified with the fluorescent dye Nile red. RESULTS: Lipid accumulation was reduced...

  12. Exogenous and endogenous ghrelin counteracts GLP-1 action to stimulate cAMP signaling and insulin secretion in islet β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Dezaki, Katsuya; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Sone, Hideyuki; Rita, Rauza; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2012-07-30

    We studied interactive effects of insulinotropic GLP-1 and insulinostatic ghrelin on rat pancreatic islets. GLP-1 potentiated glucose-induced insulin release and cAMP production in isolated islets and [Ca(2+)](i) increases in single β-cells, and these potentiations were attenuated by ghrelin. Ghrelin suppressed [Ca(2+)](i) responses to an adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. Moreover, GLP-1-induced insulin release and cAMP production were markedly enhanced by [D-lys(3)]-GHRP-6, a ghrelin receptor antagonist, in isolated islets. These results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous islet-derived ghrelin counteracts glucose-dependent GLP-1 action to increase cAMP production, [Ca(2+)](i) and insulin release in islet β-cells, positioning ghrelin as a modulator of insulinotropic GLP-1.

  13. Toxin-antitoxin loci as stress-response-elements: ChpAK/MazF and ChpBK cleave translated RNAs and are counteracted by tmRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.K.; Pedersen, K.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2003-01-01

    Prokaryotic chromosomes encode toxin-antitoxin loci, often in multiple copies. In most cases, the function of these genes is not known. The chpA (mazEF) locus of Escherichia coli has been described as a cell killing module that induces bacterial apoptosis during nutritional stress. However, we...... found recently that ChpAK (MazF) does not confer cell killing but rather, induces a bacteriostatic condition from which the cells could be resuscitated. Results presented here yield a mechanistic explanation for the detrimental effect on cell growth exerted by ChpAK and the homologous ChpBK protein of E....... coli. We show that both proteins inhibit translation by inducing cleavage of translated mRNAs. Consistently, the inhibitory effect of the proteins was counteracted by tmRNA. Amino acid starvation induced strong transcription of chpA that depended on Lon protease but not on ppGpp. Simultaneously, Chp...

  14. 水下激光目标的统计对消分割法%Target Segmentation from Laser Underwater Images Based on Statistic Counteraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费佩燕; 郭宝龙; 章正宇

    2004-01-01

    The recognition of laser underwater target is a new disquisitive field, in which many problems are open, and segmentation is the key problem. To recognize underwater target,segmentation must be performed efficiently because there is a lot of speckle noise in laser underwater images. According to the principle that noise with identically statistic characteristics can counteract noise in images, a new algorithm called target segmentation from laser underwater image based on statistic counteraction is proposed to remove speckle noise and extract targets with wavelet transform and statistics. Experiments demonstrate that this method is efficient and feasible.%水下激光目标的识别是一个崭新的研究领域,有许多问题需要解决,其中,目标分割是关键.水下激光图像中夹杂着严重的散斑噪声,受其影响,要识别水下激光目标,就要对图像进行有效的消噪,然后进行目标分割.本文依据具有相似统计特征的噪声可抵消图像中的相应噪声这一基理,结合小波变换和统计法,提出了一种水下激光目标的统计对消分割法,以去除噪声,提取目标.实验结果表明该方法是有效可行的.

  15. Life-long environmental enrichment counteracts spatial learning, reference and working memory deficits in middle-aged rats subjected to perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Pablo; Blanco, Eduardo; Logica Tornatore, Tamara M A; Romero, Juan I; Holubiec, Mariana I; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Capani, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Continuous environmental stimulation induced by exposure to enriched environment (EE) has yielded cognitive benefits in different models of brain injury. Perinatal asphyxia results from a lack of oxygen supply to the fetus and is associated with long-lasting neurological deficits. However, the effects of EE in middle-aged rats suffering perinatal asphyxia are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether life-long exposure to EE could counteract the cognitive and behavioral alterations in middle-aged asphyctic rats. Experimental groups consisted of rats born vaginally (CTL), by cesarean section (C+), or by C+ following 19 min of asphyxia at birth (PA). At weaning, rats were assigned to standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE) for 18 months. During the last month of housing, animals were submitted to a behavioral test battery including Elevated Plus Maze, Open Field, Novel Object Recognition and Morris water maze (MWM). Results showed that middle-aged asphyctic rats, reared in SE, exhibited an impaired performance in the spatial reference and working memory versions of the MWM. EE was able to counteract these cognitive impairments. Moreover, EE improved the spatial learning performance of middle-aged CTL and C+ rats. On the other hand, all groups reared in SE did not differ in locomotor activity and anxiety levels, while EE reduced locomotion and anxiety, regardless of birth condition. Recognition memory was altered neither by birth condition nor by housing environment. These results support the importance of environmental stimulation across the lifespan to prevent cognitive deficits induced by perinatal asphyxia.

  16. Life-long environmental enrichment counteracts spatial learning, reference and working memory deficits in middle-aged rats subjected to perinatal asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo eGaleano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous environmental stimulation induced by exposure to enriched environment (EE has yielded cognitive benefits in different models of brain injury. Perinatal asphyxia results from a lack of oxygen supply to the fetus and is associated with long-lasting neurological deficits. However, the effects of EE in middle-aged rats suffering perinatal asphyxia are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether life-long exposure to EE could counteract the cognitive and behavioral alterations in middle-aged asphyctic rats. Experimental groups consisted of rats born vaginally (CTL, by cesarean section (C+, or by C+ following 19 min of asphyxia at birth (PA. At weaning, rats were assigned to standard (SE or enriched environment (EE for 18 months. During the last month of housing, animals were submitted to a behavioral test battery including Elevated Plus Maze, Open Field, Novel Object Recognition and Morris water maze (MWM. Results showed that middle-aged asphyctic rats, reared in SE, exhibited an impaired performance in the spatial reference and working memory versions of the MWM. EE was able to counteract these cognitive impairments. Moreover, EE improved the spatial learning performance of middle-aged CTL and C+ rats. On the other hand, all groups reared in SE did not differ in locomotor activity and anxiety levels, while EE reduced locomotion and anxiety, regardless of birth condition. Recognition memory was altered neither by birth condition nor by housing environment. These results support the importance of environmental stimulation across the lifespan to prevent cognitive deficits induced by perinatal asphyxia.

  17. Life-long environmental enrichment counteracts spatial learning, reference and working memory deficits in middle-aged rats subjected to perinatal asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Pablo; Blanco, Eduardo; Logica Tornatore, Tamara M. A.; Romero, Juan I.; Holubiec, Mariana I.; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Capani, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Continuous environmental stimulation induced by exposure to enriched environment (EE) has yielded cognitive benefits in different models of brain injury. Perinatal asphyxia results from a lack of oxygen supply to the fetus and is associated with long-lasting neurological deficits. However, the effects of EE in middle-aged rats suffering perinatal asphyxia are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether life-long exposure to EE could counteract the cognitive and behavioral alterations in middle-aged asphyctic rats. Experimental groups consisted of rats born vaginally (CTL), by cesarean section (C+), or by C+ following 19 min of asphyxia at birth (PA). At weaning, rats were assigned to standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE) for 18 months. During the last month of housing, animals were submitted to a behavioral test battery including Elevated Plus Maze, Open Field, Novel Object Recognition and Morris water maze (MWM). Results showed that middle-aged asphyctic rats, reared in SE, exhibited an impaired performance in the spatial reference and working memory versions of the MWM. EE was able to counteract these cognitive impairments. Moreover, EE improved the spatial learning performance of middle-aged CTL and C+ rats. On the other hand, all groups reared in SE did not differ in locomotor activity and anxiety levels, while EE reduced locomotion and anxiety, regardless of birth condition. Recognition memory was altered neither by birth condition nor by housing environment. These results support the importance of environmental stimulation across the lifespan to prevent cognitive deficits induced by perinatal asphyxia. PMID:25601829

  18. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 heals cysteamine-colitis and colon-colon-anastomosis and counteracts cuprizone brain injuries and motor disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klicek, R; Kolenc, D; Suran, J; Drmic, D; Brcic, L; Aralica, G; Sever, M; Holjevac, J; Radic, B; Turudic, T; Kokot, A; Patrlj, L; Rucman, R; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2013-10-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 was suggested to link inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis, and thereby, shown to equally counteract the models of both of those diseases. For colitis, cysteamine (400 mg/kg intrarectally (1 ml/rat)) and colon-colon anastomosis (sacrifice at day 3, 5, 7, and 14) were used. BPC 157 (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg) was applied either intraperitoneally once time daily (first application immediately after surgery, last at 24 hours before sacrifice) or per-orally in drinking water (0.16 μg/ml/12 ml/day till the sacrifice) while controls simultaneously received an equivolume of saline (5 ml/kg) intraperitoneally or drinking water only (12 ml/day). A multiple sclerosis suited toxic rat model, cuprizone (compared with standard, a several times higher regimen, 2.5% of diet regimen + 1 g/kg intragastrically/day) was combined with BPC 157 (in drinking water 0.16 μg or 0.16 ng/ml/12 ml/day/rat + 10 μg or 10 ng/kg intragastrically/day) till the sacrifice at day 4. In general, the controls could not heal cysteamine colitis and colon-colon anastomosis. BPC 157 induced an efficient healing of both at the same time. Likewise, cuprizone-controls clearly exhibited an exaggerated and accelerated damaging process; nerve damage appeared in various brain areas, with most prominent damage in corpus callosum, laterodorsal thalamus, nucleus reunions, anterior horn motor neurons. BPC 157-cuprizone rats had consistently less nerve damage in all damaged areas, especially in those areas that otherwise were most affected. Consistently, BPC 157 counteracted cerebellar ataxia and impaired forelimb function. Thereby, this experimental evidence advocates BPC 157 in both inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis therapy.

  19. Contrast-induced nephropathy in interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarsky D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Doron Sudarsky, Eugenia NikolskyCardiology Department, Rambam Health Care Campus and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Development of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN, ie, a rise in serum creatinine by either ≥0.5 mg/dL or by ≥25% from baseline within the first 2–3 days after contrast administration, is strongly associated with both increased inhospital and late morbidity and mortality after invasive cardiac procedures. The prevention of CIN is critical if long-term outcomes are to be optimized after percutaneous coronary intervention. The prevalence of CIN in patients receiving contrast varies markedly (from <1% to 50%, depending on the presence of well characterized risk factors, the most important of which are baseline chronic renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Other risk factors include advanced age, anemia, left ventricular dysfunction, dehydration, hypotension, renal transplant, low serum albumin, concomitant use of nephrotoxins, and the volume of contrast agent. The pathophysiology of CIN is likely to be multifactorial, including direct cytotoxicity, apoptosis, disturbances in intrarenal hemodynamics, and immune mechanisms. Few strategies have been shown to be effective to prevent CIN beyond hydration, the goal of which is to establish brisk diuresis prior to contrast administration, and to avoid hypotension. New strategies of controlled hydration and diuresis are promising. Studies are mixed on whether prophylactic oral N-acetylcysteine reduces the incidence of CIN, although its use is generally recommended, given its low cost and favorable side effect profile. Agents which have been shown to be ineffective or harmful, or for which data supporting routine use do not exist, include fenoldopam, theophylline, dopamine, calcium channel blockers, prostaglandin E1, atrial natriuretic peptide, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.Keywords: contrast-induced nephropathy, contrast media

  20. Contingency contrast effects in discrimination conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grings, W W; Givens, M C; Carey, C A

    1979-09-01

    Three experiments observed differential electrodermal responding to signal stimuli (CSs) by contrasting positive, random, and negative contingencies between the signals and strong stimuli (UCSs). Experimentation began as a test of the proposition that electrodermal response to a random signal (or CSR) would lie between the response to a reinforced or excitatory stimulus (CS+) and that to a nonreinforced or inhibitory stimulus (CS- or CSI). A clear intermediate position for CSR did not result. Instead it appeared that CSR was operating as a mildly excitatory signal. This led to a second experiment where response to pairs of stimuli with different contingent relations could be compared in independent samples. The pairs were CS+ and CS-, CS+ and CSR, and CSR and CS-. Differential responding was observed in all pairs and response to CSR was significantly larger in the group receiving CSR with CS- than it was in the group receiving CSR with CS+. A contingency contrast effect was suggested. A third experiment explored the implications of a contingency contrast effect by varying overall UCS density, the duration of "safety intervals," and the presence or absence of instructions about contingencies. The UCS density and instruction variables influenced the differential performance to CSR and CS-, a result that was interpreted as further evidence for a perceptual contingency-contrast effect. Some theoretical implications of such a contrast phenomenon are examined, as they apply to autonomic learning. The CS is interpreted as a signal supplying contingency information that is dependent upon a complex of factors in the stimulation environment.

  1. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of sentinel lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XinWu Cui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sentinel lymph nodes are the first lymph nodes in the region that receive lymphatic drainage from a primary tumor. The detection or exclusion of sentinel lymph node micrometastases is critical in the staging of cancer, especially breast cancer and melanoma because it directly affects patient’s prognosis and surgical management. Currently, intraoperative sentinel lymph node biopsies using blue dye and radioisotopes are the method of choice for the detection of sentinel lymph node with high identification rate. In contrast, conventional ultrasound is not capable of detecting sentinel lymph nodes in most cases. Contrast enhanced ultrasound with contrast specific imaging modes has been used for the evaluation and diagnostic work-up of peripherally located suspected lymphadenopathy. The method allows for real-time analysis of all vascular phases and the visualization of intranodal focal “avascular” areas that represent necrosis or deposits of neoplastic cells. In recent years, a number of animal and human studies showed that contrast enhanced ultrasound can be also used for the detection of sentinel lymph node, and may become a potential application in clinical routine. Several contrast agents have been used in those studies, including albumin solution, hydroxyethylated starch, SonoVue®, Sonazoid® and Definity®. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the use of ultrasound techniques in detection and evaluation of sentinel lymph node.

  2. Image evolution approach for contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiro, Guillermo; Casalles, Vicent

    1995-09-01

    An algorithm for histogram modification via image evolution equations is first presented in this paper. We show that the image histogram can be modified to achieve any given distribution as the steady state solution of this partial differential equation. We then prove that this equation corresponds to a gradient descent flow of a variational problem. That is, the proposed PDE is solving an energy minimization problem. This gives a new interpretation to histogram modification and contrast enhancement in general. This interpretation is completely formulated in the image domain, in contrast with classical techniques for histogram modification which are formulated in a probabilistic domain. From this, new algorithms for contrast enhancement, which include for example, image modeling, can be derived. Based on the energy formulation and its corresponding PDE, we show that the proposed histogram modification algorithm can be combined with denoising schemes. This allows to perform simultaneous contrast enhancement and denoising, avoiding common noise sharpening effects in classical algorithms. The approach is extended to local contrast enhancement as well. Theoretical results regarding the existence of solutions of the proposed equations are presented.

  3. Peripheral contrast sensitivity and attention in myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Kristen L.; Thorn, Frank; Bex, Peter J.; Vera-Diaz, Fuensanta A.

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of normal visual experience or changes in the normal interaction between central and peripheral retinal input may lead to the development of myopia. In order to examine the relationship between peripheral contrast sensitivity and myopia, we manipulated attentional load for foveal vision in emmetropes and myopes while observers detected targets with peripheral vision. Peripheral contrast detection thresholds were measured binocularly using vertical Gabor stimuli presented at three eccentricities (±8°, 17°, 30°) in a spatial 2 alternative forced choice task. Contrast thresholds were measured in young adult (mean age 24.5 ± 2.6 years) emmetropes (n = 17; group SE: +0.19 ± 0.32D) and myopes (n = 25; group SE: −3.74 ± 1.99D). Attention at central fixation was manipulated with: (1) a low attention task, requiring simple fixation; or (2) a high attention task, which required subjects to perform a mathematical task. We found that at 30° all subjects exhibited lower contrast sensitivity (higher thresholds). In addition, myopes (Wilcoxon, p task. However, the attention dependent threshold increase for myopes was not significantly greater than for emmetropes (Wilcoxon, p = 0.27). Attentional load did not increase thresholds at 8° or 17° for either refractive group. These data indicate that myopes experience a greater decrease in contrast sensitivity in the far periphery than emmetropes when attention is deployed in central vision. PMID:27264028

  4. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Lab.

    1996-08-01

    X-ray transmission imaging that creates image contrast from the distribution of the X-ray absorption coefficient is not sensitive to materials consisting of light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. On the other hand, the X-ray phase shift caused by the light elements is substantial enough to be detected even when absorption is almost zero. Hence, phase-contrast X-ray imaging is a promising technique for observing the structure inside biological soft tissues without the need for staining and without serious radiation exposure. Using fringe scanning X-ray interferometry, the X-ray phase shift caused by an object was measured. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of cancerous tissues using the measured phase shifts was enabled under tomographic configuration phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT). (author)

  5. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  6. Generalised phase contrast: microscopy, manipulation and more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Generalised phase contrast (GPC) not only leads to more accurate phase imaging beyond thin biological samples, but serves as an enabling framework in developing tools over a wide spectrum of contemporary applications in optics and photonics, including optical trapping and micromanipulation, optic...... phase cryptography, light-efficient image projection and parallel laser beam shaping for optical landscapes. In this review, we discuss the fundamental ideas behind generalised phase contrast and present a survey of its exciting applications.......Generalised phase contrast (GPC) not only leads to more accurate phase imaging beyond thin biological samples, but serves as an enabling framework in developing tools over a wide spectrum of contemporary applications in optics and photonics, including optical trapping and micromanipulation, optical...

  7. Vowel identification by amplitude and phase contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molis, Michelle R; Diedesch, Anna; Gallun, Frederick; Leek, Marjorie R

    2013-02-01

    Vowel identification is largely dependent on listeners' access to the frequency of two or three peaks in the amplitude spectrum. Earlier work has demonstrated that, whereas normal-hearing listeners can identify harmonic complexes with vowel-like spectral shapes even with very little amplitude contrast between "formant" components and remaining harmonic components, listeners with hearing loss require greater amplitude differences. This is likely the result of the poor frequency resolution that often accompanies hearing loss. Here, we describe an additional acoustic dimension for emphasizing formant versus non-formant harmonics that may supplement amplitude contrast information. The purpose of this study was to determine whether listeners were able to identify "vowel-like" sounds using temporal (component phase) contrast, which may be less affected by cochlear loss than spectral cues, and whether overall identification improves when congruent temporal and spectral information are provided together. Five normal-hearing and five hearing-impaired listeners identified three vowels over many presentations. Harmonics representing formant peaks were varied in amplitude, phase, or a combination of both. In addition to requiring less amplitude contrast, normal-hearing listeners could accurately identify the sounds with less phase contrast than required by people with hearing loss. However, both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired groups demonstrated the ability to identify vowel-like sounds based solely on component phase shifts, with no amplitude contrast information, and they also showed improved performance when congruent phase and amplitude cues were combined. For nearly all listeners, the combination of spectral and temporal information improved identification in comparison to either dimension alone.

  8. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  9. Stereomotion speed perception is contrast dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, K.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of contrast on the perception of stimulus speed for stereomotion and monocular lateral motion was investigated for successive matches in random-dot stimuli. The familiar 'Thompson effect'--that a reduction in contrast leads to a reduction in perceived speed--was found in similar proportions for both binocular images moving in depth, and for monocular images translating laterally. This result is consistent with the idea that the monocular motion system has a significant input to the stereomotion system, and dominates the speed percept for approaching motion.

  10. Dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound for therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John M. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Williams, Ross [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Sheeran, Paul S. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Milot, Laurent [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bjarnason, Georg A. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Toronto, and Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Burns, Peter N., E-mail: burns@sri.utoronto.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative imaging is a crucial component of the assessment of therapies that target the vasculature of angiogenic or inflamed tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) using microbubble contrast offers the advantages of being sensitive to perfusion, non-invasive, cost effective and well suited to repeated use at the bedside. Uniquely, it employs an agent that is truly intravascular. This papers reviews the principles and methodology of DCE-US, especially as applied to anti-angiogenic cancer therapies. Reproducibility is an important attribute of such a monitoring method: results are discussed. More recent technical advances in parametric and 3D DCE-US imaging are also summarised and illustrated.

  11. Spiral phase contrast imaging in microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürhapter, Severin; Jesacher, Alexander; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2005-02-07

    We demonstrate an optical method for edge contrast enhancement in light microscopy. The method is based on holographic Fourier plane filtering of the microscopic image with a spiral phase element (also called vortex phase or helical phase filter) displayed as an off-axis hologram at a computer controlled high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) in the optical imaging pathway. The phase hologram imprints a helical phase term of the form exp(i phi) on the diffracted light field in its Fourier plane. In the image plane, this results in a strong and isotropic edge contrast enhancement for both amplitude and phase objects.

  12. Liver CT with portal-venous contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H.; Mildenberger, P.; Schweden, F.; Eckmann, A.; Nagel, K.; Knuth, A.; Boerner, N.; Thelen, M.; Junginger, T.

    1987-12-01

    Contrast administration through the superior mesenteric or splenic arteries provided additional information in 22 out of 31 patients, when compared with intravenous contrast bolus for CT of the liver. In 11 patients, the demonstration of a tumour lead to a change in treatment. False positive findings occurred in four of the 31 patients. In 2 patients intrahepatic lesions were overlooked, but were found during angiography carried out at the same examination. The diagnosis of intrahepatic space-occupying lesions is discussed as well as the CT appearances of portal-venous liver perfusion.

  13. Global contrast based salient region detection

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Ming-Ming

    2011-08-25

    Reliable estimation of visual saliency allows appropriate processing of images without prior knowledge of their contents, and thus remains an important step in many computer vision tasks including image segmentation, object recognition, and adaptive compression. We propose a regional contrast based saliency extraction algorithm, which simultaneously evaluates global contrast differences and spatial coherence. The proposed algorithm is simple, efficient, and yields full resolution saliency maps. Our algorithm consistently outperformed existing saliency detection methods, yielding higher precision and better recall rates, when evaluated using one of the largest publicly available data sets. We also demonstrate how the extracted saliency map can be used to create high quality segmentation masks for subsequent image processing.

  14. Laser projection using generalized phase contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate experimental laser projection of a gray-level photographic image with 74% light efficiency using the generalized phase contrast (GPC) method. In contrast with a previously proposed technique [Alonzo et al., New J. Phys. 9, 132 (2007)], a new approach to image construction via GPC...... is introduced. An arbitrary phase shift filter eliminates the need for high-frequency modulation and conjugate phase encoding. This lowers device performance requirements and allows practical implementation with currently available dynamic spatial light modulators. (c) 2007 Optical Society of America....

  15. The Contrast Sensitivity Function in Low Vision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity of 51 low vision patients (95 eyes) showed a substantial decrease in all spatial frequencies. The peak contrast sensitivity was shifted to 1 C/D from the normal 3-4 C/D. The high-frequency cut off is correlated to the visual acuity positively. Of the 33 patients, the preferred eye was the eye with better peak sensitivity in 28 patients (84%), while the preferred eye was the eye with better visual acuity in 22 patients (66%). It seems that the peak sensitivity is more important t...

  16. Post-traumatic contrast enhancing brain lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Hyun Sook; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Deok Ryeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Only a few studies have been reported on the MR contrast enhancement and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) findings of the post-traumatic lesion of the brain. We report a case of the venous ischemia in the left frontal lobe observed in the MRI obtained one day after the incidence of trauma. Considering the presented slight increase in the ADC, the vasogenic edema was thought to be the major mechanism of the venous ischemia and excitotoxic injury. In spite of a slight increase in the ADC, the hyperintensity in the diffusion weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced areas eventually changed into hemorrhagic lesions.

  17. Relationship Between Collateral Status, Contrast Transit, and Contrast Density in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Bivard, Andrew; Lin, Longting; Spratt, Neil J; Miteff, Ferdinand; Parsons, Mark W; Levi, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    Collateral circulation is recognized to influence the life expectancy of the ischemic penumbra in acute ischemic stroke. The best method to quantify collateral status on acute imaging is uncertain. We aimed to determine the relationship between visual collateral status, quantitative collateral assessments, baseline computed tomographic perfusion measures, and tissue outcomes on follow-up imaging. Sixty-six consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke clinically eligible for recanalization therapy and with M1 or M2 middle cerebral artery occlusion were evaluated. We compared the visual collateral scoring with measures of contrast peak time delay and contrast peak density. We also compared these measures for their ability to predict perfusion lesion and infarct core volumes, final infarct, and infarct growth. Shorter contrast peak time delay (P=0.041) and higher contrast peak density (P=0.002) were associated with good collateral status. Shorter contrast peak time delay correlated with higher contrast peak density (β=-4.413; P=0.037). In logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, sex, onset-computed tomographic time, and occlusion site, higher contrast peak density was independently associated with good collateral status (P=0.009). Multiple regression analysis showed that higher contrast peak density was an independent predictor of smaller perfusion lesion volume (P=0.029), smaller ischemic core volume (P=0.044), smaller follow-up infarct volume (P=0.005), and smaller infarct growth volume (P=0.010). Visual collateral status, contrast peak density, and contrast peak time delay were inter-related, and good collateral status was strongly associated with contrast peak density. Contrast peak density in collateral vessel may be an important factor in tissue fate in acute ischemic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Contrast-enhanced angiographic cone-beam computed tomography without pre-diluted contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, K.I.; Kim, S.R.; Choi, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Jeon, P. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been introduced and accepted as a useful technique to evaluate delicate vascular anatomy and neurovascular stents. Current protocol for CBCT requires quantitative dilution of contrast medium to obtain adequate quality images. Here, we introduce simple methods to obtain contrast-enhanced CBCT without quantitative contrast dilution. A simple experiment was performed to estimate the change in flow rate in the internal carotid artery during the procedure. Transcranial doppler (TCD) was used to evaluate the velocity change before and after catheterization and fluid infusion. In addition, 0.3 cm{sup 3}/s (n = 3) and 0.2 cm{sup 3}/s (n = 7) contrast infusions were injected and followed by saline flushes using a 300 mmHg pressure bag to evaluate neurovascular stent and host arteries. Flow velocities changed -15 ± 6.8 % and +17 ± 5.5 % from baseline during catheterization and guiding catheter flushing with a 300 mmHg pressure bag, respectively. Evaluation of the stents and vascular structure was feasible using this technique in all patients. Quality assessment showed that the 0.2 cm{sup 3}/s contrast infusion protocol was better for evaluating the stent and host artery. Contrast-enhanced CBCT can be performed without quantitative contrast dilution. Adequate contrast dilution can be achieved with a small saline flush and normal blood flow. (orig.)

  19. Swedish Modal Particles in a Contrastive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijmer, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Presents a study based on the analysis of contrastive Swedish-English data on modal particles. The article maintains that the meaning of modal particles requires an analysis of their pragmatic aspects such as the relation between the interlocutors. The analysis most accurately accounting for the multifunctionality of the particles is based on a…

  20. Contraste de Hipótesis

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    En este vídeo se presenta los fundamentos teóricos y la aplicación práctica del contraste de hipótesis en el ámbito de la Fisioterapia.Fecha: 2015Producción: Servei de Formació Permanent i Innovació Educativa (SFPIE) www.uv.es/sfpie

  1. Literature Review of Japanese Contrastive Rhetoric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Brett

    2012-01-01

    This literature review serves to inform the reader on current literature on Contrastive Rhetoric (CR), with specific reference to teaching writing to Japanese students of English. It will examine the historical developments of CR and its present significance before then looking at possible reasons for unique characteristics of Japanese L2 writers…

  2. Contrasting Two Approaches to Distance Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros i Sole, Cristina; Hopkins, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    In this article we contrast two distance foreign language programs developed at two European institutions of higher education (the Modern Languages Program at the Open University, UK; and the English Program at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain) as instances of two pedagogical models used to address the many challenges posed by teaching…

  3. Bounding the bias of contrastive divergence learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Anja; Igel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Optimization based on k-step contrastive divergence (CD) has become a common way to train restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs). The k-step CD is a biased estimator of the log-likelihood gradient relying on Gibbs sampling. We derive a new upper bound for this bias. Its magnitude depends on k...

  4. Nonspherical Oscillations of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Meer, van der Sander M.; Garbin, Valeria; Jong, de Nico; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of nonspherical oscillations (or surface modes) of coated microbubbles, used as ultrasound contrast agents in medical imaging, is investigated using ultra–high-speed optical imaging. Optical tweezers designed to micromanipulate single bubbles in 3-D are used to trap the bubbles far fr

  5. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Laboratory; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) enabling the observation of biological soft tissues without contrast enhancement has been developed. The X-ray phase shift caused by an object is measured and input to a standard CT reconstruction algorithm. A thousand times increase in the image sensitivity to soft tissues is achieved compared with the conventional CT using absorption contrast. This is because the X-ray phase shift cross section of light elements is about a thousand times larger than the absorption cross section. The phase shift is detected using an X-ray interferometer and computer analyses of interference patterns. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron X-ray source. Excellent image sensitivity is demonstrated in the observation of cancerous rabbit liver. The CT images distinguish cancer lesion from normal liver tissue and, moreover, visualize the pathological condition in the lesion. Although the X-ray energy employed and the present observation area size are not suitable for medical applications as they are, phase-contrast X-ray CT is promising for investigating the internal structure of soft tissue which is almost transparent for X-rays. The high sensitivity also provides the advantage of reducing X-ray doses. (author).

  6. Radionuclide tumor therapy with ultrasound contrast microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamel, van Annemieke; Bouakaz, Ayache; Bernard, Bert; Cate, ten Folkert; Jong, de Nico

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides have shown to be effective in tumour therapy. However, the side effects determine the maximum deliverable dose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cells can be permeabilised through sonoporation using ultrasound and contrast microbubbles. The use of sonoporation in treatment of tu

  7. Refractive index contrast in porous silicon multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, R.; Mora, M.B. de la; Tagueena-Martinez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Rio, J.A. del [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Centro Morelense de Innovacion y Transferencia Tecnologica, Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnologia del Estado de Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-07-15

    Two of the most important properties of a porous silicon multilayer for photonic applications are flat interfaces and a relative large refractive index contrast between layers in the optical wavelength range. In this work, we studied the effect of the current density and HF electrolyte concentration on the refractive index of porous silicon. With the purpose of increasing the refractive index contrast in a multilayer, the refractive index of porous silicon produced at low current was studied in detail. The current density applied to produce the low porosity layers was limited in order to keep the electrolyte flow through the multilayer structure and to avoid deformation of layer interfaces. We found that an electrolyte composed of hydrofluoric acid, ethanol and glycerin in a ratio of 3:7:1 gives a refractive index contrast around 1.3/2.8 at 600 nm. Several multilayer structures with this refractive index contrast were fabricated, such as dielectric Bragg mirrors and microcavities. Reflectance spectra of the structures show the photonic quality of porous silicon multilayers produced under these electrochemical conditions. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Processing of Contrastiveness by Heritage Russian Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerina, Irina A.; Trueswell, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments in the Visual World paradigm compared how monolingual Russian (Experiment 1) and heritage Russian-English bilingual (Experiment 2) listeners process contrastiveness online in Russian. Materials were color adjective-noun phrases embedded into the split-constituent construction Krasnuju polozite zvezdovku..."Red put…

  9. Superhydrophobic silica nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Lin, Chih-Yu; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yang, Chia-Min; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2017-05-01

    Microbubbles have been widely studied as ultrasound contrast agents for diagnosis and as drug/gene carriers for therapy. However, their size and stability (lifetime of 5-12min) limited their applications. The development of stable nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents would therefore benefit both. Generating bubbles persistently in situ would be one of the promising solutions to the problem of short lifetime. We hypothesized that bubbles could be generated in situ by providing stable air nuclei since it has been found that the interfacial nanobubbles on a hydrophobic surface have a much longer lifetime (orders of days). Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with large surface areas and different levels of hydrophobicity were prepared to test our hypothesis. It is clear that the superhydrophobic and porous nanoparticles exhibited a significant and strong contrast intensity compared with other nanoparticles. The bubbles generated from superhydrophobic nanoparticles sustained for at least 30min at a MI of 1.0, while lipid microbubble lasted for about 5min at the same settings. In summary MSNs have been transformed into reliable bubble precursors by making simple superhydrophobic modification, and made into a promising contrast agent with the potentials to serve as theranostic agents that are sensitive to ultrasound stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormolen, M.M.; Bouakaz, A.; Krenning, B.J.; Lancée, C.; ten Cate, F.; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it

  11. Ultrasonic characterization of ultrasound contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. de Jong (Nico); M. Emmer (Marcia); A. van Wamel (Annemieke); M. Versluis (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe main constituent of an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) is gas-filled microbubbles. An average UCA contains billions per ml. These microbubbles are excellent ultrasound scatterers due to their high compressibility. In an ultrasound field they act as resonant systems, resulting in

  12. Color assimilation and contrast near absolute threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, John

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous Contrast and Assimilation test targets are almost always viewed at high light levels. We measured the appearances of Simultaneous Contrast, Assimilation and other spatial surrounds near absolute rod threshold. Given the very different spatial organizations of receptive fields in rod and cone vision at detection threshold, it is not obvious that these familiar cone-vision spatial effects would be observed at rod light levels. Nevertheless, the spatial experiments showed that these targets have the same changes in appearance as those observed in bright light. Our experiments used very dim candle light that was above threshold for rods and L cones, and below threshold for M and S cones. Although detection threshold experiments show very different spatial organizations for rod and cone vision, we found that spatial contrast experiments gave the same changes of appearance. Neural contrast mechanisms at the lowest end of our visual HDR range are very similar to those at the top of the range in sunlight. This is true for both chromatic and achromatic targets.

  13. Recent hot topics in contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    This editorial reviews the way in which the facts related to the safety of iodinated and gadolinium based contrast agents have emerged over the last two decades. This is especially important given their ever increasing usage in modern computed tomographic (CT) and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  14. Lexical representation of novel L2 contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Masuda, Kyoko

    2005-04-01

    There is much interest among psychologists and linguists in the influence of the native language sound system on the acquisition of second languages (Best, 1995; Flege, 1995). Most studies of second language (L2) speech focus on how learners perceive and produce L2 sounds, but we know of only two that have considered how novel sound contrasts are encoded in learners' lexical representations of L2 words (Pallier et al., 2001; Ota et al., 2002). In this study we investigated how native speakers of English encode Japanese consonant quantity contrasts in their developing Japanese lexicons at different stages of acquisition (Japanese contrasts singleton versus geminate consonants but English does not). Monolingual English speakers, native English speakers learning Japanese for one year, and native speakers of Japanese were taught a set of Japanese nonwords containing singleton and geminate consonants. Subjects then performed memory tasks eliciting perception and production data to determine whether they encoded the Japanese consonant quantity contrast lexically. Overall accuracy in these tasks was a function of Japanese language experience, and acoustic analysis of the production data revealed non-native-like patterns of differentiation of singleton and geminate consonants among the L2 learners of Japanese. Implications for theories of L2 speech are discussed.

  15. Contrast media safety-an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    The value of contrast agents has for long been documented by their common daily use in imaging departments worldwide. In principle, they should be injected and leave the body immediately after use in the same condition or undergo natural metabolism without making any harm to the patient. However,...

  16. Contrast sensitivity function and image discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peli, E

    2001-02-01

    A previous study tested the validity of simulations of the appearance of a natural image (from different observation distances) generated by using a visual model and contrast sensitivity functions of the individual observers [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 1131 (1996)]. Deleting image spatial-frequency components that should be undetectable made the simulations indistinguishable from the original images at distances larger than the simulated distance. The simulated observation distance accurately predicted the distance at which the simulated image could be discriminated from the original image. Owing to the 1/f characteristic of natural images' spatial spectra, the individual contrast sensitivity functions (CSF's) used in the simulations of the previous study were actually tested only over a narrow range of retinal spatial frequencies. To test the CSF's over a wide range of frequencies, the same simulations and testing procedure were applied to five contrast versions of the images (10-300%). This provides a stronger test of the model, of the simulations, and specifically of the CSF's used. The relevant CSF for a discrimination task was found to be obtained by using 1-octave Gabor stimuli measured in a contrast detection task. The relevant CSF data had to be measured over a range of observation distances, owing to limitations of the displays.

  17. Phase contrast imaging of Bose condensed clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, R; Rozendaal, R.A.; Koller, S.B.; Vogels, J.M.; van der Straten, P.

    2010-01-01

    Phase contrast imaging is used to observe Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at finite temperature in situ. The imaging technique is used to accurately derive the absolute phase shift of a probe laser beam due to both the condensate and the thermal cloud. The accuracy of the method is enhanced by usin

  18. Marginal contrasts and the Contrastivist Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Currie Hall

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Contrastivist Hypothesis (CH; Hall 2007; Dresher 2009 holds that the only features that can be phonologically active in any language are those that serve to distinguish phonemes, which presupposes that phonemic status is categorical. Many researchers, however, demonstrate the existence of gradient relations. For instance, Hall (2009 quantifies these using the information-theoretic measure of entropy (unpredictability of distribution and shows that a pair of sounds may have an entropy between 0 (totally predictable and 1 (totally unpredictable. We argue that the existence of such intermediate degrees of contrastiveness does not make the CH untenable, but rather offers insight into contrastive hierarchies. The existence of a continuum does not preclude categorical distinctions: a categorical line can be drawn between zero entropy (entirely predictable, and thus by the CH phonologically inactive and non-zero entropy (at least partially contrastive, and thus potentially phonologically active. But this does not mean that intermediate degrees of surface contrastiveness are entirely irrelevant to the CH; rather, we argue, they can shed light on how deeply ingrained a phonemic distinction is in the phonological system. As an example, we provide a case study from Pulaar [ATR] harmony, which has previously been claimed to be problematic for the CH.

  19. Contrastive Study of English and Chinese Euphemism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴燕

    2009-01-01

    This thesis makes a contrastive study of English and Chinese euphemism with an attempt to explore and demonstrate the differences and similarities between the two linguistic phenomena in the hope of enlightening and guiding English learners a bit in their language learning, translation studies, cross -cultural communica-tion, etc

  20. Nano/microparticles and ultrasound contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Guang; Zheng; Hui-Xiong; Xu; Hang-Rong; Chen

    2013-01-01

    Microbubbles have been used for many years now in clinical practice as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging.Recently,their therapeutic applications have also attracted more attention.However,the short circulation time(minutes)and relatively large size(two to ten micrometers)of currently used commercial microbubbles do not allow effective extravasation into tumor tissue,preventing efficient tumor targeting.Fortunately,more multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages over the traditional microbubbles have been widely investigated and explored for biomedical applications.The way to synthesize an ideal ultrasound contrast agent based on nanoparticles in order to achieve an expected effect on contrast imaging is a key technique.Currently a number of nanomaterials,including liposomes,polymers,micelles,dendrimers,emulsions,quantum dots,solid nanoparticles etc.,have already been applied to pre or clinical trials.Multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages,such as the tumor-targeted(passive or active),multi-mode contrast agents(magnetic resonance imaging,ultrasonography or fluorescence),carrier or enhancer of drug delivery,and combined chemo or thermal therapy etc.,are rapidly gaining popularity and have shown a promising application in the field of cancer treatment.In this mini review,the trends and the advances of multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles are briefly discussed.

  1. Contrast media safety-an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    The value of contrast agents has for long been documented by their common daily use in imaging departments worldwide. In principle, they should be injected and leave the body immediately after use in the same condition or undergo natural metabolism without making any harm to the patient. However...

  2. Semantics, contrastive linguistics and parallel corpora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Koseska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Semantics, contrastive linguistics and parallel corpora In view of the ambiguity of the term “semantics”, the author shows the differences between the traditional lexical semantics and the contemporary semantics in the light of various semantic schools. She examines semantics differently in connection with contrastive studies where the description must necessary go from the meaning towards the linguistic form, whereas in traditional contrastive studies the description proceeded from the form towards the meaning. This requirement regarding theoretical contrastive studies necessitates construction of a semantic interlanguage, rather than only singling out universal semantic categories expressed with various language means. Such studies can be strongly supported by parallel corpora. However, in order to make them useful for linguists in manual and computer translations, as well as in the development of dictionaries, including online ones, we need not only formal, often automatic, annotation of texts, but also semantic annotation - which is unfortunately manual. In the article we focus on semantic annotation concerning time, aspect and quantification of names and predicates in the whole semantic structure of the sentence on the example of the “Polish-Bulgarian-Russian parallel corpus”.

  3. Recent developments in nonionic contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taenzer, V. (Krankenhaus Moabit, Berlin (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik); Wende, S. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische Strahlenkunde) (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    Over forty contributions by various European and non-European teams provide an insight on the pharmacological, pharmacokinetic and clinical aspects of non-ionic contrast media, as well as on related experiments with animals. Special attention is devoted to initial results achieved with the newly developed non-ionic hexajodinated dimer 'Iotrolan'. The contributions discussing a common aspect of main interest have been arranged into the following chapters: General aspects of the clinical application of iodinated X-ray contrast media - Physico-chemical, biochemical, and general pharmacologic aspects - Angiography - Kidneys and urinary tract - Neural tolerance, myelography - Lymphography and body cavities - Pharmacokinetics. The advantages of non-ionic contrast media are confirmed by their wide clinical applicability with respect to local and general tolerability. Problems arising from the use of non-ionic contrast media, such as reduced diuresis as compared to ionic substances, and lower inhibition of blood clotting, are discussed in individual contributions. The question of the reduction in the risk of lethal incidents when using these new substances remains unanswered, since the rarity of such events makes statistical confirmation difficult. (orig./GDG) With 103 figs., 137 tabs.

  4. Contrast-enhanced and targeted ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Michiel; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2011-01-07

    Ultrasonic imaging is becoming the most popular medical imaging modality, owing to the low price per examination and its safety. However, blood is a poor scatterer of ultrasound waves at clinical diagnostic transmit frequencies. For perfusion imaging, markers have been designed to enhance the contrast in B-mode imaging. These so-called ultrasound contrast agents consist of microscopically small gas bubbles encapsulated in biodegradable shells. In this review, the physical principles of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble behavior and their adjustment for drug delivery including sonoporation are described. Furthermore, an outline of clinical imaging applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound is given. It is a challenging task to quantify and predict which bubble phenomenon occurs under which acoustic condition, and how these phenomena may be utilized in ultrasonic imaging. Aided by high-speed photography, our improved understanding of encapsulated microbubble behavior will lead to more sophisticated detection and delivery techniques. More sophisticated methods use quantitative approaches to measure the amount and the time course of bolus or reperfusion curves, and have shown great promise in revealing effective tumor responses to anti-angiogenic drugs in humans before tumor shrinkage occurs. These are beginning to be accepted into clinical practice. In the long term, targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging and eventually for directed anti-tumor therapy are expected to be tested.

  5. Context effect in assimilation and contrast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, C.M.M. de; Koning, A.R.; Lier, R.J. van

    2005-01-01

    We have systematically studied the change of lightness appearance in an ambiguous visual pattern. Fuchs (1923 Zeitschrift für Psychologie 92 249 - 325) found that differently coloured parts assimilate, whereas Agostini et al (1993 Perception 22 263 - 272) described the opposite effect: contrast betw

  6. Iterative Reconstruction for Differential Phase Contrast Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, T.; Brendel, B.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to combine two areas of active research in tomographic x-ray imaging. The first one is the use of iterative reconstruction techniques. The second one is differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI). Method: We derive an SPS type maximum likelihood (ML) reconstructi

  7. Nature versus Nurture: The Simple Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Jules; Goldstein, Julie; Roberson, Debi

    2009-01-01

    We respond to the commentary of Franklin, Wright, and Davies ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102", 239-245 [2009]) by returning to the simple contrast between nature and nurture. We find no evidence from the toddler data that makes us revise our ideas that color categories are learned and never innate. (Contains 1 figure.)

  8. Nature versus Nurture: The Simple Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Jules; Goldstein, Julie; Roberson, Debi

    2009-01-01

    We respond to the commentary of Franklin, Wright, and Davies ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102", 239-245 [2009]) by returning to the simple contrast between nature and nurture. We find no evidence from the toddler data that makes us revise our ideas that color categories are learned and never innate. (Contains 1 figure.)

  9. Acoustic properties of ultrasound contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. de Jong (Nico)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSafety of contrast agents is reported in the years after. Both the intracoronary use of sonicated Renografin as well as intravenous use of commercial product as Albunex and Lechovist has been investigated. Thereafter more pathophysiologic studies were performed. Ten Cate described the po

  10. Advanced detection strategies for ultrasound contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.G. Borsboom (Jerome)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Ultrasound contrast agent was discovered serendipitously by Gramiak and Shah in I968 when they injected indocyanine green dye into the heart and observed increased echogenicity of the blood containing the dye. Small cavitation bubbles that were formed upon injection of

  11. El metodo contrastivo (The Contrastive Method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menton, Seymour

    1972-01-01

    Presidential address delivered at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, December 30, 1971, in Chicago, Illinois. Applies the contrastive method to literature and culture in teaching Spanish. Compares points of view in interpretation and criticism of Spanish American literature, also cultural and…

  12. Contrast-enhanced and targeted ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michiel Postema; Odd Helge Gilja

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging is becoming the most popular medical imaging modality,owing to the low price per examination and its safety.However,blood is a poor scatterer of ultrasound waves at clinical diagnostic transmit frequencies.For perfusion imaging,markers have been designed to enhance the contrast in B-mode imaging.These so-called ultrasound contrast agents consist of microscopically small gas bubbles encapsulated in biodegradable shells.In this review,the physical principles of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble behavior and their adjustment for drug delivery including sonoporation are described.Furthermore,an outline of clinical imaging applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound is given.It is a challenging task to quantify and predict which bubble phenomenon occurs under which acoustic condition,and how these phenomena may be utilized in ultrasonic imaging.Aided by high-speed photography,our improved understanding of encapsulated microbubble behavior will lead to more sophisticated detection and delivery techniques.More sophisticated methods use quantitative approaches to measure the amount and the time course of bolus or reperfusion curves,and have shown great promise in revealing effective tumor responses to anti-angiogenic drugs in humans before tumor shrinkage occurs.These are beginning to be accepted into clinical practice.In the long term,targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging and eventually for directed anti-tumor therapy are expected to be tested.

  13. Atmospheric visibility estimation and image contrast calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansson, Patrik; Edstam, Klas

    2016-10-01

    A method, referred to as contrast calibration, has been developed for transforming digital color photos of outdoor scenes from the atmospheric conditions, illumination and visibility, prevailing at the time of capturing the image to a corresponding image for other atmospheric conditions. A photo captured on a hazy day can, for instance, be converted to resemble a photo of the same scene for good visibility conditions. Converting digital color images to specified lightning and transmission conditions is useful for image based assessment of signature suppression solutions. The method uses "calibration objects" which are photographed at about the same time as the scene of interest. The calibration objects, which (indirectly) provide information on visibility and lightning conditions, consist of two flat boards, painted in different grayscale colors, and a commercial, neutral gray, reference card. Atmospheric extinction coefficient and sky intensity can be determined, in three wavelength bands, from image pixel values on the calibration objects and using this information the image can be converted to other atmospheric conditions. The image is transformed in contrast and color. For illustration, contrast calibration is applied to sample images of a scene acquired at different times. It is shown that contrast calibration of the images to the same reference values of extinction coefficient and sky intensity results in images that are more alike than the original images. It is also exemplified how images can be transformed to various other atmospheric weather conditions. Limitations of the method are discussed and possibilities for further development are suggested.

  14. Theories to be combined and contrasted

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Tonnesen, Pia Beck; Weng, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    for Tidlig Matematikindsats Til Marginalgrupper). The paper tells the story of how networking strategies have informed the design of TMTM: one strategy is combining elements from the two paradigms; another strategy is contrasting elements from the paradigms. The two constructs ‘the six stages...

  15. Recent hot topics in contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    This editorial reviews the way in which the facts related to the safety of iodinated and gadolinium based contrast agents have emerged over the last two decades. This is especially important given their ever increasing usage in modern computed tomographic (CT) and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)...

  16. International guidelines for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, Christian Pállson; Lorentzen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    The intent of this review is to discuss and comment on common clinical scenarios in which contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) may play a decisive role and to illustrate important points with typical cases. With the advent of CEUS, the scope of indications for ultrasonography has been...

  17. Epinephrine enhanced double contrast knee arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Choi, Byung Ihn [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-12-15

    It is well known that double contrast knee arthrography is useful in diagnosis of meniscal lesion and other knee pathology. But intra-articular structures become less well delineated shortly after injection into the knee joint with water soluble contrast media because of rapid absorption and dilution of the injected media. This limits the time when sharply detailed arthrograms are obtained and precludes repeat delayed arthrogram without reinjection of contrast media. In order to overcome this major disadvantage, the authors used epinephrine which has vasoconstrictive effect and is expected to reduce fluid movement across the synovial membrane temporarily. The authors attempted to compare epinephrine enhanced double contrast arthrographic group, epinephrine (+) group, to the double contrast arthrographic group without epinephrine, epinephrine (-) group, by statistical evaluation. Each group consisted of 35 cases and 7 lateral films of knee joint were taken sequentially 2, 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after injection of contrast media, and were assessed by 5 certified radiologist. The results were as follows: 1. The differences of mean score of quality between epinephrine (+) group and epinephrine (-) group was statistically significant at every time interval (p value<0.01 at 2 minutes, p<0.001 at all other time interval). Epinephrine (+) group was superior to the epinephrine (-) group in quality of film. 2. Numbers of cases above score of 2 which was considered to be of diagnostic quality in evaluating meniscal lesions were larger in epinephrine (+) group than epinephrine (-) group at every time interval. And the differences between two groups was highly significant statistically (p,0.001). 3. Only 43% of cases was above score of 2 at 10 minutes in epinephrine (-) group, but 97% at 10 minutes and 80% at 20 minutes respectively in epinephrine (+) group. Therefore duration for adequate study of arthrogram is prolonged more than two times epinephrine (+) group. 4

  18. Homogenization of High-Contrast Brinkman Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Donald L.

    2015-04-16

    Modeling porous flow in complex media is a challenging problem. Not only is the problem inherently multiscale but, due to high contrast in permeability values, flow velocities may differ greatly throughout the medium. To avoid complicated interface conditions, the Brinkman model is often used for such flows [O. Iliev, R. Lazarov, and J. Willems, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 1350--1372]. Instead of permeability variations and contrast being contained in the geometric media structure, this information is contained in a highly varying and high-contrast coefficient. In this work, we present two main contributions. First, we develop a novel homogenization procedure for the high-contrast Brinkman equations by constructing correctors and carefully estimating the residuals. Understanding the relationship between scales and contrast values is critical to obtaining useful estimates. Therefore, standard convergence-based homogenization techniques [G. A. Chechkin, A. L. Piatniski, and A. S. Shamev, Homogenization: Methods and Applications, Transl. Math. Monogr. 234, American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI, 2007, G. Allaire, SIAM J. Math. Anal., 23 (1992), pp. 1482--1518], although a powerful tool, are not applicable here. Our second point is that the Brinkman equations, in certain scaling regimes, are invariant under homogenization. Unlike in the case of Stokes-to-Darcy homogenization [D. Brown, P. Popov, and Y. Efendiev, GEM Int. J. Geomath., 2 (2011), pp. 281--305, E. Marusic-Paloka and A. Mikelic, Boll. Un. Mat. Ital. A (7), 10 (1996), pp. 661--671], the results presented here under certain velocity regimes yield a Brinkman-to-Brinkman upscaling that allows using a single software platform to compute on both microscales and macroscales. In this paper, we discuss the homogenized Brinkman equations. We derive auxiliary cell problems to build correctors and calculate effective coefficients for certain velocity regimes. Due to the boundary effects, we construct

  19. Epinephrine inhanced double contrast knee arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Choi, Byung Ihn [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-09-15

    It is well known that double contrast knee arthrography is useful in diagnosis of meniscal lesions and other knee pathology. But intra-articular structures become less well delineated shortly after injection into the knee joint with water soluble contrast media because of rapid absorption and dilution of the injected media. This limits the time when sharply detailed arthrograms are obtainable and precludes repeat delayed arthrogram without reinjection of contrast media. In order to overcome this major disadvantage, the authors used epinephrine which has vasoconstrictive effect and is expected to reduce fluid movement across the synovial membrane temporarily. The authors attempted to compare epinephrine inhanced double contrast arthrographic group, epinephrine(+) group, to the double contrast arthrographic group without epinephrine, epinephrine(-) group, by statistical evaluation. Each group consisted of 35 cases and 7 lateral films of knee joint were taken sequentially 2, 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after injection of contrast media, and were assessed by 5 certified radiologists. The results were as follows: 1. The difference of mean score of quality between epinephrine(+) group and epinephrine(-) group was statistically significant at every time interval ({rho} value < 0.01 at 2 minutes, {rho} < 0.001 at all other time intervals). Epinephrine(+) group was superior to the epinephrine(-) group in quality of film. 2. Numbers of cases above score of 2 which was considered to be of diagnostic quality in evaluating meniscal lesions were larger in epinephrine(+) group than epinephrine(-) group at every time interval. And the difference between two groups was highly significant statistically ({rho} < 0.001). 3. Only 43% of cases was above score of 2 at 10 minutes in epinephrine(-) group, but 97% at 10 minutes and 80% at 20 minutes respectively in epinephrine(+) group. Therefore duration for adequate study of arthrogram is prolonged more than two times in epinephrine

  20. Maternal Methyl Donor Supplementation during Gestation Counteracts the Bisphenol A-Induced Impairment of Intestinal Morphology, Disaccharidase Activity, and Nutrient Transporters Gene Expression in Newborn and Weaning Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to explore whether exposure to bisphenol A (BPA during pregnancy could change intestinal digestion and absorption function in offspring using pigs as a model, and whether methyl donor (MET could counteract the BPA-induced impacts. Fifty Landrace × Yorkshire sows were divided into four dietary groups throughout gestation: control diet (CON; control diet supplemented with BPA (50 mg/kg; control diet supplemented with MET (3 g/kg betaine, 400 mg/kg choline, 150 μg/kg vitamin B12, and 15 mg/kg folic acid; and control diet with BPA and MET supplementation (BPA + MET. Intestine samples were collected from pigs’ offspring at birth and weaning. Maternal BPA exposure during pregnancy significantly reduced the ratio of jejunum villus height to crypt depth, decreased the jejunum sucrase activity, down-regulated the mRNA expression of jejunum peptide transporter 1 (Pept1 and DNA methyl transferase 3a (DNMT3a, and decreased the DNA methylation level of jejunum Pept1 in offspring (p < 0.05. Maternal MET supplementation significantly raised the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in jejunum and ileum, improved the jejunum lactase activity, up-regulated the mRNA expression of jejunum Pept1, lactase (LCT, DNMT1, DNMT3a, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, and increased the DNA methylation level of jejunum Pept1 in offspring (p < 0.05. However, the ratio of jejunum villus height to crypt depth was higher in BPA + MET treatment compared with CON and BPA treatment (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, there was no difference in the jejunum sucrase activity, the mRNA expression of jejunum Pept1 and DNMT3a, and the DNA methylation level of jejunum Pept1 between CON and BPA + MET treatment. These results indicated that maternal exposure to BPA during gestation might suppress offspring’s intestinal digestion and absorption function, whereas supplementation of MET could counteract these damages, which might be associated with DNA methylation.

  1. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A; Nielsen, Agnete Hedemann

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn'sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic...

  2. Comparison of neutral oral contrast versus positive oral contrast medium in abdominal multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berther, Ralph; Eckhardt, Boris; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Kantonsspital, Institute of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A. [Kantonsspital, Institute of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Inselspital, University Hospital of Bern, Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Erturk, Sukru M. [Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    To determine whether neutral contrast agents with water-equivalent intraluminal attenuation can improve delineation of the bowel wall and increase overall image quality for a non-selected patient population, a neutral oral contrast agent (3% mannitol) was administered to 100 patients referred for abdominal multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT). Their results were compared with those of 100 patients given a positive oral contrast agent. Qualitative and quantitative measurements were done on different levels of the gastrointestinal tract by three experienced readers. Patients given the neutral oral contrast agent showed significant better qualitative results for bowel distension (P<0.001), homogeneity of the luminal content (P<0.001), delineation of the bowel-wall to the lumen (P<0.001) and to the mesentery (P<0.001) and artifacts (P<0.001), leading to a significant better overall image quality (P<0.001) than patients receiving positive oral contrast medium. The quantitative measurements revealed significant better distension (P<0.001) and wall to lumen delineation (P<0.001) for the patients receiving neutral oral contrast medium. The present results show that the neutral oral contrast agent (mannitol) produced better distension, better homogeneity and better delineation of the bowel wall leading to a higher overall image quality than the positive oral contrast medium in a non-selected patient population. (orig.)

  3. Power constrained contrast enhancement based on brightness compensated contrast-tone mapping operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Cheolkon; Su, Haonan; Wang, Lu; Ke, Peng

    2016-09-01

    We propose power constrained contrast enhancement based on brightness compensated contrast-tone mapping operation (BCCTMO). We adopt brightness compensation to restore the original perceptual luminance and combine tone mapping with contrast enhancement to improve image quality. First, we increase pixel values to compensate for the reduced brightness caused by backlight dimming while maintaining the perceived luminance. Then we perform a contrast-tone mapping operation to reduce the information loss caused by the brightness compensation and enhance contrast in images. Finally, we conduct color scaling to reproduce natural colors. We implement BCCTMO on an Android tablet with an LCD display using mathematical approximation. Experimental results demonstrate that BCCTMO produces high-quality images while minimizing distortions and saving power compared with state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Mark, E-mail: mark-mueller@ph.tum.de; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bech, Martin [Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Barngatan 2:1, 221 85 Lund (Sweden); Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander [Bruker microCT, Kartuizersweg 3B, B-2550 Kontich (Belgium); Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institut für diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 München (Germany); Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  5. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  6. Semantic contrastive linguistics theory and dialectological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Roszko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Semantic contrastive linguistics theory and dialectological studies Theoretical contrastive studies (hereinafter referred to as TCS emerged with a view to compare and contrast natural languages on the basis of a logical interlanguage. The idea of making the TCS guidelines available to science resulted in discontinuing the division into the original language and the target language when comparing and contrasting two (or more languages, and at the same time, terminating the dependence of the resulting material (i.e. form indexes in the target language on the formal structures in the original language. The TCS essence is included in the interlanguage, which is used as tertium comparationis in the studies. To get more on this topic see Koseska, Korytkowska, R. Roszko (2007. Till now, TCS have not been applied in dialectal studies. There are a lot of reasons for this conjuncture. First of all, dialectal studies usually concentrate on one code (i.e. only a single local dialect is being specified, whilst in TCS, a comparison and contrast between (at least two languages is provided. Moreover, research on the dialectal differentiation of a specific language (i.e. at least two dialects (/ local dialects are being specified together is based on demonstrating the features shared and differentiated on the level of (a lexis, (b morphology (most often narrowed to demonstrate differential morphological features and (c syntactic (relatively most rarely. Thus, dialectal studies are essentially a description of the formal conjuncture, whereas semantic aspects are out of the area of researchers interest. With this article, I am going to break the current patterns and prove that dialectal studies can be conducted in accordance with the TCS guidelines. The advantage of such dialectal studies is not only a different/new look at a specific local dialect, but also a possibility of an instant comparison and contrast between the local dialect and the standardized language

  7. Reduced-Contrast Approximations for High-Contrast Multiscale Flow Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study multiscale methods for high-contrast elliptic problems where the media properties change dramatically. The disparity in the media properties (also referred to as high contrast in the paper) introduces an additional scale that needs to be resolved in multiscale simulations. First, we present a construction that uses an integral equation to represent the highcontrast component of the solution. This representation involves solving an integral equation along the interface where the coefficients are discontinuous. The integral representation suggests some multiscale approaches that are discussed in the paper. One of these approaches entails the use of interface functions in addition to multiscale basis functions representing the heterogeneities without high contrast. In this paper, we propose an approximation for the solution of the integral equation using the interface problems in reduced-contrast media. Reduced-contrast media are obtained by lowering the variance of the coefficients. We also propose a similar approach for the solution of the elliptic equation without using an integral representation. This approach is simpler to use in the computations because it does not involve setting up integral equations. The main idea of this approach is to approximate the solution of the high-contrast problem by the solutions of the problems formulated in reduced-contrast media. In this approach, a rapidly converging sequence is proposed where only problems with lower contrast are solved. It was shown that this sequence possesses the convergence rate that is inversely proportional to the reduced contrast. This approximation allows choosing the reduced-contrast problem based on the coarse-mesh size as discussed in this paper. We present a simple application of this approach to homogenization of elliptic equations with high-contrast coefficients. The presented approaches are limited to the cases where there are sharp changes in the contrast (i.e., the high

  8. Contrast MR imaging of acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogame, Saeko; Syakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi (Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-04-01

    Thirty patients with acute and subacute cerebral infarction (13 and 17 deep cerebral infarction) were studied with 0.5 T MR unit before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA. Thirteen patients were studied within 7 days after neurological ictus, 17 patients were studied between 7 and 14 days. Two types of abnormal enhancement, cortical arterial and parenchymal enhancement, were noted. The former was seen in 3 of 4 cases of very acute cortical infarction within 4 days after clinical ictus. The latter was detected in all 7 cases of cortical infarction after the 6th day of the ictus, and one patient with deep cerebral infarction at the 12th day of the ictus. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging seems to detect gyral enhancement earlier compared with contrast CT, and depict intra-arterial sluggish flow which was not expected to see on contrast CT scans. (author).

  9. Contrast edge colors under different natural illuminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Juan Luis; Nascimento, Sérgio M C; Romero, Javier

    2012-02-01

    Essential to sensory processing in the human visual system is natural illumination, which can vary considerably not only across space but also along the day depending on the atmospheric conditions and the sun's position in the sky. In this work, edges derived from the three postreceptoral Luminance, Red-Green, and Blue-Yellow signals were computed from hyperspectral images of natural scenes rendered with daylights of Correlated Color Temperatures (CCTs) from 2735 to 25,889 K; for low CCT, the same analysis was performed using Planckian illuminants up to 800 K. It was found that average luminance and chromatic edge contrasts were maximal for low correlated color temperatures and almost constants above 10,000 K. The magnitude of these contrast changes was, however, only about 2% across the tested daylights. Results suggest that the postreceptoral opponent and nonopponent color vision mechanisms produce almost constant responses for color edge detection under natural illumination.

  10. Liver-targeting macromolecular MRI contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular ligands with liver-targeting group (pyridoxamine, PM) PHEA-DTPA-PM and PAEA-DTPA-PM were prepared by the incorporation of different amount of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid monopyridoxamine group (DTPA-PM) into poly-a, b-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-L- aspartamide] (PHEA) and poly-a, b-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-L-aspartamide] (PAEA). The macromolecular ligands thus obtained were further complexed with gadolinium chloride to give macromolecular MRI contrast agents with different Gd(Ⅲ) contents. These macromolecular ligands and their gadolinium complexes were characterized by 1H NMR, IR, UV and elementary analysis. Relaxivity studies showed that these polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes possess higher relaxation effectiveness than that of the clinically used Gd-DTPA. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats and experimental data of biodistribution in mice indicate that these macromolecular MRI contrast agents containing pyridoxamine exhibit liver-targeting property.

  11. High-index-contrast subwavelength grating VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilet, Philippe; Olivier, Nicolas; Grosse, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report our results on 980nm high-index-contrast subwavelength grating (HCG) VCSELs for optical interconnection applications. In our structure, a thin undoped HCG layer replaces a thick p-type Bragg mirror. The HCG mirror can feasibly achieve polarization-selective reflectivities...... close to 100%. The investigated structure consists of a HCG mirror with an underneath /4-thick oxide gap, four p-type GaAlAs/GaAs pairs for current spreading, three InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells, and an n-type GaAlAs/GaAs Bragg mirror. The HCG structure was defined by e-beam lithography and dry etching....... The current oxide aperture and the oxide gap underneath the HCG were simultaneously formed by the selective wet oxidation process. Compared to air-gap high contrast grating mirrors demonstrated elsewhere, our grating mirrors are particular since they are supported by thinner /4 aluminium oxide layer, and thus...

  12. Contrast Gain Control Model Fits Masking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Solomon, Joshua A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We studied the fit of a contrast gain control model to data of Foley (JOSA 1994), consisting of thresholds for a Gabor patch masked by gratings of various orientations, or by compounds of two orientations. Our general model includes models of Foley and Teo & Heeger (IEEE 1994). Our specific model used a bank of Gabor filters with octave bandwidths at 8 orientations. Excitatory and inhibitory nonlinearities were power functions with exponents of 2.4 and 2. Inhibitory pooling was broad in orientation, but narrow in spatial frequency and space. Minkowski pooling used an exponent of 4. All of the data for observer KMF were well fit by the model. We have developed a contrast gain control model that fits masking data. Unlike Foley's, our model accepts images as inputs. Unlike Teo & Heeger's, our model did not require multiple channels for different dynamic ranges.

  13. Prevention of iodinated contrast-induced nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-hua; HE Neng-shu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To lessen the occurrence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN),the preventive measures of CIN were reviewed.Data sources The data used in this review were from PubMed with relevant English articles and from Chinese Knowledge Information (CNKI) published from 1989 to 2009.The search terms were “contrast medium”,“contrast-induced nephropathy” and “prevention”.Articles involved in prevention of CIN were selected.Study selection CIN is the third most common cause of acute kidney injury and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis.The best treatment is prophylaxis because CIN can not be reversed or ameliorated.Results Thirty articles were included.Among various preventive measures,pericatheterization hydration is almost universally accepted as an appropriate and safe measure to prevent CIN,although there is no agreement as to composition,amount,and timing of hydration.Based on the use of concomitant nephrotoxic agents or high doses of contrast medium (CM) is one of risk factors for CIN,discontinuation of potentially nephrotoxic drugs 2-3 days before and after the procedure until renal function recover,and using the lowest possible dose of CM can decrease the risk of CIN.It is promising that removing the majority of CM from the coronary sinus,before it enters the systemic circulation,during coronary angiography can reduce the risk for CIN in animal studies and in limited clinical trials.Inconsistent data exist with respect to application of some vasodilators (endothelin antagonists and adenosine antagonists) and antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and statins) in preventing CIN in high-risk patients,and new vasodilators and antioxidants continue to be tested.Conclusions Pericatheterization hydration,discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs,and using the lowest possible dose of CM are effective measures to lessen the risk for CIN.Other prophylactic strategies and some drugs are promising,but further confirmation is required.

  14. Contrast medium-induced nephropathy: the pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, P B; Tepel, Martin

    2006-01-01

    haemodynamics, regional hypoxia, auto-, and paracrine factors (adenosine, endothelin, reactive oxygen species) to direct cytotoxic effects. Although these potential mediators of CIN will be discussed separately, several factors may act in concert to perturb kidney function after exposure to contrast media. From...... ducts will decrease and enhance fluid excretion. Hence, CM in the distal portions of the tubular system is diluted, which implies reduced fluid viscosity and a lower risk of obstruction....

  15. Contrast between China English and Chinese English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨公建

    2014-01-01

    With the globalization of English,the discussion about China English and Chinese English attracts many scholars’ interest and attention.The concept of China English and Chinese English usual y makes people confused, so the article wil make some tentative contrasts in terms of definition、attributes and causes of the two terms and make people have a clear comprehension of China English and Chinese English.

  16. Different Types of Contrast in Persian Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Yousefi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The contrast of semantic links between words and its important compound of language which in aspect of words studies it’s placed in grammatical part and within meaning its part of Rhetoric issues. Speakers are utilizing these components in their language subconsciously. Because the conflict in the Persian language is completely modular so in many cases is auricular. In some modular structure, in addition to the type of structure, the user, it should also make sense to semantic. The style of relationship companion of the most important factor is in determining the contrast. As opposed to two in all features other than a word that refers to the same specification. the conflict word refers to negative words. The style of relationship companion of the most important factor is in determining the contrast. When it opposite should apply to all non-identical and identical features of two words.  Conflict in the Persian language has two main structures: inductive or antonyms derived from a combination of different prefixes with nouns, adjectives, verbs and roots. because there are no conflicting instrument in Persian languages. ​​ The second sonic antonyms or compound that when the main focus on the meaning of a word is a constant and a variable component to another. Sometimes contradictory combinations with “ vave atf” or without is made . If it this contradictory combinations consists of a single concept of antonyms bring to mind in the paradoxical or contradictory view of is used rhetoric in grammatical books rarely pointed to category of conflict. Scholars typically have not paid to the conflict. In a field study was nearly studied sixty books. A total of them were more than 20-thousand-pages. Less than seven pages of these books was on contrast.

  17. Two Contrasting Phenomena in Textile Exports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ As the two traditional markets for China's textile and clothing exports,the U.S.and Europe have recently shown a huge contrast. The 103rd China Import and Export Fair,also known as the Canton Fair,the largest trade fair in China,has closed its closed its doors,impacted by the rising costs of raw materials,appreciation of the RMB,decreased demand from U.S.customers and other factors.

  18. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Contrast between China English and Chinese English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨公建

    2014-01-01

    With the globalization of English, the discussion about China English and Chinese English attracts many scholars ’interest and attention. The con-cept of China English and Chinese English usual y makes people confused, so the article wil make some tentative contrasts in terms of definition、attri-butes and causes of the two terms and make people have a clear comprehension of China English and Chinese English.

  20. The benefits of staying active in old age: physical activity counteracts the negative influence of PICALM, BIN1, and CLU risk alleles on episodic memory functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Beata; Laukka, Erika J; Welmer, Anna-Karin; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Angleman, Sara; Keller, Lina; Graff, Caroline; Lövdén, Martin; Bäckman, Lars

    2014-06-01

    PICALM, BIN1, CLU, and APOE are top candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease, and they influence episodic memory performance in old age. Physical activity, however, has been shown to protect against age-related decline and counteract genetic influences on cognition. The aims of this study were to assess whether (a) a genetic risk constellation of PICALM, BIN1, and CLU polymorphisms influences cognitive performance in old age; and (b) if physical activity moderates this effect. Data from the SNAC-K population-based study were used, including 2,480 individuals (age range = 60 to 100 years) free of dementia at baseline and at 3- to 6-year follow-ups. Tasks assessing episodic memory, perceptual speed, knowledge, and verbal fluency were administered. Physical activity was measured using self-reports. Individuals who had engaged in frequent health- or fitness-enhancing activities within the past year were compared with those who were inactive. Genetic risk scores were computed based on an integration of risk alleles for PICALM (rs3851179 G allele, rs541458 T allele), BIN1 (rs744373 G allele), and CLU (rs11136000 T allele). High genetic risk was associated with reduced episodic memory performance, controlling for age, education, vascular risk factors, chronic diseases, activities of daily living, and APOE gene status. Critically, physical activity attenuated the effects of genetic risk on episodic memory. Our findings suggest that participants with high genetic risk who maintain a physically active lifestyle show selective benefits in episodic memory performance.

  1. An observational, prospective, two-cohort comparison of a fixed versus variable dosing strategy of prothrombin complex concentrate to counteract vitamin K antagonists in 240 bleeding emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsand, Nakisa; Veeger, Nic J G M; van Hest, Reinier M; Ypma, Paula F; Heidt, Jeroen; Meijer, Karina

    2012-10-01

    Despite years of experience with vitamin K antagonist-associated bleeding events, there is still no evidence to help identify the optimal treatment with prothrombin complex concentrates. Variable dosing and fixed dose strategies are being used. In this observational prospective two-cohort study, we aimed to assess the non-inferiority of a low fixed PCC dose (1,040 IU Factor IX) compared to the registered variable dosing regimen based on baseline International Normalized Rate, bodyweight, and target International Normalized Rate, to counteract vitamin K antagonists in a bleeding emergency in a daily clinical practice setting. Non-inferiority of the fixed prothrombin complex concentrate dose was hypothesized with a margin of 4%. Main end points were proportion of patients reaching the target International Normalized Rate (complex concentrate treatment, and successful clinical outcome. Target International Normalized Rate was reached in 92% of the fixed dose patients (n=101) versus 95% of variable dose patients (n=139) resulting in a risk difference of -2.99% (90% CI: - 8.6 to 2.7) (non-inferiority not confirmed). Clinical outcome was successful in 96% and 88% of fixed versus variable dose, respectively, with a risk difference of 8.3% (90% CI: 2.7-13.9; non-inferiority confirmed). Although a lower fixed prothrombin complex concentrate dose was associated with successful clinical outcome, fewer patients reached the target International Normalized Rate.

  2. Protective role of malvidin-3-glucoside on peroxynitrite-induced damage in endothelial cells by counteracting reactive species formation and apoptotic mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Joana; Dinis, Teresa C P; Almeida, Leonor M

    2012-01-01

    The health-promoted benefits of anthocyanins, including vascular protective effects and antiatherogenic properties, have now been recognized, but the involved molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. Following our previous work on cytoprotective mechanisms of some anthocyanins against apoptosis triggered by peroxynitrite in endothelial cells, here we investigated the protective role of malvidin-3-glucoside, a major dietary anthocyanin, on such deleterious process, by exploring the interference on cellular reactive species formation and on apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Preincubation of cells with 25 μM malvidin-3-glucoside protected efficiently endothelial cells from peroxynitrite-promoted apoptotic death, an effect which may be partially mediated by its ability to decrease the formation of reactive species after cell aggression, as assessed by the dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate assay and by carbonyl groups formation. Moreover, malvidin-3-glucoside inhibited mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathways induced by peroxynitrite, by counteracting mitochondrial membrane depolarization, the activation of caspase-3 and -9, and the increase in the expression of the proapoptotic Bax protein. Altogether, our data expands our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms underlying the vascular protection afforded by malvidin-3-glucoside, and anthocyanins in general, in the context of prevention of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

  3. A comparison of the potency of newly developed oximes (K027, K048) and commonly used oximes (obidoxime, HI-6) to counteract tabun-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Jirí; Kunesova, Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of newly developed oximes (K027, K048) and currently available oximes (obidoxime, HI-6) in combination with atropine in rats poisoned with tabun at a sublethal dose (170 microg kg(-1) i.m.; 80% of LD(50) value) were studied. The tabun-induced neurotoxicity was monitored using a functional observational battery and an automatic measurement of motor activity. The neurotoxicity of tabun was monitored at 24 h and 7 days following tabun challenge. The results indicate that the oxime HI-6 in combination with atropine was not able to protect the rats from the lethal effects of tabun. Two non-treated tabun-poisoned rats and one tabun-poisoned rat treated with atropine combined with HI-6 died within 2 h. On the other hand, all other tested oximes combined with atropine allowed all the tabun-poisoned rats to survive 7 days following tabun challenge. Both newly developed oximes combined with atropine seem to be sufficiently effective antidotes for a decrease in tabun-induced neurotoxicity in the case of sublethal poisoning although they are not able to eliminate tabun-induced neurotoxicity completely. The neuroprotective efficacy of obidoxime in combination with atropine approached the potency of newly developed oximes but the ability of the oxime HI-6 to counteract tabun-induced acute neurotoxicity was significantly lower, especially at 24 h after tabun poisoning. Due to their neuroprotective effects, both newly developed oximes appear to be suitable oximes for the antidotal treatment of acute tabun poisoning.

  4. Dopamine D₄ receptor counteracts morphine-induced changes in µ opioid receptor signaling in the striosomes of the rat caudate putamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Boomgaard, Diana; Gago, Belén; Valderrama-Carvajal, Alejandra; Roales-Buján, Ruth; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Duchou, Jolien; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Medina-Luque, José; de la Calle, Adelaida; Fuxe, Kjell; Rivera, Alicia

    2014-01-21

    The mu opioid receptor (MOR) is critical in mediating morphine analgesia. However, prolonged exposure to morphine induces adaptive changes in this receptor leading to the development of tolerance and addiction. In the present work we have studied whether the continuous administration of morphine induces changes in MOR protein levels, its pharmacological profile, and MOR-mediated G-protein activation in the striosomal compartment of the rat CPu, by using immunohistochemistry and receptor and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS autoradiography. MOR immunoreactivity, agonist binding density and its coupling to G proteins are up-regulated in the striosomes by continuous morphine treatment in the absence of changes in enkephalin and dynorphin mRNA levels. In addition, co-treatment of morphine with the dopamine D4 receptor (D4R) agonist PD168,077 fully counteracts these adaptive changes in MOR, in spite of the fact that continuous PD168,077 treatment increases the [3H]DAMGO Bmax values to the same degree as seen after continuous morphine treatment. Thus, in spite of the fact that both receptors can be coupled to Gi/0 protein, the present results give support for the existence of antagonistic functional D4R-MOR receptor-receptor interactions in the adaptive changes occurring in MOR of striosomes on continuous administration of morphine.

  5. The novel adipokine progranulin counteracts IL-1 and TLR4-driven inflammatory response in human and murine chondrocytes via TNFR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; López, Verónica; Pirozzi, Claudio; Pino, Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Gualillo, Oreste

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a recently identified adipokine that is supposed to have anti-inflammatory actions. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL1β) stimulates several mediators of cartilage degradation. Toll like receptor-4 (TLR4) can bind to various damage-associated molecular patterns, leading to inflammatory condition. So far, no data exist of PGRN effects in inflammatory conditions induced by IL1β or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of PGRN in IL1β- or LPS-induced inflammatory responses of chondrocytes. Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and ATDC-5 cells were treated with PGRN in presence or not of IL1β or LPS. First, we showed that recombinant PGRN had no effects on cell viability. We present evidence that PGRN expression was increased during the differentiation of ATDC-5 cell line. Moreover, PGRN mRNA and protein expression is increased in cartilage, synovial and infrapatellar fat pad tissue samples from OA patients. PGRN mRNA levels are upregulated under TNFα and IL1β stimulation. Our data showed that PGRN is able to significantly counteract the IL1β-induced expression of NOS2, COX2, MMP13 and VCAM-1. LPS-induced expression of NOS2 is also decreased by PGRN. These effects are mediated, at least in part, through TNFR1. Taken together, our results suggest that PGRN has a clear anti-inflammatory function. PMID:26853108

  6. M3-receptor activation counteracts opioid-mediated apneusis, but the apneusis per se is not necessarily related to an impaired M3 mechanism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Yuka; Haji, Akira

    2011-11-07

    Morphine slows the respiratory cycle due to a predominant prolongation of inspiration (apneusis) by postponing the spontaneous termination of inspiration (inspiratory off-switching). The present study investigates whether the morphine-induced apneusis results from impairment of cholinergic mechanisms in the central respiratory network. The efferent discharge was recorded from the phrenic nerve in artificially ventilated and anesthetized rats with vagotomy. All drugs were injected intravenously. The phrenic nerve displayed an augmenting discharge during inspiration and arrest of discharge during expiration in normal condition. Administration of morphine (0.3-10.0mg/kg) dose-dependently provoked apneusis characterized by a long-lasting, plateau inspiratory discharge of the phrenic nerve. It shortened the expiratory duration. Subsequent administration of physostigmine (0.1mg/kg) restored the morphine-induced apneusis to eupnea with a partial recovery of the augmenting inspiratory discharge. This modification of physostigmine was blocked by a non-specific muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (3.0mg/kg), leading to re-prolongation of inspiration. A similar antagonism was affected by an antagonist of M3 cholinergic receptors, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (4-DAMP, 1.0 and 10.0mg/kg) but not by an antagonist of M1 cholinergic receptors, pirenzepine (1.0 and 10.0mg/kg). These results demonstrate that the activation of endogenous M3 cholinergic mechanisms counteracts the morphine-induced apneusis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Black Tea Increases Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improves Flow Mediated Dilatation Counteracting Deleterious Effects from a Fat Load in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Grassi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Endothelial dysfunction predicts cardiovascular events. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs maintain and repair the endothelium regulating its function. Tea flavonoids reduce cardiovascular risk. We investigated the effects of black tea on the number of CACs and on flow-mediated dilation (FMD before and after an oral fat in hypertensives; (2 Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over study, 19 patients were assigned to black tea (150 mg polyphenols or a placebo twice a day for eight days. Measurements were obtained in a fasted state and after consuming whipping cream, and FMD was measured at baseline and after consumption of the products; (3 Results: Compared with the placebo, black tea ingestion increased functionally active CACs (36 ± 22 vs. 56 ± 21 cells per high-power field; p = 0.006 and FMD (5.0% ± 0.3% vs. 6.6% ± 0.3%, p < 0.0001. Tea further increased FMD 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after consumption, with maximal response 2 h after intake (p < 0.0001. Fat challenge decreased FMD, while tea consumption counteracted FMD impairment (p < 0.0001; (4 Conclusions: We demonstrated the vascular protective properties of black tea by increasing the number of CACs and preventing endothelial dysfunction induced by acute oral fat load in hypertensive patients. Considering that tea is the most consumed beverage after water, our findings are of clinical relevance and interest.

  8. Organization into Higher Ordered Ring Structures Counteracts Membrane Binding of IM30, a Protein Associated with Inner Membranes in Chloroplasts and Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Jennifer; Wulf, Verena; Hennig, Raoul; Saur, Michael; Markl, Jürgen; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Schneider, Dirk

    2016-07-15

    The IM30 (inner membrane-associated protein of 30 kDa), also known as the Vipp1 (vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1), has a crucial role in thylakoid membrane biogenesis and maintenance. Recent results suggest that the protein binds peripherally to membranes containing negatively charged lipids. However, although IM30 monomers interact and assemble into large oligomeric ring complexes with different numbers of monomers, it is still an open question whether ring formation is crucial for membrane interaction. Here we show that binding of IM30 rings to negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol membrane surfaces results in a higher ordered membrane state, both in the head group and in the inner core region of the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, by using gold nanorods covered with phosphatidylglycerol layers and single particle spectroscopy, we show that not only IM30 rings but also lower oligomeric IM30 structures interact with membranes, although with higher affinity. Thus, ring formation is not crucial for, and even counteracts, membrane interaction of IM30.

  9. Ghrelin-induced orexigenic effect in rats depends on the metabolic status and is counteracted by peripheral CB1 receptor antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alen

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is an endogenous regulator of energy homeostasis synthesized by the stomach to stimulate appetite and positive energy balance. Similarly, the endocannabinoid system is part of our internal machinery controlling food intake and energy expenditure. Both peripheral and central mechanisms regulate CB1-mediated control of food intake and a functional relationship between hypothalamic ghrelin and cannabinoid CB1 receptor has been proposed. First of all, we investigated brain ghrelin actions on food intake in rats with different metabolic status (negative or equilibrate energy balance. Secondly, we tested a sub-anxiogenic ultra-low dose of the CB1 antagonist SR141716A (Rimonabant and the peripheral-acting CB1 antagonist LH-21 on ghrelin orexigenic actions. We found that: 1 central administration of ghrelin promotes food intake in free feeding animals but not in 24 h food-deprived or chronically food-restricted animals; 2 an ultra-low dose of SR141716A (a subthreshold dose 75 folds lower than the EC50 for induction of anxiety completely counteracts the orexigenic actions of central ghrelin in free feeding animals; 3 the peripheral-restricted CB1 antagonist LH-21 blocks ghrelin-induced hyperphagia in free feeding animals. Our study highlights the importance of the animaĺs metabolic status for the effectiveness of ghrelin in promoting feeding, and suggests that the peripheral endocannabinoid system may interact with ghrelińs signal in the control of food intake under equilibrate energy balance conditions.

  10. Meaning Of The Term "Corruption Offense" As A Feature Of The Public Prosecutor's Supervision Over The Legislation On The Corruption Counteraction In The Municipal Governments Execution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseniya D. Okuneva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present article theoretical and practical aspects of the corruption offense definition, which are being characteristic features of the methodology of prosecutorial supervision over the legislation on counteraction to corruption in local government are analyzed. Federal Law of Jan. 17, 1992 No. 2202-1 "On the Procuracy of the Russian Federation" (Article 21 establishes the public prosecutor's supervision over the legislation on combating corruption in local government execution, which is a special sub-cluster. On general terms of theoretical techniques of the prosecutor's supervision, taking into account its specific and complex nature of corruption prosecutors based activities in this area. Author emphasizes attention on characteristics of the corruption offense, as well as aspects of legal responsibility, which lie in the fact that it is applied in accordance with law to offender as measures of state coercion of personal, financial or organizational nature for the offense committed; responsibilities of the person, who committed the offense, to be subject to measures of state coercion. In the conclusion author notes that specifics of corruption offenses that are subject of prosecutorial supervision over the execution of legislation on combating corruption in local government is determined by the special status of the offense subjects, as well as the content of legal prohibitions and legal responsibilities in the field of ​​anti-corruption at the municipal level.

  11. Inability of HDL from type 2 diabetic patients to counteract the inhibitory effect of oxidised LDL on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perségol, L; Vergès, B; Foissac, M; Gambert, P; Duvillard, L

    2006-06-01

    In healthy normolipidaemic and normoglycaemic control subjects, HDL are able to reverse the inhibition of vasodilation that is induced by oxidised LDL. In type 2 diabetic patients, HDL are glycated and more triglyceride-rich than in control subjects. These alterations are likely to modify the capacity of HDL to reverse the inhibition of vasodilation induced by oxidised LDL. Using rabbit aorta rings, we compared the ability of HDL from 16 type 2 diabetic patients and 13 control subjects to suppress the inhibition of vasodilation that is induced by oxidised LDL. Oxidised LDL inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation (maximal relaxation [Emax] = 58.2+/-14.6 vs 99.3+/-5.2% for incubation without any lipoprotein, p HDL from control subjects significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of oxidised LDL on vasodilatation (Emax = 77.6+/-12.9 vs 59.5+/-7.7%, p HDL from type 2 diabetic patients had no effect (Emax = 52.4+/-20.4 vs 57.2+/-18.7%, NS). HDL triglyceride content was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients than in control subjects (5.3+/-2.2 vs 3.1+/-1.4%, p HDL in type 2 diabetic patients (r = -0.71, p diabetes mellitus, the ability of HDL to counteract the inhibition of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by oxidised LDL is impaired and is inversely correlated with HDL triglyceride content. These findings suggest that HDL are less atheroprotective in type 2 diabetic patients than in control subjects.

  12. Escherichia coli α-hemolysin counteracts the anti-virulence innate immune response triggered by the Rho GTPase activating toxin CNF1 during bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamady Diabate

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the activities of pathogen-encoded virulence factors by the innate immune system has emerged as a new paradigm of pathogen recognition. Much remains to be determined with regard to the molecular and cellular components contributing to this defense mechanism in mammals and importance during infection. Here, we reveal the central role of the IL-1β signaling axis and Gr1+ cells in controlling the Escherichia coli burden in the blood in response to the sensing of the Rho GTPase-activating toxin CNF1. Consistently, this innate immune response is abrogated in caspase-1/11-impaired mice or following the treatment of infected mice with an IL-1β antagonist. In vitro experiments further revealed the synergistic effects of CNF1 and LPS in promoting the maturation/secretion of IL-1β and establishing the roles of Rac, ASC and caspase-1 in this pathway. Furthermore, we found that the α-hemolysin toxin inhibits IL-1β secretion without affecting the recruitment of Gr1+ cells. Here, we report the first example of anti-virulence-triggered immunity counteracted by a pore-forming toxin during bacteremia.

  13. Ghrelin-Induced Orexigenic Effect in Rats Depends on the Metabolic Status and Is Counteracted by Peripheral CB1 Receptor Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alen, Francisco; Crespo, Inmaculada; Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Jagerovic, Nadine; Goya, Pilar; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; de Heras, Raquel Gómez; Orio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous regulator of energy homeostasis synthesized by the stomach to stimulate appetite and positive energy balance. Similarly, the endocannabinoid system is part of our internal machinery controlling food intake and energy expenditure. Both peripheral and central mechanisms regulate CB1-mediated control of food intake and a functional relationship between hypothalamic ghrelin and cannabinoid CB1 receptor has been proposed. First of all, we investigated brain ghrelin actions on food intake in rats with different metabolic status (negative or equilibrate energy balance). Secondly, we tested a sub-anxiogenic ultra-low dose of the CB1 antagonist SR141716A (Rimonabant) and the peripheral-acting CB1 antagonist LH-21 on ghrelin orexigenic actions. We found that: 1) central administration of ghrelin promotes food intake in free feeding animals but not in 24 h food-deprived or chronically food-restricted animals; 2) an ultra-low dose of SR141716A (a subthreshold dose 75 folds lower than the EC50 for induction of anxiety) completely counteracts the orexigenic actions of central ghrelin in free feeding animals; 3) the peripheral-restricted CB1 antagonist LH-21 blocks ghrelin-induced hyperphagia in free feeding animals. Our study highlights the importance of the animaĺs metabolic status for the effectiveness of ghrelin in promoting feeding, and suggests that the peripheral endocannabinoid system may interact with ghrelińs signal in the control of food intake under equilibrate energy balance conditions. PMID:23565287

  14. Solar irradiance reduction to counteract radiative forcing from a quadrupling of CO2: climate responses simulated by four earth system models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compare the response of four state-of-the-art Earth system models to climate engineering under scenario G1 of two model intercomparison projects: GeoMIP (Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project and IMPLICC (EU project "Implications and risks of engineering solar radiation to limit climate change". In G1, the radiative forcing from an instantaneous quadrupling of the CO2 concentration, starting from the preindustrial level, is balanced by a reduction of the solar constant. Model responses to the two counteracting forcings in G1 are compared to the preindustrial climate in terms of global means and regional patterns and their robustness. While the global mean surface air temperature in G1 remains almost unchanged compared to the control simulation, the meridional temperature gradient is reduced in all models. Another robust response is the global reduction of precipitation with strong effects in particular over North and South America and northern Eurasia. In comparison to the climate response to a quadrupling of CO2 alone, the temperature responses are small in experiment G1. Precipitation responses are, however, in many regions of comparable magnitude but globally of opposite sign.

  15. Neuroinflammatory processes in cognitive disorders: Is there a role for flavonoids and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in counteracting their detrimental effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauzour, David; Martinsen, Anneloes; Layé, Sophie

    2015-10-01

    Neuroinflammatory processes are known to contribute to the cascade of events culminating in the neuronal damage that underpins neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. With the ageing population and increased cases of neurodegenerative diseases, there is a crucial need for the development of new strategies capable to prevent, delay the onset or treat brain dysfunction and associated cognitive decline. Growing evidence sheds light on the use of dietary polyphenols and n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to improve cognitive performance and reduce the neuroinflammatory and oxidative stress responses occurring with age and neurodegenerative pathologies. This review will summarise the most recent information related to the impact and mechanisms underlying the neuroinflammatory processes in neurodegenerative disorders. We will also detail the current evidence indicating that flavonoids and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are strong candidates in preventing neuroinflammation and modulating age-related memory decline, and we will describe the potential mechanisms of action underlying their neuroprotective effects. As such, these dietary bioactives represent important precursor molecules in the quest to develop a new generation of drugs capable of counteracting neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Simultaneous ultrasound-assisted water extraction and β-cyclodextrin encapsulation of polyphenols from Mangifera indica stem bark in counteracting TNFα-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Marzia; Palmieri, Daniela; Garella, Davide; Di Stilo, Antonella; Perego, Patrizia; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Palombo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an alternative technique to prevent heat degradation induced by classic procedures of bioactive compound extraction, comparing classical maceration/decoction in hot water of polyphenols from Mango (Mangifera indica L.) (MI) with ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) in a water solution of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) at room temperature and testing their biological activity on TNFα-induced endothelial dysfunction. Both extracts counteracted TNFα effects on EAhy926 cells, down-modulating interleukin-6, interleukin-8, cyclooxygenase-2 and intracellular adhesion molecule-1, while increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase levels. β-CD extract showed higher efficacy in improving endothelial function. These effects were abolished after pre-treatment with the oestrogen receptor inhibitor ICI1182,780. Moreover, the β-CD extract induced Akt activation and completely abolished the TNFα-induced p38MAPK phosphorylation. UAE and β-CD encapsulation provide an efficient extraction protocol that increases polyphenol bioavailability. Polyphenols from MI play a protective role on endothelial cells and may be further considered as oestrogen-like molecules with vascular protective properties.

  17. Single-Word Recognition Need Not Depend on Single-Word Features: Narrative Coherence Counteracts Effects of Single-Word Features that Lexical Decision Emphasizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Dan W; Wallot, Sebastian; Kelty-Stephen, Damian G

    2016-12-01

    Research on reading comprehension of connected text emphasizes reliance on single-word features that organize a stable, mental lexicon of words and that speed or slow the recognition of each new word. However, the time needed to recognize a word might not actually be as fixed as previous research indicates, and the stability of the mental lexicon may change with task demands. The present study explores the effects of narrative coherence in self-paced story reading to single-word feature effects in lexical decision. We presented single strings of letters to 24 participants, in both lexical decision and self-paced story reading. Both tasks included the same words composing a set of adjective-noun pairs. Reading times revealed that the tasks, and the order of the presentation of the tasks, changed and/or eliminated familiar effects of single-word features. Specifically, experiencing the lexical-decision task first gradually emphasized the role of single-word features, and experiencing the self-paced story-reading task afterwards counteracted the effect of single-word features. We discuss the implications that task-dependence and narrative coherence might have for the organization of the mental lexicon. Future work will need to consider what architectures suit the apparent flexibility with which task can accentuate or diminish effects of single-word features.

  18. Arabidopsis Glutamate Receptor Homolog3.5 Modulates Cytosolic Ca2+ Level to Counteract Effect of Abscisic Acid in Seed Germination1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dongdong; Ju, Chuanli; Parihar, Aisha; Kim, So; Cho, Daeshik; Kwak, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Seed germination is a critical step in a plant’s life cycle that allows successful propagation and is therefore strictly controlled by endogenous and environmental signals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying germination control remain elusive. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) glutamate receptor homolog3.5 (AtGLR3.5) is predominantly expressed in germinating seeds and increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration that counteracts the effect of abscisic acid (ABA) to promote germination. Repression of AtGLR3.5 impairs cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation, significantly delays germination, and enhances ABA sensitivity in seeds, whereas overexpression of AtGLR3.5 results in earlier germination and reduced seed sensitivity to ABA. Furthermore, we show that Ca2+ suppresses the expression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4), a key transcription factor involved in ABA response in seeds, and that ABI4 plays a fundamental role in modulation of Ca2+-dependent germination. Taken together, our results provide molecular genetic evidence that AtGLR3.5-mediated Ca2+ influx stimulates seed germination by antagonizing the inhibitory effects of ABA through suppression of ABI4. These findings establish, to our knowledge, a new and pivotal role of the plant glutamate receptor homolog and Ca2+ signaling in germination control and uncover the orchestrated modulation of the AtGLR3.5-mediated Ca2+ signal and ABA signaling via ABI4 to fine-tune the crucial developmental process, germination, in Arabidopsis. PMID:25681329

  19. Neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment counteracts circadian arrhythmicity induced by phase shifts of the light-dark cycle in female and male Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Zucker, Irving

    2013-07-12

    Studies of rats and voles suggest that distinct pathways emanating from the anterior hypothalamic-retrochiasmatic area and the mediobasal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus independently generate ultradian rhythms (URs) in hormone secretion and behavior. We evaluated the hypothesis that destruction of arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons, in concert with dampening of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian rhythmicity, would compromize the generation of ultradian rhythms (URs) of locomotor activity. Siberian hamsters retain-->of both sexes treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG) that destroys ARC neurons were subjected in adulthood to a circadian disrupting phase-shift protocol (DPS) that produces SCN arrhythmia. MSG treatments induced hypogonadism and obesity, retain-->and markedly reduced the size of the optic chiasm and optic nerves. MSG-treated hamsters exhibited normal entrainment to the light-dark cycle, but MSG treatretain-->ment counteracted the circadian arrhythmicity induced by the DPS protocol: only 6% of retain-->MSG-treated hamsters exhibited circadian arrhythmia, whereas 50% of control hamsters were circadian disrupted. In MSG-treated hamsters that retained circadian rhythmicity after DPS treatment, quantitative parameters of URs appeared normal, but in the two MSG-treated hamsters that became circadian arrhythmic after DPS, both dark-phase and light-phase URs were abolished. Although preliminary, these data are consistent with reports in voles suggesting that the combined disruption of SCN and ARC function impairs the expression of behavioral URs. The data also suggest that light thresholds for entrainment of circadian rhythms may be lower than those required to disrupt circadian organization.

  20. Arabidopsis glutamate receptor homolog3.5 modulates cytosolic Ca2+ level to counteract effect of abscisic acid in seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dongdong; Ju, Chuanli; Parihar, Aisha; Kim, So; Cho, Daeshik; Kwak, June M

    2015-04-01

    Seed germination is a critical step in a plant's life cycle that allows successful propagation and is therefore strictly controlled by endogenous and environmental signals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying germination control remain elusive. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) glutamate receptor homolog3.5 (AtGLR3.5) is predominantly expressed in germinating seeds and increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration that counteracts the effect of abscisic acid (ABA) to promote germination. Repression of AtGLR3.5 impairs cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation, significantly delays germination, and enhances ABA sensitivity in seeds, whereas overexpression of AtGLR3.5 results in earlier germination and reduced seed sensitivity to ABA. Furthermore, we show that Ca2+ suppresses the expression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4), a key transcription factor involved in ABA response in seeds, and that ABI4 plays a fundamental role in modulation of Ca2+-dependent germination. Taken together, our results provide molecular genetic evidence that AtGLR3.5-mediated Ca2+ influx stimulates seed germination by antagonizing the inhibitory effects of ABA through suppression of ABI4. These findings establish, to our knowledge, a new and pivotal role of the plant glutamate receptor homolog and Ca2+ signaling in germination control and uncover the orchestrated modulation of the AtGLR3.5-mediated Ca2+ signal and ABA signaling via ABI4 to fine-tune the crucial developmental process, germination, in Arabidopsis.

  1. Inositol's and other nutraceuticals' synergistic actions counteract insulin resistance in polycystic ovarian syndrome and metabolic syndrome: state-of-the-art and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Cristiana; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Maniglio, Paolo; Triolo, Onofrio; Brady, David M

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), type II diabetes (T2D) and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) has been progressively increasing. Insulin resistance (InsR) seems to play a key role in a majority of phenotypes of these conditions, altering metabolic homeostasis, within muscle, liver, adipose and other tissues. Hyperinsulinemia is often associated with InsR and causes hormonal imbalances especially within ovaries and adrenals. Inositol is a polyalcohol, naturally occurring as nine stereoisomers, including D-chiro-inositol (DCI) and myo-inositol (MI), which have prominent roles in the metabolism of glucose and free fatty acids. MI and DCI have been classified as insulin-sensitizers and seem to adequately counteract several InsR-related metabolic alterations with a safe nutraceutical profile. Based on our analysis of selected studies that investigated MI and/or DCI, we conclude that supplementation with MI and/or DCI complement each other in their metabolic actions and act in synergy with other insulin sensitizing drugs and/or nutraceuticals. Nevertheless, considering the possible severe bias due to different methodologies across published studies, we conclude that there is a need for further studies on larger cohorts and with greater statistical power. These should further clarify outcomes and suitable therapeutic dosages of MI and DCI, possibly based on each patient's clinical status.

  2. Melatonin Counteracts at a Transcriptional Level the Inflammatory and Apoptotic Response Secondary to Ischemic Brain Injury Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Blockade in Aging Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Sergio D; Rancan, Lisa; Kireev, Roman; González, Alberto; Louzao, Pedro; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2015-01-01

    Aging increases oxidative stress and inflammation. Melatonin counteracts inflammation and apoptosis. This study investigated the possible protective effect of melatonin on the inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemia induced by blockade of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) in aging male Wistar rats. Animals were subjected to MCA obstruction. After 24 h or 7 days of procedure, 14-month-old nontreated and treated rats with a daily dose of 10 mg/kg melatonin were sacrificed and right and left hippocampus and cortex were collected. Rats aged 2 and 6 months, respectively, were subjected to the same brain injury protocol, but they were not treated with melatonin. mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD), Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and sirtuin 1 was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In nontreated animals, a significant time-dependent increase in IL-1β, TNF-α, BAD, and BAX was observed in the ischemic area of both hippocampus and cortex, and to a lesser extent in the contralateral hemisphere. Hippocampal GFAP was also significantly elevated, while Bcl-2 and sirtuin 1 decreased significantly in response to ischemia. Aging aggravated these changes. Melatonin administration was able to reverse significantly these alterations. In conclusion, melatonin may ameliorate the age-dependent inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemic cerebral injury.

  3. Adaptive overlapped sub-blocks contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anqiu; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Siqi; Li, An; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an overlapped sub-block gray-level average method for contrast enhancement is presented. The digital image correction of uneven illumination under microscope transmittance is a problem in image processing, also sometimes the image in the dark place need to correct the uneven problem. A new correction method was proposed based on the mask method and sub-blocks gray-level average method because Traditional mask method and background fitting method are restricted due to application scenarios, and the corrected image brightness is low by using background fitting method, so it has some limitations of the application. In this paper, we introduce a new method called AOSCE for image contrast enhancement. The image is divided into many sub-blocks which are overlapped, calculate the average gray-level of the whole image as M and the calculate the average gray-level of each one as mi, next for each block it can get d = mi - m, each block minus d to get a new image, and then get the minimum gray-level of each block into a matrix DD to get the background, and use bilinearity to get the same scale of the image. over fitting the image in matlab in order to get smoother image, then minus the background to get the contrast enhancement image.

  4. Optimization of subcutaneous vein contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Herbert D.; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Deshmukh, Harshal

    2000-05-01

    A technique for enhancing the contrast of subcutaneous veins has been demonstrated. This techniques uses a near IR light source and one or more IR sensitive CCD TV cameras to produce a contrast enhanced image of the subcutaneous veins. This video image of the veins is projected back onto the patient's skin using a n LCD video projector. The use of an IR transmitting filter in front of the video cameras prevents any positive feedback from the visible light from the video projector from causing instabilities in the projected image. The demonstration contrast enhancing illuminator has been tested on adults and children, both Caucasian and African-American, and it enhances veins quite well in all cases. The most difficult cases are those where significant deposits of subcutaneous fat are present which make the veins invisible under normal room illumination. Recent attempts to see through fat using different IR wavelength bands and both linearly and circularly polarized light were unsuccessful. The key to seeing through fat turns out to be a very diffuse source of RI light. Results on adult and pediatric subjects are shown with this new IR light source.

  5. Fast contrast enhanced imaging with projection reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Dana Ceceilia

    The use of contrast agents has lead to great advances in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Here we present the first application of projection reconstruction to contrast enhanced MRA. In this research the limited angle projection reconstruction (PR) trajectory is implemented to acquire higher resolution images per unit time than with conventional Fourier transform (FT) imaging. It is well known that as FOV is reduced in conventional spin- warp imaging, higher resolution per unit time can be obtained, but aliasing may appear as a replication of outside material within the FOV. The limited angle PR acquisition also produces aliasing artifacts. This method produced artifacts which were unacceptable in X-ray CT but which appear to be tolerable in MR Angiography. Resolution throughout the FOV is determined by the projection readout resolution and not by the number of projections. As the number of projections is reduced, the resolution is unchanged, but low intensity artifacts appear. Here are presented the results of using limited angle PR in phantoms and contrast-enhanced angiograms of humans.

  6. High contrast laser marking of alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penide, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Quintero, F., E-mail: fquintero@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Riveiro, A. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Fernández, A. [Department of Engineering Design, University of Vigo, Escuela de Ingeniería Industrial, Campus Universitario, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Val, J. del [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Comesaña, R. [Materials Engineering, Applied Mechanics and Construction Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo E-36310 (Spain); Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser marking of alumina using near infrared (NIR) lasers was experimentally analyzed. • Color change produced by NIR lasers is due to thermally induced oxygen vacancies. • Laser marking results obtained using NIR lasers and green laser are compared. • High contrast marks on alumina were achieved. - Abstract: Alumina serves as raw material for a broad range of advanced ceramic products. These elements should usually be identified by some characters or symbols printed directly on them. In this sense, laser marking is an efficient, reliable and widely implemented process in industry. However, laser marking of alumina still leads to poor results since the process is not able to produce a dark mark, yielding bad contrast. In this paper, we present an experimental study on the process of marking alumina by three different lasers working in two wavelengths: 1064 nm (Near-infrared) and 532 nm (visible, green radiation). A colorimetric analysis has been carried out in order to compare the resulting marks and its contrast. The most suitable laser operating conditions were also defined and are reported here. Moreover, the physical process of marking by NIR lasers is discussed in detail. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were also employed to analyze the results. Finally, we propose an explanation for the differences of the coloration induced under different atmospheres and laser parameters. We concluded that the atmosphere is the key parameter, being the inert one the best choice to produce the darkest marks.

  7. Axial Phase-Darkfield-Contrast (APDC), a new technique for variable optical contrasting in light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, T; Piper, J

    2012-09-01

    Axial phase-darkfield-contrast (APDC) has been developed as an illumination technique in light microscopy which promises significant improvements and a higher variability in imaging of several transparent 'problem specimens'. With this method, a phase contrast image is optically superimposed on an axial darkfield image so that a partial image based on the principal zeroth order maximum (phase contrast) interferes with an image, which is based on the secondary maxima (axial darkfield). The background brightness and character of the resulting image can be continuously modulated from a phase contrast-dominated to a darkfield-dominated character. In order to achieve this illumination mode, normal objectives for phase contrast have to be fitted with an additional central light stopper needed for axial (central) darkfield illumination. In corresponding condenser light masks, a small perforation has to be added in the centre of the phase contrast providing light annulus. These light modulating elements are properly aligned when the central perforation is congruent with the objective's light stop and the light annulus is conjugate with the phase ring. The breadth of the condenser light annulus and thus the intensity of the phase contrast partial image can be regulated with the aperture diaphragm. Additional contrast effects can be achieved when both illuminating light components are filtered at different colours. In this technique, the axial resolution (depth of field) is significantly enhanced and the specimen's three-dimensional appearance is accentuated with improved clarity as well as fine details at the given resolution limit. Typical artefacts associated with phase contrast and darkfield illumination are reduced in our methods.

  8. Ultrasonido con contraste de masas hepáticas Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in hepatic masses

    OpenAIRE

    Hojun Yu; Korosh Khalili; Hyun-Jung Jang; Tae Kyoung Kim; Mostafa Atri

    2009-01-01

    El ultrasonido (US) con contraste constituye una poderosa herramienta diagnóstica en la caracterización de masas hepáticas. Las modernas técnicas de ultrasonido con contraste presentan alta sensibilidad con dosis bajas de contraste, lo que juntamente con la técnica de supresión de ecos resulta en imágenes de muy alta resolución temporal y espacial, propiciando el resurgimiento de la ultrasonografía en la era de la tomografía computada (TC) y de la resonancia magnética (RM). El agente de contr...

  9. Medios de contraste en imágenes Media contrasts in imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sartori

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo realizamos una revisión y actualización de las acciones, indicaciones, reacciones adversas y sus tratamientos, interacciones y contraindicaciones de los distintos medios de contrastes.In this review, we revised and updated the actions, indications, interactions and contraindications of the different contrast media, as well as their adverse reactions and how to treat them.

  10. A Nanocomplex System as Targeted Contrast Agent Delivery Vehicle for MRI Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Study

    OpenAIRE

    Korotcov, Alexandru; Shan, Liang; Meng, Huan; Wang, Tongxin; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Zhao, Yuliang; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and tested a liposomal nanocomplex system, which contains Gd-DTPA as a payload and transferrin on the surface, as a tumor specific targeting MRI contrast agent for studying prostate cancer tumors in mice. In vivo, the probe significantly enhanced the MRI signal. The image contrast between the peripheral region of the tumor and the non-involved muscle was nearly 50% higher two hours after administration of the nanocomplex. The liposomal nanocomplex increased the amount of Gd ...

  11. Dual energy contrast enhanced breast imaging optimization using contrast to noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Royle, G.; Speller, R.

    2007-03-01

    The properties of dual energy contrast enhanced breast imaging have been analyzed by imaging a 4 cm breast equivalent phantom consisting of adipose and glandular equivalent plastics. This phantom had superimposed another thin plastic which incorporated a 2 mm deep cylinder filled with iodinated contrast media. The iodine projected thicknesses used for this study was 3 mg/cm2. Low and high energy spectra that straddle the iodine K-edge were used. Critical parameters such as the energy spectra and exposure are discussed, along with post processing by means of nonlinear energy dependent function. The dual energy image was evaluated using the relative contrast to noise ratio of a 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm region of the image at the different iodine concentrations incorporating different breast composition with respect to the noniodinated areas. Optimum results were achieved when the low and high-energy images were used in such a way that relative contrast to noise ratio of the iodine with respect to the background tissue was maximum. A figure of merit suggests that higher noise levels can be tolerated at the benefit of lower exposure. Contrast media kinetics of a phantom incorporating a water flow of 20.4 ml/min through the plastic cylinder suggests that time domain imaging could be performed with this approach. The results suggest that optimization of dual energy contrast enhanced mammography has the potential to lead to the development of perfusion digital mammography.

  12. Contrast Improvement in Sub- and Ultraharmonic Ultrasound Contrast Imaging by Combining Several Hammerstein Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Sbeity

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sub- and ultraharmonic (SUH ultrasound contrast imaging is an alternative modality to the second harmonic imaging, since, in specific conditions it could produce high quality echographic images. This modality enables the contrast enhancement of echographic images by using SUH present in the contrast agent response but absent from the nonperfused tissue. For a better access to the components generated by the ultrasound contrast agents, nonlinear techniques based on Hammerstein model are preferred. As the major limitation of Hammerstein model is its capacity of modeling harmonic components only, in this work we propose two methods allowing to model SUH. These new methods use several Hammerstein models to identify contrast agent signals having SUH components and to separate these components from harmonic components. The application of the proposed methods for modeling simulated contrast agent signals shows their efficiency in modeling these signals and in separating SUH components. The achieved gain with respect to the standard Hammerstein model was 26.8 dB and 22.8 dB for the two proposed methods, respectively.

  13. Contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with renal insufficiency undergoing contrast-enhanced MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Ryusuke; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Sugizaki, Ken-ichi; Yoshida, Tamiko; Okazaki, Emi; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Owan, Chojin [Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    To evaluate the safety of contrast-enhanced MDCT in patients with renal impairment. We conducted a retrospective review of 938 patients with stable renal insufficiency (eGFR between 15 and 60 ml/min) who underwent contrast-enhanced MDCT. SCr levels were measured at baseline and 48-72 h after contrast medium administration. The incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in the total study population was assessed. As a control group, 1,164 separate patients with renal insufficiency who did not receive contrast medium for CT were also reviewed. The overall incidence of CIN in the patient population with renal insufficiency was 6.1 %; the incidence was 4.4 %, 10.5 % and 10.0 % for patients whose eGFR was 45-60, 30-45 and {<=}30 ml/min, respectively (P < 0.01). In the control group, 5.8 % of patients showed an increase in the SCr level from the baseline. The increase in the SCr level showed no significant difference between the patients who received CM and those who did not (P = 0.82) The risk of CIN from contrast-enhanced MDCT in patients with renal insufficiency appeared to be low, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of CIN in comparison with patients who did not receive CM. (orig.)

  14. Gricean and Confucian Pragmatics: A Contrastive Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michiel Leezenberg

    2006-01-01

    A contrastive study confronting the influential paradigm of Gricean pragmatics with Confucius' rather less well-known doctrines on language and language usage may explicate the hidden assumptions in both, and suggest new lines of research. Grice' s famous account of conversational implicature not only assumes speaker' s intentions ( that is, private mental states) as basic explanatory notions; it also appears to rely on strong assumptions about speaker' s agency, and about communication as normally or essentially cooperative and power-free. In other words, Grice presumes both methodological individualism and what we may call a social contract view of communication.The Confucian Analects share neither of these assumptions. They attach little importance to the inner, and even less to mental states as explanatory notions. They do not assume individual actors' agency to be given or primitive,authority or power in it: in correcting names, the ruler constitutes the very social realities he is describing, and the social roles (and by extension, the very personalities or subjectivities) of the persons he is naming.When contrasted with the Gricean framework, Confucian pragmatics allows for a more radical questioning of,among others, the role of speaker' s intentions in explaining communication; the relation between literal and figurative usage; and strategies and aims of indirect language usage. The absence of any appeal to the law and to any universal or codified rules of correct language usage in Confucius also opens up new dimensions for the discussion of linguistic normativity. Finally, a contrastive study raises questions about the variable interrelationship between folk theories or language ideologies and linguistic practices.

  15. Obesity is not associated with contrast nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Jaipaul

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Navin Jaipaul1, Rendell Manalo2, Seyed-Ali Sadjadi1, James McMillan11Section of Nephrology, VA Loma Linda Healthcare System, 2Department of Medicine, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA, USABackground: Exposure to radiocontrast media may result in acute kidney injury (AKI or traditionally defined contrast nephropathy (CN, both of which may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of both these variants of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN may involve inflammatory mediators that lead to renal impairment. A link between obesity and inflammation has been clearly established, but whether obesity is independently associated with CIN is unknown.Objective: To determine whether obesity, when stratified by body mass index (BMI, is a risk factor for CIN in a large and hemodynamically stable population of hospitalized United States veterans.Design: Retrospective chart review.Measurements: Presence or absence of AKI or CN after intravenous radiocontrast administration and comparison of patient characteristics between those with versus without AKI or CN.Results: The overall prevalence of AKI and CN was 16.1% and 12.6%, respectively. Patients with AKI or CN were comparable to those without radiocontrast injury, except that affected patients tended to be older and diabetic. When stratified by BMI, obesity was not found to be associated with the development of AKI or CN after exposure to radiocontrast.Conclusion: Obesity does not appear to be an independent risk factor for AKI or CN after exposure to radiocontrast.Keywords: obesity, contrast nephropathy, kidney injury

  16. Directional motion contrast sensitivity in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaghuis, Walter L; Ryan, John F

    2006-10-01

    The present study compared the perception of visual motion in two dyslexia classification schemes; the [Boder, E. (1973). Developmental dyslexia: a diagnostic approach based on three atypical reading-spelling patterns. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 15, 663-687.] dyseidetic, dysphonetic and mixed subgroups and [Williams, M. J., Stuart, G. W., Castles, A., & McAnally, K. I. (2003). Contrast sensitivity in subgroups of developmental dyslexia. Vision Research, 43, 467-477.] surface, phonological and mixed subgroups by measuring the contrast sensitivity for drifting gratings at three spatial frequencies (1.0, 4.0, and 8.0 c/deg) and five drift velocities (0.75, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, and 18.0 cyc/s) in a sample of 32 children with dyslexia and 32 matched normal readers. The findings show that there were no differences in motion direction perception between normal readers and the group with dyslexia when dyslexia was taken as a homogeneous group. Motion direction perception was found to be intact in the dyseidetic and surface dyslexia subgroups and significantly lowered in both mixed dyslexia subgroups. The one inconsistency in the findings was that motion direction perception was significantly lowered in the [Boder, E. (1973). Developmental dyslexia: a diagnostic approach based on three atypical reading-spelling patterns. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 15, 663-687.] dysphonetic subgroup and intact in the [Williams, M. J., Stuart, G. W., Castles, A., & McAnally, K. I. (2003). Contrast sensitivity in subgroups of developmental dyslexia. Vision Research, 43, 467-477.] phonological subgroup. The findings also provide evidence for the presence of a disorder in sequential and temporal order processing that appears to reflect a difficulty in retaining sequences of non-meaningful auditory and visual stimuli in short-term working memory in children with dyslexia.

  17. Contrast-associated Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    Contrast-associated acute kidney injury (CAAKI) is a common iatrogenic condition. The principal risk factors for CAAKI are underlying renal impairment; diabetes in the setting of kidney disease; and intravascular volume depletion, effective or absolute. CAAKI is associated with serious adverse short-term and long-term outcomes, including mortality and more rapidly progressive chronic kidney disease, although the causal nature of these associations remains unproved. Patients with chronic kidney disease and other risk factors for CAAKI who present with acute coronary syndrome should undergo indicated angiographic procedures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Density contrast indicators in cosmological dust models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Filipe C Mena; Reza Tavakol

    2000-10-01

    We discuss ways of quantifying structuration in relativistic cosmological settings, by employing a family of covariant density constrast indicators. We study the evolution of these indicators with time in the context of inhomogeneous Szekeres models. We find that different observers (having either different spatial locations or different indicators) see different evolutions for the density contrast, which may or may not be monotonically increasing with time. We also find that monotonicity seems to be related to the initial conditions of the model, which may be of potential interest in connection with debates regarding gravitational entropy and the arrow of time.

  19. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-10-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting.

  20. Photoacoustic phasoscopy super-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-05-26

    Phasoscopy is a recently proposed concept correlating electromagnetic (EM) absorption and scattering properties based on energy conservation. Phase information can be extracted from EM absorption induced acoustic wave and scattered EM wave for biological tissue characterization. In this paper, an imaging modality, termed photoacoustic phasoscopy imaging (PAPS), is proposed and verified experimentally based on phasoscopy concept with laser illumination. Both endogenous photoacoustic wave and scattered photons are collected simultaneously to extract the phase information. The PAPS images are then reconstructed on vessel-mimicking phantom and ex vivo porcine tissues to show significantly improved contrast than conventional photoacoustic imaging.

  1. Process for preparation of MR contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for the preparation of an MR contrast agent, said process comprising: i) obtaining a solution in a solvent of a hydrogenatable, unsaturated substrate compound and a catalyst for the hydrogenation of said substrate compound; ii) introducing said solution...... in droplet form into a chamber containing hydrogen gas (H2) enriched in para-hydrogen (p-1H2) and/or ortho-deuterium (o-2H2) whereby to hydrogenate said substrate to form a hydrogenated imaging agent; iii) optionally subjecting said hydrogenated imaging agent to a magnetic field having a field strength below...

  2. Acoustic Nonlinear Behaviour of Microbubble Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞金飞; 陆荣荣; 龚秀芬; 石涛

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear characteristics of a microbubble contrast agent Sonazoid R (Nycomed,Norway), including the second, third, 1/2-order, 3/2-order and 5/2-order harmonics. We have measured the 1/2-order subharmonic response to different transmission sound pressures. We have found that subharmonic signals cannot be generated until the acoustic pressure reaches a certain value, which is the most different subharmonic from high harmonics. This result is favourable for the further study of the subharmonic in the bubbly liquid.The 3/2-order ultraharmonic response to acoustic pressure was also measured.

  3. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-01-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting. PMID:3225588

  4. EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1)Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2)Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3)The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is going to be, when we know the record of specific earthquakes and the routes they have followed towards the East. For example, to foresee an earthquake in the Mediterranean region, we take starting point earthquakes to Latin America (0°-40°).The aforementioned elements will reach Italy in an average time period of 49 days and Greece in 53 days. The most reliable preceding phenomenon to determine the epicenter of an earthquake is the rise of the crust's temperature at the area where a large quantity of elements is concentrated, among other phenomena that can be detected either by instruments or by our senses. When there is an active volcano along the route between the area where the "starting-point" earthquake occurred and the area where we expect the same elements to cause a new earthquake, it is possible these elements will escape through the volcano's crater, carrying lava with them. We could contribute to that end, nullifying earthquakes that might be triggered by these elements further to the east, by using manmade resources, like adequate quantities of explosives at the right moment.

  5. Training users to counteract phishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhorn, Christopher B; Nyeste, Patrick G

    2012-01-01

    Phishing is an increasingly more prevalent form of online, social engineered scams that escalate costs and risks to society year to year. This study demonstrates an association between anti-phishing training techniques used in previous research and individual differences which could affect phishing susceptibility. Results indicated that anti-phishing training in both a simple comic and more complex video game form is helpful in decreasing phishing susceptibility as measured by Miss rates for all individuals including college aged and computer savvy participants. Based on the results of the present study, implications for future efforts to combat phishing are discussed.

  6. Ultrasonido con contraste de masas hepáticas Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in hepatic masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Yu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El ultrasonido (US con contraste constituye una poderosa herramienta diagnóstica en la caracterización de masas hepáticas. Las modernas técnicas de ultrasonido con contraste presentan alta sensibilidad con dosis bajas de contraste, lo que juntamente con la técnica de supresión de ecos resulta en imágenes de muy alta resolución temporal y espacial, propiciando el resurgimiento de la ultrasonografía en la era de la tomografía computada (TC y de la resonancia magnética (RM. El agente de contraste utilizado es muy seguro, sin efectos de nefrotoxicidad y apropiado para pacientes con función renal disminuida. La posibilidad de utilizar múltiples inyecciones de micro burbujas y de realizar observaciones reiteradas de patrones de vascularización de las masas hepáticas, la convierten en una herramienta diagnóstica segura y confiable en la resolución de lesiones hepáticas indeterminadas previo a la TC y RM. En este artículo describimos los principios básicos del US con contraste, consideraciones prácticas en la realización de los estudios, debilidades y fortalezas del método en comparación con la TC y RM y patrones de vascularización en las cinco masas hepáticas más comunes: hemangioma, hiperplasia nodular focal, adenoma, carcinoma hepatocelular y metástasis.Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS is a powerful tool in the characterization of various liver masses. Modern techniques of contrast ultrasonography are highly sensitive to minute doses of the contrast agent and with the suppression of background tissue echoes result in images with very high contrast resolution. Added to this advantage are the high temporal and spatial resolution intrinsic to sonography in general, which have resulted in a robust resurgence of sonography in this era of CT and MRI. The excellent safety profile of the contrast agent with no nephrotoxicity allows for multiple injections of microbubble in deciphering the vascular structure and enhancement

  7. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  8. Contrast Enhancement through Clustered Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Chuan Tai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed a contrast enhancement algorithm. Some methods enhance images depending on only the global or the local information, therefore it would cause over-enhancement usually and make the image look unnatural. The proposed method enhances image based on the global and local information. For the global part, we proposed mapping curves to find the new average, maximum and minimum intensity to try to suit the concept of Human Visual System (HVS for obtaining the better perceptual results. For the local part, we utilized fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm to group image and we can obtain the information of intensity distribution and pixel number from each group. Then we calculate weights according to the information and enhance images by Histogram Equalization (HE depending on the weights. The experiment results show that our method can enhance the contrast of image steadily and it causes over-enhancement with lower probability than other methods. The whole image not only looks natural but also shows detail texture more clearly after applying our method.

  9. The Contrast Theory of negative input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, M

    1997-02-01

    Beliefs about whether or not children receive corrective input for grammatical errors depend crucially on how one defines the concept of correction. Arguably, previous conceptualizations do not provide a viable basis for empirical research (Gold, 1967; Brown & Hanlon, 1970; Hirsh-Pasek, Treiman & Schneiderman, 1984). Within the Contrast Theory of negative input, an alternative definition of negative evidence is offered, based on the idea that the unique discourse structure created in the juxtaposition of child error and adult correct form can reveal to the child the contrast, or conflict, between the two forms, and hence provide a basis for rejecting the erroneous form. A within-subjects experimental design was implemented for 36 children (mean age 5;0), in order to compare the immediate effects of negative evidence with those of positive input, on the acquisition of six novel irregular past tense forms. Children reproduced the correct irregular model more often, and persisted with fewer errors, following negative evidence rather than positive input.

  10. Seeing the unseen with localized optical contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    Optical wide-field imaging of sub-diffraction limit nanostructures is of interest in a wide array of applications. In applications where the nanostructures to be visualized are well isolated, a high enough optical contrast is sufficient to detect these. Here we demonstrate a technique to visualize nanoscale features, such as grain boundaries in Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) single layer graphene, which are just a few atom length defects, using regular bright field optical microscopy. This remarkably low lateral length scale was imaged using of a special thin film structure consisting of a water-soluble thin film layer deposited on a metal substrate, which produces a strong color change as a function of the film thickness. Small local water transport differences in the graphene layer result in thickness variation of the underlying thin film due to its solubility in water and produces color contrast readily observable under a normal brightfield optical microscope with the naked eye. We demonstrate the use of this technique for direct optical visualization of grain boundaries in graphene as wide as 2-5 nm and sub-100 nm photoresist lines. By using super-resolution image processing algorithms, we may be able to detect structure even smaller in size than currently achieved. We believe that this technique can be extended to single molecule detection.

  11. Photoacoustic cell for ultrasound contrast agent characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2010-10-01

    Photoacoustics has emerged as a tool for the study of liquid gel suspension behavior and has been recently employed in a number of new biomedical applications. In this paper, a photoacoustic sensor is presented which was designed and realized for analyzing photothermal signals from solutions filled with microbubbles, commonly used as ultrasound contrast agents in echographic imaging techniques. It is a closed cell device, where photothermal volume variation of an aqueous solution produces the periodic deflection of a thin membrane closing the cell at the end of a short pipe. The cell then acts as a Helmholtz resonator, where the displacement of the membrane is measured through a laser probe interferometer, whereas photoacoustic signal is generated by a laser chopped light beam impinging onto the solution through a glass window. Particularly, the microbubble shell has been modeled through an effective surface tension parameter, which has been then evaluated from experimental data through the shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor. This shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor caused by microbubble solutions is high enough for making such a cell a reliable tool for testing ultrasound contrast agent, particularly for bubble shell characterization.

  12. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  13. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D. [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Biophysics Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liba, Orly [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zerda, Adam de la [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Biophysics Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects.

  14. Intensity contrast of the average supergranule

    CERN Document Server

    Langfellner, J; Gizon, L

    2016-01-01

    While the velocity fluctuations of supergranulation dominate the spectrum of solar convection at the solar surface, very little is known about the fluctuations in other physical quantities like temperature or density at supergranulation scale. Using SDO/HMI observations, we characterize the intensity contrast of solar supergranulation at the solar surface. We identify the positions of ${\\sim}10^4$ outflow and inflow regions at supergranulation scales, from which we construct average flow maps and co-aligned intensity and magnetic field maps. In the average outflow center, the maximum intensity contrast is $(7.8\\pm0.6)\\times10^{-4}$ (there is no corresponding feature in the line-of-sight magnetic field). This corresponds to a temperature perturbation of about $1.1\\pm0.1$ K, in agreement with previous studies. We discover an east-west anisotropy, with a slightly deeper intensity minimum east of the outflow center. The evolution is asymmetric in time: the intensity excess is larger 8 hours before the reference t...

  15. Synthesis of Laboratory Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaemin Oh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs were developed to maximize reflection contrast so that organs can be seen clearly in ultrasound imaging. UCAs increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR by linear and non-linear mechanisms and thus help more accurately visualize the internal organs and blood vessels. However, the UCAs on the market are not only expensive, but are also not optimized for use in various therapeutic research applications such as ultrasound-aided drug delivery. The UCAs fabricated in this study utilize conventional lipid and albumin for shell formation and perfluorobutane as the internal gas. The shape and density of the UCA bubbles were verified by optical microscopy and Cryo SEM, and compared to those of the commercially available UCAs, Definity® and Sonovue®. The size distribution and characteristics of the reflected signal were also analyzed using a particle size analyzer and ultrasound imaging equipment. Our experiments indicate that UCAs composed of spherical microbubbles, the majority of which were smaller than 1 um, were successfully synthesized. Microbubbles 10 um or larger were also identified when different shell characteristics and filters were used. These laboratory UCAs can be used for research in both diagnoses and therapies.

  16. Microlesions induced by microcavitation during contrast echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Douglas; Li, Peng; Gordon, David; Armstrong, William

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to search for histologically identifiable lesions associated with myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in rats. Diagnostic ultrasound scans with 1:4 end-systolic triggering provided a short-axis view of the left ventricle in rats at 1.5 MHz with 1.45-μs pulses of 1.7 Mechanical Index. Two relatively high doses (500 μl/kg) of OptisonTM ultrasound contrast agent were given 5 min apart during 10 min of MCE. One day after scanning, rats were sacrificed and the hearts fixed for histology. Slides were scored blind by a pathologist, and photomicrographs in the anterior half of the heart sections were characterized by digital image analysis. Microlesions identified by inflammatory infiltrates were scattered primarily over the anterior half of the sections. Pathologically, there was inflammatory cell infiltration in areas of 0.6+/-0.5% of the sections for shams and 3.6+/-3.6% for MCE (P<0.01). Analysis of the photographs from the anterior wall found microlesion areas of 0.5+/-0.8% for shams and 7.4+/-5.0% for MCE (P<0.02). Diagnostic MCE at high Mechanical Index has a potential for causing microscale lesions in the myocardium by nucleation of microcavitation. [Work supported by NIH Grant EB0338.

  17. Osteoblastic Metastases Mimickers on Contrast Enhanced CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Al-Lhedan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary osseous involvement in lymphoma is more common compared to primary bone lymphoma. The finding of osseous lesion can be incidentally discovered during the course of the disease. However, osseous metastases are infrequently silent. Detection of osseous metastases is crucial for accurate staging and optimal treatment planning of lymphoma. The aim of imaging is to identify the presence and extent of osseous disease and to assess for possible complications such as pathological fracture of the load-bearing bones and cord compression if the lesion is spinal. We are presenting two patients with treated lymphoma who were in complete remission. On routine follow-up contrast enhanced CT, there were new osteoblastic lesions in the spine worrisome for metastases. Additional studies were performed for further evaluation of both of them which did not demonstrate any corresponding suspicious osseous lesion. The patients have a prior history of chronic venous occlusive thrombosis that resulted in collaterals formation. Contrast enhancement of the vertebral body marrow secondary to collaterals formation and venous flow through the vertebral venous plexus can mimic the appearance of spinal osteoblastic metastases.

  18. Population genetic structure in Myrtus communis L. in a chronically fragmented landscape in the Mediterranean: can gene flow counteract habitat perturbation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, R G; Carrillo, L F; Aparicio, A; Fernández-Manjarrés, J F; González-Varo, J P

    2009-05-01

    Ancient managed landscapes provide ideal opportunities to assess the consequences of habitat fragmentation on the patterns of genetic diversity and gene flow in long-lived plant species. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and allozyme markers, we quantified seed-mediated gene flow and population genetic diversity and structure in 14 populations of Myrtus communis (myrtle), a common endozoochorous shrub species of forest patches in lowland agricultural Mediterranean areas. Overall, allozyme diversity for myrtle was low (P(95) = 25%; A = 1.411; H(e) = 0.085) compared to other known populations, and a significant portion of populations (57%) had lower levels of allelic diversity and/or heterozygosity than expected at random, as shown by simulated resampling of the whole diversity of the landscape. We found significant correlations between allozyme variability and population size and patch isolation, but no significant inbreeding in any population. Genetic differentiation among populations for both allozyme and AFLP markers was significant (Phi(ST) = 0.144 and Phi(ST) = 0.142, respectively) but an isolation-by-distance pattern was not detected. Assignment tests on AFLP data indicated a high immigration rate in the populations (ca. 20-22%), likely through effective seed dispersal across the landscape by birds and mammals. Our results suggest that genetic isolation is not the automatic outcome of habitat destruction since substantial levels of seed-mediated gene flow are currently detectable. However, even moderate rates of gene flow seem insufficient in this long-lived species to counteract the genetic erosion and differentiation imposed by chronic habitat destruction.

  19. A comparison of the potency of newly developed oximes (K074, K075) and commonly used oximes (obidoxime, HI-6) to counteract tabun-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Jiri; Karasova, Jana

    2007-01-05

    The neuroprotective effects of newly developed oximes (K074, K075) and currently available oximes (obidoxime, HI-6) in combination with atropine in rats poisoned with tabun at a sublethal dose (180 micro g/kg i.m.; 80% LD(50)) were studied. The tabun-induced neurotoxicity was monitored using a functional observational battery and an automatic measurement of motor activity. The neurotoxicity of tabun was monitored at 24h and 7 days following tabun challenge. The results indicate that all oximes studied in combination with atropine allow all tabun-poisoned rats to survive within 7 days following tabun challenge while two non-treated tabun-poisoned rats died within 2h. Both newly developed oximes combined with atropine seem to be effective antidotes for a decrease in tabun-induced neurotoxicity in the case of sublethal poisoning although they are not able to eliminate tabun-induced neurotoxicity completely. The oxime K075 showed a higher neuroprotective efficacy against tabun than K074 according to the number of eliminated tabun-induced neurotoxic signs at 24h as well as 7 days after tabun challenge. The neuroprotective efficacy of obidoxime in combination with atropine is similar to the potency of newly developed oxime K075 but the ability of the oxime HI-6 to counteract tabun-induced acute neurotoxicity is significantly lower at 24h as well as 7 days after tabun poisoning. Due to their neuroprotective effects, both newly developed oximes (especially K075) appear to be more suitable oximes for the antidotal treatment of acute tabun poisonings than the oxime HI-6.

  20. Modulation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Counteracts Apoptotic Cell Death and Fibrosis in a Mouse Model for Secondary Biliary Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paridaens, Annelies; Raevens, Sarah; Devisscher, Lindsey; Bogaerts, Eliene; Verhelst, Xavier; Hoorens, Anne; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; van Grunsven, Leo A; Geerts, Anja; Colle, Isabelle

    2017-01-20

    The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cholestatic liver disease and fibrosis is not fully unraveled. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, has been shown to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and counteract apoptosis in different pathologies. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of TUDCA in experimental secondary biliary liver fibrosis in mice, induced by common bile duct ligation. The kinetics of the hepatic UPR and apoptosis during the development of biliary fibrosis was studied by measuring markers at six different timepoints post-surgery by qPCR and Western blot. Next, we investigated the therapeutic potential of TUDCA, 10 mg/kg/day in drinking water, on liver damage (AST/ALT levels) and fibrosis (Sirius red-staining), in both a preventive and therapeutic setting. Common bile duct ligation resulted in the increased protein expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) at all timepoints, along with upregulation of pro-apoptotic caspase 3 and 12, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRsf1a) and Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) expression. Treatment with TUDCA led to a significant reduction of liver fibrosis, accompanied by a slight reduction of liver damage, decreased hepatic protein expression of CHOP and reduced gene and protein expression of pro-apoptotic markers. These data indicate that TUDCA exerts a beneficial effect on liver fibrosis in a model of cholestatic liver disease, and suggest that this effect might, at least in part, be attributed to decreased hepatic UPR signaling and apoptotic cell death.

  1. Vitamin K supplementation increases vitamin K tissue levels but fails to counteract ectopic calcification in a mouse model for pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgels, Theo G M F; Waarsing, Jan H; Herfs, Marjolein; Versteeg, Daniëlle; Schoensiegel, Frank; Sato, Toshiro; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Ivandic, Boris; Vermeer, Cees; Schurgers, Leon J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2011-11-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which calcification of connective tissue leads to pathology in skin, eye and blood vessels. PXE is caused by mutations in ABCC6. High expression of this transporter in the basolateral hepatocyte membrane suggests that it secretes an as-yet elusive factor into the circulation which prevents ectopic calcification. Utilizing our Abcc6 (-/-) mouse model for PXE, we tested the hypothesis that this factor is vitamin K (precursor) (Borst et al. 2008, Cell Cycle). For 3 months, Abcc6 (-/-) and wild-type mice were put on diets containing either the minimum dose of vitamin K required for normal blood coagulation or a dose that was 100 times higher. Vitamin K was supplied as menaquinone-7 (MK-7). Ectopic calcification was monitored in vivo by monthly micro-CT scans of the snout, as the PXE mouse model develops a characteristic connective tissue mineralization at the base of the whiskers. In addition, calcification of kidney arteries was measured by histology. Results show that supplemental MK-7 had no effect on ectopic calcification in Abcc6 ( -/- ) mice. MK-7 supplementation increased vitamin K levels (in skin, heart and brain) in wild-type and in Abcc6 (-/-) mice. Vitamin K tissue levels did not depend on Abcc6 genotype. In conclusion, dietary MK-7 supplementation increased vitamin K tissue levels in the PXE mouse model but failed to counteract ectopic calcification. Hence, we obtained no support for the hypothesis that Abcc6 transports vitamin K and that PXE can be cured by increasing tissue levels of vitamin K.

  2. Targeting of Proteoglycan Synthesis Pathway: A New Strategy to Counteract Excessive Matrix Proteoglycan Deposition and Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced Fibrotic Phenotype in Lung Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Irfan; Barré, Lydia; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Li, Dong; Jaquinet, Jean-Claude; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and deposition plays an important role in the pathophysiology of fibrosis and is an early and dominant feature of pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a major cytokine associated with fibrosis that induces excessive synthesis of matrix proteins, particularly PGs. Owing to the importance of PGs in matrix assembly and in mediating cytokine and growth factor signaling, a strategy based on the inhibition of PG synthesis may prevent excessive matrix PG deposition and attenuates profibrotic effects of TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts. Here, we showed that 4-MU4-deoxy-β-D-xylopyranoside, a competitive inhibitor of β4-galactosyltransferase7, inhibited PG synthesis and secretion in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing the level of both chondroitin/dermatan- and heparin-sulfate PG in primary lung fibroblasts. Importantly, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside was able to counteract TGF-β1-induced synthesis of PGs, activation of fibroblast proliferation and fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation. Mechanistically, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside treatment inhibited TGF-β1-induced activation of canonical Smads2/3 signaling pathway in lung primary fibroblasts. The knockdown of β4-galactosyltransferase7 mimicked 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside effects, indicating selective inhibition of β4-galactosyltransferase7 by this compound. Collectively, this study reveals the anti-fibrotic activity of 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside and indicates that inhibition of PG synthesis represents a novel strategy for the treatment of lung fibrosis.

  3. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  4. Counteracting negative venous line pressures to avoid arterial air bubbles: an experimental study comparing two different types of miniaturized extracorporeal perfusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Anas; Mederos-Dahms, Hendrikje; Liebing, Kai; Zittermann, Armin; Schubert, Harald; Murray, Edward; Renner, Andre; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-05-29

    Because of its low rate of clinical complications, miniaturized extracorporeal perfusion systems (MEPS) are frequently used in heart centers worldwide. However, many recent studies refer to the higher probability of gaseous microemboli formation by MEPS, caused by subzero pressure values. This is the main reason why various de-airing devices were developed for today's perfusion systems. In the present study, we investigated the potential benefits of a simple one-way-valve connected to a volume replacement reservoir (OVR) for volume and pressure compensation. In an experimental study on 26 pigs, we compared MEPS (n = 13) with MEPS plus OVR (n = 13). Except OVR, perfusion equipment was identical in both groups. Primary endpoints were pressure values in the venous line and the right atrium as well as the number and volume of air bubbles. Secondary endpoints were biochemical parameters of systemic inflammatory response, ischemia, hemodilution and hemolysis. One animal was lost in the MEPS + OVR group. In the MEPS + OVR group no pressure values below -150 mmHg in the venous line and no values under -100 mmHg in right atrium were noticed. On the contrary, nearly 20% of venous pressure values in the MEPS group were below -150 and approximately 10% of right atrial pressure values were below -100 mmHg. Compared with the MEPS group, the bubble counter device showed lower numbers of arterial air bubbles in the MEPS + OVR group (mean ± SD: 13444 ± 5709 vs. 1 ± 2, respectively; p system with a volume replacement reservoir is able to counteract excessive negative venous line pressures and to reduce the number and volume of arterial air bubbles. This approach may lead to a lower rate of neurological complications.

  5. Histamine H3 receptor activation counteracts adenosine A2A receptor-mediated enhancement of depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA release from rat globus pallidus synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Figueroa, Guadalupe-Elide; Márquez-Gómez, Ricardo; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2014-08-20

    High levels of histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are found in the globus pallidus (GP), a neuronal nucleus in the basal ganglia involved in the control of motor behavior. By using rat GP isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we studied whether H3R activation modified the previously reported enhancing action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation on depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release. At 3 and 10 nM, the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 enhanced [(3)H]-GABA release induced by high K(+) (20 mM) and the effect of 3 nM CGS-21680 was prevented by the A2AR antagonist ZM-241385 (100 nM). The presence of presynaptic H3Rs was confirmed by the specific binding of N-α-[methyl-(3)H]-histamine to membranes from GP synaptosomes (maximum binding, Bmax, 1327 ± 79 fmol/mg protein; dissociation constant, Kd, 0.74 nM), which was inhibited by the H3R ligands immepip, clobenpropit, and A-331440 (inhibition constants, Ki, 0.28, 8.53, and 316 nM, respectively). Perfusion of synaptosomes with the H3R agonist immepip (100 nM) had no effect on K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release, but inhibited the stimulatory action of A2AR activation. In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist clobenpropit, which had no significant effect of its own on K(+)-induced [(3)H]-GABA release. These data indicate that H3R activation selectively counteracts the facilitatory action of A2AR stimulation on GABA release from striato-pallidal projections.

  6. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eRivera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10% or sucrose liquid diets for two weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+ and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU+ in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ, subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3±1.1 g/kg/day after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133 exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence.

  7. Modeling reduction of the Urban Heat Island effect to counter-act the effects of climate change in densely built-up areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Konrad; Zuvela-Aloise, Maja; Lettmayer, Gudrun; Schwaiger, Hannes Peter; Kaltenegger, Ingrid; Bird, David Neil; Woess-Gallasch, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of Urban Heat Islands (UHIs) observed in cities, caused by changes in energy balance due to the structural development of the city as well as by sealed surfaces and a lack of vegetation, is expected to strengthen in the future and will further contribute to heat stress, creating an increased need for energy for cooling and ventilation as well as lowering human comfort. Due to a changing climate, rising heat stress, pronounced by an increased intensity or frequency of heat waves, could have far reaching implications for major Austrian cities in the near future. Simultaneous to this expected increasing of the already existing UHI-effect, it is observable, that continuous densification of the core parts of cities is being intensified through implemented traditional urban planning measures. This is particular relevant for high densely populated districts of the city. Several possible counteractions how to address this challenge are already known, partly investigated in urban modeling studies on the effects of modifying the reflective properties of buildings and urban areas for the city of Vienna. On this experience, within the Austrian FFG and KLIEN Smart Cities project JACKY COOL CHECK (Project Nr. 855554), a wide set of measures to reduce heat stress, consisting of e.g. unsealed surfaces, green areas, green roofs, improve reflective properties of different surfaces etc., for the densely built-up residential and business district of Jakomini in the city of Graz/Styria is investigated, to gain decisive data pointing out the peculiarities of UHIs and the potential cooling effects of these target measures for this local specific area. These results serving as a basis for the selection of sustainable measures that will be implemented, in coordination with local stakeholders and considering their interests.

  8. Aquaphilus dolomiae extract counteracts the effects of cutaneous S. aureus secretome isolated from atopic children on CD4(+) T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hélène; Laborel-Préneron, Emeline; Fraysse, Frédérique; Nguyen, Thien; Schmitt, Anne-Marie; Redoulès, Daniel; Davrinche, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Skin microbiota takes part in the control of cutaneous inflammation. In skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD) cutaneous dysbiosis and the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease. New therapeutic approaches consist in topical application of natural products able to counteract S. aureus effects through activation of resident immune cells producing anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. This study investigates the potential immunosuppressive properties of Aquaphilus dolomiae (Neisseriaceae), a flagellated bacterium contained in Avène Thermal Spring Water used in hydrotherapy treatments of AD patients. An aqueous protein extract of Aquaphilus dolomiae (ADE, 60 μg/mL) was added to human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) for 24 h. Expression of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD83 was evaluated by flow cytometry and released cytokines (IL-10, IL-12) by cytometry bead array assay. The proliferation of allogeneic CFSE-labelled CD4(+ )T cells stimulated with ADE-conditioned moDC and S. aureus secretome was analysed by flow cytometry. MoDC exposed to ADE expressed lower levels of HLA-DR and CD86 than untreated cells, no CD83 and secreted barely detectable IL-12 but high amounts of IL-10 (N = 12, p S. aureus secretome on CD4(+ )T cells was reduced (p S. aureus secretome on CD4(+)T cells. Owing to the role of S. aureus colonization in driving inflammation in AD the immunosuppressive property of the ADE might be useful to reduce disease severity.

  9. High-fat diet reduces the formation of butyrate, but increases succinate, inflammation, liver fat and cholesterol in rats, while dietary fibre counteracts these effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Jakobsdottir

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Obesity is linked to type 2 diabetes and risk factors associated to the metabolic syndrome. Consumption of dietary fibres has been shown to have positive metabolic health effects, such as by increasing satiety, lowering blood glucose and cholesterol levels. These effects may be associated with short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, particularly propionic and butyric acids, formed by microbial degradation of dietary fibres in colon, and by their capacity to reduce low-grade inflammation. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether dietary fibres, giving rise to different SCFAs, would affect metabolic risk markers in low-fat and high-fat diets using a model with conventional rats for 2, 4 and 6 weeks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional rats were administered low-fat or high-fat diets, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks, supplemented with fermentable dietary fibres, giving rise to different SCFA patterns (pectin - acetic acid; guar gum - propionic acid; or a mixture - butyric acid. At the end of each experimental period, liver fat, cholesterol and triglycerides, serum and caecal SCFAs, plasma cholesterol, and inflammatory cytokines were analysed. The caecal microbiota was analysed after 6 weeks. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Fermentable dietary fibre decreased weight gain, liver fat, cholesterol and triglyceride content, and changed the formation of SCFAs. The high-fat diet primarily reduced formation of SCFAs but, after a longer experimental period, the formation of propionic and acetic acids recovered. The concentration of succinic acid in the rats increased in high-fat diets with time, indicating harmful effect of high-fat consumption. The dietary fibre partly counteracted these harmful effects and reduced inflammation. Furthermore, the number of Bacteroides was higher with guar gum, while noticeably that of Akkermansia was highest with the fibre-free diet.

  10. A eukaryotic-acquired gene by a biotrophic phytopathogen allows prolonged survival on the host by counteracting the shut-down of plant photosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Garavaglia, Betiana S.

    2010-01-28

    Xanthomonas citri pv. citri, the bacteria responsible for citrus canker posses a biological active plant natriuretic peptide (PNP)-like protein, not present in any other bacteria. PNPs are a class of extracellular, systemically mobile peptides that elicit a number of plant responses important in homeostasis and growth. Previously, we showed that a Xanthomonas citri pv. citri mutant lacking the PNP-like protein XacPNP produced more necrotic lesions in citrus leaves than wild type infections and suggested a role for XacPNP in the regulation of host homeostasis. Here we have analyzed the proteome modifications observed in citrus leaves infected with the wild type and XacPNP deletion mutant bacteria. While both of them cause downregulation of enzymes related to photosynthesis as well as chloroplastic ribosomal proteins, proteins related to defense responses are up-regulated. However, leaves infiltrated with the XacPNP deletion mutant show a more pronounced decrease in photosynthetic proteins while no reduction in defense related proteins as compared to the wild-type pathogen. This suggests that XacPNP serves the pathogen to maintain host photosynthetic efficiency during pathogenesis. The results from the proteomics analyses are consistent with our chlorophyll fluorescence data and transcript analyses of defense genes that show a more marked reduction in photosynthesis in the mutant but no difference in the induction of genes diagnostic for biotic-stress responses. We therefore conclude that XacPNP counteracts the shut-down of host photosynthesis during infection and in that way maintains the tissue in better conditions, suggesting that the pathogen has adapted a host gene to modify its natural host and render it a better reservoir for prolonged bacterial survival and thus for further colonization. 2010 Garavaglia et al.

  11. Targeting of Proteoglycan Synthesis Pathway: A New Strategy to Counteract Excessive Matrix Proteoglycan Deposition and Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced Fibrotic Phenotype in Lung Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Irfan; Barré, Lydia; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Li, Dong; Jaquinet, Jean-Claude; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and deposition plays an important role in the pathophysiology of fibrosis and is an early and dominant feature of pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a major cytokine associated with fibrosis that induces excessive synthesis of matrix proteins, particularly PGs. Owing to the importance of PGs in matrix assembly and in mediating cytokine and growth factor signaling, a strategy based on the inhibition of PG synthesis may prevent excessive matrix PG deposition and attenuates profibrotic effects of TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts. Here, we showed that 4-MU4-deoxy-β-D-xylopyranoside, a competitive inhibitor of β4-galactosyltransferase7, inhibited PG synthesis and secretion in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing the level of both chondroitin/dermatan- and heparin-sulfate PG in primary lung fibroblasts. Importantly, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside was able to counteract TGF-β1-induced synthesis of PGs, activation of fibroblast proliferation and fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation. Mechanistically, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside treatment inhibited TGF-β1-induced activation of canonical Smads2/3 signaling pathway in lung primary fibroblasts. The knockdown of β4-galactosyltransferase7 mimicked 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside effects, indicating selective inhibition of β4-galactosyltransferase7 by this compound. Collectively, this study reveals the anti-fibrotic activity of 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside and indicates that inhibition of PG synthesis represents a novel strategy for the treatment of lung fibrosis. PMID:26751072

  12. The angiotensin-(1-7/Mas axis counteracts angiotensin II-dependent and –independent pro-inflammatory signaling in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Villalobos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Targeting inflammation is nowadays considered as a challenging pharmacological strategy to prevent or delay the development of vascular diseases. Angiotensin-(1-7 is a member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS that binds Mas receptors and has gained growing attention in the last years as a regulator of vascular homeostasis. Here, we explored the capacity of Ang-(1-7 to counteract human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC inflammation triggered by RAS-dependent and –independent stimuli, such as Ang II or interleukin (IL-1.Methods and Results: In cultured HASMC, the expression of iNOS and the release of nitric oxide were stimulated by both Ang II and IL-1, as determined by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence or the Griess method, respectively. iNOS induction was inhibited by Ang-(1-7 in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was equally blocked by two different Mas receptor antagonists, A779 and D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7, suggesting the participation of a unique Mas receptor subtype. Using pharmacological inhibitors, the induction of iNOS was proven to rely on the consecutive upstream activation of NADPH oxidase and NF-B. Indeed, Ang-(1-7 markedly inhibited the activation of the NADPH oxidase and subsequently of NF-B, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminiscence and electromobility shift assay, respectively.Conclusion: Ang-(1-7 can act as a counter-regulator of the inflammation of vascular smooth muscle cells triggered by Ang II, but also by other stimuli beyond the RAS. Activating or mimicking the Ang-(1-7/Mas axis may represent a pharmacological opportunity to attenuate the pro-inflammatory environment that promotes and sustains the development of vascular diseases.

  13. The Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas Axis Counteracts Angiotensin II-Dependent and -Independent Pro-inflammatory Signaling in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Laura A; San Hipólito-Luengo, Álvaro; Ramos-González, Mariella; Cercas, Elena; Vallejo, Susana; Romero, Alejandra; Romacho, Tania; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Peiró, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Targeting inflammation is nowadays considered as a challenging pharmacological strategy to prevent or delay the development of vascular diseases. Angiotensin-(1-7) is a member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) that binds Mas receptors and has gained growing attention in the last years as a regulator of vascular homeostasis. Here, we explored the capacity of Ang-(1-7) to counteract human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) inflammation triggered by RAS-dependent and -independent stimuli, such as Ang II or interleukin (IL)-1β. Methods and Results: In cultured HASMC, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of nitric oxide were stimulated by both Ang II and IL-1β, as determined by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence or the Griess method, respectively. iNOS induction was inhibited by Ang-(1-7) in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was equally blocked by two different Mas receptor antagonists, A779 and D-Pro(7)-Ang-(1-7), suggesting the participation of a unique Mas receptor subtype. Using pharmacological inhibitors, the induction of iNOS was proven to rely on the consecutive upstream activation of NADPH oxidase and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Indeed, Ang-(1-7) markedly inhibited the activation of the NADPH oxidase and subsequently of NF-κB, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence and electromobility shift assay, respectively. Conclusion: Ang-(1-7) can act as a counter-regulator of the inflammation of vascular smooth muscle cells triggered by Ang II, but also by other stimuli beyond the RAS. Activating or mimicking the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis may represent a pharmacological opportunity to attenuate the pro-inflammatory environment that promotes and sustains the development of vascular diseases.

  14. Contrast enhanced cartilage imaging: Comparison of ionic and non-ionic contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: ewiener@roe.med.tu-muenchen.de; Woertler, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Institute of Pathology, Technical University Munich, Troger Str. 18, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Settles, Marcus [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Our objective was to compare relaxation effects, dynamics and spatial distributions of ionic and non-ionic contrast agents in articular cartilage at concentrations typically used for direct MR arthrography at 1.5 T. Dynamic MR-studies over 11 h were performed in 15 bovine patella specimens. For each of the contrast agents gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, gadoteridol and mangafodipir trinatrium three patellae were placed in 2.5 mmol/L contrast solution. Simultaneous measurements of T {sub 1} and T {sub 2} were performed every 30 min using a high-spatial-resolution 'MIX'-sequence. T {sub 1}, T {sub 2} and {delta}R {sub 1}, {delta}R {sub 2} profile plots across cartilage thickness were calculated to demonstrate the spatial and temporal distributions. The charge is one of the main factors which controls the amount of the contrast media diffusing into intact cartilage, but independent of the charge, the spatial distribution across cartilage thickness remains highly inhomogeneous even after 11 h of diffusion. The absolute {delta}R {sub 2}-effect in cartilage is at least as large as the {delta}R {sub 1}-effect for all contrast agents. Maximum changes were 5-12 s{sup -1} for {delta}R {sub 1} and 8-15 s{sup -1} for {delta}R {sub 2}. This study indicates that for morphologically intact cartilage only the amount of contrast agents within cartilage is determined by the charge but not the spatial distribution across cartilage thickness. In addition, {delta}R {sub 2} can be considered for quantification of contrast agent concentrations, since it is of the same magnitude and less time consuming to measure than {delta}R {sub 1}.

  15. A comparison of the potency of newly developed oximes (K074, K075) and currently available oximes (obidoxime, trimedoxime, HI-6) to counteract acute toxic effects of tabun and cyclosarin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Jirí; Humlicek, Vojtech

    2008-01-01

    The potency of newly developed oximes (K074, K075) and commonly used oximes (obidoxime, trimedoxime, and HI-6) to counteract tabun or cyclosarin-induced acute toxic effects was studied in mice. The therapeutic efficacy of trimedoxime and both newly developed oximes (K074, K075) was significantly higher than the potency of obidoxime and the oxime HI-6 in the case of acute tabun poisonings. On the other hand, the oxime HI-6 was significantly more efficacious than other studied oximes when mice were intoxicated with cyclosarin. The findings support the hypothesis that the therapeutic efficacy of oximes depends on the type of nerve agent. Due to their therapeutic efficacy, both newly developed K oximes can be considered to be promising oximes for the antidotal treatment of acute tabun poisonings, while the oxime HI-6 is still the most promising oxime for the treatment of acute cyclosarin poisonings due to its high potency to counteract cyclosarin-induced acute toxic effects.

  16. Papers and Studies in Contrastive Linguistics. Volume Eighteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisiak, Jacek, Ed.; Drozdzial, Krystyna, Ed.

    A collection of 14 papers in contrastive linguistics includes: "Some Comments on Language Data in Contrastive Analysis" (Ruta Nagucka); "Contrastive Sociolinguistics Reconsidered" (Karol Janicki); "Variations in Polish Nasal /e/: A Contribution to the Development of Contrastive Sociolinguistic Methodology" (Jane Johnson); "Languages in Contact and…

  17. Examination of patient factors and contrast medium factors that exert influence on contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Isao; Morimoto, Akira; Shouga, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Noriyuki [Kure Kyosai Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between patient factors and contrast medium factors, both of which influence contrast enhancement. Our goal was to achieve improved standardization and reproducibility of enhancement based on the findings of this study. Enhancement units (EU) and the contrast enhancement index (CE index) were calculated in the areas of the hepatic parenchyma and abdominal aorta in 370 subjects who underwent our hepatic dynamic study. We analyzed the obtained values in terms of differences in age, sex, body weight, iodine volume per body weight, and volume and concentration of contrast medium. Changes in EU values were dependent on total iodine volume and body weight, showing a positive correlation with iodine volume per body weight. When assessed in terms of fixed total volume, the values were found to show a negative correlation with body weight. The obtained CE index values were closely distributed on a fixed iodine volume per weight, with slight variations that were related to sex, body weight, and age. Particularly, in the analysis of changes in enhancement levels according to age, a notable increase in contrast enhancement in inverse relationship with decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with aging was observed. (author)

  18. Functional imaging with MR T1 contrast: a feasibility study with blood-pool contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majos, Agata; Stefanczyk, Ludomir [Medical University of Lodz, Radiology Department, Lodz (Poland); Bogorodzki, Piotr; Piatkowska-Janko, Ewa; Kurjata, Robert [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw (Poland); Wolak, Tomasz [Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this study was to prove the concept of using a long intravenous half-life blood-pool T1 contrast agent as a new functional imaging method. For each of ten healthy subjects, two dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) protocols were carried out: (1) a reference run with a typical T2* echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence based on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect and (2) a run with a T1-sensitive three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) sequence using cerebral blood volume (CBV) contrast after intravenous administration of a contrast agent containing a chelate of gadolinium diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate with a phosphono-oxymethyl substituent. All sequences were performed during the execution of a block-type finger-tapping paradigm. SPM5 software was used for statistical analysis. For both runs maximum activations (peak Z-score = 5.5, cluster size 3,449 voxels) were localized in the left postcentral gyrus. Visual inspection of respective signal amplitudes suggests the T1 contrast to be substantially smaller than EPI (0.5% vs 1%). A new functional imaging method with potentially smaller image artefacts due to the nature of CBV contrast and characteristics of the T1 sequence was proposed and verified. (orig.)

  19. Very fast watermarking by reversible contrast mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Coltuc, Dinu

    2007-01-01

    Reversible contrast mapping (RCM) is a simple integer transform that applies to pairs of pixels. For some pairs of pixels, RCM is invertible, even if the least significant bits (LSBs) of the transformed pixels are lost. The data space occupied by the LSBs is suitable for data hiding. The embedded information bit-rates of the proposed spatial domain reversible watermarking scheme are close to the highest bit-rates reported so far. The scheme does not need additional data compression, and, in terms of mathematical complexity, it appears to be the lowest complexity one proposed up to now. A very fast lookup table implementation is proposed. Robustness against cropping can be ensured as well.

  20. MRI contrast agents from molecules to particles

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri; Boutry, Sébastien; Lipani, Estelle; Belaid, Sarah; Muller, Robert N; Vander Elst, Luce

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the multiple aspects of (i) preparation of the magnetic core, (ii) the stabilization with different coatings, (iii) the physico-chemical characterization and (iv) the vectorization to obtain specific nanosystems. Several bio-applications are also presented in this book. In the early days of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), paramagnetic ions were proposed as contrast agents to enhance the diagnostic quality of MR images. Since then, academic and industrial efforts have been devoted to the development of new and more efficient molecular, supramolecular and nanoparticular systems. Old concepts and theories, like paramagnetic relaxation, were revisited and exploited, leading to new scientific tracks. With their high relaxivity payload, the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are very appealing in the context of molecular imaging but challenges are still numerous: absence of toxicity, specificity, ability to cross the biological barriers, etc. .

  1. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for perfusion quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke

    2002-01-01

    to be more robust. Successful brain perfusion quantication based on R1 weighted signals has not previously been reported, due to the poor signal to noise ratio of the images. Initial experiments reported in this thesis show that improved sequence may provide more accurate perfusion estimates in the brain...... with the tissue IRF. To obtain the IRF, the tissue curves and the input curves are deconvolved and perfusion is related to the peak of IRF. In this thesis, a new method for deconvolution of perfusion data is introduced. It is the Gaussian process for deconvolution, GPD. The method is compared to singular value......Magnetic resonance imaging, during bolus passage of a paramagnetic contrast agent, is used world-wide to obtain parameters that reflect the pathological state of tissue. Abnormal perfusion occurs in diseases such as stoke and tumour. Consequently, perfusion quantication could have signi cant...

  2. CONTRAST ENHANCED SPECTRAL MAMMOGRAPHY (CESM (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Rozhkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of early diagnosis of a breast cancer is extremely actual. Growth of incidence at women from 19 to 39 years increased for 34% over the last 10 years. It defines need of acceleration of development and deployment of the latest technologies of identification of the earliest symptoms of diseases. The x-ray mammography is the conducting method among of all radiological methods of diagnostics. Nevertheless a number of restrictions of method reduces its efficiency. The technologies increasing informational content of x-ray mammography – the leading method of screening – due to use of artificial contrasting and advantages of digital technologies are constantly developed. In this review it is described works, in which the authors having clinical experience of application of CESM – contrastenhanced spectral mammography on representative group of women. Positive sides and restrictions of new technology in comparison with mammography, ultrasonography and MRT are shown in this article.

  3. Contrasting Freezeouts in Large Versus Small Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Sandeep; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2016-01-01

    We report the evidence for different freeze-out dynamics in high energy proton-proton (p+p), proton-Lead ion (p+Pb) and Lead ion-Lead ion (Pb+Pb) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies. Additional interactions in Pb+Pb collisions relative to those occurring in the p+p and p+Pb collisions are responsible for the differences observed. We study the data on mean hadron yields and contrast the chemical freezeout conditions in these systems. A clear dependence of the freezeout scheme on the system size as well as the strangeness content of the hadrons emerges. While the Pb+Pb data favor a sequential freezeout with early freezeout of strangeness, minimum bias p+p and different centralities of p+Pb data prefer a unified freezeout prescription with varying degree of strangeness suppression.

  4. Holo-GPC: Holographic Generalized Phase Contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew; Glückstad, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Light shaping methods based on spatial phase-only modulation can be classified depending on whether they distribute multiple beams or shape the individual beams. Diffractive optics or holography can be classified as the former, as it spatially distributes a plurality of focal spots over a working...... volume. On the other hand, Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) forms beams with well-defined lateral shapes and could be classified as the latter. To certain extents, GPC and holography can also perform both beam distribution and beam shaping. But despite the overlap in beam distribution and beam shaping...... of GPC in forming well-defined speckle-free shapes that can be distributed over an extended 3D volume through holographic means. The combined strengths of the two photon-efficient phase-only light shaping modalities open new possibilities for contemporary laser sculpting applications....

  5. Minimally-destructive Partial Phase Contrast Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wigley, Paul; Hardman, Kyle; Sooriyabandara, Mahasen; Perumbil, Manju; Close, John; Robins, Nicholas; Kuhn, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a minimally-destructive imaging technique based on a combination of phase contrast and Faraday rotation imaging used to continuously observe a condensate of 85 Rb. We demonstrate that the technique is capable of imaging a small sample of only 10 4 atoms up to 100 times with negligible decreases in atom number and no observable heating. At approximately 1GHz detuning, the SNR remains at approximately 7 for all 100 images, with a 22ms TOF absorption image confirming the survival of the condensate. The splitting of the magnetic sublevels of this species at such fields show non-trivial selection rules. We present experimental data outlining particular allowed transitions in this regime.

  6. Contrast of Compliments Between Chinese and English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张薇

    2014-01-01

    Compliments and their responses are special speech actions which are broadly used in interpersonal communications. And how to give compliments and respond to them constitute a significant part of the communicative competence of every member in a speech community. Complimenting is a particularly suitable speech action to investigate in comparative studies, for it acts as a window through which we can view what is valued by a particular culture. This essay mainly analyzes and researches the differences between Chinese and English compliments, attempting to reveal the contrast between Chinese and English compliments in the aspects of expression, topics and lexical formulas. The comparative study may contribute to understand more about Chinese and English compliment cultures, and furthermore, promote the study of pragmatics and the development of intercultural communication effectively.

  7. A Concise Contrastive Grammar of English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    of the workbook is to supply students and teachers with material which can be used in connection with the study of grammar. The workbook is organised so that each chapter in the grammar book matches a chapter in the workbook. There are exercises of many different kinds in the workbook. Some aim at explanation......Like the first edition, this second revised edition of the workbook is intended to be used together with A Concise Contrastive Grammar of English for Danish Students, which is a systematic and pedagogical introduction to English grammar for Danish students of English at bachelor level. The purpose...... and exemplification, others at awareness-raising and recognition of particular structures. Some aim at production in the form of either insertion of particular forms or translation, others at recognising differences between English and Danish. Finally, there are a number of exercises where students get...

  8. High-contrast imaging with METIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Absil, Olivier; Agócs, Tibor; Pantin, Eric; Quanz, Sascha; Stuik, Remko; Snik, Frans; Brandl, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    The Mid-infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph (METIS) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) consists of diffraction-limited imagers that cover 3 to 14 microns with medium resolution (R 5000) long slit spectroscopy, and an integral field spectrograph for high spectral resolution spectroscopy (R 100,000) over the L and M bands. One of the science cases that METIS addresses is the characterization of faint circumstellar material and exoplanet companions through imaging and spectroscopy. We present our approach for high contrast imaging with METIS, covering diffraction suppression with coronagraphs, the removal of slowly changing optical aberrations with focal plane wavefront sensing, interferometric imaging with sparse aperture masks, and observing strategies for both the imagers and IFU image slicers.

  9. Contrastings views on bullying in Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    Contrasting views on bullying in schools Which views on bullying influence teachers intervention strategies? This question is discussed  on the basis of the findings of my empirical study of that aspect of bullying that has to do with the position of the teacher (a quantitative survey...... of the teachers' staff room, observations, interviews and analysis of explicit ‘bullying-politics'). I found contradictions in teachers' definitions of the phenomenon of bullying, in how they describe causality and furthermore in how they would attempt to solve a specific and complicated bullying case....... The informants describe ‘bullying' in general terms that include group dynamic signs, when pressed for a causal explanation, or asked how they would handle a specific case. Most commonly, however, their focus is on the individual bully. In this, the teachers' positions seem to follow the commonplace conception...

  10. Robust Automatic Focus Algorithm for Low Contrast Images Using a New Contrast Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinshan Tang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Low contrast images, suffering from a lack of sharpness, are easily influenced by noise. As a result, many local false peaks may be generated in contrast measurements, making it difficult for the camera’s passive auto-focus system to perform its function of locating the focused peak. In this paper, a new passive auto-focus algorithm is proposed to address this problem. First, a noise reduction preprocessing is introduced to make our algorithm robust to both additive noise and multiplicative noise. Then, a new contrast measure is presented to bring in local false peaks, ensuring the presence of a well defined focused peak. In order to gauge the performance of our algorithm, a modified peak search algorithm is used in the experiments. The experimental results from an actual digital camera validate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm.

  11. Phonetic Distinctiveness vs. Lexical Contrastiveness in Non-Robust Phonemic Contrasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. L. Renwick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the mid vowel contrasts of Standard Italian distinguish few minimal pairs, may be lexically variable, and show some degree of phonological conditioning in certain varieties. As such, they are relevant to recent suggestions that phonemic contrast may be partial, gradient, or otherwise more cognitively complex than traditionally assumed. Production data and vowel height judgments from 17 speakers con rm that most have clear 'phonetic 'distinctions between higher and lower mid vowels. However, the lexical distribution of these vowels is variable, and (in some speakers phonologically conditioned to some extent; and though phonological awareness for all speakers is broadly accurate, we also observe cases where production and speaker judgment fail to match, in part because individual speakers’ productions are variable. This suggests that the somewhat marginal status of the Italian mid vowel contrasts resides in the link between phonetic categories and individual lexical items, not in any indistinctness of the phonetic categories themselves.

  12. Contrast optimization in multiphase arterial spin labeling; Otimizacao do contraste em ASL multi-fase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Paschoal, Andre M., E-mail: paiva@ifsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (CIERMag/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Foerster, Bernd U. [Philips Medical Systems LatAm, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Moll, Jorge [Instituto D' Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    Multiphase ASL is an effective way to overcome the regional variation of the transit time that difficult the estimation of perfusion values. However, with conventional multiple phases ASL techniques, the ASL contrast at later phases is impaired due to repeated application of excitation pulses and longitudinal relaxation making it difficult to evaluate the tissue perfusion in regions where the transit time is longer. In the present study, we show an improvement of the acquisition scheme by exploring a modulation on the flip angle of the MR acquisition to keep the ASL contrast constant over multiple phases. (author)

  13. Analysis of contrast and absorbed doses in mammography; Analise de contraste e doses absorvidas em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, F.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: fernando@fmrp.usp.br; Dias, T.S.K. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ghilardi Netto, T.; Subtil, L.J.; Silva, R. da [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2001-07-01

    One of the great causes of mortality between women in the world is the breast cancer. The mammograms are the method most efficient to detect some cases of cancer of breast before this to be clinically concrete. The quality of a picture system must be determined by the ability to detect tissue soft masses, cyst or tumors, but also calcifications. This detection is directly connected with the contrast obtained in these pictures. This work has for objective to develop a method for the analysis of this contrast in mammograms verifying the doses referred to these mammograms and comparing them with national and international levels of reference. (author)

  14. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury: how much contrast is safe?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keaney, John J

    2013-02-14

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) are used in many investigations that a patient may undergo during the course of an in-patient stay. For the vast majority of patients, exposure to CM has no sequelae; however, in a small percentage, it can result in a worsening in renal function termed contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). CI-AKI is one of the leading causes of in-hospital renal dysfunction. It is associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality as well as an increased length of hospital stay and costs. Unfortunately, the results of extensive research into pharmacological inventions to prevent CI-AKI remain disappointing. In this article, we briefly outline the pathophysiological mechanisms by which iodinated CM may cause CI-AKI and discuss the evidence for reducing CI-AKI by limiting contrast volumes. In particular, we review the data surrounding the use of contrast volume to glomerular filtration rate ratios, which can be used by clinicians to effectively lower the incidence of CI-AKI in their patients.

  15. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal planeregion extending from 14 D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. TheVNC is a hybrid interferometriccoronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stopefficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential futureNASA flight telescopes. NASAGoddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNCand its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and itsenabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry tounprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a W configurationto accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters.We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, criticaltechnologies and null sensing and control.

  16. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  17. Evaluationofhepatocellularcarcinomausing contrast-enhancedultrasonography:correlation withmicrovesselmorphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Dong Xiao; Wen-Hui Zhu; Shou-Rong Shen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) is an important technique for depiction and assessment of tumor vascularity. This study aimed to explore the relationship between the morphological characteristics of tumor microvessels and enhancement patterns on CEUS in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Eighty patients with HCC underwent CEUS using SonoVue before hepatectomy. Contrast-enhanced ultrasono-graphic enhancement patterns and quantitative parameters were recorded. The tumor tissue sections were immunostained with human CD34 monoclonal antibody. The patients were classiifed into a point-line type group (n=36) and a loop-strip type group (n=44) according to microvessel morphology. The microvascular density (MVD) in the different types of microvessels was calculated. The relationship between enhancement patterns of HCC lesions and morphological characteristics of tumor microvessels was analyzed. RESULTS: The mean MVD in HCC was 22.4±3.5 per 0.2 mm2 in the point-line group, and 19.6±6.7 per 0.2 mm2 in the loop-strip group, and there was no signiifcant difference between them (t=0.948, P=0.354). In the portal vein phase, hypoenhancement was signiifcantly more frequent in HCC (χ2=4.789, P=0.029) in the loop-strip group (40/44, 90.9%) than in the point-line group (26/36, 72.2%). The time to hypo-enhancement in the loop-strip group (mean 64.84±26.16 seconds) was shorter than that in the point-line group (mean 78.39±28.72 seconds) (t=2.247, P=0.022). The time to hypo-enhancement was correlated with MVD in the loop-strip group (r=-0.648, P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The enhancement patterns on CEUS are related to tumor microvascular morphology, and the type of microvascular morphology inlfuences CEUS characterization. CEUS, an important noninvasive imaging technique, is used to evaluate microvascular morphology and angiogenesis, providing valuable information for antiangiogenic therapy in HCC.

  18. Comparison of non-landslide sampling strategies to counteract inventory-based biases within national-scale statistical landslide susceptibility models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Pedro; Steger, Stefan; Glade, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    , composed by 14,519 shallow landslides. Within this study, we introduce the following explanatory variables to test the effect of different non-landslide strategies: Lithological units, grouped by their geotechnical properties and topographic parameters such as aspect, elevation, slope gradient and the topographic position. Landslide susceptibility maps will be derived by applying logistic regression, while systematic comparisons will be carried out based on models created by different non-landslide sampling strategies. Models generated by the conventional random sampling are presented against models based on stratified and clustered sampling strategies. The modelling results will be compared in terms of their prediction performance measured by the AUROC (Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve) obtained by means of a k-fold cross-validation and also by the spatial pattern of the maps. The outcomes of this study are intended to contribute to the understanding on how landslide-inventory based biases may be counteracted.

  19. Renal stones on portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT: does intravenous contrast interfere with detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dym, R. Joshua; Duncan, Dameon R.; Spektor, Michael; Cohen, Hillel W.; Scheinfeld, Meir H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the sensitivity of portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT for the detection of renal stones. Methods This retrospective study included 97 CT examinations of the abdomen without and with intravenous contrast, including 85 (87.6%) examinations with at least one renal stone on the “gold standard” noncontrast images, as scored by a single radiologist. Three other radiologists each independently reviewed only the contrast-enhanced images from all 97 examinations and recorded all renal stones. Reviewer sensitivity for stones was categorized by stone diameter. Reviewer sensitivity and specificity for stone disease were also calculated on a per-kidney basis. Results The 97 cases included a total of 238 stones ≥1 mm, with a mean (±SD) of 1.2 ± 1.9 stones per kidney and a stone diameter of 3.5 ± 3.0 mm. Pooling data for the three reviewers, sensitivity for all stones was 81%; sensitivity for stones ≥2, ≥3, ≥4, and ≥5 mm was 88%, 95%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 94% when considering all stones; when considering only stones ≥2, ≥3, and ≥4 mm, sensitivity was 96%, 99%, and 100%, respectively. Specificity for stone disease on a per-kidney basis was 98% overall, 99% when considering only stones ≥2 mm, and 100% when considering only stones ≥3 mm. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT is highly sensitive for the detection of renal stones ≥3 mm in diameter and less sensitive for smaller stones. In cases where the clinical diagnosis is uncertain and performance of a CT examination is being contemplated, intravenous contrast utilization would allow assessment for stone disease while also optimizing evaluation for other conditions. PMID:24504541

  20. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammer, Christoph, E-mail: cgammer@lbl.gov [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Burak Ozdol, V. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Liebscher, Christian H.; Minor, Andrew M. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast. - Highlights: • A dataset containing all structural information of a given position is recorded. • The dataset allows reconstruction of virtual diffraction patterns or images. • Specific virtual apertures are designed to image precipitates in a complex alloy. • Virtual diffraction patterns from arbitrarily small regions can be established. • Using STEM diffraction to record the dataset is more efficient than TEM dark-field.

  1. Printed Multicolor High-Contrast Electrochromic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo-Han; Kao, Sheng-Yuan; Hu, Chih-Wei; Higuchi, Masayoshi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Liao, Ying-Chih

    2015-11-18

    In this study, electrochemical responses of inkjet-printed multicolored electrochromic devices (ECD) were studied to evaluate the feasibility of presenting multiple colors in one ECD. Metallo-supramolecular polymers (MEPE) solutions with two primary colors were inkjet-printed on flexible electrodes. By digitally controlling print dosages of each species, the colors of the printed EC thin film patterns can be adjusted directly without premixing or synthesizing new materials. The printed EC thin films were then laminated with a solid transparent thin film electrolyte and a transparent conductive thin film to form an ECD. After applying a dc voltage, the printed ECDs exhibited great contrast with a transmittance change (ΔT) of 40.1% and a high coloration efficiency of 445 cm(2) C(-1) within a short darkening time of 2 s. The flexible ECDs also showed the same darkening time of 2 s and still had a high ΔT of 30.1% under bending condition. This study demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate display devices with different color setups by an all-solution process and can be further extended to other types of displays.

  2. Contrasting freezeouts in large versus small systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sandeep; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2017-10-01

    We study the data on mean hadron yields and contrast the chemical freezeout (CFO) conditions in p+p, p+Pb and Pb+Pb at the Large Hadron Collider energies. We study several schemes for freezeout that mainly differ in the way strangeness is treated: i. Strangeness freezes out along with the non-strange hadrons in complete equilibrium (1CFO), ii. Strangeness freezes out along with non-strange hadrons with an additional parameter {γ }S accounting for non-equilibrium production of strangeness (1CFO+{γ }S), and iii. Strangeness freezes out earlier than non-strange hadrons and in thermal equilibrium (2CFO). A comparison of the chisquares of the fits indicate a dependence of the freezeout scheme on the system size. The minimum bias p+p and different centralities of p+Pb and peripheral Pb+Pb data prefer 1CFO+{γ }S with {γ }S approaching unity as we go from p+p to central p+Pb and peripheral Pb+Pb. On the other hand, the mid-central to central Pb+Pb data prefer 2CFO over 1CFO+{γ }S. Such system size dependence of the freezeout scheme could be an indication of the additional interaction in Pb+Pb over p+Pb and p+p.

  3. Nicotine and cannabinoids: parallels, contrasts and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros, Maria-Paz; Marco, Eva M; File, Sandra E

    2006-01-01

    After a brief outline of the nicotinic and cannabinoid systems, we review the interactions between the pharmacological effects of nicotine and cannabis, two of the most widely used drugs of dependence. These drugs are increasingly taken in combination, particularly among the adolescents and young adults. The review focuses on addiction-related processes, gateway and reverse gateway theories of addiction and therapeutic implications. It then reviews studies on the important period of adolescence, an area that is in urgent need of further investigation and in which the importance of sex differences is emerging. Three other areas of research, which might be particularly relevant to the onset and/or maintenance of dependence, are then reviewed. Firstly, the effects of the two drugs on anxiety-related behaviours are discussed and then their effects on food intake and cognition, two areas in which they have contrasting effects. Certain animal studies suggest that reinforcing effects are likely to be enhanced by joint consumption of nicotine and cannabis, as also may be anxiolytic effects. If this was the case in humans, the latter might be viewed as an advantage particularly by adolescent girls, although the increased weight gain associated with cannabis would be a disadvantage. The two drugs also have opposite effects on cognition and the possibility of long-lasting cognitive impairments resulting from adolescent consumption of cannabis is of particular concern.

  4. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  5. Global fishery prospects under contrasting management regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Clavelle, Tyler; Strauss, C. Kent; Hilborn, Ray; Melnychuk, Michael C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Gaines, Steven D.; Szuwalski, Cody S.; Cabral, Reniel B.; Rader, Douglas N.; Leland, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Data from 4,713 fisheries worldwide, representing 78% of global reported fish catch, are analyzed to estimate the status, trends, and benefits of alternative approaches to recovering depleted fisheries. For each fishery, we estimate current biological status and forecast the impacts of contrasting management regimes on catch, profit, and biomass of fish in the sea. We estimate unique recovery targets and trajectories for each fishery, calculate the year-by-year effects of alternative recovery approaches, and model how alternative institutional reforms affect recovery outcomes. Current status is highly heterogeneous—the median fishery is in poor health (overfished, with further overfishing occurring), although 32% of fisheries are in good biological, although not necessarily economic, condition. Our business-as-usual scenario projects further divergence and continued collapse for many of the world’s fisheries. Applying sound management reforms to global fisheries in our dataset could generate annual increases exceeding 16 million metric tons (MMT) in catch, $53 billion in profit, and 619 MMT in biomass relative to business as usual. We also find that, with appropriate reforms, recovery can happen quickly, with the median fishery taking under 10 y to reach recovery targets. Our results show that commonsense reforms to fishery management would dramatically improve overall fish abundance while increasing food security and profits. PMID:27035953

  6. Contrasting drivers of reproductive ageing in albatrosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froy, Hannah; Lewis, Sue; Nussey, Daniel H; Wood, Andrew G; Phillips, Richard A

    2017-09-01

    Age-related variation in reproductive performance is ubiquitous in wild vertebrate populations and has important consequences for population and evolutionary dynamics. The ageing trajectory is shaped by both within-individual processes, such as improvement and senescence, and the among-individual effects of selective appearance and disappearance. To date, few studies have compared the role of these different drivers among species or populations. In this study, we use nearly 40 years of longitudinal monitoring data to contrast the within- and among-individual processes contributing to the reproductive ageing patterns in three albatross species (two biennial and one annual breeder) and test whether these can be explained by differences in life histories. Early-life performance in all species increased with age and was predominantly influenced by within-individual improvements. However, reproductive senescence was detected in only two of the species. In the species exhibiting senescent declines, we also detected a terminal improvement in breeding success. This is suggestive of a trade-off between reproduction and survival, which was supported by evidence of selective disappearance of good breeders. We demonstrate that comparisons of closely related species which differ in specific aspects of their life history can shed light on the ecological and evolutionary forces shaping variation in ageing patterns. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society.

  7. Differential interference contrast microscopy using Savart plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trịnh, Hưng-Xuân; Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Chen, Liang-Chia; Yeh, Sheng-Lih; Chen, Chin-Sheng

    2017-04-01

    A new differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM), which uses Savart prisms as a shearing plate and a phase-shifting device, is proposed. The system consists of a phase-shifting module (PSM) and a DICM module (DICMM). The PSM has two Savart prisms: the first prism separates the incident beam into two parallel beams, and the second prism recombines these two beams. The optical path difference (OPD) of the two beams, which is represented by a biased OPD, can be adjusted by rotating the angle of the normal surface of the second prism. In the DICMM, the other Savart prism is used to replace the Nomarski prism (NP) in conventional DICM. It combines with an afocal microscopic system (AMS) to produce a Savart-DICM system, which is able to perform a phase-shifting technique by changing the biased OPD to produce a phase shift of π/2 for each step. This paper describes the configuration and measurement theory of the microscope. The experimental results confirm the validity and capability of the proposed microscope.

  8. Simultaneous brightness contrast of foraging Papilio butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takahashi, Yuki; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-05-22

    This study focuses on the sense of brightness in the foraging Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We presented two red discs of different intensity on a grey background to butterflies, and trained them to select one of the discs. They were successfully trained to select either a high intensity or a low intensity disc. The trained butterflies were tested on their ability to perceive brightness in two different protocols: (i) two orange discs of different intensity presented on the same intensity grey background and (ii) two orange discs of the same intensity separately presented on a grey background that was either higher or lower in intensity than the training background. The butterflies trained to high intensity red selected the orange disc of high intensity in protocol 1, and the disc on the background of low intensity grey in protocol 2. We obtained similar results in another set of experiments with purple discs instead of orange discs. The choices of the butterflies trained to low intensity red were opposite to those just described. Taken together, we conclude that Papilio has the ability to learn brightness and darkness of targets independent of colour, and that they have the so-called simultaneous brightness contrast.

  9. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzi, Roberto [Marie Curie Research Wing, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: robertoalonzi@btinternet.com; Padhani, Anwar R. [Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom); Synarc Inc. 575 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 (United States)], E-mail: anwar.padhani@paulstrickland-scannercentre.org.uk; Allen, Clare [Department of Imaging, University College Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.allen@uclh.nhs.uk

    2007-09-15

    Angiogenesis is an integral part of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is associated with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and is key to the growth and for metastasis of prostate cancer. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using small molecular weight gadolinium chelates enables non-invasive imaging characterization of tissue vascularity. Depending on the technique used, data reflecting tissue perfusion, microvessel permeability surface area product, and extracellular leakage space can be obtained. Two dynamic MRI techniques (T{sub 2}*-weighted or susceptibility based and T{sub 1}-weighted or relaxivity enhanced methods) for prostate gland evaluations are discussed in this review with reference to biological basis of observations, data acquisition and analysis methods, technical limitations and validation. Established clinical roles of T{sub 1}-weighted imaging evaluations will be discussed including lesion detection and localisation, for tumour staging and for the detection of suspected tumour recurrence. Limitations include inadequate lesion characterisation particularly differentiating prostatitis from cancer, and in distinguishing between BPH and central gland tumours.

  10. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Asha; Freeman, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Abnormalities in the spleen are less common than in most other abdominal organs. However, they will be regularly encountered by ultrasound practitioners, who carefully evaluate the spleen in their abdominal ultrasound studies. Conventional grey scale and Doppler ultrasound are frequently unable to characterise focal splenic abnormalities; even when clinical and laboratory information is added to the ultrasound findings, it is often not possible to make a definite diagnosis. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is easy to perform, inexpensive, safe and will usually provide valuable additional information about splenic abnormalities, allowing a definitive or short differential diagnosis to be made. It also identifies those lesions that may require further imaging or biopsy, from those that can be safely dismissed or followed with interval ultrasound imaging. CEUS is also indicated in confirming the nature of suspected accessory splenic tissue and in selected patients with abdominal trauma. This article describes the CEUS examination technique, summarises the indications for CEUS and provides guidance on interpretation of the CEUS findings in splenic ultrasound.

  11. Contrasting Specific English Corpora: Language Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Carrió Pastor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community has traditionally considered technical English as neutral and objective, able to transmit ideas and research in simple sentences and specialized vocabulary. Nevertheless, global communication and intense information delivery have produced a range of different ways of knowledge transmission. Although technical English is considered an objective way to transmit science, writers of academic papers use some words or structures with different frequency in the same genre. As a consequence of this, contrastive studies about the use of second languages have been increasingly attracting scholarly attention. In this research, we evidence that variation in language production is a reality and can be proved contrasting corpora written by native writers of English and by non-native writers of English. The objectives of this paper are first to detect language variation in a technical English corpus; second, to demonstrate that this finding evidences the parts of the sentence that are more sensitive to variation; finally, it also evidences the non-standardisation of technical English. In order to fulfil these objectives, we analysed a corpus of fifty scientific articles written by native speakers of English and fifty scientific articles written by non-native speakers of English. The occurrences were classified and counted in order to detect the most common variations. Further analysis indicated that the variations were caused by mother tongue interference in virtually all cases, although meaning was only very rarely obscured. These findings suggest that the use of certain patterns and expressions originating from L1 interference should be considered as correct as standard English.La comunidad científica considera al inglés técnico como un tipo de lenguaje neutral y objetivo, capaz de transmitir ideas y hallazgos en frases simples y vocabulario reconocido por los especialistas de ese campo. Sin embargo, la comunicación global y el

  12. Contrasting Controversies: Fracking and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan-Haas, D.; Zabel, I. H. H.; Ross, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Slickwater high-volume hydraulic fracturing (commonly known as "fracking") is highly controversial. So is global warming, and the two issues are closely related, but the natures of these two controversies have substantial and important differences. Building upon years of experience in teaching and developing resources and strategies for teaching about evolution and climate change, staff at the Paleontological Research Institution have engaged in public outreach and educator professional development to help nurture understanding of fracking and the broader energy system. How are these controversies similar to and different from one another, and how should understanding these similarities and differences inform educational programming (and about how you talk about these issues with your Uncle Fred at the family holiday dinner?). It is nearly universally agreed amongst scientists who study climate that changes now underway are real and human caused, and are posing or likely to pose very serious problems for humanity. Scientists who study slickwater high-volume hydraulic fracturing agree that it causes environmental damage, but there is no consensus as to whether fracking causes more or less harm (e.g., among different kinds of environment harm, across different temporal and spatial scales, and among different social contexts) than other ways of producing energy on a large scale. In other words, the basic tenets of climate change are not a matter of scientific controversy, though the implications for policy making obviously remain politically controversial, while fracking is an issue of both scientific and political controversy. Without advocating for or against fracking, we help audiences disentangle scientific and political issues, better understand the energy resources used in their own communities, and consider issues of scale, systems, and complexity. We will compare and contrast the overlapping controversies surrounding climate change and fracking and highlight

  13. Rhizosphere priming effects in two contrasting soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Davidson; Kirk, Guy; Ritz, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Inputs of fresh plant-derived carbon may stimulate the turnover of existing soil organic matter by so-called priming effects. Priming may occur directly, as a result of nutrient 'mining' by existing microbial communities, or indirectly via population adjustments. However the mechanisms are poorly understood. We planted C4 Kikuyu grass (Pennisetum clandestinum) in pots with two contrasting C3 soils (clayey, fertile TB and sandy, acid SH), and followed the soil CO2 efflux and its δ13C. The extent of C deposition in the rhizosphere was altered by intermittently clipping the grass in half the pots; there were also unplanted controls. At intervals, pots were destructively sampled for root and shoot biomass. Total soil CO2 efflux was measured using a gas-tight PVC chamber fitted over bare soil, and connected to an infra-red gas analyser; the δ13C of efflux was measured in air sub-samples withdrawn by syringe. The extent of priming was inferred from the δ13C of efflux and the δ13C of the plant and soil end-members. In unclipped treatments, in both soils, increased total soil respiration and rhizosphere priming effects (RPE) were apparent compared to the unplanted controls. The TB soil had greater RPE overall. The total respiration in clipped TB soil was significantly greater than in the unplanted controls, but in the clipped SH soil it was not significantly different from the controls. Clipping affected plant C partitioning with greater allocation to shoot regrowth from about 4 weeks after planting. Total plant biomass decreased in the order TB unclipped > SH unclipped >TB clipped > SH clipped. The results are consistent with priming driven by microbial activation stimulated by rhizodeposits and by nitrogen demand from the growing plants under N limited conditions. Our data suggest that photosynthesis drives RPE and soil differences may alter the rate and intensity of RPE but not the direction.

  14. PICTORIAL INTERLUDE Experiences of using a single post-contrast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a single post-contrast scan technique improved the diagnostic information and also alleviated the ... After scanning a few test cases using a single post-contrast series .... morphology, cardiac function, degree of valsalva with breath hold, etc.

  15. Generation And Measurement Of High Contrast Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Konoplev, O A

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis, the generation and measurement of high contrast, intense, ultrashort pulses have been studied. Various factors affecting the contrast and pulse shape of ultrashort light pulses from a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system are identified. The level of contrast resulting from influence of these factors is estimated. Methods for improving and controlling the pulse shape and increasing the contrast are discussed. Ultrahigh contrast, 1-ps pulses were generated from a CPA system with no temporal structure up to eleven orders of magnitude. This is eight orders of magnitude higher contrast than the original pulse. This contrast boost was achieved using two techniques. One is the optical pulse cleaning based on the nonlinear birefringence of the chirping fiber and applied to the pulses before amplification. The other is the fast saturable absorber. The fast saturable absorber was placed after amplification and compression of the pulse. The measurements of high-contrast, ultrashort pulse with h...

  16. Subharmonic Contrast Intravascular Ultrasound for Vasa Vasorum Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, David E.; Frijlink, Martijn E.; Tempel, Dennie; Bhagwandas, Vijay; Gisolf, Andries; Krams, Robert; Jong, de Nico; Steen, van der Antonius F.W.

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of subharmonic contrast intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging was investigated using a prototype nonlinear IVUS system and the commercial contrast agent Definity™. The system employed a mechanically scanned commercial catheter with a custom transducer element fabricated to have sen

  17. Research progress of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical diagnostic modality, which has become popular in hospitals around the world. Approximately 30% of MRI exams include the use of contrast agents. The research progress of the paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents was described briefly. Three important approaches in the soluble paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents design including nonionic, tissue-specific and macromolecular contrast agents were investigated. In addition, the problems in the research and development in future were discussed.

  18. A Translational Investigation of Positive and Negative Behavioral Contrast

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Megan A.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral contrast occurs when a change in reinforcement rate in one context causes behavior to change in the opposite direction in another context. Positive contrast occurs when a decrease in the rate of reinforcement in one context results in an increase in behavior in another context. Negative contrast occurs when an increase in the rate of reinforcement in one context results in a decrease in behavior in another context. Research with nonhumans has found that positive contrast is more re...

  19. Automated mass detection in contrast-enhanced CT colonography: an approach based on contrast and volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luboldt, W. [University Hospital Essen, Clinic and Policlinic of Angiology, Essen (Germany); Multiorgan Screening Foundation (Germany); Tryon, C. [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Kroll, M.; Vogl, T.J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Toussaint, T.L. [Multiorgan Screening Foundation (Germany); Holzer, K. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Hoepffner, N. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Gastroenterology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to design and test an algorithm for automating mass detection in contrast-enhanced CT colonography (CTC). Five patients with known colorectal masses underwent a pre-surgical contrast-enhanced (120 ml volume 1.6 g iodine/s injection rate, 60 s scan delay) CTC in high spatial resolution (16-slice CT: collimation: 16 x 0.75 mm, tablefeed: 24 mm/0.5 s, reconstruction increment: 0.5 mm). A CT-density- and volume-based algorithm searched for masses in the colonic wall, which was extracted before by segmenting and dilating the colonic air lumen and subtracting the inner air. A radiologist analyzed the detections and causes of false positives. All masses were detected, and false positives were easy to identify. Combining CT density with volume as a cut-off is a promising approach for automating mass detection that should be further refined and also tested in contrast-enhanced MR colonography. (orig.)

  20. Phonetics and Phonology of Thematic Contrast in German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    It is acknowledged that contrast plays an important role in understanding discourse and information structure. While it is commonly assumed that contrast can be marked by intonation only, our understanding of the intonational realization of contrast is limited. For German there is mainly introspective evidence that the rising theme accent (or…