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Sample records for counseling spouse caregivers

  1. From spouse to caregiver and back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågård, Anne Sophie; Egerod, Ingrid; Tønnesen, Else

    2015-01-01

    and rehabilitation in general hospital wards, rehabilitation facilities and at home. Consequently, millions of spouses become informal caregivers. Little is known, however, about the concrete challenges spouses face in post-intensive care unit everyday life. DESIGN: Explorative, qualitative grounded theory study...... role. Post-ICU caregiving comprised five patient dimensions: observing, assisting, coaching, advocating and managing activities. CONCLUSIONS: Spouses play a vital and multifaceted role in post-intensive care unit recovery. The findings can inform healthcare professionals in their efforts to prepare...... intensive care unit patients' families for the time following intensive care unit and hospital discharge. Hospital staff, rehabilitation experts and primary care professionals must acknowledge spouses' important contribution from intensive care unit admission throughout recovery....

  2. Gender Differences in Spouse Caregiver Strain: Socialization and Role Explanations.

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    Miller, Baila

    1990-01-01

    Examined gender differences in spouse caregiver strain among 554 spouse caregivers, using a multivariate model in which caregiver strains were a function of caregiver stressors and support resources. The effect of gender was found to be small; wives' greater experience of health strains appeared to result from situational factors and traditional…

  3. Neuroticism and Longitudinal Change in Caregiver Depression: Impact of a Spouse-Caregiver Intervention Program

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    Jang, Yuri; Clay, Olivio J.; Roth, David L.; Haley, William E.; Mittelman, Mary S.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of caregiver neuroticism on longitudinal change in depression among spouse-caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease receiving either enhanced psychosocial treatment or usual care. We were interested in whether high levels of caregiver neuroticism would lead to a diminished response to the enhanced…

  4. Time Spent Caregiving and Help Received by Spouses and Adult Children of Brain-Impaired Adults.

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    Enright, Robert B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 233 family caregivers for brain-impaired adults. Spousal caregivers (both husbands and wives) devoted much time to caregiving. Most caregivers received little assistance from other family members and friends, but husbands received more than others. Employed spouses received more paid help than unemployed spouses; employment did not affect…

  5. From spouse to caregiver and back: a grounded theory study of post-intensive care unit spousal caregiving.

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    Ågård, Anne Sophie; Egerod, Ingrid; Tønnesen, Else; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2015-08-01

    To explore the challenges and caring activities of spouses of intensive care unit survivors during the first year of patient recovery. Every year, millions of people globally are discharged from an intensive care unit after critical illness to continue treatment, care and rehabilitation in general hospital wards, rehabilitation facilities and at home. Consequently, millions of spouses become informal caregivers. Little is known, however, about the concrete challenges spouses face in post-intensive care unit everyday life. Explorative, qualitative grounded theory study. Participants were spouses of intensive care unit survivors. The study was undertaken in Denmark in 2009-2010. Data consisted of 35 semi-structured dyad interviews at 3 and 12 months post-intensive care unit discharge, two group interviews with patients and two with spouses. 'Shifting their role from spouse to caregiver and back' was identified as the core category of the study. The role shifts progressed in a dynamic process involving four elements: (1) committing to caregiving; (2) acquiring caregiving skills; (3) negotiating level of caregiving and (4) gradually leaving the caregiver role. Post-ICU caregiving comprised five patient dimensions: observing, assisting, coaching, advocating and managing activities. Spouses play a vital and multifaceted role in post-intensive care unit recovery. The findings can inform healthcare professionals in their efforts to prepare intensive care unit patients' families for the time following intensive care unit and hospital discharge. Hospital staff, rehabilitation experts and primary care professionals must acknowledge spouses' important contribution from intensive care unit admission throughout recovery. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Caregiving strain and estimated risk for stroke and coronary heart disease among spouse caregivers: differential effects by race and sex.

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    Haley, William E; Roth, David L; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M

    2010-02-01

    Psychosocial stress has been widely studied as a risk factor for stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) but little is known about the differential effects of stress on stroke and CHD risk by race and sex. Caregiving for a disabled spouse has been associated with increased mortality and CHD risk, but the association of caregiving strain with stroke and CHD risk across race and sex is unknown. Participants in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study who were providing in-home caregiving to a disabled spouse reported on caregiving strain (high, some, or none), depressive symptoms, social network, education, and age. Caregiving strain groups were compared on the Framingham Stroke Risk Score (N=716) and Framingham CHD Risk Score (N=607), which estimate the projected 10-year risk of incident stroke and ischemic heart disease, respectively. High caregiving strain was associated with a 23% higher covariate-adjusted estimated stroke risk (11.06% for caregivers with no strain versus 13.62% risk for high-strain caregivers). This association was stronger in men, particularly African American men with high caregiving strain (26.95% estimated 10-year stroke risk). Caregiving strain was not associated with CHD risk scores. Caregiving strain is significantly associated with higher estimated stroke risk with greatest effects for men, particularly African American men, providing caregiving to their wives. Male spouse caregivers may need special caregiving support. Prospective longitudinal studies should examine how sex and race may moderate the impact of stress on stroke and CHD risk.

  7. Mental health and sleep of older wife caregivers for spouses with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

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    Willette-Murphy, Karen; Todero, Catherine; Yeaworth, Rosalee

    2006-10-01

    This descriptive study examined sleep and mental health variables in 37 older wife caregivers for spouses with dementia compared to 37 age-matched controls. The relationships among selected caregiving variables (behavioral problems, caregiving hours, and years of caregiving), appraisal of burden, self-reported sleep efficiency for the past week, and mental health outcomes were examined. Lazarus and Folkman's stress and coping framework guided the study. Mental health and sleep were poorer for caregivers. Caregiving and appraisal of burden variables showed direct and indirect effects on mental health. However, caregiving and appraisal of burden variables were not significant for predicting sleep efficiency. Sleep efficiency was a good predictor of mental health in this sample of wife caregivers.

  8. Positive caregiving experiences are associated with life satisfaction in spouses of stroke survivors.

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    Kruithof, Willeke J; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Post, Marcel W M

    2012-11-01

    Studies into caregivers usually have been focused on negative caregiving experiences. This study is based on the hypotheses that positive caregiving experiences (i.e., self-esteem derived from caregiving) of spouses of stroke patients also need to be taken into account, and that these are related to life satisfaction in 2 ways: first, by a direct association with life satisfaction, and second, indirectly by way of a buffer effect (i.e., by compensating for the impact of negative caregiving experiences on life satisfaction). In this cross-sectional study (n = 121) 3 years poststroke, the Caregiver Reaction Assessment was used to assess caregiver burden (Burden) and self-esteem derived from caregiving (Self-esteem scale). Life satisfaction was measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-9). Spearman correlations and regression analyses were performed. Both Self-esteem and Burden scores were associated with life satisfaction (correlation coefficients 0.35 and -0.74, respectively). An interaction effect was also found (P = .006); spouses who perceived both high Burden and high Self-esteem reported significantly higher life satisfaction scores (mean 4.2, standard deviation [SD] 0.5) than spouses who perceived high Burden but low Self-esteem (mean 3.6, SD 0.7). Positive caregiving experiences are related to spouses' life satisfaction 3 years poststroke and mediate the impact of burden on life satisfaction. Positive caregiving experiences should get more attention in rehabilitation research and practice. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Depression, anxiety and quality of life in caregiver spouses of veterans with chronic spinal cord injury.

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    Mohammad Hosein Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We were curious about the degree of anxiety and depression and their effect on the quality of life of the caregivers of veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI.A convenience sample of 72 out of 120 caregiver spouses of veterans with spinal cord injury participated in our study. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were considered as a measure of depression and anxiety. The World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF was considered to evaluate the quality of life. To compare the caregivers, we enrolled 74 matched caregiver spouses of patients without spinal cord injury.The average age of the spouses was 44.7±6.5. The average time elapsed from the injury was 26.4±3.1 years. There was a significant difference in all domains of quality of life and depression between the caregivers and the control group, but there was not a significant difference in terms of anxiety. There was a negative correlation between depression and age, level of education and quality of life.Mental care support should be implemented for veterans and their spouses in addition to the provided facilities.

  10. Depression, anxiety and quality of life in caregiver spouses of veterans with chronic spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hosein Ebrahimzadeh; Bibi Soheyla Shojaee; Farideh Golhasani-Keshtan; Fatemeh Moharari; Amir Reza Kachooei; Asieh Sadat Fattahi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We were curious about the degree of anxiety and depression and their effect on the quality of life of the caregivers of veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A convenience sample of 72 out of 120 caregiver spouses of veterans with spinal cord injury participated in our study. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were considered as a measure of depression and anxiety. The World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) was considered...

  11. Traumatic brain injury caregivers: A qualitative analysis of spouse and parent perspectives on quality of life.

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    Kratz, Anna L; Sander, Angelle M; Brickell, Tracey A; Lange, Rael T; Carlozzi, Noelle E

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to examine how family caregivers of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) describe their quality of life in the context of their caregiving role. Fifty-two caregivers of adults with moderate or severe TBI (n = 31 parents, n = 21 partners/spouses; 77% female; mean age = 57.96 years, range = 34-78 years) were recruited from three data collection sites to participate in focus groups. Thematic content analysis was used to identify two main meta-themes: Caregiver Role Demands and Changes in Person with TBI. Prominent sub-themes indicated that caregivers are (1) overburdened with responsibilities, (2) lack personal time and time for self-care, (3) feel that their life is interrupted or lost, (4) grieve the loss of the person with TBI, and (5) endorse anger, guilt, anxiety, and sadness. Caregivers identified a number of service needs. A number of sub-themes were perceived differently by partner versus parent caregivers. The day-to-day responsibilities of being a caregiver as well as the changes in the person with the TBI present a variety of challenges and sources of distress for caregivers. Although services that address instrumental as well as emotional needs of caregivers may benefit caregivers in general, the service needs of parent and partner caregivers may differ.

  12. Do You Remember? How Caregivers Question Their Spouses Who Have Alzheimer's Disease and the Impact on Communication

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    Small, Jeff A.; Perry, JoAnn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the types of questions caregivers use and their outcomes when conversing with their spouse with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular interest was caregivers' use of yes-no and open-ended questions and the demands they make on the memory of the person with AD. It was hypothesized that communication between caregivers and…

  13. Depression and anxiety in parent versus spouse caregivers of adult patients with traumatic brain injury: a systematic review.

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    Ennis, Naomi; Rosenbloom, Brittany N; Canzian, Sonya; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane

    2013-01-01

    A systematic review of studies which evaluated depression and anxiety in parent versus spouse caregivers of adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) was conducted. Demographic variables of the TBI patients and caregivers, study design, measurement tools used, and outcomes reported were collected. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated for methodological quality. While the majority of studies revealed no significant differences between caregiver types on measures of depression and/or anxiety, there was a great deal of variation in methodology and quality between the studies. Overall, high levels of caregiver distress were exposed, regardless of caregiver type (parent versus spouse). There is a need for qualitative and quantitative research designs in order to elucidate the factors that put caregivers at risk for depression and anxiety.

  14. Providing Counseling for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers

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    Granello, Paul F.; Fleming, Matthew S.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition that results in brain wasting and eventual death. With its increasing diagnosis rate, counselors will likely acquire clients with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers. Important background information and several practical counseling methods are provided that may assist counselors working with this…

  15. Direct and indirect cost burden associated with multiple sclerosis relapses: excess costs of persons with MS and their spouse caregivers.

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    Parisé, Hélène; Laliberté, François; Lefebvre, Patrick; Duh, Mei Sheng; Kim, Edward; Agashivala, Neetu; Abouzaid, Safiya; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2013-07-15

    MS relapses are unpredictable and can be concerning to patients and their caregivers. To assess the direct and indirect cost burden associated with relapses of different severities in MS patients and with MS relapse frequency on spouse caregivers. Using a U.S. insurance claims and employee disability database (1999-2011), we studied adult MS patients (ICD-9-CM: 340.x) and their spouse caregivers. A previously published algorithm to identify relapses was used to stratify: (1) MS patients into cohorts of no, low/moderate, and high severity relapse based on the most severe relapse within one year of follow-up (if any); (2) caregivers into cohorts of no, less, and more frequent relapses based on the overall frequency of relapses of their spouse. Adjusted cost differences and 95% confidence intervals evaluating the yearly incremental costs at 12 months of follow-up (MS patients) and overall (caregivers) associated with relapses are reported. Among the 9421 MS patients (N: no relapse=7686; low/moderate severity relapse=1220; high severity relapse=515) identified, both relapse cohorts incurred significantly higher annual incremental direct costs than the no relapse cohort (low/moderate severity=$8269 [6565-10,115]; high severity=$24,180 [20,263-28,482]) and indirect costs (low/moderate severity=$1429 [759-2147]; high severity=$2714 [1468-4035]). More frequent relapses versus no relapse also translated into a significantly greater cost burden for caregivers (direct+indirect=$1725 [376-2885]) but less frequent relapses did not. Relapse severity was significantly and increasingly associated with greater direct and indirect costs in MS patients. More frequent relapses also translated into a significant cost burden in spouse caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Therapeutic nursing care: transition in sexuality of the elderly caregiving spouse.

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    Lima, Claudia Feio da Maia; Caldas, Célia Pereira; Santos, Iraci Dos; Trotte, Liana Amorim Correa; Silva, Bárbara Martins Corrêa da

    2017-01-01

    To understand the transitions experienced, and the conditions and expected response patterns to changes in sexuality of the spouse-caregiver of the elderly, during progression of the dementia process. A qualitative research study, conducted at the neurogeriatric clinic between May of 2014 and May of 2015. An intensive, individual interview was administered to 12 elderly caregivers. Thematic content analysis was applied, using the theoretical model of Transition Theory. Seven categories emerged, involving relationship and conjugal sexuality; disease repercussions; care and professional approach; attitudes, beliefs and social imagery of sexuality and care; family relationship and redefining of sexuality. Family development and marital life, the aspects of formation and development of sexuality, the specifics that involved living and caring for the other were understood, with successive events and changes influenced by old age, dementia, beliefs and social imagery. compreender as transições vivenciadas, suas condições e os padrões de resposta esperados a mudanças na sexualidade do cônjuge-cuidador do idoso em processo demencial. pesquisa de abordagem qualitativa, realizada no ambulatório de neurogeriatria, entre maio de 2014 e maio de 2015. Aplicou-se a entrevista individual e intensiva a 12 cônjuges-cuidadores de idosos. Fez-se a análise de conteúdo temática, com aplicação do modelo teórico da Teoria das Transições. emergiram sete categorias, que envolveram relação e sexualidade conjugal; repercussões da doença; o cuidado e a abordagem profissional; atitudes, crenças e imaginário social de sexualidade e cuidado; relação familiar e ressignificação de sexualidade. compreendeu-se a construção de vida familiar e conjugal; os aspectos de formação e desenvolvimento da sexualidade; as especificidades que envolvem viver e cuidar do outro, com sucessivos acontecimentos e mudanças influenciados pela velhice, por processo demencial, crenças e

  17. Factors Underpinning Caregiver Burden in Frontotemporal Dementia Differ in Spouses and their Children

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    Kaizik, Cassandra; Caga, Jashelle; Camino, Julieta; O’Connor, Claire M.; McKinnon, Colleen; Oyebode, Jan R.; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R.; Mioshi, Eneida

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this observational study were to (1) compare spousal and child caregiver burden; (2) compare co-resident and live-out child caregiver burden; and (3) investigate factors influencing spousal and child caregiver burden. Data was collected from 90 caregivers of people with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) recruited from the Frontotemporal Dementia Research Group (Frontier) at Neuroscience Research, Australia. Of this caregiver group, 43 were spousal caregivers and 47 were child caregivers. Caregiver burden and emotional state were evaluated using the short Zarit Burden Interview and the short version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. The Social Network Index was applied to ascertain the social network of the caregiver, while the Intimate Bond Measure was used to evaluate the current quality of the relationship between the caregiver and the person with dementia. The Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale was used to assess severity of dementia. Spousal and child caregivers experienced similar levels of burden, depression, anxiety, and stress, regardless of disease severity. Co-resident child caregivers had smaller social networks and greater burden than live-out caregivers. Dementia severity was key in spousal caregiver burden, whereas caregiver depression was most important in child caregiver burden. Child and spousal caregivers of individuals with FTD share similar levels of burden, influenced by different factors. Future interventions need to account for these differences. PMID:28106550

  18. Factors Underpinning Caregiver Burden in Frontotemporal Dementia Differ in Spouses and their Children.

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    Kaizik, Cassandra; Caga, Jashelle; Camino, Julieta; O'Connor, Claire M; McKinnon, Colleen; Oyebode, Jan R; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R; Mioshi, Eneida

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this observational study were to (1) compare spousal and child caregiver burden; (2) compare co-resident and live-out child caregiver burden; and (3) investigate factors influencing spousal and child caregiver burden. Data was collected from 90 caregivers of people with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) recruited from the Frontotemporal Dementia Research Group (Frontier) at Neuroscience Research, Australia. Of this caregiver group, 43 were spousal caregivers and 47 were child caregivers. Caregiver burden and emotional state were evaluated using the short Zarit Burden Interview and the short version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. The Social Network Index was applied to ascertain the social network of the caregiver, while the Intimate Bond Measure was used to evaluate the current quality of the relationship between the caregiver and the person with dementia. The Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale was used to assess severity of dementia. Spousal and child caregivers experienced similar levels of burden, depression, anxiety, and stress, regardless of disease severity. Co-resident child caregivers had smaller social networks and greater burden than live-out caregivers. Dementia severity was key in spousal caregiver burden, whereas caregiver depression was most important in child caregiver burden. Child and spousal caregivers of individuals with FTD share similar levels of burden, influenced by different factors. Future interventions need to account for these differences.

  19. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

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    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors.

  20. Predictors of improvement in social support: Five-year effects of a structured intervention for caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer's disease.

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    Drentea, Patricia; Clay, Olivio J; Roth, David L; Mittelman, Mary S

    2006-08-01

    Those who provide care at home for a spouse with Alzheimer's disease (AD) endure considerable challenges, including social isolation and increasing caregiving responsibilities. We examine the extent to which an intervention that helps spouse-caregivers mobilize their social support network, helps them better adapt to the caregiving role. We used detailed social support information collected from 200 spouse-caregivers participating in a randomized, controlled trial of enhanced social support services in the USA. Using random effects regression models, we found that individuals in the intervention group reported higher levels of satisfaction with their social support network over the first 5 years of the intervention than those in the support group. Higher levels of emotional support, more visits, and having more network members to whom they felt close were all individually predictive of longitudinal changes in social support network satisfaction. We conclude with a discussion of the importance of having psychological respite when caregivers spend their days in the home and are isolated.

  1. Older People Using e-Health Services—Exploring Frequency of Use and Associations with Perceived Benefits for Spouse Caregivers

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    Madeleine Blusi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ICT, information- and communication technologies, and e-health services are essential for meeting future care demands. Greater knowledge regarding the implementation of e-health services in long-term care for older people is needed. The purpose of the study was to explore older people’s use of e-health services and associations between frequency of use and perceived benefits. In the longitudinal comparative intervention study (n = 65, intervention group participants (n = 42 used an e-health service for 1.5 years. A control group (n = 23 used similar services provided in a traditional manner. Data was collected through questionnaires and analyzed using linear and logistic regressions. Although general use of the Internet was similar in both groups, the e-health group perceived significantly higher benefits. The component information- and education programs, developed specifically for the e-health service, had the highest association with benefits. Conclusion: e-health services targeted at supporting older people who care for a spouse at home can provide benefits which most likely will not be obtained without participation in an organized e-service. Care professionals play an essential role in encouraging spouse caregivers to become e-service users.

  2. Experiences of long-term home care as an informal caregiver to a spouse: gendered meanings in everyday life for female carers.

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    Eriksson, Henrik; Sandberg, Jonas; Hellström, Ingrid

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we explore the gender aspects of long-term caregiving from the perspective of women providing home care for a spouse suffering from dementia. One of the most common circumstances in which a woman gradually steps into a long-term caregiver role at home involves caring for a spouse suffering from dementia. Little attention has been paid to examining the experiences and motivations of such caregivers from a feminist perspective. Twelve women, all of whom were informal caregivers to a partner suffering from dementia, were interviewed on the following themes: the home, their partner's disease, everyday life, their relationship and autonomy. The results of these interviews were analysed in relation to gender identity and social power structures using a feminist perspective. The findings of this study show that the informants frequently reflected on their caregiving activities in terms of both general and heteronormative expectations. The results suggest that the process of heteropolarisation in these cases can be an understood as a consequence of both the spouse's illness and the resulting caring duties. Also, the results suggest that the act of caring leads to introspections concerning perceived 'shortcomings' as a caregiver. Finally, the results indicate that it is important to recognise when the need for support in day-to-day caring is downplayed. Women view their caregiving role and responsibilities as paramount; their other duties, including caring for themselves, are deemed less important. We stress that the intense commitment and responsibilities that women experience in their day-to-day caring must be acknowledged and that it is important for healthcare professionals to find mechanisms for providing choices for female caregivers without neglecting their moral concerns. Female carers face difficulties in always living up to gendered standards and this need to be considered when evaluating policies and practices for family carers. © 2012 Blackwell

  3. Profile of an HIV Testing and Counseling Unit in Bangladesh: Majority of New Diagnoses among Returning Migrant Workers and Spouses.

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    Arunthia Zaidi Urmi

    Full Text Available Analysis of data from HIV testing and counseling (HTC services provides an opportunity to identify important populations for targeting of HIV prevention efforts. Our primary aim was to describe the demographics of clients presenting to HTC in Bangladesh, a low HIV prevalence country. Our secondary aim was to determine the risk factors for HIV positivity among returning migrant workers who were tested.We performed a cross-sectional study of data collected between 2002 and 2010 from the first HTC service established in Bangladesh, located in three large cities.8973 individuals attended HTC services, with 558 (6.2% of clients testing positive for HIV, including 33 children. The majority of those who tested positive were aged 25-44 (71%, male (70%, and married (68%. Key populations considered at increased risk of HIV, such as female sex workers, people who inject drugs, and males who have sex with males accounted for only 11% of adults who tested positive. Notably, 75% of adults testing positive had a history of migrant work or was the spouse of a migrant worker. In multivariable logistic regression of those with a migrant work history presenting for HTC, we found rural residence, working in the Middle East, and longer duration of migrant work to be independently associated with testing positive, and female gender and higher level of education to be negatively associated.These data suggest that in Bangladesh, in addition to targeting traditional key populations, HIV prevention efforts should also focus on migrant workers and their spouses.

  4. Nutrition counseling training changes physician behavior and improves caregiver knowledge acquisition.

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    Pelto, Gretel H; Santos, Iná; Gonçalves, Helen; Victora, Cesar; Martines, José; Habicht, Jean-Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Physician behavior and caregiver retention of nutrition advice were examined as potential mediating factors in the success of a nutrition counseling efficacy trial in Pelotas, Brazil, which reduced growth faltering in children 12-24 mo old. After pair-matching on socioeconomic status and nutrition indicators, municipal health centers were randomly assigned to an intervention group, in which physicians were trained with an IMCI-derived (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) nutrition counseling protocol, or to a control group, without continuing education in nutrition. In a substudy of the larger trial, direct observation of consultations, followed by home interviews with mothers, provided data on physician counseling behavior and mothers' retention of nutrition advice. Trained providers were more likely to engage in nutrition counseling (P < 0.013) and to deliver more extensive advice (P < 0.02). They also used communication skills designed to improve rapport and ensure that mothers understood the advice (P < 0.01). Mothers who received advice from trained providers had high rates of recalling the messages on specific foods (95 vs.27%; P < 0.01) and feeding practice and food preparation recommendations (90 vs. 20%; P < 0.01), whereas the proportions of the messages recalled on breast-feeding (60% vs. 30%) did not differ significantly (P < 0.20). The training course contained several elements that may explain why intervention group mothers were better able to recall nutrition advice. These include locally appropriate messages, tools for assessing individual problems, and counseling skills.

  5. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview Short Form (ZBI-12 in spouses of Veterans with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury, Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version

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    Mohammad T. Rajabi Mashhadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  To test the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-12 in the Iranian opulation.  Methods: After translating and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire into Persian, 100 caregiver spouses of Iran-Iraq war (1980-88 veterans with chronic spinal cord injury who live in the city of Mashhad, Iran, invited to participate in the study. The Persian version of ZBI-12 accompanied with the Persian SF-36 was completed by the caregivers to test validity of the Persian ZBI-12.A Pearson`s correlation coefficient was calculated for validity testing.In order to assess reliability of the Persian ZBI-12, we administered the ZBI-12 randomly in 48 caregiver spouses again 3 days later. Results:  Generally, the internal consistency of the questionnaire was found to be strong (Cronbach’s alpha 0.77. Intercorrelationmatrix between the different domains of ZBI-12 at test-retest was 0.78. The results revealed that majority of questions the Persian ZBI_12 have a significant correlation to each other. In terms of validity, our results showed that there is significant correlations between some domains of the Persian version the Short Form Health Survey -36 with the Persian Zarit Burden Interview such as Q1 with Role Physical (P=0.03,General Health (P=0.034,Social Functional (0.037, Mental Health (0.023 and Q3 with Physical Function (P=0.001,Viltality (0.002, Socil Function (0.001.  Conclusions:  Our findings suggest that the Zarit Burden Interview Persian version is both a valid and reliable instrument for measuring the burden of caregivers of individuals with chronic spinal cord injury.

  6. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview Short Form (ZBI-12 in spouses of Veterans with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury, Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad T. Rajabi Mashhadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  To test the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-12 in the Iranian opulation.  Methods: After translating and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire into Persian, 100 caregiver spouses of Iran-Iraq war (1980-88 veterans with chronic spinal cord injury who live in the city of Mashhad, Iran, invited to participate in the study. The Persian version of ZBI-12 accompanied with the Persian SF-36 was completed by the caregivers to test validity of the Persian ZBI-12.A Pearson`s correlation coefficient was calculated for validity testing.In order to assess reliability of the Persian ZBI-12, we administered the ZBI-12 randomly in 48 caregiver spouses again 3 days later. Results:  Generally, the internal consistency of the questionnaire was found to be strong (Cronbach’s alpha 0.77. Intercorrelationmatrix between the different domains of ZBI-12 at test-retest was 0.78. The results revealed that majority of questions the Persian ZBI_12 have a significant correlation to each other. In terms of validity, our results showed that there is significant correlations between some domains of the Persian version the Short Form Health Survey -36 with the Persian Zarit Burden Interview such as Q1 with Role Physical (P=0.03,General Health (P=0.034,Social Functional (0.037, Mental Health (0.023 and Q3 with Physical Function (P=0.001,Viltality (0.002, Socil Function (0.001.  Conclusions:  Our findings suggest that the Zarit Burden Interview Persian version is both a valid and reliable instrument for measuring the burden of caregivers of individuals with chronic spinal cord injury.

  7. Early counselling and support for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: a qualitative study on outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth V; Waldorff, Frans B; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2008-01-01

    revealed that patients found support groups relevant: they found it stimulating to be with peers, it supported their self-esteem, and it supported them in finding new ways of managing everyday life and social relations. During and after the intervention, caregivers were better able to cope....... CONCLUSION: Early tailored counselling and support may improve patients' and caregivers' opportunities to adapt to the challenges of Alzheimer's disease and to maintain well-being....

  8. Caregiving burden and psychological distress among spouses of bipolar patients – comparative analysis of subtype I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Izabela Arciszewska

    2015-12-01

    The specific types of bipolar disorder (I and II have the different impact on partners, which affects their subjective and objective burden and relationship with patients, indicating a real need to offer them an adequate help, depending on subtype of patient’s bipolar disorder, as well as the spouse sex.

  9. Wellness, Perceived Stress, Mattering, and Marital Satisfaction among Medical Residents and Their Spouses: Implications for Education and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Anne S.; Myers, Jane E.; Tingle, Lynne R.; Powers, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies document that medical education is demanding and stressful, yet few studies have examined the effects of medical training on spouses and medical marriages. Eighty-three individuals (42 couples) living in medical marriages completed questionnaires measuring marital satisfaction, perceived stress, general mattering, and wellness.…

  10. Reducing Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure of Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Class-Based Health Education and Smoking Cessation Counseling for Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Wang; Zhiqiang Huang; Mei Yang; Fuzhi Wang; Shuiyuan Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess counseling to caregivers and classroom health education interventions to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure of children aged 5–6 years in China. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial in two preschools in Changsha, China, 65 children aged 5–6 years old and their smoker caregivers (65) were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (no intervention) groups (n = 32). In the intervention group, caregivers received self-help materials and smoking ces...

  11. Counsellors contact dementia caregivers - predictors of utilisation in a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Counselling of family members is an established procedure in the support of dementia patients' relatives. In absence of widespread specialised dementia care services in most countries, however, counselling services are often not taken up or only very late in the course of the disease. Object In order to promote acceptance of this service, a new counselling concept was implemented where general practitioners recommended family counsellors, who then actively contacted the family caregivers to offer counselling ("Counsellors Contact Caregivers", CCC. The research questions were: To what extent can the rate of family counselling be increased by CCC? What are the predictors for usage of this form of family counselling? Methods The study started in June 2006 in Middle Franconia for patients with mild to moderate dementia. At baseline, 110 family caregivers were offered counselling based on the CCC guideline. Data was analysed from 97 patient-caregiver dyads who received counselling for one year. The mean age of the patients with dementia (67 women and 30 men was 80.7 years (SD = 6.2. The mean age of their primary family caregivers (68 women, 23 men was 60.8 years (SD = 13.8. Results 35 family members (36% made use of more extensive counselling (more than one personal contact. By contrast, 29 family members (30% had no personal contact or only one personal contact (33 cases, 34%. The factors "spouse" (p = .001 and "degree of care" (p = .005 were identified as significant predictors for acceptance of extensive counselling. Conclusions Actively contacting patients and their caregivers is a successful means of establishing early and frequent contact with family members of patients with mild to moderate dementia. Use of extensive counselling is made especially by spouses of patients requiring intensified care. Trial Registration ISRCTN68329593

  12. Psychological Distress of Caregivers: The Mediator Effect of Caregiving Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, A. M.; Deeg, D. J. H.; van Dyck, R.; Jonker, C.

    1998-01-01

    Examines whether the role of caregiving appraisal explains why stressors in the caregiving situation affect caregivers' psychological distress. Results show that for spouse caregivers, perceived pressure explains the association between their caregiving tasks and psychological distress. Results also show clear mediator effects of perceived…

  13. Wife Caregivers of Frail Elderly Veterans: Correlates of Caregiver Satisfaction and Caregiver Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lorraine T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated correlates of satisfaction and strain in 80 wife caregivers of frail elderly veterans. Support from spouse was the strongest positive predictor of satisfaction with caregiving and the strongest negative predictor of caregiver strain. Self efficacy was the strongest predictor of caregiver life satisfaction. (Author)

  14. Reducing Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure of Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Class-Based Health Education and Smoking Cessation Counseling for Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess counseling to caregivers and classroom health education interventions to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure of children aged 5–6 years in China. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial in two preschools in Changsha, China, 65 children aged 5–6 years old and their smoker caregivers (65 were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 33 and control (no intervention groups (n = 32. In the intervention group, caregivers received self-help materials and smoking cessation counseling from a trained counselor, while their children were given classroom-based participatory health education. Children’s urinary cotinine level and the point prevalence of caregiver quitting were measured at baseline and after 6 months. Results: At the 6-month follow-up, children’s urinary cotinine was significantly lower (Z = –3.136; p = 0.002 and caregivers’ 7-day quit rate was significantly higher (34.4% versus 0% (p < 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02–1.26 in the intervention than control group. Conclusions: Helping caregivers quitting smoke combined with classroom-based health education was effective in reducing children’s environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Larger-scale trials are warranted.

  15. Marital Satisfaction as Perceived by the Medical Student's Spouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlow, Arlinda Dishman; Mullins, Stella Churchill

    1976-01-01

    Medical student marriages were examined in order to identify areas of stress, evaluate the congruence between expectations and actualities in the marital partner's role performance as perceived by the spouse, investigate the spouse's attitudes toward marital counseling, and determine whether a marital counseling service should be made available.…

  16. Improving caregiver well-being delays nursing home placement of patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, Mary S; Haley, William E; Clay, Olivio J; Roth, David L

    2006-11-14

    To determine the effectiveness of a counseling and support intervention for spouse caregivers in delaying time to nursing home placement of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify the mechanisms through which the intervention accomplished this goal. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of an enhanced counseling and support intervention compared to usual care. Participants were a referred volunteer sample of 406 spouse caregivers of community-dwelling patients who had enrolled in the study over a 9.5-year period. The intervention consisted of six sessions of individual and family counseling, support group participation, and continuous availability of ad hoc telephone counseling. Structured questionnaires were administered at baseline and at regular follow-up intervals, every 4 months for the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Cox proportional hazard models were used to test the effects of the intervention on the time to nursing home placement for the patients after controlling for multiple time-invariant and time-dependent predictors of placement. Patients whose spouses received the intervention experienced a 28.3% reduction in the rate of nursing home placement compared with usual care controls (hazard ratio = 0.717 after covariate adjustment, p = 0.025). The difference in model-predicted median time to placement was 557 days. Improvements in caregivers' satisfaction with social support, response to patient behavior problems, and symptoms of depression collectively accounted for 61.2% of the intervention's beneficial impact on placement. Greater access to effective programs of counseling and support could yield considerable benefits for caregivers, patients with Alzheimer disease, and society.

  17. Differences in Outcomes of Caregiver Support Services for Male and Female Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Mei Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine whether different types of caregiver support services are associated with different outcomes for male and female caregivers. Information was obtained on 148 caregivers’ use of three types of support services provided by government-contracted agencies: counseling and education services, respite and supplemental services, and financial services. Five caregiver outcomes were included. Use of counseling and education services and financial services was associated with better caregiver outcomes in female caregivers, but not male caregivers. Among caregivers using respite and supplemental types of services, male caregivers showed better outcomes than did female caregivers. Female caregivers who used respite and supplemental services showed worse outcomes in caregiver mastery and caregiver satisfaction than those who did not use the services. Male and female caregivers responded differently to the caregiver support service. Providing female caregivers with counseling services along with respite services may result in added benefits for female caregivers.

  18. Telephone Support During Overseas Deployment for Military Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    depression, and coping. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spouses, social support, stress disorders, communication, combat disorders 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...chronic schizophrenia caregivers 7 Supporting Parent Caregivers of Injured Veterans – VA HSR&D Specific Aims This randomized clinical trial will...test a behavioral caregiving intervention that has been used successfully for dementia and SCI/D caregivers to provide services to stressed and

  19. Reintegration the Role of Spouse Telephone Battlemind Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Afghanistan service members. The goal is to build spouses’ resilience to cope with reintegration challenges, help them serve as a support system for... reintegration difficulties; strategies to support the returning service member; and cues to alert spouses when to seek mental health services for the...available on request) Spouse Telephone Support (STS). In May 2010, Public Law 111-163 Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010

  20. Reconstructing Marital Closeness while Caring for a Spouse with Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylstein, Craig; Hayes, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how people caring for a spouse with Alzheimer's disease reconstruct the meaning of closeness within their marriage. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 men and 15 women. The authors discovered that significant changes in the social identity of the impaired spouse may have important implications for how caregivers view…

  1. Reconstructing Marital Closeness while Caring for a Spouse with Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylstein, Craig; Hayes, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how people caring for a spouse with Alzheimer's disease reconstruct the meaning of closeness within their marriage. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 men and 15 women. The authors discovered that significant changes in the social identity of the impaired spouse may have important implications for how caregivers view…

  2. Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Caregiver Depression and Burden: What Noncaregiving Adults Can Learn from Active Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; Han, GiBaeg; Anderson, Cristina L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined similarities and differences between active caregivers (adult children and spouses whose family member had Alzheimer's disease) and not-as-yet caregiving adults (adult children and spouses whose family members are older, but do not as yet suffer from Alzheimer's disease). The objective was to determine what factors predict…

  3. Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Caregiver Depression and Burden: What Noncaregiving Adults Can Learn from Active Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; Han, GiBaeg; Anderson, Cristina L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined similarities and differences between active caregivers (adult children and spouses whose family member had Alzheimer's disease) and not-as-yet caregiving adults (adult children and spouses whose family members are older, but do not as yet suffer from Alzheimer's disease). The objective was to determine what factors predict…

  4. Gender and Control among Spouses of the Cognitively Impaired: A Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Baila

    1987-01-01

    Explored perceptions of caring for cognitively impaired spouses in 15 elderly spouses. Male and female caregiving spouses differed in how they perceived dimensions of control as reflected in interpretation of the disease process, assumption of authority, control over the environment, and use of social support. (Author)

  5. More caregiving, less working: caregiving roles and gender difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonjung; Tang, Fengyan

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the relationship of caregiving roles to labor force participation using the nationally representative data from the Health and Retirement Study. The sample was composed of men and women aged 50 to 61 years (N = 5,119). Caregiving roles included caregiving for spouse, parents, and grandchildren; a summary of three caregiving roles was used to indicate multiple caregiving roles. Bivariate analysis using chi-square and t tests and binary logistic regression models were applied. Results show that women caregivers for parents and/or grandchildren were less likely to be in the labor force than non-caregivers and that caregiving responsibility was not related to labor force participation for the sample of men. Findings have implication for supporting family caregivers, especially women, to balance work and caregiving commitments. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Cancer caregiving tasks and consequences and their associations with caregiver status and the caregiver's relationship to the patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Seriously ill patients often depend on their informal caregivers to help and support them through the disease course. This study investigated informal cancer caregivers' experiences of caregiving tasks and consequences and how caregiver status (primary vs. non-primary caregiver......-primary caregivers experienced most problems with getting time off from work. Spouses/partners and/or parents experienced the highest workload, most lack of time for social relations, most financial difficulties, and had the greatest need for seeing a psychologist. They furthermore experienced the highest degree......) and the caregiver's relationship to the patient (spouse/partner, etc.) are related to these experiences. METHODS: In a cross-sectional questionnaire study, randomly selected cancer patients with a range of diagnoses and disease stages were invited to pass on the 'Cancer Caregiving Tasks, Consequences and Needs...

  7. Hope in Huntington's disease A survey in counseling patients with Huntington's disease,as well as the caregivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerzy T Marcinkowski; Daniel Zielonka

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is difficult to attract interest in non-compulsory, preventive, medical care, and persons diagnosed with certain diseases often ignore the existence of these diseases. However, Huntington's disease (HD) is an exception. OBJECTIVE: To qualitatively analyze factors motivating HD patients to participate in a study, namely the European Huntington's Disease Network (EHDN) REGISTRY. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational survey was conducted in the EHDN Study Site in Pozna(n), Poland between 2007 and 2008.PARTICIPANTS: The study involved 22 persons affected with HD and 3 pre-symptomatic individuals, totaling 9 males and 16 females. The 24 participants in this study had 24 different caregivers. A total of 25 symptomatic or pre-symptomatic subjects participated in the initial REGISTRY visit, as well as 6 in the second, and 1 in the third. All subjects did not know each other prior to the visit. METHODS: A mutation in the IT15 gene was confirmed in each patient or pre-symptomatic mutation carrier. An in-depth interview produced detailed information on the HD patients, as well as the caregivers, for the REGISTRY study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A qualitative analysis of the factors motivating HD patients and the pre-symptomatic mutation carriers to participate in the REGISTRY longitudinal, observational, research project was performed. RESULTS: The primary motivating factor for involvement of HD patients and the caregivers in the REGISTRY study was the hope that an effective HD therapy would soon be discovered. In HD patients and the pre-symptomatic group, the response to participate in the REGISTRY project reached 100%, despite the fact that they knew the project was only an observational study. CONCLUSION: Patient hope is thought to be a factor for engaging in preventive, therapeutic activities. However, this is rarely mentioned in medical papers and clinical textbooks, and is usually overlooked in medical teaching. Clearly, efforts should be made to

  8. Caregiver Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Caregiver stress Caregiver stress > A-Z Health Topics Caregiver fact sheet (PDF, ... receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Caregiver stress Caregivers care for someone with an illness, injury, ...

  9. Caregivers with Visual Impairments: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhr, Patti; Martinez, Bethany; Williams, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Persons who are elderly, visually impaired, and primary caregivers for ailing or disabled spouses or significant others are a unique population that has not been studied previously. By definition, "informal caregivers" are family members or friends who provide unpaid day-to-day assistance with activities of daily living and are familiar with the…

  10. 38 CFR 3.50 - Spouse and surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Spouse and surviving... surviving spouse. (a) Spouse. “Spouse” means a person of the opposite sex whose marriage to the veteran meets the requirements of § 3.1(j). (b) Surviving spouse. Except as provided in § 3.52,...

  11. Caregiver stress in traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Aims\\ud Many patients experience physical, behavioural, cognitive and emotional problems following traumatic brain injury (TBI). They may require continuing care for many years, most of which is provided by informal caregivers, such as spouses, parents, or other family members. The caregiving role is associated with a range of adverse effects including anxiety, depression, poor physical health and lowered quality of life. This article explores issues around caregiver stress; highlighting inte...

  12. What Are the Caregiver's Rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your feelings with friends or joining a support group may be a good way to ease the pressure you feel as a caregiver. The Well Spouse Association wellspouse.org A nonprofit group formed to provide support and advocacy for the ...

  13. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Patient and Spouse Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Roanne G.; Brice, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    This second article of a two-part case study focuses on the experiences of a patient and his spouse (caregiver) when a neurological trauma occurs. It is the personal account when A.B. survived a vertebral artery aneurysm and hemorrhage resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage. It is also an in-depth post-trauma account from two speech-language…

  14. Cause-specific mortality among spouses of Parkinson disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. METHODS: All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson...... disease between 1986 and 2009 were identified, and each case was matched to five population controls. We further identified all spouses of those with Parkinson disease (n = 8,515) and also the spouses of controls (n = 43,432). All spouses were followed in nationwide registries until 2011. RESULTS: Among...... men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1...

  15. Spousal role and caregiver burden in HIV affected families in Anhui Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Julie; Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Luo, Sitong; Ji, Guoping

    2017-03-09

    This study examined the burden experienced by various roles of family caregivers of people living with HIV (PLH), in particular spouses vs. non-spouses. A total of 475 family members of PLH were recruited from Anhui Province, China. Participants responded to a survey using the Computer Assisted Personal Interview method. The assessment collected data on demographic characteristics and their perceived caregiver burden, which was compared between spouses and non-spouses. Multiple regression models were built to identify factors associated with caregiver burden. About 64.4% of our study participants were female and the mean age was 42.1 years. Among various relationships to PLH, almost half reported being a spouse. Spouses reported significantly higher caregiver burden than non-spouses. In addition, older age and lower family income were significantly associated with higher level of caregiver burden. Among the subsample of spouses, significantly higher level of caregiver burden was identified among wives. Future studies should give special consideration to address the needs of female spouses in order to reduce their caregiver burden.

  16. Does Gender Moderate Factors Associated with Whether Spouses Are the Sole Providers of IADL Care to Their Partners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Sheila; Dunkle, Ruth E; Schroepfer, Tracy; Shen, Huei-Wern

    2010-07-01

    We explored whether gender moderated the influence of other factors on solo spousal caregiving. The subsample (N = 452) from the AHEAD study included elderly care recipients (CRs) receiving IADL assistance and their spouses. Logistic regression modeled the likelihood of solo spousal IADL care. Gender moderation was tested by product terms between CRs' gender and measures of partners' health, potential helpers, and sociodemographic characteristics. As numbers of CRs' IADLs and couples' proximate daughters increased, wives less often received care solely from their husbands, but husbands' receipt of care from their wives was unaffected. Age differences between spouses and CRs affected solo spousal caregiving to wives and husbands in opposite ways. Regardless of gender, CRs' number of ADL limitations and spouses with IADL or ADL limitations reduced the likelihood of solo spouse care. Identifying circumstances influencing solo spouse caregiving differently among couples with frail wives and husbands facilitates gender sensitive services.

  17. Predictors of loneliness in caregivers of persons with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Cynthia; Fazio, Emily; Hartsock, Gina; Kelley, Livia; Urbanski, Shawna; Russell, Dan

    2009-09-01

    This study examined loneliness among caregivers of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). The sample included 70 caregivers (74% female; 96% spouses) who were currently living with the patient. A postal survey was sent to caregivers of persons with PD on the mailing list of a regional Parkinson association; response rate was 39%. Assessment instruments included the UCLA Loneliness Scale, Social Provisions Scale, Hoehn and Yahr (caregiver version), a perceived Self-Efficacy Scale developed previously for use with PD caregivers, and questions related to both patient and caregiver characteristics. Caregivers reported more loneliness than all similar normative groups except Alzheimer caregivers (Ploneliness. Results indicated that patient variables accounted for only 12% of the variance in loneliness, whereas caregiver variables accounted for an additional 46% of the variance (Ploneliness were less education, lower perceived self-efficacy (both Ploneliness (Ploneliness was significantly predicted by caregiver rather than patient variables, it is possible that strategic interventions for caregivers could ameliorate loneliness.

  18. What causes grief in dementia caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchol-Biedermann, Katarzyna; Mojs, Ewa; Gregersen, Rikke; Maibom, Kirsten; Millán-Calenti, José C; Maseda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease in the world. Most AD patients become dependent on their relatives, i.e. family caregivers. Providing care to a person with AD influences caregiver's life and leads to feelings of grief, which often precede caregiver depression. The purpose of the article was to evaluate the Meuser and Marwit Caregiver Grief Inventory (MM-CGI-50) for use in Polish family caregivers and to find out determinants of grief of family caregivers of AD individuals living in Poland. A sample of 151 spouse and adult child caregivers of community-dwelling AD patients (95 females and 56 males) was interviewed to determine the influence of such factors as caregiver's age, gender, family relation to the care recipient (CR) and caregiving-related changes in caregiver's working time, leisure time and material status to find out the impact of caregiving role on intensity of caregiver grief. Caregiver grief was measured by means of MM-CGI-50. Additionally, carers were administered a questionnaire including patient's and caregiver's demographics. Also, CR's dementia assessment was informant-based and determined with investigator-administered clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale. Of all analyzed factors, only caregiver's informant dementia rating significantly influenced caregiver grief. To conclude, the effect of caregiver's age, gender, family relation to the CR and caregiving-related changes in caregiver's working time; leisure time and material status could not be found. To add, MM-CGI-50 can be effectively used to assess grief in Polish family caregivers of AD patients.

  19. Spousal Caregiver Perspectives on a Person-Centered Social Program for Partners With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Areum; Radel, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    This qualitative study explored spousal caregiver perspectives on the experience and impact of a person-centered social program for partners with dementia. Interviews with 5 caregivers and the spouses with dementia were conducted 7 to 8 months after the program ended to explore the sustained impact of the program. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to support in-depth exploration of interviews. Three themes emerged including benefits of the program for caregivers, initial expectations and later perspectives of caregivers about the program, and conflicting values and perspectives between caregivers and the spouses. These findings suggest participation in a person-centered social program by people with dementia benefits their caregivers, by meeting the caregivers' desire for their spouses to increase social participation and engagement in meaningful activities. Participation in the program provided a sustained benefit to one couple in particular, by encouraging the caregiver to resume arranging activities the couple once enjoyed but now had difficulty pursuing.

  20. The supportive expatriate spouse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the influence of accompanying expatriate spouses has emphasized the negative impact on the business expatriates that could contribute to unsuccessful outcomes of the foreign assignments. But spouses' influences could also be positive. Applying ethnographic field-work methodol....... These findings are consistent with recent theoretical developments focusing on positive outcomes of the work-family interface and social capital theory and are in line with empirical research on repatriation and post-assignment careers.......-work methodology, this study investigated female spouses' involvement in the career of a sample of Danish business expatriates living in the same compound in Saudi Arabia. Results showed that the accompanying partners were active in trying to support and further their expatriate husbands' immediate careers...

  1. Family Functioning and Communication in Spouses of Patients with Parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seo Young; Yang, Myung Hwa; Lee, Jung Ah; Jang, Wooyoung; Lee, Chong Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with parkinsonism exhibit motor symptoms, cognitive impairment, and neuropsychiatric changes, and these symptoms increase caregiver burden. Family dynamics can be influenced by the presence of comorbidities, which is especially important in diseases causing caregiver burden. We investigated the effects of spousal parkinsonism on family functioning and communication. Methods Couples without parkinsonism, who visited hospital-based family practices, were recruited by 28 family physicians from 22 hospitals between April 2009 and June 2011; patients with parkinsonism and their spouses were recruited from a single institution. The participants completed questionnaires on demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, family functioning (the Korean version of the Family Adaptation and Cohesion Evaluation Scale [FACES] III), and family communication (the Family Communication Scale of the FACES-IV). We compared family functioning and communication between spouses of the patients with and without parkinsonism. Results The mean family adaptability and cohesion scores of the spouses of the patients with parkinsonism were 23.09±6.48 and 32.40±8.43, respectively, whereas those of the control group were 23.84±5.88 and 34.89±7.59, respectively. Family functioning and family communication were significantly different between the spouses of individuals with and without parkinsonism. After adjusting for age, sex, income, and cardiovascular disease in the logistic regression analysis, family functioning was found to significantly deteriorate in the spouses of patients with parkinsonism but not the control group. Family communication decreased significantly in spouses of patients with parkinsonism. Conclusion Family functioning and family communication significantly deteriorated in spouses of patients with parkinsonism. PMID:28197328

  2. Spouses Needs for Professional Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Danielson, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Spouses' experiences with their partners' hospitalization and the spouses' relationship with nurses and physicians were examined. Health professionals, should reflect more on the importance. of an ongoing dialogue with the spouses of patients, ensuring they receive correct information to become m...

  3. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  4. Caregiving Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was developed and constructed. Comparing Survey Stats and Understanding Why They Differ explains this in more detail. ... Room Social Media Hub Caregiver Action Network Caregiver Action Network ...

  5. Spouses of persons with dementia: Attachment, loss and coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidun Ingebretsen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTThe purpose is to study how spouses of persons with dementia cope with losses and caregiving tasks during thedementia process and how their coping is related to the individual's and the couple's history of attachment. Thesample consists of 28 couples where one of the spouses has dementia. The caregiving spouses, aged 60-87, areinterviewed at an early stage of dementia and are followed up every 6-9 months over a periode of three years.The life situation is continually changing, and coping methods are repeatedly challenged. Coping with lossesand readjustments are dependent upon their need of the partner to feel safe. Different patterns of attachment behaviourare seen. Compulsive caregiving spouses attend to their spouse beyond their needs. Spouses in anxiousattachment often panic and try to fight back the symptoms of dementia. A pattern of compulsive self-sufficiencymanifests itself as arguing or withdrawal from the partner. Secure attachment makes it easier to accept thechanges, keep in contact and care. To understand the strains and coping of the spouses, we need to understandhow dementia triggers patterns of attachment behaviour. They need more than information on dementia andtraining in handling various symptoms. They need empathy and individually adapted interventions.INTRODUCTIONEmerging dementia with gradual mental deterioriationand increasing dependency ending in death, is frighteningto those involved, both to the person himself andto the family. The new situation disturbes an establishedbalance in the relationship and interferes withcommunication. Meaningful mutual contact and sharedmeaning is gradually lost.In the book ‘Living in the Labyrinth’ Diana FrielMcGowin, who had received a diagnosis of dementia,writes: ’My every molecule seems to scream out that Ido, indeed, exist, and that existence must be valued bysomeone! Without someone to walk this labyrinth bymy side, without the touch of a fellow traveller

  6. Telephone Networks Connect Caregiving Families of Alzheimer's Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Catherine Chase; Pynoos, Jon

    1988-01-01

    Describes telephone network bringing family caregivers of Alzheimer's victims together over telephone in rotating pattern of twosomes. Explains how five caregiving spouses and five adult children were matched and connected over three months. Describes program's 25 telephone-accessed audiotapes that guided networks and provided information on…

  7. The Effect of a Family Therapy and Technology-Based Intervention on Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisdorfer, Carl; Czaja, Sara J.; Loewenstein, David A.; Rubert, Mark P.; Arguelles, Soledad; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Szapocznik, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The majority of persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are cared for at home by a family member such as a spouse or daughter. Caregiving places enormous demands on these caregivers, and the negative consequences associated with caregiving are well documented. This paper reports results from the Miami site of the REACH (Resources for…

  8. Fulfilling a sense of duty : how men and women giving care to spouses with multiple sclerosis interpret this role

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeije, H.R.; Doorne-Huiskes, A. van

    2003-01-01

    This qualitative study examines how spouses experience caregiving when predominantly motivated by a sense of duty and addresses whether any differences between female and male caregivers can be detected. For our purpose semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight male and five female

  9. Marital relationship quality in early-stage dementia: perspectives from people with dementia and their spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Linda; Nelis, Sharon M; Whitaker, Christopher J; Martyr, Anthony; Markova, Ivana S; Roth, Ilona; Woods, Robert T; Morris, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Spouse caregivers of people with dementia (PwD) report relatively poor marital relationship quality (RQ), but few studies have obtained the perspective of the PwD, examined discrepancies between spouses, or considered changes in RQ over time. This study explored caregiver and PwD perceptions of RQ, identified associated factors, and examined changes over an 18-month period. Participants were 54 couples where one spouse had early-stage dementia and 54 were control couples. RQ was assessed with the Positive Affect Index. Measures of mood, stress, and quality of life (QoL) were also administered. The clinical couples were followed up after 9 and 18 months. Caregivers gave significantly lower RQ ratings than controls. PwD ratings did not differ significantly from those of caregivers or controls. Dyadic discrepancies were significantly greater in the clinical than in the control group. Caregiver ratings were associated with stress, whereas PwD ratings were associated with depression and QoL. Discrepancies were associated with caregiver stress and with PwD mood, QoL, and age. Caregiver ratings declined significantly over time; PwD ratings did not decline significantly, but showed different trends for men and women. It is important to consider RQ when considering how to support couples where one partner has early-stage dementia.

  10. Family Caregivers' Perspectives on Institutionalization Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Aloen L.

    Family caregivers may face ethical dilemmas when deciding whether a parent or spouse should enter a nursing home. There is considerable evidence that decisions about institutionalization are usually stressful and difficult for family members. This study obtained qualitative and quantitative data from two studies conducted at the Margaret Blenkner…

  11. Behavior Modification in Marriage Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Emily; Redfering, David L.

    1975-01-01

    The spouses were counseled jointly with a cognitive approach and separately with behavior modification techniques for the husband's obesity and the wife's lack of affective verbalization. After eight weeks, the husband had lost thirty pounds and the wife's affective language had increased markedly. (Author)

  12. 38 CFR 21.3046 - Periods of eligibility; spouses and surviving spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; spouses and surviving spouses. 21.3046 Section 21.3046 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT...; spouses and surviving spouses. This section states how VA will compute the beginning date, the ending date and the length of a spouse's or surviving spouse's period of eligibility. The period of eligibility...

  13. 76 FR 33999 - Spouse and Surviving Spouse; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... toll-free number). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On February 6, 1997 (62 FR 5528), VA amended 38 CFR part... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Parts 18 and 21 RIN 2900-AI36 Spouse and Surviving Spouse; Technical Amendment...

  14. The modifying role of caregiver burden on predictors of quality of life of caregivers of hospitalized chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon-Gyu; Myong, Jun-Pyo; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2015-10-01

    Caregiver burden is an important predictor of quality of life (QoL) among caregivers of stroke patients. While caregiver burden and QoL might be closely related, caregiver burden seems also to be a potential modifier of the associations between patients' and caregivers' characteristics and caregivers' QoL. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of caregiver burden in caregivers of hospitalized chronic stroke patients and the predictors of caregivers' QoL by level of caregiver burden. A total of 238 patients and their caregivers were interviewed using questionnaires consisting of the Zarit Burden Interview and the Korean-version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF. Multiple hierarchical regression analyses were performed to determine the predictors of caregivers' QoL among caregivers stratified by median caregiver burden score (high/low). Caregiver burden had a modifying effect on caregivers' QoL. In caregivers with high burden, the patient characteristics of being unemployed and the caregiver characteristics of poor health status, lower income, and being a spouse were negative predictors of caregivers' QoL. In caregivers with low burden, the patient characteristics of being hospitalized for a longer duration and the caregiver characteristics of poor health status were negative predictors of caregivers' QoL (all ps stroke patients, particularly with regard to their health status and financial problems. Further studies are needed to examine the impact of factors not examined in the Korean cultural context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Culturally Sensitive Dementia Caregiving Models and Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Andrew P.; Mitcham-Smith, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Family caregiving for individuals with dementia is an increasingly complex issue that affects the caregivers' and care recipients' physical, mental, and emotional health. This article presents 3 key culturally sensitive caregiver models along with clinical interventions relevant for mental health counseling professionals.

  16. Restricted participation in stroke caregivers: who is at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorovich, Alisa; Forde, Samantha; Levinson, Dahlia; Bastawrous, Marina; Cheung, Angela M; Cameron, Jill I

    2015-07-01

    To identify caregiver-, stroke survivor-, and caregiving situation-related factors that are associated with caregivers' restriction from participation in their normative activities (ie, participation restriction) over the first 2 years poststroke. Longitudinal cohort study. Acute care facilities and community. A secondary data analysis of caregiver/survivor dyads (N=399). Not applicable. Data were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months poststroke. The primary outcome was caregivers' participation restriction and was assessed using the Caregiver Impact Scale. Caregivers also provided demographic information and completed standardized measures to capture assistance provided, mastery, and depression. From stroke survivors we collected demographic characteristics, stroke severity, and cognitive and physical functioning. Data were analyzed using individual growth curve modeling. Participation restriction level improved over time. Caregiver factors associated with restricted participation included younger age, being employed, higher depression, and lower mastery level. Stroke survivor factors associated with caregivers' restricted participation included hemorrhagic stroke, more severe stroke, more physical and memory impairments, and lower participation. Significant factors related to the caregiving situation included providing high levels of assistance and caring for a spouse. Depressed younger caregivers, with low levels of mastery, who provide high-intensity support to spouses with cognitive difficulties may be at risk. Screening for these factors may help identify stroke families at risk for poor outcomes and may be used to more efficiently allocate health resources. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictors of Loneliness in Caregivers of Persons with Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McRae, Cynthia; Fazio, Emily; Hartsock, Gina; Kelley, Livia; Urbanski, Shawna; Russell, Dan

    2009-01-01

    This study examined loneliness among caregivers of individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The sample included 70 caregivers (74% female; 96% spouses) who were currently living with the patient. A postal survey was sent to caregivers of persons with PD on the mailing list of a regional Parkinson association; response rate was 39%. Assessment instruments included the UCLA Loneliness Scale, Social Provisions Scale, Hoehn and Yahr (caregiver version), a perceived Self-Efficacy Scale developed...

  18. Impact of mild to severe hemophilia on education and work by US men, women, and caregivers of children with hemophilia B: The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Susan; Molter, Don; Dunn, Spencer; Hunter, Susan; Peltier, Skye; Haugstad, Kimberly; Frick, Neil; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2017-04-01

    The psychosocial impact of hemophilia on work was recently investigated in the Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) study. The findings revealed that hemophilia had an impact for adults with moderate/severe hemophilia and caregivers of children with hemophilia. HERO did not specifically evaluate impact on education in adults/children with mild/moderate hemophilia or the impact on employment of spouses/partners of caregivers of affected children. The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study evaluated the impact of hemophilia on the lives of adult men/women with mild-severe hemophilia B and caregivers of boys/girls with hemophilia B and their spouses/partners. Many adults with hemophilia B (94%) reported that hemophilia had a negative effect on their ability to complete a formal education, often attributed to the inability to attend or concentrate in school as a result of hemophilia-related bleeding or pain. Most adults with hemophilia B (95%) and caregivers/partners (89%/84%) indicated that hemophilia had a negative impact on employment. Most adults with hemophilia were employed (81%), with construction/manufacturing (35%) as the most frequently reported industry; many worked in jobs requiring manual labor (39%). Of those unemployed, 62% never worked, and those who stopped working reported that they left the workforce due to financial issues (59%), including insurance coverage/co-pays, or hemophilia-related issues (55%). Nearly one-third of caregivers voluntarily left the workforce to care for children with hemophilia. These results suggest a need to focus more effort on career counseling for adults with hemophilia B and caregivers of affected children, especially around mild/moderate hemophilia, as this population may not be as well informed regarding potential impact in school and the workplace.

  19. Life satisfaction in spouses of stroke survivors and control subjects: A 7-year follow-up of participants in the Sahlgrenska Academy study on ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Abzhandadze

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate life satisfaction in spouses of middle-aged stroke survivors from the long-term perspective and to identify factors that explain their life satisfaction. Design: Cross-sectional, case-control study. Subjects: Cohabitant spouses of survivors of ischaemic stroke aged < 70 years at stroke onset (n = 248 and spouses of controls (n = 246. Methods: Assessments were made 7 years after inclusion to the study. Spouses’ life satisfaction was assessed with the Fugl-Meyer’s Life Satisfaction Check-List (LiSAT 11. Stroke-related factors were examined with the National Institutes of Health stroke scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale. Results: Spouses of stroke survivors had significantly lower satisfaction with general life, leisure, sexual life, partner relationship, family life, and poorer somatic and psychological health than spouses of controls. Caregiving spouses had significantly lower scores on all life domains except vocation and own activities of daily living than non-caregiving spouses. Spouses’ satisfaction on different life domains was explained mainly by their age, sex, support given to the partner, and the survivor’s level of global disability, to which both physical and cognitive impairments contributed. Conclusion: Seven years after stroke, spouses of stroke survivors reported lower life satisfaction compared with spouses of controls. Life satisfaction in stroke survivors’ spouses was associated with spouses’ age, sex, giving support, and the stroke survivors’ level of global disability.

  20. Reintegration: The Role of Spouse Telephone Battlemind

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    treating a service member or veteran . Spouses can have a dramatic effect on the reintegration of the family after deployment and can be a major support...Physical Health in a Sample of Spouses of OEF/OIF Service Members .......... 37 Easing Reintegration : Telephone Support Groups for Spouses of...68 Reintegration : The Role of Spouse Telephone BATTLEMIND Pilot Project

  1. 20 CFR 216.91 - Entitlement as an employee and spouse, divorced spouse, or survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., divorced spouse, or survivor. 216.91 Section 216.91 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD... § 216.91 Entitlement as an employee and spouse, divorced spouse, or survivor. (a) General. If an individual is entitled to an annuity as a spouse, divorced spouse or survivor, and is also entitled to...

  2. Burden and depression in primary caregivers of persons with visual impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhank Khare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Caregivers who assist persons with visual impairment often neglect their needs, resulting in burden and depression. Rehabilitation efforts, directed to the disabled, seldom target the caregiver. Aim: To assess burden and depression in persons caring for blind individuals. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in the outpatient department of a tertiary-level teaching hospital in New Delhi. Materials and Methods : Institutional Ethical Board approval was obtained and written informed consent too was obtained from the participants involved in this study. Persons with best-corrected vision <20/200 in the better eye, and their primary caregivers, were recruited. We recorded demography, other illness/disability, household income, relationship with disabled person, and caregiver burden (Caregiver Burden Scale and depression (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 20 (Released 2011. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.; range, average, and standard deviation were determined for age, burden, and depression. The association between burden and depression was determined using Pearson′s correlation; the relationship between degree of disability and caregiver burden and depression was determined using unpaired t-test; using multiple linear regression, factors were found to be statistically significant; significance was taken at P < 0.05. Results: Twenty-seven (53.0% men and 24 (47.0% women had visual impairment. Most caregivers (n = 40; 81.6% were first-degree relatives or a spouse; 32 (65% had schooling <5 years; and 29 (59% were unemployed. Depression ranged from 21 to 52 (average 43.2 ± 5.71; it correlated with degree of disability (P = 0.012, household income (r = −0.320; P = 0.025, and burden (r = 0.616; P < 0.001. Burden ranged from 30 to 73 (average 54.5 ± 6.73 and correlated with degree of disability (P = 0.006. On multiple linear

  3. The Caregiving Experience in a Racially Diverse Sample of Cancer Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Mary Lou; Williams, Anna-leila; Dowd, Michael F.; Chappel-Aiken, Lolita; McCorkle, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The literature supports a variety of predictor variables to account for the psychological and stress burden experienced by cancer family caregivers. Missing among the predictor variables are the differences by or influence of race/ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to describe the sample, explore differences in outcomes by patient and family caregiver characteristics, and determine if any of the patient and family characteristics, including race/ethnicity, predicted outcomes. Cross-sectional surveys were used to determine sociodemographics, psychological and physical health, and burdens of caregiving among 54 caregivers. The analysis consisted of descriptive methods, including frequencies and t tests, and regression modeling. The sample was 35% African American or Hispanic. African American and Hispanic caregivers were younger than white caregivers and more often women, were rarely the spouse of the patient, and frequently had other dependents, including children and older parents. African American and Hispanic caregivers reported lower incomes and more burden related to finances and employment than did white caregivers. When controlling for sociodemographic factors, there was no difference by race/ethnicity on the outcome measures. The experience of caregiving may supersede race/ethnicity and may be its own cultural entity. Areas of concern include the interrelationship between socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity, the absence of cultural frameworks to direct caregiver research, and the question of cultural relevance of measurement tools. PMID:18772665

  4. Caregiving Immediately After Stroke: A Study of Uncertainty in Caregivers of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Eeeseung; Riegel, Barbara; Sommers, Marilyn; Tkacs, Nancy; Evans, Lois

    2016-12-01

    Caregivers of stroke survivors experience high rates of mental and physical morbidity. Stroke has sudden onset, and the outcome is not immediately known. Uncertainties surrounding the new caregiving role may not only necessitate major changes in the lives of family caregivers but also contribute to negative health outcomes for the caregiver. The purposes of this study were to describe caregiver uncertainty across the early weeks after a family member's stroke and to explore characteristics of caregivers and stroke survivors associated with that uncertainty. A prospective, longitudinal exploratory observational study was conducted with a convenience sample of 40 caregivers and older adult (≥65 years) stroke survivors recruited from urban acute care settings in the mid-Atlantic region. Caregivers were enrolled by 2 weeks poststroke (T1) and revisited 4 weeks later (T2). Uncertainty was measured usingthe Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale for Family Members. An unadjusted linear mixed model was computed to examine significant associations between each caregiver or stroke survivor characteristic and repeated measures of uncertainty. Uncertainty at T1 (83.73 ± 23.47) was higher than reported in other caregiver populations and remained high 6 weeks poststroke (T2: 85.23 ± 23.94). Each of the following characteristics was independently associated with greater caregiver uncertainty: caregivers' older age (p = .019), being a spouse (p = .01), higher stress (p stroke survivors' recurrent stroke (p = .034), poorer functional status (p = .009), and insurance type (p = .008). Caregivers experienced persistently high uncertainty during the first 6 weeks poststroke. Better understanding of uncertainty, its associated characteristics, and its outcomes may help clinicians identify caregivers at highest risk who may benefit from targeted interventions.

  5. Cause-specific mortality among spouses of Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate; Nordahl, Helene; Schernhammer, Eva; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-03-01

    Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson disease between 1986 and 2009 were identified, and each case was matched to five population controls. We further identified all spouses of those with Parkinson disease (n = 8,515) and also the spouses of controls (n = 43,432). All spouses were followed in nationwide registries until 2011. Among men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1.05-3.42]) and death from undefined symptoms/abnormal findings (1.25 [1.07-1.47]). Censoring at the time of death of the patient attenuated the findings for all-cause mortality in husbands (1.02 [0.95-1.09]), indicating that part of the association is with bereavement. Still, living with a person with Parkinson disease 5 years after first Parkinson hospitalization was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality for both husbands (1.15 [1.07-1.23]) and wives (1.11 [1.04-1.17]). Caring for a spouse with a serious chronic illness is associated with a slight but consistent elevation in mortality risk.

  6. [Night of the Alzheimer's patient: the nightmare of the caregiver via the caregivers'guides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Madeleine; Mietkiewicz, Marie-Claude

    2015-06-01

    Care for Alzheimers' patients is quite a burden on the caregivers. Guides have been devoted to improve their knowledge about the disease and to help to provide the best care for the patient. A recent study on the reluctance of caregivers'spouses to seek external help, shows that none of 31 spouses had read a caregiver's guide. The aim of this study was to assess if caregiver's guides would help caregivers to deal with sleep/wake disorders. Amongst the 46 French guides, published between 1988 and 2013, thirty three raised the subject of the night sleep with more or less details. In these guides sleep disturbances are considered either as a symptom to be monitored or a natural aging process to be supported. We made a survey of the content of the caregiver's guides, of their goals and why they have been designed to. Then we analyze how the night sleep issue is dealt with in the guides, and eventually we consider the place to be granted to the patient in the management of his/her sleep disturbances.

  7. COUNSELING PRACTICES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATERLOO, GLENN E.

    THE NEED FOR COUNSELING IS EMPHASIZED BY THE FACT THAT 875,000 CHILDREN IN THE UNITED STATES HAVE MENTAL AND PHYSICAL IMPEDIMENTS TO LEARNING. TYPICAL COUNSELING PRACTICES ARE PROBLEM-CENTERED COUNSELING, EXCLUSIVELY "VOCATIONAL" OR "EDUCATIONAL" COUNSELING WITH LITTLE CONCERN FOR THE WHOLE INDIVIDUAL, EXTREME DIRECTIVE OR NONDIRECTIVE COUNSELING,…

  8. Are there Gender, Racial, or Relationship Differences in Caregiver Task Difficulty, Depressive Symptoms, and Life Changes among Stroke Family Caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Nenette M.; Bakas, Tamilyn; McLennon, Susan M.; Weaver, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine differences in caregiver perceptions of task difficulty, depressive symptoms, and life changes based on caregiver characteristics of gender, race, and type of relationship to the person with stroke. Methods A sample of 243 stroke caregivers (females n =191; males n =52; non-African Americans n= 184; African Americans n=59; non-spouses n =127; spouses n =116) were interviewed by telephone within 8 weeks of the survivor’s discharge to home. Measures included the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) for task difficulty, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms, and Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS) for life changes. Three general linear models computed differences in OCBS, PHQ9, and OCBS scores. Results Significant differences were found on the OCBS for females (pstroke caregivers are relatively more likely to experience task difficulty, depressive symptoms, and negative life changes as a result of providing care. African American spouses were also at risk. Tailoring interventions based on caregivers’ characteristics may improve outcomes. PMID:25141098

  9. 20 CFR 216.92 - Entitlement as a spouse or divorced spouse and as a survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and as a survivor. 216.92 Section 216.92 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS....92 Entitlement as a spouse or divorced spouse and as a survivor. If an individual is entitled to both a spouse or divorced spouse and survivor annuity, only the larger annuity will be paid. However,...

  10. 20 CFR 725.213 - Duration of entitlement; surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse. 725.213 Section 725.213 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION... Benefits) § 725.213 Duration of entitlement; surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse. (a)...

  11. Alzheimer's Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alzheimer's Caregiving After the Diagnosis Now that your family ... the news with family and friends. Learning About Alzheimer’s Sometimes, you may feel that you don't ...

  12. Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Nancy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Blein, Laure; Olazabal, Ignace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many Baby Boomers are faced with the care of aging parents, as well as that of disabled or ill spouses or children. This study examines how Baby Boomers in Quebec, Canada, perceive and play their role as caregivers and how this might differ from their parents' generation. Design and methods: This was a qualitative and empirical study…

  13. Needs assessment of caregivers of people with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, S L; Cohen, F L; Forrest, J; Zelewsky, M

    1997-01-01

    This descriptive study assessed 34 caregivers of people with HIV/AIDS to learn their perceived needs, concerns, and use of services. Results indicated the most common health problems of the care recipient were fatigue and weight loss; care recipients needed help with climbing stairs, walking, and bathing; caregivers helped with the household chores, transportation, and companionship; caregivers were concerned about coping with loss and responsibilities; caregivers had help from family, case manager, and neighbor; caregivers wanted help such as a companion and counseling. Discussion relates to the implications of the study for health care professionals.

  14. [Evaluation of gender differences of family caregivers with reference to the mode of caregiving at home and caregiver distress in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Keiko; Ito, Mikiko; Mikami, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Male caregivers are growing in number, as the frequency of spouse caregiving rapidly increases. This study aimed to examine gender differences in family caregivers with reference to the mode of caregiving and caregiver distress in Japan. It was designed to clarify the characteristics of both female and male caregivers. The subjects were 2,020 users of public Long-term Care Insurance, randomly stratified and sampled in Higashi-osaka city, Osaka prefecture. Data were collected through mailed, anonymous self-report questionnaires. 1,287 (63.7%) surveys were collected and data from 868 caregivers and care recipients were analyzed, after excluding incomplete cases from 947 participants who were family caregivers. We compared males and females for the level of nursing needs, cognitive disorders of their care recipients, the types and amounts of care provided, the levels of their burdens and the depression associated with providing care, the availability of informal support, the frequency of usage of Long-term care insurance services, and the types of stress coping strategies. Of the total, 27.1% of the caregivers were male. Their age was higher than that of females, but the age of care recipients of female caregivers was significantly higher than that of care recipients of males. There were no significant gender differences in the level of nursing needs of recipients. However, cognitive disorders of care recipients of female caregivers were more severe. Female caregivers spent more time providing care, and performed a greater number of care activities. In particular, female caregivers assisted their care recipients in taking medications, dressing, bathing, eating, meal preparation, shopping, laundry, and money management more often to a significant degree. Furthermore, the average scores for burden and depression were higher in female than in male caregivers. Concerning the usage of Long-term care insurance services, males used a Home-helper service more often. Female

  15. 20 CFR 222.20 - When determination of relationship as divorced spouse, surviving divorced spouse, or remarried...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... divorced spouse, surviving divorced spouse, or remarried widow(er) is made. 222.20 Section 222.20 Employees... Relationship as Divorced Spouse, Surviving Divorced Spouse, or Remarried Widow(er) § 222.20 When determination of relationship as divorced spouse, surviving divorced spouse, or remarried widow(er) is made....

  16. The cost of caregiving: endocrine and immune implications in elderly and non elderly caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Brian; Wetherell, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    This review will provide an overview of literature that has linked caregiver stress with development and progression of disease, via interactions between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune systems. The link between caregiver stress and dysregulation of key physiologic mediators has, in the main, focussed on elderly caregivers of spouses with degenerative illness, i.e., dementia. In these populations, aberrations of both endocrinological and immunologic mediators have been demonstrated. However, as a function of their advancing age, elderly populations experience natural dysregulation of the HPA axis and decline of immunologic efficacy. More recently, research has begun to assess whether caregiver stress exacts a similar physiologic toll on non elderly caregivers, i.e., parents of medically fragile children. Dysregulation of endocrinological and immunologic mediators have been observed in both populations, however, more consistently so in the elderly. The authors suggest that, by considering specific characteristics of the care recipient, i.e., type of impairment, and concomitant changes in the caregiving experience, i.e., caregiving intensity, as well as the role of dyadic support, researchers might be better poised to explain discrepant physiologic findings between elderly and non elderly caregivers and reconcile similar physiologic inconsistencies between different, non elderly populations.

  17. LGBT Caregiver Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    LGBT CAREGIVER CONCERNS IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS FOR LGBT CAREGIVERS LGBT CAREGIVER CONSIDERATIONS As a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, you will face various challenges. Some are common among all ...

  18. What Is Caregiver Burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction Caregiving What Is Caregiver Burnout? Caregiver burnout is caused by too much long-term stress. ... themselves. They begin to show signs of caregiver burnout. Your healthy body, mind and spirit benefit your ...

  19. Understanding Women in the Role of Caregivers for Older Adults in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Atsuko; Dahlen, Penny

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of Japanese women in the role of caregivers of older family members. Cultural influence on women's identity, significance of the caregiver's role, and the struggles and rewards of being caregivers are discussed. Finally, ideas are provided for the use of arts in counseling and implications of their use are…

  20. How common is depression among ALS caregivers? A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabkin, Judith G; Albert, Steven M; Rowland, Lewis P; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the impact of personal, situational and patient characteristics on mood, and changes over time, among ALS caregivers. Seventy-one patient-caregiver pairs were interviewed once and 51 (72%) monthly until endpoints of death or tracheostomy for long-term mechanical ventilation (LTMV). Depressive symptoms and DSM-IV disorders, coping strategies, caregiver burden, satisfaction with care-giving, and patient disease severity were assessed. At baseline, 13% of caregivers had major depression, and 10% had minor depression. Rates declined at last visit before death or LTMV (median interval three months), as did depressive symptoms. Correlates of caregiver depression included reliance on avoidance, perceived burden, fatigue, and feeling that the patient was critical and unappreciative. Half of the 14 caregivers of patients who planned LTMV were depressed at baseline, declining to 8% at endpoint, versus 16% (9/57) among caregivers of patients who died, declining non-significantly to 11%. While few personal or situational factors were correlated with caregiver distress, patients' plans and degree of supportiveness influenced caregiver mood. Verbal comments of caregivers clarified the distinction between sadness and psychiatric depression. The high baseline rate of depression among caregivers of patients who planned tracheostomy decreased as caregivers instituted major changes in patient care or personal counseling.

  1. Cognitive behaviour therapy to prevent complicated grief among relatives and spouses bereaved by suicide: Csuster andomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.; Keyser, de J.; Neeleman, J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Nolen, W.; Burger, H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of a family based grief counselling programme to prevent complicated grief among first degree relatives and spouses of someone who had committed suicide. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial with follow-up at 13 months after the suicide. Setting General p

  2. Cognitive behaviour therapy to prevent complicated grief among relatives and spouses bereaved by suicide : cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; de Keijser, J.; Neeleman, J.; Kerkhof, A.; Nolen, W.; Burger, H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of a family based grief counselling programme to prevent complicated grief among first degree relatives and spouses of someone who had committed suicide. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial with follow-up at 13 months after the suicide. Setting General p

  3. Spouse with schizophrenia and risk of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Christopher; Agerbo, Esben; Nielsen, Philip Rising

    2016-12-01

    Increased prevalence of lifestyle risk factors or shared etiology may underlie the association between schizophrenia and the subsequent risk of dementia. We explored the association between having a spouse with schizophrenia and the risk of dementia. We found a positive relationship between having a spouse with schizophrenia and vascular dementia in individuals without a mental disorder themselves but no association between having a spouse with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's dementia. As spouses share environmental risk factors and lifestyle, this might suggest that the excess risk of dementia in probands with schizophrenia could be ascribed to the unhealthy living environment among individuals with schizophrenia.

  4. Marriage Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... counseling can help couples in all types of intimate relationships — heterosexual or homosexual, married or not. Some ... marriage counseling to address many specific issues, including: Communication problems Sexual difficulties Conflicts about child rearing or ...

  5. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  6. 20 CFR 725.212 - Conditions of entitlement; surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conditions of entitlement; surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse. 725.212 Section 725.212 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS... Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.212 Conditions of entitlement; surviving spouse or surviving...

  7. Child characteristics, caregiver characteristics, and environmental factors affecting the quality of life of caregivers of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Hui; Chen, Kuan-Lin; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Huang, Chien-Yu; Simeonsson, Rune J

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate comprehensively the determinants of the quality of life (QOL) of caregivers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY). A total of 167 children with CP (mean age 9.06 years, SD 2.61 years) and their caregivers (mean age 40.24 years, SD 5.43 years) participated in this study. The QOL of caregivers was measured with the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF-Taiwan version (WHOQOL-BREF-TW). The potential determinants of QOL were collected, including child characteristics, caregiver characteristics, and environmental factors from all dimensions of the ICF-CY and analysed using multiple regression models. Four multiple regression models revealed that determinants of the QOL of caregivers of children with CP was multidimensional, encompassing child characteristics (age, type of CP, fine motor impairment, other diseases, behaviour and emotions, visual impairment, hearing impairment), caregiver characteristics (general mental health, parenting stress, marital status, family coping patterns, and socio-economic status), and environmental factors (child's medication, school setting, and current rehabilitation service, caregiver's spouse's age, family life impacts, and domestic helper). Knowledge of the determinants of QOL could serve as a guide in a holistic approach to evaluation and intervention and help plan interventions targeted at these determinants to improve the QOL of caregivers of children with CP. Implications for Rehabilitation Caregivers of children with CP had lower QOL, except the environment QOL. The QOL determinants of caregivers of children with CP are multidimensional, including child characteristics, caregiver characteristics, and environmental factors. In addition to child characteristics of severity of fine motor impairments and emotional and behavioural problems, caregiver characteristics of general mental

  8. Adaptation to a spouse's disability by parents of adult children with mental illness or developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subharati; Greenberg, Jan S; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the effects on well-being of a spouse's disability among aging parents already serving as caregivers of adult children with severe mental illness or a developmental disability. The study sample consisted of two groups of participants in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study of 1957 high school graduates and their randomly selected siblings-those who had a child with a disability (N=227) and a matched comparison group of parents who did not have a child with a disability (N=1,463). The participants were surveyed in 1992-1994 and 2004-2006, and participants with a spouse with a disability in 1992-1994 were excluded from the analysis. The effect of multiple caregiving roles was investigated by using regression analysis. Parents of adult children with severe mental illness were more likely than either parents of adult children with developmental disabilities or the comparison group to report that their spouse developed a disability in the early retirement years. The experience of caring for a spouse with a disability and the experience of caring for an adult child with disabilities had additive effects in eroding the well-being of older adults. Parents of adult children with severe mental illness in general had the lowest levels of well-being. As they move into their retirement years, aging parents who care for children with long-term disabilities are likely to experience multiple caregiving responsibilities. Service providers must address the needs of these aging parents and develop interventions to help them cope and plan for their future.

  9. Modeling trajectories and transitions: results from the New York University caregiver intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Joseph E; Roth, David L; Haley, William E; Mittelman, Mary S

    2011-01-01

    Current research fails to capture the temporal dynamics of chronic disease in favor of cross-sectional snapshots of symptoms and outcomes. The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of comprehensive psychosocial support on trajectories of spouse caregivers' well-being related to the nursing home placement transition. Data from the New York University Caregiver Intervention, a randomized controlled trial of a comprehensive support program for spouse caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease, were utilized. A convenience sample of 406 spouse caregivers of community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease was enrolled over a 9.5-year period in an Alzheimer's disease research center in New York City. Outcome measures, including the Zarit Burden Inventory and Geriatric Depression Scale, were used to assess the differential effects of nursing home placement and of the intervention on spouse caregivers. In-person interviews of spouse caregivers took place every 4 months during the first year of participation and every 6 months thereafter for up to 16 years; 385 caregivers provided sufficient follow-up data for all analyses. Longitudinal models found that wives were more likely than husbands to indicate reductions in burden in the months after placement in an institution. Wives also reported greater decreases in depressive symptoms after placement in an institution when compared with husbands. The inclusion of transitions and health trajectories in a randomized controlled trial offers an intriguing picture of how comprehensive psychosocial interventions can help families navigate the challenges of chronic disease care. The results also indicate how advances in nursing science can facilitate future research in the modeling of trajectories and transitions in the dementia care context.

  10. Critical coping challenges facing caregivers of persons living with HIV/AIDS and other terminally ill persons: The case of Kanye care program, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Kangethe

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: This article recommends counseling and debriefings; formation of caregivers support groups; motivation strategies to be put in place; and provisions of adequate care package and food basket.

  11. 38 CFR 3.502 - Surviving spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surviving spouses. 3.502..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Reductions and Discontinuances § 3.502 Surviving... compensation to or for a surviving spouse will be the earliest of the dates stated in this section. Where...

  12. Family Caregiver Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on your schedule. Look for our launch soon! FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... County Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn more Caregiver Research Veterans suffer ...

  13. Increased risks of coronary heart disease and stroke among spousal caregivers of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianguang; Zöller, Bengt; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan

    2012-04-10

    Spousal caregivers of cancer patients suffer psychological and physical burdens that may affect their risk of subsequently developing coronary heart disease and stroke. Cancer patients were identified in the Swedish Cancer Registry, and information on their spouses was retrieved from the Swedish Multi-Generation Register. Follow-up of caregivers was performed from the date of the first diagnosis of cancer in their spouses through 2008. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for spousal caregivers of cancer patients compared with those without an affected spouse. After the cancer diagnosis in wives, the risks of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke in husbands were 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.16), 1.24 (95% CI, 1.21-1.27), and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.18-1.32), respectively. The corresponding risks in wives with an affected husband were 1.13 (95% CI, 1.10-1.16), 1.29 (95% CI, 1.26-1.32), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.19-1.34). The increases were consistent over time and were more pronounced if the spouse was affected by a cancer with a high mortality rate, such as pancreatic and lung cancers. Spousal caregivers of cancer patients have increased risks of coronary heart disease and stroke that persist over time. Clinical attention should be paid to spousal caregivers, especially those caring for cancer patients with high mortality rates.

  14. The longitudinal and dyadic effects of mutuality on perceived stress for stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Kyler M; Swank, Paul R; Vaeth, Patrice; Ostwald, Sharon K

    2013-01-01

    Functional impairment resulting from a stroke frequently requires the care of a family caregiver, often the spouse. This change in the relationship can be stressful for the couple. Thus, this study examined the longitudinal, dyadic relationship between caregivers' and stroke survivors' mutuality and caregivers' and stroke survivors' perceived stress. This secondary data analysis of 159 stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers utilized a cross-lagged, mixed models analysis with the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the dyadic relationship between mutuality and perceived stress over the first year post-discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Caregivers' mutuality showed an actor effect (β = -3.82, p caregivers' mutuality influenced one's own perceived stress but not the stroke survivors' perceived stress. Stroke survivors' perceived stress showed a partner effect and affected caregivers' perceived stress (β = 0.13, p = 0.047). Caregivers' perceived stress did not show a partner effect and did not significantly affect stroke survivors' perceived stress. These findings highlight the interpersonal nature of stress in the context of caregiving for a spouse. Caregivers are especially influenced by perceived stress in the spousal relationship. Couples should be encouraged to focus on positive aspects of the caregiving relationship to mitigate stress.

  15. Caregivers' incongruence: emotional strain in caring for persons with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Linda L; Thompson, Teresa L; Govoni, Amy L; Steiner, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Guided by Friedemann's framework, the purpose of this study was to examine the dimensions of new family caregivers' emotional strain in caring for persons with stroke. Seventy-three caregivers who were new to that role participated in an interview every 2 weeks for a year as part of a NIH project. Of these caregivers, 36 participants were randomly assigned and had access to a Web-based intervention and its e-mail discussion. In this secondary data analysis, 2,148 e-mail discussion messages plus 2,455 narrative interview entries were used to examine dimensions of caregivers' emotional strain. Rigorous content analysis was applied to these data. The majority of these caregivers were white women with an average of 55 years who cared for spouses. Three themes emerged from these data: (1) being worried, (2) running on empty, and (3) losing self. Caregivers worried about themselves and their care recipient, sharing feelings of being just "plain tired." The caregivers felt that their lives were lost to giving care. They described in detail the emotional strain that they felt, as they took on new roles in caring for the person with stroke. This study informs nurses about new family caregivers' emotional strain, or incongruence in Friedemann's terms, from their viewpoint and provides direction for supportive education interactions. © 2012 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  16. Pain affects spouses too: personal experience with pain and catastrophizing as correlates of spouse distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Michelle T; Cano, Annmarie

    2006-12-15

    Chronic pain has adverse effects on individuals with chronic pain (ICPs) as well as their family members. Borrowing from an empathy model described by Goubert et al. (2005), we examined top-down and bottom-up factors that may be related to psychological well-being in the spouses of ICPs. A diverse community sample of 113 middle-aged spouses of individuals with chronic pain (ICPs) completed measures on pain severity and spouse pain catastrophizing (PCS-S; Cano et al., 2005). Results showed that almost half (48.7%) of spouses reported chronic pain themselves and that pain in the spouse accounted for within-couple differences on psychological distress. That is, in couples where only the ICP reported pain, ICP psychological distress was greater than their spouses. However, when both partners reported chronic pain, there was no significant difference in psychological distress between partners. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that spouse magnification catastrophizing was associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms, and that helplessness catastrophizing was associated with depressive symptoms for spouses of ICPs who also reported chronic pain but not for spouses of ICPs without chronic pain. The results are discussed in light of interpersonal processes that may affect spouses' distress.

  17. Psychological distress of female caregivers of significant others with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Cassidy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the role of time since diagnosis and whether the care recipient was a child, a parent, or a spouse, on caregiver’s perceptions of the caring role, with a group of 269 female cancer caregivers. Questionnaire measures were used to explore psychological and social resources and psychological distress. Analysis of variance and hierarchical multiple regression were used and identified significant effects of time since diagnosis and care recipient. This study concludes that a more tailored approach to understanding the needs of caregivers is required particularly in terms of time since diagnosis and care recipient, in order to provide more effective support.

  18. Subjective burden on spouses of schizophrenia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Kumari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : There is limited information from India on subjective burden on spouses of schizophrenia patients. The aim of the present study was to assess and compare patterns of subjective burden on spouses of schizophrenia patients. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted at the OPD level, and follow-up was done at the Ranchi Institute of Neuropsychiatry and Sciences (RINPAS during the period May 2008 to November 2008. Tools utilized were sociodemographic data sheet, Family Burden Interview Schedule developed by Pai and R. L. Kapur (1981. The sample comprised of 50 samples of spouses (25 male and 25 female spouses of schizophrenia patients. Results: The findings suggest that both the groups, viz., male and female spouses of schizophrenia patients, showed moderate level of subjective burden, i.e., 13 (52% and 15 (60% male and female spouses, respectively, which was statistically found to be insignificant. Conclusion : No significant difference was found between male and female spouses of schizophrenia patients with regard to the level of subjective burden.

  19. Parenting after the death of a spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Hilda R; Clark, Myra D; Thomas, Rebecca; Haxton, Heather

    2010-12-01

    The death of a spouse is a complicated experience in a family. Understanding the circumstances of the loss is part of the family's healing process. The current qualitative phenomenological study builds on the existing studies by focusing on the lived experience of parents as they transition to single parenthood. Six individuals participated in this study. Data analysis revealed 5 themes related to the change to single parenting after the loss of the spouse including the need to revision the parenting role and the role of support. The study has implications for the design of interventions and groups following the death of a spouse.

  20. 22 CFR 19.9 - Pension benefits for former spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pension benefits for former spouses. 19.9 Section 19.9 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL BENEFITS FOR SPOUSES AND FORMER SPOUSES OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.9 Pension benefits for former spouses....

  1. Implications of smart wear technology for family caregiving relationships: focus group perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Harden, Amy; Park, Soonjee

    2014-10-01

    Technological advances in monitoring vulnerable care-recipients are on the rise. Recent and future development of Smart Wear technology (devices integrated into clothing that monitor care-recipients) might assist family caregivers with tasks related to caring for young children, relatives with disabilities, and frail spouses or parents. However, the development and use of this technology in family caregiving contexts is in its infancy. Focus group interviews of family caregivers were conducted to explore perspectives regarding the potential integration of Smart Wear technology into their family caregiving. Responses were analyzed qualitatively for themes related to perceptions of how Smart Wear could impact relationships between caregivers and care-recipients. Three major themes emerged: quality and quantity of interaction, boundary issues, and implications for anxiety. Implications and recommendations are discussed regarding maximizing the potential benefits of Smart Wear technology in ways that promote and protect healthy relationships among caregivers and care-recipients.

  2. Commentary on "Rehabilitation Outcomes Associated With Foreign Domestic Workers as Caregivers".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Frances M; Kao, Solon T

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to illuminate the role of foreign domestic workers (FDW) as caregivers for patients undergoing rehabilitation in Asia. The authors of a published study in this issue of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation investigate the association between the characteristics of caregivers for patients recovering from sub-acute stroke and the rehabilitation outcomes of those patients in Singapore. The investigators examined over 4,000 caregivers and one of the findings showed that after controlling for characteristics of both caregivers and patients, there was a significant and negative association between having an FDW as a caregiver, compared to a spouse, and patient rehabilitation effectiveness. The inclusion of FDW's in this study is an important and understudied group of caregivers in the role of patient rehabilitation that is relatively new to the US, but common in other parts of the world. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship continuity and emotional well-being in spouses of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gerard A; Evans, Laura; Oyebode, Jan R

    2016-11-03

    Qualitative research has suggested that spousal experiences of discontinuity in their relationship with a person who has dementia (i.e. the relationship is experienced as radically changed) may contribute to heightened feelings of burden, entrapment, isolation, guilt and intolerance of behaviours that challenge. By contrast, continuity in the relationship may contribute to a greater sense of achievement and gratification from providing care. The present study served as a quantitative test of these suggestions. A convenience sample of 71 spouses of people with dementia completed three questionnaires - the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), the Positive Aspects of Caregiving measure (PAC) and the Birmingham Relationship Continuity Measure (BRCM). In accordance with the hypotheses, the experience of greater relationship continuity (higher BRCM scores) was correlated with fewer negative emotional reactions to caregiving (lower ZBI scores; rho = -.795) and more positive emotional reactions (higher PAC scores; rho = .764). The study provided some quantitative support for suggestions arising from qualitative research about how perceptions of continuity/discontinuity in the relationship may impact on the caregiving spouse's emotional well-being. Helping couples to maintain a sense of continuity and couplehood may assist their emotional adjustment to dementia.

  4. Religiosity and the expansion of caregiver stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A J; Driscoll, A K; Pearlin, L I

    2004-09-01

    We present a stress process framework as a model for understanding how religiosity may influence the expansion of stress. Survey data from informal caregivers to a spouse with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia (n = 200) were analyzed to observe the relationships among three variables: (1) care-related stress, (2) religiosity, and (3) depression. This sample, which has a mean age of 73 years, demonstrates high rates of self-described religiosity, church attendance and frequency of prayer. Using these criteria, women and racial/ethnic minority caregivers are the most religious. In a series of multivariate analyses, we found strong evidence to suggest that there is an expansion of care-related stressors leading to depression in this sample. Religiosity, as measured here, appears to be largely unrelated to stress and stress expansion. We found no evidence to suggest that it moderates stress expansion. However, these data do suggest that one stressor--feelings of role overload--is correlated with greater levels of self-perceived religiosity, which among caregivers who have health problems of their own is associated with greater depressive symptomatology. Thus, for a sub-sample of these caregivers, we find weak evidence of a mediation effect wherein one subjective, non-organizational dimension of religiosity is a conduit of the harmful effects of stress (rather than a suppressor). Results and data limitations are discussed in relation to better assessing the role of religiosity and spirituality in the experience of the stress process.

  5. Expansion of Elderly Couples' IADL Caregiver Networks beyond the Marital Dyad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Sheila; Dunkle, Ruth E.; Schroepfer, Tracy; Shen, Huei-Wern

    2006-01-01

    Factors influencing expansion of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) caregiver networks beyond the spouse/partner were studied, using data from the Asset and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) nationally representative sample of American elders (ages 70 and older). Analyses were based on 427 Black and White couples in which…

  6. Caregiver Well-Being: Intersections of Relationship and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L; Dujela, Carren; Smith, André

    2015-08-01

    We know much about caregiving women compared with caregiving men and caregiving spouses compared with caregiving adult children. We know less about the intersections of relationship and gender. This article explores this intersection through the well-being (burden and self-esteem) of caregivers to family members with dementia. Throughout British Columbia, Canada, 873 caregivers were interviewed in person for on average, over 1½ hours. The results reveal that daughters experience the highest burden but also the highest self-esteem, suggesting the role is less salient for their self-identities. Wives emerge as the most vulnerable of the four groups when both burden and self-esteem are considered. The data confirm the usefulness of the intersectionality framework for understanding co-occupancy of more than one status and indicate that positive cognitive well-being and negative affective well-being can be differentially related. Multivariate analyses confirm the importance of caregiver, not patient, characteristics for burden and self-esteem. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. The influence of Chinese culture on family caregivers of stroke survivors: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xichenhui; Sit, Janet W H; Koo, Fung Kuen

    2017-07-05

    To explore and describe the caregiving experiences of Chinese stroke caregivers. Previous research has indicated that culture can have a significant impact on the stroke caregiving experience. Moreover, scant research exists on stroke caregivers' experience within the Chinese culture. A qualitative descriptive design was used. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 25 family caregivers of stroke survivors. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed. Content analysis was also performed. Twenty-five family caregivers of stroke survivors were recruited for the study. On average, respondents were 66 years old (range 45-82 years). Of 25 interviewees, 76% were female, 64% were spouse-caregivers and 36% were children-caregivers. Three themes reflecting the influence of Chinese culture on stroke caregiving emerged from the interviews. (i) Caregiving role perception. Informants accepted caregiving for the sick family member as an expected part of life, a culturally prescribed obligation and an expression of reciprocal love. (ii) Coping strategies. Connecting with family resources and connecting with inner strength were frequently reported coping strategies. (iii) Self-sacrifice. Informants identified self-reliance and feeling of restraint in their utilisation or access of formal caregiving service. Chinese caregivers sacrifice themselves for the care recipients regardless of the hardships and the neglect of their own health. Our findings provide a comprehensive and culturally sensitive perspective in understanding the experience of stroke caregivers in Chinese communities. Cultural and religious backgrounds were found to influence Chinese stroke caregivers' experience, coping strategies and self-sacrifice behaviour in idiosyncratic ways. Research on the practice of culture can serve as a basis for the formulation of specific policies and effective interventions for supporting stroke caregivers of different cultural backgrounds. © 2017 The

  8. Rural Caregivers for a Family Member With Dementia: Models of Burden and Distress Differ for Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Norma J; Morgan, Debra G; Karunanayake, Chandima P; Wickenhauser, Joseph P; Cammer, Allison; Minish, Duane; O'Connell, Megan E; Hayduk, Leslie A

    2016-02-01

    Forecasts of increasing prevalence of dementia in rural settings, coupled with reliance on family caregiver support, indicate that a greater understanding of caregiver distress in these contexts is necessary. The purpose of this study was to examine family caregiver burden and severity of distress on the day that a family member was diagnosed with dementia at a memory clinic that serves a rural population. Participants in this retrospective study were 231 primary family caregivers of a rural community-dwelling person with dementia. On the diagnostic day, women reported more burden and severity of distress than men and spouses reported more severity of distress than adult children. A structural equation model was not supported for the entire sample, but was supported for women caregivers only (n = 161). Caregiver distress related to dementia-specific behaviors explained both global distress and burden. Patients' functional decline was related to caregiver burden.

  9. 20 CFR 228.21 - Entitlement as a spouse or divorced spouse and as a survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and as a survivor. 228.21 Section 228.21 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.21 Entitlement as a spouse or divorced spouse and as a survivor. If an individual is entitled to...

  10. Fear of cancer recurrence in survivor and caregiver dyads: differences by sexual orientation and how dyad members influence each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike; Tripodis, Yorghos; Bazzi, Angela R; Winter, Michael; Clark, Melissa A

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify explanatory factors of fear of recurrence (FOR) in breast cancer survivors of different sexual orientations and their caregivers and to assess the directionality in the survivor and caregiver dyads' FOR. We recruited survivors of non-metastatic breast cancer of different sexual orientations and invited their caregivers into this study. Using a telephone survey, we collected data from 167 survivor and caregiver dyads. Using simultaneous equation models and a stepwise selection process, we identified the significant determinants of survivors' and caregivers' FOR and determined the directionality of survivors' and caregivers' FOR. Weighting the model by the inverse propensity score ensured that differences by sexual orientation in age and proportion of life in the caregiver-survivor relationship were accounted for. Caregivers' FOR predicted survivors' FOR, and sexual orientation had a significant effect on survivors' FOR, in that sexual minority women reported less FOR than heterosexual women. Other determinants of survivors' FOR included their medical characteristics, coresidence with caregivers, and caregivers' social support and use of counseling. Caregivers' FOR was related to their social support and survivors' medical characteristics. This study suggests a need for caregiver interventions. Because survivors' FOR is affected by caregivers' FOR, caregiver interventions will likely benefit survivors' FOR. Both sexual minority and heterosexual breast cancer survivors' FOR are affected by their caregivers' FOR, which suggests that the caregivers of breast cancer survivors are central for the survivors' well-being and shall therefore be integrated into the care process.

  11. Caregiver Statistics: Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 65+ population were reported to be below the poverty level. 7 [Updated February 2015] Among the population ... informal caregivers in the U.S., depending on the definitions used for both caregiver and care recipient as ...

  12. A Bright Side to the Work-Family Interface: Husbands' Support as a Resource in Double-and-Triple-Duty Caregiving Wives' Work Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Nicole; Polenick, Courtney A; Davis, Kelly D; Berkman, Lisa F; Cabot, Thomas D

    2017-06-16

    This study examined how women who combine long-term care employment with unpaid, informal caregiving roles for children (double-duty-child caregivers), older adults (double-duty-elder caregivers), and both children and older adults (triple-duty caregivers) differed from their workplace-only caregiving counterparts on workplace factors related to job retention (i.e., job satisfaction and turnover intentions) and performance (i.e., perceived obligation to work while sick and emotional exhaustion). The moderating effects of perceived spouse support were also examined. Regression analyses were conducted on survey data from 546 married, heterosexual women employed in U.S.-based nursing homes. Compared to workplace-only caregivers, double-duty-elder and triple-duty caregivers reported more emotional exhaustion. Double-duty-child caregivers reported lower turnover intentions and both double-and-triple-duty caregivers felt less obligated to work while sick when perceiving greater support from husbands. Results indicate that double-and-triple-duty caregiving women's job retention and obligation to work while sick may depend on perceived spouse support, highlighting the important role husbands play in their wives' professional lives. Findings also lend support to the emerging literature on marriage-to-work positive spillover, and suggest that long-term care organizations should target marital relationships in family-friendly initiatives to retain and engage double-and-triple-duty caregiving employees.

  13. Whatever Happened to Counseling in Counseling Psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Michael J.; Berman, Margit; Friedlander, Myrna L.; Conoley, Collie W.; Duan, Changming; Whiston, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    A suspected decline in published counseling-related research in "The Counseling Psychologist" ("TCP") and the "Journal of Counseling Psychology" ("JCP") was investigated through content analyses of the two journals from 1979 to 2008. A marked decline in counseling-related research may signify a shift in emphasis away from counseling as the most…

  14. Welcoming spouses and partners to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The questions related to Diversity were examined in the framework of the Five-yearly Review, which was approved in December 2015. The first themes implemented this year concern helping spouses or partners integrate into the working world, and improving the balance between professional and private life.   To this end, the Social Affairs Service and the CERN Diversity Office organised together on Tuesday, 15 November, a “Welcome Drink” for the spouses and partners of employed members of the personnel of CERN who have recently arrived in the region. This event was an occasion for the spouses and partners to meet and greet with various internal services at CERN, including the Staff Association, as well as local networks that can provide assistance in integrating into the region, in terms of job search for instance. Therefore, several service providers were present, including: the Geneva Welcome Center (CAGI), a welcoming network for newly arrived employees of international organi...

  15. Development of an observer rating scale for caregiver communication in persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L; Parker, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    There have been few reported studies of communication between spouses with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementia. An observer rating scale for verbal and nonverbal behavior, Verbal-Nonverbal Interaction Scale for Caregivers (VNVIS-CG), was developed to study caregiver communication in couples affected by AD. Preliminary psychometric testing showed that the VNVIS-CG evidenced good reliability and validity. Researchers observed both common caregiver communication strategies and novel strategies that have not been reported in the literature. In future studies, researchers can examine the relationship between caregiver communication and indicators of mental health. Everyday conversations provide fertile ground for nurses to influence family relationships. Nurses can teach caregivers to use strategies that promote engagement and avoid those that discourage participation.

  16. Pain affects spouses too: Personal experience with pain and catastrophizing as correlates of spouse distress ⋆

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Chronic pain has adverse effects on individuals with chronic pain (ICPs) as well as their family members. Borrowing from an empathy model described by Goubert et al. (2005), we examined top-down and bottom-up factors that may be related to psychological well-being in the spouses of ICPs. A diverse community sample of 113 middle-aged spouses of individuals with chronic pain (ICPs) completed measures on pain severity and spouse pain catastrophizing (PCS-S; Cano et al., 2005). Results showed tha...

  17. 78 FR 28461 - Military Spouse Appreciation Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... military spouses are at the core of our Armed Forces, and on Military Spouse Appreciation Day, we celebrate... certification process, we can help ensure the financial stability of our military families, strengthen our...

  18. Mental health of female foreign spouses in transnational marriages in southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung For-Wey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the mental health status, and the risk factors associated with mild psychiatric disorders, of female foreign spouses (from Vietnam, Indonesia, and mainland China in southern Taiwan, and to understand the mental health needs of these women. Methods One hundred and twenty nine participants were willing to participate in this study. All participants fulfilled all questionnaires which included demographic information, the Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ, and the Mental Health Care Needs Questionnaire (MHCNQ. Results By multiple linear regression, neuroticism characteristics (p = 0.000, the dimension of knowledge of the level of their own psychological disturbance (p = 0.001, dimension of friends assistance (p = 0.033, and dimension of religion comfort (p = 0.041 in mental health care needs could be used to predict possible mild psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, SEM model showed that Indonesian or Vietnamese spouses have more likely degree in mental health care needs (β = -0.24, p = 0.003, compared with Chinese ones. A higher level of neuroticism was associated with a greater likelihood of mild psychiatric disorder (β = 0.54, p p = 0.013. A higher degree of mental health care needs was related to a greater likelihood of mild psychiatric disorder (β = 0.14, p = 0.05. Conclusion In conclusion, we have obtained a better understanding of the mental health status of female foreign spouses in transnational marriages, who face many difficulties. Indonesian or Vietnamese spouses tend to more likely degree in mental health care needs than Chinese spouses, and then indirectly influenced their mental health status. Some individuals with a neurotic personality are exposed to high risk and might suffer from mild psychiatric symptoms. The needs for psychological counseling and religion therapy were the first priority for these women, particularly the

  19. 7 CFR 400.306 - Spouses and minor children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spouses and minor children. 400.306 Section 400.306... Regulations for the 1991 and Succeeding Crop Years § 400.306 Spouses and minor children. (a) The spouse and minor children of an individual are considered to be the same as the individual for purposes of this...

  20. Marital Adjustment to Adult Diabetes: Interpersonal Congruence and Spouse Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrot, Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated adjustment to insulin-treated diabetes among 20 adult patients and spouses. Found illness-related perceptions of patients and spouses were positively correlated and discrepancies decreased with increasing duration of marriage after diagnosis. Marital satisfaction of spouses was negatively related to knowledge about diabetes,…

  1. 5 CFR 838.711 - Maximum former spouse survivor annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum former spouse survivor annuity... Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Limitations on Survivor Annuities § 838.711 Maximum former spouse survivor annuity. (a) Under CSRS, payments under a court order may not exceed the...

  2. 20 CFR 725.215 - Determination of dependency; surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; surviving spouse...) § 725.215 Determination of dependency; surviving spouse. An individual who is the miner's surviving... service serving on active duty (as defined in § 404.1019 of this title), and the surviving spouse...

  3. 5 CFR 2634.309 - Spouses and dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a spouse or dependent child. (c) Divorce and separation. A reporting individual need not report any... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spouses and dependent children. 2634.309....309 Spouses and dependent children. (a) Special disclosure rules. Each report required by...

  4. Assertion and Family Violence: Correlates of Spouse Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, K. Daniel; Curley, Alison D.

    1986-01-01

    Abusive, discordant, and satisfactorily married couples were compared on self-report measures of general assertion, spouse-specific assertion, spouse-specific aggression, and spousal physical aggression in their families of origin. Low levels of spouse-specific assertion were characteristic of discordant couples whether abusive or not. Spousal…

  5. Abuse of aging caregivers: test of a nursing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Linda R

    2008-01-01

    Although most women find it difficult to provide care to an older family member, some women face additional challenges and health risks because the care recipient is abusive or aggressive toward them. This study tested a 12-week psychoeducative nursing intervention intended to decrease the frequency and intensity of physical and verbal/psychological aggression toward older caregiving wives and daughters by care recipients and improve selected abuse-related outcomes. The intervention, which focused on pattern identification, advocacy counseling, reframing of the caregiving situation, and nonconfrontational caregiving strategies, was individualized and highly interactive with emphasis placed on mutual problem solving and mutual planning. Subjects included women older than 50 who provided care to elders older than 55. Subjects were randomly assigned to group (intervention, N = 38; control, N = 45) and data collectors were "blinded" to group assignment. Findings indicated the intervention significantly reduced frequency of verbal/psychological aggression, and feelings of anger for caregivers providing care to fathers or husbands. It was not effective for caregivers providing care to mothers, and it did not reduce burden. Implications for nursing include raising awareness about the special vulnerabilities of older caregivers, providing provocative new information about the gender-based power dynamics in caregiving situations and underscoring the need for nurses to assume a stronger leadership role in building science with regard to family caregiving.

  6. Lifestyle as a health risk for family caregivers with least life satisfaction, in home-based post-stroke caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michèle; Bucki, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    Our purpose was to clarify that caregiving roles represent a situation of risk for the health of family caregivers, in home-based caring two years after cerebrovascular disease. Our aim was to determine the social and emotional repercussions of the event on family caregivers. Family caregivers living at home with stroke survivors were identified by a national survey. The Life Satisfaction (LS) national indicator for Luxembourg is 7.9/10, while in Canada it stands at 7.7. Caregivers with a LS level ≤ 7 were more likely to care for survivors affected by motor, sensory and memory neurological impairments. For a great majority, these impairments led to serious upheaval among families, and for spouses it was "a drama." For family caregivers with a least life satisfaction, their lifestyle poses a real health risk for the public health system. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  7. Approval of Spouse in Middle Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troll, Lillian E.

    A strongly positive opinion of spouse in middle age tends to be associated with social conformity and family integration. Mutually approving couples were more often politically moderate, homogamous in religious background, and had more interpersonal power than their children. They also had more highly integrated family structures with low conflict…

  8. Spouse-aided therapy with depressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EmanuelsZuurveen, L; Emmelkamp, PMG

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three non-maritally distressed depressed patients who were married or cohabitating were randomly assigned to either individual behavioral-cognitive therapy or spouse-aided treatment. Both treatment conditions focused on depressed mood, behavioral activity, and dysfunctional cognitions, the di

  9. Outplacement Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony S.; Dai, Sheila

    Rapid changes in technology and the economy have led to major staff reductions in the workplace, and have increased the need to assist displaced employees with outplacement counseling that is responsive, cost-effective, humane, and on-going. College counselors have the basic skills to effectively expand their role in this field in ways that…

  10. COUNSELING MULTIKULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUZLIAH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multicutural is a term used to describe one's view of the variety of life in the world, or cultural policy emphasizing their acceptance of diversity, and a wide range of cultures (multicultural that exist in society regarding values, system, culture, customs and politics that they profess. The effectiveness of counseling depends on many factors the most important is the relation to each other, and mutual understanding between counselor and client. Cultural differences that exist in this country requires the counselor needs to understand the different cultures that exist. Importance of multicultural for counselors as a form of consciousness that the counselor and client have cultural differences. Multicultural counseling a counseling relationship with the concept that there is a counselor with a client who has a cultural background, values and different lifestyles. Building a good relationship when the counseling process takes place so that the counselor can understand the culture of its clients one of the key attitudes that exist within konsleor is empathy. Counselors who have empathy will be able to understand the way the world through the perspective of the client.

  11. Outplacement Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowdell, Richard L.; And Others

    This monographs discusses outplacement counseling (the process of helping a terminated employee secure new employment) in business and industry and in higher education. The first section, outplacement in business and industry, describes the emergence of outplacement services and discusses benefits and problems associated with the service. The…

  12. Task difficulty and life changes among stroke family caregivers: relationship to depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennon, Susan M; Bakas, Tamilyn; Jessup, Nenette M; Habermann, Barbara; Weaver, Michael T

    2014-12-01

    To investigate differences in stroke caregiver task difficulty and life changes based on level of caregiver depressive symptoms, and to estimate probabilities among task difficulty and life change items. Descriptive analysis of baseline data from an ongoing stroke caregiver intervention trial. Hospitals and rehabilitation facilities. Caregivers (N=242; 78.6% women; 47.7% spouses; 71.8% white; mean age, 54.2±12.1y) caring for stroke survivors within 8 weeks of discharge to home. Not applicable. Baseline measures for task difficulty (Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale) and life changes (Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale) were compared based on level of depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] scores Caregivers with mild to severe depressive symptoms have greater difficulty with tasks and worse life changes than those with no depressive symptoms (Pstroke caregivers during or shortly after discharge. Assisting caregivers with depressive symptoms to arrange for respite care and addressing negative physical and psychological changes may be priority areas for future interventions. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differences in caregivers' psychological distress and associated factors by care recipients' gender and kinship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Noboru; Horiguchi, Kazuko

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we examined the level of psychological distress of Japanese caregivers according to various combinations of the gender of care recipients and the kinship of caregivers (spouse, son, daughter, or daughter-in-law). Furthermore, we explored the associated factors that could exacerbate or alleviate psychological distress. We utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design and implemented a self-administered questionnaire survey with a two-stage stratified sample of community-dwelling caregivers of frail elderly persons throughout Japan. We surveyed 1279 caregiving families, and 1020 questionnaires were completed by primary caregivers (response rate: 79.8%), with 945 respondents providing data on the Japanese version of the Kessler 6 psychological distress scale (K6). Caregivers' K6 scores varied significantly by care recipients' gender and their relationship with the caregiver. K6 scores were significantly higher among daughters-in-law caring for fathers-in-law than among daughters-in-law caring for mothers-in-law, wives caring for husbands, or daughters or sons caring for mothers. 'Negative influence of caregiving' and 'anxious about continuing caregiving' were factors that commonly exacerbated caregivers' psychological distress. Further analyses involving interactions indicated that the effects of 'anxious about continuing caregiving' and 'personal growth through caregiving' on the psychological distress of daughters-in-law varied by care recipients' gender as did the effects of an alleviating factor, 'keeping their own pace', on daughters. Psychological distress levels among family caregivers, as well as exacerbating and alleviating factors, varied depending on the gender and kinship of care recipients.

  14. Genomic counseling: next generation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Rachel; Haga, Susanne B

    2014-08-01

    Personalized medicine continues to expand with the development and increasing use of genome-based testing. While these advances present new opportunities for diagnosis and risk assessment, they also present challenges to clinical delivery. Genetic counselors will play an important role in ushering in this new era of testing; however, it will warrant a shift from traditional genetic counseling to "genomic counseling." This shift will be marked by a move from reactive genetic testing for diagnosis of primarily single-gene diseases to proactive genome-based testing for multiple complex diseases for the purpose of disease prevention. It will also require discussion of risk information for a number of diseases, some of which may have low relative risks or weak associations, and thus, may not substantially impact clinical care. Additionally, genomic counselors will expand their roles, particularly in the area of health promotion to reduce disease risk. This additional role will require a style of counseling that is more directive than traditional counseling and require greater knowledge about risk reducing behaviors and disease screening.

  15. Characteristics of the relationship that develops from nurse-caregiver communication during telecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, Hilde; Hvalvik, Sigrun; Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2015-07-01

    To explore the relationship between nurses and caregivers using a web camera and web forum as the communication methods. In Norway and other European countries, there is an increased focus on ageing at home, which is aided by technology, as well as formal and informal care. The literature reveals that caregivers endure physical and mental burdens. With computer-mediated communication, such as telecare, it is possible for nurses to provide supportive care to caregivers in their homes. An explorative design using qualitative content analysis. Six nurses and nine caregivers with residential spouses suffering from stroke or dementia were interviewed two times over a six-month period. The nurses responded dynamically to the information they received and helped to empower the individual caregivers and to strengthen the interpersonal relationships between the caregivers. While some participants thought that meeting in a virtual room was close and intimate, others wanted to maintain a certain distance. The participants' altered their roles as the masters and receivers of knowledge and experience; this variation was based on a relationship in which mutual respect for one another and an interest in learning from one another allowed them to work together as partners to demonstrate the system and to follow-up with new caregivers. The flexibility of the service allows the possibility of engaging in a close, or to some extent, a more distant relationship, depending on the participants' attitudes towards using this type of service. Nurses can provide close care, support and information to caregivers who endeavour to master their everyday lives together with their sick spouses. The support seems to help the caregivers cope with their own physical and emotional problems. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. COUNSELING MULTIKULTURAL

    OpenAIRE

    NUZLIAH

    2016-01-01

    Multicutural is a term used to describe one's view of the variety of life in the world, or cultural policy emphasizing their acceptance of diversity, and a wide range of cultures (multicultural) that exist in society regarding values, system, culture, customs and politics that they profess. The effectiveness of counseling depends on many factors the most important is the relation to each other, and mutual understanding between counselor and client. Cultural differences that exist in this coun...

  17. The financial requirements and time commitments of caregivers for autologous stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Kenneth R; Fitzmaurice, Thomas; Root, Lynn; Kimtis, Elizabeth; Patchett, Linda; Hill, John

    2006-04-01

    This study is a prospective evaluation of the time commitment and financial requirements of caregivers of autologous stem cell recipients during the period of inpatient hospitalization. Eligible patients identified one caregiver, and a one-page survey addressing the necessary time commitment and out-of-pocket expenses was completed by the caregiver at each visit. The caregivers of 40 patients participated (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [n = 19], multiple myeloma [n = 18], Hodgkin's lymphoma [n = 2], or acute myelogenous leukemia [n = 1]). Caregivers included spouses (n = 35), partners/friends (n = 2), or family members (n = 3). Results were summarized for the patient's total length of stay. Each caregiver traveled a median of 829 miles over 17.8 hours. Out-of-pocket expenses varied greatly depending on whether a caregiver stayed in local accommodations (cohort 1; n = 11) or in the patient's hospital room (cohort 2; n = 29). Total expenses (median) for each caregiver in cohort 1 were dollar 849.35, including accommodations (dollar 560), gasoline (dollar 87.35), and food (dollar 202). Total expenses (median) for each caregiver in cohort 2 were dollar 181.15, including gasoline (dollar 70) and food (dollar 111.15). Each caregiver in cohort 1 lost a median of 43.5 hours of work compared with 8 hours for each caregiver in cohort 2. The results from this prospective study demonstrate that there is a significant financial and time requirement on the part of the caregiver when a family member or significant other is hospitalized for an autologous stem cell transplant.

  18. The impact of daily arthritis pain on spouse sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Lynn M; Keefe, Francis J; Schulz, Richard; Parris Stephens, Mary Ann; Mogle, Jacqueline A

    2013-09-01

    Although chronic pain has been linked to poorer psychosocial well-being in the spouse, the extent to which patient pain affects spouse sleep is unknown. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that greater daily knee pain would be associated with poorer sleep for the spouse that evening. We also tested the hypothesis that this pain contagion is exacerbated in couples who have a close relationship. A total of 138 knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and their spouses completed baseline interviews and a 22-day diary assessment. Multilevel lagged models indicated that greater knee OA pain at the end of the day was associated with spouses' poorer overall sleep quality that night and feeling less refreshed after sleep. In contrast, there was no evidence that spouse sleep was related to greater patient pain the next day. The effects of patient pain on spouse sleep were not due to disturbances in patient sleep and were also independent of spouse sex, depressive symptoms, and physical comorbidities; both partners' negative affect; and the quality of marital interactions throughout the day. As predicted, we also found that patient pain was more strongly related to less refreshing sleep for spouses who were in a close relationship. Findings illustrate that chronic pain may place the spouse's health at risk and suggest an important target for couple-oriented interventions.

  19. Marital Communication, Adjustment and Perceptual Differences between "Happy" and "Counseling" Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelsma, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Identified 16 significantly different marital communication practices which distinguished 23 happily married individuals from those undergoing counseling (N=23). Results revealed that happy individuals had significantly more congruency between their self-perceptions and their spouse's perceptions of their communication practices and more congruent…

  20. [Needs and expectations of Alzheimer's disease family caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, H; Rullier, L; Bouisson, J; Dartigues, J-F; Dubois, O; Salamon, R

    2012-06-01

    Family members of people suffering from Alzheimer's disease play a major role in providing daily life care for their relatives. Compared to non-caregivers, they present increased risks of mortality as well as psychological and physical co-morbidity. Altered relationships between caregivers and medical staff and dissatisfaction with the quality of help provided tend to increase the risk of depression and anxiety disorders among caregivers. The present study aimed at exploring the needs and expectations of family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease who request medical assistance for their relatives. The present analysis is an ancillary study of a large multicentric controlled randomized study designed to assess the efficacy of three non-pharmacological treatments in Alzheimer's disease, in which 645 mild-to-moderate Alzheimer patients were enrolled. Needs and expectations of the caregivers were assessed with a French scale of patient expectations for medical consultation, the échelle d'attentes en matière de consultations (EAC), completed by caregivers during the inclusion visit. This scale consists in a self-administered 28-item questionnaire concerning four main needs: learning skills to improve daily life management of their relatives; information regarding the disease; improving caregivers' self-confidence; support to improve communication with their relatives. The ten items for which more than 40% of caregivers reported high or very high expectations referred to two main needs: information regarding the disease (treatment, prognosis…) and learning skills in order to improve daily life management of their relative. The predominance of such needs was observed whatever the relationship between the caregiver and the cared relative but seemed to be more pronounced in female spouses and children of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Needs and expectations of Alzheimer's disease family caregivers involve two major aspects: first, information regarding

  1. Caregiver-recipient closeness and symptom progression in Alzheimer disease. The Cache County Dementia Progression Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Maria C; Piercy, Kathleen W; Rabins, Peter V; Green, Robert C; Breitner, John C S; Ostbye, Truls; Corcoran, Christopher; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Tschanz, Joann T

    2009-09-01

    Applying Rusbult's investment model of dyadic relationships, we examined the effect of caregiver-care recipient relationship closeness (RC) on cognitive and functional decline in Alzheimer's disease. After diagnosis, 167 participants completed up to six visits, observed over an average of 20 months. Participants were 64% women, had a mean age of 86 years, and mean dementia duration of 4 years. Caregiver-rated closeness was measured using a six-item scale. In mixed models adjusted for dementia severity, dyads with higher levels of closeness (p Alzheimer's dementia (AD) decline with closer relationships, particularly with spouse caregivers, are consistent with investment theory. Future interventions designed to enhance the caregiving dyadic relationship may help slow decline in AD.

  2. The impact of caregiver support on mortality following burn injury in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsafran, Salman K; Davis, James S; Tankel, Susan; Varas, Robin; Quintana, Olga; Manning, Ron; Glenn, Candace; Pizano, Louis R; Namias, Nicholas; Schulman, Carl I

    2013-01-01

    Advances in burn care have decreased mortality in the past 20 years, but affecting elderly mortality rates (>65 years) remain challenging. This study evaluates the impact of home caregiver support on elderly burn patients' mortality. The authors retrospectively reviewed patients aged 65 and older admitted to their burn center from July 1995 to October 2004. Patient demographics, Injury Severity Score, TBSA, and patients' primary caregiver were collected. The outcomes were mortality, disposition, and length of stay and these were evaluated using univariate and subsequently multivariate regression. Significance was calculated at P ≤ .05. A total of 112 patients were included in the analysis. The mean age was 76±8. Male patients constituted 47%, whereas 53% were female patients, and mean TBSA was 21±16%. Thirty patients' primary caregiver was a spouse, for 38 it was a child, and 44 had no caregiver. Fifty-eight patients survived (51.7%), and 54 patients died (48.3%). Only 21% of the survivors had a child as their primary caregiver; however, 48% of the nonsurvivors had a child as the primary caregiver (P ≤ 0.05). On multivariate analysis, age, TBSA, and child as primary caregiver were all independent predictors of mortality. Having a child as a caregiver provided the largest impact, with an odds ratio of 4.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-15.62; P = .02).

  3. Is salivary pH a marker of depression among older spousal caregivers for cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaila, Rabia; Cohen, Miri; Zidan, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The pH in saliva, which decreases due to the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, may serve as a biomarker of psychological distress in caregivers but has rarely been studied in this context. The aims are to examine the levels of salivary pH as a possible biomarker of depression among caregivers and whether depression mediates the association between caregiving status (cancer caregivers vs. non-cancer caregivers) and pH levels. Cross-sectional data were collected from 68 consecutive-sampled spouses of cancer patients, and 42 age-matched individuals. Lower levels of pH saliva were found among caregivers of cancer patients than in the comparison group. Being a caregiver, poor subjective health, higher depression, and lower mastery predicted lower pH levels. In addition, depression mediated the associations of mastery with pH levels. The study provides preliminary evidence that salivary pH may serve as an easily tested indicator of the stress of caregiving and its related depression.

  4. Examining the social context in the caregiving experience: correlates of global self-esteem among adult daughter caregivers to an older parent with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachner, Yaacov G; Karus, Daniel G; Raveis, Victoria H

    2009-10-01

    To examine the associations between various patient, disease, situation, and caregiver characteristics (organized by five conceptual domains) and global self-esteem among caregiver daughters to parents with cancer. Dyads comprised of 237 cancer outpatients and their adult caregiving daughter completed structured telephone interviews. Two of the five domains of potential correlates significantly predicted caregiving daughters' global self-esteem-daughters' sociodemographics and constraints on/facilitators of caregiving. Daughters' overall sense of self-worth was directly correlated with their household income and inversely correlated with greater depressive affect and the number of patient needs for which someone else provided assistance. It was also correlated with the daughters' other role obligations. A higher sense of self-worth was associated with either being employed or having to care for a child/grandchild; a lower sense of self-worth was associated with having a spouse/partner. The present analysis documents the complexity of social connectedness, demonstrating that various role obligations contribute to caregiving daughters' global self-esteem in different ways. In the context of assuming cancer careprovision, daughters' existing repertoire of social roles may possibly mediate the stress associated with their care involvement or serve as a buffer against the strain of the caregiving experience.

  5. Caring for the caregivers: an investigation of factors related to well-being among parents caring for a child with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Rebecca H; Kozachek, Stephanie; Stern, Marilyn; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-04-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex disorder characterized by numerous challenges, including intellectual disability, speech delay, decreased pain sensitivity, sleep disturbances, hyperactivity, mood instability, and self-injury. Caregivers must readily adapt to the ever-changing needs of the child. Due to these demands, caregivers may encounter difficulties maintaining their own level of well-being. Thus, a total of 112 primary caregivers (i.e., parents) of individuals diagnosed with SMS responded to online questionnaires to assess demographic and psychosocial factors, such as perceptions of child health vulnerability, benefit finding, sleep behaviors, anxiety and depression symptomatology, and caregiver satisfaction and self-efficacy, which may be related to caregiver well-being. Results show that, among mothers, caregiver well-being was directly related to perceived child health vulnerability, caregiver satisfaction, and benefit finding, and a significant moderating effect was observed for depression/anxiety counseling after beginning the caregiver role on the relationship between anxiety symptomatology and caregiver well-being. Results further suggest that maternal caregivers who report high levels of anxiety but do not seek counseling fair the worst in terms of well-being. Among fathers, lower depression symptoms and greater benefit finding were related to higher levels of caregiver well-being. These data show that many factors play roles in influencing coping and well-being among SMS caregivers. Investigating these variables and relationships may reveal additional resources and interventions to assist primary caregivers.

  6. Psychological distress in informal caregivers of patients with dementia in primary care: course and determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsje, Petra; Hems, Marleen A P; Lucassen, Peter L B J; Bor, Hans; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2016-08-01

    The course of psychological distress in informal caregivers of patients with dementia has been investigated in longitudinal studies with conflicting outcomes. We investigated the course and determinants of psychological distress in informal caregivers of patients with dementia in primary care. In this prospective observational cohort study, data were collected at baseline, after 9 and 18 months. We assessed cognition and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of the patient (Mini-Mental State Examination and Neuropsychiatric Inventory) and psychological distress (Sense of Competence Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale and General Health Questionnaire 12-tem version) of the informal caregivers. Determinants for the course of psychological distress were caregivers' age, gender and relationship with the patient, patients' cognition and NPS, participation in a care program and admission to long-term care facilities (LTCF). With linear mixed models, the course over time for psychological distress and its determinants were explored. We included 117 informal caregivers, of whom 23.1% had a high risk for depression and 41.0% were identified to be likely to have mental problems at baseline. We found a stable pattern of psychological distress over time. Higher frequency of NPS, informal caregivers' age between 50 and 70 years and being female or spouse were associated with higher psychological distress. For patients who were admitted to a LTCF during the study psychological distress of the informal caregivers improved. GPs should focus on NPS in patients with dementia and on caregivers' psychological distress and be aware of their risk for depression and mental problems, specifically to those who are spouse, female or between 50 and 70 years of age. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Counseling Psychology and Professional School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a historical, political, and organizational analysis regarding counseling psychology's involvement in professional school counseling. Issues discussed include collaboration, curriculum and training, and professional identity, as well as the commonalities that bind counselor education/professional school counseling and…

  8. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  9. Interventions with family caregivers of cancer patients: meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Katapodi, Maria C; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Lingling; Mood, Darlene W

    2010-01-01

    Family caregivers of cancer patients receive little preparation, information, or support to perform their caregiving role. However, their psychosocial needs must be addressed so they can maintain their own health and provide the best possible care to the patient. The purpose of this article is to analyze the types of interventions offered to family caregivers of cancer patients, and to determine the effect of these interventions on various caregiver outcomes. Meta-analysis was used to analyze data obtained from 29 randomized clinical trials published from 1983 through March 2009. Three types of interventions were offered to caregivers: psychoeducational, skills training, and therapeutic counseling. Most interventions were delivered jointly to patients and caregivers, but they varied considerably with regard to dose and duration. The majority of caregivers were female (64%) and Caucasian (84%), and ranged in age from 18 to 92 years (mean age, 55 years). Meta-analysis indicated that although these interventions had small to medium effects, they significantly reduced caregiver burden, improved caregivers' ability to cope, increased their self-efficacy, and improved aspects of their quality of life. Various intervention characteristics were also examined as potential moderators. Clinicians need to deliver research-tested interventions to help caregivers and patients cope effectively and maintain their quality of life.

  10. The caregivers' perspective on the end-of-life phase of glioblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechl, Birgit; Ackerl, Michael; Sax, Cornelia; Oberndorfer, Stefan; Calabek, Bernadette; Sizoo, Eefje; Reijneveld, Jaap; Crevenna, Richard; Keilani, Mohammad; Gaiger, Alexander; Dieckmann, Karin; Preusser, Matthias; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Marosi, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) still harbors a fatal prognosis. The involvement of the neurocognition and psyche poses unique challenges for care provision by relatives. We lack data about the caregivers' perspective on the end-of-life (EOL) phase of GBM patients to improve counseling and support. In this study we investigated the experiences of 52 caregivers of deceased GBM patients treated in Austria. We used a questionnaire developed by the University Medical Centre of Amsterdam for exploration of the EOL-phase in glioma patients. The caregivers (17 men, 34 women) completed the questionnaire in median three years after the patients' death. 29 % of caregivers reported that they felt incompletely prepared for their tasks, however, those with higher education levels felt significantly better informed. 29 % suffered from financial difficulties, which was associated with burnout (60 %) and reduced quality of life (QOL). The patients' most common symptoms reported by caregivers were fatigue (87 %), reduced consciousness (81 %) and aphasia (77 %). 22 % of patients were bedbound during their last three months increasing to 80 % in the last week of life. The reported QOL of caregivers was very low and did not differ between caregivers of patients, who died at home (40 %) and caregivers of patients, who died in hospital (46 %). The caregiver reported that their QOL was only slightly better than the QOL they attributed to the patients. Furthermore, the high frequency of financial difficulties, burnout symptoms and feelings of insufficient information emphasize the urgent need for support and training dedicated to caregivers.

  11. Universality of ageing: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea eBaider

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The world population is ageing, with the proportion of older people (65+ years expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world.Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries.In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning care giving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of ageing that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables.This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture and gender have on it.

  12. 5 CFR 838.932 - Court orders that permit the former spouse to elect to receive a former spouse survivor annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... spouse to elect to receive a former spouse survivor annuity. 838.932 Section 838.932 Administrative... AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Terminology Used in Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities... spouse survivor annuity. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a court order...

  13. Predictors of life satisfaction in retired physicians and spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero Austrom, Mary; Perkins, Anthony J; Damush, Teresa M; Hendrie, Hugh C

    2003-03-01

    With the current demographic changes, adjustment to retirement has become a major concern for physicians. Yet information on adjustment to retirement gathered from retired physicians is sparse. Information on physician spouses following retirement is currently not available. Therefore, we conducted a survey of a multi-disciplinary group of retired physicians and their spouses on adjustment to retirement. A mail survey was sent to 1834 alumni who graduated from medical school prior to 1965. Responses were received from 795 (43 %) physicians and 455 spouses. Of the physicians, 678 indicated that they were retired or semi-retired. Life satisfaction was measured on a 9-point Likert scale. Levels of life satisfaction were high for both physicians and spouses. Approximately 88 % of both groups reported being mostly satisfied or better with their lives. Factors associated with better life satisfaction for physicians included better health, optimism, feelings of financial security, participation in activities and hobbies and a good sexual relationship. For spouses, good health, having a husband willing to help with chores, quality of relationships including sexual relationship and attending theatre or sporting events were associated with higher levels of life satisfaction. Spouses who had never worked reported higher levels of life satisfaction than spouses who had worked and were now retired. For changes in life satisfaction since physician retirement, predictors for both physicians and spouses were similar to those for life satisfaction. However, for physicians, both younger age and more years in retirement were independently associated with improved life satisfaction. Issues regarding loss of role and methods and reasons for retirement influenced satisfaction in the early retirees. For spouses, major challenges involved coping with changes in the marital relationship. Physicians and their spouses reported high levels of life satisfaction. The factors predicting life

  14. A Systematic Review of Psychosocial Interventions to Cancer Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To systematically review the effect of psychosocial interventions on improving QoL, depression and anxiety of cancer caregivers.Methods: We conducted a systematic review of psychosocial interventions among adult cancer caregivers published from 2011 to 2016. PsycINFO, PubMed, Proquest, Cochrane Library, Embase, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI and EBSCO, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and WANFANG were searched. Inclusion criteria were: randomized controlled trails (RCTs; psychosocial intervention to cancer caregivers; psychosocial health indicators including quality of life, depression or anxiety.Results: 21 studies out of 4,666 identified abstracts met inclusion criteria, including 19 RCTs. The intervention modes fell into the following nine categories: family connect intervention, self-determination theory-based intervention (SDT, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, emotion-focused therapy (EFT, comprehensive health enhancement support system (CHESS, FOCUS programme, existential behavioral therapy (EBT, telephone interpersonal counseling (TIP-C, problem-solving intervention (COPE.Conclusion: paired-intervention targeting self-care and interpersonal connections of caregivers and symptom management of patients is effective in improving quality of life and alleviating depression of cancer caregivers while music therapy is helpful for reducing anxiety of cancer caregivers.

  15. Caring for the Caregiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary NCI Dictionary of Genetics Terms ... care to a person with cancer. It is a condensed version of our booklet, When Someone You Love Is Being Treated for Cancer . Being a caregiver ...

  16. Eldercare at Home: Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strategies for dealing with strong feelings It is natural to have strong feelings when giving care over a long period of time. Following is a list of strong feelings that caregivers often have and strategies for dealing with them ...

  17. Does caregiving stress affect cognitive function in older women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunmin; Kawachi, Ichiro; Grodstein, Francine

    2004-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women provide care to their ill spouses; however, no studies have examined possible effects of caregiving stress on cognitive function. We administered 6 tests of cognitive function to 13740 Nurses' Health Study participants aged 70-79 years. We collected information on caregiving and numerous potential confounding variables via biennial mailed questionnaires. After adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, mental health index, vitality index, use of antidepressants, and history of high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease), we found modest but significantly increased risks of low cognitive function on three of the cognitive tests among women who provided care to a disabled or ill spouse compared with women who did not provide any care. For example, on the TICS, a test of general cognition, the risk of a low score was 31% higher in women who provided care compared with women who did not (RR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10, 1.56). We found a moderately increased risk of poor performance on several cognitive tests among women who provided care to their disabled or ill husbands.

  18. The Choreography of Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sterling K.; Purkey, William W.

    1997-01-01

    Compares counseling to the choreography of dance. Reviews other counseling structures, such as the scientific process, and then introduces the "choreography of counseling." Claims that counseling, as in a dance performance, involves an introduction, exploration, exposition, and resolution. Offers principles and techniques for success in each of…

  19. Dementia and Caregiver Stress: An Application of the Reconceptualized Uncertainty in Illness Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unson, Christine; Flynn, Deborah; Glendon, Mary Ann; Haymes, Elayne; Sancho, Diane

    2015-06-01

    The Reconceptualized Uncertainty in Illness Theory (RUIT) was used to investigate antecedents to, appraisals of, and ways of coping with stressful caregiving. Four focus groups with caregivers (8 males and 16 females) of relatives with dementia were conducted; 15 cared for their parents and the remainder cared for their spouses. They were recruited from an adult care center and other community settings in a metropolitan area in New England. The discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers independently coded the transcripts. Thematic analysis was structured according to the RUIT. The study is unique in its application to caregivers as opposed to patients and to all of the elements of the RUIT. Caregivers experience uncertainty in similar ways to patients with life-altering illness. Symptom severity--lack of personal boundaries, repetitive and aggressive behaviors, and the need for constant care--was the most frequent source of stress. The appraisals were mostly negative and included feelings of resentment, a lack of support from family members, financial strains, and loss of freedom. Self-improvement and self-care were important aspects of coping. Spirituality and humor were other coping skills that respondents used. Not all respondents said they were coping and some also reported that support from health care providers was not always helpful. Nurses can help improve coping by explaining the factors that contribute to caregiver strain and uncertainty, and by assisting caregivers to anticipate the effects of the caregiving role.

  20. Patient and caregiver perceptions of the social impact of advanced Parkinson's disease and dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebtovsky, Alexander; Rigbi, Amihai; Melamed, Eldad; Ziv, Ilan; Steiner, Israel; Gad, Alona; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2012-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) exacts a physical and emotional toll on both patients and family. The aim of this study was to compare patient and caregiver perceptions of the social consequences of basic symptoms of PD and levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Forty patients with PD and dyskinesias and 35 of their caregivers completed a self-report questionnaire on the impact of PD and dyskinesias on their feelings of security and embarrassment and participation in family/social events, and indicated their preference for the "on" (with dyskinesias) or the "off" (without dyskinesias) state. The patients scored significantly higher than the caregivers did on the negative social impact of the disease in general (p = 0.002) and of the dyskinesias in particular (p = 0.03). Nevertheless, the patients expressed a significantly greater preference for the "on" state (83 %) than the caregivers (59 %) (p = 0.03). Preferences turned to be reverse in direction among spouse-caregivers who significantly preferred the "off" state (54 %) than the patients (25 %) (p = 0.04). Although patients have a worse perception of the effects of PD than their caregivers do, they prefer the more independent "on" state, whereas their caregivers prefer the "off" state.

  1. [Family members' experiences of caring for persons with dementia and outreach counseling--an interpretative phenomenological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, Samuel; Frei, Irena Anna; Spichiger, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Almost two-thirds of the 110,000 people living with dementia in Switzerland receive home care from family members. Outreach counselling can reduce the burden for family caregivers and delay nursing home placement. However, little is known of how this works and how caregivers experience the counselling. The Canton of Aargau Alzheimer's Association has been conducting a pilot project to demonstrate the necessity, effectiveness and practicability of outreach counselling in (their canton). As a part of the evaluation of the project this study explored how family members experience the process of caring for a relative with dementia and outreach counselling. Interpretive phenomenology–a qualitative approach–was used to analyse data from interviews with twelve family caregivers. Most family members felt supported in caregiving by outreach counselling. Three aspects of the counselling were especially important to the participants: being understood and taken seriously by the counsellor; receiving answers to their most pressing questions concerning the illness and being supported when difficult decision had to be taken; regaining personal time and learning how to better interact with the person with dementia. Two participants would have wished for more help by the counsellor. To meet the needs of the family members, consultants should have sufficient experience in dementia patient care and should be strongly networked across the local health and welfare system. This study shows that family members can experience outreach counselling as a great support in their caregiving roles.

  2. The Survival of Spouses Marrying Into Longevity-Enriched Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jacob K; Elo, Irma T; Schupf, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of longevity-enriched families are an important tool to gain insight into the mechanisms of exceptionally long and healthy lives. In the Long Life Family Study, the spouses of the members of the longevity-enriched families are often used as a control group. These spouses could...

  3. Gender Norms and Retaliatory Violence against Spouses and Acquaintances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Scott L.; Felson, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines an experiment embedded within a nationally representative survey of adult Americans to investigate gender norms regarding retaliatory violence between spouses and acquaintances. Contrary to claims that societal norms permit violence within marriage, respondents disapproved of retaliatory violence against spouses more than…

  4. The Role Development of a Community College President's Spouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Tracy M.

    2013-01-01

    The role of a community college president's spouse can be an important one in the life of the college and in the success of the presidency, yet the role itself is often vaguely defined. This can cause frustration for a college president's spouse because he or she experiences ambiguity by not knowing the expectations college stakeholders hold of…

  5. 22 CFR 19.7-3 - Agreement with former spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., reduce or increase the following benefits for a former spouse; (1) A pension under § 19.9; (2) A regular survivor annuity under § 19.11-2; (3) A supplemental survivor annuity under § 19.10-6; (4) A lump sum... annuity for such former spouse in accordance with § 19.11-2(e). An agreement to establish or increase...

  6. Gender Norms and Retaliatory Violence against Spouses and Acquaintances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Scott L.; Felson, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines an experiment embedded within a nationally representative survey of adult Americans to investigate gender norms regarding retaliatory violence between spouses and acquaintances. Contrary to claims that societal norms permit violence within marriage, respondents disapproved of retaliatory violence against spouses more than…

  7. Cancer and the family: strategies to assist spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, L L; Peters-Golden, H

    1993-05-01

    Research that has been conducted with spouses of cancer patients documents the nature of their stress, the duration of their stress, and the concerns that they confront over the course of the illness. A variety of intervention strategies have been used to assist spouses in dealing with the stressful effects of cancer. Two major categories of intervention strategies are providing information and offering support.

  8. 38 CFR 3.257 - Children; no surviving spouse entitled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Children; no surviving... and Estate § 3.257 Children; no surviving spouse entitled. Where pension is not payable to a surviving... worth, payments will be made to or for the child or children as if there were no surviving spouse....

  9. 20 CFR 725.214 - Determination of relationship; surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of relationship; surviving... Benefits) § 725.214 Determination of relationship; surviving spouse. An individual shall be considered to be the surviving spouse of a miner if: (a) The courts of the State in which the miner was...

  10. 38 CFR 3.214 - Court decisions; unremarried surviving spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; unremarried surviving spouses. 3.214 Section 3.214 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 3.214 Court decisions; unremarried surviving spouses. Effective July 15, 1958, a decision rendered by a Federal court in an action to which the United States was a party holding that a...

  11. 2012 Survey of Reserve Components Spouses (RCSS): Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    120  o.  Loneliness ...472  63.  Identification scale : Constructed from Q63a-d. The Identification scale indicates how much a spouse identifies with the...482  64.  Perceived Stress scale : Constructed from Q64a-d. Perceived Stress can be defined as spouses’ stress

  12. Group therapy for spouses of aphasic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen-Horbach, H; Crone, M; Wallesch, C W

    1999-01-01

    The setting, course, and results of a counseling and a therapeutic group for relatives of chronic aphasic patients are reviewed. Generally, providing and discussing information on the illness, its consequences, and medical and social services are greatly appreciated by group members. Counseling and group psychotherapy, as conducted by us, did not result in measurable improvements of relatives' perceptions of personal, social, and familial burdens. We assume, however, that group therapy does lead to more realistic attitudes toward burdensome and severely straining situations and may help with coping. Further research into psychotherapeutic strategies for relatives of disabled persons, who themselves suffer from psychological and social handicaps, is needed.

  13. Coping strategies and caregiving outcomes among rural dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Kosberg, Jordan I; Kaufman, Allan V; Leeper, James D

    2010-08-01

    We studied the coping styles by which family caregivers living in rural areas of Alabama deal with the demands of caring for an older relative with dementia. Data were obtained from a sample of 141 caregivers through the random-digit dialing telephone survey. Two coping styles were identified: deliberate coping and avoidance coping. Deliberate coping was related to higher life satisfaction scores and, avoidance coping was related to lower life satisfaction scores and higher caregiver burden scores. Avoidance coping appeared to moderate the effects of caregiver health on caregiver burden. Social workers should pay greater attention to caregivers with dysfunctional coping styles.

  14. Informal caregiver burden in middle-income countries Results from Memory Centers in Lima - Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Custodio

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate caregiver burden based on Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI and depression in caregivers on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II. METHODS: Literate individuals, 18 years or older, who spoke Spanish as their native language were included. Demographic characteristics: Age, sex, education, relationship to person with dementia, length of time caregiving, other sources of help for caring, impact on the household economy, family support, and perception of impaired health; and Clinical data on care-recipients: type of dementia, time since diagnosis, treatment, and Global Deterioration Scale (GDS; the ZBI and BDI-II. Descriptive and analytical statistics were employed to assess caregiver burden and predictors of higher burden in caregivers. RESULTS: A total of 92 informal caregivers were evaluated. Regarding care-recipients, 75% were 69 years old or over, 75% had at least one year since diagnosis, 73.9% had Alzheimer's disease, 84.8% received treatment, 75% scored 5 or over on the GDS. For caregivers, 75% were 55.5 years old or over, predominantly female (81.5%, married (83.7%, the spouse of care-recipients (60.87%, had at least 10 years of education (75.0% and one year of caregiving (75%, reduced entertainment time (90.2% and self-perception of impaired health (83.7%. Median score on the ZBI was 37.5 (minimum value = 3; and maximum value = 74. The coefficient of BDI was 1.38 (p-value <0.001. CONCLUSION: This sample of Peruvian informal caregivers showed elevated ZBI values. Self-perception of worsened health, repercussion on the family economy and time caregiving were the main determinants of ZBI, although only BDI was a consistent predictor of ZBI.

  15. Coping styles, stress tolerance, and wellbeing and their correlations in the women spouses of the mentally ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkil Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Indian cultural scenario, the wife is the primary caregiver when the husband falls mentally sick. The caregiver burden and the gender issues make women more vulnerable to this particular situation. This study attempts to take a closer look at the coping styles, stress tolerance, and wellbeing of such a population and the interplay of the above variables. Aim: This study aims to determine correlations between coping styles, stress tolerance, and wllbeing of the women spouses of the mentally ill. Materials and Method: A passive observational design has been used. The tools used in this study are Life Change Event Inventory, AECOM Coping Scale Questionnaire, and PGI Well being scale. Statistical Analysis: Pearson′s product moment correlation is used to study the relationship between the variables. Result and Conclusions: It is concluded that the wives of mentally ill tend to use certain coping styles more than others and this preference lowers the stress experienced and enhance their sense of well being. It is also concluded that women with mentally ill spouses could be hardier due to the sociocultural expectations imposed on them where care giving of their mentally sick husbands are concerned.

  16. 22 CFR 19.10-2 - Reduced annuity with regular survivor annuity to spouse or former spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...'s reduced annuity would then be further reduced by this pension ($13,220-$4,957.50) to provide an... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduced annuity with regular survivor annuity... SYSTEM § 19.10-2 Reduced annuity with regular survivor annuity to spouse or former spouse. (a)...

  17. Cancer caregiving tasks and consequences and their associations with caregiver status and the caregiver's relationship to the patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Seriously ill patients often depend on their informal caregivers to help and support them through the disease course. This study investigated informal cancer caregivers' experiences of caregiving tasks and consequences and how caregiver status (primary vs. non-primary caregiver...... consequences, most commonly stress (59%). Some caregivers experienced personal growth, but relatively large proportions did not. Caregiver status and the caregiver's relationship to the patient were associated with some caregiving aspects. Primary caregivers experienced the highest caregiving workload, and non-primary...... is burdensome. The primary and the closest caregivers seemed to take on most caregiving tasks, but, contrary to expectations, regarding the majority of caregiving consequences non-primary and more distant caregivers were affected to the same degree as the primary and closest caregivers. Initiatives...

  18. Caregiver profiles and determinants of caregiving burden in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanuade, O A; Boatemaa, S

    2015-07-01

    Due to the growing elderly population, the high cost of care in Ghana and low coverage of the National Health Insurance Scheme, demands for family caregiving have become more imperative in Ghana than ever before. Many caregivers experience high burdens, yet literature on caregiving in Ghana is lacking. This study examined caregiver profiles and determinants of the burden of caregiving in Ghana. Cross-sectional study. This study used data from Wave 1 of the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (2007-2008). In total, 238 caregivers were analysed in the study. The burden of caregiving was measured using the WHO Impact of Caregiving Scale. Independent sample t-tests, correlations and analysis of variance were used to investigate associations between background characteristics and the burden of caregiving. Linear regression was used to examine determinants of the burden of caregiving. The mean age of caregivers was 61 years (standard deviation 14.5), and the male:female ratio was approximately equal. On average, approximately two adults per household required care. Less than five percent of caregivers received financial, emotional, health, physical and personal care support. Place of residence, provision of financial, health and physical support to care recipients, and receipt of financial, physical and health support were significant determinants of the burden of caregiving. This study found a mismatch between the number of people needing care and the number of people providing care. In order to improve the health of caregivers and care recipients, there is a need to provide financial support for caregivers. In addition, pro-caregiving government programmes and policies should be established. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Caregiver credits in France, Germany, and Sweden: lessons for the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, John

    2011-01-01

    Recently, analysts in the United States (US) have proposed adopting caregiver credits, or pension credits, provided to individuals for time spent out of the workforce while caring for dependent children and sick or elderly relatives. The primary objective of these credits, used in almost all public pension systems in the European Union, is to improve the adequacy of old-age benefits for women whose gaps in workforce participation typically lead to fewer years of contributions, lower lifetime average earnings, and consequently lower pensions. This article examines caregiver credits in the context of future reforms to the US Social Security system, with attention given to the adequacy of current spouse and survivor benefits and how changing marital patterns and family structures have increased the risk of old-age poverty among certain groups of women. It then analyzes caregiver credit programs in selected countries, with particular focus on design, administration, and cost.

  20. [Psychiatric distress and related risk factors of family caregivers who care for the demented elderly at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Y; Ogata, K

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to assess psychiatric distress of caregivers who had been caring for the demented elderly at home and to examine the association of caregivers' psychiatric distress with putative risk factors. Subjects were 294 caregivers living in Amakusa, Kumamoto Prefecture of Japan, whose spouses, parents or other family members were registered at Amakusa Public Health Center as demented elderly. In 1998, Survey on Caregivers' Mental Health was conducted using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12) as a measurement for general psychiatric state of caregivers. Two hundred and eighty-two caregivers responded to interviews with complaints of the following psychological symptoms: feelings of unhappiness (55.7%), of stress (41.8%), insomnia (29.4%) and depressed mood (29.1%). Seventy-six caregivers (27.2%) were identified as being above the cut-off point 4 for psychiatric distress caseness. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated caregivers' psychiatric distress was statistically associated with caregivers' age, the caregivers' perception of the severity of dementia, the number of years devoted to caregiving at home and perceived financial state. Being 50 to 69 years (OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.17-0.81) and being 70 years or older (OR = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.14-0.83) were negatively associated with caseness as compared to being 20 to 49 years. Caseness was positively related to the severity of the elderly's demented state (OR = 6.93, 95% CI: 1.99-24.19), 1 year to 2 years devoted to caregiving at home (OR = 3.26, 95% CI: 1.02-10.38), no family or social support (OR = 2.99, 95% CI: 1.12-7.96) and lower perceived financial state (always OR = 6.99, 95% CI: 2.77-17.64, sometimes OR = 2.41, 95% CI: 1.19-4.85). Reduction of caregivers' psychiatric distress is important for not merely the enhancement of quality of care for demented elders and caregivers' life but for the prevention of elder abuse or neglect. Our study suggests that a comprehensive

  1. Sudden-On-Chronic Death and Complicated Grief in Bereaved Dementia Caregivers: Two Case Studies of Complicated Grief Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Katherine P; Andersen, Troy C; Haynes, Lara Burns

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease is challenging and often has negative health and mental health effects that, for 7-20% of caregivers, persist into bereavement in the form of complicated grief. Complicated grief is a state of prolonged and ineffective mourning. An under-recognized phenomenon in dementia care and bereavement is "sudden-on-chronic death." In these situations, the caregiver is preparing for a gradual dying process from dementia, but the care recipient dies instead from a sudden death. In this study, an application of complicated grief group therapy for bereaved dementia caregivers with complicated grief is presented, and the effect of therapy with two bereaved caregivers who experienced the sudden death of their spouses who had a diagnosis of dementia is described. The unique treatment elements of complicated grief group therapy facilitated resolution of the 'trauma-like" features of bereavement and progression to a healthy grief process.

  2. Family and Medical Leave Act; Definition of Spouse. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is revising the definition of spouse in its regulations on the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) as a result of the decision by the United States Supreme Court holding section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional. The new definition replaces the existing definition, which contains language from DOMA that refers to "a legal union between one man and one woman.'' The new definition permits Federal employees with same-sex spouses to use FMLA leave in the same manner as Federal employees with opposite-sex spouses.

  3. Burden in the main caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Yonte Huete

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective is to determine the degree of burden in the main caregivers of dependent patients, to analyse the profile of informal caregivers and dependent patients. Their claims and help received with caring, the influence of mental deteriorate and duration of care giving regarding the burden of caregivers.Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional observational study amongst 50 caregivers and dependents. We used descriptive statistics and correlational studies. Results: 86 % of caregivers were women, middle aged, son/daughter of the dependent, married, with basic studies, no work outside the home, the average time in the role of caregiver was 16,96 hours a day and 2,1 free hours a day. 64 % of them received family support and 68 % wish to receive economic aid. It was found that for 38 % of the caregivers there was no burden at all, 34 % of them had a minimum burden and 28 % a greater burden.Conclusion: There are some caregivers with moderate or great burden. Our caregiver wishes to receive economic help. Our research shows that the decrease of mental health and the years of evolution do not have a significant statistically influence on caregivers. It is necessary prioritize the interventions and its recipients, provide solutions for caregivers with a greater burden, trying to keep away “caregiver syndrome”.

  4. Effects of Self-esteem, Optimism, and Perceived Control on Depressive Symptoms in Stroke Survivor-Spouse Dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Misook L; Bakas, Tamilyn; Plue, Laura D; Williams, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in stroke survivors and their family caregivers. Given the interdependent relationship between the members of dyads in poststroke management, improving depressive symptoms in dyads may depend on their partner's characteristics. Self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control, all known to be associated with depressive symptoms in an individual, may also contribute to their partner's depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine actor and partner effects of self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control on depression in stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers. A total of 112 ischemic stroke survivors (78% white, 34% women; mean age, 62.5 ± 12.3 years) and their spouses (mean age, 60.6 ± 12.9 years) completed surveys in which depressive symptoms, self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Revised Life Orientation Test, and the Sense of Control Scale. Multilevel modeling, actor-partner interdependence model regression was used to determine influences on depressive symptoms within the dyad. Individuals with lower self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control had higher levels of depressive symptoms. Stroke survivors whose spouses had lower levels of self-esteem (B = -0.338, P self-esteem (B = -0.047, P = .036) also had higher levels of depressive symptoms. We found significant partner effects of self-esteem on depression for both members and partner effect of optimism on patient's depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that further research is needed to determine if dyadic interventions may help to improve self-esteem, optimism, and depressive symptoms in both patients and their caregivers.

  5. Burden among care-givers of kidney transplant recipients and its associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollahi Behzad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Burden among care-givers of chronically ill patients has been widely investigated. However, there is no study evaluating perceived pressure on care-givers of kidney transplant recipients. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of care-giving to renal transplant recipients in Iranian Muslim population and to analyze factors associated with it. A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 41 care-givers of renal recipients. The Care-giver Burden Scale (CB Scale was used to evaluate the care-giver′s perceived burden and its correlates. Statistical analysis was performed using software SPSS v.13.0. P < 0.05 was considered significant. We found that increased care-giver burden was related to being married (p< 0.02, having lower education level (p< 0.05, and being a parent or spouse to the patient (p< 0.05. We also found significant adverse effects of patients′ second transplantation and gender (male on care-givers′ burden. There was no significant relationship between care-giver burden score and patients′ marital status, education level, operation time, age, donor type (cadaveric or living, and dialysis history before and after transplantation. In conclusion, care-givers experience strain, which has implications for research and service provision. Service providers need to identify those care-givers at risk of greater strain and help them in situations that cannot be altered. Future research should be conducted to identify the effects of interventions, on care-givers′ burden perception.

  6. Caregivers: Do They Make a Difference to Patient Recovery in Subacute Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Peck-Hoon; Tai, Bee-Choo; Wong, Wai-Pong; Wee, Liang En; Chen, Cynthia; Cheong, Angela; Fong, Ngan Phoon; Chan, Kin Ming; Tan, Boon Yeow; Menon, Edward; Lee, Kok Keng; Ee, Chye Hua; Petrella, Robert; Thind, Amardeep; Koh, Gerald Choon-Huat

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship between caregiver nature and availability, and rehabilitation outcomes in subacute stroke. Retrospective cohort study. Four community rehabilitation hospitals. Patients with subacute, first-time stroke (N=4042; 48.5% men; mean age ± SD, 70.12±10.4y; 51.5% women; mean age ± SD, 72.54 ±10.0y). Not applicable. Rehabilitation effectiveness, defined as the percentage of potential improvement eventually achieved with rehabilitation; and rehabilitation efficiency, defined as the rate of functional improvement during rehabilitation. In our cohort, 96.7% had available caregiver(s), of which 42.0% were primarily supported by foreign domestic workers (FDWs), 25.9% by spouses, 19.3% by first-degree relatives, 7.8% by other relatives, and 5.1% by other caregivers. Using quantile regression, we found that having a caregiver was independently associated with rehabilitation efficiency (β=-3.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], -6.99 to -0.66; P=.018). The relationship between caregiver availability and rehabilitation effectiveness was modified by patient sex in that the negative association was significantly greater in men (β=-22.81; 95% CI, -32.70 to -12.94; Pcaregiver compared with a spousal caregiver was negatively associated with rehabilitation effectiveness (β=-3.95; 95% CI, -6.94 to -0.95; P=.01) and rehabilitation efficiency (β=-1.83; 95% CI, -3.14 to -0.53; P=.006). The number of potential caregivers was only significantly associated with rehabilitation effectiveness at the bivariate level (P=.006). Caregiver identity, and possibly availability, appears to negatively affect rehabilitation outcomes in subacute stroke. A better understanding of these relationships has potential implications on clinical practice and policy directions. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 22 CFR 19.10-4 - Death or divorce of a spouse and remarriage after retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death or divorce of a spouse and remarriage...-4 Death or divorce of a spouse and remarriage after retirement. (a) If the marriage of an annuitant... spouse is dissolved by divorce or by death of the spouse, the retiree's annuity shall be recomputed,...

  8. Selection of kin for spouse: Importance of socioeconomic status, reputation and beauty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Bakoush

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The frequency of kin marriages in studied population did not change significantly in the last generation. Knowledge of biological harm of inbreeding has only a small inhibitory effect on choice of kin for spouse. Family reputation was far more important in selection of spouse than family wealth, social status and beauty of spouse, but reputation was uncorrelated with choice of kin for spouse.

  9. 38 CFR 3.712 - Improved pension elections; surviving spouses of Spanish-American War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... elections; surviving spouses of Spanish-American War veterans. 3.712 Section 3.712 Pensions, Bonuses, and... spouses of Spanish-American War veterans. (a) General. A surviving spouse of a Spanish-American War... and attendance. A surviving spouse of a Spanish-American War veteran who is receiving or entitled...

  10. Parental caregivers of children with developmental disabilities mount a poor antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Stephen; Phillips, Anna C; Drayson, Mark T; Carroll, Douglas

    2009-03-01

    In older populations, caregiving for a spouse with dementia has been associated with a poor antibody response to vaccination. The present study examined whether younger caregivers, specifically the parents of children with developmental disabilities, would also show a diminished antibody response to vaccination. At baseline assessment, 30 parents of children with developmental disabilities and 29 parents of typically developing children completed standard measures of depression, perceived stress, social support, caregiver burden, and child problem behaviours. They also provided a blood sample and were then vaccinated with a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Further blood samples were taken at 1- and 6-month follow-ups. Caregivers mounted a poorer antibody response to vaccination than control parents at both follow-ups. This effect withstood adjustment for a number of possible confounders and appeared to be, at least in part, mediated by child problem behaviours. The negative impact of caregiving on antibody response to vaccination is not restricted to older spousal caregivers, but is also evident in younger parents caring for children with developmental disabilities. The behavioural characteristics of the care recipients may be a key consideration in whether or not immunity is compromised in this context.

  11. Benefits of Required Counseling for Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Holm, Jessica M.; Daly, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students experience mental health distress. The authors investigated the benefits of required counseling services at a training clinic for students enrolled in counseling courses. Results indicated that after receiving services, students ("N" = 55) reported decreases in overall problems, depressive symptoms, and anxiety…

  12. Depression and caregiver burden among rural elder caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Sandra S; Turner, Winston; Kaye, Lenard W; Ruffin, Leah; Downey, Roberta

    2005-01-01

    Family caregivers of older adults frequently experience feelings of burden and depression though they may not come to the attention to health and service providers until they are at a point of crisis. Through a simple screening tool, the Maine Primary Partners in Caring (MPPC) project identified individuals providing care to older adults through rural primary care practices, in order to provide upstream interventions before caregivers were in crisis. This paper describes a sample (n=62) of rural family caregivers identified through their physicians' offices. High levels of caregiver burden and depression were reported. Family support and knowledge of caregiver tasks predicted decreased caregiver burden and depression, while isolation predicted increased caregiver burden. Implications of these results for gerontological social workers are outlined.

  13. Outplacement as Transition Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes outplacement counseling as a process that enables management to deal with the problem of the employee who must be released or the staff that must be reduced. Discusses the process of outplacement counseling, the stages of transition counseling, and techniques to be implemented. (BH)

  14. High Tech Counseling: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Christina Mann; Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    This article includes a discussion of technology's use in counseling. It contains reviews and implications of 4 articles that appeared in the Journal of Technology in Counseling (JTC) and provides a discussion of the future of technology in the counseling profession.

  15. Outplacement as Transition Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes outplacement counseling as a process that enables management to deal with the problem of the employee who must be released or the staff that must be reduced. Discusses the process of outplacement counseling, the stages of transition counseling, and techniques to be implemented. (BH)

  16. Caregiving in Indian Country

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-23

    This podcast discusses the role of caregivers in Indian County and the importance of protecting their health. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 12/23/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/23/2009.

  17. Caregiver Health and Wellness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tips on how to manage stress, read “Caregiver Stress.”Avoid alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. It may seem that these substances help you feel better for a short time, but they can affect your sleep and cause health problems if you use them regularly. If you ...

  18. Caregiver Action Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back from Iraq, he depends on me.” “My wife has been diagnosed with MS.” We CAN help ... and I’m his primary caregiver.” “Since my wife’s stroke, I handle everything.” “It’s been 10 years ...

  19. Suicide Often Leaves Mental, Physical Woes in Surviving Spouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggest. Surviving partners are more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety and other mood disorders. Surviving spouses are also at higher risk for suicide themselves, the study said. "It's a really distressing ...

  20. Level of Caregiver Burden in Jamaican Stroke Caregivers and Relationship between Selected Sociodemographic Variables

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roopchand-Martin, S; Creary-Yan, S

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine the level of caregiver burden present in Jamaican stroke caregivers and to investigate the relationship between caregiver burden and selected sociodemographic variables...

  1. Military Benefits for Former Spouses: Legislation and Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-06

    regarding military personnel in 42 U.S.C. 659). 4. It allows a military member or retired member to voluntarily designate a former spouse as a...These payments are managed by the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS).9 In order to be eligible for direct payment, a former spouse must have...dependents of deceased military members and retirees.11 All personnel of the uniformed services who retire on or after September 21, 1972, are

  2. 2012 Survey of Active Duty Spouses: Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    unit ................. 88 2012 Survey of Active Duty Spouses DMDC v k. My work unit produces high quality products and services... telework preference. 3. Permanent Change of Station (PCS) Moves—Number of spouse moves, length of time since most recent PCS move, length of time...you agree or disagree with the following statements about your workplace? k. My work unit produces high quality products and services. 1. Strongly

  3. Telephone Support During Overseas Deployment for Military Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    distress, loneliness , anticipatory fear or grief, somatic complaints, and depression. The goal is to help spouses learn ways to manage stress and...distress, loneliness , anticipatory fear or grief, somatic complaints, and depression. Spouses may also be stressed by single-parenting, learning...or chi-square tests as appropriate to compare study arms Support and Webinar. b N = 102 and n = 49, 53 respectively. This scale is only assessed

  4. Counseling in teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Dorthe Busk

    2015-01-01

    Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant-orientated pilotp......Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant...... decisions, while one experience the opposite. 10 students perceive the counseling as guiding and broaching of new perspectives. The results show nothing about abilities to adapt or increased self-knowledge....

  5. Primer on genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Susan Estabrooks

    2011-04-01

    Once limited to rare mendelian disorders, genetic counseling is playing an ever-increasing role in the multidisciplinary approach to predicting, diagnosing, and managing neurologic disease. However, genetic counseling services may not be optimized because of lack of availability and lack of knowledge regarding when it is appropriate to refer, what occurs in genetic counseling, and how genetic counseling can affect care. These issues are addressed in this article, along with corresponding clinical scenarios. Websites to find genetic counseling services and resources are also provided.

  6. The subjective feeling of burden in caregivers of elderly with dementia: how to intervene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, L; Uhunmwangho, E; Dordoni, G; Lorido, A; Barbieri, S; Bolognesi, A G; Gobbi, G; Franchi, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to know how caregiver burden was influenced by caregivers' and patients' characteristics and by social support; the intention was to use these elements in order to suggest how to optimize the interventions which may reduce caregivers' subjective feeling of burden. A sample of 99 caregivers was studied using a descriptive-correlational design. Caregiver burden was assessed by using the caregiver burden inventory (CBI). The burden was due to restrictions on their personal time and to the sense of failure regarding their hopes and expectations. These results suggest that it could be useful to intervene in two ways. On one hand, improving all those interventions targeted to reduce restrictions on the personal caregivers' time, making respite care and day care units more accessible to elderly with dementia. On the other hand, giving caregivers the opportunity to benefit from interventions oriented to cope the sense of failure and the physical stress, to say, individual counseling or continued informal support.

  7. Needs of family caregivers of stroke patients: a longitudinal study of caregivers’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chun; Yip, Ping-Keung; Tai, John Jen; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background After a stroke, patients often suffer from varying degrees of disability that require acute inpatient treatment and extended care at home. Therefore, the caregivers assume multiple responsibilities that can result in stress, particularly when their own needs are inadequately addressed during the patient’s recovery. Objectives This study aimed to explore the changing needs of family caregivers of stroke patients and factors related to the needs in four stages, before the transfer from intensive care unit to neurological unit, before discharge, 2 weeks post-hospitalization, and 3 months post-hospitalization. Methods The design of this study was based on longitudinal research, and the participants were family caregivers of stroke patients. Sixty family caregivers were recruited in this study. Data were collected at four time points by questionnaire. Results We found that the total number of needs of family caregivers decreased as the illness duration increased and that needs differed significantly between the four time points (Pcaregivers were the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores of patients on admission, length of hospital stay, and physical dependence of patients. Conclusion Family caregivers expected to obtain assistance and related care information from professionals during the course of the disease. Assessing the needs of family caregivers is important for health care workers in understanding problems from the caregivers’ perspectives. Relevant information and counseling should be provided to family caregivers to help them access support when needed. PMID:25834409

  8. Exploring identity in the 'figured worlds' of cancer care-giving and marriage in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Rebecca E

    2015-03-01

    Following changes in the structure and funding of the Australian medical system, patients have become 'consumers' or 'clients'. Family and friends have become 'carers' or 'caregivers', signifying their increased responsibilities as patients move from hospitals to communities. While policy makers embrace the term 'carer', some argue that the title is not widely recognised and has disempowering connotations. This paper examines spouses' reflections on the term 'carer' based on qualitative interviews with 32 Australians caring for a spouse with cancer from a study conducted between 2006 and 2009. Recruitment involved survey and snowball sampling. Following a grounded theory approach, data collection and analysis were performed simultaneously. Using Holland and colleagues' sociocultural 'identity as practice' theory and a thematic approach to analysis, findings depict identification with the 'spouse' and 'carer' label as relationally situated and dependent on meaningful interaction. Although others argue that the term 'carer' is a 'failure', these findings depict identification with the label as contextual, positional and enacted, not fixed. Furthermore, and of most significance to practitioners and policy makers, the title has value, providing carers with an opportunity to position themselves as entitled to inclusion and support, and providing health professionals with a potential indicator of a spouse's increased burden. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The crisis of stroke: experiences of patients and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Barbara J; Young, Mary Ellen; Cox, Kim J; Martz, Crystal; Creasy, Kerry Rae

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 4.8 million stroke survivors are living in the community with some level of disability requiring the assistance of family caregivers. Stroke family caregivers are often unprepared for the demands required of them. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore the needs of stroke patients and their family caregivers as they transitioned through the stroke care continuum from acute care to inpatient rehabilitation to home. Thirty-eight participants, 19 recovering stroke patients (11 male, 8 female), 15 primary family caregivers (14 spouses, 1 mother), and 4 adult children were interviewed during their stay at a rehabilitation facility and within 6 months of discharge. Interview questions were loosely structured and focused on the stroke experience and how patients and caregivers were managing postdischarge. Data were analyzed using dimensional and comparative analysis. Findings were organized in a conceptual framework illustrating the trajectory of the crisis of stroke. Stroke survivors and their caregivers faced enormous challenges as they moved through 3 phases of the trajectory: the stroke crisis, expectations for recovery, and the crisis of discharge. Findings from this study suggest that as caregivers move through the phases of the trajectory, they do not have a good understanding of the role to which they are committing, and they are often underprepared to take on even the basic tasks to meet the patients' needs on discharge. Stroke survivors and their caregivers do not have adequate time to deal with the shock and crisis of the stroke event, let al.one the crisis of discharge and all of the new responsibilities with which they must deal.

  10. Childhood adversity, attachment and personality styles as predictors of anxiety among elderly caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigerson, H G; Shear, M K; Bierhals, A J; Zonarich, D L; Reynolds, C F

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which childhood adversity, attachment and personality styles influenced the likelihood of having an anxiety disorder among aged caregivers for terminally ill spouses. We also sought to determine how childhood adversity and attachment/personality styles jointly influenced the likelihood of developing an anxiety disorder among aged caregivers. Data were derived from semistructured interviews with 50 spouses (aged 60 and above) of terminally ill patients. The Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse (CECA) record provided retrospective, behaviorally based information on childhood adversity. Measures of attachment and personality styles were obtained from self-report questionnaires, and the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-III-R (SCID) was used to determine diagnoses for anxiety disorders. Logistic regression models estimated the effects of childhood adversity, attachment/personality disturbances, and the interaction between the two on the likelihood of having an anxiety disorder. Results indicated that childhood adversity and paranoid, histrionic and self-defeating styles all directly increase the odds of having an anxiety disorder as an elderly spousal caregiver. In addition, childhood adversity in conjunction with borderline, antisocial and excessively dependent styles increased the likelihood of having an anxiety disorder. The results indicate the need to investigate further the interaction between childhood experiences and current attachment/personality styles in their effects on the development of anxiety disorders.

  11. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Psychological Trauma and LGBT Caregivers: A Conceptual Framework to Guide Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesser, Richard S; Patel, Bina R

    2016-01-01

    LGBT adults face unique risk factors such as social isolation, discrimination, and victimization, and occasionally th ey engage in detrimental behaviors like high alcohol and drug use and risky sexual activity that negatively impacts psychological/physical health. These risks can affect their overall health and stress the relationship with an older caregiver/recipient-partner following exposure to acute medical event. The experience of an acute medical event among a LGBT caregiving partner can result in psychological trauma. In this article the authors present a conceptual framework involving stress process theory, life course theory, and family systems perspective to understand the effect of stressors on LGBT caregiving partners. Implications for social work practice include assessing, coordinating care, counseling and negotiating services at micro level, engaging family-centered approaches to support positive transition to caregiving role at mezzo level, and advocating for policy and cultural shifts to supports and diminish stigma of this group.

  13. [Difficulties facing spouses of in-patients undergoing tocolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya-Ling

    2008-08-01

    When a pregnant woman needs tocolysis to preempt the need for an abortion, there are great impacts on the daily life of her family and on the relationships between the couple and their family members, which negatively influence the balance of the family system. For a pregnant woman under tocolysis in hospital, the spouse indeed plays an important supportive role in helping her to endure many difficulties. Because men are always controllers of power and opinion, being strong and active in attitude to everything, male spouses always suppress their emotions and do not express their feelings to others. These characteristics of men, either in Eastern or Western countries, always cause nursing staff to realize the needs of the male spouse poorly during tocolysis. The current concept of nursing emphasizes family-centered nursing, so the patient's family members are also recipients of treatment, especially male spouses during the process of tocolysis. This is usually neglected, however. In this paper, the author analyzes the characteristics and the roles of male spouses in the family, and the difficulties faced by a pregnant woman during tocolysis in hospital, for the benefit of future clinical nursing practice.

  14. Effective School Counseling Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Lilley, Stacey Custer

    2007-01-01

    Despite much attention given to effective teams in the workplace, school counseling teams have been neglected in the research. The primary purpose of this mixed methods study was to learn what characteristics secondary counselors perceive contribute to an effective school counseling team. The first research phase conducted six team interviews; themes emerging from the interviews yielded the development of the Effective School Counseling Team Questionnaire (ESCTQ). The following research quest...

  15. Overlooking Informal Dementia Caregivers' Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Oliver; Klotsche, Jens; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) need early caregiver support. Caregivers often have poor health, but usually do not have time to seek medical advice for their own conditions. Patients' physicians, who are frequently the sole medical practitioner caregivers contact regularly, have an important function in recognizing family caregivers' burdens. The current study investigated to what extent medical practitioners recognized family caregivers' problems. In a two-staged survey in neurology outpatient care, caregivers of patients with mild or moderate AD were enrolled and assessed by physicians regarding their physical and mental burden, as well as need for help and advice about AD. Subsequently, caregivers' mental health was evaluated in a comprehensive diagnostic interview by blinded psychologists. Overall, 73.7% of caregivers had at least one somatic condition and 43.7% had clinically relevant depressive symptoms (of these, 37.5% met criteria for major depression). The findings suggest that the burden of a substantial proportion of affected family caregivers is overlooked. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):167-174.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  17. [Interventions for caregivers of stroke patients: need and effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilz, Gabriele; Böhm, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    After discharge from hospital most stroke patients are being cared for by relatives. In the majority of cases it does mean long-term demands for relatives and often it has also an effect on their health. There is a variety of possibilities for offering support to relatives in accomplishing their tasks and thus contribute to a relief of burden. There has not yet been enough research investigating how various intervention concepts really meet the needs of the relatives and how effective the interventions reduce the burden of the caregivers. Five types of intervention concepts for supporting relatives of stroke patients can be differentiated so far: special services, training, counselling, social support through other caregivers and multi-component interventions. On the basis of 42 intervention studies an attempt is being made to give a preliminary statement about the effectiveness of intervention models. The multi-component interventions combined with psychotherapeutic strategies seem to emerge as a recommendable concept.

  18. Quality of Life Among Food Allergic Patients and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christopher M; Otto, Alana K; Walkner, Madeline M; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy is increasing in prevalence worldwide. This review summarizes progress made studying relationships between food allergy and quality of life (QOL), with an emphasis on recent work in the field. Early work examining QOL among food allergy patients established that stress and anxiety associated with continuous allergen avoidance and the looming threat of anaphylaxis were associated with significantly impaired food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for children with food allergy and their caregivers. Recent clinical studies suggest that undergoing oral food challenge to confirm food allergy and oral immunotherapy to treat food allergy may each improve FAQOL among both patients and their caregivers. Other intervention modalities, such as nurse-facilitated counseling and educational workshops, also hold promise, but additional work is needed. Future work must strive to recruit more representative, population-based samples, including adult patients, in order to improve the generalizability and clinical relevance of findings.

  19. Spouse abuse and other domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, L J

    1988-12-01

    Concern about the different forms of domestic violence continues to escalate. Beginning with identification of child abuse in the 1960s; spouse abuse, primarily of women, in the 1970s; and, most recently, identification of the rising incidence of elder abuse and neglect, the medical community, state, local, and federal governmental agencies and the public continue to promote joint programs to identify, guide to treatment, and simultaneously develop prevention and early intervention programs. Emphasis initially on the use of legal systems to stop, the abuse must almost be mandatory, because numerous studies show that treatment is most successful when abusers are forced to admit to themselves and others that they have, in fact, committed crimes. For women victims, safe refuge, self-help, and advocacy-support groups were found to be effective, whereas children first need the same protection and a great deal of empathy and explanation. Psychiatrists' roles lie in the important area of early diagnosis and treatment, as most domestic abuse victims do not readily admit to this violence, primarily out of shame, guilt, and fear. Numerous studies demonstrate that following a protocol with every patient, in every setting and under every circumstance, psychiatrists must ask about domestic violence when they least suspect it and when other diagnoses are obvious. The multiple etiologies include general sociocultural pressures, such as poverty and crowding, stereotypic sex role socialization, alcohol and drug abuse, history of head injury, and personal childhood abuse. Psychiatric treatment modalities must occur within a framework of acknowledging that domestic violence victims suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. Psychiatrists can serve as leaders in coordinating multi-pronged treatment options for the victims: advocacy groups; alcohol and drug detoxification; and individual, couple, and family therapy. Psychiatrists can also serve as consultants, leaders, and educators

  20. Informal caregivers of persons with dementia, their use of and needs for specific professional support: a survey of the National Dementia Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spreeuwenberg Peter MM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes both the use of and needs for informal caregivers of people with dementia, based on a questionnaire survey organized within the National Dementia Programme in the Netherlands. The National Dementia Programme is a quality collaborative of the Dutch Alzheimer's Association, the Institute of Quality of Healthcare (CBO and the Knowledge Centre on Ageing (Vilans, instigated by the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, to improve integrated care for people with dementia and their informal caregivers. The support needs of informal caregivers are important to improve caregiver well-being and delaying institutionalization of the person with dementia. Methods In the period April 2006 - January 2007, the National Dementia Programme questionnaire was completed by 984 informal caregivers. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the use of and needs for additional professional support by informal caregivers. Chi-square tests were used to assess the relationships between characteristics of the caregivers (spouses, sons/daughters, sons/daughters in-law and support needs on one hand and to assess the relationship between the living situation of the person with dementia (living at home or living in a nursing home or home for the elderly and support needs on the other hand. Results Almost all informal caregivers (92.6% received some professional support. However, two thirds (67.4% indicated they had one or more needs for additional professional support. Informal caregivers often need additional professional advice about what to do when their relative is frightened, angry of confused. Spouses reported different needs than sons or daughters (in-law: spouses relatively often need emotional support and sons or daughters (in-law more often need information and coordination of dementia care. Conclusions Most of the informal caregivers report that they need additional information and advice, e.g. about how to cope with

  1. [Caregivers of individuals with spinal cord injury: caregiver burden].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Paula Cristina; Rabeh, Soraia Assad Nasbine; Caliri, Maria Helena Larcher; Haas, Vanderlei José

    2013-06-01

    A sectional study that had as its objectives to assess caregiver burden of for caregivers of individuals with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury (TSCI) and its association with sociodemographic variables (age and sex), health status (self-reported illnesses) and caregiver characteristics (care time in years and daily hours of care). Data were collected by consultation of patient files and individual interviews at home using the instrument, Caregiver Burden Scale (CBScale). The results showed that most burden occurred in the domains: environment, disappointment and general strain. Presenting health problem (for all domains of the CBScale) and spending more hours per day in care (in the domain disappointment) represented the variables associated with burden. Studies of a more confirmatory nature than exploratory between the variables studied can be used to measure the burden obtained in this population of caregivers of individuals with TSCI.

  2. Predictors of grief in bereaved family caregivers of person's with Alzheimer's disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Melissa M; Ott, Carol H; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to identify factors in 66 spouses and adult child caregivers of person's with Alzheimer's disease prior to the death that predicted higher levels of grief in bereavement. A hierarchical regression model was tested. Predeath grief, dysfunctional coping, depression, social support, and decreased positive states of mind explained 54.7% of the variance in postdeath grief. Factors that contributed significantly to postdeath grief included predeath grief and depression. Results from this study indicate that risk factors for postdeath grief can be predicted prior to the death.

  3. The 'reformation' of counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Lotter

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the Reformation took place some four hundred years ago, one area in which reformation is really needed today is the counselling of people. Since Wilhelm Wundt started the “study of the mind” in 1879, William James and Sigmund Freud followed and secular psychology gradually has developed to take the “front seat”; hence moving Biblical counselling, which has been practised since the times of the New Testament, to the “back burner”. This development had been going on for the greater part of the 20th century, up to the publication of Competent to Counsel by Jay E. Adams in 1970. In the model for counselling suggested by Adams, the principles of the Reformation of the sixteenth century, Soli Deo Gloria, Soli Scriptura, Soli Fidei, Sola Gratia, etc. were again implemented in assisting and counselling people with personal and interpersonal problems. The epistomological and anthropological approach of secular psychology differs radically from that of Biblical principles, thus necessitating a new “reformation” of counselling. Within this new form counselling, inter alia, implies the following: the Word of God has its rightful place, sin has to be taken seriously and the work of the Holy Spirit should be recognised. In this article it is proposed that the “reformation” of counselling was started by scholars with a Biblical Reformational approach and that this method of counselling followed the parameters of the Reformation of the sixteenth century. This “reformation” developed into a new direction in counselling and still continues today with fascinating new frontiers opening up for Biblical counselling.

  4. Caregiving men of Alzheimer's disease sufferers in Nuevo León (Mexico: experiences and meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Azoh Barry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite their invaluable contribution to health care, men who fulfill the social role of primary caregivers at an older age represent an understudied group in the state of Nuevo León (Mexico, and elsewhere. Ongoing demographic and epidemiological changes point to a graying population, an increase of disabling chronic and degenerative diseases, and functional limitations linked to a decline in self-reliance. The latter leads to further dependence on assistance which is predominantly home based. This article investigates the lived experiences of caregiving men providing care to their elderly relatives who have Alzheimer's disease (AD. After obtaining verbal informed consent, face-to-face, in-depth interviews were carried out in the natural environment with a convenience sample of 58 spouses and sons. Absenteeism was a common occurrence among those who were still involved in the labor force; however, the ways it was handled differed according to the sector of the economy (formal vs. informal the participant contributed to. Assistance provided by AD support groups, the availability and use of paid helpers, immediate and extended family, and making adjustments to daily routines to accommodate work schedules contributed to easing the burden of care. However, medical expenses put a strain on caregiver finances, and complaints about the costs of medications were consistent among employed and retired caregivers. A mix of positive and negative aspects inherent to this dyadic process was revealed along with trajectories of elder caregiving that were not always unilineal. Relationships of reciprocity, dependence and interdependence, and strengthened family bonds were salient. These findings are discussed in light of existentialist and humanistic theoretical frameworks on social integration and needs, with their propensity for emphasizing cognitive benefits, and the related meanings to individuals. The findings imply that concerted policy making in public

  5. Resurgence of Infant Caregiving Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzek, Jennifer L.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Peters, Lindsay C.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to identify the conditions likely to produce resurgence among adult human participants. The preparation was a simulated caregiving context, wherein a recorded infant cry sounded and was terminated contingent upon targeted caregiving responses. Results of Experiment 1 demonstrated resurgence with human participants in…

  6. Special Section: Educating Elderly Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Bernice A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four articles in this special section report on (1) Arizona curriculum for home-based caregivers of the elderly in rural communities (Epstein, Koenig); (2) educational programs for nursing home caregivers (Marsden); (3) extension programs for helping low-income elderly with money management (Koonce); and (4) energy education for the elderly…

  7. Childhood Obesity: The Caregiver's Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haschke, Bernadette

    2003-01-01

    Describes the role caregivers play in helping young children dealing with obesity. Examines: (1) causes of childhood obesity; (2) caregiver's position; (3) learning nutrition concepts; (4) preparing and serving healthy foods; (5) encouraging physical activity; (6) working with parents; and (7) assisting an obese child. (SD)

  8. Childhood Obesity: The Caregiver's Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haschke, Bernadette

    2003-01-01

    Describes the role caregivers play in helping young children dealing with obesity. Examines: (1) causes of childhood obesity; (2) caregiver's position; (3) learning nutrition concepts; (4) preparing and serving healthy foods; (5) encouraging physical activity; (6) working with parents; and (7) assisting an obese child. (SD)

  9. Mutual Help for Spouses Whose Partners are Employed in Stressful Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, JoAnne Fish

    1986-01-01

    ASSIST is a self-help program for spouses whose partners are employed in stressful occupations. Describes ASSIST from a practitioner's viewpoint, discusses emergent issues among spouses, and suggests using ASSIST as a helping resource. (Author)

  10. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  11. Counseling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Soo Yin; Neihart, Maureen F.

    2012-01-01

    Singapore, a tiny island nation, rose from 3rd- to 1st-world status in just 3 decades. Unlike in most developed countries, counseling in Singapore has a short history with faith-based beginnings and currently faces challenges to remain culturally relevant. The authors trace the development of Singapore's counseling services, provide an update…

  12. Perioperative counseling in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Koutelekos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Counseling is a part of professional role of nurses and a prerequisite for holistic care. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the literature about Counseling of children that undergo surgery. Material and method: The methodology οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature, between 2005-2009 mainly in the pubmed data base which referred to Counseling of children that undergo surgery, using the key words: Counseling, perioperative treatment, holistic care . Results: In the literature it is cited that counseling is provided by well trained and balanced individuals that have communication skills. Prerequisite of effective counseling is Conversation, where the nurse-consultant after elaborate listening proposes remarks, proposals, in order to enhance self-image, self-knowledge and self-esteem of the child and improve its’ personal emotional state. Perioperative counseling procedure as a part of the holistic care of children should follow and individualized approach either on preoperative and postoperative stage. Conclusion: Ultimate goal of effective counseling to children that undergo surgery is to improve the quality of provided care and increase the degree of satisfaction of hospitalized children and their families.

  13. Crisis Counseling: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Jonathan; Scott, Amy Nicole; Padilla, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists working in schools are often the first contacts for children experiencing a potentially traumatizing event or change in status. This article reviews basic concepts in crisis counseling and describes the components of psychological first aid. This form of counseling must be developmentally and culturally appropriate as well as…

  14. Islamic approach in counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin Hamjah, Salasiah; Mat Akhir, Noor Shakirah

    2014-02-01

    A religious approach is one of the matters emphasized in counseling today. Many researchers find that there is a need to apply the religious element in counseling because religion is important in a client's life. The purpose of this research is to identify aspects of the Islamic approach applied in counseling clients by counselors at Pusat Kaunseling Majlis Agama Islam Negeri Sembilan (PKMAINS). In addition, this research also analyses the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS with reference to al-Quran and al-Sunnah. This is a qualitative research in the form of case study at PKMAINS. The main method used in this research is interview. The research instrument used is interview protocol. The respondents in this study include 9 counselors who serve in one of the counseling centers in Malaysia. This study also uses questionnaire as an additional instrument, distributed to 36 clients who receive counseling service at the center. The findings of the study show that the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS may be categorized into three main aspects: aqidah (faith), ibadah (worship/ultimate devotion and love for God) and akhlaq (moral conduct). Findings also show that the counseling in these aspects is in line with Islamic teachings as contained in al-Quran and al-Sunnah.

  15. Counseling with Exceptional Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver-Behring, Shari; Spagna, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    Children and adolescents with disabilities are an extremely heterogeneous group of diverse learners, each with unique learning strengths and needs. Often misunderstood and frequently less served by the counseling profession, these children and adolescents need counseling services just as much as, if not more than, other children. Federal…

  16. Selfishness, Greed, and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, David

    2002-01-01

    Although the concepts of greed and selfishness have often been used in discussions about human nature, there seems to be little attention to these characteristics in the disciplines of psychology and counseling. Considers characteristics of greed and selfishness as encountered in counseling from a multidisciplinary perspective and identifies…

  17. High Tech Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    2000-01-01

    Includes a discussion of technology's use in counseling at the beginning of the new millennium. Contains reviews and implications of several articles that appeared in the first issue of the "Journal of Technology in Counseling" and some recent technology related developments by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision and…

  18. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  19. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  20. Narrative Dietary Counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard Jakobsen, Nina; Hennesser, Yvonne; Kaufmann, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Using cases and empirical data from a research and development project at a Danish prevention center, this study explores whether and how the use of narrative dietary counseling can strengthen dietitians' relationships and collaboration with clients who are chronically ill. The results of the study...... dietary counseling empowered clients and improved relationship building and collaboration between client and dietitian....

  1. The indispensable intermediaries: a qualitative study of informal caregivers' struggle to achieve influence at and after hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragstad, Line Kildal; Kirkevold, Marit; Foss, Christina

    2014-07-30

    The care policy and organization of the care sector is shifting to accommodate projected demographic changes and to ensure a sustainable model of health care provision in the future. Adult children and spouses are often the first to assume care giving responsibilities for older adults when declining function results in increased care needs. By introducing policies tailored to enabling family members to combine gainful employment with providing care for older relatives, the sustainability of the future care for older individuals in Norway is more explicitly placed on the family and informal caregivers than previously. Care recipients and informal caregivers are expected to take an active consumer role and participate in the care decision-making process. This paper aims to describe the informal caregivers' experiences of influencing decision-making at and after hospital discharge for home-bound older relatives. This paper reports findings from a follow-up study with an exploratory qualitative design. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 19 informal caregivers of older individuals discharged from hospital in Norway. An inductive thematic content analysis was undertaken. Informal caregivers take on comprehensive all-consuming roles as intermediaries between the care recipient and the health care services. In essence, the informal caregivers take the role of the active participant on behalf of their older relative. They describe extensive efforts struggling to establish dialogues with the "gatekeepers" of the health care services. Achieving the goal of the best possible care for the care recipient seem to depend on the informal caregivers having the resources to choose appropriate strategies for gaining influence over decisions. The care recipients' extensive frailty and increasing dependence on their families coupled with the complexity of health care services contribute to the perception of the informal caregivers' indispensable role as intermediaries

  2. Caregiver Mental Health and Potentially Harmful Caregiving Behavior: The Central Role of Caregiver Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Gordon; Kosberg, Jordan I.; Durkin, Daniel W.; Dooley, W. Keith; DeCoster, Jamie; Williamson, Gail M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Caregivers feeling stress and experiencing mental health problems can be at risk for engaging in abusive acts against elderly care recipients. Potentially harmful behavior (PHB) was used as a measure of caregivers' engagement in, or fear of engagement in, behavior that places dependent care recipients at risk of physical and/or…

  3. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... and Positions § 734.405 Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or a...

  4. 5 CFR 734.307 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family... candidate for partisan political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a campaign...

  5. 5 CFR 838.931 - Court orders that provide temporary awards of former spouse survivor annuities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... awards of former spouse survivor annuities. 838.931 Section 838.931 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... BENEFITS Terminology Used in Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Miscellaneous Provisions § 838.931 Court orders that provide temporary awards of former spouse survivor annuities....

  6. Fatal violence among spouses in the United States, 1976-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercy, J A; Saltzman, L E

    1989-05-01

    In this paper we examine patterns and trends in homicides between marriage partners in the United States for 1976 through 1985 using data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplemental Homicide Reports (FBI-SHR). We identified 16,595 spouse homicides accounting for 8.8 per cent of all homicides reported to the FBI-SHR during this 10-year period. The rate of spouse homicide for this 10-year period was 1.6 per 100,000 married persons. The risk of being killed by one's spouse was 1.3 times greater for wives than for husbands. Black husbands were at greater risk of spouse homicide victimization than Black wives or White spouses of either sex. The risk of victimization was greater for spouses in interracial than in intraracial marriages and increased as age differences between spouses increased. From 1976 through 1985, the risk of spouse homicide declined by more than 45.0 per cent for both Black husbands and wives but remained relatively stable for White husbands and wives. Demographic patterns in the risk of spouse homicide were similar to those reported for nonfatal spouse abuse suggesting that the causes of spouse homicide and nonfatal spouse abuse may be similar.

  7. 20 CFR 218.43 - When a surviving divorced spouse annuity ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... surviving divorced spouse— (1) Dies; (2) Becomes entitled to an old age benefit under the Social Security... upon age). (c) Entitlement based on “child in care.” When the surviving divorced spouse annuity is... spouse annuity ends. (a) Entitlement based on age. When the surviving divorced spouse annuity is based...

  8. 22 CFR 19.9-3 - Computation and payment of pension to former spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation and payment of pension to former... Computation and payment of pension to former spouse. (a) A pension to a former spouse is paid monthly on the... for a pension or any combination of pensions to former spouses of any one principal which exceeds the...

  9. 20 CFR 218.16 - When a surviving divorced spouse annuity begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When a surviving divorced spouse annuity... RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT ANNUITY BEGINNING AND ENDING DATES When an Annuity Begins § 218.16 When a surviving divorced spouse annuity begins. (a) A surviving divorced spouse annuity begins on the later of either...

  10. 38 CFR 3.20 - Surviving spouse's benefit for month of veteran's death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surviving spouse's... General § 3.20 Surviving spouse's benefit for month of veteran's death. (a) Where the veteran died on or... indemnity compensation otherwise payable for the surviving spouse for the month in which the death...

  11. 26 CFR 20.2056A-10 - Surviving spouse becomes citizen after QDOT established.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surviving spouse becomes citizen after QDOT... Taxable Estate § 20.2056A-10 Surviving spouse becomes citizen after QDOT established. (a) Section 2056A... longer subject to the imposition of the section 2056A estate tax if the surviving spouse becomes...

  12. 38 CFR 3.657 - Surviving spouse becomes entitled, or entitlement terminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surviving spouse becomes... Adjustments and Resumptions § 3.657 Surviving spouse becomes entitled, or entitlement terminates. Where a surviving spouse establishes entitlement to pension, compensation, or dependency and indemnity...

  13. 38 CFR 3.10 - Dependency and indemnity compensation rate for a surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compensation rate for a surviving spouse. 3.10 Section 3.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... General § 3.10 Dependency and indemnity compensation rate for a surviving spouse. (a) General determination of rate. When VA grants a surviving spouse entitlement to DIC, VA will determine the rate of...

  14. 38 CFR 3.857 - Children's benefits to fiduciary of surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fiduciary of surviving spouse. 3.857 Section 3.857 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF..., Guardianship and Institutional Awards § 3.857 Children's benefits to fiduciary of surviving spouse. Where children are separated from the surviving spouse by reason of her (or his) incompetency, no...

  15. 26 CFR 20.2056(b)-4 - Marital deduction; valuation of interest passing to surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... passing to surviving spouse. 20.2056(b)-4 Section 20.2056(b)-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... surviving spouse. (a) In general. The value, for the purpose of the marital deduction, of any deductible interest which passed from the decedent to his surviving spouse is to be determined as of the date of...

  16. 38 CFR 3.805 - Loan guaranty for surviving spouses; certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... surviving spouses; certification. 3.805 Section 3.805 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Benefits § 3.805 Loan guaranty for surviving spouses; certification. A certification of loan guaranty benefits may be extended to surviving spouses based on an application filed on or after January 1, 1959,...

  17. 26 CFR 20.2056(b)-7 - Election with respect to life estate for surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... surviving spouse. 20.2056(b)-7 Section 20.2056(b)-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., 1954 Taxable Estate § 20.2056(b)-7 Election with respect to life estate for surviving spouse. (a) In... paragraph (a) is treated as passing to the surviving spouse (for purposes of § 20.2056(a)-1), and no part...

  18. Marital Therapy when a Symptom is Presented by a Spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanes, Cloe

    1980-01-01

    Hierarchical incongruities in a marriage can occur when a spouse develops a symptom in an attempt to balance the division of power in the couple. The therapist must organize the couple so that the division of power is balanced, and the couple is organized in a congruous hierarchy. (Author)

  19. Individual and Marital Adjustment in Spouse Pairs Subsequent to Mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ross E.; Carter, Charlene A.

    1993-01-01

    Explored effects of mastectomy for breast cancer on individual and marital adjustment among 20 spouse pairs in which wife had single mastectomy. Results indicated that both husbands and wives had adapted to mastectomy and were functioning well as individuals. Measures of marital adjustment, however, indicated serious problems with extremes of…

  20. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  1. Can cultural values help explain the positive aspects of caregiving among Chinese American caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Maggie

    2011-01-01

    This study used an adaptation of the caregivers' stress model to examine the positive aspects of caregiving with 113 Chinese American family caregivers who provided care to their elderly relatives. The hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that combination of caregiver background characteristics, stressors, and cultural values had direct effects on positive aspects of caregiving. Unlike previous studies in which cultural values were not measured, this study found that cultural values helped explain positive aspects of caregiving. Specifically, cultural values, caregiver's health, and caregiver's age predicted positive aspects of caregiving. Service implications are discussed based upon the findings.

  2. [Caring for a stroke victim: the emotional reactions of male and female caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucki, Barbara; Spitz, Elisabeth; Baumann, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the emotional response to caregiving among stroke caregivers and to assess the social and psychological impact of strokes on households two years after the event. Questionnaires were administered to 62 patient (64.4 years old)/caregiver (59.3 years old) dyads. The survey focused on: 1) residual impairments, based on the American Heart Association Stroke Outcome Classification; 2) the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA ? 24 items ? 5 dimensions); and 3) changes in the division of household tasks (seven items). Although male and female caregivers care for patients with similar residual impairments, the study found that female caregivers were more likely to be affected by the impact of caregiving on their health and schedule and by lack of family support. Women were more likely to feel "tired all the time" (50% vs. 12.5%), to struggle to "find time to relax" (35.7% vs. 6.3%) and to feel that "others dumped caring onto them" (35.7% vs. 11.8%). Since the onset of stroke, women had also taken on more responsibilities in the household (37.5% vs. 5.9%), while men were more likely to "enjoy caring" for patients (93.8% vs. 67.9%) and to have become more involved in organizing holidays (29% vs. 5.6%) and seeing friends (20.6% vs. 10.5%). Because of the high level of exhaustion, particularly among women, caregivers are a high-risk population for the healthcare system. Interventions such as trialogue and counseling are required to meet the needs of male and female caregivers.

  3. Elderly Psychiatric Patient Status and Caregiver Perceptions as Predictors of Caregiver Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Jane; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined aspects of patient status and caregiver perceptions in 46 pairs of elderly psychiatric patients and their caregivers. Found that significant predictors of caregiver burden included disruptive patient behavior, caregiver distress, and patients' functional limitations. Findings suggest that predictors of caregiver burden vary with patient…

  4. Counselling Techniques for Outdoor Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Michelle; Chase, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Outdoor leaders need counseling skills to deal with interpersonal conflicts that arise within a group and to facilitate participant growth and change. Person-centered counseling, reality therapy counseling, and behavioral counseling are discussed, as well as how various techniques from each can be used to the benefit of the leader and the group.…

  5. The relationship between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers: caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Lian-Hua

    2016-12-21

    The aim of this study was to explore caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator for the association between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers in Taiwan. This study adopted a cross-sectional correlational design. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 115 dyads of dementia patients and family caregivers from the outpatient neurological clinics of two hospitals in northern Taiwan. Data were gathered through interviews with a structured questionnaire, which included demographic characteristics for caregivers and patients, family functioning, caregiving self-efficacy, as well as positive and negative aspects of caregiving appraisal. Family functioning, patients' activities of daily living score, Neuropsychiatric Inventory caregiver distress, and three domains of self-efficacy were significantly associated with caregiver burden. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that self-efficacy for obtaining respite (SE-OR) significantly explained 20.5% of the variance in caregiver esteem. Caregiver perceived worsened health status, family functioning, and SE-OR significantly explained 59% of the variance in caregiver burden. The mediation test only supported the partially mediating role of SE-OR on the relationship between family functioning and caregiver burden, while the mediating effect of self-efficacy for responding to disruptive behaviours and controlling upsetting thoughts were insignificant. Our findings provided preliminary evidence for health professionals recommending that future studies should assess the family dynamic and health problems of caregivers, and develop appropriate family-centred interventions that focus on strengthening interfamily support and respite services to alleviate caregiver burden.

  6. Return to work predictors of stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Celia H; Godwin, Kyler M; Hersch, Gayle I; Hyde, Leslie K; Irabor, Jocelyn J; Ostwald, Sharon K

    2017-01-01

    Return to work is an issue of concern for stroke survivors and their spouses. Ramifications may include loss of income and self-efficacy. This study describes the return to work patterns of stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers post stroke. One hundred fifty-nine dyads were examined for their return to work patterns at baseline (post hospital discharge) and then at 3 month intervals for one year. Relationships were determined between work and gender, age, ethnicity, education, type of insurance, type of stroke, location of stroke, motor and cognitive functional status, depression, mutuality, and life satisfaction. Low levels of return to work by stroke survivors (7.5%) and a small decrease in the amount of working caregivers (from 45.3% to 40.35%) were found one year post baseline. Variables that predicted return to work changed over the five data points except for younger age for the caregiver, which was consistently significant across all data points. Three case scenarios representative of working patterns are offered. Further research is needed regarding the return to work needs of stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers, particularly what role the occupational therapist may play in facilitating that process.

  7. Controlling Depersonalized Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Outlines Gestalt therapy techniques to increase active listening and counselor/client involvement in career counseling. Discusses awareness through dialog, role playing or "presentizing," and experiential "presentizing." Presents a sample dialog as illustration. (RC)

  8. Therapy and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can give you tools to help fight low self-esteem and depression.Therapy can help treat a variety ... trained in psychotherapy include professionals representing psychiatry, clinical psychology, mental health counseling, clinical social work, marriage and ...

  9. Counseling Black Adolescent Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn C.

    1974-01-01

    Black adolescent parents need counsel from social workers who are able to intervene with a discerning knowledge of concepts, such as neocolonialism, survival, and liberation, that are important to them and to the black community. (Author)

  10. A Non-Member Spouse's Entitlement To The Member's Pension Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motseotsile Clement Marumoagae

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important that married couples seek legal advice with regard to the assets falling within their joint estate, more particularly their retirement benefits. This article reflects on the entitlement (if any of non-member spouses to their spouses' retirement fund benefits. Pension benefits can be due before, during or after divorce, and parties to the marriage should be aware of their rights with regard to the accruing pension benefits of their spouses. While it is settled law that non-member spouses are entitled to receive a portion of their member spouses' pension benefits (known as "pension interest" immediately on divorce, it is not particularly clear whether non-member spouses are also entitled to receive the same before or sometime after divorce. In this article I provide a contextual understanding of the entitlements (if any which spouses or former spouses of members of pension funds have on such member spouses' retirement benefits. Furthermore, it shown in this article that various divisions of South African High Courts have been inconsistent in how they have approached the issue of the pension interest between divorcing spouses or divorced ex-spouses.

  11. Marriage work in older couples: Disclosure of marital problems to spouses and friends over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob F; Rauer, Amy J

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the frequency and impact of "marriage work" (MW), or the act of discussing marital problems with spouses and friends, among a sample of older married couples (N = 64). Using actor-partner interdependence models, we examined how turning to one's spouse and one's friend was linked to changes in both spouses' marital satisfaction and conflict 1 year later. We also investigated whether satisfaction and conflict predicted change in MW for older spouses. Both wives and husbands engaged in more MW with spouses than with friends, and only husbands' MW with spouses decreased over time. Wives' MW with spouses was associated with decreased marital satisfaction for husbands, whereas husbands' MW with spouses was linked with increased satisfaction for husbands. Furthermore, wives' MW with spouses predicted increases in wives' marital conflict over time. When examining effects in the opposite direction, wives' marital satisfaction predicted decreases in wives' MW with spouse. Husbands' satisfaction was linked with increases in wives' MW with spouses, increases in wives' MW with friends, and decreases in husbands' MW with friends. Finally, husbands' conflict predicted increases in husbands' MW with friends. Findings suggest that openly engaging in discussions of marital problems may not be as uniformly helpful for aging couples as it is for their younger counterparts. Given that many older adults tend to actively avoid conflictual interactions in an attempt to maximize emotional rewards, researchers and clinicians should note that traditional approaches to working through romantic conflict may not be ideal for aging couples.

  12. Caregiver Stress and the Patient With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Amy E

    2016-04-01

    Informal caregivers (often, but not exclusively, family members) are essential to the clinical care of a patient with dementia. Most caregivers are untrained and unpaid. As a result, caregivers often experience stress caused by the caregiving experience; they are the "invisible second patients" in dementia care. Clinicians can help caregivers by supporting them in their role and by referring them to additional resources for support.

  13. Helping at the bedside: spouses' preferences for helping critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Deborah

    2004-10-01

    Spouses of patients in intensive care units (ICU) need to be close and helpful to ill partners. According to adult attachment theory, emotional responses may be related to preferences for closeness and helpfulness, and according to control theory optimism also may influence spouses' emotional responses. Spouses' goals and helping behaviors were assessed in 88 spouses of ICU patients. Using a repeated-measures design, the relationships of closeness, helpfulness, and optimism to emotional outcomes were assessed. Preferences for closeness and helpfulness were strongly related, and together with optimism, predicted spouses' mood at some point of the illness trajectory. Spouses who were over-involved with partners' care requirements were at greater risk for emotional distress. Results suggest that closeness and helpfulness are integrated concepts, and that attachment dimensions of a relationship and optimism are useful for understanding spouses' emotional responses to critical illness.

  14. Reducing cardiovascular risk in spouses of cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Bernice C; Rowland, Sheri; Mancuso, Kerry; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Norman, Joseph F; Shurmur, Scott; Tesina, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reducing interventions in spouses of coronary artery bypass patients. This study examined the effects of the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) intervention versus usual care on cardiovascular risk factors. Spouses in the experimental group (n = 17/group) attended cardiac rehabilitation with patients and made the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the usual care group attended educational classes with patients. Spouses' 30-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Scale before and after cardiac rehabilitation (3 months), and at 6 months. Spouses in both groups significantly reduced 30-year risk scores at 3 and 6 months. Exercise was the key ingredient in lowering risk. There was a trend toward reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. Although there were no group differences, having spouses participate in cardiac rehabilitation with the patient was effective for reducing spouses' cardiovascular risk.

  15. Attachment insecurity and the distinction between unhappy spouses who do and do not divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, J; Bradbury, T N

    2001-09-01

    The hypothesis that attachment insecurity would be associated with remaining in an unhappy marriage was tested. One hundred seventy-two newly married couples participated in a 4-year longitudinal study with multiple assessment points. Hierarchical linear models revealed that compared with spouses in happy marriages and divorced spouses, spouses who were in stable but unhappy marriages showed the highest levels of insecurity initially and over time. Spouses in stable, unhappy marriages also had lower levels of marital satisfaction than divorced spouses and showed relatively high levels of depressive symptoms initially and over time. Results suggest that spouses at risk for stable, unhappy marriages can be identified early and may benefit from interventions that increase the security of spouses' attachment to each other.

  16. Depression and caregiver burden experienced by caregivers of Jordanian patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Andaleeb Abu; Bond, A Elaine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2012-04-01

    Many stroke survivors will be cared for at home, primarily by their relatives. Providing care to a family member with a chronic disabling disease can be both emotionally and physically distressing for the caregivers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patients' characteristics, duration of caregiving, daily caregiving time, caregiver's characteristics, caregiver depression and burden in caregivers of patients with stroke. A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 116 subjects. The Center of Epidemiologic Studies of Depression and the Caregiver Strain Index were used to identify caregiver depression and burden, respectively. Logistic regression analysis identified the influence of independent variables on caregiver depression and caregiver burden. Caregivers had high scores for depression and burden indices. Caregivers' health, receiving professional home health care and caregivers' burden were related to caregiver depression. Functional disabilities of patients with stroke and depression of caregivers were related to caregiver burden. To decrease caregiver depression and burden, nurses must provide caregivers with instructions for home management of patients with stroke. Development of specialized stroke home health services in Jordan that targets patients with stroke and their caregivers are recommended. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions Order this publication Printer- ... service or organization is open to working with LGBT families? Kudos to you for managing to “go ...

  18. For Caregivers: Coping with Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Community Advocate Get Involved Donate Coping With Burnout Being a caregiver of someone with ALS is ... Solutions in Dealing with Burnout Common Causes of Burnout Perfectionism: A perfectionist continually focuses on what needs ...

  19. 38 CFR 21.3100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.3100.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3100 Counseling. (a) Purpose of counseling. The purpose of counseling is to...)) (b) Availability of counseling. Counseling assistance is available for— (1) Identifying and...

  20. 26 CFR 1.1041-1T - Treatment of transfer of property between spouses or incident to divorce (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... spouses or incident to divorce (temporary). 1.1041-1T Section 1.1041-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Exchanges § 1.1041-1T Treatment of transfer of property between spouses or incident to divorce (temporary... of) a spouse or, if the transfer is incident to a divorce, a former spouse. The following...

  1. 26 CFR 20.2056(b)-5 - Marital deduction; life estate with power of appointment in surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... appointment in surviving spouse. 20.2056(b)-5 Section 20.2056(b)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... surviving spouse. (a) In general. Section 2056(b)(5) provides that if an interest in property passes from the decedent to his surviving spouse (whether or not in trust) and the spouse is entitled for life...

  2. Determinants of Heart Failure Self-Care Maintenance and Management in Patients and Caregivers: A Dyadic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Julie T; Vellone, Ercole; Lyons, Karen S; D'Agostino, Fabio; Riegel, Barbara; Juárez-Vela, Raúl; Hiatt, Shirin O; Alvaro, Rosaria; Lee, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    Disease self-management is a critical component of maintaining clinical stability for patients with chronic illness. This is particularly evident in the context of heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization for older adults. HF self-management, commonly known as HF self-care, is often performed with the support of informal caregivers. However, little is known about how a HF dyad manages the patient's care together. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of patient and caregiver contributions to HF self-care maintenance (daily adherence and symptom monitoring) and management (appropriate recognition and response to symptoms), utilizing an approach that controls for dyadic interdependence. This was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from 364 dyads of Italian HF patients and caregivers. Multilevel modeling was used to identify determinants of HF self-care within patient-caregiver dyads. Patients averaged 76.2 (SD = 10.7) years old, and a slight majority (56.9%) was male, whereas caregivers averaged 57.4 (SD = 14.6) years old, and about half (48.1%) were male. Most caregivers were adult children (48.4%) or spouses (32.7%) of patients. Both patients and caregivers reported low levels of HF maintenance and management behaviors. Significant individual and dyadic determinants of self-care maintenance and self-care management included gender, quality of life, comorbid burden, impaired ADLs, cognition, hospitalizations, HF duration, relationship type, relationship quality, and social support. These comprehensive dyadic models assist in elucidating the complex nature of patient-caregiver relationships and their influence on HF self-care, leading to more effective ways to intervene and optimize outcomes.

  3. The Effect of Intra- and Intergenerational Caregiving on Subjective Well-Being--Evidence of a Population Based Longitudinal Study among Older Adults in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Hajek

    Full Text Available To examine whether intra- and intergenerational caregiving affect subjective well-being (SWB of the caregivers longitudinally.Data were drawn from the German Ageing Survey (DEAS, which is a population-based longitudinal study of individuals living in Germany aged 40 and over. The waves in 2002, 2008 and 2011 were used (with 10,434 observations. SWB was examined in a broad sense, covering affective (AWB and cognitive well-being (CWB, positive (PA and negative affect (NA as well as functional and mental health. While intragenerational caregiving was defined as providing care for spouse/partner, intergenerational caregiving was defined as providing care for mother, father, mother-in-law, father-in-law, partner's mother or partner's father.Fixed effects regressions adjusting for sociodemographic factors, social network, self-efficacy and morbidity showed that intergenerational informal care did not affect the various SWB outcome measures. Intragenerational caregiving affected CWB (women and mental health (total sample and men, whereas it did not affect the other outcome variables.Our findings highlight the importance of intragenerational caregiving for mental health (men and cognitive well-being (women. Consequently, interventions to avoid mental illness due to intragenerational caregiving are urgently needed.

  4. Depression among caregivers of the frail elderly in Japan before and after the introduction of the Public Long-Term Care Insurance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, A; Washio, M; Arai, Y; Ide, S; Yamasaki, R; Wada, J; Kuwahara, Y; Mori, M

    2007-04-01

    Cross sectional studies were conducted in five towns in Japan before and after the introduction of the Long-term Care Insurance System (LTCIS), in order to evaluate the factors relating to depression among family caregivers for the frail elderly. Depressive caregivers were more likely to consult with their doctors, to be in poor health, to care for demented elderly with behavioral disturbances than the non-depressive caregivers both before and after the LTCIS. Before LTCIS, depressive caregivers were more likely to attend to the elderly for more than 16 hours per day than their counterparts. After the LTCIS, depressive caregivers were more likely to be a spouse, to care for a frail elderly male, and less likely to be able to go out without accompanying the elderly than their counterparts. Even after the introduction of LTCIS, half of the caregivers were depressive. It is suggested that a government agency should be created to support not only the frail elderly but also their caregivers.

  5. Caregivers of multiple myeloma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtin, Sandra; Lilleby, Kathryn; Spong, Jacy

    2013-12-01

    Patients living with multiple myeloma (MM) face complex decisions throughout their journey relative to their diagnosis, options for treatment, and how their disease and treatment choices may affect them physically, emotionally, financially, and spiritually. Patients considering a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation face specific self-management challenges. The availability of a reliable caregiver is a prerequisite to transplantation eligibility. Currently, the majority of clinical management is episodic and provided in the outpatient setting. Therefore, the bulk of care for patients living with MM is provided by the patient together with his or her caregivers. Caregivers face similar challenges to those faced by the patient living with MM. They are required to take in complex information, perform often complicated or technical procedures such as line care or injections, assist the patient with activities of daily living, and attend the myriad of appointments required. Understanding the dynamics of the patient-caregiver relationship, the strengths and weaknesses unique to that relationship, common elements of caregiver stress or strain, and available tools and strategies to promote a sense of control and enhance self-management skills may improve the health-related quality of life for both the patient with MM and his or her caregiver.

  6. Caregiving setting and Baby Boomer caregiver stress processes: Findings from the National Study of Caregiving (NSOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heehyul; Rote, Sunshine; Beaty, Jeff A

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive understanding of how the caregiving setting relates to caregiving experience among Baby Boomer caregivers (CGs). Based on a secondary data analysis (the National Study of Caregiving, N = 782), compared with CGs providing care to an older adult living in the community, CGs to older adults in non-NH residential care settings reported better emotional well-being, self-rated health, and relationship quality and less provision of assistance older adults with daily activities. While chronic conditions, relationship quality, and financial strain were associated with the health and well-being for both CG groups, degree of informal support was more consequential for the health of CGs providing care to older adults in the community. Our results provide critical information on the risk factors and areas of intervention for both CG groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Personality trait similarity between spouses in four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Robert R; Martin, Thomas A; Hrebícková, Martina; Urbánek, Tomás; Boomsma, Dorret I; Willemsen, Gonneke; Costa, Paul T

    2008-10-01

    We examined patterns of trait similarity (assortative mating) in married couples in four cultures, using both self-reports and spouse ratings on versions of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. There was evidence of a subtle but pervasive perceived contrast bias in the spouse-rating data. However, there was strong agreement across methods of assessment and moderate agreement across cultures in the pattern of results. Most assortment effects were small, but correlations exceeding .40 were seen for a subset of traits, chiefly from the Openness and Agreeableness domains. Except in Russia, where more positive assortment was seen for younger couples, comparisons of younger and older cohorts showed little systematic difference. This suggested that mate selection, rather than convergence over time, accounted for similarity. Future research on personality similarity in dyads can utilize different designs but should assess personality at both domain and the facet levels.

  8. Reciprocal Suffering: Caregiver Concerns During Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Burt, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Context For many hospice caregivers, the constancy and difficulty of caregiving impact their physical quality of life and cause depression, psychological distress, guilt, loneliness, and restrictions on social activities. Objectives Deviating from traditional unidimensional research on hospice caregivers, this study explored the transactional nature of reciprocal suffering by examining caregiver concerns through four dimensions: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual. Methods Researchers analyzed audiotapes of intervention discussions between hospice caregivers and research social workers. Results Results indicated that of the 125 pain talk utterances, the majority referenced psychological concern (49%), followed by physical (28%), social (22%), and spiritual (2%). Reflections on concerns revealed a global perspective of caregiving, which highlighted the patient’s needs juxtaposed to the caregiver’s recognized limitations. Conclusion By examining the reciprocal nature of suffering for caregivers, this study reinforced the need for assessing caregivers in hospice care, with specific emphasis on the importance of providing caregiver education on pain management. PMID:21146356

  9. Outcome indicators for direct and indirect caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, D P; Swanson, E A; Specht, J K; Maas, M; Johnson, M

    2000-02-01

    Informal caregiving and outcomes for caregiving are an important part of health care and of particular importance in nursing. The purpose of this research is to report the results of a survey mailed to nursing experts for validation of the outcome labels Caregiver Role Performance: Direct Care and Caregiver Role Performance: Indirect Care and their accompanying indicators. Experts were asked to rate how important the identified indicators were for assessing those two outcomes. In addition, the respondents were asked to what extent nursing interventions influence the achievement of each identified indicator for Caregiver Role Performance: Direct Care and Caregiver Role Performance: Indirect Care. In general, the validity of the concept analysis work by the caregiver focus group was supported. Ten indicators for Caregiver Performance: Direct Care were retained, 1 was dropped that was considered most appropriate for indirect care, and 3 new indicators were added to reflect the nurse experts surveyed. For Caregiver Performance: Indirect Care, all of the indicators were retained.

  10. An exploration into caring for a stroke-survivor in Lima, Peru: Emotional impact, stress factors, coping mechanisms and unmet needs of informal caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesantes, M. Amalia; Brandt, Lena R.; Ipince, Alessandra; Miranda, J. Jaime; Diez-Canseco, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Understanding local complexities and challenges of stroke-related caregiving are essential to develop appropriate interventions. Our study aimed to characterize the impact of post-stroke care among caregivers in a setting of transitioning economy. Materials and Methods Qualitative study based on in-depth interviews with primary caregivers of stroke survivors in Lima, Peru. Transcribed data was organized into the emotional impact of caregiving, main stress factors and coping mechanisms to deal with the caregiving role, as well as the unmet needs of caregivers. Results We interviewed twelve caregivers, mean age 52.5 years, 8/12 were females, who were either the spouse or child of the stroke survivor. Stroke patients had a median age of 70 years, range 53–85 years. All participants reported having experienced emotional stress and depressive symptoms as a result of caregiving. Although most had family support, reduced social activities and added unanticipated financial burdens increased caregiver’s stress. None of the caregivers had received training in post-stroke care tasks after the patient’s discharge and only a few had received some psychological support, yet almost all expressed the need to see a professional to improve their mental health. Keeping a positive attitude towards their relative’s physical post-stroke condition was a key coping mechanism. Conclusions In the absence of structured institutional responses, family members endure with the provision of care for stroke survivors, a task escorted by major emotional, financial, and social strains. This burden could be prevented or curtailed if caregivers were to be targeted by interventions providing psychological and financial support, together with basic training on post-stroke care.

  11. Gender Differences in Dementia Spousal Caregiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Maria Pöysti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of male caregivers is rapidly increasing. However, there are few large scale studies exploring gender differences in the burden or coping with caregiving. We investigated this among caregivers of patients with dementia. The study cohort consisted of 335 dyads of wife-husband couples from two studies including dementia patients and their spousal caregivers. Baseline mini-mental state examination (MMSE, clinical dementia rating scale (CDR, neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI, cornell depression scale and charlson comorbidity index (CCI were used to describe patients with dementia, Zarit burden scale and geriatric depression scale were used to measure experienced burden and depression of caregivers. Mean age of caregivers was 78 years. There were no differences in depression, satisfaction with life, or loneliness according to caregivers' gender. Male caregivers had more comorbidities than females (CCI 1.9 versus 1.1, P<0.001, and the wives of male caregivers had a more severe stage of dementia than husbands of female caregivers (CDR, P=0.048; MMSE14.0 versus 17.7, P<0.001. However, the mean Zarit burden scale was significantly lower among male than female caregivers (31.5 versus 37.5; P<0.001. Lower education of male caregivers tended to be associated with less experienced burden. In conclusion, male caregivers of dementia experienced lower burden than female caregivers despite care recipients' more severe disease.

  12. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  13. Effects of Deployments on Spouses of Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    and Rees , 2000). However, a spouse may find it difficult to remain in the labor force when a husband is gone for a deployment. Most child care...and Ray Rees . Household production, full consumption and the costs of children. Sydney: Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, 2000. Beth J. Asch, James...Army Medical Research Center: Heidelberg, Germany, 2000. Ann H. Huffman, Amy B. Adler, Carol A. Dolan, Jeffrey L. Thomas, and Carl A. Castro. Impact of

  14. QUEER UNIONS: Same-Sex Spouses Marrying Tradition and Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Isaiah Green

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Same-sex civil marriage is a focal point of debate among socialconservatives, feminists, queer critics, and lesbian and gay assimilationists. In this paper, I draw on in-depth interviews of thirty samesex married spouses to explore how actual same-sex marriages relate to these debates. Among these spouses, civil marriage is perceived to provide significant legal, social, and psychological resources that, in effect, consolidate the nuclear family and the institution of marriage. Yet, conversely, these spouses do not uniformly embrace traditional norms of marriage, but, rather, adopt a range of nontraditional norms and practices that, in effect, destabilize the traditional marital form. In sociological terms, however, their complexity is not surprising, as contemporary lesbiansand gay men are dually socialized in the dialectic of a dominant“meaning-constitutive” tradition (Gross 2005 that valorizes (heterosexualmarriage and kinship, on the one hand, but a queer-meaning constitutive tradition that promotes sexual freedom and nontraditional gender relations, on the other. In this sense, one important sociological question for the future is the extent to which the increasing availability of samesex marriage will transform the dialectic, eroding the structural conditions that underpin a distinctive queer meaning-constitutive tradition and, in turn, same-sex marital innovation.

  15. Supplementary contribution payable to the Health Insurance Scheme for spouses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Staff members, fellows and pensioners are reminded that any change in their marital status, as well as any change in their spouse or registered partner’s income or health insurance cover, must be reported to CERN in writing within 30 calendar days, in accordance with Articles III 6.01 to 6.03 of the Rules of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Such changes may affect the conditions of the spouse or registered partner’s membership of the CHIS or the payment of the supplementary contribution to it for the spouse or registered partner’s insurance cover. For more information see: http://cern.ch/chis/contribsupp.asp From 1.1.2008, the indexed amounts of the supplementary monthly contribution for the different monthly income brackets are as follows, expressed in Swiss francs: more than 2500 CHF and up to 4250 CHF: 134.- more than 4250 CHF and up to 7500 CHF: 234.- more than 7500 CHF and up to 10,000 CHF: 369.- more than 10,000 CHF: 470.- It is in the member of the ...

  16. Health counseling of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, A; Radius, S M

    1991-05-01

    Health counseling is a fundamental aspect of health care for adolescents and is a natural extension of the concept of anticipatory guidance. It is a dynamic process involving active participation by adolescents. Pediatricians are a valued source of health-relevant information, but must also recognize how their attitudes and beliefs can affect the counseling process. Knowledge of the multitude of changes occurring during adolescence and an understanding of the role of health-risking behaviors in meeting various developmental needs are critical to successful counseling. Particular attention must be focused on ways to help adolescents develop the skills necessary to maintain health-promoting lifestyles and to resist peer pressure to engage in health-risking behaviors.

  17. Multicultural Counseling: From Diversity to Universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C. H.

    1996-01-01

    Although multicultural counseling has been a source of controversy, it has recently been recognized that counseling is really generic in nature, and therefore all counseling is multicultural. Thus, multiculturalism has joined the movement toward a universal system of counseling. (JPS)

  18. Taking Care of You: Self-Care for Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Caregiving Caregiving Across the States: 50 State Profiles (2014) Research and Reports Caregiving Policy Digest Newsletter ... the nurse. Many caregiving questions relate more to nursing than to ... surgical procedures, providing personal care, and managing medications at ...

  19. Application of Adaptive Counseling and Therapy to Career Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mary Z.; Tracey, Terence J.

    1995-01-01

    Adaptive Counseling and Therapy theory predicts that counseling efficacy depends on a match between counselor style and client readiness. Data from 137 females and 54 males showed a negative relationship between client readiness and preference for directive counseling and a curvilinear (inverted U) relationship between readiness and preference for…

  20. The Ghosts of Counseling Psychology: Is Counseling Research Really Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Scheel et al. offer an interesting analysis on the publication rate of counseling-related research articles in counseling psychology's two major journals. In this reaction to their work, the author considers various aspects of their results and contemplates possible explanations for the decline of counseling-related publications. The author…

  1. The Ghosts of Counseling Psychology: Is Counseling Research Really Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Scheel et al. offer an interesting analysis on the publication rate of counseling-related research articles in counseling psychology's two major journals. In this reaction to their work, the author considers various aspects of their results and contemplates possible explanations for the decline of counseling-related publications. The author…

  2. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Therapy Improves Patient and Caregiver-Reported Outcomes in Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Ellwood, Michael; Ainger, Timothy; Burroughs, Thomas; Fagan, Andrew; Gavis, Edith A; Heuman, Douglas M; Fuchs, Michael; John, Binu; Wade, James B

    2017-07-27

    Patient-reported outcomes such as health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are impaired in cirrhosis due to under-treated mood and sleep disorders, which can adversely impact their caregivers. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) can improve patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in non-cirrhotic patients but their impact in cirrhosis is unclear. To evaluate the effect of MBSR and supportive group therapy on mood, sleep and HRQOL in cirrhotic patients and their caregivers. Cirrhotic outpatients with mild depression (Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)>14) on screening with an adult caregiver were enrolled. At baseline, BDI, sleep (Pittsburgh sleep quality index PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, ESS), anxiety (Beck Anxiety inventory) and HRQOL (Sickness Impact Profile, SIP) for both patients/caregivers and caregiver burden (Zarit Burden Interview Short-form, ZBI-SF and perceived caregiver burden, PCB) and patient covert HE(CHE) status were measured. Patients who had BDI>14 at baseline, along with their caregivers then underwent a structured MBSR program with four weekly hour-long group sessions interspersed with home practice using CDs. After the last group, all questionnaires were repeated. 20 patient/caregiver dyads were included. All patients were men (60±8 years MELD 12.9±5.7, 14 prior hepatic encephalopathy (HE)) while most caregivers (n=15) were women (55±12 years, 23±14 years of relationship, 65% spouses). There was no change in patient BDI between screening and baseline (20.1±11.2 vs. 19.0±10.6, P=0.81). All dyads were able to complete the four MBSR+supportive group therapy sessions. There was a significant improvement in BDI (19.0±10.6 vs.15.6±8.2 P=0.01), PSQI (7.2±3.7 vs. 5.5±3.7, P<0.001) and overall HRQOL (25.0±13.2 vs. 17.7±14.0,P=0.01) but not in anxiety or CHE rates in patients. Similarly caregiver burden (ZBI-SF13.0±9.0 vs. 9.8±6.9,P=0.04, Perceived burden 72.1±29.9 vs. 63.0±14.5,P=0.05) and depression reduced (BDI 9.1±7.8 vs. 5.9±6.0,P=0

  3. [Couples counseling with Latinos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumaya, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Intimate ties and emotional relationship gain the function to confirm, to stabilize and, afterwards, to structure the coherency's model of the structured self-organization up to that moment. When the couple perceives the bond of the relationship such as a sole and exclusive for a person, they take a leading role to be able to deduce a sense of individuality and uniqueness in the way to feel himself in the world. Based on these considerations, in this paper I propose a brief description of a counselling method, which characterises the work I am carrying out since several years in the counselling and therapy with couples.

  4. Beyond Spaces of Counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Mads; Nissen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    The article articulates experiments with spatial constructions in two Danish social work agencies, basing on a) a sketchy genealogical reconstruction of conceptualisations and uses of space in social work and counselling; b) a search for theoretical resources to articulate new spaces, and c) data...... from a long-standing collaboration with the social workers. Beside the classical disciplinary and pastoral spaces, we find spaces of attunement, spaces of production, and public spaces as forms of spatialisations which might be taken as prototypical in attempts to develop social work and counselling....

  5. Some Approaches for Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David G.

    1970-01-01

    Suggests teachers use following steps in counseling students: preparation, introduction, problem definition, solution identification, information gathering, decision making, and follow-up. Discusses role of teacher in directive and non-directive counseling. (DM)

  6. Trends in Counseling and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darrell

    1982-01-01

    Surveyed the views of both clinical and counseling psychologists regarding current trends in counseling and psychotherapy. Found psychoanalysis to be declining in popularity, while cognitive-behavioral options represented one of the strongest theoretical emphases today. (Author/GC)

  7. Managed Care, Ethics, and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses issues of managed care and ethics and how they relate to counseling. Specifically reviews a recent article published in "The Counseling Psychologist" (2000). Explores implications for counselors and counselor educators. (Author/GCP)

  8. Kierkegaard's Philosophy: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopson, Lorraine; Gade, Eldon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses how the philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard can provide useful guidelines for the study of the counseling process. Compares Kierkegaard's philosophy with selected contributions of Freud, Skinner, Rogers, and May and with four common themes of counseling and psychotherapy. (Author)

  9. Trends in Counseling and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darrell

    1982-01-01

    Surveyed the views of both clinical and counseling psychologists regarding current trends in counseling and psychotherapy. Found psychoanalysis to be declining in popularity, while cognitive-behavioral options represented one of the strongest theoretical emphases today. (Author/GC)

  10. Counselling skills to improve Nursing Relational System within the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannacciulli, C

    2012-05-01

    The relationships amongst healthcare providers, as well as between these and the patients/families they care for, are currently experiencing profound changes in Italian hospitals, and--more generally--in the whole Italian health system, thus reproducing similar changes concomitantly occurring in most Western countries. A growing body of evidence suggests that nurses play a central role in the proper development of a healthy and transparent communication between caregivers and patients/families in all neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This article discusses the current knowledge in this area, and provides further evidence supporting the introduction in all NICUs of specific educational and training tools for nurses in order to promote the use of counselling skills. The implementation of specific counselling skills can improve the Nursing Relational System within the NICU, ultimately helping in better addressing the parental relational needs in the NICU.

  11. The impact of foreign postings on accompanying military spouses: an ethnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Blakely

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of an ethnographic study, the impact of foreign postings on spouses who accompany military personnel was explored. Individual interviews and focus groups with 34 British military spouses based in one location in southern Europe were conducted. Key findings suggested that reaction to a foreign posting was a reflection of personal attitudes, prior experiences, support, ability to adjust to change and strength of relationship with the serving spouse and community. For many the experience was positive due to the increased opportunity for family time, for others this helped to compensate for the difficulties experienced. Some military spouses experienced significant distress on the posting, particularly if the family was not well-supported. The potential implications of military spouses not adapting to foreign postings have significant implications for healthcare practice. Provision of more appropriate support resources before and during the posting would facilitate the transition for the military spouse and their family.

  12. Supporting rural family palliative caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carole A; Pesut, Barbara; Bottorff, Joan L

    2012-11-01

    There is urgent need to effectively support the well-being of rural palliative family caregivers (FCGs). A mixed method study was conducted with 23 FCGs. Data collection included completion of an assessment questionnaire and semistructured interviews. The most prevalent needs identified by questionnaire were caring for the patient's pain, fatigue, body, and nourishment; FCG's fatigue and need for respite. Yet few FCGs wanted more attention to these needs by healthcare providers. FCGs resisted considering their own personal needs. Instead, they focused on needs related to providing care including to be(come) a palliative caregiver, be skilled and know more, navigate competing wishes, needs, demands, and priorities, and for "an extra pair of hands." Gaps in rural palliative services contributed to low expectations for assistance; reluctance to seek assistance was influenced by FCGs' resourcefulness and independence. Findings suggest that supporting FCGs will most likely be successful when framed in relation to their caregiving role.

  13. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health > Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Main Content ... appointments easier. Back to To Prepare for Every Dental Visit: Your Role Be prepared for every appointment. ...

  14. Increasing Marital Adjustment in Graduate Students and their Spouses through Relationship Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Shollenberger, Matthew Alan

    2001-01-01

    Graduate school for most students can be quite stressful. When combined with the responsibility of being a spouse, parent, and/or employee, the stress is elevated. Research has indicated that the greatest area of discord for married graduate students and their nonstudent spouses is communication. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a relationship enhancement program on the marital adjustment of graduate students and their spouses. The sample consisted of 28 married grad...

  15. 38 CFR 21.5100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.5100.... Chapter 32 Counseling § 21.5100 Counseling. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is: (1) To assist in... of counseling. Counseling assistance in available for— (1) Identifying and removing reasons...

  16. Do Counseling and Marketing Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by discussing concerns about two of Wittman's purposes for use of marketing: improved services in consumers and economic survival of counseling profession. Agrees that counseling profession needs to understand basic marketing principles used by business and health care industry;…

  17. Contemporary Counseling: Services, Applications, Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Charles W.

    This book was written to serve as a basic text in courses that overview the use of counseling services and to serve as a useful reference for counseling practitioners. It is designed to stress counseling services in different settings (social agencies, mental health centers, schools, business/industry, correctional institutions, and private…

  18. Do Counseling and Marketing Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by discussing concerns about two of Wittman's purposes for use of marketing: improved services in consumers and economic survival of counseling profession. Agrees that counseling profession needs to understand basic marketing principles used by business and health care industry;…

  19. [Factors involved in the burden of the primary caregiver of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, M C; Meza-Osnaya, G; Pérez-Cruz, I; Cortes-Campero, N; Hernández-Ovalle, J; Hernández-Paredes, P; Juárez-Romero, K; Chino-Hernández, B; Romero-Figueroa, M S

    The aim of the study was to identify the factors involved between burden in the primary caregiver of cancer patients and their quality of life. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a secondary level hospital on 100 primary caregivers of cancer patients. The level of burden was determined using the Zarit scale and the perception of quality of life using the World Health Organisation Quality of Life questionnaire. Quality of life was categorised as high or low and compared between groups according to their level of burden. Descriptive statistics were performed on the study variables, and differences between groups were analysed according to their level of burden. In assessing the overload, it was found that 31% of caregivers had burden. A good quality of life was perceived by 76% of caregivers, while the remaining 24% perceived it as poor. To identify association between these two variables Chi squared (X2) was used to determine whether there was any association between quality of life and overloading of the primary caregiver, giving a P≤.05. A Spearman correlation was also performed, obtaining an r-value of .321 with a P≤.05, finding a slightly positive correlation. The factors that have a bearing on a good quality of life despite having burden were: being married, dedicated to the home, and kinship (to be immediate family: spouse, parents and children). Conversely, the type of cancer, sleep hours, and hours of care influence the perception of a poor quality of life. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Perceived quality in a dementia unit: patients' caregivers as information providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picazo, J J; de Dios Cánovas-García, J; Antúnez, C; Marín, J; Antequera, M M; Vivancos, L; Martínez, B; Legaz, A; Navarro, D; Leal, M

    2016-10-22

    Dementia units (DU) provide comprehensive and specialised care to patients with dementia. However, assessment in these units normally focuses on patient management. The aim of this study was to determine satisfaction of the caregivers of patients managed in a DU and how they rated DU care. We created a self-administered questionnaire which was completed by 236 caregivers visiting the DU in 2015. The questionnaire included 6 dimensions (accessibility, organisation, professionalism, relationship with staff, information, and facilities); data were analysed using problem rates. A total of 53.4% caregivers completed the questionnaire; most were women, patients' spouses, or first-degree relatives. The overall problem rates was 15.0% (95% CI, 13.9-16.1), with sizeable differences between dimensions: from 0.1% (95% CI, 0.0-0.4) for 'relationship with staff' and 'professionalism' to 49.3% (95% CI, 45.4-53.2) for 'information'. Waiting times over 30minutes were perceived as excessive. Information problems were not directly related to patient management. Satisfaction was scored 8.29/10 (median 8; SD 1.45); 77.3% (95% CI, 69.8-74.8) of respondents were highly satisfied. Ninety-nine percent of the caregivers stated that they would recommend the DU. This questionnaire provides interesting data on care quality as perceived by patients' caregivers. Our results have allowed us to identify problems and implement corrective actions. Our questionnaire has proved to be a useful tool for evaluating and improving care quality in DUs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Experiences of Stigma and Discrimination among Caregivers of Persons with Schizophrenia in China: A Field Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi; Zhang, Weijun; Hu, Zhenyu; Jia, Fujun; Li, Yafang; Xu, Huiwen; Zhao, Shuliang; Guo, Jing; Tian, Donghua; Qu, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    In China, caregivers for family members with schizophrenia play an important role in treatment and recovery but may experience stigma and discrimination simply because of their family relationship. The object of this study was to measure the degrees and correlates of stigma and discrimination experiences among this group. Four hundred twenty-seven caregivers participated in this hospital-based and cross-sectional study in Ningbo and Guangzhou, China. Data were collected by trained interviewers using fixed questionnaires. Stigma and discrimination experiences were measured by the Modified Consumer Experiences of Stigma Questionnaire (MCESQ). Caregivers’ social support was measured by the Social Support Rating Scale. Parametric analysis, nonparametric analysis and multivariate linear regression were used. The mean (SD) score of MCESQ was 2.44(0.45), 2.91(0.71) for stigma experiences and 1.97(0.37) for discrimination experiences on a five-point score (“1 = never” and “5 = very often”). Approximately 65% of caregivers reported that they tried to conceal their family members’ illness, and 71% lacked the support of friends. The experience of stigma was significantly negatively associated with the perceived social support of caregivers (standard β = −0.2,pstigmas than other (standard β = −0.18, pstigmas. In addition, stigma and discrimination was more experienced in Zhejiang than in Guangdong (pstigmas and rare discrimination and found the relations with social support, kinship, patient’s educational level and regional differences. More interventions and supports should been given to caregivers who are lack of social support, who live in rural area and who are the patients’ parents, spouses or siblings. PMID:25259732

  2. 1978 U.S. Medical School Graduates: Practice Setting Preferences, Hometowns, and Spouses' Hometowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Janet Melei

    1980-01-01

    National information about 1978 graduating medical students is reported that confirms a substantial relationship between their preferred practice settings and their hometowns and those of their spouses. (JMD)

  3. Intimate terrorism and situational couple violence in general surveys: ex-spouses required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael P; Leone, Janel M; Xu, Yili

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we argue that past efforts to distinguish among types of intimate partner violence in general survey data have committed a critical error--using data on current spouses to develop operationalizations of intimate terrorism and situational couple violence. We use ex-spouse data from the National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS) to develop new operationalizations. We then demonstrate that NVAWS current spouse data contain little intimate terrorism; we argue that this is likely to be the case for all general surveys. In addition, the ex-spouse data confirm past findings regarding a variety of differences between intimate terrorism and situational couple violence, including those predicted by feminist theories.

  4. Psychologic distress of patients and their spouses after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S M

    1994-02-01

    The first 6 weeks of recovery from coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a source of stress for both patients and their spouses. Attempts by patients and spouses to manage the stress associated with this post-hospitalization recovery are associated with alterations in psychologic functioning. This study consisted of a secondary analysis of a larger study evaluating the effects of a homegoing family information intervention. The authors identify and compare the psychologic distress of patients and spouses 6 weeks after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Patients and spouses were individually interviewed in their homes 6 weeks after surgery. They were asked about their psychologic functioning by using the Profile of Moods States. Results indicated that spouses experienced more psychologic distress than patients at 6 weeks after surgery. Younger spouses reported more anger than older spouses. These results support the need for discharge and home interventions to reduce the psychologic distress of spouses as well as patients. Younger spouses, in particular, may need targeted interventions. Additionally, the effect of gender on measures of psychologic distress needs further exploration.

  5. A Maslovian Counseling Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Stephen

    1979-01-01

    With Maslow's hierarchy as a basis, the model provides structure for setting goals in counseling cases and overall programs. Different kinds of client concerns are identified, and suggestions are made for using these 14 categories. The article includes specific suggestions for using the model in diagnosis, evaluation, counselor education, and…

  6. Vocational Counseling Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    The author stresses the importance for counselors to articulate a viable and comprehensive approach to vocational counseling to both clients and the larger society. A re-thinking and re-stating of career education concepts can be a first step in applying vocational theory more constructively. (EA)

  7. Client Expectations for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Howard E. A.; Harris, Donna J.

    1976-01-01

    Undergraduate students (N=287) completed an 82-item questionnaire about their expectations of counseling. The respondents' strongest expectations were of seeing an experienced, genuine, expert, and accepting counselor they could trust. Expectancies that the counselor would be understanding and directive were lower. Significant sex differences were…

  8. Counseling and Transcendental Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donceel, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    An acquaintance with the different philosophies of human nature is an invaluable asset for counseling. The author presents a modern Christian concept of man with emphasis on contributions of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas and elements from modern philosophy. Its two main concerns are man's spirit and man's knowledge and will. (Author/CG)

  9. Counseling Third Culture Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Carolyn Fox

    Third Culture Kids (TCKs) represent a group of youth who have lived overseas with their families for business, service, or missionary work. The implications of living in multiple cultures, especially during the developmental and formative years of youth, warrant investigation. This study informs the US counseling community about the…

  10. First Cycle Counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darska, Anna

    1981-01-01

    Investigations are described that were carried out by the Centre d'Information de Documentation et d'Orientation of the Rene Descartes University to find an answer to the counseling problems arising from student admission, through coursework, and upon leaving the university to start a career. (Author/MLW)

  11. Counseling in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remley, Theodore P.; Bacchini, Eugenio; Krieg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The counseling profession in Italy is in an early stage of development. No university preparation programs exist, and counselors are not employed in schools. Counselors maintain private practices, work in agencies, and are employed by the government. Counselors receive their preparation in Italy from professional associations in programs that…

  12. Counseling Skills for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Jeffrey A.; Kottler, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    By necessity, today's teachers do much more than deliver instruction. In the classroom, on the playground, or even in the parking lot, teachers are often called upon to respond quickly and appropriately to students' social and emotional needs, drawing from instinct more than anything else. In this second edition of "Counseling Skills for…

  13. Existentialism in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Leona E.

    1971-01-01

    The counselor, in working with students, can make each choice a means through which the person clarifies his purposes and designs his own future. Every commitment of time is a serious undertaking. This, the author sees, is the fundamental message of existentialism for counseling. (Author)

  14. Balancing competing needs mediates the association of caregiving demand with caregiver role strain and depressive symptoms of dementia caregivers: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yun; Yang, Ching-Tzu; Wang, Yu-Nu; Hsu, Wen-Chuin; Huang, Tzu-Hsin; Lin, Yueh-E; Liu, Chin-Yi; Shyu, Yea-Ing L

    2017-08-17

    To examine the role of balancing competing needs in the relationship between caregiving demand and caregiving outcomes (caregivers' role strain and depressive symptoms). Caregivers who do not balance competing needs are more likely to experience negative caregiving outcomes, suggesting that balance mediates between caregiving demand and caregiving outcomes. Identifying a mediator of negative caregiving effects may help in developing tailored interventions for family caregivers of persons with dementia. A cross-sectional, correlational design. Data were collected from family caregivers' self-completed questionnaires between March 2013 - April 2014. A convenience sample of 120 family caregivers and care receivers with dementia was enrolled. We examined whether balance mediated the relationship between caregiving demand and caregiving outcomes (caregivers' role strain and depressive symptoms) by multiple regression analysis. To evaluate the significance of the indirect effect of caregiver balance, we used the Sobel test and Monte Carlo method, an alternative approach to testing mediation. Balancing competing needs completely mediated the association of caregiving demand with depressive symptoms and partially mediated the association of caregiving demand with role strain. Assessing caregivers' self-perceived sense of balance may help to identify caregivers at high risk for role strain and depressive symptoms. Interventions to enhance caregivers' perceived sense of balance between competing needs may provide a strategy for reducing the negative effects of caregiving. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Changes in Adult Child Caregiver Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinovacz, Maximiliane E.; Davey, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Caregiving research has typically relied on cross-sectional data that focus on the primary caregiver. This approach neglects the dynamic and systemic character of caregiver networks. Our analyses addressed changes in adult child care networks over a 2-year period. Design and Methods: The study relied on pooled data from Waves 1 through 5…

  16. Family Caregiver Identity: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, Elise K.; Adams, Rebecca; Dudley, William; Perko, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the multitude of available resources, family caregivers of those with chronic disease continually underutilize support services to cope with the demands of caregiving. Several studies have linked self-identification as a caregiver to the increased likelihood of support service use. Purpose: The present study reviewed the…

  17. Gender Differences in Caregiving: Fact or Artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Baila; Cafasso, Lynda

    1992-01-01

    Conducted meta-analysis of 14 studies to determine gender differences in caregiving stressors and burden. Found essentially no significant gender differences in functional impairment of frail care recipient or total caregiver involvement in care or in money management tasks. Female caregivers were more likely to carry out personal care and…

  18. Widening the Generational Circle: Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This document addresses the dilemma faced by families with an aging or disabled member and the stress associated with the role of family caregiver. Emotions experienced by family caregivers, especially when the caregiver is an adult child caring for an elderly or frail parent, are discussed and feelings of desertion, dependence, and sibling…

  19. Validation of a model of family caregiver communication types and related caregiver outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Kravits, Kate; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty; Fujinami, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Caring for the family is included as one of the eight domains of quality palliative care, calling attention to the importance of the family system and family communications about cancer during care and treatment of the disease. Previously, a model of family caregiver communication defined four caregiver communication types-Manager, Carrier, Partner, Lone-each with a unique communication pattern. The purpose of the present study was to extend the model of family caregiver communication in cancer care to further understand the impact of family communication burden on caregiving outcomes. This mixed-method study employed fieldnotes from a family caregiver intervention focused on quality of life and self-reported caregiver communication items to identify a specific family caregiver type. Caregiver types were then analyzed using outcome measures on psychological distress, skills preparedness, family inventory of needs, and quality-of-life domains. Corroboration between fieldnotes and self-reported communication for caregivers (n = 21, 16 women, mean age of 53 years) revealed a definitive classification of the four caregiver types (Manager = 6, Carrier = 5, Partner = 6, Lone = 4). Mean scores on self-reported communication items documented different communication patterns congruent with the theoretical framework of the model. Variation in caregiver outcomes measures confirmed the model of family caregiver communication types. Partner and Lone caregivers reported the lowest psychological distress, with Carrier caregivers feeling least prepared and Manager caregivers reporting the lowest physical quality of life. This study illustrates the impact of family communication on caregiving and increases our knowledge and understanding about the role of communication in caregiver burden. The research provides the first evidence-based validation for a family caregiver communication typology and its relationship to caregiver outcomes. Future research is needed to develop and test

  20. Baby boomer caregiver and dementia caregiving: findings from the National Study of Caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heehyul; Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have well documented the characteristics of baby boomers but less is known about the experiences of boomer caregivers (CGs) of people with dementia. The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of boomer CGs of people with dementia with those of boomer CGs for people without dementia and to ascertain factors associated with outcomes. We selected baby boomer CGs from the National Study of Caregiving (NSOC) with 650 primary boomer CGs (138 CGs of people with dementia and 512 CGs of people without dementia). The Stress Process Model (SPM) was used to examine the effects of resources (the use of paid help and informal support) and stressors (primary: level of CG care activities and interrupted sleep; secondary: strain of caregiving on work, other care and social activities) on CGs' down, depressed or hopeless feelings and self-perceived general health. T-tests and chi-square tests were used to compare SPM domain differences and ordinary least-square multiple regression analysis was used to investigate predictors of CGs' outcomes. High blood pressure and arthritis were the most prevalent chronic diseases in both groups. Boomer CGs of people with dementia reported providing more help with daily activities, higher level of caregiving and social activity conflict, experiencing more interrupted sleep and more down, depressed or hopeless feelings than CGs of people without dementia. Different factors predicted boomer CGs' outcomes. The current results yield important information about the considerable differences between two baby boomer CG groups within the caregiving experiences. The findings highlight the need to provide tailored interventions to boomer CGs to help them cope with caregiving stress to improve their physical and mental health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. INTER-SPOUSE COMMUNICATION AND ACCEPTANCE OF FAMILY PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazish Rasheed

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Inter-spouse communication majorly influences the decision making process of couples for adopting family planning measures. This factor is especially important in male dominated cultures, where, it is thought unnecessary for men to discuss family planning as child bearing and contraception are presumed to be female matters. Aims: The present study was conducted with the aim to know the extent of inter spouse communication among couples and its impact on use of family planning measures and family size. Settings and Design: The study was conducted among ever married women in the reproductive age group of 15-49 years (n=718 residing in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India. The study was a community based cross-sectional study. Methods and Material: A community based household survey was conducted in the registered areas of urban and rural health training centres of Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh,Uttar Pradesh. Participants were enquired on various parameters related to their conversations on family planning with their husband, ever use of contraception and their family size. Statistical analysis used: Chi square was applied to test the association. Results: A sizeable portion (18.1% of women had never conversed with their husbands on family planning matters. Communicators were observed to have lesser number of living children (p<0.001. Current use of contraceptives was significantly associated with inter spouse discussion (p<0.05. 43% women from the study sample had never discussed the choice of a contraceptive method with their husbands. Conclusions: Husband-wife communication plays an important role in family planning acceptance as well as in deciding the final family size.

  2. What does phenomenology offer to the study of care-giving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Norman; Reed, Val

    2006-01-01

    Care giving to a dementia sufferer is complex (Parsons, 1997) and inherently stressful (Baldwin et al 1989). It is suggested that the predominance of the care-giver stressor-burden research paradigm during the last thirty years has frequently been uni-dimensional, objectively oriented, generally equivocal, and unconvincing in its findings. Dillehay and Sandys (1990), suggest that preoccupation w ith such typically narrow approaches has delayed the much-needed development of a more accurate understanding of the lived experience (the phenomenology of care-giving). Researching the experience of care giving to a dementing relative requires a research strategy, which acknowledges the intricacies, complexities, subjectivity and humanness of that experience. That is the premise behind this paper. A multi-dimensional phenomenological PhD study is presented. The focus is on understanding care giving from the individual and collective perspectives of forty-six spouse caregivers. The methodological implications (including influences of Husserl and Heidegger) are outlined before the phenomenological research findings are presented and discussed. Ethical approval was given by the Bassetlaw Hospital and Community NHS Trust Ethics Committee (now part of the Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust).

  3. Usage and design evaluation by family caregivers of a stroke intervention web site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Linda L; Steiner, Victoria

    2013-10-01

    Four of five families are affected by stroke. Many caregivers access the Internet and gather healthcare information from Web-based sources. The purpose of this descriptive evaluation was to assess the usage and design of the Caring∼Web site, which provides education/support for family caregivers of persons with stroke residing in home settings. Thirty-six caregivers from two Midwest states accessed this intervention in a 1-year study. The average participant was 54 years old, White, woman, and the spouse of the care recipient. In a telephone interview, four Web site questions were asked twice a month/bimonthly, and a 33-item survey at the conclusion of the study evaluated the Web site usage and design of its components. Descriptive analysis methods were used, and statistics were collected on the number of visits to the Web site. On average, participants logged on to the Web site 1-2 hours per week, although usage declined after several months for some participants. Participants positively rated the Web site's appearance and usability that included finding the training to be adequate. Web site designers can replicate this intervention for other health conditions.

  4. 76 FR 26147 - Caregivers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... traumatic brain injury, psychological trauma, or other mental disorder, incurred or aggravated in the line... and servicemembers whose serious injury is a psychological trauma or mental disorder, and who have... eligible for the Family Caregiver program if they incurred or aggravated a serious injury in the line of...

  5. The Effects of a Family Support Program Including Respite Care on Parenting Stress and Family Quality of Life Perceived by Primary Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minjung; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a family support program was carried out for primary caregivers of children with disabilities. The program included respite care, recreation programs, counseling, and social support coordination based on individual needs of each family. In order to verify the intervention effects, parenting stress and family quality of life were…

  6. Implementation of a Community-Based Secondhand Smoke Reduction Intervention for Caregivers of Urban Children with Asthma: Process Evaluation, Successes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaakman, Susan; Tremblay, Paul J.; Halterman, Jill S.; Fagnano, Maria; Borrelli, Belinda

    2013-01-01

    Many children, including those with asthma, remain exposed to secondhand smoke. This manuscript evaluates the process of implementing a secondhand smoke reduction counseling intervention using motivational interviewing (MI) for caregivers of urban children with asthma, including reach, dose delivered, dose received and fidelity. Challenges,…

  7. Implementation of a Community-Based Secondhand Smoke Reduction Intervention for Caregivers of Urban Children with Asthma: Process Evaluation, Successes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaakman, Susan; Tremblay, Paul J.; Halterman, Jill S.; Fagnano, Maria; Borrelli, Belinda

    2013-01-01

    Many children, including those with asthma, remain exposed to secondhand smoke. This manuscript evaluates the process of implementing a secondhand smoke reduction counseling intervention using motivational interviewing (MI) for caregivers of urban children with asthma, including reach, dose delivered, dose received and fidelity. Challenges,…

  8. Caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFries, Erin L; McGuire, Lisa C; Andresen, Elena M; Brumback, Babette A; Anderson, Lynda A

    2009-04-01

    Because of the growing number of caregivers and the awareness of related health and quality-of-life issues, caregiving has emerged as an important public health issue. We examined the characteristics and caregiving experiences of caregivers of people with and without cognitive impairment. Participants (n = 668) were adults who responded to the 2005 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Caregivers were people who provided regular care to a family member or friend aged 60 years or older either with or without cognitive impairment (ie, memory loss, confusion, or Alzheimer's disease). Demographic characteristics of caregivers of people with cognitive impairment were similar to those of caregivers of people without cognitive impairment. However, compared with caregivers of people without cognitive impairment, caregivers of people with cognitive impairment reported higher levels of disability, were more likely to be paid, and provided care for a longer duration. Care recipients with cognitive impairment were more likely than care recipients without cognitive impairment to be older, have dementia or confusion, and need assistance with memory and learning. State-level caregiving surveillance is vital in assessing and responding to the needs of the growing number of caregivers.

  9. Neurosciences of infant mental health development: recent findings and implications for counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Adriana; Lifter, Karin

    2014-10-01

    This article is about the neural correlates of infant mental health and their correspondences to social emotional development. These correspondences are organized in terms of the definition of infant mental provided by Zero to Three (2001), centered on infants' capacities regarding the experience and expression of emotions, interpersonal relationships, and learning. We conclude with implications of these correspondences for counseling psychology-namely, working with children's caregivers to maximize children's healthy social and emotional development.

  10. Pastoral care and counseling with the "un-homeless homeless": understanding cultures of homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jill

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a subset of findings from a larger study exploring the lived experiences of 16 former residents of a 90-day emergency family shelter program in Los Angeles County. Interpretative phenomenological analysis serves as a qualitative method for understanding the cultural uniqueness of the "un-homeless homeless." The findings offer implications for culturally competent pastoral care and counseling in the context of family homelessness and attend to both the process and content of caregiving.

  11. The Rights and Obligations of Spouses in Islamic Classic Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Juelda Lamçe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Islamic Law, the third largest global legal system, next to Civil Law and Common Law, has been far -back subject of an increased interest to the academics.  Its main peculiarity is the absorption of theology in the law. There is no clear borderline between juridical and religious regulation. For this reason it is important to understand how certain legal institutes where regulated in the past. In fact, Islamic classic law despite its later evolution is considered the most authoritative legal source, because closest to the Divine Revelation. With regard to the rights and obligations of spouses, they’re conceived in terms of complementary, while their equality is interpreted in terms of moral and spiritual rights and obligations. In order to better comprehend their rights and obligations, it is necessary to analyze the different roles of gender inside the Islamic family. Given the premises, this paper will focus on specific rights and obligations between spouses and with regard to the child-parent relationship. In particular, it will treat the meaning of the supremacy or authority of the man to the woman; the rights and obligations that they have towards the children born in and out of wedlock; the questions on the practice of the polygyny.

  12. Discourse analytic study of counseling sessions in stroke physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talvitie, Ulla; Pyöriä, Outi

    2006-01-01

    Studies on the interaction between physiotherapists and patients during treatment sessions have found low levels of communicative participation by patients and lack of direct influence by patients on the content of their treatment. This article reports the results of 7 counseling sessions in which physiotherapists and patients with stroke and their caregivers discussed the patients' postural control and balance, which had been tested and videotaped at different stages of the rehabilitation process. The physiotherapists' discourses relating to the videotaped test performances were either brief comments on the patient's performance or critical appraisals with references to difficulties encountered during performance. Performances of the easier tasks were treated by the physiotherapists with rhetorical questions. The second type of discourse consisted of the physiotherapists directing the patients' attention to their problems, and of the patients' and caregivers' initiatives leading to conversation about the patients' problems. The patients understood the significance of the test performance for their life at home in varying ways. The results of this study showed that successful counseling calls for physiotherapists to develop dialogic communication skills to help patients in coconstructing their home exercise together with their social network.

  13. Self-esteem links in families with 12-year-old children and in separated spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfhag, Kristina; Tynelius, Per; Rasmussen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to map associations of self-esteem in families with 12-year-old children and in separated spouses. The authors assessed self-esteem using the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Adults (B. Messer & S. Harter, 1986) and the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children (S. Harter, 1988; L. Wichstrom, 1995) in (a) 1,236 pairs of spouses and their 12-year-old children and (b) 159 pairs of ex-spouses. The authors found links for all aspects of self-esteem for married and cohabiting spouses in contrast with ex-spouses who lacked such associations. Ex-spouses had a lower global self-worth than did married and cohabiting spouses. The authors also found parent-child associations for self-esteem. Girls resembled their mothers' global self-worth more than their fathers' and more than the boys. Family members manifest similar levels of self-esteem. The spouses' similarity can be due to assortative mating, a convergence over time, or both. For children, environmental influence in the family context can contribute to the formation of self-esteem. The stronger mother-girl link suggests that maternal identification of self-esteem is an environmental factor for girls in particular.

  14. Relational Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Stroke Survivor-Spouse Dyads

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael J.; Lyons, Karen S.; Powers, Laurie E.

    2012-01-01

    Depression following stroke is a major problem for survivors and spouses, but few studies have focused on the experiences of couples. This study investigates associations between perceived relationship quality, communication and coping patterns, interpersonal misunderstandings and expectations, and survivors' and spouses' depressive symptoms after…

  15. Level of Agreement between Self and Spouse in the Assessment of Personality Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Susan C.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.; Johnson, Jarrod; Turkheimer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Informant reports can provide important information regarding the presence of pathological personality traits, and they can serve as useful supplements to self-report instruments. Ratings from a spouse may be a particularly valuable source of personality assessment because spouses are very well acquainted with the target person, have typically…

  16. The Army Spouse: Perceptions of Educational Needs during Deployment and Nondeployment Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alicia G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare educational needs and goals during deployment and nondeployment of spouses of active-duty Army service members. The sample consisted of spouses of active-duty military service members from the Army brigades who had recently returned from a deployment or who were experiencing a deployment…

  17. Marital Therapy and Spouse Involvement in the Treatment of Depression, Agoraphobia, and Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Neil S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines literature on marital therapy and spouse involvement as treatments for major psychopathology, focusing on depression, agoraphobia, and alcoholism. For each disorder, examines relation between marital dynamics and disorder and discusses empirical efforts to evaluate impact of marital therapy or spouse involvement on disorder. Summarizes…

  18. 20 CFR 222.15 - When spouse is living with employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When spouse is living with employee. 222.15 Section 222.15 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Wife, Husband, or Widow(er) § 222.15 When spouse is living...

  19. The Marital and Family Functioning of Adults with ADHD and Their Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, L.; Minde, K.; Hechtman, L.; Ochs, E.; Krane, E.; Bouffard, R.; Greenfield, B.; Looper, K.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the family relationships of adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Thus, the marital adjustment and family functioning of 33 married adults with ADHD and their spouses was compared to 26 non-ADHD control participants and their spouses. Results revealed that married adults with ADHD reported poorer…

  20. 5 CFR 838.912 - Specifying an award of a former spouse survivor annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... survivor annuity. 838.912 Section 838.912 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... in Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Identification of Benefits § 838.912 Specifying an award of a former spouse survivor annuity. (a) To satisfy the requirements of §...

  1. 22 CFR 19.11-2 - Regular survivor annuity for a former spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regular survivor annuity for a former spouse... survivor annuity for a former spouse. (a) Divorce prior to retirement. If a participant or former... share of such a principal's maximum regular survivor annuity (based on service performed prior to...

  2. 5 CFR 838.933 - Payment of the cost of a former spouse survivor annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... survivor annuity. 838.933 Section 838.933 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... in Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Miscellaneous Provisions § 838.933 Payment of the cost of a former spouse survivor annuity. (a) A court order that unequivocally awards a...

  3. 5 CFR 838.921 - Determining the amount of a former spouse survivor annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... survivor annuity. 838.921 Section 838.921 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... in Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Computation of Benefit § 838.921 Determining the amount of a former spouse survivor annuity. (a) A court order that contains no...

  4. 5 CFR 846.722 - Former spouse's consent to an election of FERS coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Extension, or Search, to request a waiver of the former spouse consent requirement or to request an... a completed SF 3111, Request for Waiver, Extension, or Search, to request OPM to determine whether...) Documentary corroboration such as newspaper reports about the former spouse's disappearance. (iii)...

  5. 20 CFR 725.216 - Determination of relationship; surviving divorced spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of relationship; surviving... Benefits) § 725.216 Determination of relationship; surviving divorced spouse. An individual will be considered to be the surviving divorced spouse of a deceased miner in a claim considered under this part...

  6. 20 CFR 725.217 - Determination of dependency; surviving divorced spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; surviving... Benefits) § 725.217 Determination of dependency; surviving divorced spouse. An individual who is the miner's surviving divorced spouse (see § 725.216) shall be determined to have been dependent on the...

  7. 20 CFR 216.66 - Who is an employee's surviving divorced spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is an employee's surviving divorced... RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT ELIGIBILITY FOR AN ANNUITY Widow(er), Surviving Divorced Spouse, and Remarried Widow(er) Annuities § 216.66 Who is an employee's surviving divorced spouse. An individual who...

  8. Diabetes Distress and Depressive Symptoms: A Dyadic Investigation of Older Patients and Their Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Melissa M.; Lucas, Todd; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Rook, Karen S.; Gonzalez, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this dyadic study, we examined diabetes distress experienced by male and female patients and their spouses (N = 185 couples), and its association with depressive symptoms using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Diabetes-related distress reported by both patients and spouses was associated with each partner's own depressive symptoms…

  9. A Key Challenge in Global HRM: Adding New Insights to Existing Expatriate Spouse Adjustment Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ritu; Banerjee, Pratyush; Gaur, Jighyasu

    2012-01-01

    This study is an attempt to strengthen the existing knowledge about factors affecting the adjustment process of the trailing expatriate spouse and the subsequent impact of any maladjustment or expatriate failure. We conducted a qualitative enquiry using grounded theory methodology with 26 Indian spouses who had to deal with their partner's…

  10. Chronic Stress, Depression and Immunity in Spouses of Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Jane S. Blake; Sephton, Sandra E.; Kimerling, Rachel; Butler, Lisa; Bernstein, Aaron S.; Spiegel, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine how the chronicity of stress affects psychological stress-responses, depressive symptoms, and "in vivo" immunocompetence in spouses of women with metastatic breast cancer. Methods: Participants were 34 spouses of breast cancer patients. Their wives had been living with a diagnosis of…

  11. More Careful or Less Marriageable? Parental Divorce, Spouse Selection and Entry into Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erola, Jani; Harkonen, Juho; Dronkers, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Despite the large literature on the long-term effects of parental divorce, few studies have analyzed the effects of parental divorce on spouse selection behavior. However, the characteristics of one's spouse can have important effects on economic well-being and on marital success. We use discrete-time, event-history data from Finnish population…

  12. Friendly and Antagonistic Contact Between Former Spouses After Divorce : Patterns and Determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Tamar F.C.; Graaf, Paul M. de; Kalmijn, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    This study presents descriptive and explanatory analyses of contact between former spouses, using data on 1,791 previously married men andwomen in the Netherlands. The authors employ a typology of relationships between former spouses, differentiating between friendly contact, antagonistic contact, a

  13. Female-to-male transsexualism and sex roles: self and spouse ratings on the PAQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, M Z; MacGowan, B R; Salt, P

    1984-02-01

    The sex-role-based perceptions of self and spouse in a group of female-to-male transsexuals, their wives, and a matched control group were studied. Each participant was given four copies of the Personal Attributes Questionnaire and asked to rate self, spouse, ideal self, and ideal spouse. The transsexual group rated themselves significantly higher than the control male group on the F scale, while there were no significant differences between the two groups on the M and M-F scales. The transsexuals' wives rated their spouses higher than did the control women on the F scale, and this difference approached significance. There were no significant differences between the spouse ratings of these two groups on the M and M-F scales. These results are discussed in terms of the relationship between sex role and gender identity and in terms of the theories that propose role strain as the cause of transsexualism.

  14. The effect of a structured intervention on caregivers of patients with dementia and problem behaviors: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Alessandro; Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Liscio, Mariarosaria; Petrucci, Bianca; Porro, Gabriella Salvini

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effect of a structured intervention on caregiver stress and the institutionalization rate of patients with dementia and problem behaviors. Caregivers contacting the Federazione Alzheimer Italia (AI) to receive help, advice, or information in relation to problem behaviors of outpatients were enrolled. Eligible caregiver-patient dyads were randomized to receive either a structured intervention or the counseling AI usually provides (control group). After basal assessment, families were reassessed at 6 and 12 months. Problem behavior (particularly agitation) was the only variable significantly correlated (P = 0.006) with the baseline caregivers' stress score. Thirty-nine families completed the 12-month follow-up; the mean problem behavior score was significantly lower in the intervention than the control group (p < 0.03); the time needed for care of the patient increased by 0.5 +/- 9.7 hours/day in the control group and decreased by 0.3 +/- 4.1 in the intervention group (p = 0.4, Wilcoxon test). The main determinant of institutionalization seemed to be the level of caregiver stress (p = 0.03). In patients of the intervention group, there was a significant reduction in the frequency of delusions. This pilot study suggests that caregiver stress is relieved by a structured intervention. The number of families lost to follow-up, the relatively short duration of the study, and the ceiling effect due to the severity of the clinical characteristics of patients probably all partly dilute the observed findings.

  15. Chronic psychosocial stress: does it modulate immunity to the influenza vaccine in Hong Kong Chinese elderly caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samuel Yeung Shan; Wong, Chun Kwok; Chan, Frank Wan Kin; Chan, Paul K S; Ngai, Karry; Mercer, Stewart; Woo, Jean

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies evaluated the effects of psychosocial stress on influenza vaccine responses. However, there were methodological limitations. This study aims to determine whether chronic stress is associated with poorer influenza-specific immune responses to influenza vaccines in Hong Kong Chinese elderly people. This is a prospective study with a 12-week follow-up. Subjects were recruited from government general out-patient clinics, non-government organizations, and public housing estates in Hong Kong. Participants include 55 caregivers of spouses with chronic conditions that impaired their activities of daily living and 61 age- and sex-matched non-caregivers. A single-dose trivalent influenza vaccine was given to all subjects by intramuscular ingestion. Blood samples were collected before vaccination, at 6 weeks, and at 12 weeks after vaccination. Influenza vaccine strain-specific antibody titers were measured by the hemagglutination inhibition method. Lymphocyte subsets were analyzed for ratios and absolute counts, and cytokine concentration were measured by flow cytometry. Validated scales were used to assess psychological (depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and caregiver strain), social (multidimensional social support scale), and lifestyle factors (physical exercise, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption) at baseline prior to vaccination. Demographic and socioeconomic variables were also collected. Albumin levels were measured as an indicator for nutritional status in subjects. Caregivers had statistically significant (p < 0.05) lower cell-mediated immune responses to influenza vaccination at 12 weeks when compared with those of the controls. No differences in humoral immune response to vaccination were observed between caregivers and controls. Hong Kong Chinese elderly who experience chronic stress have a significantly lower cell-mediated immune response to influenza vaccination when compared with non-caregivers.

  16. Low level of stroke care awareness among stroke patients’ caregivers: an important but neglected area of stroke care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Stroke patients require longterm care for better outcome. Most often family members are the back bone of the service provided to people affected by stroke. Stroke patients and their caregivers are known to have large gaps in stroke knowledge and have suboptimal personal health behaviors, thereby putting the patient at high risk for complications. Our study was designed to explore the stroke care awareness among stroke patients' caregivers. Methods 50 stroke caregivers aged >18 years from neurology ward of College of Medical Sciences-Teaching Hospital were selected by non-probability purposive sampling from June 2012 to July 2012. Questionnaire focusing basic stroke care was prepared by researchers with the help of literature and a neurophysician. Validity and reliability of the tools were tested and data collected. Analysis of collected data was done using SPSS 16.0. Results The mean age of the respondents was 40 years (range: 20-80 years. Thirty-nine (78% were either spouse or children. Thirty-eight (76% caregivers were literate. Overall, 27 (54% caregivers had low level of awareness regarding stroke care and mean knowledge score was 23.7. Conclusion This study has revealed the existence of low level of stroke care awareness amongst stroke caregivers. Interventional education program oriented to address this important yet neglected area can improve the stroke care in countries like Nepal where recent advancement for stroke management is lacking.   Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-3, 1-8 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i3.10208    

  17. Caregivers' burden in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Peña-Longobardo, Luz María; Oliva-Moreno, Juan; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a very prevalent and invalidating disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the burden borne by informal caregivers of patients with COPD. We used the Survey on Disabilities, Personal Autonomy, and Dependency Situations (Encuesta sobre Discapacidad, Autonomía personal y Situaciones de Dependencia [EDAD]-2008) to obtain information on the characteristics of disabled individuals with COPD and their caregivers in Spain. Additionally, statistical multivariate analyses were performed to analyze the impact that an increase in dependence would have on the problems for which caregivers provide support, in terms of health, professional, and leisure/social dimensions. A total of 461,884 individuals with one or more disabilities and with COPD were identified, and 220,892 informal caregivers were estimated. Results showed that 35% of informal caregivers had health-related problems due to the caregiving provided; 83% had leisure/social-related problems; and among caregivers of working age, 38% recognized having profession-related problems. The probability of a problem arising was significantly associated with the degree of dependence of the patient receiving care. Caregivers of patients with great dependence showed a 39% higher probability of presenting health-related problems, 27% more professional problems, and 23% more leisure problems compared with those with nondependent patients. The results show the large impact on society in terms of the welfare of informal caregivers of patients with COPD. A higher level of dependence was associated with more severe problems in caregivers, in all dimensions.

  18. Cross-national differences in the prevalence and correlates of burden among older family caregivers in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahly, V.; Chatterji, S.; Gruber, M. J.; Al-Hamzawi, A.; Alonso, J.; Andrade, L. H.; Angermeyer, M. C.; Bruffaerts, R.; Bunting, B.; Caldas-de-Almeida, J. M.; de Girolamo, G.; de Jonge, P.; Florescu, S.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; Hinkov, H. R.; Hu, C.; Karam, E. G.; Lépine, J.-P.; Levinson, D.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Posada-Villa, J.; Sampson, N. A.; Trivedi, J.K.; Viana, M. C.; Kessler, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current trends in population aging affect both recipients and providers of informal family caregiving, as the pool of family caregivers is shrinking while demand is increasing. Epidemiologic research has not yet examined the implications of these trends for burdens experienced by aging family caregivers. Methods Cross-sectional community surveys in 20 countries asked 13,892 respondents ages 50+ about the objective (time, financial) and subjective (distress, embarrassment) burdens they experience in providing care to first-degree relatives with 12 broadly-defined serious physical and mental conditions. Differential burden was examined by country income category, kinship status, and type of condition. Results Among the 26.9-42.5% respondents in high, upper-middle, and low/lower-middle income countries reporting serious relative health conditions, 35.7-42.5% reported burden. Of those, 25.2-29.0% spent time and 13.5-19.4% money, while 24.4-30.6% felt distress and 6.4-21.7% embarrassment. Mean caregiving hours/week given any was 16.6-23.6 (169.9-205.8 hours/week/100 people ages 50+). Burden in low/lower-middle income countries was 2-3-fold higher than in higher income countries, with financial burden given any averaging 14.3% of median family income in high, 17.7% in upper-middle, and 39.8% in low/lower-middle income countries. Higher burden was reported by women than men and for conditions of spouses and children than parents or siblings. Conclusions Uncompensated family caregiving is an important societal asset that offsets rising formal healthcare costs. However, the substantial burdens experienced by aging caregivers across multiple family health conditions and geographic regions threaten the continued integrity of their caregiving capacity. Initiatives supporting older family caregivers are consequently needed, especially in low/lower-middle income countries. PMID:22877824

  19. 38 CFR 21.3102 - Required counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required counseling. 21.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3102 Required counseling. (a) Child. The VA counseling psychologist will provide counseling and assist in preparing the educational plan only if the eligible child or his or...

  20. 38 CFR 21.7100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7100... Bill-Active Duty) Counseling § 21.7100 Counseling. A veteran or servicemember may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is (1)...

  1. Social support, caregiving, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L; Funk, Laura M

    2011-09-01

    This article reviews the international English-language literature on social support and caregiving in gerontology since the early 1990s. The literature has grown, but consensus on the terms' meaning and measurement is lacking. Interest is ongoing in practical help, in benefits of social support, and in demands and negative outcomes for caregivers, with growing but less emphasis on more theoretical questions, on negative outcomes from the receipt of support, and on positive consequences of providing care. Nevertheless, social support is duly recognized as a social determinant of health and receiving attention at policy levels - both are significant shifts from two decades ago and add to the interest this area will receive from researchers in coming decades. There remain many unanswered questions regarding the changing societal context, but it is clear that the social support of others - throughout our lives including old age - will continue in the future, albeit in ever-changing forms.

  2. Life worth living for caregiving and caregiver burden among Japanese caregivers of the disabled elderly in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kazushi; Momose, Yumiko; Fujino, Ayumi; Osawa, Yukari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between life worth living and caregiver burden among caregivers in Japan. We used 111 caregivers of frail elders who completed a self-administered questionnaire including the 8 items developed by Arai et al. (J-ZBI) used as a scale to measure subjective burdens and psychological factors used as covariates other than life worth living. Total score (0-32) of the J-ZBI was dichotomized into "high burden" (> or =21 points) and "low burden" (worth living was significantly associated with caregiver burden. The direct effect of life worth living on caregiver burden (92.9%) was much greater than the indirect effect (7.1%). Our findings suggest that the increase of the sense of life worth living may play an important role in the prevention of the development of caregiver burden.

  3. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart I of... - Recommended Language for Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities A Appendix A to Subpart I of Part 838 Administrative Personnel... RETIREMENT BENEFITS Terminology Used in Court Orders Awarding Former Spouse Survivor Annuities Pt. 838, Subpt... Spouse Survivor Annuities This appendix provides recommended language for use in court orders...

  4. 76 FR 18811 - Submission for Review: Letter Reply To Request for Information (RI 20-64), Former Spouse Survivor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Letter Reply To Request for Information (RI 20-64), Former Spouse Survivor Annuity Election (RI 20-64A), Information on Electing a Survivor Annuity for Your Former Spouse (RI 20-64B... Reply to Request for Information, RI 20-64, and Former Spouse Survivor Annuity Election, RI 20-64A....

  5. 20 CFR 404.1577 - Disability defined for widows, widowers, and surviving divorced spouses for monthly benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... surviving divorced spouses for monthly benefits payable for months prior to January 1991. 404.1577 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Widows, Widowers, and Surviving Divorced Spouses § 404.1577 Disability defined for widows, widowers, and surviving divorced spouses for monthly...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1578 - How we determine disability for widows, widowers, and surviving divorced spouses for monthly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., widowers, and surviving divorced spouses for monthly benefits payable for months prior to January 1991. 404... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Widows, Widowers, and Surviving Divorced Spouses § 404.1578 How we determine disability for widows, widowers, and surviving divorced spouses...

  7. Autonomous caregiver following robotic wheelchair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, E. Venkata; Sivaramalingam, Sethurajan; Vignesh, A. Sri; Vasanth, Elanthendral; Joans, S. Mary

    2011-12-01

    In the last decade, a variety of robotic/intelligent wheelchairs have been proposed to meet the need in aging society. Their main research topics are autonomous functions such as moving toward some goals while avoiding obstacles, or user-friendly interfaces. Although it is desirable for wheelchair users to go out alone, caregivers often accompany them. Therefore we have to consider not only autonomous functions and user interfaces but also how to reduce caregivers' load and support their activities in a communication aspect. From this point of view, we have proposed a robotic wheelchair moving with a caregiver side by side based on the MATLAB process. In this project we discussing about robotic wheel chair to follow a caregiver by using a microcontroller, Ultrasonic sensor, keypad, Motor drivers to operate robot. Using camera interfaced with the DM6437 (Davinci Code Processor) image is captured. The captured image are then processed by using image processing technique, the processed image are then converted into voltage levels through MAX 232 level converter and given it to the microcontroller unit serially and ultrasonic sensor to detect the obstacle in front of robot. In this robot we have mode selection switch Automatic and Manual control of robot, we use ultrasonic sensor in automatic mode to find obstacle, in Manual mode to use the keypad to operate wheel chair. In the microcontroller unit, c language coding is predefined, according to this coding the robot which connected to it was controlled. Robot which has several motors is activated by using the motor drivers. Motor drivers are nothing but a switch which ON/OFF the motor according to the control given by the microcontroller unit.

  8. Caring for caregivers and patients: Research and clinical priorities for informal cancer caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Erin E; Rowland, Julia H; Northouse, Laurel; Litzelman, Kristin; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Timura, Catherine; O'Mara, Ann; Huss, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Informal/family caregivers are a fundamental source of care for cancer patients in the United States, yet the population of caregivers and their tasks, psychosocial needs, and health outcomes are not well understood. Changes in the nature of cancer care and its delivery, along with the growing population of survivors and their caregivers, warrant increased attention to the roles and demands of caregiving. This article reviews current evidence presented at a 2-day meeting examining the state of the science of informal cancer caregiving that was convened by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Nursing Research. The meeting sought to define who is an informal cancer caregiver, summarize the state of the science in informal cancer caregiving, and describe both the kinds of interventions developed to address caregiving challenges and the various outcomes used to evaluate their impact. This article offers recommendations for moving science forward in 4 areas: 1) improving the estimation of the prevalence and burden of informal cancer caregiving; 2) advancing the development of interventions designed to improve outcomes for cancer patients, caregivers, and patient-caregiver dyads; 3) generating and testing strategies for integrating caregivers into formal health care settings; and 4) promoting the use of technology to support informal cancer caregivers. Cancer 2016;122:1987-95. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  9. 45 CFR 2555.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 2555.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance...

  10. 34 CFR 106.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling...

  11. 32 CFR 196.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 196.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling...

  12. 45 CFR 618.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 618.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance...

  13. Family routines within the ecological niche: An analysis of the psychological well-being of U.S. caregivers of children with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ann Larson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using mixed methods, this study examined the relationship of caregivers of children with disabilities’ psychological well-being and their orchestration of daily routines within their ecological niche. Thirty-nine U.S. caregivers completed in-depth interviews, Psychological Well-being Scales (PWB, and Family Time and Routines Index (FTRI. We used a multi-step analysis. Interview data was coded and vignettes created without knowledge of PWB and FTRI ratings. Next, the relationship of quantitative measures was analyzed. Four groups were created using FTRI-extent and PWB means: (1 low routine-low PWB, (2 low routine-high PWB, (3 high routine-low PWB, and (4 high routine-high PWB. We examined qualitative differences in key features between groups. Findings: Total PWB and FTRI scores were not significantly correlated, PWB Purpose in Life and FTRI-extent scores were moderately positively correlated, and PWB Environmental Mastery and FTRI-extent correlation approached significance. Qualitative findings describe caregivers’ structuring of routines, intensity of oversight, support in routines, management of dinner, paid work, and needs for respite. The four groups differed in paid work, household support, degree the child could self-occupy, Environmental Mastery, and opportunities to recuperate. Caregivers with higher levels of well-being and more regular routines did paid work, had supportive spouses, had children who more often could follow routines, had higher Environmental Mastery, could orchestrate a family meal, and had breaks from care in either work or leisure. All Native American caregivers and Mexican American caregivers with spouses were in the high routine-high PWB group. Insight into this complex negotiation between family members within daily routines may provide practitioners a better understanding of how to work within family circles to foster therapeutic alliances, identify focused intervention targets, and promote positive family

  14. Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit for Stroke Caregivers: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Tamilyn; Austin, Joan K; Habermann, Barbara; Jessup, Nenette M; McLennon, Susan M; Mitchell, Pamela H; Morrison, Gwendolyn; Yang, Ziyi; Stump, Timothy E; Weaver, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    There are few evidence-based programs for stroke family caregivers postdischarge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy of the Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit (TASK II), a nurse-led intervention enabling caregivers to build skills based on assessment of their own needs. A total of 254 stroke caregivers (primarily female TASK II/information, support, and referral 78.0%/78.6%; white 70.7%/72.1%; about half spouses 48.4%/46.6%) were randomized to the TASK II intervention (n=123) or to an information, support, and referral group (n=131). Both groups received 8 weekly telephone sessions, with a booster at 12 weeks. General linear models with repeated measures tested efficacy, controlling for patient hospital days and call minutes. Prespecified 8-week primary outcomes were depressive symptoms (with Patient Health Questionnaire Depressive Symptom Scale PHQ-9 ≥5), life changes, and unhealthy days. Among caregivers with baseline PHQ-9 ≥5, those randomized to the TASK II intervention had a greater reduction in depressive symptoms from baseline to 8, 24, and 52 weeks and greater improvement in life changes from baseline to 12 weeks compared with the information, support, and referral group (Pcaregivers randomized to the TASK II intervention had a relatively greater reduction in unhealthy days from baseline to 8 weeks (Pcaregivers with mild to severe depressive symptoms. The TASK II intervention reduced unhealthy days for the total sample, although not sustained over the long term. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01275495. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Factors associated with third-party disability in spouses of older people with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, Nerina; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This study had two aims: (1) to describe the extent of third-party disability in a sample of spouses of older people with hearing impairment, and (2) to investigate factors associated with third-party hearing disability. Third-party disability is defined as the disability and functioning of family members as a result of the health condition of their significant other. One hundred older spouses who had partners with hearing impairment participated. All assessments were self-reported, and included a set of measures (the 36-item Significant Other Scale for Hearing Disability, SOS-HEAR; the Relationship Assessment Scale; and the Significant Other Assessment of Communication) administered to the target population of normally hearing older spouses, and those administered to the hearing impaired partners of the spouses in the study (the Self Assessment of Communication). To address the first aim, descriptive statistics were used to describe the extent of third-party hearing disability in the spouses. To address the second aim, binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with third-party hearing disability. Factors investigated were focused on the spouse (e.g., spouse perception of relationship satisfaction) and on the partners with hearing impairment (e.g., partners' level of hearing impairment). Most spouses (98%) reported some degree of third-party hearing disability on at least one item of the SOS-HEAR, with the majority reporting a mild disability. Three risk factors were found to be significantly associated with severe or complete third-party disability: lower relationship satisfaction as reported by the spouse (Relationship Assessment Scale), spousal age difference, and spouse perception of their partner's hearing disability (Significant Other Assessment of Communication). Partners' level of hearing impairment, self-reported hearing disability (Self Assessment of Communication), use of hearing aids, and spouse satisfaction that their

  16. Impact of Spouse's Opiate Dependence on the Partner's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Noori

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to evaluate the influence of drug dependency on sexual function of wives of opium addicts.Materials and methods: In a cross-sectional study, 150 wives of opiate dependent men were assessed for the impact of drug addiction. Sociodemographic factors like age, educational level, job, marital duration and having child were evaluated. Sexual function was measured using relationship and sexuality scale (RSS. Results: Approximately 73% of the participitants were sexually active with having at least one intercourse in the last 2 weeks, and approximately half of the participitants had unsatisfied intercourse. About ninety percent reported negative effect of the addiction on their sexual life. After the spouse addiction, sexual desire, ability to reach orgasm and frequency of sexual intercourse were decreased in 73%, 64% and 67.3%, respectively. Conclusion: The wives of opiate addicts believe that their sexual function has been impaired by the addiction of their husbands.

  17. A web-based program for informal caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease: an iterative user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho-Lacroix, Victoria; Moulin, Florence; Wrobel, Jérémy; Batrancourt, Bénédicte; Plichart, Matthieu; De Rotrou, Jocelyne; Cantegreil-Kallen, Inge; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-09-15

    Web-based programs have been developed for informal caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease (PWAD). However, these programs can prove difficult to adopt, especially for older people, who are less familiar with the Internet than other populations. Despite the fundamental role of usability testing in promoting caregivers' correct use and adoption of these programs, to our knowledge, this is the first study describing this process before evaluating a program for caregivers of PWAD in a randomized clinical trial. The objective of the study was to describe the development process of a fully automated Web-based program for caregivers of PWAD, aiming to reduce caregivers' stress, and based on the user-centered design approach. There were 49 participants (12 health care professionals, 6 caregivers, and 31 healthy older adults) that were involved in a double iterative design allowing for the adaptation of program content and for the enhancement of website usability. This process included three component parts: (1) project team workshops, (2) a proof of concept, and (3) two usability tests. The usability tests were based on a mixed methodology using behavioral analysis, semistructured interviews, and a usability questionnaire. The user-centered design approach provided valuable guidelines to adapt the content and design of the program, and to improve website usability. The professionals, caregivers (mainly spouses), and older adults considered that our project met the needs of isolated caregivers. Participants underlined that contact between caregivers would be desirable. During usability observations, the mistakes of users were also due to ergonomics issues from Internet browsers and computer interfaces. Moreover, negative self-stereotyping was evidenced, when comparing interviews and results of behavioral analysis. Face-to-face psycho-educational programs may be used as a basis for Web-based programs. Nevertheless, a user-centered design approach involving targeted

  18. Caregiver Burden in Fragile X Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosif, Ana-Maria; Sciolla, Andres F; Brahmbhatt, Khyati; Seritan, Andreea L

    2013-02-01

    Complex caregiving issues occur in multigenerational families carrying the fragile X mutation and premutation. The same family members may care for children or siblings with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and for elderly parents with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Family caregivers experience anxiety, depression, neglect of personal health care needs, employment difficulties, and loss of social support, leading to isolation and further psychiatric consequences. There is growing awareness of caregiver burden with regard to parents of children with FXS, but much less is known about the needs of informal caregivers of patients with FXTAS. In this paper, we review the available literature to date and provide suggestions for further exploration of caregivers' needs. Evidence-based strategies to address these needs are included. Many more research studies exploring caregiver burden in multigenerational fragile X families are needed, as well as studies aimed at investigating interventions and their impact on reduction.

  19. Caregiver Burden, Spirituality, and Psychological Well-Being of Parents Having Children with Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anum, Jawaria; Dasti, Rabia

    2016-06-01

    The research determined the relationship of caregiving burden, spirituality and psychological well-being of parents of Pakistani thalassemic patients in a crosssectional research design. The sociodemographic form, Montgomery-Borgatta burden measure (Montgomery et al. in Who should care for the elderly? An east-west value divide. World Scientific, River Edge, pp 27-54, 2000), Multidimensional Measure of Islamic Spirituality (Dasti and Sitwat in J Muslim Ment Health 8(2):47-67, 2014. doi: 10.3998/jmmh.10381607.0008.204 ) and Ryff Scale of Psychological Well-being (Ryff in J Pers Soc Psychol 57(6):1069-1081, 1989. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.57.6.1069 ) were administered on a sample of 80 parents (32 fathers and 48 mothers) recruited from different Thalassemic Centers of Lahore city, Pakistan. Data were analyzed through correlation and mediational analyses. Results indicated that the caregiver burden was negatively correlated with the psychological well-being and the domains of spirituality, while the psychological well-being and spirituality were positively correlated. We identified that the caregiver burden has direct effect on the psychological well-being of the parents and it influences the psychological well-being through the pathway of the two domains of spirituality, i.e., self-discipline and meanness-generosity. These results highlighted the role of spirituality upon the psychological well-being of caregivers, which could be utilized to prevent pathological influences (such as hard feelings, hopelessness, depressed mood, anxiety, and relationship problems) of caregiver burden and enhance psychological well-being through spiritual counseling. Caregivers can work on their well-being and burden by disciplining their lives and forgoing hard feelings toward others.

  20. Predictors of caregiving satisfaction in informal caregivers of people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Labra, Carmen; C. Millan Calenti, Jose; Buján, Ana;

    2015-01-01

    attention has been paid to the positive aspects of caregiving. The aim of the present work was to study the phenomenon of caregiving satisfaction in informal caregivers of people with dementia by assessing their likely predictors. Methods: A stress process model was used to study caregiver’s satisfaction......Objective: The prevalence of dementia is increasing and consequently the demands from families, institutions and healthcare system. Although a substantial amount of research on caregiving has emphasized the negative aspects of caregiving, specifically on caregiver burden and depression, less...... (measured using the Revised Caregiving Satisfaction Scale) on 101 informal caregivers of patients with dementia in relation to the caregiver’s background and context, stress-related factors, and mediators. Results: The regression model has an adjusted R2 of 0.20, which indicates that having a consanguinity...

  1. Study of factors determining caregiver burden among primary caregivers of patients with intracranial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Dhandapani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Behavioral changes in patients (especially irritability and financial constraints had a significant independent impact on the burden experienced by primary caregivers of patients operated for intracranial tumors. Identifying and managing, these are essential for reducing caregiver burden.

  2. Video teaching program on management of colostomy: Evaluation of its impact on caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heena Dabas

    2016-01-01

    effective in bringing about an increase in the knowledge and skill of caregivers of children having colostomy. Therefore, video can be utilized for the counselling of caregivers of children with colostomy.

  3. Needs of family caregivers of stroke patients: a longitudinal study of caregivers’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai PC

    2015-03-01

    caregivers’ perspectives. Relevant information and counseling should be provided to family caregivers to help them access support when needed.Keywords: chronic illness, family needs, transitional care

  4. Examining Multicultural Counseling Competencies of Rehabilitation Counseling Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Chandra M.

    2008-01-01

    There has been little examination of multicultural counseling competencies of rehabilitation counselor trainees. The current study examined competency development (knowledge, skills and awareness) of 68 rehabilitation counseling master's degree students across six universities. Results indicate that students did not demonstrate competence in…

  5. Counseling without Truth: Toward a Neopragmatic Foundation for Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James T.

    2007-01-01

    The author presents an overview of contemporary developments in philosophy regarding the status of truth and discusses the implications of these ideas for the practice of counseling. Counseling without truth is presented as a desirable option when a neopragmatic frame of reference is adopted.

  6. Addiction Counseling Accreditation: CACREP's Role in Solidifying the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Culbreth, Jack R.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs' (CACREP) role in furthering the specialty of addiction counseling. After sharing a brief history and the role of counselor certification and licensure, the authors share the process whereby CACREP developed the first set of…

  7. Abortion Counseling and the School Counselor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jack A.; Moffett, Catherine F.

    1974-01-01

    Abortion counseling is now legally within the purview of the school counselor. It is therefore essential that counselors determine their role in abortion counseling, the kind of training necessary, and whether professional organizations should develop counseling guidelines. (RP)

  8. Motivational Interviewing and Rehabilitation Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C. C.; McMahon, B. T.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores commonalities between rehabilitation counseling and the counseling approach known as motivational interviewing. Motivational interviewing is an empirically supported, clientcentered, directive counseling approach designed to promote client motivation and reduce motivational conflicts and barriers to change. The underpinnings…

  9. The Individual Differences Tradition in Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawis, Rene V.

    1992-01-01

    Traces historical development from individual differences psychology through psychological testing, vocational counseling, and student personnel work, to counseling psychology. Describes individual differences tradition in counseling psychology research and practice. Discusses how individual differences psychology has influenced counseling…

  10. Counseling in Turkey: An Evolving Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Guneri, Oya Yerin

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of counseling and addresses the current issues and future trends of counseling in Turkey. Special emphasis is placed on the factors that impede the development of school counseling as a discipline.

  11. Behavioral family counseling for substance abuse: a treatment development pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Timothy J; Murphy, Marie; Alter, Jane; Fals-Stewart, William

    2010-01-01

    Substance-dependent patients (N=29) living with a family member other than a spouse were randomly assigned to equally intensive treatments consisting of either (a) Behavioral Family Counseling (BFC) plus Individual-Based Treatment (IBT) or (b) IBT alone. Outcome data were collected at baseline, post-treatment, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. BFC patients remained in treatment significantly longer than IBT patients. BFC patients improved significantly from baseline at all time periods on all outcomes studied, and had a medium effect size reflecting better primary outcomes of increased abstinence and reduced substance use than IBT patients. For secondary outcomes of reduced negative consequences and improved relationship adjustment, both BFC and IBT patients improved significantly and to an equivalent extent. The present results show BFC is a promising method for retaining patients in treatment, increasing abstinence, and reducing substance use. These results also provide support for larger scale, randomized trials examining the efficacy of behavioral family counseling for patients living with family members beyond spouses.

  12. Daily verbal and nonverbal expression of osteoarthritis pain and spouse responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephanie J; Martire, Lynn M; Keefe, Francis J; Mogle, Jacqueline A; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Schulz, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The current study applied a model of pain communication to examine the distinction between verbal and nonverbal pain expression in their prediction of punishing, empathic, and solicitous spouse responses to patient pain. It was hypothesized that on days when patients engaged in more nonverbal expression, spouses would respond more positively (ie, with less punishing and more solicitous and empathic behavior). The same pattern was predicted for verbal expression. In addition, it was expected that associations between patient nonverbal pain expression and positive spouse responses would be strengthened, and that the association with punishing responses would be weakened, on days when levels of verbal pain expression were higher than usual, regardless of daily pain severity. In a 22-day diary study, 144 individuals with knee osteoarthritis and their spouses completed daily measures of pain expression, spouse responses, health, and affect. The predicted positive main effect of nonverbal expression on empathic and solicitous responses was supported by the data, as was the positive main effect for verbal pain expression. Results from moderation analyses partially supported our hypothesis in that patients' nonverbal pain expression was even more strongly related to empathic and solicitous spouse responses on days of high verbal pain expression, and patients were buffered from spouse punishing responses on days when both nonverbal and verbal expression were high. These findings suggest that pain expression in both verbal and nonverbal modes of communication is important for positive and negative spousal responses.

  13. [Informal caregivers of elderly people in South Tyrol. A qualitative assessment of home care situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Mantovan, Franco; Innerhofer, Esther; Götsch, Ingrid; Ploner, Elfriede; Them, Christa

    2009-11-01

    Within the framework of a pilot project in the sanitary district of Bruneck (sanitary establishment of South Tyrol), the concept of care management is being investigated both practically and scientifically for informal caregivers of elderly people in need of care since 2009 the results of the qualitative assessment of the homecare situation. The assessment before the intervention will form the basis for further design and implementation of individual stress-reducing and supportive offers for the informal caregivers. Using a semi structured interview guideline twelve problem-centered interviews with informal caregivers were conducted and analysed according to Mayring's content analysis technique (2007). Informal caregivers are exposed to burdens in social, physical and mental areas. Own resources, family ties and support reduce stress and burdens caused by the homecare situation. The need of individual and continuous support of families and implications for further measures of care management can be deduced from the results. There is a need of support in the areas coping strategies, empowerment and direct stress reduction with regard to the homecare situation through education, training, counselling and the interconnection of social and health services.

  14. Caregiver Perceptions and Child-Caregiver Interactions in a Newly Inclusive Infant Child Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Susan L.; Berr, Christy N.; Hsiung, Madeline

    1998-01-01

    Explored caregivers' perceptions concerning inclusion of infants and toddlers with special needs, as well as their actual behaviors toward these children. Findings indicated that while individual differences in infant behavior may affect caregiving need more than differences specific to a particular risk condition, caregivers' perceptions about…

  15. Caregiving demands and caregivers' psychological outcomes : The mediating role of perceived injustice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Somayyeh; de Boer, Maaike J; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariët

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study hypothesized that higher caregiving demands are related to higher perceived injustice. Furthermore, this study investigated the mediating role of perceived injustice in the link between caregiving demands and caregivers' psychological well-being. Design: A cross-sectional desi

  16. Caregiving for Dementia in Family Members: Caregiving Burden and Prospects for Effective Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Robert J.; And Others

    Caring for a family member with dementia is a major source of stress for the caregiver. To assess the impact of caring for an impaired family member and to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs, 34 caregivers of relatives with dementia completed an amended form of the Philadelphia Geriatric Center's Caregiver Survey and two…

  17. Anxiety and depression associated with caregiver burden in caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denno, Melissa S; Gillard, Patrick J; Graham, Glenn D; DiBonaventura, Marco D; Goren, Amir; Varon, Sepi F; Zorowitz, Richard

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between anxiety/depression and caregiver burden in informal caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity. Data were collected via online surveys from informal caregivers 18 years or older who cared for stroke survivors. Internet-based survey. 2007 through 2009 U.S. National Health and Wellness Survey database or Lightspeed Research general panel respondents (N=153). Not applicable. Anxiety and depression were self-reported by the caregiver as a physician diagnosis. Depression severity was measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Caregiver burden was measured by the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) and the Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS). Logistic regression analyses were conducted with anxiety, depression, and the PHQ-9 depression severity categories as a result of each caregiver burden scale. Data were analyzed for 153 informal caregivers; they were mostly women (70.6%) and white (78.4%), with a mean age of 51.6 years. For every 1-point increase in the OCBS Difficulty Scale, the odds of anxiety or depression were 2.57 times as great (Pcaregiver burden increases, caregivers are more likely to have anxiety and depression. Depression severity also increases. Providing treatment to stroke survivors with spasticity that lessens the time and more importantly, the difficulty of caregiving may lead to a reduction in caregiver anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring negative and positive caregiving experiences: A psychometric analysis of the Caregiver Strain Index Expanded

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, WJ; Post, MWM; Meily, JMA

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the psychometric properties of the Caregiver Strain Index Expanded with those of the original Caregiver Strain Index among partners of stroke patients. Design and subjects: Cross-sectional validation study among 173 caregivers of stroke patients six months post-stroke. Main

  19. Correlates and consequences of the disclosure of pain-related distress to one's spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Annmarie; Leong, Laura E M; Williams, Amy M; May, Dana K K; Lutz, Jillian R

    2012-12-01

    The communication of pain has received a great deal of attention in the pain literature; however, one form of pain communication--emotional disclosure of pain-related distress (e.g., sadness, worry, anger about pain)--has not been studied extensively. This study examined the extent to which this form of pain communication occurred during an observed conversation with one's spouse and also investigated the correlates and consequences of disclosure. Individuals with chronic pain (ICP) and their spouses (N=95 couples) completed several questionnaires regarding pain, psychological distress, and relationship distress as well as video recorded interactions about the impact of pain on their lives. Approximately two-thirds of ICPs (n=65) disclosed their pain-related distress to their spouses. ICPs who reported greater pain severity, ruminative catastrophizing and affective distress about pain, and depressive and anxiety symptoms were more likely to disclose their distress to their spouses. Spouses of ICPs who disclosed only once or twice were significantly less likely to invalidate their partners whereas spouses of ICPs who disclosed at a higher rate were significantly more likely to validate their partners. Furthermore, spouses were more likely to engage in invalidation after attempting more neutral or validating responses, suggesting an erosion of support when ICPs engaged in high rates of disclosure. Correlates of spousal invalidation included both spouses' helplessness catastrophizing, ICPs' affective distress about pain, and spouses' anxiety, suggesting that both partners' distress are implicated in maladaptive disclosure-response patterns. Findings are discussed in light of pain communication and empathy models of pain.

  20. [Counsel for traveling children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, F; Gendrel, D

    2013-01-01

    Consultation of child traveler has two main objectives: to assess of health risk related to the child's health status and history and also the risk related to travel environment; to counsel and prescribe preventive measure to reduce these travel health risks. The evaluation is based on physical examination and a detailed interview including personal history and information regarding the regions of proposed travel. Up to date knowledge of the epidemiology of visited sites, preventive measures and presumptive treatment is required. Essential health recommendations include, in case of exposure, prevention of malaria, arthropod borned diseases and vaccine preventable diseases. For all destinations advice regarding prevention of diarrhea, accident risks and aggravation of preexisting chronic diseases is needed. Universal primary prevention counselling is valuable for all travellers regardless of their age. In the case of children, special attention must be given to food and water hygiene, sun and heat exposure, swimming risks and transports security measures. Evaluation of risk and health education take time and often several visits are needed to complete the immunization schedule before departure.

  1. Breastfeeding counsel against cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prameela Kannan Kutty

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer potential by breastfeeding is not fully tapped in the light of the present knowledge of the subject. Literature indicates that breastmilk has anticancer action but may underestimate its full capacity. The protective spectrum within breastmilk hints on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of it as an anticancer tool. Exclusive breastfeeding could confer protection from carcinogenesis with a greater impact than realised. A literature review was conducted using four electronic databases. Selected areas were extracted after thorough perusal of the articles. The uninitiated would take exclusive breastfeeding seriously if actively counselled as an anticancer tool. Advice on details of the breastfeeding process and holistic information on breastfeeding may endow a greater impact among the skeptics. Counselling the breastfeeding mother on information sometimes not imparted, such as on maternal nutrition, details of the process of breastfeeding, benefits of direct breastfeeding versus milk expression and her psychosocial well being may make a difference in optimising anticancer action that exists in breastmilk. Additionally, its anticancer potential provides a platform to universally improve physical and psychosocial well being of women who breastfeed. Statistics of protection by breastfeeding in some maternal and childhood cancers are evident. “Bio-geno-immuno-nutrition” of breastmilk may shield the mother and infant from carcinogenesis in more ways than appreciated. The molecular basis of mother-to-infant signals and their “energies” need to be researched. Breastfeeding as a modifiable behaviour provides cost effective nutrition with potential for both cancer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy.

  2. Breastfeeding counsel against cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prameela Kannan Kutty

    2016-01-01

    The anticancer potential by breastfeeding is not fully tapped in the light of the present knowledge of the subject. Literature indicates that breastmilk has anticancer action but may underestimate its full capacity. The protective spectrum within breastmilk hints on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of it as an anticancer tool. Exclusive breastfeeding could confer protection from carcinogenesis with a greater impact than realised. A literature review was conducted using four electronic databases. Selected areas were extracted after thorough perusal of the articles. The uninitiated would take exclusive breastfeeding seriously if actively counselled as an anticancer tool. Advice on details of the breastfeeding process and holistic information on breastfeeding may endow a greater impact among the skeptics. Counselling the breastfeeding mother on information sometimes not imparted, such as on maternal nutrition, details of the process of breast-feeding, benefits of direct breastfeeding versus milk expression and her psychosocial well being may make a difference in optimising anticancer action that exists in breastmilk. Additionally, its anticancer potential provides a platform to universally improve physical and psychosocial well being of women who breastfeed. Statistics of protection by breastfeeding in some maternal and childhood cancers are evident. “Bio-geno-immuno-nutrition” of breastmilk may shield the mother and infant from carcinogenesis in more ways than appreciated. The molecular basis of mother-to-infant signals and their “en-ergies” need to be researched. Breastfeeding as a modifiable behaviour provides cost effective nutrition with potential for both cancer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy.

  3. Breastfeeding counsel against cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prameela Kannan Kutty

    2016-01-01

    The anticancer potential by breastfeeding is not fully tapped in the light of the present knowledge of the subject. Literature indicates that breastmilk has anticancer action but may underestimate its full capacity. The protective spectrum within breastmilk hints on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of it as an anticancer tool. Exclusive breastfeeding could confer protection from carcinogenesis with a greater impact than realised. A literature review was conducted using four electronic databases. Selected areas were extracted after thorough perusal of the articles. The uninitiated would take exclusive breastfeeding seriously if actively counselled as an anticancer tool. Advice on details of the breastfeeding process and holistic information on breastfeeding may endow a greater impact among the skeptics. Counselling the breastfeeding mother on information sometimes not imparted, such as on maternal nutrition, details of the process of breastfeeding, benefits of direct breastfeeding versus milk expression and her psychosocial well being may make a difference in optimising anticancer action that exists in breastmilk.Additionally, its anticancer potential provides a platform to universally improve physical and psychosocial well being of women who breastfeed. Statistics of protection by breastfeeding in some maternal and childhood cancers are evident. "Bio-geno-immunonutrition" of breastmilk may shield the mother and infant from carcinogenesis in more ways than appreciated. The molecular basis of mother-to-infant signals and their "energies" need to be researched. Breastfeeding as a modifiable behaviour provides cost effective nutrition with potential for both cancer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy.

  4. Rape: Counseling the Traumatized Victim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, P. Paul; Heppner, Mary

    1977-01-01

    There are at least three goals of intensive rape counseling: identifying and accepting feelings, reorienting perceptions, attributions, and self-statements, and resuming a normal lifestyle. Various counseling techniques can be employed to help rape victims restructure cognitions to reduce negative self-evaluations, physical distress, and loss of…

  5. Oedipal Issues in Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes current status of counseling psychology from perspective of Freudian, drive-structure theory. Argues that counseling psychology has committed classical response to oedipal conflict in its treatment of counselor education by identifying with aggressor (psychiatry and clinical psychology). Recommends more unified relationship between…

  6. Qualitative Research in Rehabilitation Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley-Maxwell, Cheryl; Al Hano, Ibrahim; Skivington, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative research approaches offer rehabilitation scholars and practitioners avenues into understanding the lives and experiences of people with disabilities and those people and systems with whom they interact. The methods used often parallel those used in counseling and appear to be well matched with the field of rehabilitation counseling.…

  7. Practicum Training in Gerontological Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Kathleen H.; Zarit, Steven H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a practicum model for mental health counselor training in gerontology which includes academic preparation and clinical values, assessment skills, beginning counseling techniques, advanced counseling skills, and administrative competence. Presents supervision, the placement process, and procedural issues surrounding practica. (Author/ABB)

  8. Client Motivation and Multicultural Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2011-01-01

    This reaction article comments on the major contribution titled "Motivation and Autonomy in Counseling, Psychotherapy, and Behavior Change: A Look at Theory and Practice." It first points out the article's strengths, the primary of which was to move the construct of motivation to the center of focus in the discussion of counseling. In addition,…

  9. Physical Attractiveness and Counseling Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Alice M.; Borkowski, John G.

    1982-01-01

    Searched for interaction between quality of counseling skills (presence or absence of empathy, genuineness, and positive regard) and physical attractiveness as determinants of counseling effectiveness. Attractiveness influenced perceived effectiveness of counselor's skill. Analyses of expectancy data revealed that only with good skills did…

  10. Physical Attractiveness and Counseling Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Alice M.; Borkowski, John G.

    1982-01-01

    Searched for interaction between quality of counseling skills (presence or absence of empathy, genuineness, and positive regard) and physical attractiveness as determinants of counseling effectiveness. Attractiveness influenced perceived effectiveness of counselor's skill. Analyses of expectancy data revealed that only with good skills did…

  11. School Counseling in China Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Timothy C.; Qiong, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the development of psychological thinking in China and social influences on the practice of school counseling today. Common problems of students are described, including anxiety due to pressure to perform well on exams, loneliness and social discomfort, and video game addiction. Counseling approaches used…

  12. Counseling Japanese Men on Fathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Atsuko; Becker, Kent W.; Akutsu, Motoko

    2006-01-01

    The authors review an article (J. Yamamoto & F. Tagami, 2004) published in the "Japanese Journal of Counseling Science" that described changes in contemporary Japanese family structures and illustrated a therapy process with a father to enhance the father-son relationship. Implications for the counseling profession in working with…

  13. Restructuring Guidance and Counseling Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Beverly A.; Daly, Timothy P.

    1993-01-01

    Briefly reviews counseling profession's call for revitalization and transformation in school counseling and guidance programs. Summarizes one school system's efforts during late 1980s and early 1990s to transform its program from services and crisis orientation into a comprehensive developmental model based on Myrick's developmental guidance and…

  14. Allegories and Symbols in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Victor I.; Cavazos, Lionel J.

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript describes how counselors can facilitate self-awareness in clients and counselors-in-training through the use of metaphors. The use of metaphors and others symbols provide a creative, non-intrusive, and non-confrontational approach to counseling. Examples of stories and fables used during counseling sessions and instructional…

  15. Oedipal Issues in Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes current status of counseling psychology from perspective of Freudian, drive-structure theory. Argues that counseling psychology has committed classical response to oedipal conflict in its treatment of counselor education by identifying with aggressor (psychiatry and clinical psychology). Recommends more unified relationship between…

  16. Family Caregivers in Cancer (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the challenges faced by family caregivers of cancer patients. This summary focuses on typical caregiver roles and concerns, and helpful interventions for caregivers.

  17. The mental health of elderly couples. II. Concordance for psychiatric morbidity in spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles, J M; Walker, L G; Blackwood, G W; Beattie, J A; Restall, D B

    1987-03-01

    A community sample of elderly married couples completed the 60-item General Health Questionnaire and the Leeds General Scales for the Self-Assessment of Depression and Anxiety. Significant concordance was demonstrated between the spouses' scores on these scales. Concordance was higher for depression than for anxiety. There was little to support previous findings that wives are more likely than husbands to be concordant with an ill spouse. The spouse concordance rates for psychiatric morbidity were similar to those found in studies of younger married couples.

  18. Spouse READI (Resilience Education and Deployment Information): Randomized Clinical Trial. Formerly Reintegration: The Role of Spouse Telephone BATTLEMIND Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    patients and caregivers (Nokes, Chew, & Altman, 2003; Stewart et al., 2001), chemotherapy patients (Alter et al., 1996), stroke patients (Hartke...King, R. (2003). Telephone group intervention for older stroke caregivers . Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 9, 65-81. Hazle, M., Wilcox, S. L...to report that stress or emotional problems impact their work or other activities (Hoge, Castro, & Eaton, 2006). Caregivers with higher levels

  19. 43 CFR 30.263 - May a surviving spouse reserve a life estate when a tribe exercises its statutory option to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a surviving spouse reserve a life... Interests Under Special Statutes § 30.263 May a surviving spouse reserve a life estate when a tribe... tribal purchase option is a surviving spouse, the spouse may reserve a life estate in one-half of...

  20. [The meaning of caregiving experience lived by Lebanese family caregivers of stroke survivors at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Samy; Kazan, Rima Sassine

    2015-03-01

    Introduction six million of deaths are due today to stroke, while stroke survivors will depend on their caregivers at home. As the literature noted in, these caregivers meet challenges and satisfactions, encouraging them to resort to adaptation strategies in order to cope with their care situation. The purpose of this article is to describe and understand the experience of Lebanese family caregivers who take care at home of a relative stroke survivor. Using the phenomenological approach of Giorgi (1997), twelve interviews were conducted with six family caregivers who have been recruited through a rehabilitation center in Beirut. Eight themes have emerged from the phenomenological analysis: the family caregiver burden, the missing social support, the learning through his experience of a family caregiver, the contribution to caregiving survivor, the selflessness in the caregiving, the gratitude in the caregiving, the familiarization with new routines and reconciliation with new lifestyle. The proposed essence from this phenomenological analysis is: the satisfaction in taking care of the stoke survivor by facing challenges and bringing order into the chaos caused by the stroke. The knowledge gained from this study would allow nurses to identify family caregivers at risk in order to help them to adapt to their new role as caregivers, and to develop health promotion strategies, taking into consideration their experience.

  1. Rural Stroke Caregivers: A Qualitative Study of the Positive and Negative Response to the Caregiver Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P D

    1998-01-01

    Caregivers are often referred to as the "hidden patients." Rarely has caregiving research focused on the positive aspects of caregiving. The purpose of this study was to investigate the lived experiences of caregivers of stroke survivors who have been in the caregiver role for at least 6 months poststroke. The conceptual framework was based on a combination of Lazarus' stress and coping theory and Weiner's attribution theory. A qualitative cross-sectional design was employed. It involved a sample of 10 caregivers from a rural county in Wyoming. A total of 24 categories were identified and five themes emerged: (1) a sense of loyalty; (2) acceptance; (3) a sense of "feeling good"; (4) satisfaction is associated with helping others; and (5) burden is associated with lifestyle change. Participants in this study reported several positive outcomes as well as some negative outcomes in regard to their role as caregivers.

  2. Predictors of caregiving satisfaction in informal caregivers of people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Labra, Carmen; C. Millan Calenti, Jose; Buján, Ana

    2015-01-01

    (measured using the Revised Caregiving Satisfaction Scale) on 101 informal caregivers of patients with dementia in relation to the caregiver’s background and context, stress-related factors, and mediators. Results: The regression model has an adjusted R2 of 0.20, which indicates that having a consanguinity...... attention has been paid to the positive aspects of caregiving. The aim of the present work was to study the phenomenon of caregiving satisfaction in informal caregivers of people with dementia by assessing their likely predictors. Methods: A stress process model was used to study caregiver’s satisfaction...... relationship with the care recipient, suffering from lower levels of subjective burden, and managing individuals with severe cognitive impairment are the most important predictors of higher caregiving satisfaction. Conclusion: Interventions focused on the enhancement of the caregiving satisfaction...

  3. Assessing Pain in Infancy: The Caregiver Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pillai Riddell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain is largely accepted as being influenced by social context. Unlike most other developmental stages throughout the lifespan, infancy is marked by complete dependence on the caregiver. The present paper discusses the primary importance of understanding the caregiver context when assessing infant pain expression.

  4. Cognitive and Socioemotional Caregiving in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    Enriching caregiving practices foster the course and outcome of child development. This study examined 2 developmentally significant domains of positive caregiving--cognitive and socioemotional--in more than 127,000 families with under-5 year children from 28 developing countries. Mothers varied widely in cognitive and socioemotional caregiving…

  5. Caregiver Burden in Epilepsy: Determinants and Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Karakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Caregiver burden (CB in epilepsy constitutes an understudied area. Here we attempt to identify the magnitude of this burden, the factors associated with it, and its impact to caregiver quality of life (QOL. Methods. 48 persons with epilepsy (PWE underwent video-EEG monitoring and their caregivers completed questionnaires providing demographic, disease-related, psychiatric, cognitive, sleep, QOL, and burden information. Results. On regression analysis, higher number of antiepileptic drugs, poorer patient neuropsychological performance, lower patient QOL score, and lower caregiver education level were associated with higher CB. Time allocated to patient care approximated but did not attain statistical significance. A moderate inverse correlation between CB and caregiver QOL physical component summary score and a stronger inverse correlation between CB and caregiver QOL mental component summary score were seen. Conclusion. In a selected cohort of PWE undergoing video-EEG monitoring, we identified modest degree of CB, comparable to that reported in the literature for other chronic neurological conditions. It is associated with specific patient and caregiver characteristics and has a negative effect on caregiver QOL.

  6. Family caregivers' experiences in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Wilhelm Rehnsfeldt, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is focusing on dignity in nursing homes from the perspective of family caregivers. Dignity is a complex concept and central to nursing. Dignity in nursing homes is a challenge, according to research. Family caregivers are frequently involved in their family members’ daily e...

  7. Palliative Care and Parkinson's Disease: Caregiver Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Jones, Jacqueline; Coughlan, Christina; Carter, Julie; Bekelman, David; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean; Kluger, Benzi

    2017-09-01

    Palliative care for Parkinson's disease (PD) is an emerging area of interest for clinicians, patients and families. Identifying the palliative care needs of caregivers is central to developing and implementing palliative services for families affected by PD. The objective of this paper was to elicit PD caregiver needs, salient concerns, and preferences for care using a palliative care framework. 11 PD caregivers and one non-overlapping focus group (n = 4) recruited from an academic medical center and community support groups participated in qualitative semi-structured interviews. Interviews and focus group discussion were digitally recorded, transcribed and entered into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. We used inductive qualitative data analysis techniques to interpret responses. Caregivers desired access to emotional support and education regarding the course of PD, how to handle emergent situations (e.g. falls and psychosis) and medications. Participants discussed the immediate impact of motor and non-motor symptoms as well as concerns about the future, including: finances, living situation, and caretaking challenges in advanced disease. Caregivers commented on the impact of PD on their social life and communication issues between themselves and patient. All participants expressed interest and openness to multidisciplinary approaches for addressing these needs. Caregivers of PD patients have considerable needs that may be met through a palliative care approach. Caregivers were receptive to the idea of multidisciplinary care in order to meet these needs. Future research efforts are needed to develop and test the clinical and cost effectiveness of palliative services for PD caregivers.

  8. Determinants of caregiving experiences and mental health of partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Research regarding informal caregiving showed considerable individual variation in responses to cancer caregiving. The current longitudinal study examined determinants of caregiver outcomes in terms of caregiver experiences at 3 months and caregiver's mental health at 6 months after hosp

  9. Determinants of caregiving experiences and mental health of partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Research regarding informal caregiving showed considerable individual variation in responses to cancer caregiving. The current longitudinal study examined determinants of caregiver outcomes in terms of caregiver experiences at 3 months and caregiver's mental health at 6 months after

  10. Military Spouses Residency Relief Act (MSRRA): Use Caution and Read Carefully

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janet H Fenton

    2010-01-01

      [...] the claims of residency of both spouses and Soldiers are likely to be scrutinized carefully by state taxing authorities because the basis for the new SCRA protection is the shared residence...

  11. Effects of sex, parental status, and spouse work involvement in dual-career couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, R J

    2000-12-01

    This study examined the effects of sex, parental status, and spouse's work involvement on measures of work-family experiences. Data were collected from women and men employed in similar jobs at the same organizational level in a large professional services firm using anonymously completed questionnaires. A response rate of 70% was achieved. Spouses of men worked fewer hours per week than the men did; spouses of women worked more hours per week than the women did. The effects of three independent variables (sex, presence of children, hours worked by spouse) were considered simultaneously. Each had independent and significant relationships with a majority of the work-family and work outcome measures. Implications for organizations are drawn to address the increasing priority of balancing work and family commitments in dual-career couples.

  12. Stress and coping on the home front: guard and reserve spouses searching for a new normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Cheryl Ann; Taft, Lois B; Tollefson, Thora; Hoepner, Ann; Moore, Kevin; Divyak, Katie

    2010-02-01

    During deployment of National Guard or reserve troops to Iraq or Afghanistan, spouses on the home front have been largely invisible to our collective consciousness. A total of 18 spouses living in rural Wisconsin were interviewed to identify sources of stress and coping strategies. Stressors varied from predeployment through postdeployment, as did coping responses. During predeployment, spouses articulated that the primary stressor was their lives being "on hold." During deployment, five stressors summarize the experience: worrying, waiting, going it alone, pulling double duty, and loneliness. Communication technology made it possible for most spouses to stay in touch using telephone, e-mail, or even Webcam. Keeping busy-managing personal, family, and household responsibilities-was the most commonly identified coping strategy. Postdeployment was a period of adjustment while couples searched for a new normal. Throughout all deployment phases, skilled and astute nurses can assist families toward health and healing.

  13. Health and work in the family: Evidence from spouses' cancer diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sung-Hee; Pohl, R Vincent

    2017-01-20

    Using Canadian administrative data from multiple sources, we provide the first nationally representative estimates for the effect of spouses' cancer diagnoses on individuals' employment and earnings and on family income. Our identification strategy exploits unexpected health shocks and combines matching with individual fixed effects in a generalized difference-in-differences framework to control for observable and unobservable heterogeneity. While the effect of spousal health shocks on labor supply is theoretically ambiguous, we find strong evidence for a decline in employment and earnings of individuals whose spouses are diagnosed with cancer. We interpret this result as individuals reducing their labor supply to provide care to their sick spouses and to enjoy joint leisure. Family income substantially declines after spouses' cancer diagnoses, suggesting that the financial consequences of such health shocks are considerable.

  14. Economic and health consequences of COPD patients and their spouses in Denmark-1998-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke, Anders; Hilberg, Ole; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but longitudinal studies of the economic consequences of COPD are scarce. This study evaluated the economic consequences of COPD patients in Denmark and their spouses...... for age, gender and residence. Direct and indirect costs, including frequency of primary and secondary sector contacts and procedures, medication, unemployment benefits and social transfer payments were extracted from national databases for patients, spouses and controls. RESULTS: COPD patients...... on the economic consequences of COPD patients in Denmark and their spouses as well as displaying the serious health consequences for the individual spouse and society. Second, data shows substantial impact of COPD on income level and health expenses regardless of age and gender. It could be speculated that early...

  15. The Cancer Disaster: Psychology of Informal Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnima Awasthi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers surface among one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. With umpteen cases being revealed every year, this killer disease seems to be tightening its grip in India too. Experts say that the incidence of cancer is expected to rise five-fold by the year 2025. As the cases of cancer are increasing, so is the need for the informal caregiving that is rising manifold. Caring for a beloved member of the family or a friend who is suffering from a deadly disease is in itself a big challenge. Taking on new responsibilities on one hand and worrying about the future can be very exhausting at the very least and might quickly lead to burnout. The major concern here is that when you are busy taking care of a person with such a care demanding disease, who is taking care of you? The informal caregivers of cancer patients undergo through fear, emotional burden, anxiety, depression and a lot of physical problems too. Their needs need to be identified and they need support in order to manage their caregiving role without harming their own health and psychological wellbeing. Significant amount of research work has shown that the informal caregivers suffer from the physical, mental and emotional problems that emanate from the complex caregiving situations in chronic diseases like cancer. Mostly the psychological health of the informal caregivers of cancer patients are put at great risk. The purpose of the present study is to review the literature on the psychological health and wellbeing of the informal caregivers of cancer patients along with the role of cultural factors in caregiving in India. Various online journals, PubMed journals, web searches, PsycInfo databases and online publications of various organisations related to the informal caregiving of cancer patients were accessed for the study. A number of review articles, studies and meta-analysis of studies pinpointing on the psychological health of the informal caregivers of cancer

  16. Caregiver burden in dependent elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mauricio Ocampo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the frequency and the associated factors with the presence of care burden imposed by dependent elderly of Buenaventura, Valle; Colombia. Design: A pilot cross-sectional study. Patients and methods: Between March and May of 2006, data were collected on 35 over 60 years old patients who live in the community of Buenaventura, with a score in the Barthel index Results: The mean age and the standard deviation of the patient group was 78.9±10 years. There was a larger proportion of women (68.5%. In the care givers, the regular age and the standard deviation was 49.4±18.8 years, where 91% were women. It was found that for 54.2% of the caregivers there was no burden at all, 40% of them had a minimum burden and the others a greater burden. Bivariate analysis between the care giver’s burden and the number of chronic disease, the score on the minimental test, elderly depression and the family APGAR, resulted in statistic association (p Conclusions: There is an association between aged people, dependent in basic common day activities related with physical aspects, and care giver’s burden. Being the caregivers mostly family members, further studies must be focused on identifying and realizing interventions to prevent or limit the decrease of declining mental health and loss of life quality and the consequent increase of the care giver’s burden.

  17. Family caregivers and limitations in social activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B; Montgomery, A

    1990-03-01

    Constriction of social and personal activities is one of the most frequently noted consequences of caring for a frail elder. This study analyzed the correlates of perceived limitations in social activities using data from a national sample of the frail elderly and their caregivers. Two research issues were addressed: 1) What differences in demographic, family, and caregiving attributes are associated with variation in perceived restricted social activities? and, 2) How does the process influencing restriction of social activities vary by family relationship of the caregiver? Higher levels of elder dependency and task demands were characteristic of those who reported social limitations, and daughters and wives were more likely to report such limitations than sons and husbands. Subjective assessment of time and task demands, however, were more important influences than objective caregiving activities for all family caregivers.

  18. An organizing framework for informal caregiver interventions: detailing caregiving activities and caregiver and care recipient outcomes to optimize evaluation efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Houtven Courtney

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caregiver interventions may help improve the quality of informal care. Yet the lack of a systematic framework specifying the targets and outcomes of caregiver interventions hampers our ability to understand what has been studied, to evaluate existing programs, and to inform the design of future programs. Our goal was to develop an organizing framework detailing the components of the caregiving activities and the caregiver and care recipient outcomes that should be affected by an intervention. In so doing, we characterize what has been measured in the published literature to date and what should be measured in future studies to enable comparisons across interventions and across time. Methods Our data set comprises 121 reports of caregiver interventions conducted in the United States and published between 2000 and 2009. We extracted information on variables that have been examined as primary and secondary outcomes. These variables were grouped into categories, which then informed the organizing framework. We calculated the frequency with which the interventions examined each framework component to identify areas about which we have the most knowledge and under-studied areas that deserve attention in future research. Results The framework stipulates that caregiver interventions seek to change caregiving activities, which in turn affect caregiver and care recipient outcomes. The most frequently assessed variables have been caregiver psychological outcomes (especially depression and burden and care recipient physical and health care use outcomes. Conclusions Based on the organizing framework, we make three key recommendations to guide interventions and inform research and policy. First, all intervention studies should assess quality and/or quantity of caregiving activities to help understand to what extent and how well the intervention worked. Second, intervention studies should assess a broad range of caregiver and care recipient

  19. The Military Spouse Education and Career Opportunities Program: Recommendations for an Internal Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the word about available benefits and services of SECO and the importance of portable career choices for spouses of career military personnel...eligible indicated that they did not use a My Career Advancement Account Scholarship in the previous year because family or personal obligations...The Military Spouse Education and Career Opportunities Program Recommendations for an Internal Monitoring System Gabriella C. Gonzalez, Laura L

  20. Comparing Violence against Women with and Without an Addicted Spouse in Kashan, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Karimi, Rouhangiz; Karbasi, Hassan; Haji-Rezaei, Mostafa; Aminolroayaee, Efat

    2015-01-01

    Background Although some studies have been conducted on violence against women, but all these studies were conducted in the general population and not the wives of addicts. This study was aimed to compare the violence against women with and without an addicted spouse. Methods This comparative study was conducted on 200 married women in Kashan, Iran. 100 cases were females with addicted spouse and 100 were women with non-addict husbands. Data collected using Haj-Yahia violence questionnaire. D...

  1. Comparing Violence against Women with and Without an Addicted Spouse in Kashan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Karimi, Rouhangiz; Karbasi, Hassan; Haji-Rezaei, Mostafa; Aminolroayaee, Efat

    2015-01-01

    Background Although some studies have been conducted on violence against women, but all these studies were conducted in the general population and not the wives of addicts. This study was aimed to compare the violence against women with and without an addicted spouse. Methods This comparative study was conducted on 200 married women in Kashan, Iran. 100 cases were females with addicted spouse and 100 were women with non-addict husbands. Data collected using Haj-Yahia violence questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS. Descriptive statistics and chi-square, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests, odds ratio (OR) and Kendall's correlation coefficient were used to analyze the data. Findings The overall mean score of violence was 69.29 ± 14.84 for the women with addicted husbands and 40.02 ± 9.26 in women with non-addicted spouses (P < 0.001). The mean score of psychological violence was 39.03 ± 7.60 in women with addicted spouses and 21.86 ± 6.11 in those with non-addicted husbands (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the mean score of physical violence was 20.98 ± 6.50 in women with addicted spouses and 12.2 ± 2.55 in those with non-addicted husbands (P < 0.001). Moreover, the mean scores of sexual violence were 4.52 ± 2.21 and 3.28 ± 0.75 in women with and without addicted spouses, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion The overall rate of violence was significantly higher among women with addicted spouse and especially if the spouse abused more than one type of substances. Further investigations are suggested on the effects of opium withdrawal or changes in the substance abused on the rate of violence against women. PMID:26322214

  2. Silence as an element of care: A meta-ethnographic review of professional caregivers' experience in clinical and pastoral settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Lynn; Bingley, Amanda F; Brearley, Sarah G

    2017-07-01

    In interactions between professional caregivers, patients and family members at the end of life, silence often becomes more prevalent. Silence is acknowledged as integral to interpersonal communication and compassionate care but is also noted as a complex and ambiguous phenomenon. This review seeks interdisciplinary experience to deepen understanding of qualities of silence as an element of care. To search for published papers which describe professional caregivers' experience of silence as an element of care, in palliative and other clinical, spiritual and pastoral care settings and to synthesise their findings. Meta-ethnography: employing a systematic search strategy and line-of-argument synthesis. PsycINFO and seven other cross-disciplinary databases, supplemented by hand-search, review of reference lists and citation tracking. No date range was imposed. Inclusion criteria focused on reported experience of silence in professional caregiving. Selected papers ( n = 18) were appraised; none were rejected on grounds of quality. International, interdisciplinary research and opinion endorses the value of silence in clinical care. As a multi-functional element of interpersonal relationships, silence operates in partnership with speech to support therapeutic communication. As a caregiving practice, silence is perceived as particularly relevant in spiritual and existential dimensions of care when words may fail. Experience of silence as an element of care was found in palliative and spiritual care, psychotherapy and counselling supporting existing recognition of the value of silence as a skill and practice. Because silence can present challenges for caregivers, greater understanding may offer benefits for clinical practice.

  3. Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicare & You” handbook Mail you get about Medicare Lost/incorrect Medicare card Report fraud & abuse File a complaint Identity theft: protect yourself Phone numbers & websites Privacy practices ...

  4. Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day, 7 days a week. If you're caring for someone with mental problems like Alzheimer's disease it can be especially difficult. Support groups can help. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  5. Pediatric caregiver involvement in the assessment of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Pound, Catherine M; Eady, Kaylee

    2015-08-01

    Given the growth and benefits of consumerist and family-centred approaches to pediatric health care, there is a need to involve pediatric caregivers in the assessment of their children's physicians. We present interconnected questions that are important to address in order to facilitate pediatric caregiver involvement in the assessment of their children's physicians. Pediatric caregivers can be valuable assessors of physicians' non-technical skills. It is important to conduct additional research on caregiver involvement in assessment activities and create a reflective discourse on this topic. To ensure that pediatric caregivers' assessments of physicians are formally recognized and advantageous, it is important to understand: (a) what pediatric caregivers can assess; (b) what assessment tools exist for pediatric caregivers; (c) how to create appropriate assessment tools for pediatric caregivers; (d) how to collect pediatric caregivers' assessments; (e) how to increase the legitimacy, use, and effectiveness of pediatric caregivers' assessments; and (f) the consequences of pediatric caregiver assessment.

  6. The impact of interactions with providers on stroke caregivers' needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Kerry Rae; Lutz, Barbara J; Young, Mary Ellen; Ford, Ariel; Martz, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    Preparation for caregiving is improved through engaged interactions between stroke family caregivers and healthcare providers throughout the care trajectory. We explored caregivers' perceptions about interactions with providers in rehabilitation, and how these experiences affected caregiver preparation. Seventeen caregivers, included in this grounded theory study, were interviewed during a rehabilitation stay and postdischarge. Data were analyzed using dimensional and comparative analysis. Caregivers described interactions with providers on a continuum from collaborative to disconnected, and a range of strategies to enhance interactions. Caregivers want to be actively engaged with providers during inpatient rehabilitation and collaborative interactions enhance preparedness and care satisfaction. Family members should be assessed for caregiving capacity and interactions between providers and caregivers should be individualized to specific needs. Providers must also be aware that many caregivers are not active information seekers. They must engage caregivers who may not even know what questions to ask. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  7. Spared emotional perception in patients with Alzheimer's disease is associated with negative caregiver outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Ryan T; Sugarman, Michael A; Shirk, Steven D; O'Connor, Maureen K

    2017-02-17

    Caregivers (CGs) for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often experience negative mental health and relationship outcomes. Additionally, emotional perception abilities are often compromised in early AD; the relationships between these deficits and CG outcomes are unclear. The present study investigated the relationship between emotional perception abilities in AD participants and CG well-being. Participants included 28 individuals with AD, their spousal CGs, and 30 older controls (OCs). Patients and controls completed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Advanced Clinical Solutions: Social Perception subtest. CGs completed questionnaires related to relationship satisfaction, burden, depression, and patient neuropsychiatric symptoms and activities of daily living. The patient group performed significantly worse than OCs on measures of cognition and emotional perception. Several significant relationships emerged between AD participant emotional perception and CG outcomes. Higher CG depression was associated with greater overall emotional perception abilities (r = .39, p = .041). Caregiver burden was positively correlated with AD participants' ability to label the emotional tones of voices (r = .47, p = .015). Relationship satisfaction was not significantly correlated with emotional perception. This study replicated earlier findings of impaired emotional perception abilities in AD participants. However, preserved abilities in emotional perception were associated greater CG depression and burden. Interestingly, the CGs satisfaction with the marital relationship did not appear to be influenced by changes in emotional perception. Higher emotional engagement among couples in which one spouse has cognitive impairment may contribute to increased negative interactions and in turn a greater sense of burden and depression, while leaving the marital relationship preserved.

  8. Multicultural Counseling : Issues and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, Ray T

    2007-01-01

    In this working paper, I consider a case in multicultural counseling of “Sandra,” a Brazilian black female who emigrated to Portugal but who characterizes her experience there like that of Cinderella’s pumpkin, a heartbreak reversal of fortune. Invited to assess her case, I shall treat it as if a referral for counseling from a case worker, for that is nearly how I got involved. Given a sketchy set of notes from her file, I found that her case could be instructive for multicultural counseling,...

  9. Easing reintegration: telephone support groups for spouses of returning Iraq and Afghanistan service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda Olivia; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Graney, Marshall J; Zuber, Jeffrey; Burns, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Spouses of returning Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) military service members report increased depression and anxiety post deployment as they work to reintegrate the family and service member. Reconnecting the family, renegotiating roles that have shifted, reestablishing communication patterns, and dealing with mental health concerns are all tasks that spouses must undertake as part of reintegration. We tested telephone support groups focusing on helping spouses with these basic reintegration tasks. Year-long telephone support groups focused on education, skills building (communication skills, problem solving training, cognitive behavioral techniques, stress management), and support. Spouse depression and anxiety were decreased and perceived social support was increased during the course of the study. In subgroup analyses, spouses with husbands whose injuries caused care difficulties had a positive response to the intervention. However, they were more likely to be depressed, be anxious, and have less social support compared to participants who had husbands who had no injury or whose injury did not cause care difficulty. Study findings suggest that this well-established, high-access intervention can help improve quality of life for military spouses who are struggling with reintegration of the service member and family.

  10. Perceptions of tissue storage in a dementia population among spouses and offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Megan M; Rothwell, Erin W; Venne, Vickie L; Foster, Norman L

    2015-06-01

    Cognitively impaired patients with dementia often rely on health advocates or guardians, such as spouses or adult offspring, to consent for medical procedures. These family members may also decide whether an autopsy is performed after death or whether their family member donates tissues. However, spouses are not genetically related to the patient and may have different perspectives than genetically related family members when making medical decisions with genetic implications, such as participation in a tissue repository (biobank). Interviews were conducted with spouses and adult offspring of individuals with a progressive dementing disease. Both spouses and offspring were supportive of the patient with dementia to participate in tissue storage. The top perceived benefits of tissue storage in both offspring and spouses were future value for family members and advancement of medical knowledge. Concerns included misuse of the tissue and insurance discrimination. Although the personal genetic implications differ between spouses and offspring, they share similar attitudes about the importance of tissue banking for the individual with a dementing disease.

  11. Factors associated with strain in informal caregivers of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jen-Wen; Huang, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liao, Li-Na; Lin, Chun-Ju; Chuo, Chia-Ying; Chang, Ku-Chou

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most prevalent causes of adult disability and handicap. Informal caregivers play an important role in poststroke care. However, informal caregivers may experience strain, which threatens the recovery of stroke subjects. This study aimed to describe changes in strain experienced by informal caregivers from 3 to 6 months after the stroke, and identify the predicting factors. We recruited pairs of inpatients with ischemic stroke and informal caregivers from a tertiary referral hospital and interviewed them at 3 and 6 months after the stroke. Caregiver strain was evaluated using the Caregiver Strain Index (CSI), with a CSI ≥ 7 indicating considerable caregiver strain. Various factors associated with caregiver strain were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Eighty-nine stroke patients and caregivers completed the study. Considerable strain was reported in 46% and 43% of the caregivers at the 3rd and 6th month, respectively. Patient factors such as severe disabilities (Barthel Index ≤ 60), poor cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 23), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] ≥ 10), and recurrent stroke were predictors for caregiver strain. Caregiver factors, such as changed employment status, help from formal caregivers, and depression (BDI ≥ 10) were also associated with considerable caregiver strain. Nearly 50% of caregivers experienced considerable strain. Interventions aimed at reducing the caregivers' strain should focus on enhancing the functional and emotional status of stroke subjects, prevention of recurrent stroke, and efficient management of depression symptoms in caregivers.

  12. Counselling: Fit It into Your Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerford, Kristi

    What is career counseling? With the development of professional standards and guidelines and the ever changing definition of counseling, now is the time to re-examine career counseling. The term career counseling encompasses many different types of work, from personal therapy to job search coaching. This discussion will examine the continuum known…

  13. Courtland Lee: A Global Advocate for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    2011-01-01

    Courtland Lee is exemplary in his accomplishments nationally and internationally. His academic achievements are notable in multicultural counseling and social justice. His leadership in counseling has been outstanding with his having served as president of the American Counseling Association, the Association for Multicultural Counseling and…

  14. The Impact of Creativity in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    2008-01-01

    Creativity is a crucial component in the advancement of all major cultural entities, including effective counseling. It is through creativity that major theories of counseling and skills in counseling have been developed. Creativity is longitudinal in its impact. If counseling is to progress in the future, it is essential that counselors be…

  15. 38 CFR 21.6100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.6100... Recipients Counseling § 21.6100 Counseling. General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under this temporary program shall be provided professional counseling services by the...

  16. 38 CFR 21.7600 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7600...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve Counseling § 21.7600 Counseling. A reservist may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and...

  17. 24 CFR 214.300 - Counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling services. 214.300... HOUSING COUNSELING PROGRAM Program Administration § 214.300 Counseling services. (a) Basic requirements. (1) Agencies must provide counseling to current and potential homeowners and tenants to assist...

  18. 38 CFR 21.9580 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.9580...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9580 Counseling. An individual may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. VA will apply the provisions...

  19. 38 CFR 21.100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.100... Counseling § 21.100 Counseling. (a) General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under Chapter 31 shall be provided professional counseling services by Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment...

  20. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43 Drug counseling. (a) Drug counseling shall be provided to sentenced inmates in contract community...