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Sample records for cost-effective mammography screening

  1. Is computer aided detection (CAD) cost effective in screening mammography? A model based on the CADET II study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Single reading with computer aided detection (CAD) is an alternative to double reading for detecting cancer in screening mammograms. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the use of a single reader with CAD is more cost-effective than double reading. Methods Based on data from the CADET II study, the cost-effectiveness of single reading with CAD versus double reading was measured in terms of cost per cancer detected. Cost (Pound (£), year 2007/08) of single reading with CAD versus double reading was estimated assuming a health and social service perspective and a 7 year time horizon. As the equipment cost varies according to the unit size a separate analysis was conducted for high, average and low volume screening units. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed by varying the reading time, equipment and assessment cost, recall rate and reader qualification. Results CAD is cost increasing for all sizes of screening unit. The introduction of CAD is cost-increasing compared to double reading because the cost of CAD equipment, staff training and the higher assessment cost associated with CAD are greater than the saving in reading costs. The introduction of single reading with CAD, in place of double reading, would produce an additional cost of £227 and £253 per 1,000 women screened in high and average volume units respectively. In low volume screening units, the high cost of purchasing the equipment will results in an additional cost of £590 per 1,000 women screened. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the factors having the greatest effect on the cost-effectiveness of CAD with single reading compared with double reading were the reading time and the reader's professional qualification (radiologist versus advanced practitioner). Conclusions Without improvements in CAD effectiveness (e.g. a decrease in the recall rate) CAD is unlikely to be a cost effective alternative to double reading for mammography screening in UK. This study

  2. Is computer aided detection (CAD cost effective in screening mammography? A model based on the CADET II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallis Matthew G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single reading with computer aided detection (CAD is an alternative to double reading for detecting cancer in screening mammograms. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the use of a single reader with CAD is more cost-effective than double reading. Methods Based on data from the CADET II study, the cost-effectiveness of single reading with CAD versus double reading was measured in terms of cost per cancer detected. Cost (Pound (£, year 2007/08 of single reading with CAD versus double reading was estimated assuming a health and social service perspective and a 7 year time horizon. As the equipment cost varies according to the unit size a separate analysis was conducted for high, average and low volume screening units. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed by varying the reading time, equipment and assessment cost, recall rate and reader qualification. Results CAD is cost increasing for all sizes of screening unit. The introduction of CAD is cost-increasing compared to double reading because the cost of CAD equipment, staff training and the higher assessment cost associated with CAD are greater than the saving in reading costs. The introduction of single reading with CAD, in place of double reading, would produce an additional cost of £227 and £253 per 1,000 women screened in high and average volume units respectively. In low volume screening units, the high cost of purchasing the equipment will results in an additional cost of £590 per 1,000 women screened. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the factors having the greatest effect on the cost-effectiveness of CAD with single reading compared with double reading were the reading time and the reader's professional qualification (radiologist versus advanced practitioner. Conclusions Without improvements in CAD effectiveness (e.g. a decrease in the recall rate CAD is unlikely to be a cost effective alternative to double reading for mammography screening

  3. Barriers to screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BRCA) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the USA, and mammography is an effective means for the early detection of BRCA. Identifying the barriers to screening mammography can inform research, policy and practice aiming to increase mammography adherence. A literature review was conducted to determine common barriers to screening mammography adherence. PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and 2012 that examined barriers associated with reduced mammography adherence. Three thematic groups of barriers, based on social ecology, were identified from the literature: healthcare system-level, social and individual-level barriers. Researchers must consider screening behaviour in context and, therefore, should simultaneously consider each level of barriers when attempting to understand screening behaviour and create interventions to increase mammography adherence.

  4. Mammography screening in denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Ilse Merete Munk; Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe; Garne, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mammography screening is offered healthy women, and a high standard on professional and organizational level is mandatory not only in the screening programme but even in the diagnostic work-up and treatment. The main goal is to achieve a substantial reduction in disease specific mortality...

  5. Mammography screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Ilse; Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe; Garne, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mammography screening is offered healthy women, and a high standard on professional and organizational level is mandatory not only in the screening programme but even in the diagnostic work-up and treatment. The main goal is to achieve a substantial reduction in disease specific mortality...

  6. Abolishing mammography screening programs?

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Biller-Andorno and Jüni (2014), in a widely debated commentary published in the May 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, accept the concept that mammography every 2 years from age 50 can decrease breast cancer mortality by 20%, that is, from five to four deaths per 1000 women over a 10-year period. Both the absolute and the relative risk of breast cancer death may vary depending on the baseline mortality rates in various populations and on the impact of screening mammography in re...

  7. Mammography screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Ilse; Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe; Garne, Jens Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Mammography screening is offered healthy women, and a high standard on professional and organizational level is mandatory not only in the screening programme but even in the diagnostic work-up and treatment. The main goal is to achieve a substantial reduction in disease specific mortality......, but it is not possible to evaluate the effect on mortality until several years later, and continuously monitoring of the quality of all aspects of a screening programme is necessary. Based on other European guidelines, 11 quality indicators have been defined, and guidelines concerning organizational requirements...

  8. Benefits and harms of mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løberg, Magnus; Lousdal, Mette Lise; Bretthauer, Michael; Kalager, Mette

    2015-05-01

    Mammography screening for breast cancer is widely available in many countries. Initially praised as a universal achievement to improve women's health and to reduce the burden of breast cancer, the benefits and harms of mammography screening have been debated heatedly in the past years. This review discusses the benefits and harms of mammography screening in light of findings from randomized trials and from more recent observational studies performed in the era of modern diagnostics and treatment. The main benefit of mammography screening is reduction of breast-cancer related death. Relative reductions vary from about 15 to 25% in randomized trials to more recent estimates of 13 to 17% in meta-analyses of observational studies. Using UK population data of 2007, for 1,000 women invited to biennial mammography screening for 20 years from age 50, 2 to 3 women are prevented from dying of breast cancer. All-cause mortality is unchanged. Overdiagnosis of breast cancer is the main harm of mammography screening. Based on recent estimates from the United States, the relative amount of overdiagnosis (including ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer) is 31%. This results in 15 women overdiagnosed for every 1,000 women invited to biennial mammography screening for 20 years from age 50. Women should be unpassionately informed about the benefits and harms of mammography screening using absolute effect sizes in a comprehensible fashion. In an era of limited health care resources, screening services need to be scrutinized and compared with each other with regard to effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and harms.

  9. 中国妇女乳腺X线钼靶摄影普查成本效益分析%Cost-effectiveness analysis of mammography screening for Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峰; 罗立民; 鲍旭东; 陈北京

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for Chinese women. Methods: A model of Markov process adapted with clinical data about breast cancer and population of Chinese women was developed to simulate the progression of breast cancer. The model was running over ten cycles (each cycle represents one year) and then to estimate the total cost/effectiveness of mammography screening by summing across those cycles. Results: For women groups aged between 35-59 years and 35-69 years, ICER (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio) of mammography screening group will be 216656.00 yuan/QALY (quality adjusted life year) and 248 727.50 yuan/QALY respectively compared with non-screening group, and mammography screening can reduce the mortality of breast cancer by 14.66% and 14.79%, respectively. The ICER is closely correlated with the incidence of breast cancer, sensitivity and specificity of mammography screening and the costs for screening. Conclusion: The result of this analysis indicates that mammography screening in Chinese women can reduce the breast cancer mortality about 1 5%. According to the incidence rate, mean screening performance (including sensitivity and specificity) and screening costs of breast cancer in Chinese women, the mammography screening is not of cost-effectiveness at present. However, the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening is closely correlated with the incidence rate of breast cancer, screening performance and screening costs, the screening for breast cancer in Chinese women will be of or even good cost-effectiveness with the increased incidence of breast cancer, the decreased costs of screening and the improved performance of screening.%目的:分析中国妇女乳腺X线钼靶摄影普查的成本效益.方法:结合中国妇女的人群年龄结构以及乳腺癌相关数据,利用Markov模型模拟乳腺癌发展过程,结合每一种状态的成本消耗和健康收益,通过10个周期(每个周期为1年)的

  10. Overdiagnosis in screening mammography in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Olsen, Anne Helene; Blichert-Toft, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    To use data from two longstanding, population based screening programmes to study overdiagnosis in screening mammography.......To use data from two longstanding, population based screening programmes to study overdiagnosis in screening mammography....

  11. Effect of Mammography-Positive Criteria on the Cost-Effectiveness of Breast Cancer Screening%不同钼靶X线阳性标准对乳腺癌筛查成本效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨振华; 戴宏季; 闫烨; 汪培山; 陈可欣

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The current work aims to investigate the effect of mammography-positive criteria on the cost-effectiveness of a breast cancer screening program, and provide a reference for the development of breast cancer screening programs in China. Methods:From July 2008 to September 2009, a cross-sectional breast cancer screening research project was developed in four cities: (a) Shenyang, located in northeast China; (b) Tianjin, situated in the coastal area of northern China; (c) Feicheng, an inland city in Shandong;and (d) Nanchang, located in southern China. A total of 21,986 asymptomatic women, aged 45 to 69 years, volunteered to undergo breast mammography examination after signing an informed consent form. After a one-year follow-up, 65 new cases with breast cancer were diagnosed. The sensitivity and specificity of mammography were calculated on the basis of different criteria of positivity. A Markov model was used to simulate the entire screening process and calculate the cost-effectiveness ratios. The sensitivity analysis was performed using Tree Age pro 2011. The cost-effectiveness analysis was measured by the cost per life year saved ( Lys ), and the discounted rate was 3 %. Results: When the defined BIRADS 0 scale ( used for further imaging scan or for comparison with the previous image data to draw conclusions ) was classified as negative. A total of 55 new cases with breast cancer were detected. The sensitivity was 84.6 %, the specificity was 98.6 %, and the cost-effectiveness ratio was 45 632 ¥ / Lys. Moreover, when the defined BIRADS 0was classified as positive, 56 new cases with breast cancer were identified, with a sensitivity of 86.2 %, a specificity of 93.9 %, and a cost-effectiveness ratio of 52 392 ¥ / Lys. Conclusion: This study suggests that different mammography-positive criteria have minimal effect on sensitivity, but a considerable effect on specificity and cost-effectiveness.%目的:根据乳腺癌筛查数据,比较不同钼靶X线阳

  12. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  13. Mammography and Other Screening Tests for Breast Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ178 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Mammography and Other Screening Tests for Breast Problems • What ... used to screen for breast problems? • What is mammography? • Why is mammography done? • When should I start ...

  14. Cost-effectiveness of the Norwegian breast cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijt, P A; Heijnsdijk, E A M; de Koning, H J

    2017-02-15

    The Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP) has a nation-wide coverage since 2005. All women aged 50-69 years are invited biennially for mammography screening. We evaluated breast cancer mortality reduction and performed a cost-effectiveness analysis, using our microsimulation model, calibrated to most recent data. The microsimulation model allows for the comparison of mortality and costs between a (hypothetical) situation without screening and a situation with screening. Breast cancer incidence in Norway had a steep increase in the early 1990s. We calibrated the model to simulate this increase and included recent costs for screening, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and travel and productivity loss. We estimate a 16% breast cancer mortality reduction for a cohort of women, invited to screening, followed over their complete lifetime. Cost-effectiveness is estimated at NOK 112,162 per QALY gained, when taking only direct medical costs into account (the cost of the buses, examinations, and invitations). We used a 3.5% annual discount rate. Cost-effectiveness estimates are substantially below the threshold of NOK 1,926,366 as recommended by the WHO guidelines. For the Norwegian population, which has been gradually exposed to screening, breast cancer mortality reduction for women exposed to screening is increasing and is estimated to rise to ∼30% in 2020 for women aged 55-80 years. The NBCSP is a highly cost-effective measure to reduce breast cancer specific mortality. We estimate a breast cancer specific mortality reduction of 16-30%, at the cost of 112,162 NOK per QALY gained. © 2016 UICC.

  15. Classification of findings in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamilo, M; Lönnqvist, J; Halttunen, A

    1991-01-01

    survey of mammography screening in Helsinki and surroundings in Finland. PATIENTS--21,417 women (aged 50-59 years) were invited to be screened, 18,012 (84.10%) participated. Of these 579 (3.21% of those screened) were recalled for further studies; 124 of these were referred for surgical biopsy and 82 had...

  16. Body weight and sensitivity of screening mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse H.; von Euler-Chelpin, My; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Obese women tend to participate less in breast cancer screening than normal weight women. However, obese women have fattier breast than normal weight women, and screening mammography works better in fatty than in dense breasts. One might, therefore, hypothesise that obese women would actuall...

  17. Comparative effectiveness of combined digital mammography and tomosynthesis screening for women with dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christoph I; Cevik, Mucahit; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Sprague, Brian L; Tosteson, Anna N A; Miglioretti, Diana L; Kerlikowske, Karla; Stout, Natasha K; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Ramsey, Scott D; Lehman, Constance D

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of combined biennial digital mammography and tomosynthesis screening, compared with biennial digital mammography screening alone, among women with dense breasts. An established, discrete-event breast cancer simulation model was used to estimate the comparative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of biennial screening with both digital mammography and tomosynthesis versus digital mammography alone among U.S. women aged 50-74 years with dense breasts from a federal payer perspective and a lifetime horizon. Input values were estimated for test performance, costs, and health state utilities from the National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, Medicare reimbursement rates, and medical literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the implications of varying key model parameters, including combined screening sensitivity and specificity, transient utility decrement of diagnostic work-up, and additional cost of tomosynthesis. For the base-case analysis, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year gained by adding tomosynthesis to digital mammography screening was $53 893. An additional 0.5 deaths were averted and 405 false-positive findings avoided per 1000 women after 12 rounds of screening. Combined screening remained cost-effective (less than $100 000 per quality-adjusted life year gained) over a wide range of incremental improvements in test performance. Overall, cost-effectiveness was most sensitive to the additional cost of tomosynthesis. Biennial combined digital mammography and tomosynthesis screening for U.S. women aged 50-74 years with dense breasts is likely to be cost-effective if priced appropriately (up to $226 for combined examinations vs $139 for digital mammography alone) and if reported interpretive performance metrics of improved specificity with tomosynthesis are met in routine practice.

  18. Análise de Custo-efetividade do rastreamento do câncer de mama com mamografia convencional, digital e ressonância Analysis of Cost-effectiveness of screening for breast cancer with conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto de Freitas Peregrino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar análise de custo efetividade da intervenção das mamografias convencional e digital e da ressonância magnética no rastreamento de câncer de mama, comparando com o não rastreamento. Foi construído um modelo markoviano, numa uma coorte hipotética de 100 mil mulheres com rastreamento bianual, cuja linha de base é a história natural da doença. Modelaram-se quatro cenários distintos: (1 a história natural do câncer de mama como linha de base; (2 mamografia com filme convencional; (3 mamografia digital e (4 e ressonância magnética. Os custos dos cenários modelados variaram desde R$ 194.216,68 para a história natural, até R$ 48.614.338,31 para o rastreamento com ressonância magnética. As diferenças de efetividade entre as intervenções variaram de 300 até 78.000 anos de vida ganhos, na coorte de 100 mil mulheres. Em relação à Razão de Custo-Efetividade Incremental, em termos de custo por ano de vida ganhos, a estratégia do rastreamento mamográfico convencional produziu um ano extra por R$ 13.573,07. A Razão de Custo Efetividade Incremental (ICER da ressonância magnética foi de R$ 2.904.328,88 em relação ao não rastreamento. O estudo mostrou que é mais custo-efetivo realizar o rastreamento com a mamografia convencional do que as outras tecnologias de intervenção.A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in screening for breast cancer. The use of conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging were compared with natural disease history as a baseline. A Markov model projected breast cancer in a group of 100,000 women for a 30 year period, with screening every two years. Four distinct scenarios were modeled: (1 the natural history of breast cancer, as a baseline, (2 conventional film mammography, (3 digital mammography and (4 magnetic resonance imaging. The costs of the scenarios modeled ranged from R$ 194.216,68 for natural history, to R$ 48.614.338,31, for

  19. Breast cancer screening: the underuse of mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, S.; Baum, J.K.; Klos, D.S.; Tsou, C.V.

    1985-09-01

    The early detection of breast cancer is promoted by the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) by encouraging the regular use of three types of screening: breast self-examination (BSE), the clinical breast examination, and mammography. In August 1983, the ACS publicized seven recommendations pertaining to screening, including a revised statement about the routine use of mammography for women between the ages of 40 and 49 years. In response to the ACS statement, the present study assessed compliance with the updated recommendations for all three types of screening. The results show reasonable rates of compliance for the BSE (53%-69%) and clinical examination (70%-78%). In contrast, only 19% of the women between the ages of 35 and 49 and 25% of the women older than 50 reported complying with the recommendation to undergo one baseline screening mammogram. Some implications for health education by physicians and the professional education of physicians in the use of mammography are discussed.

  20. Participation rate or informed choice? Rethinking the European key performance indicators for mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strech, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Despite the intensive controversies about the likelihood of benefits and harms of mammography screening almost all experts conclude that the choice to screen or not to screen needs to be made by the individual patient who is adequately informed. However, the "European guideline for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis" specifies a participation rate of 70% as the key performance indicator for mammography screening. This paper argues that neither the existing evidence on benefits and harms, nor survey research with women, nor compliance rates in clinical trials, nor cost-effectiveness ratios justify participation rates as a reasonable performance indicator for preference-sensitive condition such as mammography screening. In contrast, an informed choice rate would be more reasonable. Further research needs to address the practical challenges in assessing informed choice rates.

  1. Digital mammography in breast cancer screening: Evaluation and innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluekens, A.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    With all other imaging modalities in radiology being digitised and conventional mammography being ready to phase out the transition to digital mammography was inevitable. This thesis describes the performance of digital screening mammography and the consequences of implementation in a population-bas

  2. Time perspective and perceived risk as related to mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griva, Fay; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Potamianos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The present study explored the relation of time perspective to perceived risk for breast cancer and mammography screening. Women free from breast cancer (N = 194), eligible for mammography screening in terms of age, completed the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999) and measures of perceived risk, attitude toward performing mammography screening, intention to get a mammogram, and mammography screening behavior. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that perceived risk of breast cancer (β= .18, p < .01) and intention to be screened (β = .35, p < .01) were significantly associated with mammography screening, after controlling for the effects of sociodemographic (e.g., age, education, and economic level) and health-related variables (e.g., family history of breast cancer and previous benign breast disease). Path analyses including the main psychological variables indicated that perceived risk was indirectly related to intention via attitude (β = .17, p < .01), and to mammography screening through attitude and intention (β = .06, p < .01). Attitude was indirectly related to mammography screening via intention (β = .20, p < .01). Also, a significant indirect association was observed between future orientation and mammography screening, via perceived risk (β = .10, p < .01). Theoretical implications of study findings and suggestions for future research on use of mammography are presented.

  3. Danish Quality Database for Mammography Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe; Njor, Sisse Helle; Vejborg, Ilse Merete Munk

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Quality Database for Mammography Screening (DKMS) was established in 2007, with the aim to monitor, sustain, and improve the quality of the Danish national breast cancer screening program. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish women aged 50-69 years who were invited every 2 years for breast...... required to determine the following eleven indicators: 1) radiation exposure, 2) participation among invited women and participation within the target population, 3) time between screening and result, 4) screening interval, 5) recall for further diagnostics, 6) interval cancers consisting of women...... working days, 2.7% of the screened women were recalled for further diagnostics, 82% of the women operated for invasive carcinomas were node negative, and 40% of the women had the tumor size of ≤10 mm. CONCLUSION: The DKMS has successfully evaluated the quality of the nationwide Danish breast cancer...

  4. Breast density and outcome of mammography screening: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A H; Bihrmann, K; Jensen, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of breast density on breast cancer (BC) mortality in a mammography screening programme. The cohort included 48 052 women participating in mammography screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, where biennial screening is offered to women aged 50-69 y...

  5. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Nielsen, Margrethe

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of screening for breast cancer with mammography on mortality and morbidity. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched Pub...... excluded a biased trial and included 600,000 women in the analyses. Three trials with adequate randomisation did not show a significant reduction in breast cancer mortality at 13 years (relative risk (RR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 1.02); four trials with suboptimal randomisation showed...... a significant reduction in breast cancer mortality with an RR of 0.75 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.83). The RR for all seven trials combined was 0.81 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.87). We found that breast cancer mortality was an unreliable outcome that was biased in favour of screening, mainly because of differential...

  6. Screening Mammography Utilization in Tennessee Women: The Association with Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen C.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.; Neutens, James J.; Klein, Diane A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Approximately 70% of US women over age 40 report mammography screening within 2 years. However, rates are likely to vary by age, income, educational level, and residence. Purpose: To describe the prevalence of screening mammography and associated factors in women living in rural and urban areas of Tennessee. Methods: Using pooled data…

  7. Cost-effectiveness of Lung Cancer Screening in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, John R; Flanagan, William M; Miller, Anthony B; Fitzgerald, Natalie R; Memon, Saima; Wolfson, Michael C; Evans, William K

    2015-09-01

    The US National Lung Screening Trial supports screening for lung cancer among smokers using low-dose computed tomographic (LDCT) scans. The cost-effectiveness of screening in a publically funded health care system remains a concern. To assess the cost-effectiveness of LDCT scan screening for lung cancer within the Canadian health care system. The Cancer Risk Management Model (CRMM) simulated individual lives within the Canadian population from 2014 to 2034, incorporating cancer risk, disease management, outcome, and cost data. Smokers and former smokers eligible for lung cancer screening (30 pack-year smoking history, ages 55-74 years, for the reference scenario) were modeled, and performance parameters were calibrated to the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). The reference screening scenario assumes annual scans to age 75 years, 60% participation by 10 years, 70% adherence to screening, and unchanged smoking rates. The CRMM outputs are aggregated, and costs (2008 Canadian dollars) and life-years are discounted 3% annually. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Compared with no screening, the reference scenario saved 51,000 quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) and had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of CaD $52,000/QALY. If smoking history is modeled for 20 or 40 pack-years, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of CaD $62,000 and CaD $43,000/QALY, respectively, were generated. Changes in participation rates altered life years saved but not the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, while the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is sensitive to changes in adherence. An adjunct smoking cessation program improving the quit rate by 22.5% improves the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio to CaD $24,000/QALY. Lung cancer screening with LDCT appears cost-effective in the publicly funded Canadian health care system. An adjunct smoking cessation program has the potential to improve outcomes.

  8. [Cost-effectiveness of breast cancer screening policies in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Mendoza, Atanacio; Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Bertozzi, Stefano M

    2009-01-01

    Generate cost-effectiveness information to allow policy makers optimize breast cancer (BC) policy in Mexico. We constructed a Markov model that incorporates four interrelated processes of the disease: the natural history; detection using mammography; treatment; and other competing-causes mortality, according to which 13 different strategies were modeled. Strategies (starting age, % of coverage, frequency in years)= (48, 25, 2), (40, 50, 2) and (40, 50, 1) constituted the optimal method for expanding the BC program, yielding 75.3, 116.4 and 171.1 thousand pesos per life-year saved, respectively. The strategies included in the optimal method for expanding the program produce a cost per life-year saved of less than two times the GNP per capita and hence are cost-effective according to WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health criteria.

  9. Cost effectiveness of type 2 diabetes screening: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Behzad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Hadian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Although studies reported diabetes mellitus screening cost effective, the mass screening for type2 diabetes remains controversial. In this study we reviewed the recently evidence about the cost effectiveness of mass screening systematically. We reviewed the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS), and Cochrane library databases by MeSH terms to identify relevant studies from 2000 to 2013. We had 4 inclusion and 6 exclusion criteria and used the Drummond's checklist for appraising the quality of studies. The initial search yielded 358 potentially related studies from selected databases. 6 studies met our inclusion and exclusion criteria and included in final review. 3 and 2 of them were conducted in Europe and America and only one of them in Asia. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was the main outcome to appraise the effectiveness in the studies. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was computed in range from $516.33 to $126,238 per QALY in the studies. A review of previous diabetes screening cost effectiveness analysis showed that the studies varied in some aspects but reached similar conclusions. They concluded that the screening may be cost effective, however further studies is required to support the diabetes mass screening.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening - An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); H. Brenner (Hermann)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThere are several modalities available for a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program. When determining which CRC screening program to implement, the costs of such programs should be considered in comparison to the health benefits they are expected to provide. Cost-effectiveness analysi

  11. Overdiagnosis in organised mammography screening in Denmark. A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten J; Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Overdiagnosis in cancer screening is the detection of cancer lesions that would otherwise not have been detected. It is arguably the most important harm. We quantified overdiagnosis in the Danish mammography screening programme, which is uniquely suited for this purpose, as only 20......% of the Danish population has been offered organised mammography screening over a long time-period. METHODS: We collected incidence rates of carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer in areas with and without screening over 13 years with screening (1991-2003), and 20 years before its introduction (1971...

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of screening. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggeri M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Matteo RuggeriFacoltà di Economia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore – sede di Roma, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common tumors worldwide. HCC is a potential target for cancer surveillance (or screening as it occurs in well-defined, at-risk populations. Curative therapy is possible only for small tumors and screening strategy has been recommended by the US, Italian, and other international liver societies and is practiced widely, but its benefits are not clearly established. The objective of this study was to review the available evidence with respect to the cost-effectiveness of key technologies in the prevention HCC. The literature search was conducted with the support of PubMed. Firstly we selected articles by reading the abstracts. Secondly, we read the articles and the revision was further restricted, with the following as inclusion criteria: (1 full economic evaluation of HCC screening programs; (2 comparison between HCC techniques; (3 outcome measures expressed in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALY; (4 full text availability. The initial review of the literature yielded 346 articles. Of those, 288 were excluded at the first stage. Of those excluded, 108 did not meet the target, 106 did not present the cost analysis, 33 did not analyze the treatment of the disease, and in 41 the abstract was not available. Of the 58 included in the first step, seven examined the cost-effectiveness of different HCC screening techniques, seven investigated the cost-effectiveness of HCC screening versus no screening, and one looked at the cost-effectiveness of timing for HCC surveillance and monitoring, while 43 were about HBV vaccination and screening. We included only the seven articles examining the cost-effectiveness of different HCC screening techniques. In general, incidence is the key parameter which determines the cost-effectiveness of HCC screening. Discrepancies in the results exist when

  13. Statistical methods for determining the effect of mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lophaven, Søren

    2016-01-01

    In an overview of five randomised controlled trials from Sweden, a reduction of 29% was found in breast cancer mortality in women aged 50-69 at randomisation after a follow up of 5-13 years. Organised, population based, mammography service screening was introduced on the basis of these resultsin...... the municipality of Copenhagen in 1991, in the county of Fyn in 1993 and in the municipality of Frederiksberg in 1994, although reduced mortality in randomised controlled trials does not necessarily mean that screening also works in routine health care. In the rest of Denmark mammography screening was introdueed...... in 2007-2008. Women aged 50-69 were invited to screening every second year. Taking advantage of the registers of population and health, we present statistical methods for evaluating the effect of mammography screening on breast cancer mortality (Olsen et al. 2005, Njor et al. 2015 and Weedon-Fekjær etal...

  14. Statistical methods for determining the effect of mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lophaven, Søren

    2016-01-01

    In an overview of five randomised controlled trials from Sweden, a reduction of 29% was found in breast cancer mortality in women aged 50-69 at randomisation after a follow up of 5-13 years. Organised, population based, mammography service screening was introduced on the basis of these resultsin...... the municipality of Copenhagen in 1991, in the county of Fyn in 1993 and in the municipality of Frederiksberg in 1994, although reduced mortality in randomised controlled trials does not necessarily mean that screening also works in routine health care. In the rest of Denmark mammography screening was introdueed...... in 2007-2008. Women aged 50-69 were invited to screening every second year. Taking advantage of the registers of population and health, we present statistical methods for evaluating the effect of mammography screening on breast cancer mortality (Olsen et al. 2005, Njor et al. 2015 and Weedon-Fekjær etal...

  15. Influence of advertisement on women's attitudes toward mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C; Davis, L S; Rentz, K; Vannoy, D

    1997-01-01

    This project represents an effort to incorporate a feminist perspective into research on mammography screening. The purpose of this study was to assess women's attitudes toward four advertisements designed to encourage mammography screening. The goal was to create awareness about women's attitudes toward mammography advertisements in order to encourage the development of more effective and responsive motivational materials. The results indicated that each ad communicated different messages about the seriousness of breast cancer and the efficacy of mammography in detecting early breast cancer. Each ad also affected women differently regarding their feelings of control over breast cancer, their perceived loss of sex appeal resulting from a breast cancer diagnosis, and their general fear of breast cancer.

  16. Impact of screening mammography on breast cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyer, Archie; Baines, Cornelia; Miller, Anthony B

    2016-04-15

    The degree to which observed reductions in breast cancer mortality is attributable to screening mammography has become increasingly controversial. We examined this issue with three fundamentally different approaches: (i) Chronology--the temporal relationship of the onset of breast cancer mortality decline and the national implementation of screening mammography; (ii) Magnitude--the degree to which breast cancer mortality declined relative to the amount (penetration) of screening mammography; (iii) Analogy--the pattern of mortality rate reductions of other cancers for which population screening is not conducted. Chronology and magnitude were assessed with data from Europe and North America, with three methods applied to magnitude. A comparison of eight countries in Europe and North America does not demonstrate a correlation between the penetration of national screening and either the chronology or magnitude of national breast cancer mortality reduction. In the United States, the magnitude of the mortality decline is greater in the unscreened, younger women than in the screened population and regional variation in the rate of breast cancer mortality reduction is not correlated with screening penetrance, either as self-reported or by the magnitude of screening-induced increase in early-stage disease. Analogy analysis of United States data identifies 14 other cancers with a similar distinct onset of mortality reduction for which screening is not performed. These five lines of evidence from three different approaches and additional observations discussed do not support the hypothesis that mammography screening is a primary reason for the breast cancer mortality reduction in Europe and North America.

  17. Cost-Effective Screening for Breast Cancer Worldwide: Current State and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarvazyan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Affordability of healthcare is highly limited by its skyrocketing cost. Access to screening and diagnostic medical equipment and medicine in developing countries is inadequate for the majority of the population. There is a tremendous worldwide need to detect breast cancer at its earliest stage. These needs must be balanced by the ability of countries to provide breast cancer screening technology to their populations. We reviewed the diagnostic accuracy, procedure cost and cost-effectiveness of currently available technique for breast screening and diagnosis including clinical breast examination, mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, biopsy and a new modality for cancer diagnostics termed elasticity imaging that has emerged in the last decade. Clinical results demonstrate that elasticity imaging even in its simplest and least sophisticated versions, like tactile imaging, has significant diagnostic potential comparable and exceeding that of conventional imaging techniques. In view of many countries with limited resources, effective yet less expensive modes of screening must be considered worldwide. The tactile imaging is one method that has the potential to provide cost-effective breast cancer screening and diagnostics.

  18. Is population screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm cost-effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lotte

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is responsible for 1–2% of all male deaths over the age of 65 years. Early detection of AAA and elective surgery can reduce the mortality risk associated with AAA. However, many patients will not be diagnosed with AAA and have therefore an increased death risk due to the untreated AAA. It has been suggested that population screening for AAA in elderly males is effective and cost-effective. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of published cost-effectiveness analyses of screening elderly men for AAA. Methods We performed a systematic search for economic evaluations in NHSEED, EconLit, Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Cinahl and two Scandinavian HTA data bases (DACEHTA and SBU. All identified studies were read in full and each study was systematically assessed according to international guidelines for critical assessment of economic evaluations in health care. Results The search identified 16 cost-effectiveness studies. Most studies considered only short term cost consequences. The studies seemed to employ a number of "optimistic" assumptions in favour of AAA screening, and included only few sensitivity analyses that assessed less optimistic assumptions. Conclusion Further analyses of cost-effectiveness of AAA screening are recommended.

  19. Access to Mammography Facilities and Detection of Breast Cancer by Screening Mammography: A GIS Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Selina; Price, James H; Dignan, Mark; Rahman, Saleh; Lindquist, Peter S; Jordan, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to examine the association between access to mammography facilities and utilization of screening mammography in an urban population. METHODS: Data on female breast cancer cases were obtained from an extensive mammography surveillance project. Distance to mammography facilities was measured by using GIS, which was followed by measuring geographical access to mammography facilities using Floating Catchment Area (FCA) method (considering all available facilities within an arbitrary radius from the woman's residence by using Arc GIS 9.0 software). RESULTS: Of 2,024 women, 91.4% were Caucasian; age ranged from 25 to 98 years; most (95%) were non-Hispanic in origin. Logistic regression found age, family history, hormone replacement therapy, physician recommendation, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis to be significant predictors of having had a previous mammogram. Women having higher access to mammography facilities were less likely to have had a previous mammogram compared to women who had low access, considering all the facilities within 10 miles (OR=0.41, CI=0.22-0.76), 30 miles (OR=0.52, CI=0.29-0.91) and 40 miles (OR=0.51, CI=0.28-0.92) radiuses. CONCLUSIONS: Physical distance to mammography facilities does not necessarily predict utilization of mammogram and greater access does not assure greater utilizations, due to constraints imposed by socio economic and cultural barriers. Future studies should focus on measuring access to mammography facilities capturing a broader dimension of access considering qualitative aspect of facilities, as well as other travel impedances.

  20. 42 CFR 405.535 - Special rule for nonparticipating physicians and suppliers furnishing screening mammography...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... suppliers furnishing screening mammography services before January 1, 2002. 405.535 Section 405.535 Public... Special rule for nonparticipating physicians and suppliers furnishing screening mammography services before January 1, 2002. The provisions in this section apply for screening mammography services...

  1. 42 CFR 405.534 - Limitation on payment for screening mammography services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on payment for screening mammography... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.534 Limitation on payment for screening mammography services... January 1, 1991 until December 31, 2001. Screening mammography services provided after December 31,...

  2. Predicting the risk of a false-positive test for women following a mammography screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Olsen, Anne Helene; Schwartz, Walter

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study was to provide a simple estimate of the cumulative risk of a false-positive test for women participating in mammography screening. To test the method, we used data from two well-established, organized mammography screening programmes offering biennial...... be calculated in a simple way relatively early after the start of a mammography screening programme....

  3. An equivalent relative utility metric for evaluating screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Craig K; Eckstein, Miguel P; Boone, John M

    2010-01-01

    Comparative studies of performance in screening mammography are often ambiguous. A new method will frequently show a higher sensitivity or detection rate than an existing standard with a concomitant increase in false positives or recalls. The authors propose an equivalent relative utility (ERU) metric based on signal detection theory to quantify screening performance in such comparisons. The metric is defined as the relative utility, as defined in classical signal detection theory, needed to make 2 systems equivalent. ERU avoids the problem of requiring a predefined putative relative utility, which has limited application of utility theory in receiver operating characteristic analysis. The metric can be readily estimated from recall and detection rates commonly reported in comparative clinical studies. An important practical advantage of ERU is that in prevalence matched populations, the measure can be estimated without an independent estimate of disease prevalence. Thus estimating ERU does not require a study with long-term follow-up to find cases of missed disease. The approach is applicable to any comparative screening study that reports results in terms of recall and detection rates, although the authors focus exclusively on screening mammography in this work. They derive the ERU from the definition of utility given in classical treatments of signal detection theory. They also investigate reasonable values of relative utility in screening mammography for use in interpreting ERU using data from a large clinical study. As examples of application of ERU, they reanalyze 2 recently published reports using recall and detection rates in screening mammography.

  4. [Fine needle aspiration cytology of mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvad, B.; Laenkholm, A.V.; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2009-01-01

    -choice treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 767 women had FNAC performed from a total of 783 lesions at the Mammography Clinic, University Hospital Odense. All FNACs were compared with the final histology diagnosis. Nine statistical parameters were calculated according to the European guidelines. RESULTS: A total...

  5. Variation in Screening Mammography Rates Among Medicare Advantage Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Fleming, Margaret; Duszak, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Prior studies have shown higher screening mammography rates for beneficiaries in capitated managed care Medicare Advantage (MA) plans compared with traditional fee-for-service Medicare. The aim of this study was to explore variation in screening mammography rates at the level of MA managed care plans. Using the 2016 MA Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set Public Use File, screening mammography rates were identified for all 385 reporting MA plans. Associations were explored with a range of plan characteristics from this file, as well as from the CMS Part C and Part D Medicare Star Ratings Data File, Medicare Advantage Plan Directory, and Medicare Monthly Enrollment by Plan File. Overall MA plan screening rates were high (mean, 72.6 ± 9.4%) but varied substantially among plans (range, 14.3%-91.8%). Screening rates were higher in nonprofit versus for-profit plans (77.3% versus 71.8%, P plans versus private fee-for-service or regional preferred provider organization plans (71.9%-73.2% versus 65.5%-66.8%, P = .001). Among parent organizations with five or more plans, screening rates were highest for Kaiser Foundation (median, 88.4%) and lowest for Molina Healthcare (median, 65.3%). Screening rates showed small but significant associations with plans' contract lengths, enrolled populations, and counties served. Screening rates showed strong associations (r = 0.796-0.798) with colorectal cancer screening and annual flu vaccine rates and showed moderate associations (r = 0.283-0.365) with ambulatory and preventive care visits, osteoporosis screenings, body mass index assessments, and nonrecommended prostate-specific antigen screenings after age 70. Screening mammography rates vary considerably among MA plans. With increased federal interest in promoting the MA program, enhanced transparency will be necessary to ensure appropriate Medicare beneficiary participation decision making. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc

  6. Two-view versus single-view mammography at subsequent screening in a region of the Dutch breast screening programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallenburg, V.v.; Duijm, L.E.M.; Heeten, G.J. den; Groenewoud, J.H.; Jansen, F.H.M.; Fracheboud, J.; Plaisier, M.L.; Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively determined the effect of analogue two-view mammography versus single-view mammography at subsequent screens on breast cancer detection and determined financial consequences for a current digital mammography setting. Two screening radiologists reviewed the mammograms of 536 screen

  7. [Cost-effectiveness analysis on colorectal cancer screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Q C; Ye, D; Jiang, X Y; Li, Q L; Yao, K Y; Wang, J B; Jin, M J; Chen, K

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening program in different age groups from the view of health economics. Methods: The screening compliance rates, detection rates in different age groups were calculated by using the data from colorectal cancer screening program in Jiashan county, Zhejiang province. The differences in indicator among age groups were analyzed with χ(2) test or trend χ(2) test. The ratios of cost to the number of case were calculated according to cost statistics. Results: The detection rates of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) positivity, advanced adenoma and colorectal cancer and early stage cancer increased with age, while the early diagnosis rates were negatively associated with age. After exclusion the younger counterpart, the cost-effectiveness of individuals aged >50 years could be reduced by 15%-30%. Conclusion: From health economic perspective, it is beneficial to start colorectal cancer screening at age of 50 years to improve the efficiency of the screening.

  8. Socio-demographic determinants of participation in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My; Olsen, Anne Helene; Njor, Sisse

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to use individual data on socio-demographic characteristics to identify predictors of participation in mammography screening and control to what extent they can explain the regional difference. We used data from mammography screening programmes in Copenhagen, 1991-1999, and Funen......, 1993-2001, Denmark. Target groups were identified from the Population Register, screening data came from the health authority, and socio-demographic data from Statistics Denmark. Included were women eligible for at least 3 screens. The crude RR of never use versus always use was 3.21 (95%CI, 3...... women in Copenhagen, irrespective of their socio-demographic characteristics, had low participation. Screening programmes have to find ways to handle this urbanity factor....

  9. Barriers to Mammography Screening: How to Overcome Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Hassoun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Screening mammography is an established intervention that leads to early breast cancer detection and reduced mortality. The Lebanese Ministry of Health has initiated yearly awareness campaigns and provided free mammography in multiple centers around the country. Methods: The study took place in two major areas of Lebanon - Beirut and South Lebanon. This cross-sectional survey aimed to assess knowledge about breast cancer screening and screening behaviors in the Lebanese population. The primary outcome of the study was to assess the reasons that prevented women from performing screening mammography based on our categories of questions: lack of knowledge about breast cancer, lack of access to screening facilities, failure of primary care physician to encourage screening behavior, and other reasons. Results: The major barriers to seek screening that had statistically significant P-values, in order of prevalence, included: lack of knowledge about breast cancer, followed by social reasons and lack of access. Conclusion: Given the prevalence of breast cancer in our population, it is important to understand the pitfalls that we experience in promoting awareness. Our study is the first study to reach out to the community to assess perceived barriers against screening and provide solutions for such barriers.

  10. 42 CFR 413.123 - Payment for screening mammography performed by hospitals on an outpatient basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for screening mammography performed by... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.123 Payment for screening mammography... mammographies performed by hospitals. (b) Payment to hospitals for outpatient services. Payment to hospitals...

  11. Global cost-effectiveness of GDM screening and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Louise K K; Kahn, James G; Marseille, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    and intervention approaches, and outcomes (e.g., inclusion or exclusion of long-term type 2 diabetes risk and associated costs). We concluded that incorporation of long-term benefits of GDM screening and treatment has huge impact on cost-effectiveness estimates. Based on the large methodological heterogeneity...... and varying results in the existing body of evidence, we find it unreasonable to outline any global recommendations. For future economic studies, we recommend inclusion of long-term outcomes and adaptation to local preferences, as well as examination of the impact of the diagnostic criteria recently proposed...

  12. Psychosocial predictors of first attendance for organised mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; de Koning, H J; Absetz, P

    1999-01-01

    of breast cancer risk as moderate were also predictive of attendance. Expectation of pain at mammography was predictive of non-attendance. CONCLUSION: Mammography screening organised as a public health service was well accepted. A recent mammogram, high reliance on self control of breast cancer......OBJECTIVE: To study psychosocial predictors of attendance at an organised breast cancer screening programme. SETTING: Finnish screening programme based on personal first round invitations in 1992-94, and with 90% attendance rate. METHODS: Attenders (n = 946) belonged to a 10% random sample (n...... Scale, Illness Attitude Scale, Health Locus of Control Scale, Anxiety Inventory, and Depression Inventory. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to predict attendance. RESULTS: Those most likely to attend were working, middle income, and averagely educated women, who had...

  13. Significance of screening mammography in the detection of breast diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Soo Youn; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Oh, Yu Whan; Kim, Hong In; Chung, Kyoo Byung [College of Medicine Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the screening mammography in the detection of the breast diseases, especially breast carcinoma. We analyzed 1,800 cases of mammography retrospectively. The mammography was done as a part of routine check in Health Counselling Center, Korea University Medical Center, during 9 months from November 1993 to July 1994. The age range was from 23 years to 76 years, mean 49.8 years, and the largest age group was 6th decade (31.4%). According to the mammographic findings, we divided the subjects into three groups; normal group, abnormal group in need of follow-up study, abnormal group requiring biopsy. On mammography, the normal group consisted of 1,534 cases (85%), and the abnormal group consisted of 266 cases (15%). The abnormal findings were benign-looking calcification (n = 140), fibroadeno ma (n = 29), fibrocystic changes (n = 27), cyst (n = 23), malignant lesion (n = 15) lipoma (n = 7), and others. In four of 15 cases, which were suspected to be malignant on mammograms, breast carcinoma was confirmed pathologically. In four cases of breast carcinoma, one was under 40 and the other 3 were over 50 years of age. All of the breast cancers were under 3 cm in size, and the mammographic findings of breast cancer included spiculated margin (n = 3), parenchymal distortion (n = 3), malignant calcification (n = 2) and enlarged axillary node (n = 1). Screening mammogram is helpful for early detection of non-palpable breast cancer, especially for women over 50 years of age.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Double Reading versus Single Reading of Mammograms in a Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posso, Margarita; Carles, Misericòrdia; Rué, Montserrat; Puig, Teresa; Bonfill, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The usual practice in breast cancer screening programmes for mammogram interpretation is to perform double reading. However, little is known about its cost-effectiveness in the context of digital mammography. Our purpose was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of double reading versus single reading of digital mammograms in a population-based breast cancer screening programme. Methods Data from 28,636 screened women was used to establish a decision-tree model and to compare three strategies: 1) double reading; 2) double reading for women in their first participation and single reading for women in their subsequent participations; and 3) single reading. We calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), which was defined as the expected cost per one additionally detected cancer. We performed a deterministic sensitivity analysis to test the robustness of the ICER. Results The detection rate of double reading (5.17‰) was similar to that of single reading (4.78‰; P = .768). The mean cost of each detected cancer was €8,912 for double reading and €8,287 for single reading. The ICER of double reading versus single reading was €16,684. The sensitivity analysis showed variations in the ICER according to the sensitivity of reading strategies. The strategy that combines double reading in first participation with single reading in subsequent participations was ruled out due to extended dominance. Conclusions From our results, double reading appears not to be a cost-effective strategy in the context of digital mammography. Double reading would eventually be challenged in screening programmes, as single reading might entail important net savings without significantly changing the cancer detection rate. These results are not conclusive and should be confirmed in prospective studies that investigate long-term outcomes like quality adjusted life years (QALYs). PMID:27459663

  15. Comparison of digital screening mammography and screen-film mammography in the early detection of clinically relevant cancers: a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluekens, A.M.; Holland, R.; Karssemeijer, N.; Broeders, M.J.M.; Heeten, G.J. den

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare screen-film mammography with digital mammography in a breast cancer screening program, with a focus on the clinical relevance of detected cancers. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the regional medical ethics review board. Informed consent was not required. Before

  16. Overdiagnosis, sojourn time, and sensitivity in the Copenhagen mammography screening program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne Helene; Agbaje, Olorunsola F; Myles, Jonathan P

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this research was to estimate the overdiagnosis at the first and second screens of the mammography screening program in Copenhagen, Denmark. This study involves a mammography service screening program in Copenhagen, Denmark, with 35,123 women screened at least once. We fit multistate...

  17. Different BIRADS Categories in Screening and Diagnostic Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Ehsanbakhsh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Iranian women. The mean age of these cancer patients is one decade younger than that of other developing countries. The aim of this study was frequency determination of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS subcategories, especially, higher categories and analysis of its related factors in the patients referred to the radiology department of Valie-Asr Hospital, Birjand."n"nPatients and Methods: The study was performed on 437 female patients from June 2006 to May 2007. Patients were divided into two groups; namely, those who underwent screening mammography and those who underwent diagnostic mammography. An expert radiologist reported the mammograms according to BIRADS classification. SPSS ver 12 software and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis and P-value was significant under 0.05. Results: The mean age was 43.8±9 years. Eighty-one percent of the mammograms were diagnostic and only 19% of them were screening mammographies. Unilateral breast pain was the most common symptom (29% of which 68% were premenopausal. Fify-five percent of them had a history of OCP consumption. The overall BIRADS classification frequencies were: category 0: 9 (3%, category 1: 85 (19%, category 2: 268 (61%, category 3: 37 (8%, category 4: 22 (5%, category 5: 16 (4%. A positive test result (BIRADS categories 4 and 5 in our study was 10.7% in the diagnostic group and 1.2% in the screening group (p=0.007. Five percent of all patients had a familial history of breast cancer. Conclusion: Screening mammography is recommended for early evaluation and early diagnosis of breast cancer.     

  18. Mammography screening. Benefits, harms, and informed choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2013-01-01

    . A mortality reduction can never justify a medical intervention in its own right, but must be weighed against the harms. Overdiagnosis is the most important harm of breast screening, but has gained wider recognition only in recent years. Screening leads to the detection and treatment of breast cancers...... that would otherwise never have been detected because they grow very slowly or not at all and would not have been detected in the woman's lifetime in the absence of screening. Screening therefore turns women into cancer patients unnecessarily, with life-long physical and psychological harms. The debate about...

  19. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2013-01-01

    A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary.......A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary....

  20. Discussing the benefits and harms of screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Meagan; Houssami, Nehmat

    2016-10-01

    Mammographic screening programs were established around the world following randomised clinical trials showing that women who were screened had a significant reduction in the risk of dying from breast cancer. Now, decades later, several harms of screening have become apparent and the degree of risk reduction is being debated. This article aims to provide clinicians with evidence-based information about the benefits and harms of screening mammography to enable them to confidently discuss the issues with their patients. The issues around screening for breast cancer in asymptomatic women at average risk are complex. Women need accurate, balanced information to make an informed decision about whether they wish to participate in screening. The decision will vary from one woman to another, depending on her level of anxiety about cancer and recall, her personal values and her philosophy about health care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Which screening strategy should be offered to women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations? A simulation of comparative cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bock, G H; Vermeulen, K M; Jansen, L; Oosterwijk, J C; Siesling, S; Dorrius, M D; Feenstra, T; Houssami, N; Greuter, M J W

    2013-04-30

    There is no consensus on the most effective strategy (mammography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) for screening women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Dutch, UK and US screening strategies, which involve mammography and MRI at different ages and intervals were evaluated in high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Into a validated simulation screening model, outcomes and cost parameters were integrated from published and cancer registry data. Main outcomes were life-years gained and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. The simulation was situated in the Netherlands as well as in the United Kingdom, comparing the Dutch, UK and US strategies with the population screening as a reference. A discount rate of 3% was applied to both costs and health benefits. In terms of life-years gained, the strategies from least to most cost-effective were the UK, Dutch and US screening strategy, respectively. However, the differences were small. Applying the US strategy in the Netherlands, the costs were €43 800 and 68 800 for an additional life-year gained for BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. At a threshold of €20 000 per life-year gained, implementing the US strategy in the Netherlands has a very low probability of being cost-effective. Stepping back to the less-effective UK strategy would save relatively little in costs and results in life-years lost. When implementing the screening strategies in the United Kingdom, the Dutch, as well as the US screening strategy have a high probability of being cost-effective. From a cost-effectiveness perspective, the Dutch screening strategy is preferred for screening high-risk women in the Netherlands as well as in the United Kingdom.

  2. Colorectal cancer screening participation: comparisons with mammography and prostate-specific antigen screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, S; Zapka, J; Puleo, E; Luckmann, R; Chasan-Taber, L

    2001-08-01

    The relation of personal characteristics, health and lifestyle behaviors, and cancer screening practices to current colorectal cancer (CRC) screening was assessed and compared with those factors' relation to current mammography screening in women and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in men. A cross-sectional random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 954 Massachusetts residents aged 50 and older was conducted. The overall prevalence of current CRC screening was 55.3%. Logistic regression results indicated that family history of CRC (odds ratio [OR] = 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02, 3.86), receiving a regular medical checkup (OR = 3.07; 95% CI = 2.00, 4.71), current screening by mammography in women and PSA in men (OR = 4.40; 95% CI = 2.94, 6.58), and vitamin supplement use (OR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.27, 2.77) were significant predictors of CRC screening. Health and lifestyle behaviors were related to increased current CRC, mammography, and PSA screening. Personal factors independently related to CRC screening were not consistent with those related to mammography and PSA screening. This lack of consistency may reflect different stages of adoption of each type of screening by clinicians and the public.

  3. Four Principles to Consider Before Advising Women on Screening Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, John D; Jørgensen, Karsten J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews four important screening principles applicable to screening mammography in order to facilitate informed choice. The first principle is that screening may help, hurt, or have no effect. In order to reduce mortality and mastectomy rates, screening must reduce the rate of advanced disease, which likely has not happened. Through overdiagnosis, screening produces substantial harm by increasing both lumpectomy and mastectomy rates, which offsets the often-promised benefit of less invasive therapy. Next, all-cause mortality is the most reliable way to measure the efficacy of a screening intervention. Disease-specific mortality is biased due to difficulties in attribution of cause of death and to increased mortality due to overdiagnosis and the resulting overtreatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. To enhance participation, the benefit from screening is often presented in relative instead of absolute terms. Third, some screening statistics must be interpreted with caution. Increased survival time and the percentage of early-stage tumors at detection sound plausible, but are affected by lead-time and length biases. In addition, analyses that only include women who attend screening cannot reliably correct for selection bias. The final principle is that accounting for tumor biology is important for accurate estimates of lead time, and the potential benefit from screening. Since "early detection" is actually late in a tumor's lifetime, the time window when screen detection might extend a woman's life is narrow, as many tumors that can form metastases will already have done so. Instead of encouraging screening mammography, physicians should help women make an informed decision as with any medical intervention.

  4. Is mammography screening history a predictor of future breast cancer risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the model by Walter and Day for risk of cervical cancer following negative screens, one might hypothesize that women in a mammography screening programme with a certain number of negative screens had a lower remaining breast cancer risk than that of women in general. We studied whether...... number of negative screens was a predictor for a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Funen. Data were collected from the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden (1989-2012), Copenhagen, Denmark (1991...... was not a predictor of a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden, Copenhagen and Funen, Denmark. The history of previous negative screens is therefore not suitable for personalisation of mammography screening....

  5. Socio-demographic determinants of participation in mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My; Olsen, Anne Helene; Njor, Sisse; Vejborg, Ilse; Schwartz, Walter; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2008-01-15

    Our objective was to use individual data on socio-demographic characteristics to identify predictors of participation in mammography screening and control to what extent they can explain the regional difference. We used data from mammography screening programmes in Copenhagen, 1991-1999, and Funen, 1993-2001, Denmark. Target groups were identified from the Population Register, screening data came from the health authority, and socio-demographic data from Statistics Denmark. Included were women eligible for at least 3 screens. The crude RR of never use versus always use was 3.21 (95%CI, 3.07-3.35) for Copenhagen versus Funen, and the adjusted RR was 2.55 (95%CI, 2.43-2.67). The adjusted RR for never use among women without contact to a primary care physician was 2.50 (95% CI, 2.31-2.71) and 2.89 (95% CI, 2.66-3.14), and for women without dental care 2.94 (95% CI, 2.77-3.12) and 2.88 (95% CI, 2.68-3.10) for Copenhagen and Funen, respectively. Other important predictive factors for nonparticipation were not being married and not being Danish. In conclusion, to enhance participation in mammography screening programmes special attention needs to be given to women not using other primary health care services. All women in Copenhagen, irrespective of their socio-demographic characteristics, had low participation. Screening programmes have to find ways to handle this urbanity factor. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Effect of adding screening ultrasonography to screening mammography on patient recall and cancer detection rates: A retrospective study in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohno, Eriko, E-mail: tohno@tmch.or.jp [Total Health Evaluation Center Tsukuba, 1-2, Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005 (Japan); Umemoto, Takeshi, E-mail: umemoto@tmch.or.jp [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, 1-3-1, Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005 (Japan); Sasaki, Kyoko, E-mail: kdon@za.cyberhome.ne.jp [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, 1-3-1, Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005 (Japan); Morishima, Isamu, E-mail: morishima@tmch.or.jp [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, 1-3-1, Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005 (Japan); Ueno, Ei, E-mail: e-ueno@tmch.or.jp [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, 1-3-1, Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To determine whether adding screening ultrasonography to screening mammography can reduce patient recall rates and increase cancer detection rates. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of mammography and ultrasonography breast screenings performed at the Total Health Evaluation Center Tsukuba, Japan, between April 2011 and March 2012. We also reviewed the modalities and results of diagnostic examinations from women with mammographic abnormalities who visited the Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital for further testing. Results: Of 11,753 women screened, cancer was diagnosed in 10 (0.22%) of the 4529 participants who underwent mammography alone, 23 (0.37%) of the 6250 participants who underwent ultrasonography alone, and 5 (0.51%) of the 974 participants who underwent mammography and ultrasonography. The recall rate due to mammographic abnormalities was 4.9% for women screened only with mammography and 2.6% for those screened with both modalities. The cancer detection rate was 0.22% for women screened only with mammography (positive predictive value, 4.5%) and 0.31% for those screened with both modalities (positive predictive value, 12.0%). Of the 211 lesions presenting as mammographic abnormalities investigated further, diagnostic ultrasonography found no abnormalities in 63 (29.9%) and benign findings in 69 (33.7%). The rest 36.4% needed mammography, cytological or histological examinations or follow-up in addition to diagnostic ultrasonography. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the recall rate in screening mammography by combining mammography and ultrasonography for breast screening.

  7. Performance of systematic and non-systematic ('opportunistic') screening mammography: a comparative study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihrmann, Kristine; Jensen, Allan; Olsen, Anne Helene;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation and comparison of the performance of organized and opportunistic screening mammography. METHODS: Women attending screening mammography in Denmark in 2000. The study included 37,072 women attending organized screening. Among these, 320 women were diagnosed with breast cancer...

  8. Breast cancer mortality in organised mammography screening in Denmark: comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl Jørgensen, Karsten; Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether the previously observed 25% reduction in breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen following the introduction of mammography screening was indeed due to screening, by using an additional screening region and five years additional follow-up.......To determine whether the previously observed 25% reduction in breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen following the introduction of mammography screening was indeed due to screening, by using an additional screening region and five years additional follow-up....

  9. Breast cancer mortality in organised mammography screening in Denmark: comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl Jørgensen, Karsten; Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether the previously observed 25% reduction in breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen following the introduction of mammography screening was indeed due to screening, by using an additional screening region and five years additional follow-up.......To determine whether the previously observed 25% reduction in breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen following the introduction of mammography screening was indeed due to screening, by using an additional screening region and five years additional follow-up....

  10. Effects of mammography screening under different screening schedules: Model estimates of potential benefits and harms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Mandelblatt (Jeanne); K.A. Cronin (Kathleen); S. Bailey (Stephanie); D.A. Berry (Donald); H.J. de Koning (Harry); G. Draisma (Gerrit); H. Huang (Hailiang); S.J. Lee (Stephanie Joi); M.F. Munsell (Mark); S.K. Plevritis (Sylvia); P.M. Ravdin (P.); C.B. Schechter (Clyde); B. Sigal (Bronislava); M.A. Stoto (Michael); N.K. Stout (Natasha); N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); J. Venier (John); M. Zelen (Marvin); E. Feuer (Eric)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Despite trials of mammography and widespread use, optimal screening policy is controversial. Objective: To evaluate U.S. breast cancer screening strategies. Design: 6 models using common data elements. Data Sources: National data on age-specific incidence, competing mortality

  11. [Fine needle aspiration cytology of mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvad, B.; Laenkholm, A.V.; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the year 2000 a quality assurance programme for the preoperative breast diagnostics was introduced in Denmark. The programme was based on the "European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis" where - among other measures - five cytological...... diagnostic classes were introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality assurance programme in a screening population to determine whether fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) as first choice remains a useful tool in the preoperative diagnostics, or if needle core biopsy should be the first...... of 66% of the 783 FNACs had a malignant cytology diagnosis, which in 99% of the cases turned out to be the correct diagnosis. Four lesions were false positives all of which represented benign proliferative breast diseases. The surgical procedures in these cases were either excisional biopsy...

  12. ROC study of screen-film mammography and storage phosphor digital mammography: analysis of nonconcordant classifications and implications for the approval of digital mammography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Matthew T.; Artz, Dorothy S.; Hogge, Jacquelyn; Zuurbier, Rebecca A.; Jafroudi, Hamid; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-04-01

    A recently completed ROC study of digital mammography using a 100 micron pixel storage phosphor receptor showed that digital mammography and conventional screen film mammography were essentially equivalent in areas under the ROC curve. In this study, there were 24 biopsy proven breast cancer cases, 25 benign biopsy cases and 48 clinically normal breast images each with matched screen film and storage phosphor images. Fifteen of the 24 cancer cases were 10 mm or less in size. Of these 10 presented with microcalcifications as the sign of disease. Six radiologists not involved with the research program and without prior experience with digital mammography and who met qualification criteria under the Mammography Quality Standards Act of 1992 served as readers. This poster looks at the cases in which there was variance between the radiologists ROC classification system for the digital and screen film system in order to analyze case specific discrepancies that may indicate benefits or deficits of the digital system. Aspects of the ROC ratings are also analyzed including an evaluation of the different thresholds used by radiologists on the digital and screen film systems, the distribution of ROC ratings in normal and abnormal cases, the effect of using different gold standards of proof on the results and the effect of substituting an ACR BIRADS category agreement study as proposed by the FDA compared to the ROC study outcome.

  13. Real-time reading in mammography breast screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotto, R; Brancato, B; Bonetti, F; Manfrin, E; Strabbioli, M; Mercanti, A; Falsirollo, F; Bricolo, P; Pistolesi, G F

    2007-03-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the role of real-time reading in the mammography screening programme carried out at the Hospital of Marzana, Verona, Italy. During the 5-year period 1999-2004, 54,472 women attended the screening programme (32,291 first calls: unadjusted uptake 41.4%, adjusted uptake 50.3%; 21,551 2- year routine recalls: unadjusted uptake 86.4%, adjusted uptake 89.9%). Further diagnostic investigations [(FDI), imaging and cytohistological] were performed immediately after real-time reading of the screening mammograms (FDI rate among first calls 10.9%; FDI rate among 2-year recalls 5.4%). Overall, cytohistological FDI were requested in 27% of imaging FDI, with a clear prevalence of cytological [fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) 87%] over histological procedures [core needle biopsy (CNB) 11%; vacuum aspiration biopsy (VAB) 2%]. Imaging FDI proved to be conclusive in 73%. Cytohistological FDI led to the use of surgical biopsy (SB) in 39.5% (ratio between benign and malignant SB: 0.19/first calls, 0.14/2-year recalls). There were a total of 427 screen-detected breast cancers (BC), with a very good breast cancer detection rate (BCDR/first calls 9.7 per thousand; BCDR/2-year recalls 5.1 per thousand). In the 427 screen-detected BC, the incidence of pTis, pT1a,b cancers was 59.6% (diagnostic anticipation); the incidence of pN0 cancers was 61.2%; the incidence of conservative surgical procedures was 78.6%. In interval cancers, the false negative rate was 8.3% only, whereas the proportional incidence was very low indeed (14% first year; 38% second year). The high sensitivity exhibited by the Marzana mammography screening programme suggests that the value of real-time reading should be validated by other programmes adopting a similar approach.

  14. Screening mammography beliefs and recommendations: a web-based survey of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Shagufta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appropriateness and cost-effectiveness of screening mammography (SM for women younger than 50 and older than 74 years is debated in the clinical research community, among health care providers, and by the American public. This study explored primary care physicians' (PCPs perceptions of the influence of clinical practice guidelines for SM; the recommendations for SM in response to hypothetical case scenarios; and the factors associated with perceived SM effectiveness and recommendations in the US from June to December 2009 before the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF recently revised guidelines. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,922 PCPs was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire. The response rate was 5.7% (684; (41% 271 family physicians (FP, (36% 232 general internal medicine physicians (IM, (23% 150 obstetrician-gynaecologists (OBG, and (0.2% 31 others. Cross-sectional analysis examined PCPs perceived effectiveness of SM, and recommendation for SM in response to hypothetical case scenarios. PCPs responses were measured using 4-5 point adjectival scales. Differences in perceived effectiveness and recommendations for SM were examined after adjusting for PCPs specialty, race/ethnicity, and the US region. Results Compared to IM and FP, OBG considered SM more effective in reducing breast cancer mortality among women aged 40-49 years (p = 0.003. Physicians consistently recommended mammography to women aged 50-69 years with no differences by specialty (p = 0.11. However, 94% of OBG "always recommended" SM to younger and 86% of older women compared to 81% and 67% for IM and 84% and 59% for FP respectively (p = p = Conclusions A majority of physicians, especially OBG, favour aggressive breast cancer screening for women from 40 through 79 years of age, including women with short life expectancy. Policy interventions should focus on educating providers to provide tailored recommendations for

  15. Estimating the benefits of mammography screening: the impact of study design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne Helene; Njor, Sisse H; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammography screening is justifiable only if it leads to reduction in breast cancer mortality. However, evaluation of routine screening is not straightforward, as no unscreened control group is available. We report here on a cohort study of the effect of routine mammography on breast...... control group resulted in an estimated increase of 6% in breast cancer mortality. CONCLUSION: Estimated changes in breast cancer mortality following the introduction of routine mammography ranged from a 25% reduction (based on the best methodology) to a 6% increase with a less rigid study design....... The estimated effect of routine mammography on breast cancer mortality is thus highly dependent on study design....

  16. Spousal influence on mammography screening: a life course perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missinne, Sarah; Colman, Elien; Bracke, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Recently, researchers have challenged the basic tenet that marriage is universally protective for all individuals. We scrutinize socio-economic differences between married couples to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of marriage. We introduce the life course perspective to investigate if differences in positive health behavior between couples are related to their early life conditions. Within the theoretical framework of cultural health capital, we hypothesize that the accumulation of cultural health capital proceeds at the marriage level when partners provide each other with health-related information and norms. For this purpose, we examine the influence of the childhood preventive health care behavior of both wives and husbands on the initiation of mammography screening for a sample of Belgian women (N = 734). Retrospective life histories of both partners are provided by the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement (SHARE) and are examined by means of event history analysis. The results show that a partner's cultural health capital affects the initiation of mammography screening by a woman in later life, even after her own cultural health capital and traditional measures of socio-economic status (SES) are taken into account. In line with cumulative advantage theory, it seems that inequalities in cultural health capital are accumulated at the marriage level. In order to shed further light on the spousal influence on health behavior, researchers should revert to early life in order to discern the attribution of premarital and marital conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Volumetric breast density affects performance of digital screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, Johanna O P; Holland, Katharina; Veldhuis, Wouter B; Mann, Ritse M; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Peeters, Petra H M; van Gils, Carla H; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-02-01

    To determine to what extent automatically measured volumetric mammographic density influences screening performance when using digital mammography (DM). We collected a consecutive series of 111,898 DM examinations (2003-2011) from one screening unit of the Dutch biennial screening program (age 50-75 years). Volumetric mammographic density was automatically assessed using Volpara. We determined screening performance measures for four density categories comparable to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast density categories. Of all the examinations, 21.6% were categorized as density category 1 ('almost entirely fatty') and 41.5, 28.9, and 8.0% as category 2-4 ('extremely dense'), respectively. We identified 667 screen-detected and 234 interval cancers. Interval cancer rates were 0.7, 1.9, 2.9, and 4.4‰ and false positive rates were 11.2, 15.1, 18.2, and 23.8‰ for categories 1-4, respectively (both p-trend density categories: 85.7, 77.6, 69.5, and 61.0% for categories 1-4, respectively (p-trend density, automatically measured on digital mammograms, impacts screening performance measures along the same patterns as established with ACR breast density categories. Since measuring breast density fully automatically has much higher reproducibility than visual assessment, this automatic method could help with implementing density-based supplemental screening.

  18. Statistical Methods for Estimating the Cumulative Risk of Screening Mammography Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubbard, R.A.; Ripping, T.M.; Chubak, J.; Broeders, M.J.; Miglioretti, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study illustrates alternative statistical methods for estimating cumulative risk of screening mammography outcomes in longitudinal studies. METHODS: Data from the US Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) and the Nijmegen Breast Cancer Screening Program in the Netherlands were

  19. The clinical utility and cost effectiveness of routine thyroid screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depression, cognitive impairment, and psychosis, while ... the utility and cost effectiveness of the current protocol used in thyroid testing in adult psychiatric patients presenting at .... Antidepressants were prescribed to 302 (28%) of patients,.

  20. Costs, effects, and savings of screening for cystic fibrosis gene carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Wildhagen (Mark); H.B. Hilderink; J.G. Verzijl; J.B. Verheij (Joke); L. Kooij (Loes); T. Tijmstra; L.P. ten Kate; J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractSTUDY OBJECTIVE: Evaluating the costs, effects, and savings of several strategies for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene carrier screening. DESIGN: A general model for evaluating prenatal, preconceptional, school, and neonatal carrier screening was constructed. For p

  1. Cost-effectiveness of newborn screening for cystic fibrosis determined with real-life data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, C.P.B. van der; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Vernooij-van Langen, A.M.M.; Elvers, L.H.; Gille, J.J.P.; Verkerk, P.H.; Dankert-Roelse, J.E.; Loeber, J.G.; Triepels, R.H.; Pal, S.M. van der; Dompeling, E.; Pals, G.; Gulmans, V.A.M.; Oey-Spauwen, M.J.W.; Wijnands, Y.H.H.M.; Castricum, L.M.; Arets, H.G.M.; Ent, C.K. van der; Tiddens, H.A.W.M.; Rijke, Y.B. de; Yntema, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous cost-effectiveness studies using data from the literature showed that newborn screening for cystic fibrosis (NBSCF) is a good economic option with positive health effects and longer survival. METHODS: We used primary data to compare cost-effectiveness of four screening strategie

  2. Cost-effectiveness of newborn screening for cystic fibrosis determined with real-life data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, C. P B; van den Akker-van Marle, M. E.; Vernooij-van Langen, A. M M; Elvers, L. H.; Gille, J. J P; Verkerk, P. H.; Dankert-Roelse, J. E.; Dankert-Roelse, J. E.; Vernooij-van Langen, A. M M; Loeber, J. G.; Elvers, L. H.; Triepels, R. H.; Gille, J. J P; Van der Ploeg, C. P B; van der Pal, S. M.; Dompeling, E.; Pals, G.; van den Akker van Marle, M. E.; Gulmans, V. A M; Oey-Spauwen, M. J W; Wijnands, Y. H H M; Castricum, L. M.; Arets, H. G M; van der Ent, C. K.; Tiddens, H. A W M; de Rijke, Y. B.; Yntema, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous cost-effectiveness studies using data from the literature showed that newborn screening for cystic fibrosis (NBSCF) is a good economic option with positive health effects and longer survival. Methods: We used primary data to compare cost-effectiveness of four screening strategie

  3. Cost effectiveness of abdominal aortic aneurysm screening and rescreening in men in a modern context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Laustsen, Jesper; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2012-01-01

    To assess the cost effectiveness of different screening strategies for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men, from the perspective of a national health service.......To assess the cost effectiveness of different screening strategies for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men, from the perspective of a national health service....

  4. A multiparametric automatic method to monitor long-term reproducibility in digital mammography: results from a regional screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, G; Ballaminut, A; Contento, G

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to illustrate a multiparametric automatic method for monitoring long-term reproducibility of digital mammography systems, and its application on a large scale. Twenty-five digital mammography systems employed within a regional screening programme were controlled weekly using the same type of phantom, whose images were analysed by an automatic software tool. To assess system reproducibility levels, 15 image quality indices (IQIs) were extracted and compared with the corresponding indices previously determined by a baseline procedure. The coefficients of variation (COVs) of the IQIs were used to assess the overall variability. A total of 2553 phantom images were collected from the 25 digital mammography systems from March 2013 to December 2014. Most of the systems showed excellent image quality reproducibility over the surveillance interval, with mean variability below 5%. Variability of each IQI was 5%, with the exception of one index associated with the smallest phantom objects (0.25 mm), which was below 10%. The method applied for reproducibility tests-multi-detail phantoms, cloud automatic software tool to measure multiple image quality indices and statistical process control-was proven to be effective and applicable on a large scale and to any type of digital mammography system. • Reproducibility of mammography image quality should be monitored by appropriate quality controls. • Use of automatic software tools allows image quality evaluation by multiple indices. • System reproducibility can be assessed comparing current index value with baseline data. • Overall system reproducibility of modern digital mammography systems is excellent. • The method proposed and applied is cost-effective and easily scalable.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Old and New Technologies for Aneuploidy Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkey, Rachel G; Odibo, Anthony O

    2016-06-01

    Cost-effectiveness analyses allow assessment of whether marginal gains from new technology are worth increased costs. Several studies have examined cost-effectiveness of Down syndrome (DS) screening and found it to be cost-effective. Noninvasive prenatal screening also appears to be cost-effective among high-risk women with respect to DS screening, but not for the general population. Chromosomal microarray (CMA) is a genetic sequencing method superior to but more expensive than karyotype. In light of CMAs greater ability to detect genetic abnormalities, it is cost-effective when used for prenatal diagnosis of an anomalous fetus. This article covers methodology and salient issues of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mammography and Other Screening Tests for Breast Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a clinical breast exam done? • What is breast self-awareness? • How is breast self-awareness different from the traditional breast self-exam? •Glossary ... problems includes mammography , clinical breast exams, and breast self-awareness. What is mammography? Mammography is an X-ray ...

  7. Teleradiology and mammography screening: evaluation of a network with dedicated workstations for reporting; Teleradiologie im Mammographie-Screening: Evaluation eines Testnetzes mit dedizierten Befundungsstationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, C.P.; Weigel, C.; Mohr, M.; Schimming, A.; Hosten, N. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ., Greifswald (Germany); Bick, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of a system that supports a workflow for breast cancer screening by mammography. The time of installation, system reliability and workstation operation were evaluated. Materials and Methods: The evaluated system (Image Diagnost, Munich, Germany) contains 2 diagnostic mammography workstations, a centralized server, and 2 Dicom shuttles for exchanging images via a physically existing network structure. Temporary archiving is possible. A mask designed for the needs of mammography screening facilitates assignment of BIRADS categories. The system automatically compares the categories assigned by a first and second reviewer and decides whether a consensus conference should be held. In the event that a conference is needed, the reviews are transmitted to the mammography expert responsible for the screening program and the consensus conference. Images are transferred via ISDN, Germany's National Research and Education Network (in the following DFN) and a central server between 2 sites which are approx. 100 km apart. We evaluated the duration of installation, the reliability of the system, and the usability of the workstation. Since we used curative mammography for evaluating the system, the patient age was noted for comparison. Results: the system was installed in five days. Once installed, the system functioned without any major breakdowns. Mammography units of 2 manufacturers were able to be connected to the system without difficulty. Mammographies of 151 patients were exchanged between the sites and evaluated by 2 radiologists. 57% of the patients were in the screening age (50-69 years). 9 exams were classified BIRADS 4a, 2 were 4b and 3 were BIRADS 5. The evaluations were technically perfect in 146/151 cases; hanging protocols had to be altered manually in 6 cases; the window/level had to be manually adjusted in 26/151 cases. Magnification was sufficient in all cases. The system exchanges examinations extremely quickly; up to 100 mammography

  8. Screening Mammography: A Pilot Study on Its Pertinence in Indian Population by Means of a Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Joish Upendra; Sreekanth, Vivek; Reddy, Harikiran R; Sridhar, Aishwarya B; Kodali, Niveditha; Prabhu, Anitha S

    2017-08-01

    Breast cancer incidence and related mortality is increasing in Indian women. Indian ladies hesitate to seek medical care for breast related issues. Screening mammography, proved to effectively reduce mortality, has been deemed not feasible in Indian context due to cost considerations. The suggested alternatives have not been proven to improve mortality rates. To find the relevance of screening mammography camp among Indian women. A week long screening mammography camp was organized in a tertiary care hospital. Clinical examination was done followed by bilateral mammography. Mammograms were reported as per American College of Radiology-Breast Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (ACR-BIRADS) 5(th) edition specifications. Lesions deemed BIRADS 4 and 5 were biopsied. BIRADS 3 category findings were suggested short interval follow up. A total of 118 women, ranging from 35 to 64 years of age with mean age of 49.6 years underwent mammography. Thirty ladies with dense breast compositions further underwent sono-mammography. Six (5.1%) new cases of breast carcinomas were detected during this study and 28 (23.7%) cases with probably benign findings were advised short interval follow up. Mammography, being a proven screening modality effective in reducing mortality, needs incorporation into the nationwide program for breast cancer detection, inspite of financial considerations. Organizing mammography camps will help create awareness and encourage public to utilize services.

  9. Digital mammography in a screening programme and its implications for pathology: a comparative study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeley, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Most studies comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with conventional screen-film mammography (SFM) have been radiology-based. The pathological implications of FFDM have received little attention in the literature, especially in the context of screening programmes. The primary objective of this retrospective study is to compare FFDM with SFM in a population-based screening programme with regard to a number of pathological parameters.

  10. Prevention, screening and treatment of colorectal cancer: a global and regional generalized cost effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns Benjamin P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regional generalized cost-effectiveness estimates of prevention, screening and treatment interventions for colorectal cancer are presented. Methods Standardised WHO-CHOICE methodology was used. A colorectal cancer model was employed to provide estimates of screening and treatment effectiveness. Intervention effectiveness was determined via a population state-transition model (PopMod that simulates the evolution of a sub-regional population accounting for births, deaths and disease epidemiology. Economic costs of procedures and treatment were estimated, including programme overhead and training costs. Results In regions characterised by high income, low mortality and high existing treatment coverage, the addition of screening to the current high treatment levels is very cost-effective, although no particular intervention stands out in cost-effectiveness terms relative to the others. In regions characterised by low income, low mortality with existing treatment coverage around 50%, expanding treatment with or without screening is cost-effective or very cost-effective. Abandoning treatment in favour of screening (no treatment scenario would not be cost effective. In regions characterised by low income, high mortality and low treatment levels, the most cost-effective intervention is expanding treatment. Conclusions From a cost-effectiveness standpoint, screening programmes should be expanded in developed regions and treatment programmes should be established for colorectal cancer in regions with low treatment coverage.

  11. Comparison of mammography in combination with breast ultrasonography versus mammography alone for breast cancer screening in asymptomatic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonlikit, Sarawan

    2013-01-01

    To compare the agreement of screening breast mammography plus ultrasound and reviewed mammography alone in asymptomatic women. All breast imaging data were obtained for women who presented for routine medical checkup at National Cancer Institute (NCI), Thailand from January 2010 to June 2013. A radiologist performed masked interpretations of selected mammographic images retrieved from the computer imaging database. Previous mammography, ultrasound reports and clinical data were blinded before film re-interpretation. Kappa values were calculated to assess the agreement between BIRADS assessment category and BIRADS classification of density obtained from the mammography with ultrasound in imaging database and reviewed mammography alone. Regarding BIRADS assessment category, concordance between the two interpretations were good. Observed agreement was 96.1%. There was moderate agreement in which the Kappa value was 0.58% (95%CI; 0.45, 0.87). The agreement of BI-RADS classification of density was substantial, with a Kappa value of 0.60 (95%CI; 0.54, 0.66). Different results were obtained when a subgroup of patients aged ≥60 years were analyzed. In women in this group, observed agreement was 97.6%. There was also substantial agreement in which the Kappa value was 0.74% (95%CI; 0.49, 0.98). The present study revealed that concordance between mammography plus ultrasound and reviewed mammography alone in asymptomatic women is good. However, there is just moderate agreement which can be enhanced if age- targeted breast imaging is performed. Substantial agreement can be achieved in women aged ≥60. Adjunctive breast ultrasound is less important in women in this group.

  12. Comparison of cumulative false-positive risk of screening mammography in the United States and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Katja Kemp

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the United States (US), about one-half of women screened with annual mammography have at least one false-positive test after ten screens. The estimate for European women screened ten times biennially is much lower. We evaluate to what extent screening interval, mammogram type......, and statistical methods, can explain the reported differences. METHODS: We included all screens from women first screened at age 50-69 years in the US Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) (n=99,455) between 1996-2010, and from two population-based mammography screening programs in Denmark (n=230,452 and n...

  13. Impact of Generic Alendronate Cost on the Cost-Effectiveness of Osteoporosis Screening and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Nayak; Roberts, Mark S.; Greenspan, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since alendronate became available in generic form in the Unites States in 2008, its price has been decreasing. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of alendronate cost on the cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis screening and treatment in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Microsimulation cost-effectiveness model of osteoporosis screening and treatment for U.S. women age 65 and older. We assumed screening initiation at age 65 with central dual-energy x-ray absorp...

  14. Breast examination as a cost-effective screening tool in a clinical practice setting in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetola M. Ogunbode

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is a disease of public health importance. It results in high morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. The high morbidity and mortality from breast cancer can be decreased by measures targeted at early detection such as screening. Breast examination as a screening tool for breast cancer in developing countries is advocated in view of its costeffectiveness.Method: The article selection method was obtained from primary and secondary literature sources which included original research articles, case control studies, review articles, proceedings, transactions and textbooks. The authors cited a clinical audit and articles published between 1988 and 2011. The search strategy included the use of internet search engines. This review was part of a larger research and the study protocol was approved by the University of Ibadan/University College Hospital, Ibadan Institutional Review Board (UI/UCH IRB. Clinical trial registration number-NHREC/05/01/2008a.Results: Breast self-examination (BSE and clinical breast examination (CBE as screening tools for breast cancer were analysed in detail.Conclusion: Breast examination is a screening tool that is cost-effective and reliable and should be encouraged in resource-constrained countries. Given the high cost and expertise required for mammography, current efforts at screening for breast cancer in developing countries should rely more on a combination of BSE and CBE.

  15. Breast examination as a cost-effective screening tool in a clinical practice setting in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetola M. Ogunbode

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is a disease of public health importance. It results in high morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. The high morbidity and mortality from breast cancer can be decreased by measures targeted at early detection such as screening. Breast examination as a screening tool for breast cancer in developing countries is advocated in view of its costeffectiveness.Method: The article selection method was obtained from primary and secondary literature sources which included original research articles, case control studies, review articles, proceedings, transactions and textbooks. The authors cited a clinical audit and articles published between 1988 and 2011. The search strategy included the use of internet search engines. This review was part of a larger research and the study protocol was approved by the University of Ibadan/University College Hospital, Ibadan Institutional Review Board (UI/UCH IRB. Clinical trial registration number-NHREC/05/01/2008a.Results: Breast self-examination (BSE and clinical breast examination (CBE as screening tools for breast cancer were analysed in detail.Conclusion: Breast examination is a screening tool that is cost-effective and reliable and should be encouraged in resource-constrained countries. Given the high cost and expertise required for mammography, current efforts at screening for breast cancer in developing countries should rely more on a combination of BSE and CBE.

  16. Determinants of mammography screening behavior in Iranian women: A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Moodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer remains a substantial health concern in Iran due to delay and late stage at diagnosis and treatment. Despite the potential benefits of mammography screening for early detection of breast cancer, the performance of this screening among Iranian women is low. For planning appropriate intervention, this study was carried out to identify mammography rates and explore determinants of mammography screening behavior in females of Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this population-based study, 384 women of 40 years and older were interviewed by telephone. The Farsi version of Champion′s Health Belief Model scale (CHBMS was used to examine factors associated with mammography screening. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version 16.0 using statistical Chi-square, Fisher Exact test, t-test and multiple logistic regression model to identify the importance rate of socio-demographic and Health Belief Model (HBM variables to predict mammography screening behavior. In all of tests, the level of significant was considered a = 0.05. Results: Mean age ΁ SD of women was 52.24 ΁ 8.2 years. Of the 384 participants, 44.3% reported at least one mammogram in their lifetime. Logistic regression analysis indicated that women were more likely to have mammography if they heard/read about breast cancer (OR = 4.17, 95% CI 2.09, 8.34, menopause in lower age (OR = 0.2, 95% CI 0.87, 0.99 and history of breast problem (OR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.12, 0.32. Also, women who perceived more benefits of mammography (OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.63, 2.09, fewer barriers of mammography (OR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.86, 0.96 and had more motivation for health (OR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.89, 1 were more likely to have mammography. Conclusion: The findings indicated that the rate of mammography screening among women in Isfahan province is low and highlights the need for developing a comprehensive national breast cancer control program, which should be considered as the first

  17. Comparing sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography in the United States and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp Jacobsen, Katja; O'Meara, Ellen S; Key, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of screening mammography differs substantially between the United States (US) and Denmark. We evaluated whether there are differences in screening sensitivity and specificity. We included screens from women screened at age 50-69 years during 1996-2008/2009 in the US Breast Cancer...... Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) (n = 2,872,791), and from two population-based mammography screening programs in Denmark (Copenhagen, n = 148,156 and Funen, n = 275,553). Women were followed-up for 1 year. For initial screens, recall rate was significantly higher in BCSC (17.6%) than in Copenhagen (4...

  18. Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Screening Strategies in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin Yu; Finkelstein, Eric A; Ng, Mor Jack; Yap, Fabian; Yeo, George S H; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Kwek, Kenneth Y C; Tan, Kok Hian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer's perspective in Singapore of 3 gestational diabetes mellitus screening strategies: universal, targeted, or no screening. A decision tree model assessed the primary outcome: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from the literature, the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study, and the KK Women's and Children's Hospital's database. Relative to targeted screening using risk factors, universal screening generates an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $USD10,630/QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses show that disease prevalence rates and intervention effectiveness of glycemic management have the biggest impacts on the ICERs. Based on the model and best available data, universal screening is a cost-effective approach for reducing the complications of gestational diabetes mellitus in Singapore as compared with the targeted screening approach or no screening.

  19. Impact of Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organizations at Screening Mammography: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Anand K; Harvey, Susan C; Durand, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of accountable care organizations (ACOs) on use of screening mammography in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), the largest value-based reimbursement program in U.S.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of HIV screening of patients attending clinics for sexually transmitted diseases in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, JM; Fennema, JSA; Postma, MJ

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of universal HIV screening of patients attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in Amsterdam. Design: Cost effectiveness analysis. Methods: A Bernoulli model for the secondary transmission of HIV was linked with epidemiological data on

  1. Universal HIV screening of pregnant women in England : cost effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Maarten; Beck, E J; Mandalia, S; Sherr, L; Walters, M D; Houweling, H; Jager, Johannes C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost effectiveness of universal, voluntary HIV screening of pregnant women in England. DESIGN: Cost effectiveness analysis. Cost estimates of caring for HIV positive children were based on the stage of HIV infection and calculated using data obtained from a London hospital

  2. Cost-effectiveness of HIV screening of patients attending clinics for sexually transmitted diseases in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, JM; Fennema, JSA; Postma, MJ

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of universal HIV screening of patients attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in Amsterdam. Design: Cost effectiveness analysis. Methods: A Bernoulli model for the secondary transmission of HIV was linked with epidemiological data on

  3. Cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening: Cytology versus human papillomavirus DNA testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost); I.M.C.M. de Kok (Inge); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective To determine the most cost-effective screening programme for cervical cancer. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal perspective. Setting The Netherlands. Population Dutch women who have not been invited for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Methods We calibra

  4. Cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening: Cytology versus human papillomavirus DNA testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost); I.M.C.M. de Kok (Inge); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective To determine the most cost-effective screening programme for cervical cancer. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal perspective. Setting The Netherlands. Population Dutch women who have not been invited for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Methods We calibra

  5. Universal HIV screening of pregnant women in England : cost effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Maarten; Beck, E J; Mandalia, S; Sherr, L; Walters, M D; Houweling, H; Jager, Johannes C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost effectiveness of universal, voluntary HIV screening of pregnant women in England. DESIGN: Cost effectiveness analysis. Cost estimates of caring for HIV positive children were based on the stage of HIV infection and calculated using data obtained from a London hospital

  6. Cost-effectiveness of a tailored intervention designed to increase breast cancer screening among a non-adherent population: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Yoshiki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the percentage of women who initiate breast cancer screening is rising, the rate of continued adherence is poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a tailored print intervention compared with a non-tailored print intervention for increasing the breast cancer screening rate among a non-adherent population. Methods In total, 1859 participants aged 51–59 years (except those aged 55 years were recruited from a Japanese urban community setting. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a tailored print reminder (tailored intervention group or non-tailored print reminder (non-tailored intervention group. The primary outcome was improvement in the breast cancer screening rate. The screening rates and cost-effectiveness were examined for each treatment group (tailored vs. non-tailored and each intervention subgroup during a follow-up period of five months. All analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. Results The number of women who underwent a screening mammogram following the reminder was 277 (19.9% in the tailored reminder group and 27 (5.8% in the non-tailored reminder group. A logistic regression model revealed that the odds of a woman who received a tailored print reminder undergoing mammography was 4.02 times those of a women who had received a non-tailored print reminder (95% confidence interval, 2.67–6.06. The cost of one mammography screening increase was 2,544 JPY or 30 USD in the tailored intervention group and 4,366 JPY or 52 USD in the non-tailored intervention group. Conclusions Providing a tailored print reminder was an effective and cost-effective strategy for improving breast cancer screening rates among non-adherent women.

  7. [Cost-effectiveness analysis of universal screening for thyroid disease in pregnant women in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay Candil, Sergio; Balsa Barro, José Antonio; Álvarez Hernández, Julia; Crespo Palomo, Carlos; Pérez-Alcántara, Ferrán; Polanco Sánchez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of universal screening for thyroid disease in pregnant women in Spain as compared to high risk screening and no screening. A decision-analytic model comparing the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of universal screening versus high risk screening and versus no screening. was used for the pregnancy and postpartum period. Probabilities from randomized controlled trials were considered for adverse obstetrical outcomes. A Markov model was used to assess the lifetime period after the first postpartum year and account for development of overt hypothyroidism. The main assumptions in the model and use of resources were assessed by local clinical experts. The analysis considered direct healthcare costs only. Universal screening gained .011 QALYs over high risk screening and .014 QALYS over no screening. Total direct costs per patient were €5,786 for universal screening, €5,791 for high risk screening, and €5,781 for no screening. Universal screening was dominant compared to risk-based screening and a very cost-effective alternative as compared to no screening. Use of universal screening instead of high risk screening would result in €2,653,854 annual savings for the Spanish National Health System. Universal screening for thyroid disease in pregnant women in the first trimester is dominant in Spain as compared to risk-based screening, and is cost-effective as compared to no screening (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €374 per QALY). Moreover, it allows diagnosing and treating cases of clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism that may not be detected when only high-risk women are screened. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Type of hormone therapy and risk of misclassification at mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse H; Hallas, Jesper; Schwartz, Walter;

    2011-01-01

    Current users of hormone therapy (HT) are known to have a lower accuracy of mammography screening than do never users. We studied whether the risk of misclassification depends on type of hormone, administration, regimen, and dose of the therapy.......Current users of hormone therapy (HT) are known to have a lower accuracy of mammography screening than do never users. We studied whether the risk of misclassification depends on type of hormone, administration, regimen, and dose of the therapy....

  9. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobbes, Marc B.I.; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lalji, Ulrich; Houwers, Janneke; Nijssen, Estelle C. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Roozendaal, Lori van; Heuts, Esther [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Smidt, Marjolein L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Feasibility studies have shown that contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) increases diagnostic accuracy of mammography. We studied diagnostic accuracy of CESM in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme, who have a lower disease prevalence than previously published papers on CESM. During 6 months, all women referred to our hospital were eligible for CESM. Two radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis provided BI-RADS classifications for conventional mammography and CESM. Statistical significance of differences between mammography and CESM was calculated using McNemar's test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for both imaging modalities. Of the 116 eligible women, 113 underwent CESM. CESM increased sensitivity to 100.0 % (+3.1 %), specificity to 87.7 % (+45.7 %), PPV to 76.2 % (+36.5 %) and NPV to 100.0 % (+2.9 %) as compared to mammography. Differences between conventional mammography and CESM were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). A similar trend was observed in the ROC curve. For conventional mammography, AUC was 0.779. With CESM, AUC increased to 0.976 (p < 0.0001). In addition, good agreement between tumour diameters measured using CESM, breast MRI and histopathology was observed. CESM increases diagnostic performance of conventional mammography, even in lower prevalence patient populations such as referrals from breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  10. Screening, prevention and treatment of cervical cancer -- a global and regional generalized cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary Michael; Edejer, Tessa Tan-Torres; Lauer, Jeremy A; Sepulveda, Cecilia

    2009-10-09

    The paper calculates regional generalized cost-effectiveness estimates of screening, prevention, treatment and combined interventions for cervical cancer. Using standardised WHO-CHOICE methodology, a cervical cancer model was employed to provide estimates of screening, vaccination and treatment effectiveness. Intervention effectiveness was determined via a population state-transition model (PopMod) that simulates the evolution of a sub-regional population accounting for births, deaths and disease epidemiology. Economic costs of procedures and treatment were estimated, including programme overhead and training costs. In regions characterized by high income, low mortality and high existing treatment coverage, the addition of any screening programme to the current high treatment levels is very cost-effective. However, based on projections of the future price per dose (representing the economic costs of the vaccination excluding monopolistic rents and vaccine development cost) vaccination is the most cost-effective intervention. In regions characterized by low income, low mortality and existing treatment coverage around 50%, expanding treatment with or without combining it with screening appears to be cost-effective or very cost-effective. Abandoning treatment in favour of screening in a no-treatment scenario would not be cost-effective. Vaccination is usually the most cost-effective intervention. Penta or tri-annual PAP smears appear to be cost-effective, though when combined with HPV-DNA testing they are not cost-effective. In regions characterized by low income, high mortality and low treatment levels, expanding treatment with or without adding screening would be very cost-effective. A one off vaccination plus expanding treatment was usually very cost-effective. One-off PAP or VIA screening at age 40 are more cost-effective than other interventions though less effective overall. From a cost-effectiveness perspective, consideration should be given to implementing

  11. Costs, effects, and savings of screening for cystic fibrosis gene carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildhagen, MF; Hilderink, HBM; Verzijl, JG; Verheij, JBGM; Kooij, L; Tijmstra, T; ten Kate, LP; Habbema, JDF

    1998-01-01

    Study objective-Evaluating the costs, effects, and savings of several strategies for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene carrier screening. Design-A general model for evaluating prenatal, preconceptional, school, and neonatal carrier screening was constructed. For prenatal and preconceptional screening, two s

  12. Predictive features of breast cancer on Mexican screening mammography patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Garza-Montemayor, Margarita; Trevino-Alvarado, Victor; Tamez-Pena, José Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer worldwide. In response, breast cancer screening programs are becoming common around the world and public programs now serve millions of women worldwide. These programs are expensive, requiring many specialized radiologists to examine all images. Nevertheless, there is a lack of trained radiologists in many countries as in Mexico, which is a barrier towards decreasing breast cancer mortality, pointing at the need of a triaging system that prioritizes high risk cases for prompt interpretation. Therefore we explored in an image database of Mexican patients whether high risk cases can be distinguished using image features. We collected a set of 200 digital screening mammography cases from a hospital in Mexico, and assigned low or high risk labels according to its BIRADS score. Breast tissue segmentation was performed using an automatic procedure. Image features were obtained considering only the segmented region on each view and comparing the bilateral di erences of the obtained features. Predictive combinations of features were chosen using a genetic algorithms based feature selection procedure. The best model found was able to classify low-risk and high-risk cases with an area under the ROC curve of 0.88 on a 150-fold cross-validation test. The features selected were associated to the differences of signal distribution and tissue shape on bilateral views. The model found can be used to automatically identify high risk cases and trigger the necessary measures to provide prompt treatment.

  13. Breast screening using 2D-mammography or integrating digital breast tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) for single-reading or double-reading--evidence to guide future screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssami, Nehmat; Macaskill, Petra; Bernardi, Daniela; Caumo, Francesca; Pellegrini, Marco; Brunelli, Silvia; Tuttobene, Paola; Bricolo, Paola; Fantò, Carmine; Valentini, Marvi; Ciatto, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    We compared detection measures for breast screening strategies comprising single-reading or double-reading using standard 2D-mammography or 2D/3D-mammography, based on the 'screening with tomosynthesis or standard mammography' (STORM) trial. STORM prospectively examined screen-reading in two sequential phases, 2D-mammography alone and integrated 2D/3D-mammography, in asymptomatic women participating in Trento and Verona (Northern Italy) population-based screening services. Outcomes were ascertained from assessment and/or excision histology or follow-up. For each screen-reading strategy we calculated the number of detected and non-detected (including interval) cancers, cancer detection rates (CDRs), false positive recall (FPR) measures and incremental CDR relative to a comparator strategy. We estimated the false:true positive (FP:TP) ratio and sensitivity of each mammography screening strategy. Paired binary data were compared using McNemar's test. Amongst 7292 screening participants, there were 65 (including six interval) breast cancers; estimated first-year interval cancer rate was 0.82/1000 screens (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.30-1.79/1000). For single-reading, 35 cancers were detected at both 2D and 2D/3D-mammography, 20 cancers were detected only with 2D/3D-mammography compared with none at 2D-mammography alone (preading, 39 cancers were detected at 2D-mammography and 2D/3D-mammography, 20 were detected only with 2D/3D-mammography compared with none detected at 2D-mammography alone (preading. Incremental CDR attributable to double-reading (versus single-reading) of 0.55/1000 screens (95% CI: -0.02-1.4) was evident for 2D-mammography and for 2D/3D-mammography. Estimated FP:TP ratios showed that 2D/3D-mammography screening strategies had more favourable FP to TP trade-off and higher sensitivity, applying single-reading or double-reading, relative to 2D-mammography screening. The evidence we report warrants rethinking of breast screening strategies and should

  14. Patterns and determinants of mammography screening in Lebanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Elias

    2017-03-01

    Providing mammography free-of-charge may alleviate some obstacles among women with socio-economic disadvantage. Stressing that good results one year do not make the cancer less likely or repeating the test less important, as well as improving the comfort of mammography testing could ensure test repeating.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of HIV screening for incarcerated pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Stephen; Altice, Frederick L; Paltiel, A David

    2005-02-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiated on a prenatal basis in HIV-infected pregnant women is a highly effective method for preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission. We developed a decision analytic model to project the clinical and economic outcomes of alternative HIV screening strategies (voluntary prenatal screening [VPS], routine prenatal screening [RPS], and mandatory newborn screening [MNS]) for a high-risk population of incarcerated pregnant women. Data for the decision model came from the HIV voluntary counseling and testing program at Connecticut's sole correctional facility for women and a comprehensive anonymously linked serosurvey of all inmates who entered the facility during the 2-year period beginning in October 1994. Based on serosurvey results, in the absence of any HIV screening program, 2.5 cases of pediatric HIV infection would be expected per 1000 pregnancies. Multiplied by the discounted lifetime cost per case of $247,000, this translates to a cost of $624 per testing-eligible prison entrant. Entrants were considered eligible if they were pregnant and their HIV status was unknown. MNS would save money, cost $364 per eligible entrant, and simultaneously reduce the rate of infections to 1.1 per 1000 pregnancies. Doing both MNS and RPS is most effective in reducing the rate of new infections (down to 0.2 per 1000 pregnancies). It would, however, increase costs to $430 per eligible entrant. This would result in an incremental cost of $73,603 per additional pediatric HIV case averted when compared with MNS alone. If mandatory newborn testing was not considered a feasible option, RPS would dominate VPS and would be cost-saving compared with no screening. RPS compares favorably with alternative uses of HIV prevention and treatment resources. In correctional facilities where voluntary newborn screening is already in place, our findings show that there remains a small marginal benefit to be realized from switching to RPS. In settings where HIV

  16. Cost-effectiveness of antenatal screening for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Killie, M K; Kjeldsen-Kragh, J; Husebekk, A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the costs and health consequences of three different screening strategies for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). DESIGN: Cost-utility analysis on the basis of a decision tree that incorporates the relevant strategies and outcomes. SETTING: Three health regions...

  17. Variation in detection of ductal carcinoma in situ during screening mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Ponti, Antonio; James, Ted

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in screening mammography. DCIS accounts for a substantial proportion of screen-detected lesions but its effect on breast cancer mortality is debated. The International Cancer Screening Network conducted a comparative ...

  18. Improving the Sensitivity of Screening Mammography in the South of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. van Breest Smallenburg (Vivian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis I explore several factors that influence the sensitivity of screening mammography, with the aim to improve screening outcome in the southern breast cancer screening region of the Netherlands. This general introduction describes: - the background and implementation of mass

  19. Design and methods for a randomized clinical trial comparing three outreach efforts to improve screening mammography adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed George

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the demonstrated need to increase screening mammography utilization and strong evidence that mail and telephone outreach to women can increase screening, most managed care organizations have not adopted comprehensive outreach programs. The uncertainty about optimum strategies and cost effectiveness have retarded widespread acceptance. While 70% of women report getting a mammogram within the prior 2 years, repeat mammography rates are less than 50%. This 5-year study is conducted though a Central Massachusetts healthcare plan and affiliated clinic. All womenhave adequate health insurance to cover the test. Methods/Design This randomized study compares 3 arms: reminder letter alone; reminder letter plus reminder call; reminder letter plus a second reminder and booklet plus a counselor call. All calls provide women with the opportunity to schedule a mammogram in a reasonable time. The invention period will span 4 years and include repeat attempts. The counselor arm is designed to educate, motivate and counsel women in an effort to alleviate PCP burden. All women who have been in the healthcare plan for 24 months and who have a current primary care provider (PCP and who are aged 51-84 are randomized to 1 of 3 arms. Interventions are limited to women who become ≥18 months from a prior mammogram. Women and their physicians may opt out of the intervention study. Measurement of completed mammograms will use plan billing records and clinic electronic records. The primary outcome is the proportion of women continuously enrolled for ≥24 months who have had ≥1 mammogram in the last 24 months. Secondary outcomes include the number of women who need repeat interventions. The cost effectiveness analysis will measure all costs from the provider perspective. Discussion So far, 18,509 women aged 51-84 have been enrolled into our tracking database and were randomized into one of three arms. At baseline, 5,223 women were eligible

  20. Design and methods for a randomized clinical trial comparing three outreach efforts to improve screening mammography adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Mary E; Luckmann, Roger; White, Mary Jo; Rosal, Milagros C; Cranos, Caroline; Reed, George; Clark, Robin; Sama, Susan; Yood, Robert

    2011-06-03

    Despite the demonstrated need to increase screening mammography utilization and strong evidence that mail and telephone outreach to women can increase screening, most managed care organizations have not adopted comprehensive outreach programs. The uncertainty about optimum strategies and cost effectiveness have retarded widespread acceptance. While 70% of women report getting a mammogram within the prior 2 years, repeat mammography rates are less than 50%. This 5-year study is conducted though a Central Massachusetts healthcare plan and affiliated clinic. All women have adequate health insurance to cover the test. This randomized study compares 3 arms: reminder letter alone; reminder letter plus reminder call; reminder letter plus a second reminder and booklet plus a counselor call. All calls provide women with the opportunity to schedule a mammogram in a reasonable time. The invention period will span 4 years and include repeat attempts. The counselor arm is designed to educate, motivate and counsel women in an effort to alleviate PCP burden.All women who have been in the healthcare plan for 24 months and who have a current primary care provider (PCP) and who are aged 51-84 are randomized to 1 of 3 arms. Interventions are limited to women who become ≥ 18 months from a prior mammogram. Women and their physicians may opt out of the intervention study.Measurement of completed mammograms will use plan billing records and clinic electronic records. The primary outcome is the proportion of women continuously enrolled for ≥ 24 months who have had ≥ 1 mammogram in the last 24 months. Secondary outcomes include the number of women who need repeat interventions. The cost effectiveness analysis will measure all costs from the provider perspective. So far, 18,509 women aged 51-84 have been enrolled into our tracking database and were randomized into one of three arms. At baseline, 5,223 women were eligible for an intervention. We anticipate that the outcome will provide

  1. Is adding HCV screening to the antenatal national screening program in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, cost-effective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, Anouk T.; van Keep, Marjolijn; Matser, Amy A.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Weegink, Christine J.; van den Hoek, Anneke; Prins, Maria; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to severe liver disease. Pregnant women are already routinely screened for several infectious diseases, but not yet for HCV infection. Here we examine whether adding HCV screening to routine screening is cost-effective. METHODS: To estimate

  2. Is adding HCV screening to the antenatal national screening program in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, cost-effective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, Anouk T.; van Keep, Marjolijn; Matser, Amy A.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Weegink, Christine J.; van den Hoek, Anneke; Prins, Maria; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to severe liver disease. Pregnant women are already routinely screened for several infectious diseases, but not yet for HCV infection. Here we examine whether adding HCV screening to routine screening is cost-effective. METHODS: To estimate th

  3. Mammography screening in Greece: An exploratory survey of women's views, experiences and behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athena Kalokerinou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internationally, breast cancer comprises 29% of all cancer incidences. In Greece, 1,500-1,800women die annually from breast cancer out of the 4,000 who are affected. Only 5% are detected at an early diseasestage through mammography screening.Aim: This paper presents findings from a study exploring the factors that influence Greek women’smammography screening behaviour.Methodology: Data were collected in Athens-Greece, during the period March-July 2008, from individuals whowere members of six women’s associations. One hundred and eighty six questionnaires were completed and 33interviews were conducted from a sub-sample. This paper reports the findings from the questionnaire survey.Results: Participants had a variety of demographic characteristics with 85% of them having attendedmammography screening. Only 61% of them intended to continue in the future. Τhe majority of women agreedwith a number of factors which supported their decision to participate in regular mammography screening, such asdoctors’ encouragement and mammogram efficacy to detect breast cancer at an early stage, while anxiety wasidentified as a possible inhibitor to their participation.Conclusion: Women’s mammography screening behaviour and perceptions of mammography screening appearedto be positive in relation to their participation. However, the reasons as to why a large number of women indicatedthey were unlikely to go for mammography screening again is not known, and needs further investigation.

  4. Comparison of 2D versus 3D mammography with screening cases: an observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, James Reza; Deshpande, Ruchi; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using human studies collected from was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this new 3D mammography technique. A prior study using a mammography phantom revealed no difference in calcification detection, but improved mass detection in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Data for this current study is currently being obtained, and a full report should be available in the next few weeks.

  5. A cost-effectiveness analysis of screening urine dipsticks in well-child care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Deepa L; Wang, Li; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Widome, Mark D; Paul, Ian M

    2010-04-01

    Despite data suggesting that routine urine screening for chronic kidney disease (CKD) has low diagnostic yield and the American Academy of Pediatrics 2007 recommendation to discontinue this screening, pediatricians may not have recognized this change. Because the new recommendation marks a major alteration in the practice guidelines, we sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dipstick urinalysis for detection of CKD from the primary care practitioner's perspective. Decision analysis was used to model a screening dipstick urinalysis strategy relative to a no-screening strategy. Data on the incidence of hematuria and proteinuria in children were derived from published reports of large cohorts of school-aged children. Direct costs were estimated from the perspective of the primary care practitioner. The measure of effectiveness was the rate of diagnoses of CKD. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated by using an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Expected costs and effectiveness for the no-screening strategy were 0 dollars because no resources were used and no cases of CKD were diagnosed. The screening strategy involved a cost per dipstick of 3.05 dollars. Accounting for both true-positive and false-positive initial screens, 14.2% of the patients required a second dipstick as per typical clinical care, bringing the expected cost of the screening strategy to 3.47 dollars per patient. In the screening strategy, 1 case of CKD was diagnosed per 800 screened, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was 2779.50 dollars per case diagnosed. Urine dipstick is inexpensive, but it is a poor screening test for CKD and a cost-ineffective procedure for the primary care provider. These data support the change in the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines on the use of screening dipstick urinalysis. Clinicians must consider the cost-effectiveness of preventive care procedures to make better use of available resources.

  6. Visualization of mocrocalcifications on mammographies obtained by digital fullfield mammography in comparison to conventional film-screen mammography; Visualisierung von Mikrokalzifikationen in digitaler Vollfeldmammographie im Vergleich zu konventioeller Film-Folien-Mammographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, S.; Heyden, H. von; Diekmann, F. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Inst. fuer Radiologie; Bick, U. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the visualization of microcalcifications on mammographies obtained by full-field digital mammography (FFDM) in comparison to conventional film-screen mammography (FSM). Material and Methods: Forty-seven digital and film-screen mammographies depicting histologically proven lesions (27 benign, 20 malignant) were assessed by 4 readers. The images obtained with the different systems were comparable in terms of positioning. Maximum time interval between film-screen mammography and digital mammography was three months. Using a questionnaire, the readers evaluated the number of microcalcifications and their subjective conspicuity for FFDM (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, USA) and FSM. A 7-point scale based on the BIRADS classification was used to characterize the calcifications by means of ROC analysis. Results: No statistically significant differences were seen between the two types of mammography among the readers in assessing the number of microcalcifications. The subjective conspicuity of microcalcifications was found to be significantly better for digital mammographies. The diagnosis assigned by the readers did not show significant differences between the two systems. Conclusion: Although the subjective conspicuity of microcalcifications was found to be significantly better on digital mammography compared to film-screen mammography, there was no significant advantage of digital mammography resulting from the higher contrast resolution nor a disadvantage in terms of characterization of microcalcifications resulting from the lower spacial resolution. The advantages of digital mammography (e.g. CAD-systems, archiving, dose reduction) can be used without a loss of diagnostic quality. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Mit der vorliegenden Studie soll die Erkennbarkeit von Mikroverkalkungen in der digitalen Vollfeldmammographie im Vergleich zur konventionellen Film-Folien-Mammographie evaluiert werden. Darueber hinaus soll die klinische

  7. Variation in detection of ductal carcinoma in situ during screening mammography: a survey within the International Cancer Screening Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynge, E.; Ponti, A.; James, T.; Majek, O.; Euler-Chelpin, M. von; Anttila, A.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Frigerio, A.; Kawai, M.; Scharpantgen, A.; Broeders, M.J.; Hofvind, S.; Vidal, C.; Ederra, M.; Salas, D.; Bulliard, J.L.; Tomatis, M.; Kerlikowske, K.; Taplin, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in screening mammography. DCIS accounts for a substantial proportion of screen-detected lesions but its effect on breast cancer mortality is debated. The International Cancer Screening Network conducted a comparative ana

  8. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Colonoscopy Depends on Adequate Bowel Preparation Rates – A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, James; Karanth, Siddharth; Revere, Frances Lee

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate bowel preparation during screening colonoscopy necessitates repeating colonoscopy. Studies suggest inadequate bowel preparation rates of 20–60%. This increases the cost of colonoscopy for our society. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the impact of inadequate bowel preparation rate on the cost effectiveness of colonoscopy compared to other screening strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods A microsimulation model of CRC screening strategies for the general population at average risk for CRC. The strategies include fecal immunochemistry test (FIT) every year, colonoscopy every ten years, sigmoidoscopy every five years, or stool DNA test every 3 years. The screening could be performed at private practice offices, outpatient hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers. Results At the current assumed inadequate bowel preparation rate of 25%, the cost of colonoscopy as a screening strategy is above society’s willingness to pay (<$50,000/QALY). Threshold analysis demonstrated that an inadequate bowel preparation rate of 13% or less is necessary before colonoscopy is considered more cost effective than FIT. At inadequate bowel preparation rates of 25%, colonoscopy is still more cost effective compared to sigmoidoscopy and stool DNA test. Sensitivity analysis of all inputs adjusted by ±10% showed incremental cost effectiveness ratio values were influenced most by the specificity, adherence, and sensitivity of FIT and colonoscopy. Conclusions Screening colonoscopy is not a cost effective strategy when compared with fecal immunochemical test, as long as the inadequate bowel preparation rate is greater than 13%. PMID:27936028

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis screening in Dutch pregnant women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rours, G I J G; Smith-Norowitz, Tamar Anne; Ditkowsky, Jared; Hammerschlag, Margaret R; Verkooyen, R P; de Groot, R.; Verbrugh, H A; Postma, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections during pregnancy may have serious consequences for women and their offspring. Chlamydial infections are largely asymptomatic. Hence, prevention is based on screening. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of C. trachomatis screening durin

  10. The cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes screening including prevention of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marseille, Elliot; Lohse, Nicolai; Jiwani, Aliya;

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with elevated risks of perinatal complications and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and screening and intervention can reduce these risks. We quantified the cost, health impact and cost-effectiveness of GDM screening and intervention in India and Israel...

  11. Routine HIV screening in Portugal: clinical impact and cost-effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdan Yazdanpanah

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of routine HIV screening in Portugal to the current practice of targeted and on-demand screening. DESIGN: We used Portuguese national clinical and economic data to conduct a model-based assessment. METHODS: We compared current HIV detection practices to strategies of increasingly frequent routine HIV screening in Portuguese adults aged 18-69. We considered several subpopulations and geographic regions with varying levels of undetected HIV prevalence and incidence. Baseline inputs for the national case included undiagnosed HIV prevalence 0.16%, annual incidence 0.03%, mean population age 43 years, mean CD4 count at care initiation 292 cells/μL, 63% HIV test acceptance, 78% linkage to care, and HIV rapid test cost €6 under the proposed routine screening program. Outcomes included quality-adjusted survival, secondary HIV transmission, cost, and incremental cost-effectiveness. RESULTS: One-time national HIV screening increased HIV-infected survival from 164.09 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs to 166.83 QALMs compared to current practice and had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of €28,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY. Screening more frequently in higher-risk groups was cost-effective: for example screening annually in men who have sex with men or screening every three years in regions with higher incidence and prevalence produced ICERs of €21,000/QALY and €34,000/QALY, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: One-time HIV screening in the Portuguese national population will increase survival and is cost-effective by international standards. More frequent screening in higher-risk regions and subpopulations is also justified. Given Portugal's challenging economic priorities, we recommend prioritizing screening in higher-risk populations and geographic settings.

  12. Screening Mammography: Patient Perceptions and Preferences Regarding Communication of Estimated Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornsiripanitch, Nita; Mangano, Mark; Niell, Bethany L

    2017-05-01

    Many models exist to estimate a woman's risk of development of breast cancer. At screening mammography, many imaging centers collect data required for these models to identify women who may benefit from supplemental screening and referral for cancer risk assessment. The purpose of this study was to discern perceptions and preferences of screening mammography patients regarding communication of estimated breast cancer risk. An anonymous survey was distributed to screening and surveillance mammography patients between April and June 2015. Survey questions were designed to assess patient preferences regarding the receipt and complexity of risk estimate communication, including hypothetical scenarios with and without > 20% estimated risk of breast cancer. The McNemar test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used with p ≤ 0.05 considered statistically significant. The survey was distributed to 1061 screening and surveillance mammography patients, and 503 patients responded (response rate, 47%). Although 86% (431/503) of patients expressed interest in learning their estimated risk, only 8% (38/503) had undergone formal risk assessment. The preferred method (241 respondents [26%]) of communication of risk 20%, patients preferred oral communication and were 10-fold as likely to choose only oral communication (p 20%, patients preferred to learn their estimated risk in great detail (69% and 85%), although women were significantly more likely to choose greater detail for risk > 20% (p < 0.00001). Screening mammography patients expressed interest in learning their estimated risk of breast cancer regardless of their level of hypothetical risk.

  13. Breast density as indicator for the use of mammography or MRI to screen women with familial risk for breast cancer (FaMRIsc: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadatmand Sepideh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce mortality, women with a family history of breast cancer often start mammography screening at a younger age than the general population. Breast density is high in over 50% of women younger than 50 years. With high breast density, breast cancer incidence increases, but sensitivity of mammography decreases. Therefore, mammography might not be the optimal method for breast cancer screening in young women. Adding MRI increases sensitivity, but also the risk of false-positive results. The limitation of all previous MRI screening studies is that they do not contain a comparison group; all participants received both MRI and mammography. Therefore, we cannot empirically assess in which stage tumours would have been detected by either test. The aim of the Familial MRI Screening Study (FaMRIsc is to compare the efficacy of MRI screening to mammography for women with a familial risk. Furthermore, we will assess the influence of breast density. Methods/Design This Dutch multicentre, randomized controlled trial, with balanced randomisation (1:1 has a parallel grouped design. Women with a cumulative lifetime risk for breast cancer due to their family history of ≥20%, aged 30–55 years are eligible. Identified BRCA1/2 mutation carriers or women with 50% risk of carrying a mutation are excluded. Group 1 receives yearly mammography and clinical breast examination (n = 1000, and group 2 yearly MRI and clinical breast examination, and mammography biennially (n = 1000. Primary endpoints are the number and stage of the detected breast cancers in each arm. Secondary endpoints are the number of false-positive results in both screening arms. Furthermore, sensitivity and positive predictive value of both screening strategies will be assessed. Cost-effectiveness of both strategies will be assessed. Analyses will also be performed with mammographic density as stratification factor. Discussion Personalized breast cancer screening

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community Pharmacist-Led Sleep Apnea Screening Program - A Markov Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Perraudin

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence and major public health ramifications, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS remains underdiagnosed. In many developed countries, because community pharmacists (CP are easily accessible, they have been developing additional clinical services that integrate the services of and collaborate with other healthcare providers (general practitioners (GPs, nurses, etc.. Alternative strategies for primary care screening programs for OSAS involving the CP are discussed.To estimate the quality of life, costs, and cost-effectiveness of three screening strategies among patients who are at risk of having moderate to severe OSAS in primary care.Markov decision model.Published data.Hypothetical cohort of 50-year-old male patients with symptoms highly evocative of OSAS.The 5 years after initial evaluation for OSAS.Societal.Screening strategy with CP (CP-GP collaboration, screening strategy without CP (GP alone and no screening.Quality of life, survival and costs for each screening strategy.Under almost all modeled conditions, the involvement of CPs in OSAS screening was cost effective. The maximal incremental cost for "screening strategy with CP" was about 455€ per QALY gained.Our results were robust but primarily sensitive to the treatment costs by continuous positive airway pressure, and the costs of untreated OSAS. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the "screening strategy with CP" was dominant in 80% of cases. It was more effective and less costly in 47% of cases, and within the cost-effective range (maximum incremental cost effectiveness ratio at €6186.67/QALY in 33% of cases.CP involvement in OSAS screening is a cost-effective strategy. This proposal is consistent with the trend in Europe and the United States to extend the practices and responsibilities of the pharmacist in primary care.

  15. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis of osteoporosis screening and treatment strategy for postmenopausal Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, M; Moriwaki, K; Noto, S; Takiguchi, T

    2017-02-01

    Although an osteoporosis screening program has been implemented as a health promotion project in Japan, its cost-effectiveness has yet to be elucidated fully. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis and found that osteoporosis screening and treatment would be cost-effective for Japanese women over 60 years.

  16. Breast cancer incidence after the introduction of mammography screening: what should be expected?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anne Louise; Olsen, Anne Helene; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A prevalence peak is expected in breast cancer incidence when mammography screening begins, but afterward the incidence still may be elevated compared with prescreening levels. It is important to determine whether this is due to overdiagnosis (ie, the detection of asymptomatic disease...... that would otherwise not have arisen clinically). In the current study, the authors examined breast cancer incidence after the introduction of mammography screening in Denmark. METHODS: Denmark has 2 regional screening programs targeting women ages 50 years to 69 years. The programs were initiated in 1991...

  17. Mammography screening on healthy women - advantages and disadvantages. A critical discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malterud, K.

    1986-06-01

    Studies from USA, the Netherlands and Sweden demonstrate that mamography screening reduces breast cancer mortality in women aged 50 to 74. Younger women do not profit. The results of mammography screening has never been compared with those of an organized health education programme for promoting self examination. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of mammography for screening purpose must be scrutinized. The consequences of false positive tests are at best anxiety, at worst needless breast operations. An estimate of such consequences for the female population in Oslo is presented.

  18. A comparison of the performance of modern screen-film and digital mammography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnin, P [Institut Universitaire de Radiophysique Appliquee (IRA), CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Gutierrez, D [Institut Universitaire de Radiophysique Appliquee (IRA), CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bulling, S [Institut Universitaire de Radiophysique Appliquee (IRA), CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Lepori, D [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Center (CHUV), CH-1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Valley, J-F [Institut Universitaire de Radiophysique Appliquee (IRA), CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Verdun, F R [Institut Universitaire de Radiophysique Appliquee (IRA), CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-06-07

    This work compares the detector performance and image quality of the new Kodak Min-R EV mammography screen-film system with the Fuji CR Profect detector and with other current mammography screen-film systems from Agfa, Fuji and Kodak. Basic image quality parameters (MTF, NPS, NEQ and DQE) were evaluated for a 28 kV Mo/Mo (HVL = 0.646 mm Al) beam using different mAs exposure settings. Compared with other screen-film systems, the new Kodak Min-R EV detector has the highest contrast and a low intrinsic noise level, giving better NEQ and DQE results, especially at high optical density. Thus, the properties of the new mammography film approach those of a fine mammography detector, especially at low frequency range. Screen-film systems provide the best resolution. The presampling MTF of the digital detector has a value of 15% at the Nyquist frequency and, due to the spread size of the laser beam, the use of a smaller pixel size would not permit a significant improvement of the detector resolution. The dual collection reading technology increases significantly the low frequency DQE of the Fuji CR system that can at present compete with the most efficient mammography screen-film systems.

  19. First breast cancer mammography screening program in Mexico: initial results 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Guisa-Hohenstein, Fernando; Labastida-Almendaro, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasia worldwide. In emergent countries as Mexico, an increase has been shown in frequency and mortality, unfortunately, most cases in advanced loco-regional stages developed in young women. The success of breast screening in mortality reduction has been observed since 1995 in Western Europe and the United States, where as many as 40% mortality reduction has been achieved. Most countries guidelines recommends an annual or biannual mammography for all women >40 years of age. In 2005, FUCAM, a nonlucrative civil foundation in Mexico join with Mexico City government, initiated the first voluntary mammography screening program for women >40 years of age residing in Mexico City's Federal District. Mammographies were carried out with analogical mammographs in specially designed mobile units and were performed in the area of women's domiciles. This report includes data from the first 96,828 mammographies performed between March 2005 and December 2006. There were 1% of mammographies in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 0, 4, or 5 and 208 out of 949 women with abnormal mammographies (27.7%) had breast cancer, a rate of 2.1 per thousand, most of them in situ or stage I (29.4%) or stage II (42.2%) nevertheless 21% of those women with abnormal mammography did not present for further clinical and radiologic evaluation despite being personally notified at their home addresses. The breast cancer rate of Mexican women submitted to screening mammography is lower than in European or North American women. Family history of breast cancer, nulliparity, absence of breast feeding, and increasing age are factors that increase the risk of breast cancer. Most cancers were diagnosed in women's age below 60 years (68.5%) with a mean age of 53.55 corroborating previous data published. It is mandatory to sensitize and educate our population with regard to accepting to visit the Specialized Breast Centers.

  20. Long-term psychosocial consequences of false-positive screening mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Cancer screening programs have the potential of intended beneficial effects, but they also inevitably have unintended harmful effects. In the case of screening mammography, the most frequent harm is a false-positive result. Prior efforts to measure their psychosocial consequences have been limited...

  1. Quality assurance for screening mammography data collection systems in 22 countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klabunde, C.N.; Sancho-Garnier, H.; Broeders, M.E.A.C.; Thoresen, S.; Rodrigues, V.J.; Ballard-Barbash, R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To document the mammography data that are gathered by the organized screening programs participating in the International Breast Cancer Screening Network (IBSN), the nature of their procedures for data quality assurance, and the measures used to assess program performance and impact. MET

  2. A Markov Model to Analyze Cost-Effectiveness of Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kee; APRN, Joie Davis; Pai, Sung-Yun; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Puck, Jennifer M; Apkon, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of universal neonatal screening for T cell lymphocytopenia in enhancing quality of life and life expectancy for children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Methods Decision trees were created and analyzed to estimate the cost, life years, and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) across a population when universal screening for lack of T cells is used to detect SCID, as implemented in five states, compared to detection based on recognizing symptoms and signs of disease. Terminal values of each tree limb were derived through Markov models simulating the natural history of three cohorts: unaffected subjects; those-diagnosed with SCID as neonates (early diagnosis); and those diagnosed after becoming symptomatic and arousing clinical suspicion (late diagnosis). Models considered the costs of screening and of care including hematopoietic cell transplantation for affected individuals. Key decision variables were derived from the literature and from a survey of families with children affected by SCID, which was used to describe the clinical history and healthcare utilization for affected subjects. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore the influence of these decision variables. Results Over a 70 year time horizon, the average cost per infant was $8.89 without screening and $14.33 with universal screening. The model predicted that universal screening in the U.S. would cost approximately $22.4 million/year with a gain of 880 life years and 802 QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that screening test specificity and disease incidence were critical driving forces affecting the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Assuming a SCID incidence of 1/75,000 births and test specificity and sensitivity each at 0.99, screening remained cost-effective up to a maximum cost of $15 per infant screened. Conclusion At our current estimated screening cost of $4.22/infant, universal screening for SCID would be a cost effective

  3. Association between persistence with mammography screening and stage at diagnosis among elderly women diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Ami; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies on the association between mammography screening and stage at breast cancer (BC) diagnosis have limitations because they did not analyze persistence with mammography screening and did not distinguish screening from diagnostic mammograms. The objective of this study is to determine the association between persistence with mammography screening and stage at BC diagnosis among elderly women. A retrospective observational study of 39,006 women age ≥70 diagnosed with incident BC from 2005 to 2009 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare dataset was conducted. A validated algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity was used to distinguish between screening and diagnostic mammograms. Persistence with mammography screening was measured as having at least three screening mammograms in five years before BC diagnosis. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to analyze the association between persistence with mammography screening and stage at diagnosis, in a multivariate framework. Overall, 46% of elderly women were persistent with mammography screening, 26% were not persistent, and 28% did not have any screening mammogram in five years before BC diagnosis. As compared to women who were not persistent with mammography screening, women who were persistent with mammography screening were significantly more likely to be diagnosed at earlier stages of BC. The adjusted odds ratios were 3.28, 2.37, and 1.60 for in situ, local, and regional stages, respectively. A lower proportion of elderly women was persistent with mammography and it was highly associated with earlier stages of BC diagnosis. Interventions designed to promote persistent mammography screening among elderly women are warranted.

  4. Systematic review of cost and cost-effectiveness of different TB-screening strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa José

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs for TB have the potential to replace the tuberculin skin test (TST in screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI. The higher per-test cost of IGRAs may be compensated for by lower post-screening costs (medical attention, chest x-rays and chemoprevention, given the higher specificity of the new tests as compared to that of the conventional TST. We conducted a systematic review of all publications that have addressed the cost or cost-effectiveness of IGRAs. The objective of this report was to undertake a structured review and critical appraisal of the methods used for the model-based cost-effectiveness analysis of TB screening programmes. Methods Using Medline and Embase, 75 publications that contained the terms "IGRA", "tuberculosis" and "cost" were identified. Of these, 13 were original studies on the costs or cost-effectiveness of IGRAs. Results The 13 relevant studies come from five low-to-medium TB-incidence countries. Five studies took only the costs of screening into consideration, while eight studies analysed the cost-effectiveness of different screening strategies. Screening was performed in high-risk groups: close contacts, immigrants from high-incidence countries and healthcare workers. Two studies used the T-SPOT.TB as an IGRA and the other studies used the QuantiFERON-TB Gold and/or Gold In-Tube test. All 13 studies observed a decrease in costs when the IGRAs were used. Six studies compared the use of an IGRA as a test to confirm a positive TST (TST/IGRA strategy to the use of an IGRA-only strategy. In four of these studies, the two-step strategy and in two the IGRA-only strategy was more cost-effective. Assumptions about TST specificity and progression risk after a positive test had the greatest influence on determining which IGRA strategy was more cost-effective. Conclusion The available studies on cost-effectiveness provide strong evidence in support of the use of IGRAs

  5. Prevalence of scoliosis and cost-effectiveness of screening in schools in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugras, Ali Akin; Yilmaz, Murat; Sungur, Ibrahim; Kaya, Ibrahim; Koyuncu, Yasin; Cetinus, Mahmut Ercan

    2010-01-01

    The study was intended determine the prevalence of scoliosis and to assess the cost-effectiveness of a school screening program for scoliosis in Turkey. A total of 4259 children (2057 females and 2022 males aged 10-14 years old) were screened. Thirty-nine children had a positive forward bending test. The prevalence of scoliosis was 25 per 1000 in the screened population. The ratio of girls to boys with scoliosis was 2.5:1. A minor curve was detected in 72.7% of children with scoliosis (Cobb angle of 10-20 degrees), and a major curve was found in 27.3% (Cobb angle >20 degrees). The cost of screening was found to be 47 cents per child, but the cost per case of scoliosis was determined to be $236.81. School screening for scoliosis seems to be cost-effective in Turkey.

  6. Office systems for promoting screening mammography. A survey of primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, S K; Luckmann, R; Coghlin, J; Gann, P

    1993-12-01

    Office tracking, scheduling, and reminder systems have been shown to improve utilization of screening mammography, but little is known about the use of these systems by primary care physicians. We surveyed 132 primary care and obstetrics and gynecology practices affiliated with an independent practice association model health maintenance organization in central Massachusetts to determine their use of reminder, scheduling, and follow-up systems, and education and counseling services aimed at increasing screening mammography rates. The use of chart flags to remind physicians of a patient's need for mammography screening was reported by 30% of practices. Thirty-one percent reported the use of flow sheets, and 27% reported the use of mail or telephone patient reminders. At least one of these three systems was used by 57% of the practices, whereas 43% reported having none of these three systems. Variations in the use of these office systems were related to specialty type, physician number, and clinical staffing. The majority of practices (77%) reported using written educational materials, and 42% offered prevention counseling with nonphysician staff. Very few offices (8%) reported using mail or telephone reminders for previously scheduled appointments. Despite the proven effectiveness of reminder systems for screening mammography, many practices do not have a system in place. Promotion of reminder systems in primary care practices could have a substantial impact on mammography utilization.

  7. Socioeconomic status as determinant for participation in mammography screening: assessing the difference between using women's own versus their partner's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellén, Malin; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2010-01-01

    Earlier research has shown that participation in mammography screening tends to vary across socioeconomic levels. We assessed the difference between using the woman's own socioeconomic status (SES) and using that of her household or partner as determinant of participation in mammography screening....

  8. Factors affecting sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography and MRI in women with an inherited risk for breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M.; Brekelmans, C.T.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Boetes, C.; Zonderland, H.M.; Muller, S.H.; Kok, T.; Manoliu, R.A.; Besnard, A.P.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.M.; Seynaeve, C.; Bartels, C.C.; Kaas, R.; Meijer, S.; Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Rutgers, E.J.; Koning, H.J. de; Klijn, J.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The MRISC study is a screening study, in which women with an increased risk of hereditary breast cancer are screened by a yearly mammography and MRI, and half-yearly clinical breast examination. The sensitivity found in this study was 40% for mammography and 71% for MRI and the specifici

  9. Factors affecting sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography and MRI in women with an inherited risk for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, Mieke; Brekelmans, Cecile T. M.; Obdeijn, Inge Marie; Boetes, Carla; Zonderland, Harmine M.; Muller, Sara H.; Kok, Theo; Manoliu, Radu A.; Besnard, A. Peter E.; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Bartels, Carina C. M.; Kaas, Reini; Meijer, Siebren; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Rutgers, Emiel J. T.; de Koning, Harry J.; Klijn, Jan G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Background The MRISC study is a screening study, in which women with an increased risk of hereditary breast cancer are screened by a yearly mammography and MRI, and half-yearly clinical breast examination. The sensitivity found in this study was 40% for mammography and 71% for MRI and the specificit

  10. Cost-effectiveness of preoperative screening and eradication of Staphylococcus aureus carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenberg, Marjan W M; de Wit, G Ardine; Bonten, Marc J M

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative screening for nasal S. aureus carriage, followed by eradication treatment of identified carriers with nasal mupirocine ointment and chlorhexidine soap was highly effective in preventing deep-seated S. aureus infections. It is unknown how cost-effectiveness of this intervention is affected by suboptimal S. aureus screening. We determined cost-effectiveness of different preoperative S. aureus screening regimes. We compared different screening scenarios (ranging from treating all patients without screening to treating only identified S. aureus carriers) to the base case scenario without any screening and treatment. Screening and treatment costs as well as costs and mortality due to deep-seated S. aureus infection were derived from hospital databases and prospectively collected data, respectively. As compared to the base case scenario, all scenarios are associated with improved health care outcomes at reduced costs. Treating all patients without screening is most cost-beneficial, saving €7339 per life year gained, as compared to €3330 when only identified carriers are treated. In sensitivity analysis, outcomes are susceptible to the sensitivity of the screening test and the efficacy of treatment. Reductions in these parameters would reduce the cost-effectiveness of scenarios in which treatment is based on screening. When only identified S. aureus carriers are treated costs of screening should be less than €6.23 to become the dominant strategy. Preoperative screening and eradication of S. aureus carriage to prevent deep-seated S. aureus infections saves both life years and medical costs at the same time, although treating all patients without screening is the dominant strategy, resulting in most health gains and largest savings.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of preoperative screening and eradication of Staphylococcus aureus carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan W M Wassenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preoperative screening for nasal S. aureus carriage, followed by eradication treatment of identified carriers with nasal mupirocine ointment and chlorhexidine soap was highly effective in preventing deep-seated S. aureus infections. It is unknown how cost-effectiveness of this intervention is affected by suboptimal S. aureus screening. We determined cost-effectiveness of different preoperative S. aureus screening regimes. METHODS: We compared different screening scenarios (ranging from treating all patients without screening to treating only identified S. aureus carriers to the base case scenario without any screening and treatment. Screening and treatment costs as well as costs and mortality due to deep-seated S. aureus infection were derived from hospital databases and prospectively collected data, respectively. RESULTS: As compared to the base case scenario, all scenarios are associated with improved health care outcomes at reduced costs. Treating all patients without screening is most cost-beneficial, saving €7339 per life year gained, as compared to €3330 when only identified carriers are treated. In sensitivity analysis, outcomes are susceptible to the sensitivity of the screening test and the efficacy of treatment. Reductions in these parameters would reduce the cost-effectiveness of scenarios in which treatment is based on screening. When only identified S. aureus carriers are treated costs of screening should be less than €6.23 to become the dominant strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative screening and eradication of S. aureus carriage to prevent deep-seated S. aureus infections saves both life years and medical costs at the same time, although treating all patients without screening is the dominant strategy, resulting in most health gains and largest savings.

  12. Impact of the Introduction of Digital Mammography in an Organized Screening Program on the Recall and Detection Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campari, Cinzia; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Mori, Carlo Alberto; Ravaioli, Sara; Nitrosi, Andrea; Vacondio, Rita; Mancuso, Pamela; Cattani, Antonella; Pattacini, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    In 2012, the Reggio Emilia Breast Cancer Screening Program introduced digital mammography in all its facilities at the same time. The aim of this work is to analyze the impact of digital mammography introduction on the recall rate, detection rate, and positive predictive value. The program actively invites women aged 45-74 years. We included women screened in 2011, all of whom underwent film-screen mammography, and all women screened in 2012, all of whom underwent digital mammography. Double reading was used for all mammograms, with arbitration in the event of disagreement. A total of 42,240 women underwent screen-film mammography and 45,196 underwent digital mammography. The recall rate increased from 3.3 to 4.4% in the first year of digital mammography (relative recall adjusted by age and round 1.46, 95% CI = 1.37-1.56); the positivity rate for each individual reading, before arbitration, rose from 3 to 5.7%. The digital mammography recall rate decreased during 2012: after 12 months, it was similar to the recall rate with screen-film mammography. The detection rate was similar: 5.9/1000 and 5.2/1000 with screen-film and digital mammography, respectively (adjusted relative detection rate 0.95, 95% CI = 0.79-1.13). The relative detection rate for ductal carcinoma in situ remained the same. The introduction of digital mammography to our organized screening program had a negative impact on specificity, thereby increasing the recall rate. The effect was limited to the first 12 months after introduction and was attenuated by the double reading with arbitration. We did not observe any relevant effects on the detection rate.

  13. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility of community screening for glaucoma in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Denny; Parikh, Rajul

    2017-07-01

    Population-based screening for glaucoma has been demonstrated to be cost-effective if targeted at high-risk groups such as older adults and those with a family history of glaucoma, and through use of a technician for conducting initial assessment rather than a medical specialist. This study attempts to investigate the cost-effectiveness of a hypothetical community screening and subsequent treatment programme for glaucoma in comparison with current practice (i.e. with no screening programme but with some opportunistic case finding) in the urban areas of India. A hypothetical screening programme for both primary open-angle glaucoma and angle-closure disease was built for a population aged between 40 and 69 years in the urban areas of India. Screening and treatment costs were obtained from an administrator of a tertiary eye hospital in India. The probabilities for the screening pathway were derived from published literature and expert opinion. The glaucoma prevalence rates for urban areas were adapted from the Chennai Glaucoma Study findings. A decision-analytical model using TreeAge Pro 2015 was built to model events, costs and treatment pathways. One-way sensitivity analyses were conducted. The introduction of a community screening programme for glaucoma is likely to be cost-effective, the estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) values being 10,668.68 when compared with no screening programme and would treat an additional 4443 cases and prevent 1790 person-years of blindness over a 10-year period in the urban areas of India. Sensitivity analyses revealed that glaucoma prevalence rates across various age groups, screening uptake rate, follow-up compliance after screening, treatment costs and utility values of health states associated with medical and surgical treatment of glaucoma had an impact on the ICER values of the screening programme. In comparison with current practice (i.e. without a screening programme but with some opportunistic case finding

  14. Cost-effectiveness of HCV screening: a systematic review of the literature from 2007 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Camera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: currently, 123-170 million people in the world are infected with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV and 75% of them remain undiagnosed. HCV-positive individuals will develop Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC within 25 years in 20-30% of cases. Early detection of HCV has been demonstrated to increase quality-adjusted life years (QALY and to improve the behaviour of the infected population. Current national policies usually recommend regular screenings only for at-risk populations. A systematic review of the recent evidence on long-term cost-effectiveness of HCV screening in different populations was performed.Methods: resources were searched on publicly available databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, NHS EED, Cochrane Library and Google®. Studies were considered eligible if published between 2007 and 2012 and if providing measures of incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER or incremental cost utility ratio (ICUR of HCV screening in terms of cost/life years gained (LYG and cost/QALY. All the costs were converted into Euro (€ for 2011. A weighted version of the Drummond checklist was used to further assess the quality of the included studies.Results: six articles were selected and analysed. Three U.S. and one Japanese studies suggested a positive cost-effectiveness profile of broad birth-cohort and population screening. Other studies conducted in Italy and the UK demonstrated high variability in the cost-effectiveness in different study populations. All the studies were judged of medium-high quality.Conclusions: cost-effectiveness of HCV screening significantly varies among countries and study populations. Prevalence in the population should be one of the criteria for policy-makers for future decisions and recommendations. New Direct-Acting Antiviral agents might increase the costeffectiveness of early HCV screening. Future studies should also focus on migrants and men who have sex with men (MSM populations.

  15. Benefit, risks and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.; Muehlberger, N.; Siebert, U. [Public Health, UMIT (Austria); Chemelli-Steingruber, I.E.; Chemelli, Andreas [Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Innsbruck (Austria); Strasak, A. [Statistik, Universitaetsklinikum Innsbruck (Austria); Kofler, B. [Radiologie, Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg (Austria)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) cause a considerable number of deaths. A ruptured AAA is associated with a mortality rate of 80%. The purpose of this study was to summarize the current evidence from published health economic models for the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening programs for AAA. Materials and methods: medical, economic and health technology assessment (HTA) databases were systematically searched for cost-effectiveness models up to October 2007. Only models with a lifetime time horizon of evaluating AAA screening in men over 65 years were included in the review. Study data were extracted, standardized and summarized in evidence tables and cost-effectiveness plots. Results: we reviewed 8 cost-effectiveness models published between 1993 and 2007 comparing AAA screening and lack of screening in men over 60. One model yielded a loss of life-years at additional costs. The remaining seven models yielded gains in life expectancy ranging from 0.02 to 0.28LYs. Gains in quality-adjusted life expectancy reported by six of the seven models ranged from 0.015 to 0.059 QALYs. Incremental costs ranged from 96 to 721 Euros. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) ranged from 1443 to 13299 Euros per LY or QALY gained. Conclusion: based on our analysis, the introduction of a screening program to identify AAA will probably gain additional life years and quality of life at acceptable extra costs. The target population for a screening program should be men 65 years and older. (orig.)

  16. Systematic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis : Estimating cost-effectiveness using dynamic modeling and Dutch data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.; Van Bergen, J.E.A.M.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Postma, Maarten

    2006-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a systematic one-off Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) screening program including partner treatment for Dutch young adults. Data on infection prevalence, participation rates, and sexual behavior were obtained from a large pilot study conducted in The Netherlands. Oppo

  17. Cost-effectiveness of screening programs for Chlamydia trachomatis - A population-based dynamic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R; Kretzschmar, M; Leidl, R; Van den Hoek, A; Jager, JC; Postma, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Background: Models commonly used for the economic assessment of chamydial screening programs do not consider population effects. Goal: To develop a novel dynamic approach for the economic evaluation of chlamydial prevention measures and to determine the cost-effectiveness of a general practitioner-b

  18. Cost-effectiveness of screening programs for Chlamydia trachomatis - A population-based dynamic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R; Kretzschmar, M; Leidl, R; Van den Hoek, A; Jager, JC; Postma, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Background: Models commonly used for the economic assessment of chamydial screening programs do not consider population effects. Goal: To develop a novel dynamic approach for the economic evaluation of chlamydial prevention measures and to determine the cost-effectiveness of a general

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis screening in Dutch pregnant women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.I.J.G. Rours (Ingrid); Smith-Norowitz, T.A. (Tamar Anne); Ditkowsky, J. (Jared); M.R. Hammerschlag; R.P.A.J. Verkooyen (Roel); de Groot, R.; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M.J. Postma (Maarten)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractChlamydia trachomatis infections during pregnancy may have serious consequences for women and their offspring. Chlamydial infections are largely asymptomatic. Hence, prevention is based on screening. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of C. trachomatis scr

  20. The cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in addition to screening : a Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, Didik; Luttjeboer, Jos; Westra, Tjalke Arend; Wilschut, Jan C.; Suwantika, Auliya A.; Daemen, Toos; Atthobari, Jarir; Wilffert, Bob; Postma, Maarten J.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of the HPV vaccine to available cytological screening has been proposed to increase HPV-related cancer prevention. A comprehensive review on this combined strategy implemented in the Netherlands is lacking. For this review, we therefore analyzed all relevant studies on cost-effectiveness of

  1. Cost-effectiveness of Anemia Screening in Vulnerable Groups: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Nosratnejad

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Research findings show that there is not enough evidence of cost-effectiveness of screening for decision-making. Bearing in mind the importance of the matter to health policy-makers, due to high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries, conduction of research in this field seems necessary.

  2. Sexually transmitted infections screening at HIV treatment centers for MSM can be cost-effective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Henrike J.; Lugnér, Anna K.; Xiridou, Maria; Van Der Loeff, Maarten F. Schim; Prins, Maria; De Vries, Henry J.C.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Prins, Jan M.; Rijnders, Bart J.A.; Van Veen, Maaike G.; Fennema, Johannes S.A.; Postma, Maarten J.; Van Der Sande, Marianne A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To estimate the cost-effectiveness of anorectal chlamydia screening among men who have sex with men (MSM) in care at HIV treatment centers. Design:Transmission model combined with economic analysis over a 20-year period. Setting and participants:MSM in care at HIV treatment centers. Interv

  3. Performance of screening mammography: A report of the alliance for breast cancer screening in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Hye [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keum Woo [Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Joong [Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-07-15

    To analyze the diagnostic accuracy and trend in screening mammography in Korea. We retrospectively linked the information from hospitals participating in the Alliance of Breast Cancer Screening in Korea (ABCS-K) and the database of the National Cancer Screening Program. We calculated performance indicators, including the recall rate, cancer detection rate (CDR), positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rate (FPR), and interval cancer rate (ICR). Changes in the performance indicators were calculated as the annual percent change with 95% confidence interval (CI). We enrolled 128756 cases from 10 hospitals from 2005 to 2010. The recall rate was 19.1% with a downward trend over time (-12.1% per year; 95% CI, -15.9 to -8.2). The CDR was 2.69 per 1000 examinations, without a significant trend. The PPV was 1.4% with an upward trend (20.8% per year; 95% CI, 15.2 to 26.7). The sensitivity was 86.5% without a significant trend, whereas the specificity was 81.1% with an upward trend (3.3% per year; 95% CI, 2.1 to 4.5). The FPR was 18.9% with a downward trend (-12.4% per year; 95% CI, -16.2 to -8.4). The ICR was 0.5 per 1000 negative examinations without a significant trend. There were institutional variations in the diagnostic accuracy and trend except for the CDR, sensitivity, and ICR. The sensitivity and CDR of screening mammography in the ABCS-K from 2005 to 2010 were compatible with those for Western women. The recall rate, PPV and specificity, however, were suboptimal, although they showed significant improvements over this period. A further analysis is required to explain institutional variations.

  4. Screen-film versus full-field digital mammography: Radiation dose and image quality in a large teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stantić Tomislav J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to measure the radiation dose and image quality in conventional screen-film mammography and full-field digital mammography in women referred to mammography examination. Participants underwent bilateral, two-view screen-film mammography or full-field digital mammography. The visibility of anatomical regions and overall clinical image quality was rated by experienced radiologists. Total of 387 women and 1548 mammograms were enrolled in the study. Image quality was assessed in terms of image quality score, whereas patient dose assessment was performed in terms of mean glandular dose. Average mean glandular dose for cranio-caudal projection was 1.5 mGy and 2.1 mGy in full-field digital mammography and screen-film mammography, respectively. For medio-lateral oblique projection, corresponding values were 2.3 and 2.1 mGy. Overall image quality criteria scoring was 0.82 and 0.99 for screen-film and digital systems, respectively. The scores were in the range from 0.11 to 1.0 for different anatomical structures. Overall, full-field digital mammography was superior both in terms of image quality and dose over the screen-film mammography. The results have indicated that phantom dose values can assist in setting the optimisation activities in mammography and for comparison between mammography units. To obtain accurate diagnostic information with an acceptable radiation dose to breast, it is necessary to periodically perform patient dose and image quality surveys in all mammography units.

  5. HPV testing for cervical cancer screening appears more cost-effective than Papanicolau cytology in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Yvonne N; Bishai, David M; Lorincz, Attila; Shah, Keerti V; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández, Mauricio; Granados-García, Víctor; Pérez, Ruth; Salmerón, Jorge

    2011-02-01

    To determine the incremental costs and effects of different HPV testing strategies, when compared to Papanicolau cytology (Pap), for cervical cancer screening in Mexico. A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) examined the specific costs and health outcomes associated with (1) no screening; (2) only the Pap test; (3) only self-administered HPV; (4) only clinician administered HPV; and (5) clinician administered HPV plus the Pap test. The costs of self- and clinician-HPV testing, as well as with the Pap test, were identified and quantified. Costs were reported in 2008 US dollars. The health outcome associated with these screening strategies was defined as the number of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer cases detected. This CEA was performed using the perspective of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) in Morelos, Mexico. Screening women between the ages of 30-80 for cervical cancer using clinical-HPV testing or the combination of clinical-HPV testing, and the Pap is always more cost-effective than using the Pap test alone. This CEA indicates that HPV testing could be a cost-effective screening alternative for a large health delivery organization such as IMSS. These results may help policy-makers implement HPV testing as part of the IMSS cervical cancer screening program.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of Universal and Targeted Newborn Screening for Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Dionne, Francois; Kozak, Fred K; Goshen, Oran; Goldfarb, David M; Park, Albert H; Boppana, Suresh B; Fowler, Karen

    2016-12-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is a major cause of childhood deafness. Most cCMV infections are not diagnosed without newborn screening, resulting in missed opportunities for directed care. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of universal and targeted newborn cCMV screening programs compared with no cCMV screening. Models were constructed using rates and outcomes from prospective cohort studies of newborn cCMV screening in US postpartum care and early hearing programs. Costs of laboratory testing, treatment, and hearing loss were drawn from Medicaid data and published estimates. The benefits of cCMV screening were assumed to come from antiviral therapy for affected newborns to reduce hearing loss and from earlier identification of hearing loss with postnatal onset. Analyses were performed from July 2014 to March 2016. Models compared universal or targeted cCMV screening of newborns with a failed hearing screen, with standard care for cCMV infection. The incremental costs of identifying 1 cCMV infection, identifying 1 case of cCMV-related hearing loss, and preventing 1 cochlear implant; the incremental reduction in cases of severe to profound hearing loss; and the differences in costs per infant screened by universal or targeted strategies under different assumptions about the effectiveness of antiviral treatment. Among all infants born in the United States, identification of 1 case of cCMV infection by universal screening was estimated to cost $2000 to $10 000; by targeted screening, $566 to $2832. The cost of identifying 1 case of hearing loss due to cCMV was as little as $27 460 by universal screening or $975 by targeted screening. Assuming a modest benefit of antiviral treatment, screening programs were estimated to reduce severe to profound hearing loss by 4.2% to 13% and result in direct costs of $10.86 per newborn screened. However, savings of up to $37.97 per newborn screened were estimated when costs related to functionality were included

  7. Screening mammography uptake within Australia and Scotland in rural and urban populations

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, J; MacLeod, C.; Mclaughlin, D.; Woods, LM; Henderson, R.; Watson, A.; Kyle, RG; Hubbard, G; Mullen, R.; Atherton, I

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that rural populations had lower uptake of screening mammography than urban populations in the Scottish and Australian setting. Method: Scottish data are based upon information from the Scottish Breast Screening Programme Information System describing uptake among women residing within the NHS Highland Health Board area who were invited to attend for screening during the 2008 to 2010 round (N = 27,416). Australian data were drawn from the 2010 survey of th...

  8. The role of epidemiological quality parameters in a mammography screening programme; Die Rolle der epidemiologischen Qualitaetsparameter im Mammographie-Screeningprogramm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Klinische Epidemiologie

    2006-11-15

    In the recently established mammography screening programme, for the first time in Germany an extensive data collection for prompt quantification of specified quality parameters will be intrinsic to an early detection programme. Epidemiological parameters taken from the European Guidelines are central. This article outlines how epidemiology is involved in quality assurance of cancer screening and why epidemiological quality indicators will be quantified. The reasons for focussing on those parameters, on which the European Guidelines and now the German programme are based, and their significance in the long-term effectiveness of this programme are explained. (orig.) [German] Bei dem gerade im Aufbau begriffenen Mammographie-Screeningprogramm wird erstmalig in Deutschland eine umfangreiche Datenerhebung zur zeitnahen Quantifizierung bestimmter Qualitaetsparameter zum integralen Bestandteil eines Frueherkennungsprogramms. Ein Herzstueck dieser in europaeischen Richtlinien festgelegten und in das deutsche Programm uebernommenen Parameter sind epidemiologische Groessen. In dem vorliegenden Beitrag wird dargestellt, weshalb im Kontext der Qualitaetssicherung von Krebsfrueherkennung die Epidemiologie eine Rolle spielt, und warum epidemiologische Qualitaetsparameter zu quantifizieren sind. Darauf aufbauend wird erlaeutert, aus welchen Gruenden man gerade diejenigen Groessen gewaehlt hat, die im Zentrum der europaeischen Richtlinien und nun auch der Qualitaetssicherung des deutschen Programms stehen, und was sie hinsichtlich der langfristigen Effektivitaet des Programms aussagen. (orig.)

  9. Cost-effectiveness of interferon-gamma release assay for entry tuberculosis screening in prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowada, A

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of active tuberculosis (TB) and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in inmates and prison staff is higher than that in the general population. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) provide more accurate diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection with higher specificity than the tuberculin skin test (TST). To assess the cost effectiveness of QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) compared to TST, TST followed by QFT and chest X-ray, we constructed Markov models using a societal perspective on the lifetime horizon. The main outcome measure of effectiveness was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. The incremental cost-effectiveness was compared. The QFT-alone strategy was the most cost-effective for entry TB screening in prisons in developed countries. Cost-effectiveness was not sensitive to the rates of BCG vaccination, LTBI, TB, HIV infection and multidrug-resistant TB. Entry TB screening using an IGRA in prisons should be considered on the basis of its cost-effectiveness by public health intervention.

  10. Sensitivity and Specificity of Screening Mammographies and Ultrasonographies Performed in Women at Seven Health Promotion Centers for One year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Sung; Kang, Bong Joo; Yim, Hyeon Woo [Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    We wanted to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography and ultrasonography for breast examinations and we assessed the clinical usefulness of breast ultrasound for cancer screening. Of all the women who visited the health promotion center of seven medical institutions from Mar 2004 to Feb 2005, we compared the sensitivity and specificity between a single use of mammography and mammography with ultrasonography for the patients who underwent both mammography and ultrasonography. Here, the reference criteria were the follow-up and the histopathology, which were performed after one year. A total of 1123 patients underwent both mammography and ultrasonography and they could be followed up for a year. For the 1123 patients who underwent both mammography and ultrasonography, the sensitivity and specificity of a single use of mammography were 14.3% and 86.9%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of mammography with ultrasonography were 85.7% and 85.9%, respectively. These results showed that the sensitivity was significantly increased when mammography was combined with ultrasonography (< 0.05). The sensitivity was improved for the cases that underwent both mammography and ultrasonography

  11. Improved Performance of Adjunctive Ultrasonography After Mammography Screening for Breast Cancer Among Chinese Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Henglei; Huang, Yubei; Song, Fengju; Dai, Hongji; Liu, Peifang; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Peishan; Han, Jiali; Hao, Xishan; Chen, Kexin

    2017-08-15

    Until now, no studies have investigated whether women other than those with dense breasts are suitable for adjunctive ultrasonography after negative mammography, and investigated whether all women with negative mammography are suitable for adjunctive ultrasonography. Based on the Multi-modality Independent Screening Trial in China, a total of 31,918 women aged 45 to 65 years underwent both ultrasonography and mammography. Physicians performed ultrasonography and mammography separately and were blinded to each other's findings until their interpretations had been recorded. For both ultrasonography and mammography, suspicious results and those highly suggestive of a malignancy were confirmed by pathologic examination, whereas other results were confirmed by 1-year follow-up after initial screening. Based on Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) assessments, 84 (84.8%) of 99 cancers were identified on mammography (detection rate, 2.6/1000), and 61 (61.6%) of 99 cancers were identified on ultrasonography (detection rate, 1.9/1000). Integrated mammography with ultrasonography identified 94 (95.0%) of 99 cancers, with an increment of 11.9% in cancer detection rate (from 2.6/1000 to 2.9/1000) (P BIRADS 3, adjunctive ultrasonography detected no cancers. All 10 additional cancers detected by adjunctive ultrasonography were from women with BIRADS 0 to 2, at a cost of 207 women with false positives. Additionally, dense breasts and benign breast disease were significantly associated with positive ultrasonography after BIRADS 0 to 2 (all P values BIRADS 0 to 2 but not BIRADS 3, especially for women with dense breasts or benign breast disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cervical Cancer Screening in Partly HPV Vaccinated Cohorts - A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffie K Naber

    Full Text Available Vaccination against the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV types 16 and 18 will reduce the prevalence of these types, thereby also reducing cervical cancer risk in unvaccinated women. This (measurable herd effect will be limited at first, but is expected to increase over time. At a certain herd immunity level, tailoring screening to vaccination status may no longer be worth the additional effort. Moreover, uniform screening may be the only viable option. We therefore investigated at what level of herd immunity it is cost-effective to also reduce screening intensity in unvaccinated women.We used the MISCAN-Cervix model to determine the optimal screening strategy for a pre-vaccination population and for vaccinated women (~80% decreased risk, assuming a willingness-to-pay of €50,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained. We considered HPV testing, cytology testing and co-testing and varied the start age of screening, the screening interval and the number of lifetime screens. We then calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of screening unvaccinated women with the strategy optimized to the pre-vaccination population as compared to with the strategy optimized to vaccinated women, assuming different herd immunity levels.Primary HPV screening with cytology triage was the optimal strategy, with 8 lifetime screens for the pre-vaccination population and 3 for vaccinated women. The ICER of screening unvaccinated women 8 times instead of 3 was €28,085 in the absence of herd immunity. At around 50% herd immunity, the ICER reached €50,000.From a herd immunity level of 50% onwards, screening intensity based on the pre-vaccination risk level becomes cost-ineffective for unvaccinated women. Reducing the screening intensity of uniform screening may then be considered.

  13. A cost/effective screening method for assessing the toxicity of nutrient rich effluents to algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, G; Fernández, C; Tarazona, J V

    2010-07-01

    Screening whole effluent toxicity tests are cost/effective methods for detecting the presence of toxic concentrations of unknown pollutants, but the application must solve the problem associated with the effect of high and variable concentrations of nutrients in the effluent on the results of algal toxicity tests. This work proposes a cost/effective test, based on three dilution levels measured at a single point time and a discriminant model for establishing if this kind of complex samples, with difficult interpretation of dilution-response curves, should be considered toxic to algae. This procedure identified properly around 85% of the samples considered toxic by expert judgement.

  14. [Cost-effectiveness of an organized breast cancer screening program in Southern Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Antonini; Caleffi, Maira; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an organized breast cancer mammographic screening program implemented in Porto Alegre (Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA), Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. A Markov model was constructed to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of NMPOA compared to current BC diagnosis and care in the Brazilian public health system, in a hypothetical cohort of women aged 40-69 years at risk of developing breast cancer. Model parameters were collected from NMPOA and the national literature. In the NMPOA strategy, effectiveness was modeled taking into account the actual observed screening adherence. Effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in the base case was R$ 13,426 per QALY. This result was not sensitive to variation in the main model parameters in sensitivity analyses. Considering the threshold usually suggested as highly attractive in Brazil, breast cancer screening as performed in NMPOA is cost-effective in cities with high incidence of breast cancer.

  15. Echo-based screening of rheumatic heart disease in children: a cost-effectiveness Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Justin P; Samnaliev, Mihail

    2015-06-01

    To project the cost-effectiveness of population-based echo screening to prevent rheumatic heart disease (RHD) consequences. RHD is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity during adolescence and young adulthood in low- and middle-per capita income settings. Echocardiography-based screening approaches can dramatically expand the number of children identified at risk of progressive RHD. Cost-effectiveness analysis can inform public health agencies and payers about the net economic benefit of such large-scale population-based screening. A Markov model was constructed comparing a no-screen to echo screen approach. The echo screen program was modeled as a 2-staged screen of a cohort of 11-year-old children with initial short screening performed by dedicated technicians and follow-up complete echo by cardiologists. Penicillin RHD prophylaxis was modeled to only reduce rheumatic fever recurrence-related exacerbation. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and societal costs (in 2010 Australian dollars) associated with each approach were estimated. One-way, two-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed on RHD prevalence and transition probabilities; echocardiography test characteristics; and societal level costs including supplies, transportation, and labor. The incremental costs and QALYs of the screen compared to no screen strategy were -$432 (95% CI = -$1357 to $575) and 0.007 (95% CI = -0.0101 to 0.0237), respectively. The joint probability that the screen was both less costly and more effective exceeded 80%. Sensitivity analyses suggested screen strategy dominance depends mostly on the probability of transitioning out of sub-clinical RHD. Two-stage echo RHD screening and secondary prophylaxis may achieve modestly improved outcomes at lower cost compared to clinical detection and deserves closer attention from health policy stakeholders.

  16. A randomised trial of screening with digital breast tomosynthesis plus conventional digital 2D mammography versus 2D mammography alone in younger higher risk women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Anthony J; Michell, Michael; Lim, Yit Y; Astley, Susan M; Wilson, Mary; Hurley, Emma; Evans, D Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Iqbal, Asif; Kotre, John; Duffy, Stephen; Morris, Julie

    2017-06-30

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to increase invasive cancer detection rates at screening compared to full field digital (2D) mammography alone, and some studies have reported a reduction in the screening recall rate. No prospective randomised studies of DBT have previously been published. This study compares recall rates with 2D mammography with and without concurrent DBT in women in their forties with a family history of breast cancer undergoing incident screening. Asymptomatic women aged 40-49 who had previously undergone mammography for an increased risk of breast cancer were recruited in two screening centres. Participants were randomised to screening with 2D mammography only at the first study screen followed a year later by screening with 2D plus DBT, or vice versa. Recall rates were compared using an intention to treat analysis. Reading performance was analysed for the larger centre. 1227 women were recruited. 1221 first screens (604 2D, 617 2D+DBT) and 1124second screens (558 2D+DBT, 566 2D) were analysed. Eleven women had screen-detected cancers: 5 after 2D, 6 after 2D+DBT. The false positive recall rates were 2.4% for 2D and 2.2% for 2D+DBT (p=0.89). There was a significantly greater reduction between rounds in the number of women with abnormal reads who were not recalled after consensus/arbitration with 2D+DBT than 2D (p=0.023). The addition of DBT to 2D mammography in incident screening did not lead to a significant reduction in recall rate. DBT may increase reader uncertainty until DBT screening experience is acquired. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Participation behaviour following a false positive test in the Copenhagen mammography screening programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Vejborg, Ilse; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is an ongoing debate concerning possible disadvantages of mammography screening, one being the consequence of receiving a false positive test-result. It is argued that receiving a false positive answer may have short- and/or long-term adverse psychological effects on women, bu...

  18. Balancing sensitivity and specificity: sixteen year's of experience from the mammography screening programme in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzon-Frank, Nicolai; Vejborg, Ilse; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina;

    2011-01-01

    To report on sensitivity and specificity from 7 invitation rounds of the organised, population-based mammography screening programme started in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1991, and offered biennially to women aged 50-69. Changes over time were related to organisation and technology....

  19. American Indian Women and Screening Mammography: Findings from a Qualitative Study in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolma, Eleni; Batterton, Chasity; Hamm, Robert M.; Thompson, David; Engelman, Kimberly K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is an important public health issue within the American Indian (AI) community in Oklahoma; however, there is limited information to explain the low screening mammography rates among AI women. Purpose: To identify the motivational factors affecting an AI woman's decision to obtain a mammogram. Methods: Through the use of…

  20. Rapid review: Estimates of incremental breast cancer detection from tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) screening in women with dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssami, Nehmat; Turner, Robin M

    2016-12-01

    High breast tissue density increases breast cancer (BC) risk, and the risk of an interval BC in mammography screening. Density-tailored screening has mostly used adjunct imaging to screen women with dense breasts, however, the emergence of tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) provides an opportunity to steer density-tailored screening in new directions potentially obviating the need for adjunct imaging. A rapid review (a streamlined evidence synthesis) was performed to summarise data on tomosynthesis screening in women with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts, with the aim of estimating incremental (additional) BC detection attributed to tomosynthesis in comparison with standard 2D-mammography. Meta-analysed data from prospective trials comparing these mammography modalities in the same women (N = 10,188) in predominantly biennial screening showed significant incremental BC detection of 3.9/1000 screens attributable to tomosynthesis (P mammography (N = 177,814) yielded a pooled difference in BC detection of 1.4/1000 screens representing significantly higher BC detection in tomosynthesis-screened women (P mammography. These estimates can inform planning of future trials of density-tailored screening and may guide discussion of screening women with dense breasts.

  1. Assessment of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HPV testing in primary screening for cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stefan N.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The introduction of a screening programme for cervical carcinoma in Germany has led to a significant reduction in incidence of the disease. To date, however, diagnosis in Germany has been based solely on cervical cytology, which has been criticised because of a low sensitivity and consequently high rate of false negative results. Because an infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV previously was found to be a necessary aetiological factor in the development of cervical cancer, there has been some discussion that HPV testing should be included in cervical cancer screening. Objectives: How do HPV tests compare to cytological tests in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and what are the effects of screening for cervical carcinoma in Germany? Is there health economic evidence that may foster an inclusion of HPV testing into national screening programms? Methods: A systematic literature review was performed, including studies that compared the HPV test to cervical cytology in terms of sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CIN 2+ (CIN=Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. In addition, a systematic review of the relevant health economic literature was performed to analyze cost-effectiveness in the German setting. Results: A total of 24 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. One study consisted of three substudies. Hence, results of 26 comparisons of HPV and cytology are reported. In 25 of these, the HPV test was more sensitive than cytology, whereas cytology had better specificity in 21 studies. The combination of HPV test and cytology increased sensitivity. Variability in results was considerably larger for cytology than for HPV testing. Results of the economic meta-analysis suggest that in health care settings with already established PAP screening programms, cost-effectiveness strongly depends on screening intervals. In analyses comparing HPV screening to conventional PAP screening with two-yearly intervals, only 25

  2. Cost-effectiveness of prenatal screening strategies for congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, N. M.; Nelson, R.; Puchalski, M.; Metz, T. D.; Smith, K. J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The economic implications of strategies to improve prenatal screening for congenital heart disease (CHD) in low-risk mothers have not been explored. The aim was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of different screening methods. Methods We constructed a decision analytic model of CHD prenatal screening strategies (four-chamber screen (4C), 4C + outflow, nuchal translucency (NT) or fetal echocardiography) populated with probabilities from the literature. The model included whether initial screens were interpreted by a maternal–fetal medicine (MFM) specialist and different referral strategies if they were read by a non-MFM specialist. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per defect detected. Costs were obtained from Medicare National Fee estimates. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was undertaken on model variables commensurate with their degree of uncertainty. Results In base–case analysis, 4C + outflow referred to an MFM specialist was the least costly strategy per defect detected. The 4C screen and the NT screen were dominated by other strategies (i.e. were more costly and less effective). Fetal echocardiography was the most effective, but most costly. On simulation of 10 000 low-risk pregnancies, 4C+ outflow screen referred to an MFM specialist remained the least costly per defect detected. For an additional $580 per defect detected, referral to cardiology after a 4C + outflow was the most cost-effective for the majority of iterations, increasing CHD detection by 13 percentage points. Conclusions The addition of examination of the outflow tracts to second-trimester ultrasound increases detection of CHD in the most cost-effective manner. Strategies to improve outflow-tract imaging and to refer with the most efficiency may be the best way to improve detection at a population level. PMID:24357432

  3. Cost-effectiveness of endoscopic screening followed by surveillance for Barrett's esophagus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiere, Josephine M; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2009-12-01

    Screening interventions for Barrett's esophagus (BE) are appealing, but there is little supporting evidence. We reviewed health economics studies about BE endoscopic screening followed by, as required, endoscopic surveillance ("screening and surveillance" hereafter) to help inform the design and conduct of future research. Health economics studies about BE screening and surveillance were identified using electronic database searches and personal contact with authors of identified studies. No studies examined general population screening. Five US studies published between 2003 and 2007 examined the cost effectiveness of screening and surveillance (against no intervention) in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). There was no randomized trial evidence to inform model construction. Assumptions about prevalence and transition probabilities between BE histologic subtypes and about surveillance and treatment protocols varied substantially between studies. Parameters such as potential BE diagnosis-related reduction in quality of life or increase in health care use, diagnostic accuracy, and infrastructural costs (for quality assurance) were considered either "optimistically" or not at all. Only 2 studies considered endoscopic treatments. No study considered the recently introduced radiofrequency ablation technique, or the potential for biomarker-based risk stratification of surveillance interval or duration. Current health economics evidence is likely to have provided optimistic cost-effectiveness estimates and is not sufficient to support introduction of endoscopic BE screening programs among GERD patients. The evidence does not adequately incorporate novel (endoscopic) treatments and the potential for (clinical, endoscopic, or biomarker-based) risk stratification of surveillance. Future research should aim to encompass both these factors.

  4. Problems, solutions, and perspectives in the evaluation of interval cancers in Italian mammography screening programmes: a position paper from the Italian group for mammography screening (GISMa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Lauro; Frigerio, Alfonso; Zorzi, Manuel; Fedato, Chiara; Angiolucci, Giovanni; Bernardi, Daniela; Campari, Cinzia; Crocetti, Emanuele; Ferretti, Stefano; Giorgi, Daniela; Marchisio, Francesca; Morrone, Doralba; Naldoni, Carlo; Petrella, Marco; Ponti, Antonio; Ravaioli, Alessandra; Saguatti, Gianni; Santini, Dolores; Sassoli de Bianchi, Priscilla; Serafini, Monica; Vergini, Viviana; Giordano, Livia

    2015-01-01

    In this position paper, a self-convened team of experts from the Italian Group for Mammography Screening (Gruppo italiano screening mammografico, GISMa) pointed out the problems that increasingly hamper the feasibility and validity of the estimate of the proportional incidence of interval breast cancer (IBC) in Italy, suggested potential solutions and an agenda for research, and proposed that the question of the sensitivity of mammography be viewed in a larger perspective, with a greater attention to radiological review activities and breast radiology quality assurance programmes. The main problems are as follows: the coverage of cancer registration is incomplete; the robustness of using the pre-screening incidence rates as underlying rates decreases with time since the start of screening; the intermediate mammograms performed for early detection purposes may cause an overrepresentation of IBCs; the classification of many borderline screening histories is prone to subjectivity; and, finally, the composition of cohorts of women with negative screening results is uncertain, because several mammography reports are neither clearly negative nor clearly positive, and because of the limitations and instability of the electronic mammography records. Several possibilities can be considered to cope with these issues: standard methods for using the hospital discharge records in the identification of IBCs should be established; for the calculation of regional estimates of the underlying incidence, a suitable mathematical model should be identified; the definition of IBC according to the 2008 GISMa guidelines needs to be updated, especially with respect to in situ cancers and to invasive cancers with borderline screening histories; a closer adherence to standard screening protocols, with a simplified patient management, would make it easier to objectively identify IBCs; alternative methods for estimating the sensitivity of mammography should be taken into consideration; and

  5. Cost-effectiveness of screening for HIV in primary care: a health economics modelling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Rebecca F; Irvine, Michael A; Leber, Werner; Cambiano, Valentina; Figueroa, Jose; McMullen, Heather; Anderson, Jane; Santos, Andreia C; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Miners, Alec; Hollingsworth, T Déirdre; Griffiths, Chris J

    2017-07-28

    Early HIV diagnosis reduces morbidity, mortality, the probability of onward transmission, and their associated costs, but might increase cost because of earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART). We investigated this trade-off by estimating the cost-effectiveness of HIV screening in primary care. We modelled the effect of the four-times higher diagnosis rate observed in the intervention arm of the RHIVA2 randomised controlled trial done in Hackney, London (UK), a borough with high HIV prevalence (≥0·2% adult prevalence). We constructed a dynamic, compartmental model representing incidence of infection and the effect of screening for HIV in general practices in Hackney. We assessed cost-effectiveness of the RHIVA2 trial by fitting model diagnosis rates to the trial data, parameterising with epidemiological and behavioural data from the literature when required, using trial testing costs and projecting future costs of treatment. Over a 40 year time horizon, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were £22 201 (95% credible interval 12 662-132 452) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, £372 207 (268 162-1 903 385) per death averted, and £628 874 (434 902-4 740 724) per HIV transmission averted. Under this model scenario, with UK cost data, RHIVA2 would reach the upper National Institute for Health and Care Excellence cost-effectiveness threshold (about £30 000 per QALY gained) after 33 years. Scenarios using cost data from Canada (which indicate prolonged and even higher health-care costs for patients diagnosed late) suggest this threshold could be reached in as little as 13 years. Screening for HIV in primary care has important public health benefits as well as clinical benefits. We predict it to be cost-effective in the UK in the medium term. However, this intervention might be cost-effective far sooner, and even cost-saving, in settings where long-term health-care costs of late-diagnosed patients in high

  6. Long-term benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.; Sørensen, J; Søgaard, R

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years.......The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years....

  7. Overestimation of complication rates in evaluations of Chlamydia trachomatis screening programmes--implications for cost-effectiveness analyses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkengoed, van IG; Morre, S.A.; Brule, van den AJ; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Boeke, AJ

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cost-effectiveness analyses of screening programmes for asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis infection suggest that screening at low prevalences in the population is cost-effective. However, the decision models in these studies are based on assumptions about the risk of complications, whic

  8. Overestimation of complication rates in evaluations of Chlamydia trachomatis screening programmes--implications for cost-effectiveness analyses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkengoed, van IG; Morre, S.A.; Brule, van den AJ; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Boeke, AJ

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cost-effectiveness analyses of screening programmes for asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis infection suggest that screening at low prevalences in the population is cost-effective. However, the decision models in these studies are based on assumptions about the risk of complications,

  9. Cost effectiveness, the economic considerations of prenatal screening strategies for trisomy 21 in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaifalah, I; Májek, O

    2012-02-01

    To perform an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis for screening of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) in the Czech Republic through a decision tree model designed to evaluate the costs and potential risks involved in using different strategies of screening. METHODS AND DATA ANALYSIS: Using decision-analysis modelling, we compared the cost-effectiveness of nine possible screening strategies for trisomy 21: 1. maternal age > or = 35 in first trimester, 2. maternal age > or = 35 in second trimester, 3. second trimester triple test (AFP, hCG, mu E3), 4. nuchal translucency measurement, 5. first trimester serum test (PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG), 6. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) not in OSCAR manner, 7. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) in OSCAR manner, 8. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, nasal bone, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) not in OSCAR manner, 9. first trimester combined (nuchal translucency, nasal bone, PAPP-A, fbeta-hCG) in OSCAR manner. The analysis is performed from a health care payer perspective using relevant cost and outcomes related to each screening strategy in a cohort of 118,135 pregnant women presenting around 12 weeks of pregnancy in the Czech Republic. Using a computer spreadsheet Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Wash) the following outcomes: overall cost-effectiveness, trisomy 21 cases detected, trisomy 21 live birth prevented and euploid losses from invasive procedures were obtained. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were also calculated by a comparison of strategy nine and strategy three (the current practice in the Czech Republic). Under the baseline assumptions, the model favors strategy nine as the most cost-effective trisomy 21 screening strategy. This strategy was the least expensive strategy per trisomy 21 cases averted. Although all the other strategies cost less, they all had lower trisomy 21 detection rates and higher numbers of procedure-related losses (except for

  10. Contribution of the Unified Health Care System to mammography screening in Brazil, 2013*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas-Junior, Ruffo; Rodrigues, Danielle Cristina Netto; Corrêa, Rosangela da Silveira; Peixoto, João Emílio; de Oliveira, Humberto Vinícius Carrijo Guimarães; Rahal, Rosemar Macedo Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the coverage of opportunistic mammography screening performed via the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System), at the state and regional level, in 2013. Materials and Methods This was an ecological study in which coverage was estimated by determining the ratio between the number of mammograms performed and the expected number of mammograms among the population of females between 50 and 69 years of age. The number of mammograms performed in the target population was obtained from the Outpatient Database of the Information Technology Department of the SUS. To calculate the expected number of mammograms, we considered 58.9% of the target population, the proportion that would be expected on the basis of the recommendations of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute. Results In 2013, the estimated national coverage of mammography screening via the SUS was 24.8%. The mammography rate ranged from 12.0% in the northern region to 31.3% in the southern region. When stratified by state, coverage was lowest in the state of Pará and highest in the state of Santa Catarina (7.5% and 35.7%, respectively). Conclusion The coverage of mammography screening performed via the SUS is low. There is a significant disparity among the Brazilian states (including the Federal District of Brasília) and among regions, being higher in the south/southeast and lower in the north/northeast. PMID:27818544

  11. Cost-effectiveness of screening for hepatocellular carcinoma: putting the cart before the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braillon A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alain BraillonGRES, Public Health, Amiens, FranceRuggeri has recently reviewed the cost-effectiveness of screening for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.1 However, evidence for effectiveness is still lacking, with only two randomized trials available, both from China, one of which is negative and the other positive but with several major flaws.2 Only observational studies are available from developed countries, and conclude that screening improves survival, despite raw data showing that screened patients die younger than nonscreened patients, (length time and lead time biases.3 The National Cancer Institute recommends that “based on fair evidence, screening would not result in a decrease in mortality from HCC … based on fair evidence, screening would result in rare but serious side effects”.4View original paper by Ruggeri.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Total Colonoscopy in Screening of Colorectal Cancer in Japan

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    Masau Sekiguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In Japan, the cost-effectiveness of total colonoscopy (TCS for primary screening of colorectal cancer (CRC is unclear. We compared the cost of identifying a patient with CRC using two primary screening strategies: TCS (strategy 1 and the immunochemical fecal test (FIT (strategy 2. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the TCS screening database at our institution from February 2004 to August 2010 (strategy 1, =15,348 and the Japanese nationwide survey of CRC screening in 2008 (strategy 2, =5,267,443. Results. 112 and 6,838 CRC cases were detected in strategies 1 and 2, costing 2,124,000 JPY and 1,629,000 JPY, respectively. The rate of earlier-stage CRC was higher in strategy 1. Conclusions. The cost was higher using TCS as a primary screening procedure. However, the difference was not excessive, and considering the increased rate of detecting earlier CRC, the use of TCS as a primary screening tool may be cost-effective.

  13. Health benefits and cost-effectiveness of a hybrid screening strategy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Tuan; Ladabaum, Uri; Alperin, Peter; Caldwell, Cindy; Smith, Robert; Levin, Theodore R

    2013-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines recommend screening schedules for each single type of test except for concurrent sigmoidoscopy and fecal occult blood test (FOBT). We investigated the cost-effectiveness of a hybrid screening strategy that was based on a fecal immunological test (FIT) and colonoscopy. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis by using the Archimedes Model to evaluate the effects of different CRC screening strategies on health outcomes and costs related to CRC in a population that represents members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. The Archimedes Model is a large-scale simulation of human physiology, diseases, interventions, and health care systems. The CRC submodel in the Archimedes Model was derived from public databases, published epidemiologic studies, and clinical trials. A hybrid screening strategy led to substantial reductions in CRC incidence and mortality, gains in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and reductions in costs, comparable with those of the best single-test strategies. Screening by annual FIT of patients 50-65 years old and then a single colonoscopy when they were 66 years old (FIT/COLOx1) reduced CRC incidence by 72% and gained 110 QALYs for every 1000 people during a period of 30 years, compared with no screening. Compared with annual FIT, FIT/COLOx1 gained 1400 QALYs/100,000 persons at an incremental cost of $9700/QALY gained and required 55% fewer FITs. Compared with FIT/COLOx1, colonoscopy at 10-year intervals gained 500 QALYs/100,000 at an incremental cost of $35,100/QALY gained but required 37% more colonoscopies. Over the ranges of parameters examined, the cost-effectiveness of hybrid screening strategies was slightly more sensitive to the adherence rate with colonoscopy than the adherence rate with yearly FIT. Uncertainties associated with estimates of FIT performance within a program setting and sensitivities for flat and right-sided lesions are expected to have significant impacts on the cost-effectiveness

  14. Introduction of organised mammography screening in Tyrol: results following first year of complete rollout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapp Rudolf

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tyrol, Austria, the existing system of spontaneous mammography screening was switched in 2007 to an organised program by smoothly changing the established framework. This process followed most EU recommendations for organised mammography screening with the following exceptions: women aged 40-49 are part of the target population, screening is offered annually to the age group 40-59, breast ultrasound is available as an additional diagnostic tool, and double reading has not yet been implemented. After a pilot phase the program was rolled out to all of Tyrol in June 2008. The aim of this study was to analyse the performance of the organised screening system by comparing quality indices and recommended levels given in the well-established EU guidelines. Methods Working from the results of the pilot phase, we extended the organised mammography system to all counties in Tyrol. All women living in Tyrol and covered by compulsory social insurance were invited for a mammography, in the age group 40-59 annually and in the age group 60-69 biennially. Screening mammography was offered mainly by radiologists in private practice, with further assessment performed at hospitals. Using the screening database, all well-established performance indicators were analysed and compared with accepted/desired levels as per the EU guidelines. Results From June 2008 to May 2009, 120,440 women were invited. Per 1000 mammograms, 14 women were recalled for further assessment, nine underwent biopsy and four cancer cases were detected. Of invasive breast cancer cases, 32.3% and 68.4% were ≤ 10 mm and ≤ 15 mm in size, respectively, and 79.2% were node-negative. The positive predictive value for further assessment and for biopsy was 25.9% and 39.9%, respectively. Estimated two-year participation rate was 57.0%. In total, 14 interval cancer cases were detected during one year of follow-up; this is 18.4% of the background incidence rate. Conclusions In

  15. Trends in breast cancer mortality in Sweden before and after implementation of mammography screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Haukka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Incidence-based mortality modelling comparing the risk of breast cancer death in screened and unscreened women in nine Swedish counties has suggested a 39% risk reduction in women 40 to 69 years old after introduction of mammography screening in the 1980s and 1990s. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated changes in breast cancer mortality in the same nine Swedish counties using a model approach based on official Swedish breast cancer mortality statistics, robust to effects of over-diagnosis and treatment changes. Using mortality data from the NordCan database from 1974 until 2003, we estimated the change in breast cancer mortality before and after introduction of mammography screening in at least the 13 years that followed screening start. RESULTS: Breast mortality decreased by 16% (95% CI: 9 to 22% in women 40 to 69, and by 11% (95% CI: 2 to 20% in women 40 to 79 years of age. DISCUSSION: Without individual data it is impossible to completely separate the effects of improved treatment and health service organisation from that of screening, which would bias our results in favour of screening. There will also be some contamination of post-screening mortality from breast cancer diagnosed prior to screening, beyond our attempts to adjust for delayed benefit. This would bias against screening. However, our estimates from publicly available data suggest considerably lower benefits than estimates based on comparison of screened versus non-screened women.

  16. Differences in radiological patterns, tumour characteristics and diagnostic precision between digital mammography and screen-film mammography in four breast cancer screening programmes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, Laia; Sala, Maria [IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), EHEA Doctoral Program in Public Health. Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Barcelona (Spain); Romero, Anabel; Belvis, Francesc; Macia, Francesc; Castells, Xavier [IMIM-Hospital del Mar, Department of Epidemiology and Evaluation, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, Mar [Government of Cantabria, General Directorate of Public Health, Department of Health, Santander (Spain); Ferrer, Joana [Radiology Unit. Hospital Santa Caterina, Girona (Spain); Salas, Dolores; Ibanez, Josefa [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia (Spain); Vega, Alfonso [Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Radiology Unit, Santander (Spain); Ferrer, Francesc [Hospital del Mar, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Service, Barcelona (Spain); Laso, M.S. [Breast Cancer Screening Unit Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    To compare tumour characteristics between cancers detected with screen-film mammography (SFM) and digital mammography (DM) and to evaluate changes in positive predictive values (PPVs) for further assessments, for invasive procedures and for distinct radiological patterns in recalled women. 242,838 screening mammograms (171,191 SFM and 71,647 DM) from 103,613 women aged 45-69 years, performed in four population-based breast cancer screening programmes in Spain, were included. The tumour characteristics and PPVs of each group were compared. Radiological patterns (masses, calcifications, distortions and asymmetries) among recalled women were described and PPVs were evaluated. The percentages of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were higher in DM than in SFM both in the first [18.5% vs. 15.8%(p = 0.580)] and in successive screenings [23.2% vs. 15.7%(p = 0.115)]. PPVs for masses, asymmetries and calcifications were higher in DM, being statistically significant in masses (5.3% vs. 3.9%; proportion ratio: 1.37 95%CI: 1.08-1.72). Among cancers detected by calcifications, the percentage of DCIS was higher in DM (60.3% vs. 46.4%, p = 0.060). PPVs were higher when DM was used, both for further assessments and for invasive procedures, with similar cancer detection rates and no statistically significant differences in tumour characteristics. The greatest improvements in PPVs were found for masses. (orig.)

  17. A cross sectional study on the motivators for Asian women to attend opportunistic mammography screening in a private hospital in Malaysia: the MyMammo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Norhashimah; Ho, Weang Kee; Mariapun, Shivaani; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2015-06-12

    To date, because of limited budgets and lower incidence of breast cancer, the majority of Asian countries do not have population-based screening programmes, but instead offer opportunistic screening. However, there have been few studies which have assessed the motivators for women attending such programmes and the appropriateness of the programmes in terms of targeting women at risk. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 1,619 women aged 40 to 74 years attending a subsidized opportunistic screening mammogram from October 2011 to October 2013 at a private hospital in Malaysia. Breast cancer risk was estimated using the Gail Model and two-step cluster analysis was used to examine the motivators of attending screening. Although Malaysia comprises 54.5% Malay, 24.5% Chinese and 7.3% Indian, the majority of women in the MyMammo Study were Chinese (70.1%) and 99.2% had a educated women, cited doctors, family and friends as their main motivators. Of those with only secondary school education, their main motivators were doctors. Taken together, our results suggest the women attending opportunistic mammography screening in Asia are at low risk of breast cancer and this poses challenges to cost-effective and equitable strategies for cancer control. We propose that to improve uptake of screening mammography, awareness programmes should target both doctors and members of the public.

  18. Is screening for pancreatic cancer in high-risk groups cost-effective?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Maiken Thyregod; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sørensen, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, symptoms are few and diffuse, and when the diagnosis has been made only 10-15% would benefit from resection. Surgery is the only potentially curable treatment for pancreatic cancer, and the prognosis seems...... with Hereditary pancreatitis or with a disposition of HP and 40 first-degree relatives of patients with Familial Pancreatic Cancer (FPC) were screened for development of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with yearly endoscopic ultrasound. The cost-effectiveness of screening in comparison with no...

  19. Breast cancer mortality in Norway after the introduction of mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne Helene; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse H;

    2013-01-01

    An organized mammography screening program was gradually implemented in Norway during the period 1996-2004. Norwegian authorities have initiated an evaluation of the program. Our study focused on breast cancer mortality. Using Poisson regression, we compared the change in breast cancer mortality...... from before to during screening in four counties starting the program early controlling for change in breast cancer mortality during the same time in counties starting the program late. A follow-up model included death in all breast cancers diagnosed during the follow-up period. An evaluation model...... to the program, the implementation of the organized mammography screening program was associated with a statistically nonsignificant decrease in breast cancer mortality of around 11%....

  20. Factors Influencing Breast Density in Japanese Women Aged 40-49 in Breast Cancer Screening Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori,Keisuke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A relatively large number of women in their 40s with high-density breasts, in which it can be difficult to detect lesions, are encountered in mammography cancer screenings in Japan. Here, we retrospectively investigated factors related to breast density. Two hundred women (40-49 years old were examined at the screening center in our hospital. Multivariate analysis showed that factors such as small abdominal circumference, high HDL cholesterol, and no history of childbirth were related to high breast density in women in their 40s undergoing mammography. Other non-mammographic screening methods should be considered in women with abdominal circumferences <76cm, HDL-C >53mg/dl, and no history of childbirth, as there is a strong possibility of these women having high-density breasts that can make lesion detection difficult.

  1. Comparative performance of modern digital mammography systems in a large breast screening program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, Martin J., E-mail: martin.yaffe@sri.utoronto.ca; Bloomquist, Aili K.; Hunter, David M.; Mawdsley, Gordon E. [Physical Sciences Division, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Departments of Medical Biophysics and Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Chiarelli, Anna M. [Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Ontario Breast Screening Program, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X3 (Canada); Muradali, Derek [Ontario Breast Screening Program, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X3 (Canada); Mainprize, James G. [Physical Sciences Division, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To compare physical measures pertaining to image quality among digital mammography systems utilized in a large breast screening program. To examine qualitatively differences in these measures and differences in clinical cancer detection rates between CR and DR among sites within that program. Methods: As part of the routine quality assurance program for screening, field measurements are made of several variables considered to correlate with the diagnostic quality of medical images including: modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, d′ (an index of lesion detectability) and air kerma to allow estimation of mean glandular dose. In addition, images of the mammography accreditation phantom are evaluated. Results: It was found that overall there were marked differences between the performance measures of DR and CR mammography systems. In particular, the modulation transfer functions obtained with the DR systems were found to be higher, even for larger detector element sizes. Similarly, the noise equivalent quanta, d′, and the phantom scores were higher, while the failure rates associated with low signal-to-noise ratio and high dose were lower with DR. These results were consistent with previous findings in the authors’ program that the breast cancer detection rates at sites employing CR technology were, on average, 30.6% lower than those that used DR mammography. Conclusions: While the clinical study was not large enough to allow a statistically powered system-by-system assessment of cancer detection accuracy, the physical measures expressing spatial resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio are consistent with the published finding that sites employing CR systems had lower cancer detection rates than those using DR systems for screening mammography.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative Blood-Screening Strategies for West Nile Virus in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: West Nile virus (WNV is endemic in the US, varying seasonally and by geographic region. WNV can be transmitted by blood transfusion, and mandatory screening of blood for WNV was recently introduced throughout the US. Guidelines for selecting cost-effective strategies for screening blood for WNV do not exist. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis for screening blood for WNV using a computer-based mathematical model, and using data from prospective studies, retrospective studies, and published literature. For three geographic areas with varying WNV-transmission intensity and length of transmission season, the model was used to estimate lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios associated with alternative screening strategies in a target population of blood-transfusion recipients. We compared the status quo (baseline screening using a donor questionnaire to several strategies which differed by nucleic acid testing of either pooled or individual samples, universal versus targeted screening of donations designated for immunocompromised patients, and seasonal versus year-long screening. In low-transmission areas with short WNV seasons, screening by questionnaire alone was the most cost-effective strategy. In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations designated for immunocompromised recipients was the most cost-effective strategy. Seasonal screening of the entire recipient pool added minimal clinical benefit, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios exceeding US$1.7 million per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Year-round screening offered no additional benefit compared to seasonal screening in any of the transmission settings. CONCLUSIONS: In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations

  3. Cost-effectiveness of alternative blood-screening strategies for West Nile Virus in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline T Korves

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is endemic in the US, varying seasonally and by geographic region. WNV can be transmitted by blood transfusion, and mandatory screening of blood for WNV was recently introduced throughout the US. Guidelines for selecting cost-effective strategies for screening blood for WNV do not exist.We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis for screening blood for WNV using a computer-based mathematical model, and using data from prospective studies, retrospective studies, and published literature. For three geographic areas with varying WNV-transmission intensity and length of transmission season, the model was used to estimate lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios associated with alternative screening strategies in a target population of blood-transfusion recipients. We compared the status quo (baseline screening using a donor questionnaire to several strategies which differed by nucleic acid testing of either pooled or individual samples, universal versus targeted screening of donations designated for immunocompromised patients, and seasonal versus year-long screening. In low-transmission areas with short WNV seasons, screening by questionnaire alone was the most cost-effective strategy. In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations designated for immunocompromised recipients was the most cost-effective strategy. Seasonal screening of the entire recipient pool added minimal clinical benefit, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios exceeding USD 1.7 million per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Year-round screening offered no additional benefit compared to seasonal screening in any of the transmission settings.In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations designated for immunocompromised recipients is cost

  4. The outcome of a quality-controlled mammography screening program: Experience from a population-based study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huay-Ben Pan

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: From the outcome review of this national mammography screening, there is still room to ameliorate our performance through comprehensive and continued education, to improve the competence of cancer detection and decrease false negative (FN cases.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Four Simulated Colorectal Cancer Screening Interventions, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo, David A.; Mayorga, Maria E.; Pignone, Michael; Tangka, Florence K.L.; Richardson, Lisa C.; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Hall, Ingrid J.; Smith, Judith Lee; Durham, Todd A.; Chall, Steven A.; Crutchfield, Trisha M.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are suboptimal, particularly among the uninsured and the under-insured and among rural and African American populations. Little guidance is available for state-level decision makers to use to prioritize investment in evidence-based interventions to improve their population’s health. The objective of this study was to demonstrate use of a simulation model that incorporates synthetic census data and claims-based statistical models to project screening behavior in North Carolina. Methods We used individual-based modeling to simulate and compare intervention costs and results under 4 evidence-based and stakeholder-informed intervention scenarios for a 10-year intervention window, from January 1, 2014, through December 31, 2023. We compared the proportion of people living in North Carolina who were aged 50 to 75 years at some point during the window (that is, age-eligible for screening) who were up to date with CRC screening recommendations across intervention scenarios, both overall and among groups with documented disparities in receipt of screening. Results We estimated that the costs of the 4 intervention scenarios considered would range from $1.6 million to $3.75 million. Our model showed that mailed reminders for Medicaid enrollees, mass media campaigns targeting African Americans, and colonoscopy vouchers for the uninsured reduced disparities in receipt of screening by 2023, but produced only small increases in overall screening rates (0.2–0.5 percentage-point increases in the percentage of age-eligible adults who were up to date with CRC screening recommendations). Increased screenings ranged from 41,709 additional life-years up to date with screening for the voucher intervention to 145,821 for the mass media intervention. Reminders mailed to Medicaid enrollees and the mass media campaign for African Americans were the most cost-effective interventions, with costs per additional life-year up to date with

  6. Novel emergency department registration kiosk for HIV screening is cost-effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Holtgrave, David R; Peterson, Stephen; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Rothman, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    High operating costs challenge sustainability of successful US emergency department (ED) HIV screening programs. Free-standing registration kiosks could potentially reduce the marginal costs of ED HIV screening. We investigated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) per new HIV diagnosis for a kiosk-based approach for offering screening at ED registration versus a testing staff-based approach to offer testing at the bedside. A rapid oral-fluid HIV screening program, instituted in a US ED since 2005, had a rate of new HIV diagnosis 0.16% in 2012. A two-phase quasi experimental design, including a testing staff-based approach to offer testing at the bedside (Phase I, August and September 2011) and a kiosk-based approach to offer testing at ED registration (Phase II, December 2011 and January 2012), was performed. CER per new HIV diagnosis was defined as total cost of the screening program divided by number of newly diagnosed cases. Costs included screening program personnel (study coordinator, testing staff, and kiosk helpers), diagnostic assays (rapid and confirmatory tests), and kiosks (2 kiosks, software, and IT consulting fees). Sensitivity analyses were performed. Data from our dedicated testing staff (DTS) program (Phase I) resulted in an estimated 5434 patients tested in one year and 9 newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients (95% CI: 3, 18). Data from the kiosk program (Phase II), resulted in a projected 4571 ED patients tested in one year and 21 newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients (95% CI: 4, 70). The overall cost was $ 201,433 for the DTS program, versus $292,008 for the kiosk program. Incremental CER per new HIV diagnosis for kiosk-based approach was $7523 (range: $1780-90,025 by sensitivity analysis). Our pilot data demonstrated that the use of kiosks for HIV screening was potentially more cost-effective than a testing staff-based bedside approach.

  7. Screening and decolonization of MRSA among joint arthroplasty patients:efficacy, cost-effectiveness and durability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. Carlos Rodriguez-Merchan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To review the literature with the aim of answering the following three questions:1) Is screening and decolonization effective in reducing the rate of infection after elective joint arthroplasty?2)Is screening and decolonization cost-effective?3)What is the durability of decolonization? Methods:The search engines wereMedLine(PubMed),GoogleScholar and theCochraneLibrary. The keywords used were: preoperativeMRSA screening.Seven thousand nine hundred and forty eight articles were found until30September2014(seven thousand eight hundred and fifty inGoogleScholar, ninety-seven inMedLine and one in theCochraneLibrary).Of those, only eighteen were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the question of this article. Results:The types of studies reported have a low level of evidence.Most of them are prospective case series, although some of them are systematic reviews of levelIII studies.There is a tendency toward fewerMRSA infections after elective joint arthroplasty.Decolonization has shown to be strongly cost-effective with33% of postoperative arthroplasty patients tests positive for Staphylococcus aureus colonization at3 to30 months after surgery. Conclusions:There is a tendency toward fewerMRSA infections after total joint arthroplasty when screening and decolonization is used.Decolonization is strongly cost-effective procedure with33% of patients tests positive forMRSA3 to30 months after surgery.Larger, randomized, controlled studies are needed to confirm the apparent efficacy of decolonization.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening: comparison of screening policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van den Akker-van Marle; M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein); G.J. van Oortmarssen (Gerrit); R. Boer (Rob); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Recommended screening policies for cervical cancer differ widely among countries with respect to targeted age range, screening interval, and total number of scheduled screening examinations (i.e., Pap smears). We compared the efficiency of cervical cancer-sc

  9. Value of Sonography in Screening Women with Dense Breasts in Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeel Shokrollahi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women and the main cause of death due to malignancy in women between 40-44 years of age.This cancer is responsible for 33% of all cancers in women and 20% of all deaths due to cancer in women."nMammography is the main modality for screening and diagnosis of breast lesions, but in dense breasts it has low sensitivity (about 48% with low possibility for visualization of mass lesions or calcifications, and this results in fading abnormal findings and increasing the risk of malignancy. This defect is compensated by ultrasonography."nSonography also elegantly shows hidden areas, which are covered by normal breast tissue in mammography, and also shows the pictures real time without overlap."nPresence of any palpable mass in clinical exam was an excluding criterion for patients from the study. Any lesion as a cystic or solid mass or echo change or calcification was recorded in the database. If a lesion had a malignant picture, FNA or core biopsy was done for it and the sample was sent for pathologic report."nThis study showed that correlation with sonography is mandatory in women who have dense breasts in mammography, even if it is a low-grade dense breast. If this correlation was not done, breast cancers present in 1.5% of the studied population would be missed."nSo due to the high false negativity of mammography in dense breasts, in the time being, sonography is considered as the second line screening method and complementary modality for mammography. It not only increases the diagnostic accuracy, but also as the only real time imaging modality, it can be used for localization and precise biopsy of breast lesions. Also, it can be used without any limitation as a cheap and harmless way for follow up imaging in short intervals for suspected patients.

  10. Validity and cost-effectiveness of methods for screening of primary open angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröschl, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: About 950,000 people are affected by glaucoma in Germany, about 50% of which are undiagnosed. The German Ophthalmological Society and the German Association of Ophthalmologists recommend a screening for glaucoma according to their guidelines. The Federal Joint Committee disapproved a glaucoma-screening program on expense of the compulsory health insurance in 2004. Scientific background: Primary open angle glaucoma is diagnosed by evaluation of the optic disc, the retinal fibre layer and the visual field. The main examinations are ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser polarimetry, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, retinal thickness analysis and optical coherence tomography. Scotomas are diagnosed by perimetry (standard automated perimetry, short wavelength automated perimetry and frequency doubling perimetry. The intraocular pressure is the most important treatable risk factor and is measured by (contact or non-contact tonometry. Research questions: The aim of this HTA-report is to investigate the diagnostic validity and cost effectiveness of diagnostic techniques or combinations of these methods with respect to the use in a screening setting in Germany. Methods: A systematic literature research was performed in 35 international databases and yielded 2602 articles. Overall 57 publications were included for assessment, according to predefined selection criteria. Results: The 55 medical articles deal mainly with frequency doubling perimetry, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and scanning laser polarimetry. Few articles cover short wavelength automated perimetry, tonometry and ophalmocopic evaluations by ophthalmologists. The quality of the papers is generally low, as far as the evidence in respect of screening is concerned. No single method exists with both, high sensitivity and high specificity for screening purpose. Data are also not sufficient to recommend combinations of methods. Only two economic models on cost

  11. Self administered screening for hereditary cancers in conjunction with mammography and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Charles H; Seidenwurm, David J; McDonnell, Diana E; Bobolis, Kristie A

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of an automated tablet computer application providing a family and personal history based cancer risk assessment for hereditary breast, ovarian, endometrial and colorectal cancers. 1,002 women presenting for screening mammography and 1,000 presenting for ultrasound were offered screening. The application calculated the risk of BRCA mutations using BRCAPRO, Myriad and Tyrer-Cuzick risk assessment models. Lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer was assessed with the BRCAPRO, Claus and Tyrer-Cuzick models. Colorectal and endometrial cancer risk was calculated via the MMRpro model. Patients were identified as high-risk based on thresholds 10% or greater risk for carrying genetic mutations or 20% or greater lifetime risk of breast or ovarian cancer. The percent of women found to be high-risk by a single risk assessment tool ranged from 0.5 to 5.3%. Combining assessment tools found 9.3% of women to be high-risk. The risk assessments performed similarly for the mammography and ultrasound cohorts with yields (combining assessment tools) of 9.2 and 9.4% respectively. The average ages of all the high-risk women were 45.8 and 39.6 years for the mammography and ultrasound cohorts respectively. Difficulties encountered included a need for software upgrade, wireless network unreliability and hardware theft. Automated family history screening can identify women probably at high-risk for hereditary cancers efficiently. The number of women identified is increased by employing multiple risk assessment models simultaneously. Surveying women in conjunction with ultrasound identified women at increased risk as effectively and at a younger age than with screening mammography.

  12. Imaging performance of a low-dose screen-film mammography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafroudi, Hamid; Jennings, Robert J.; Gagne, Robert M.; Artz, Dorothy S.; Vucich, James J.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the imaging and dose performance of an x-ray imaging system optimized for mammography. The x-ray system design was developed by the University of Southern California and the Center for Devices and Radiological Health using multiparameter optimization techniques. The prototype was built by Fischer Imaging and is now under evaluation at the National Institutes of Health. While previous reports have concentrated on demonstrating the does reduction potential of the system, for this study the x-ray spectrum was modified to maximize imaging performance. Measurements were made to assess the level of imaging performance achieved and to determine the increase in dose. Contrast-detail analysis along with qualitative evaluation of images of conventional mammography phantoms were used to assess imaging performance. Both imaging performance and the dose delivered by the system were compared to those of a conventional mammography system. Because of the current interest in digital mammography, the performance of the optimized system with a storage phosphor plate image receptor, sometimes referred to as computed radiography (CR), was also studied. The optimized system provided significantly better imaging performance than the conventional system with both film-screen and CR detectors. The dose was increased to a level comparable to the average value for conventional systems using grids.

  13. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: the Danish Quality Database of Mammography Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langagergaard V

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vivian Langagergaard,1 Jens P Garne,2 Ilse Vejborg,3 Walter Schwartz,4 Martin Bak,5 Anders Lernevall,1 Nikolaj B Mogensen,6 Heidi Larsson,7 Berit Andersen,1 Ellen M Mikkelsen7 1Department of Public Health Programs, Randers Hospital, Randers, Denmark; 2Department of Breast Surgery, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 3Diagnostic Imaging Center, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Center of Mammography, 5Department of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark; 6Department of Radiology, Ringsted Hospital, Ringsted, Denmark; 7Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Abstract: The Danish Quality Database of Mammography Screening (DKMS was established in 2007, when screening was implemented on a nationwide basis and offered biennially to all Danish women aged 50–69 years. The primary aims of the database are to monitor and evaluate the quality of the screening program and – after years of follow-up – to evaluate the effect of nationwide screening on breast cancer-specific mortality. Here, we describe the database and present results for quality assurance from the first round of national screening. The steering committee for the DKMS defined eleven organizational and clinical quality indicators and standards to monitor the Danish breast cancer screening program. We calculated the relevant proportions and ratios with 95% confidence intervals for each quality indicator. All indicators were assessed on a national and regional level. Of 670,039 women invited for mammography, 518,823 (77.4% participated. Seventy-one percent of the women received the result of their mammography examination within 10 days of screening, and 3% of the participants were recalled for further investigation. Among all detected cancers, 86% were invasive cancers, and the proportion of women with node negative cancer was 67%. There were 36% women with small cancers, and the ratio of surgery for

  14. Cost-effectiveness of pre-participation screening of athletes with ECG in Europe and Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanelli, Deodato; Levaggi, Rosella; Carré, François; Sharma, Sanjay; Deligiannis, Asterios; Mellwig, Klaus Peter; Tahmi, Mohamed; Vinetti, Giovanni; Aliverti, Paola

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ECG in combination with family and personal history and physical examination in order to detect cardiovascular diseases that might cause sudden death in athletes. The study was conducted on a cohort of 6,634, mainly young professional and recreational athletes, 1,071 from Algeria and 5,563 from Europe (France, Germany and Greece). Each athlete underwent medical history, physical examination, and resting 12-lead ECG. 293 athletes (4.4 %), 149 in Europe (2.7 %) and 144 in Algeria (13.4 %) required further tests, and 56 were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease and thus disqualified. The cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) was calculated as the ratio between the cost of screening and the number of statistical life-years saved by the intervention. The estimated reduced risk of death deriving from treatment or disqualification resulted in the saving of 79.1 statistical life-years in Europe and 136.3 in Algeria. CER of screening was 4,071 purchasing-power-parity-adjusted US dollars ($PPP) in Europe and 582 $PPP in Algeria. The results of this study strongly support the utilisation of 12-lead ECG in the pre-participation screening of young athletes, especially in countries where secondary preventive care is not highly developed.

  15. Four Principles to Consider Before Advising Women on Screening Mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keen, John D; Juhl Jørgensen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    of a screening intervention. Disease-specific mortality is biased due to difficulties in attribution of cause of death and to increased mortality due to overdiagnosis and the resulting overtreatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. To enhance participation, the benefit from screening is often presented...... in relative instead of absolute terms. Third, some screening statistics must be interpreted with caution. Increased survival time and the percentage of early-stage tumors at detection sound plausible, but are affected by lead-time and length biases. In addition, analyses that only include women who attend...... screening cannot reliably correct for selection bias. The final principle is that accounting for tumor biology is important for accurate estimates of lead time, and the potential benefit from screening. Since "early detection" is actually late in a tumor's lifetime, the time window when screen detection...

  16. Measurements and simulations of scatter imaging as a simultaneous adjunct for screening mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Katie; Hassan, Laila; Peerzada, Lubna; Ur-Rehman, Mahboob; MacDonald, C. A.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray coherent scatter is dependent upon the molecular structure of the scattering material and hence allows differentiation between tissue types with potentially much higher contrast than conventional absorption-based radiography. Coherent-scatter computed tomography has been used to produce images based on the x-ray scattering properties of the tissue. However, the geometry for CT imaging requires a thin fan beam and multiple projections and is incommensurate with screening mammography. In this work we demonstrate progress in a developing a system using a wide slot beam and simple anti-scatter grid which is adequate to differentiate between scatter peaks to remove the fat background from the coherent scatter image. Adequate intensity in the coherent scatter image can be achieved at the dose commonly used for screening mammography to detect carcinoma surrogates as small as 2 mm in diameter. This technique would provide an inexpensive, low dose, simultaneous adjunct to conventional screening mammography to provide a localized map of tissue type that could be overlaid on the conventional transmission mammogram. Comparisons between phantom measurements and Monte Carlo simulations show good agreement, which allowed for detailed examination of the visibility of carcinoma under realistic conditions.

  17. Underutilizers of mammography screening today: characteristics of women planning, undecided about, and not planning a mammogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemow, L; Costanza, M E; Haddad, W P; Luckmann, R; White, M J; Klaus, D; Stoddard, A M

    2000-01-01

    Using concepts from the Precaution Adoption Process Model, we identified behavioral factors, sociodemographic and psychosocial variables, and beliefs about breast cancer that discriminated among women at different stages with regard to their intention to obtain mammography screening. An independent survey company conducted telephone interviews with 2,507 women aged 50 to 80 who were identified as underutilizers of mammography screening. Each underutilizer was assigned to one of three stages with regard to intention to get a mammogram: (a) definitely planning, (b) thinking about, and (c) not planning. Estimated actual risk of breast cancer, perceived risk to breast cancer, worry about breast cancer, and fear of learning from a mammogram that one has breast cancer were variables found to be significantly associated with intention to obtain a mammogram for several subgroups of underutilizing women. There are significant behavioral and psychosocial variables, beliefs and feelings about breast cancer, and demographic characteristics that distinguish underutilizing women at various stages with regard to intention to obtain mammography screening. Our findings provide new information that could help the health care professional motivate women who are not planning to utilize this preventive health measure to become regular utilizers.

  18. Investigation of breast dose in five screening mammography centres in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapaki, V [Medical Physics Department, Konstantopoulio Hospital, Nea Ionia, 142 33, Athens (Greece); Tsalafoutas, I A [Medical Physics Department, Agios Savvas Hospital, 171 Alexandras Avenue, 115 22, Athens (Greece); Poga, V; Louizi, A; Kottou, S [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Athens University, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27, Athens (Greece); Koulentianos, E [Radiology Department, Konstantopoulio Hospital, Nea Ionia, 142 33, Athens (Greece)

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the techniques currently used for screening mammography in Greece, to estimate the mean glandular dose (MGD) for establishing a baseline radiation dose database, to analyse the effects of various factors on MGD, and to compare the results with others in the literature. Five mammographic facilities and 250 women having as a routine screening mammogram one craniocaudal (CC) and one mediolateral oblique (MLO) projection in each breast were included in the study. The parameters recorded were age, weight, compressed breast thickness (CBT), tube potential (kV), tube loading (mA s) and MLO projection angle. Large differences were observed among the different mammography facilities, mainly in terms of the tube potential setting and the MLO angle used. The average MGD per exposure was 1.4 {+-} 0.6 mGy while the respective averages separately for the CC and MLO projections were 1.2 {+-} 0.5 and 1.5 {+-} 0.7 mGy, respectively. The average MGD values recorded in this study were below the limit of 2 mGy established for the reference medium-sized breast of 4.5 cm CBT. However, the variety of techniques observed revealed the need for a nationwide survey concerning screening mammography in Greece.

  19. Evaluation of radiographers’ mammography screen-reading accuracy in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debono, Josephine C, E-mail: josephine.debono@bci.org.au [Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia); Poulos, Ann E [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Houssami, Nehmat [Screening and Test Evaluation Program, School of Public Health (A27), Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Turner, Robin M [School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Boyages, John [Macquarie University Cancer Institute, Macquarie University Hospital, Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of radiographers’ screen-reading mammograms. Currently, radiologist workforce shortages may be compromising the BreastScreen Australia screening program goal to detect early breast cancer. The solution to a similar problem in the United Kingdom has successfully encouraged radiographers to take on the role as one of two screen-readers. Prior to consideration of this strategy in Australia, educational and experiential differences between radiographers in the United Kingdom and Australia emphasise the need for an investigation of Australian radiographers’ screen-reading accuracy. Ten radiographers employed by the Westmead Breast Cancer Institute with a range of radiographic (median = 28 years), mammographic (median = 13 years) and BreastScreen (median = 8 years) experience were recruited to blindly and independently screen-read an image test set of 500 mammograms, without formal training. The radiographers indicated the presence of an abnormality using BI-RADS®. Accuracy was determined by comparison with the gold standard of known outcomes of pathology results, interval matching and client 6-year follow-up. Individual sensitivity and specificity levels ranged between 76.0% and 92.0%, and 74.8% and 96.2% respectively. Pooled screen-reader accuracy across the radiographers estimated sensitivity as 82.2% and specificity as 89.5%. Areas under the reading operating characteristic curve ranged between 0.842 and 0.923. This sample of radiographers in an Australian setting have adequate accuracy levels when screen-reading mammograms. It is expected that with formal screen-reading training, accuracy levels will improve, and with support, radiographers have the potential to be one of the two screen-readers in the BreastScreen Australia program, contributing to timeliness and improved program outcomes.

  20. Performance indicators for participation in organized mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Jacobsen, Katja Kemp

    2012-01-01

    A population's acceptance of a screening programme is reflected by its participation. Participation can be measured by cross-section, in an individual screening round, or by cumulative examination rate, which covers participation in numerous rounds at a pre-specified frequency. To establish an in...

  1. Do Social Network Characteristics Predict Mammography Screening Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Many breast cancer outreach programs assume that dissemination of information through social networks and provision of social support will promote screening. The authors prospectively examined the relationship between social network characteristics and adherence to screening guidelines. Method: Employed women age 40 years and older…

  2. Do Social Network Characteristics Predict Mammography Screening Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Many breast cancer outreach programs assume that dissemination of information through social networks and provision of social support will promote screening. The authors prospectively examined the relationship between social network characteristics and adherence to screening guidelines. Method: Employed women age 40 years and older…

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Elderly Health Examination Program: The Example of Hypertension Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Hwa Deng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Insurance (NHI and social welfare agencies have implemented the Elderly Health Examination Program (EHEP for years. No study has ever attempted to evaluate whether this program is cost-effective. The purposes of this study were, firstly, to understand the prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension and, secondly, to estimate the cost and effectiveness of the EHEP, focusing on hypertension screening. The data sources were: (1 hypertension and clinical information derived from the 1996 and 1997 EHEP, which was used to generate prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension; and (2 claim data of the NHI that included treatment costs of stroke patients (in-and outpatients. Hypothetical models were used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the hypertension screening program in various conditions. Sensitivity analysis was also employed to evaluate the effect of each estimation indicator on the cost and effectiveness of the hypertension screening program. A total of 28.3% of the elderly population in Kaohsiung (25,174 of 88,812 participated in the 1996 EHEP; 14,915 of them participated in the following 1997 EHEP, with a retention rate of 59.3%. Criteria from the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI (systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure ≥ 160/95mmHg or taking antihypertensive drugs were used; we found that prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension were 24.6% and 6.6%, respectively. Hypertension rates are increasing in the aging process as shown in both prevalence and incidence models. In comparison with non-participants, the prevalence model indicates that each hypertension patient who had attended the EHEP not only saved NT$34,570–34,890 in medical and associated costs, but also increased their lifespan by 128 days. The present findings suggest that the EHEP is a cost-effective program with health and social welfare policy

  4. Statistical analyses in Swedish randomised trials on mammography screening and in other randomised trials on cancer screening: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniol, Mathieu; Smans, Michel; Sullivan, Richard; Boyle, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We compared calculations of relative risks of cancer death in Swedish mammography trials and in other cancer screening trials. Participants Men and women from 30 to 74 years of age. Setting Randomised trials on cancer screening. Design For each trial, we identified the intervention period, when screening was offered to screening groups and not to control groups, and the post-intervention period, when screening (or absence of screening) was the same in screening and control groups. We then examined which cancer deaths had been used for the computation of relative risk of cancer death. Main outcome measures Relative risk of cancer death. Results In 17 non-breast screening trials, deaths due to cancers diagnosed during the intervention and post-intervention periods were used for relative risk calculations. In the five Swedish trials, relative risk calculations used deaths due to breast cancers found during intervention periods, but deaths due to breast cancer found at first screening of control groups were added to these groups. After reallocation of the added breast cancer deaths to post-intervention periods of control groups, relative risks of 0.86 (0.76; 0.97) were obtained for cancers found during intervention periods and 0.83 (0.71; 0.97) for cancers found during post-intervention periods, indicating constant reduction in the risk of breast cancer death during follow-up, irrespective of screening. Conclusions The use of unconventional statistical methods in Swedish trials has led to overestimation of risk reduction in breast cancer death attributable to mammography screening. The constant risk reduction observed in screening groups was probably due to the trial design that optimised awareness and medical management of women allocated to screening groups. PMID:26152677

  5. Breast cancers detected in only one of two arms of a tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) population screening trial (STORM-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Daniela; Houssami, Nehmat

    2017-04-01

    The prospective 'screening with tomosynthesis or standard mammography-2 (STORM-2)' trial compared mammography screen-reading strategies and showed that each of integrated 2D/3D-mammography or 2Dsynthetic/3D-mammography detected significantly more breast cancers than 2D-mammography alone. This short report describes 13 (from 90) cancers detected in only one of two parallel double-reading arms implemented in STORM-2. Amongst this subset of cases, the majority was invasive cancer ≤16 mm, mostly depicted as irregular masses or distortions. Furthermore, most were detected at 3D-mammography only and predominantly by one reader from double-reading pairs, highlighting that 3D-mammography may enable detection of cancers that are challenging to perceive at routine screening.

  6. [Validation of a questionnaire to assess consumer satisfaction with mammography screening, Rome (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyonov, Leda; Boggi, Roberto; Napoli, Massimo; Ravelli, Giuliana; Fulgenzi, Roberta; Landi, Adelaide; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Only 40% of women in the territory of the Local Health Unit RMA (Rome, Italy) adhere to the local breast cancer screening programme. A questionnaire was administered to participating women, to assess their level of satisfaction with the programme. A descriptive analysis, logistic regression and reliability analysis using the Cronbach's alpha as a measure of internal consistency, were performed. Most women who adhere to mammography screening are employers, retired, and with a low education. Factors that affect adherence include receiving a letter of invitation, intent to participate, age, and low education. The questionnaire is reliable for evaluating reasons affecting participation.

  7. Nationwide survey of glandular tissue dose for establishment of breast cancer screening using mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Tsuguhisa; Matsumoto, Mitsuomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. of Health Sciences (Japan); Higashida, Yoshiharu [and others

    1999-06-01

    A nationwide survey was performed in an attempt to investigate the distribution of average glandular doses caused by mammography for breast cancer mass screening, and to utilize the data to determine the national guidance level for mammography. A phantom equivalent to a breast with a compressed thickness of 42 mm, and glass radio-photo luminescence dosimeters were sent to 104 institutions and facilities. The dosimeters were exposed using a method based on the protocols described in the Mammography Quality Control Manual. The returned dosimeters were then analyzed, and the beam qualities and the entrance surface exposure were determined. Using these values, the average glandular doses were estimated with an accuracy of {+-}8%. The doses ranged from 0.5 to 3.7 mGy. The mean dose and the standard deviation were 1.48 mGy and 0.52 mGy, respectively. In 91 facilities, the doses were less than 2 mGy. Regarding the technical factors for facilities which presented doses of 2 mGy or over, it seemed that the doses could be easily reduced to less than 2 mGy if the settings of the auto exposure controller (AEC), anti-scatter grid and/or the film-screen system were optimized. (author)

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Screening for and Managing Identified Hypertension for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Phuong-Lan Nguyen

    Full Text Available To inform development of guidelines for hypertension management in Vietnam, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different strategies on screening for hypertension in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD.A decision tree was combined with a Markov model to measure incremental cost-effectiveness of different approaches to hypertension screening. Values used as input parameters for the model were taken from different sources. Various screening intervals (one-off, annually, biannually and starting ages to screen (35, 45 or 55 years and coverage of treatment were analysed. We ran both a ten-year and a lifetime horizon. Input parameters for the models were extracted from local and regional data. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate parameter uncertainty. A threshold of three times GDP per capita was applied.Cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY gained varied in different screening scenarios. In a ten-year horizon, the cost-effectiveness of screening for hypertension ranged from cost saving to Int$ 758,695 per QALY gained. For screening of men starting at 55 years, all screening scenarios gave a high probability of being cost-effective. For screening of females starting at 55 years, the probability of favourable cost-effectiveness was 90% with one-off screening. In a lifetime horizon, cost per QALY gained was lower than the threshold of Int$ 15,883 in all screening scenarios among males. Similar results were found in females when starting screening at 55 years. Starting screening in females at 45 years had a high probability of being cost-effective if screening biannually was combined with increasing coverage of treatment by 20% or even if sole biannual screening was considered.From a health economic perspective, integrating screening for hypertension into routine medical examination and related coverage by health insurance could be recommended. Screening for hypertension has a high probability of being cost-effective in

  9. [Quality assurance of fine-needle aspiration cytology of the organized mammography screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Mihály; Konyár, Eva; Schneider, Ferenc; Bidlek, Mária; Szabó, Eva; Nyári, Tibor; Godény, Mária; Kásler, Miklós

    2010-08-08

    The National Public Health Program has established the organized mammography screening in Hungary. The aim of our study was to determine the quality assurance of breast aspiration cytology. Cytology results were rated to 5 categories (C1, C2, C3, C4 and C5). All cytology reports were compared with the final histology diagnosis. 1361 women had aspiration cytology diagnosis performed from a total of 47718 mammography non-negative lesions. There were 805 (59.1%) benign and 187 (13.7%) malignant alterations. Sensitivity was 91%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 96.6% and negative predictive value turned to be 71% (pauditing values of fine needle aspiration cytology in our laboratory meet, or in certain aspects exceed the proposed minimum threshold values.

  10. Contribution of mammography to MRI screening in BRCA mutation carriers by BRCA status and age : individual patient data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phi, Xuan-Anh; Saadatmand, Sepideh; Bock, de Geertruida H; Warner, Ellen; Sardanelli, Francesco; Leach, Martin O; Riedl, Christopher C; Trop, Isabelle; Hooning, Maartje J; Mandel, Rodica; Santoro, Filippo; Kwan-Lim, Gek; Helbich, Thomas H; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine Ma; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Houssami, Nehmat

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the additional contribution of mammography to screening accuracy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers screened with MRI at different ages using individual patient data from six high-risk screening trials. METHODS: Sensitivity and specificity of MRI, mammography and the combinatio

  11. Pap, Mammography, and Clinical Breast Examination Screening Among Women with Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Elena M.; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.; Krahn, Gloria L.; Walsh, Emily S.; Horner-Johnson, Willi; Iezzoni, Lisa I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research has found some disparities between U.S. women with and without disabilities in receiving clinical preventive services. Substantial differences may also exist within the population of women with disabilities. The current study examined published research on Pap smears, mammography, and clinical breast examinations across disability severity levels among women with disabilities. Methods: Informed by an expert panel, we followed guidelines for systematic literature reviews and searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Cinahl databases. We also reviewed in-depth four disability- or preventive service-relevant journals. Two reviewers independently extracted data from all selected articles. Findings Five of 74 reviewed publications of met all our inclusion criteria and all five reported data on Pap smears, mammography, and clinical breast examination. Articles classified disability severity groups by functional and/or activity levels. Associations between disability severity and Pap smear use were inconsistent across the publications. Mammography screening fell as disability level increased according to three of the five studies. Results demonstrated modestly lower screening, but also were inconsistent for clinical breast examinations across studies. Conclusion Evidence is inconsistent concerning disparities in these important cancer screening services with increasing disability levels. Published studies used differing methods and definitions, adding to concerns about the evidence for screening disparities rising along with increasing disability. More focused research is required to determine whether significant disparities exist in cancer screening among women with differing disability levels. This information is essential for national and local public health and health care organizations to target interventions to improve care for women with disabilities. PMID:23816150

  12. Cost-effectiveness of screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puggina, Anna; Broumas, Athanasios; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-02-01

    On 31 December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force rated low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for lung cancer screening as level 'B' recommendation. Yet, lung cancer screening implementation remains controversial, particularly when considering its cost-effectiveness. The aim of this work is to investigate the cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening program for lung cancer by performing a systematic literature review. We reviewed the published economic evaluations of LDCT in lung cancer screening. MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane databases were searched for literature retrieval up to 31 March 2015. Inclusion criteria included: studies reporting an original full economic evaluation; reports presenting the outcomes as Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) gained or as Life Years Gained. Nine economic evaluations met the inclusion criteria. All the cost-effectiveness analyses included high risk populations for lung cancer and compared the use of annual LDCT screening with no screening. Seven studies reported an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio below the threshold of US$ 100 000 per QALY gained. Cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening for lung cancer is an highly debatable issue. Currently available economic evaluations suggest the cost-effectiveness of LDCT for lung cancer screening compared with no screening and indicate that the implementation of LDCT should be considered when planning a national lung cancer screening program. Additional economic evaluations, especially from a societal perspective and in an EU-setting, are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Minimizing misclassification of hormone users at mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Schwartz, Walter

    2009-01-01

    ; at subsequent screens, one projection for fatty and two projections for mixed/dense breasts. Until June 3, 2002, 2-year-old mammograms were used for comparison, and later 4-year-old mammograms. Prescription drug data were used to identify hormone, hormone therapy (HT), use. False positive risk and interval...

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-03-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico's mandated

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico’s national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Sánchez-González

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years

  17. The cost-effectiveness of neonatal screening for Cystic Fibrosis: an analysis of alternative scenarios using a decision model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Karen

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis is widely debated in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, but the evidence available to inform policy is limited. This paper explores the cost-effectiveness of adding screening for cystic fibrosis to an existing routine neonatal screening programme for congenital hypothyroidism and phenylketonuria, under alternative scenarios and assumptions. Methods The study is based on a decision model comparing screening to no screening in terms of a number of outcome measures, including diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, life-time treatment costs, life years and QALYs gained. The setting is a hypothetical UK health region without an existing neonatal screening programme for cystic fibrosis. Results Under initial assumptions, neonatal screening (using an immunoreactive trypsin/DNA two stage screening protocol costs £5,387 per infant diagnosed, or £1.83 per infant screened (1998 costs. Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis produces an incremental cost-effectiveness of £6,864 per QALY gained, in our base case scenario (an assumed benefit of a 6 month delay in the emergence of symptoms. A difference of 11 months or more in the emergence of symptoms (and mean survival means neonatal screening is both less costly and produces better outcomes than no screening. Conclusion Neonatal screening is expensive as a method of diagnosis. Neonatal screening may be a cost-effective intervention if the hypothesised delays in the onset of symptoms are confirmed. Implementing both antenatal and neonatal screening would undermine potential economic benefits, since a reduction in the birth incidence of cystic fibrosis would reduce the cost-effectiveness of neonatal screening.

  18. Validation of a susceptibility, benefits, and barrier scale for mammography screening among Peruvian women: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaman Moises A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perceived beliefs about breast cancer and breast cancer screening are important predictors for mammography utilization. This study adapted and validated the Champion's scale in Peru. This scale measures perceived susceptibility for breast cancer and perceived benefits and barriers for mammography. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among women ages 40 to 65 attending outpatient gynecology services in a public hospital in Peru. A group of experts developed and pre-tested a Spanish version of the Champion's scale to assess its comprehensibility (N = 20. Factor analysis, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability analyses were performed (N = 285. Concurrent validity compared scores from participants who had a mammogram and those who did not have it in the previous 15 months. T-test and multiple regression analysis adjusting for socio-demographic factors, mammography knowledge and other preventive behaviors were performed. Results The construct validity and reliability were optimal. Cronbach-Alpha coefficients were 0.75 (susceptibility, 0.72 (benefits and 0.86 (barriers. Concurrent validity analysis showed an association between barriers and mammography screening use in bivariate (22.3 ± 6.7 vs. 30.2 ± 7.6; p Conclusion Concurrent validity analysis showed that the Champion's scale has important limitations for assessing perceived susceptibility for breast cancer and perceived benefits for mammography among Peruvian women. There is still a need for developing valid and reliable instruments for measuring perceived beliefs about breast cancer and mammography screening among Peruvian women.

  19. Influences of Radiology Trainees on Screening Mammography Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Jeffrey R; Taylor, Clayton R; Cubbison, Alyssa M; Erdal, B Selnur; Yildiz, Vedat O; Carkaci, Selin

    2016-05-01

    Participation of radiology trainees in screening mammographic interpretation is a critical component of radiology residency and fellowship training. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of trainee involvement on screening mammographic interpretation and diagnostic outcomes. Screening mammograms interpreted at an academic medical center by six dedicated breast imagers over a three-year period were identified, with cases interpreted by an attending radiologist alone or in conjunction with a trainee. Trainees included radiology residents, breast imaging fellows, and fellows from other radiology subspecialties during breast imaging rotations. Trainee participation, patient variables, results of diagnostic evaluations, and pathology were recorded. A total of 47,914 mammograms from 34,867 patients were included, with an overall recall rate for attending radiologists reading alone of 14.7% compared with 18.0% when involving a trainee (P radiology trainees, with no change in cancer detection rate. Radiology faculty members should be aware of this potentiality and mitigate tendencies toward greater false positives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inefficiencies and High-Value Improvements in U.S. Cervical Cancer Screening Practice: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane J; Campos, Nicole G; Sy, Stephen; Burger, Emily A; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Hunt, William C; Waxman, Alan; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2015-10-20

    Studies suggest that cervical cancer screening practice in the United States is inefficient. The cost and health implications of nonadherence in the screening process compared with recommended guidelines are uncertain. To estimate the benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of current cervical cancer screening practice and assess the value of screening improvements. Model-based cost-effectiveness analysis. New Mexico HPV Pap Registry; medical literature. Cohort of women eligible for routine screening. Lifetime. Societal. Current cervical cancer screening practice; improved adherence to guidelines-based screening interval, triage testing, diagnostic referrals, and precancer treatment referrals. Reductions in lifetime cervical cancer risk, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), lifetime costs, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, and incremental net monetary benefits (INMBs). Current screening practice was associated with lower health benefit and was not cost-effective relative to guidelines-based strategies. Improvements in the screening process were associated with higher QALYs and small changes in costs. Perfect adherence to screening every 3 years with cytologic testing and adherence to colposcopy/biopsy referrals were associated with the highest INMBs ($759 and $741, respectively, at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained); together, the INMB increased to $1645. Current screening practice was inefficient in 100% of simulations. The rank ordering of screening improvements according to INMBs was stable over a range of screening inputs and willingness-to-pay thresholds. The effect of human papillomavirus vaccination was not considered. The added health benefit of improving adherence to guidelines, especially the 3-year interval for cytologic screening and diagnostic follow-up, may justify additional investments in interventions to improve U.S. cervical cancer screening practice. U.S. National Cancer Institute.

  1. Digital mammography screening: sensitivity of the programme dependent on breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Stefanie; Heindel, W; Heidrich, J; Hense, H-W; Heidinger, O

    2017-07-01

    To analyse the impact of breast density on the sensitivity of a population-based digital mammography screening programme (SP) as key evaluation parameter. 25,576 examinations were prospectively stratified from ACR category 1 to 4 for increments of 25 % density during independent double reading. SP was calculated as number of screen-detected cancers divided by the sum of screen-detected plus interval cancers (24-months period) per ACR category, related to the first reading (a), second reading (b) and highest stratification if discrepant (c). Chi-square tests were used for comparison. Overall sensitivity of the programme was 79.9 %. SP in ACR 4 (a: 50 %, b: 50 %, c: 50 %) was significantly lower than in ACR 3 (a: 72.9 %, b: 79.4 %, c: 80.7 %, p density classified as ACR 4 SP is significantly reduced compared to all other ACR categories. • Overall sensitivity of a population-based digital mammography screening programme (SP) was 79.9 %. • In women with ACR 1, 2, or 3, SP ranged between 72.9 %-100 %. • ACR 4 was rare in participants (<7 %) and SP was only 50 %. • SP in ACR 4 differed significantly from ACR 3 (p < 0.001).

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Breast Cancer Screening and Vascular Event Primary Prevention with Aspirin in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Aim: For the first time, this article presents a cost-effectiveness comparison of a breast cancer screening programme with a possible health education programme with aspirin for vascular event primary prevention. Background: Breast cancer screening is a well established part of cancer control programmes yet recent evidence on this intervention has…

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Breast Cancer Screening and Vascular Event Primary Prevention with Aspirin in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Aim: For the first time, this article presents a cost-effectiveness comparison of a breast cancer screening programme with a possible health education programme with aspirin for vascular event primary prevention. Background: Breast cancer screening is a well established part of cancer control programmes yet recent evidence on this intervention has…

  4. Mammography - recent technical developments and their clinical potential

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    Hemdal, Bengt; Mattsson, Soeren [Malmoe Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Andersson, Ingvar [Malmoe Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Thilander Klang, Anne [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering; Bengtsson, Gert; Jarlman, O. [Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Leitz, Wolfram [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Bjurstam, Nils [Univ. of North Norway, Troms (Norway). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-05-01

    The recent technical developments in digital as well as screen-film X-ray mammography have been reviewed in order to evaluate their clinical potential and to analyse possible lines for future development. Material and methods: The scientific literature has been reviewed, conferences covered and contacts with colleagues developed. Companies in the field have been inquired and invited for presentations. Own experience has been gathered from different screen-film and digital mammography systems. Results and conclusions: Although there are important complementary techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray mammography is still the golden standard for breast imaging. It is relatively simple and cost-effective, and it is presently the only realistic technique for screening in a large scale. It is still largely the only technique that can detect breast cancer in a pre invasive stage. Equipment for digital mammography is commercially available both with small area and full field technique (FFDM). The development of FFDM systems is now intense, as well as the development of dedicated workstations and computer-aided detection (CAD). In spite of this, the introduction of digital mammography has been very slow compared to most other X-ray examinations due to high costs and technical challenges to meet the high demands on image quality and dose in mammography as well as the demands on specialised workflow support for screening mammography and suitable display techniques. Film reading of digital mammograms has been the most common display mode so far, but to take full advantage of the digital concept, diagnostic as well as logistic, monitor reading must be applied. There is a potential of FFDM systems for significantly higher image quality or significantly lower dose than screen-film mammography (SFM), or both. Further research is necessary to fully use this potential. The investment costs are much higher for digital than screen-film mammography

  5. Cost-effectiveness of rapid syphilis screening in prenatal HIV testing programs in Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R Schackman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New rapid syphilis tests permit simple and immediate diagnosis and treatment at a single clinic visit. We compared the cost-effectiveness, projected health outcomes, and annual cost of screening pregnant women using a rapid syphilis test as part of scaled-up prenatal testing to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission in Haiti. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A decision analytic model simulated health outcomes and costs separately for pregnant women in rural and urban areas. We compared syphilis syndromic surveillance (rural standard of care, rapid plasma reagin test with results and treatment at 1-wk follow-up (urban standard of care, and a new rapid test with immediate results and treatment. Test performance data were from a World Health Organization-Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases field trial conducted at the GHESKIO Center Groupe Haitien d'Etude du Sarcome de Kaposi et des Infections Opportunistes in Port-au-Prince. Health outcomes were projected using historical data on prenatal syphilis treatment efficacy and included disability-adjusted life years (DALYs of newborns, congenital syphilis cases, neonatal deaths, and stillbirths. Cost-effectiveness ratios are in US dollars/DALY from a societal perspective; annual costs are in US dollars from a payer perspective. Rapid testing with immediate treatment has a cost-effectiveness ratio of $6.83/DALY in rural settings and $9.95/DALY in urban settings. Results are sensitive to regional syphilis prevalence, rapid test sensitivity, and the return rate for follow-up visits. Integrating rapid syphilis testing into a scaled-up national HIV testing and prenatal care program would prevent 1,125 congenital syphilis cases and 1,223 stillbirths or neonatal deaths annually at a cost of $525,000. CONCLUSIONS: In Haiti, integrating a new rapid syphilis test into prenatal care and HIV testing would prevent congenital syphilis cases and stillbirths, and is cost-effective. A

  6. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening programs: an evaluation of utility and cost-effectiveness

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    Cuadros JA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jorge A Cuadros Optometry/Vision Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract: Diabetes is the main cause of blindness among working age adults, although treatment is highly effective in preventing vision loss. Eye examinations are recommended on a yearly basis for most patients for timely detection of retinal disease. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening (TMDRS programs have been developed to identify patients with sight-threatening diabetic eye disease because patients are often noncompliant with recommended live eye examinations. This article reviews the cost-effectiveness of the various forms of TMDRS. A review of relevant articles, mostly published since 2008, shows that societal benefits generally outweigh the costs of TMDRS. However, advances in technology to improve efficacy, lower costs, and broaden screening to other sight-threatening conditions, such as glaucoma and refractive error, are necessary to improve the sustainability of TMDRS within health care organizations. Patient satisfaction with these telemedicine programs is generally high. New models of shared care with primary care providers and staff are emerging to improve patient engagement and follow-up care when individuals are found to have sight-threatening eye disease. TMDRS programs are growing and provide valuable clinical benefit. The cost-utility is currently well proven in locations with limited access to regular eye care services, such as rural areas, poor communities, and prison systems; however, improvements over time are necessary for these programs to be cost-effective in mainstream medical settings in the future. Keywords: telemedicine, diabetes, retinopathy, retinal imaging

  7. Mammography and Pap test screening among low-income foreign-born Hispanic women in the USA

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    Maria E. Fernandez

    Full Text Available Little is known about the factors influencing screening among low-income Hispanic women particularly among recent immigrants. A sample of 148 low-income, low-literate, foreign-born Hispanic women residing in the Washington DC metropolitan area participated in the study. The mean age of the sample was 46.2 (SD = 11.5, 84% reported annual household incomes<=$15,000. All women were Spanish speakers and had low acculturation levels. Ninety six percent had reported having a Pap smear, but 24% were not in compliance with recommended screening (Pap test within the last 3 years. Among women 40 and older, 62% had received a mammogram, but only 33% were compliant with age appropriate recommended mammography screening guidelines. Women in this study had more misconceptions about cancer than Hispanics in other studies. Multivariate logistic models for correlates of Pap test and mammography screening behavior indicate that factors such as fear of the screening test, embarrassment, and lack of knowledge influenced screening behavior. In conclusion, women in this study had lower rates of mammography screening than non-Hispanic women and lower rates of compliance with recommended Mammography and Pap test screening guidelines.

  8. Mammography and Pap test screening among low-income foreign-born Hispanic women in the USA

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    Fernandez Maria E.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the factors influencing screening among low-income Hispanic women particularly among recent immigrants. A sample of 148 low-income, low-literate, foreign-born Hispanic women residing in the Washington DC metropolitan area participated in the study. The mean age of the sample was 46.2 (SD = 11.5, 84% reported annual household incomes<=$15,000. All women were Spanish speakers and had low acculturation levels. Ninety six percent had reported having a Pap smear, but 24% were not in compliance with recommended screening (Pap test within the last 3 years. Among women 40 and older, 62% had received a mammogram, but only 33% were compliant with age appropriate recommended mammography screening guidelines. Women in this study had more misconceptions about cancer than Hispanics in other studies. Multivariate logistic models for correlates of Pap test and mammography screening behavior indicate that factors such as fear of the screening test, embarrassment, and lack of knowledge influenced screening behavior. In conclusion, women in this study had lower rates of mammography screening than non-Hispanic women and lower rates of compliance with recommended Mammography and Pap test screening guidelines.

  9. Computer-aided diagnostics of screening mammography using content-based image retrieval

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    Deserno, Thomas M.; Soiron, Michael; de Oliveira, Júlia E. E.; de A. Araújo, Arnaldo

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of death among women in occidental countries. In the last years, screening mammography has been established worldwide for early detection of breast cancer, and computer-aided diagnostics (CAD) is being developed to assist physicians reading mammograms. A promising method for CAD is content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Recently, we have developed a classification scheme of suspicious tissue pattern based on the support vector machine (SVM). In this paper, we continue moving towards automatic CAD of screening mammography. The experiments are based on in total 10,509 radiographs that have been collected from different sources. From this, 3,375 images are provided with one and 430 radiographs with more than one chain code annotation of cancerous regions. In different experiments, this data is divided into 12 and 20 classes, distinguishing between four categories of tissue density, three categories of pathology and in the 20 class problem two categories of different types of lesions. Balancing the number of images in each class yields 233 and 45 images remaining in each of the 12 and 20 classes, respectively. Using a two-dimensional principal component analysis, features are extracted from small patches of 128 x 128 pixels and classified by means of a SVM. Overall, the accuracy of the raw classification was 61.6 % and 52.1 % for the 12 and the 20 class problem, respectively. The confusion matrices are assessed for detailed analysis. Furthermore, an implementation of a SVM-based CBIR system for CADx in screening mammography is presented. In conclusion, with a smarter patch extraction, the CBIR approach might reach precision rates that are helpful for the physicians. This, however, needs more comprehensive evaluation on clinical data.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of enhanced syphilis screening among HIV-positive men who have sex with men: a microsimulation model.

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    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available Syphilis co-infection risk has increased substantially among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM. Frequent screening for syphilis and treatment of men who test positive might be a practical means of controlling the risk of infection and disease sequelae in this population.We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of strategies that increased the frequency and population coverage of syphilis screening in HIV-infected MSM receiving HIV care, relative to current standard of care.We developed a state-transition microsimulation model of syphilis natural history and medical care in HIV-infected MSM receiving care for HIV. We performed Monte Carlo simulations using input data derived from a large observational cohort in Ontario, Canada, and from published biomedical literature. Simulations compared usual care (57% of the population screened annually to different combinations of more frequent (3- or 6-monthly screening and higher coverage (100% screened. We estimated expected disease-specific outcomes, quality-adjusted survival, costs, and cost-effectiveness associated with each strategy from the perspective of a public health care payer.Usual care was more costly and less effective than strategies with more frequent or higher coverage screening. Higher coverage strategies (with screening frequency of 3 or 6 months were expected to be cost-effective based on usually cited willingness-to-pay thresholds. These findings were robust in the face of probabilistic sensitivity analyses, alternate cost-effectiveness thresholds, and alternate assumptions about duration of risk, program characteristics, and management of underlying HIV.We project that higher coverage and more frequent syphilis screening of HIV-infected MSM would be a highly cost-effective health intervention, with many potentially viable screening strategies projected to both save costs and improve health when compared to usual care. The baseline requirement for regular blood testing in this

  11. The effects of music on pain and anxiety during screening mammography.

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    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Banavage, Adrienne; James, Patricia; Easter, Kathy; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Lutwin, Lynn

    2014-06-01

    One in four women who are diagnosed with breast cancer die annually, and the single most important way to prevent this is early detection; therefore, women older than 40 years should have an annual screening mammography. Many barriers have been reported that prevent compliance with this recommendation, including lack of insurance, fear, anxiety, pain, worry, and mistrust of the medical community. Nurses are in a position to use creative interventions, such as music therapy, to help minimize barriers. Although this study did not show that music therapy during screening mammograms decreased the amount of pain that the participants experienced, it did suggest that music therapy has the potential to decrease the amount of anxiety. Assisting patients in decreasing anxiety reduces barriers for screening mammography. The literature does suggest that music is a distraction for many populations of patients; however, when patients are faced with the possible diagnosis of breast cancer, it may be difficult to find an intervention to distract a woman's mind, which was supported by the findings of this study.

  12. A randomized trial of telephone counseling to promote screening mammography in two HMOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckmann, Roger; Savageau, Judith A; Clemow, Lynn; Stoddard, Anne M; Costanza, Mary E

    2003-01-01

    Tailored telephone counseling (TTC) is effective in increasing utilization of screening mammography, but has received limited testing on a large scale in a contemporary HMO setting in which most eligible women get regular screening. We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing TTC to an active control (mailed reminders) among women aged 50-80 enrolled in two HMOs in New England (n=12,905). Over a 1-year period counselors attempted to contact women in the intervention arm who had not had a mammogram within the last 15 months. The absolute increase in mammography use due to the intervention was 4.9% (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6) in one HMO and 3.1% (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.3) in the other. We estimated that one additional woman was screened for each 10.9 women eligible for counseling. An intervention process analysis documented a high level of acceptance of TTC and identified subgroups that could be targeted for counseling to improve the efficiency of TTC.

  13. Shapelet analysis of pupil dilation for modeling visuo-cognitive behavior in screening mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamudun, Folami; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Hammond, Tracy; Hudson, Kathy; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Tourassi, Georgia

    2016-03-01

    Our objective is to improve understanding of visuo-cognitive behavior in screening mammography under clinically equivalent experimental conditions. To this end, we examined pupillometric data, acquired using a head-mounted eye-tracking device, from 10 image readers (three breast-imaging radiologists and seven Radiology residents), and their corresponding diagnostic decisions for 100 screening mammograms. The corpus of mammograms comprised cases of varied pathology and breast parenchymal density. We investigated the relationship between pupillometric fluctuations, experienced by an image reader during mammographic screening, indicative of changes in mental workload, the pathological characteristics of a mammographic case, and the image readers' diagnostic decision and overall task performance. To answer these questions, we extract features from pupillometric data, and additionally applied time series shapelet analysis to extract discriminative patterns in changes in pupil dilation. Our results show that pupillometric measures are adequate predictors of mammographic case pathology, and image readers' diagnostic decision and performance with an average accuracy of 80%.

  14. Cost effectiveness of cryptococcal antigen screening as a strategy to prevent HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in South Africa.

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    Joseph N Jarvis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cryptococcal meningitis (CM-related mortality may be prevented by screening patients for sub-clinical cryptococcal antigenaemia (CRAG at antiretroviral-therapy (ART initiation and pre-emptively treating those testing positive. Prior to programmatic implementation in South Africa we performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of alternative preventive strategies for CM. DESIGN: Cost-effectiveness analysis. METHODS: Using South African data we modelled the cost-effectiveness of four strategies for patients with CD4 cell-counts <100 cells/µl starting ART 1 no screening or prophylaxis (standard of care, 2 universal primary fluconazole prophylaxis, 3 CRAG screening with fluconazole treatment if antigen-positive, 4 CRAG screening with lumbar puncture if antigen-positive and either amphotericin-B for those with CNS disease or fluconazole for those without. Analysis was limited to the first year of ART. RESULTS: The least costly strategy was CRAG screening followed by high-dose fluconazole treatment of all CRAG-positive individuals. This strategy dominated the standard of care at CRAG prevalence ≥0.6%. Although CRAG screening followed by lumbar puncture in all antigen-positive individuals was the most effective strategy clinically, the incremental benefit of LPs and amphotericin therapy for those with CNS disease was small and additional costs were large (US$158 versus US$51 per person year; incremental cost effectiveness ratio(ICER US$889,267 per life year gained. Both CRAG screening strategies are less costly and more clinically effective than current practice. Primary prophylaxis is more effective than current practice, but relatively cost-ineffective (ICER US$20,495. CONCLUSIONS: CRAG screening would be a cost-effective strategy to prevent CM-related mortality among patients initiating ART in South Africa. These findings provide further justification for programmatic implementation of CRAG screening.

  15. Fractal Analysis of Radiologists Visual Scanning Pattern in Screening Mammography

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    Alamudun, Folami T [ORNL; Yoon, Hong-Jun [ORNL; Hudson, Kathy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Morin-Ducote, Garnetta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators have investigated radiologists visual scanning patterns with respect to features such as total time examining a case, time to initially hit true lesions, number of hits, etc. The purpose of this study was to examine the complexity of the radiologists visual scanning pattern when viewing 4-view mammographic cases, as they typically do in clinical practice. Gaze data were collected from 10 readers (3 breast imaging experts and 7 radiology residents) while reviewing 100 screening mammograms (24 normal, 26 benign, 50 malignant). The radiologists scanpaths across the 4 mammographic views were mapped to a single 2-D image plane. Then, fractal analysis was applied on the derived scanpaths using the box counting method. For each case, the complexity of each radiologist s scanpath was estimated using fractal dimension. The association between gaze complexity, case pathology, case density, and radiologist experience was evaluated using 3 factor fixed effects ANOVA. ANOVA showed that case pathology, breast density, and experience level are all independent predictors of the visual scanning pattern complexity. Visual scanning patterns are significantly different for benign and malignant cases than for normal cases as well as when breast parenchyma density changes.

  16. Mammography accreditation program

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    Wilcox, P.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980`s, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded.

  17. Comparison of standard reading and computer aided detection (CAD) on a national proficiency test of screening mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciatto, Stefano E-mail: s.ciatto@cspo.it; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Risso, Gabriella; Catarzi, Sandra; Bonardi, Rita; Viterbo, Valeria; Gnutti, Pierangela; Guglielmoni, Barbara; Pinelli, Lelio; Pandiscia, Anna; Navarra, Francesco; Lauria, Adele; Palmiero, Rosa; Indovina, Pietro Luigi

    2003-02-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of computer aided detection (CAD) in improving the interpretation of screening mammograms Material and methods: Ten radiologists underwent a proficiency test of screening mammography first by conventional reading and then with the help of CAD. Radiologists were blinded to test results for the whole study duration. Results of conventional and CAD reading were compared in terms of sensitivity and recall rate. Double reading was simulated combining conventional readings of four expert radiologists and compared with CAD reading. Results: Considering all ten readings, cancer was identified in 146 or 153 of 170 cases (85.8 vs. 90.0%; {chi}{sup 2}=0.99, df=1, P=0.31) and recalls were 106 or 152 of 1330 cases (7.9 vs. 11.4%; {chi}{sup 2}=8.69, df=1, P=0.003) at conventional or CAD reading, respectively. CAD reading was essentially the same (sensitivity 97.0 vs. 96.0%; {chi}{sup 2}=7.1, df=1, P=0.93; recall rate 10.7 vs. 10.6%; {chi}{sup 2}=1.5, df=1, P=0.96) as compared with simulated conventional double reading. Conclusion: CAD reading seems to improve the sensitivity of conventional reading while reducing specificity, both effects being of limited size. CAD reading had almost the same performance of simulated conventional double reading, suggesting a possible use of CAD which needs to be confirmed by further studies inclusive of cost-effective analysis.

  18. Breast cancer screening: Evidence of the effect of adjunct ultrasound screening in women with unilateral mammography-negative dense breasts

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    Atoosa Adibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with the previous history of breast cancer are in risk of contralateral breast cancer. On the other hand, increased breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer and the sensitivity of detecting nonpalpable cancers in screening mammography in radiographically dense breasts is low. The use of ultrasonography in dense breast remains a controversial topic. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of routine ultrasonography in follow-up of women with the previous history of breast cancer and negative mammography but dense breasts. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 267 individuals with unilateral postmastectomy mammogram screened and 153 subjects assigned to study. There were 28 subjects with American College of Radiology (ACR breast density 2 and 125 with ACR breast density 3-4, which there was no new finding in their mammogram in comparison to previous studies. We assumed subjects with ACR breast density 3-4 as mammographic Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS category 0 for malignancy. Standard two-view mammogram was performed for all participants, and breast ultrasound (US examinations were performed by an expert radiologist in radial and anti-radial planes. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA. Results: The results showed that in subjects with ACR breast density 3-4, when there was no new density in two consecutive mammograms in comparison to previous studies, US also showed no possibility for malignancy (BI-RADS 1-2. And also in subjects with ACR breast density 2, when the mammographic results were BI-RADS 1-2, the US results was the same. Conclusion: Our data indicate that for the detection of breast cancer, sensitivity of US was not greater than mammography in patients with postmastectomy unilateral dense breast if there is not any new density.

  19. Electrocardiographic Screening for Prolonged QT Interval to Reduce Sudden Cardiac Death in Psychiatric Patients: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

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    Antoine Poncet

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of mortality in psychiatric patients. Long QT (LQT is common in this population and predisposes to Torsades-de-Pointes (TdP and subsequent mortality.To estimate the cost-effectiveness of electrocardiographic screening to detect LQT in psychiatric inpatients.We built a decision analytic model based on a decision tree to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and utility of LQT screening from a health care perspective. LQT proportion parameters were derived from an in-hospital cross-sectional study. We performed experts' elicitation to estimate the risk of TdP, given extent of QT prolongation. A TdP reduction of 65% after LQT detection was based on positive drug dechallenge rate and through adequate treatment and electrolyte adjustments. The base-case model uncertainty was assessed with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Finally, the TdP related mortality and TdP avoidance parameters were varied in a two-way sensitivity analysis to assess their effect on the Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER.Costs, Quality Ajusted Life Year (QALY, ICER, and probability of cost effectiveness thresholds ($ 10,000, $25,000, and $50,000 per QALY.In the base-case scenario, the numbers of patients needed to screen were 1128 and 2817 to avoid one TdP and one death, respectively. The ICER of systematic ECG screening was $8644 (95%CI, 3144-82 498 per QALY. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 96% at a willingness-to-pay of $50,000 for one QALY. In sensitivity analyses, results were sensitive to the case-fatality of TdP episodes and to the TdP reduction following the diagnosis of LQT.In psychiatric hospitals, performing systematic ECG screening at admission help reduce the number of sudden cardiac deaths in a cost-effective fashion.

  20. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of First Trimester Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening for Fetal Trisomies in the United States.

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    Brandon S Walker

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT is a relatively new technology for diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies. NIPT is more accurate than conventional maternal serum screening (MSS but is also more costly. Contingent NIPT may provide a cost-effective alternative to universal NIPT screening. Contingent screening used a two-stage process in which risk is assessed by MSS in the first stage and, based on a risk cutoff, high-risk pregnancies are referred for NIPT. The objective of this study was to (1 determine the optimum MSS risk cutoff for contingent NIPT and (2 compare the cost effectiveness of optimized contingent NIPT to universal NIPT and conventional MSS.Decision-analytic model using micro-simulation and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. We evaluated cost effectiveness from three perspectives: societal, governmental, and payer.From a societal perspective, universal NIPT dominated both contingent NIPT and MSS. From a government and payer perspective, contingent NIPT dominated MSS. Compared to contingent NIPT, adopting a universal NIPT would cost $203,088 for each additional case detected from a government perspective and $263,922 for each additional case detected from a payer perspective.From a societal perspective, universal NIPT is a cost-effective alternative to MSS and contingent NIPT. When viewed from narrower perspectives, contingent NIPT is less costly than universal NIPT and provides a cost-effective alternative to MSS.

  1. The comparative and cost-effectiveness of HPV-based cervical cancer screening algorithms in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Nicole G; Maza, Mauricio; Alfaro, Karla; Gage, Julia C; Castle, Philip E; Felix, Juan C; Cremer, Miriam L; Kim, Jane J

    2015-08-15

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women in El Salvador. Utilizing data from the Cervical Cancer Prevention in El Salvador (CAPE) demonstration project, we assessed the health and economic impact of HPV-based screening and two different algorithms for the management of women who test HPV-positive, relative to existing Pap-based screening. We calibrated a mathematical model of cervical cancer to epidemiologic data from El Salvador and compared three screening algorithms for women aged 30-65 years: (i) HPV screening every 5 years followed by referral to colposcopy for HPV-positive women (Colposcopy Management [CM]); (ii) HPV screening every 5 years followed by treatment with cryotherapy for eligible HPV-positive women (Screen and Treat [ST]); and (iii) Pap screening every 2 years followed by referral to colposcopy for Pap-positive women (Pap). Potential harms and complications associated with overtreatment were not assessed. Under base case assumptions of 65% screening coverage, HPV-based screening was more effective than Pap, reducing cancer risk by ∼ 60% (Pap: 50%). ST was the least costly strategy, and cost $2,040 per year of life saved. ST remained the most attractive strategy as visit compliance, costs, coverage, and test performance were varied. We conclude that a screen-and-treat algorithm within an HPV-based screening program is very cost-effective in El Salvador, with a cost-effectiveness ratio below per capita GDP. © 2015 UICC.

  2. Rational choice(s)? Rethinking decision-making on breast cancer risk and screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Mandana; Gastaldo, Denise

    2003-12-01

    Women who refrain from undergoing breast cancer screening are believed to be uninformed about risks and usually labeled as irrational. Our purpose in writing this paper is to challenge the traditional notion of rational behaviour, illustrating with qualitative data that people's rationality is influenced by their socio-cultural and political identities. We explore three major themes: (1) cultural explanations regarding intention to use screening mammography (2) (dis)trust in science and expert opinion, and (3) self-responsibility and self-surveillance in caring for one's body. Understanding that women rely on different risk discourses to make decisions about their health should aide researchers, health professionals, and the community in better understanding alternative ways of conceptualizing people's health-related behaviours when they do not coincide with health authorities recommendations.

  3. Experience with the European quality assurance guidelines for digital mammography systems in a national screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, J; Keavey, E; Egan, G; Phelan, N

    2013-02-01

    The transition to a fully digital breast screening programme, utilising three different full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems has presented many challenges to the implementation of the European guidelines for physico-technical quality assurance (QA) testing. An analysis of the QA results collected from the FFDM systems in the screening programme over a 2-y period indicates that the three different systems have similar QA performances. Generally, the same tests were failed by all systems and failure rates were low. The findings provide some assurance that the QA guidelines are being correctly implemented. They also suggest that there is more scope for the development of the relevance of the guidelines with respect to modern FFDM systems. This study has also shown that a summary review of the QA data can be achieved by simple organisation of the QA data storage and by automation of data query and retrieval using commonly available software.

  4. Direct Interactive Public Education by Breast Radiologists About Screening Mammography: Impact on Anxiety and Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyon; Hardesty, Lara A; Kunzler, Nathan M; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety has been called a "harm" of screening mammography. The authors provided direct, interactive education to lay audiences and measured these sessions' impact on anxiety and any increased understanding of breast cancer screening. Academic breast radiologist provided seven 1-hour sessions of structured lectures and question-and-answer periods. Lay language and radiologic images were used to discuss disease background, screening guidelines, and areas of debate. One hundred seventeen participants (mean age, 45 ± 15 years) completed voluntary, anonymous, institutional review board-approved pre and postsession questionnaires relaying their attitudes regarding screening and the impact of the sessions. Results are summarized descriptively. Mean reported anxiety regarding screening (on a scale ranging from 1-5; 1 = no anxiety) was 2.5 ± 1.3. Anxiety was attributed to unknown results (56.4%), anticipation of pain (21.8%), known risk factors (14.5%), general uncertainty (12.7%), waiting for results (9.1%), possibility of more procedures (3.6%), and personal breast cancer history (3.6%). Ninety-seven percent reported that immediate results would lower anxiety (78% of those women indicated a 75%-100% decrease in anxiety); 93% reported that radiologist consultation with images would lower anxiety (75.6% indicated a 75%-100% decrease in anxiety). After the lecture, women reported (on a scale ranging from 1-5) increased understanding of the topic (4.7 ± 0.6), encouragement to screen (4.6 ± 0.7), and reduced anxiety (4.0 ± 1.1). Ninety-seven percent to 100% provided correct responses to these questions: rationale for screening in the absence of family history, recall does not equate to cancer diagnosis, benefit of prior films, and continued importance of physical examination. Attendees of radiologist-provided direct public lectures reported decreased anxiety and improved knowledge regarding screening mammography. The resultant reduced anxiety ("harm") and educational

  5. Performance and Cost-Effectiveness of Computed Tomography Lung Cancer Screening Scenarios in a Population-Based Setting: A Microsimulation Modeling Analysis in Ontario, Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. ten Haaf (Kevin); M.C. Tammemagi (Martin); Bondy, S.J. (Susan J.); C.M. van der Aalst (Carlijn); Gu, S. (Sumei); McGregor, S.E. (S. Elizabeth); Nicholas, G. (Garth); H.J. de Koning (Harry); L.F. Paszat (Lawrence F.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) results indicate that computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening for current and former smokers with three annual screens can be cost-effective in a trial setting. However, the cost-effectiveness in a population-based setting with

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis for triple markers serum screening for Down′s syndrome in Thai setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Down′s syndrome is an important congenital chromosomal disorder that can be seen around the world. The antenatal screening for this disorder is an important processing in present obstetrics. Objective: Due to the concept of first do no harm, the use of noninvasive test is recommended. The triple marker screening test has been introduced for a few years and acceptable for its effi cacy. Result: However, an important concern is on its cost-effectiveness. Here, the author analyze and present the cost-effectiveness of the triple markers serum screening for Down′s syndrome in Thai setting. Conclusion: According to this work, the cost per effectiveness of triple markers serum screening is slightly lower than standard amniocentesis test.

  7. Screening Mammography

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women and, until recently surpassed by lung cancer, was the leading cause of cancer-related death in women. It is the leading cause of death in women aged 39 to 44 years. The American Cancer Society has estimated that there will be 135,000 new cases of breast cancer and 42,300 breast cancer-related deaths in 1988. It is now predicted that breast cancer will develop in one out of every ten women in the United States. Given the clinical and...

  8. The cost-effectiveness of 10 antenatal syphilis screening and treatment approaches in Peru, Tanzania, and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Vickerman, Peter; Torres-Rueda, Sergio; Santesso, Nancy; Sweeney, Sedona; Mallma, Patricia; Shelley, Katharine D.; Garcia, Patricia J.; Bronzan, Rachel; Gill, Michelle M.; Broutet, Nathalie; Wi, Teodora; Watts, Charlotte; Mabey, David; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Newman, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) is frequently used to test women for maternal syphilis. Rapid syphilis immunochromatographic strip tests detecting only Treponema pallidum antibodies (single RSTs) or both treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies (dual RSTs) are now available. This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of algorithms using these tests to screen pregnant women. Methods Observed costs of maternal syphilis screening and treatment using clinic-based RPR and single RSTs in 20 clinics across Peru, Tanzania, and Zambia were used to model the cost-effectiveness of algorithms using combinations of RPR, single, and dual RSTs, and no and mass treatment. Sensitivity analyses determined drivers of key results. Results Although this analysis found screening using RPR to be relatively cheap, most (> 70%) true cases went untreated. Algorithms using single RSTs were the most cost-effective in all observed settings, followed by dual RSTs, which became the most cost-effective if dual RST costs were halved. Single test algorithms dominated most sequential testing algorithms, although sequential algorithms reduced overtreatment. Mass treatment was relatively cheap and effective in the absence of screening supplies, though treated many uninfected women. Conclusion This analysis highlights the advantages of introducing RSTs in three diverse settings. The results should be applicable to other similar settings. PMID:25963907

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Screening for and Managing Identified Hypertension for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Thi-Phuong-Lan; Wright, E Pamela; Nguyen, Thanh-Trung; Schuiling-Veninga, C C M; Bijlsma, M J; Nguyen, Thi-Bach-Yen; Postma, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inform development of guidelines for hypertension management in Vietnam, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different strategies on screening for hypertension in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD). METHODS: A decision tree was combined with a Markov model to measure incrementa

  10. Cost-effectiveness of HIV screening of blood donations in Accra (Ghana)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Marinus; Sagoe, Kwamena W. C.; Vermande, Jacobien E.; van der Schaaf, Ido P.; Adriani, Willem P. A. van der Tuuk; Torpey, Kwasi; Ansah, Justina; Mingle, Julius A. A.; Sibinga, Cees Th. Smit; Postma, Maarten J.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Areas with high HIV-incidence rates compared to the developed world may benefit from additional testing in blood banks and may show more favorable cost-effectiveness ratios. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of adding p24 antigen, mini pool nucleic acid amplification testing (MP-NAT),

  11. Development and validation of the PCQ: a questionnaire to measure the psychological consequences of screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, J; De Luise, T; Hurley, S; Clover, K

    1992-05-01

    We have developed a reliable and valid questionnaire to measure the psychological consequences of screening mammography. The questionnaire measures the effect of screening on an individual's functioning on emotional, social, and physical life domains. Content validity was ensured by extensive review of the relevant literature, discussion with professionals and interviews with attenders at a pilot Breast X-ray Screening Program in Melbourne, Australia. Discriminant validity was assessed by having expert judges sort items into dimensions which they appeared to be measuring. Acceptable levels of concordance (above 80%) with a priori classifications were found. Concurrent validity was demonstrated by comparison of subscale scores of 53 attenders at the Breast X-ray Program with an independent interview assessment of dysfunction on each of the emotional, social and physical dimensions. There was over 79% agreement between interview scores and questionnaire scores for each dimension. Construct validity was confirmed by showing that subscale scores varied in predicted ways. For women who were recalled for further investigation, scores on each subscale measuring negative consequences, were higher at the recall clinic than at screening clinic (emotional: t = -7.28; df = 70; P less than 0.001; physical: t = -2.53; df = 70; P = 0.014; social: t = -2.49; df = 70; P = 0.015). The internal consistency of all subscales was found to be acceptable. This questionnaire is potentially useful for assessing the psychological consequences of the screening process and should have wide application.

  12. The TOMMY trial: a comparison of TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY in the UK NHS Breast Screening Programme--a multicentre retrospective reading study comparing the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography with digital mammography alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Fiona J; Tucker, Lorraine; Gillan, Maureen Gc; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Lim, Yit Yoong; Purushothaman, Hema; Strudley, Celia; Astley, Susan M; Morrish, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three-dimensional mammography technique with the potential to improve accuracy by improving differentiation between malignant and non-malignant lesions. The objectives of the study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of DBT in conjunction with two-dimensional (2D) mammography or synthetic 2D mammography, against standard 2D mammography and to determine if DBT improves the accuracy of detection of different types of lesions. Women (aged 47-73 years) recalled for further assessment after routine breast screening and women (aged 40-49 years) with moderate/high of risk of developing breast cancer attending annual mammography screening were recruited after giving written informed consent. All participants underwent a two-view 2D mammography of both breasts and two-view DBT imaging. Image-processing software generated a synthetic 2D mammogram from the DBT data sets. In an independent blinded retrospective study, readers reviewed (1) 2D or (2) 2D + DBT or (3) synthetic 2D + DBT images for each case without access to original screening mammograms or prior examinations. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each reading arm and by subgroup analyses. Data were available for 7060 subjects comprising 6020 (1158 cancers) assessment cases and 1040 (two cancers) family history screening cases. Overall sensitivity was 87% [95% confidence interval (CI) 85% to 89%] for 2D only, 89% (95% CI 87% to 91%) for 2D + DBT and 88% (95% CI 86% to 90%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. The difference in sensitivity between 2D and 2D + DBT was of borderline significance (p = 0.07) and for synthetic 2D + DBT there was no significant difference (p = 0.6). Specificity was 58% (95% CI 56% to 60%) for 2D, 69% (95% CI 67% to 71%) for 2D + DBT and 71% (95% CI 69% to 73%) for synthetic 2D + DBT. Specificity was significantly higher in both DBT reading arms for all subgroups of age, density and dominant radiological

  13. Offering Lung Cancer Screening to High-Risk Medicare Beneficiaries Saves Lives and Is Cost-Effective: An Actuarial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyenson, Bruce S.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Yip, Rowena; Dec, Ellynne

    2014-01-01

    Background By a wide margin, lung cancer is the most significant cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The incidence of lung cancer increases with age, and Medicare beneficiaries are often at increased risk. Because of its demonstrated effectiveness in reducing mortality, lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) imaging will be covered without cost-sharing starting January 1, 2015, by nongrandfathered commercial plans. Medicare is considering coverage for lung cancer screening. Objective To estimate the cost and cost-effectiveness (ie, cost per life-year saved) of LDCT lung cancer screening of the Medicare population at high risk for lung cancer. Methods Medicare costs, enrollment, and demographics were used for this study; they were derived from the 2012 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) beneficiary files and were forecast to 2014 based on CMS and US Census Bureau projections. Standard life and health actuarial techniques were used to calculate the cost and cost-effectiveness of lung cancer screening. The cost, incidence rates, mortality rates, and other parameters chosen by the authors were taken from actual Medicare data, and the modeled screenings are consistent with Medicare processes and procedures. Results Approximately 4.9 million high-risk Medicare beneficiaries would meet criteria for lung cancer screening in 2014. Without screening, Medicare patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer have an average life expectancy of approximately 3 years. Based on our analysis, the average annual cost of LDCT lung cancer screening in Medicare is estimated to be $241 per person screened. LDCT screening for lung cancer in Medicare beneficiaries aged 55 to 80 years with a history of ≥30 pack-years of smoking and who had smoked within 15 years is low cost, at approximately $1 per member per month. This assumes that 50% of these patients were screened. Such screening is also highly cost-effective, at <$19,000 per life

  14. A comparison of fixed and variable kVp technique protocols for film-screen mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McParland, B J; Boyd, M M

    2000-06-01

    Mammographic image quality, contrast and dose for a variable tube potential (kVp) technique protocol for film-screen mammography have been investigated. In this protocol, the tube potential is increased for larger breast thicknesses. Comparisons were made with fixed kVp protocols, in which the tube potential is kept constant and the breast thickness compensated for by prolonging the exposure ("fixed kVp" protocol). All measurements were performed on a mammography unit with a molybdenum target and filter. Image quality was quantified by image contrast, image detail detection and the minimum detectable dimension of low contrast objects. It was demonstrated that for a compressed breast thickness of less than about 40 mm, varying the tube potential had a negligible effect upon dose but a significant effect upon image quality. For a compressed breast thickness greater than about 60 mm, the effect of the tube potential upon image quality was much reduced; however, the effect upon dose was significantly greater. The variable kVp protocol takes advantage of this feature to yield a significantly lower dose for thicker breasts with a small reduction in image quality, often only within experimental uncertainty. For an exposure under automatic exposure control, increasing the tube potential from 26 kVp to 30 kVp for a breast of a reference tissue composition (50% adipose and 50% glandular) with a compressed thickness of 60 mm reduced the mean glandular dose from 6 mGy to 3.9 mGy (-35%), but increased the minimum detectable dimension of a low contrast mass from 0.8 (+/- 0.1) mm to 1.1 (+/- 0.1) mm. Adopting a variable kVp protocol led to a median patient mean glandular dose per film of 2.7 mGy, nearly independent of compressed breast thickness. In our survey, the mean age of women presenting for mammography is younger and the mean compressed breast thickness is less than reported from screening centres. This suggests that there will be a higher proportion of denser, glandular

  15. Different screening strategies (single or dual for the diagnosis of suspected latent tuberculosis: a cost effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rook Graham

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous health economic studies recommend either a dual screening strategy [tuberculin skin test (TST followed by interferon-γ-release assay (IGRA] or a single one [IGRA only] for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, the former largely based on claims that it is more cost-effective. We sought to examine that conclusion through the use of a model that accounts for the additional costs of adverse drug reactions and directly compares two commercially available versions of the IGRA: the Quantiferon-TB-Gold-In-Tube (QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB. Methods A LTBI screening model directed at screening contacts was used to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis, from a UK healthcare perspective, taking into account the risk of isoniazid-related hepatotoxicity and post-exposure TB (2 years post contact using the TST, QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB IGRAs. Results Examining costs alone, the TST/IGRA dual screening strategies (TST/T-SPOT.TB and TST/QFT-GIT; £162,387 and £157,048 per 1000 contacts, respectively cost less than their single strategy counterparts (T-SPOT.TB and QFT-GIT; £203,983 and £202,921 per 1000 contacts which have higher IGRA test costs and greater numbers of persons undergoing LTBI treatment. However, IGRA alone strategies direct healthcare interventions and costs more accurately to those that are truly infected. Subsequently, less contacts need to be treated to prevent an active case of TB (T-SPOT.TB and QFT-GIT; 61.7 and 69.7 contacts in IGRA alone strategies. IGRA single strategies also prevent more cases of post-exposure TB. However, this greater effectiveness does not outweigh the lower incremental costs associated with the dual strategies. Consequently, when these costs are combined with effectiveness, the IGRA dual strategies are more cost-effective than their single strategy counterparts. Comparing between the IGRAs, T-SPOT.TB-based strategies (single and dual; £39,712 and £37,206 per active TB case prevented

  16. Teaching syllabus for radiological aspects of breast cancer screening with digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ongeval, Chantal; Van Steen, André; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the content of our new accreditation programme for radiologists' reading digital mammograms in a screening setting and to report our first experience with the new course. The course consisted of a theoretical part, given by the medical physicist, and a practical part given by the radiologist. The practical session is closely linked with the theoretical part and a reading session. The material is fully digital and can be presented on different platforms. In practice, the need for parallel soft-copy reading sessions on high-end workstations limits the number of participants. A high level of interactivity was noted between teacher and participant, with a thorough discussion of different digital mammography systems during a single teaching course. The main challenge for the teacher turned out to be the collection of representative material and the continuous updating of the material: new systems, processing techniques and artefacts need to be included regularly.

  17. What is the most cost-effective strategy to screen for left ventricular systolic dysfunction: natriuretic peptides, the electrocardiogram, hand-held echocardiography, traditional echocardiography, or their combination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasko, Gavin I W; Barnes, Sophie C; Collinson, Paul; Lahiri, Avijit; Senior, Roxy

    2006-01-01

    To assess the screening characteristics and cost-effectiveness of screening for left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) in community subjects. A total of 1392 members of the general public and 928 higher risk subjects were randomly selected from seven community practices. Attending subjects underwent an ECG, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) serum levels, and traditional echocardiography (TE). A total of 533 consecutive subjects underwent hand-held echocardiography (HE). The screening characteristics and cost-effectiveness (cost per case of LVSD diagnosed) of eight strategies to predict LVSD (LVSD cost-effective, screening low-risk subjects least cost-effective. TE screening was the least cost-effective strategy. NTproBNP screening gave similar cost savings to ECG screening; HE screening greater cost-savings, and HE screening following NTproBNP or ECG pre-screening the greatest cost-savings, costing approximately 650 Euros per case of LVSD diagnosed in high-risk subjects (63% cost-savings vs.TE). Thus several different modalities allow cost-effective community-based screening for LVSD, especially in high-risk subjects. Such programmes would be cost-effective and miss few cases of LVSD in the community.

  18. Is prostate cancer screening cost-effective? A microsimulation model of prostate-specific antigen-based screening for British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Reka; Gulati, Roman; Etzioni, Ruth; Black, Peter; Chi, Kim N; Coldman, Andrew J; Pickles, Tom; Tyldesley, Scott; Peacock, Stuart

    2014-08-15

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer may reduce mortality, but it incurs considerable risk of over diagnosis and potential harm to quality of life. Our objective was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of PSA screening, with and without adjustment for quality of life, for the British Columbia (BC) population. We adapted an existing natural history model using BC incidence, treatment, cost and mortality patterns. The modeled mortality benefit of screening derives from a stage-shift mechanism, assuming mortality reduction consistent with the European Study of Randomized Screening for Prostate Cancer. The model projected outcomes for 40-year-old men under 14 combinations of screening ages and frequencies. Cost and utility estimates were explored with deterministic sensitivity analysis. The incremental cost-effectiveness of regular screening ranged from $36,300/LYG, for screening every four years from ages 55 to 69 years, to $588,300/LYG, for screening every two years from ages 40 to 74 years. The marginal benefits of increasing screening frequency to 2 years or starting screening at age 40 years were small and came at significant cost. After utility adjustment, all screening strategies resulted in a loss of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs); however, this result was very sensitive to utility estimates. Plausible outcomes under a range of screening strategies inform discussion of prostate cancer screening policy in BC and similar jurisdictions. Screening may be cost-effective, but the sensitivity of results to utility values suggests individual preferences for quality versus quantity of life should be a key consideration.

  19. A cost-effectiveness analysis comparing different strategies to implement noninvasive prenatal testing into a Down syndrome screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Alice C; Whitty, Jennifer A; Ellwood, David A

    2014-10-01

    Currently, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is only recommended in high-risk women following conventional Down syndrome (DS) screening, and it has not yet been included in the Australian DS screening program. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different strategies of NIPT for DS screening in comparison with current practice. A decision-analytic approach modelled a theoretical cohort of 300,000 singleton pregnancies. The strategies compared were the following: current practice, NIPT as a second-tier investigation, NIPT only in women >35 years, NIPT only in women >40 years and NIPT for all women. The direct costs (low and high estimates) were derived using both health system costs and patient out-of-pocket expenses. The number of DS cases detected and procedure-related losses (PRL) were compared between strategies. The incremental cost per case detected was the primary measure of cost-effectiveness. Universal NIPT costs an additional $134,636,832 compared with current practice, but detects 123 more DS cases (at an incremental cost of $1,094,608 per case) and avoids 90 PRL. NIPT for women >40 years was the most cost-effective strategy, costing an incremental $81,199 per additional DS case detected and avoiding 95 PRL. The cost of NIPT needs to decrease significantly if it is to replace current practice on a purely cost-effectiveness basis. However, it may be beneficial to use NIPT as first-line screening in selected high-risk patients. Further evaluation is needed to consider the longer-term costs and benefits of screening. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Breast cancer incidence and mortality in the Nordic capitals, 1970-1998. Trends related to mammography screening programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törnberg, Sven; Kemetli, Levent; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to relate the time trends in breast cancer incidence and mortality to the introduction of mammography screening in the Nordic capitals. Helsinki offered screening to women aged 50-59 starting in 1986. The other three capitals offered screening to women aged 50......-69 starting in 1989 in Stockholm, 1991 in Copenhagen, and 1996 in Oslo. Prevalence peaks in breast cancer incidence depended on the age groups covered by the screening, the length of the implementation of screening, and the extent of background opportunistic screening. No mortality reduction following...... the introduction of screening was visible after seven to 12 years of screening in any of the three capitals where significant effects of the screening on the breast cancer mortality had already been demonstrated by using other analytical methods for the evaluation. No visible effect on mortality reduction...

  1. Relation between breast cancer mortality and screening effectiveness: systematic review of the mammography trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    as in the control group) predicted a significant 16% reduction in breast cancer mortality after 13 years (95% confidence interval, 9% to 23% reduction). This can only occur if there is bias. Further analyses uncovered bias in both assessment of the cause of death and of the number of cancers in advanced stages...... an advanced stage. I performed a systematic review of the mammography screening trials using metaregression. Finding many cancers was not related to the size of the reduction in breast cancer mortality (p = 0.19 after seven and p = 0.73 after 13 years of follow-up). In contrast, finding few cancers in stage...... II and above predicted a larger reduction in breast cancer mortality (p = 0.04 and p = 0.006). This expected association was also found for node-positive cancers (p = 0.008 and p = 0.04). However, a screening effectiveness of zero (same proportion of node-positive cancers in the screened group...

  2. Cardiovascular Disease Screening By Community Health Workers Can Be Cost-Effective In Low-Resource Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziano, Thomas; Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Surka, Sam; Sy, Stephen; Pandya, Ankur; Denman, Catalina A.; Mendoza, Carlos; Puoane, Thandi; Levitt, Naomi S.

    2016-01-01

    In low-resource settings, a physician is not always available. We recently demonstrated that community health workers—instead of physicians or nurses—can efficiently screen adults for cardiovascular disease in South Africa, Mexico, and Guatemala. In this analysis we sought to determine the health and economic impacts of shifting this screening to community health workers equipped with either a paper-based or a mobile phone–based screening tool. We found that screening by community health workers was very cost-effective or even cost-saving in all three countries, compared to the usual clinic-based screening. The mobile application emerged as the most cost-effective strategy because it could save more lives than the paper tool at minimal extra cost. Our modeling indicated that screening by community health workers, combined with improved treatment rates, would increase the number of deaths averted from 15,000 to 110,000, compared to standard care. Policy makers should promote greater acceptance of community health workers by both national populations and health professionals and should increase their commitment to treating cardiovascular disease and making medications available. PMID:26355056

  3. Trends in compressed breast thickness and radiation dose in breast screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M; Kotre, C J

    2008-03-01

    An analysis was performed of the compressed breast thickness recorded in 146 mammographic patient dose surveys each consisting of 50 or more women carried out between 1993 and 2004. The results show a steady and statistically significant increase in compressed breast thickness with time, which is also present when individual independent screening centres and equipment manufacturers are compared. This increase seems most likely to be associated with an increase in the proportion of women in the breast screening age range classified as overweight and obese, which has occurred over the same time period. The associated trends in mean glandular dose per image were calculated for the mammography units used at the time of the surveys, using the most recently published conversion factors. The increase in average radiation dose that might have been expected as a result of the increase in average compressed breast thickness was not actually found in practice, possibly because of advances in equipment design and dose optimization strategies made during the 11-year period. Other implications of an increasing average compressed breast thickness are discussed.

  4. Screening uptake rates and the clinical and cost effectiveness of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in primary versus secondary care: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Dea, Angela

    2014-01-17

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are well recognized, and there is increasing evidence to support treatment of the condition. However, clear guidance on the ideal approach to screening for GDM is lacking. Professional groups continue to debate whether selective screening (based on risk factors) or universal screening is the most appropriate approach. Additionally, there is ongoing debate about what levels of glucose abnormalities during pregnancy respond best to treatment and which maternal and neonatal outcomes benefit most from treatment. Furthermore, the implications of possible screening options on health care costs are not well established. In response to this uncertainty there have been repeated calls for well-designed, randomised trials to determine the efficacy of screening, diagnosis, and management plans for GDM. We describe a randomised controlled trial to investigate screening uptake rates and the clinical and cost effectiveness of screening in primary versus secondary care settings. The objective of this study is to assess screening uptake rates, and the clinical and cost effectiveness of screening for GDM in primary versus secondary care.

  5. Low-Dose Chest Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening Among Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattson, Daniel A., E-mail: dwattson@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hunink, M.G. Myriam [Departments of Radiology and Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands and Center for Health Decision Science, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); DiPiro, Pamela J. [Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Das, Prajnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodgson, David C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors face an increased risk of treatment-related lung cancer. Screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) may allow detection of early stage, resectable cancers. We developed a Markov decision-analytic and cost-effectiveness model to estimate the merits of annual LDCT screening among HL survivors. Methods and Materials: Population databases and HL-specific literature informed key model parameters, including lung cancer rates and stage distribution, cause-specific survival estimates, and utilities. Relative risks accounted for radiation therapy (RT) technique, smoking status (>10 pack-years or current smokers vs not), age at HL diagnosis, time from HL treatment, and excess radiation from LDCTs. LDCT assumptions, including expected stage-shift, false-positive rates, and likely additional workup were derived from the National Lung Screening Trial and preliminary results from an internal phase 2 protocol that performed annual LDCTs in 53 HL survivors. We assumed a 3% discount rate and a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Results: Annual LDCT screening was cost effective for all smokers. A male smoker treated with mantle RT at age 25 achieved maximum QALYs by initiating screening 12 years post-HL, with a life expectancy benefit of 2.1 months and an incremental cost of $34,841/QALY. Among nonsmokers, annual screening produced a QALY benefit in some cases, but the incremental cost was not below the WTP threshold for any patient subsets. As age at HL diagnosis increased, earlier initiation of screening improved outcomes. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to the lung cancer incidence and mortality rates and expected stage-shift from screening. Conclusions: HL survivors are an important high-risk population that may benefit from screening, especially those treated in the past with large radiation fields including mantle or involved-field RT. Screening

  6. Dose to patients in mammography. Retrospective study during more than 10 years of mammography screening program; Dosis a pacientes en mamografia. Estudio retrospectivo de mas de 10 anos de programa de cribado mamografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Munoz, A.; Chapel Gomez, M. L.

    2010-07-01

    Breast screening programs include large number of women, most of them asymptomatic, receiving a significant absorbed dose. Under these circumstances, estimation of breast dose arises as a valuable tool to evaluate carcinogenic risk to the patient. Dose estimation can also become a tool for comparison of imaging systems, beam qualities and techniques for mammography. Mammographic systems have undergone many changes since its origins: new beam qualities have been introduced and digital mammography has replaced conventional systems. Data obtained from 2266 mammographic studies, during more than ten years of experience on the Canary Islands Breast Cancer Screening Program, have been analysed. Semi-automatic exposure control, completely automatic exposure control, screen-film and full field digital systems have been considered, Average glandular dose (the carcinogenic risk indicator) received by patients has been compared. A reduction in average glandular dose of full field digital mammography has been found. The optimisation of exposition parameters appears as critical factor on dose reduction. (Author) 26 refs.

  7. Comparative effectiveness of breast MRI and mammography in screening young women with elevated risk of developing breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Anand K; Visvanathan, Kala; Harvey, Susan C

    2016-08-01

    Screening guidelines recommend that women with 20 % or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer undergo annual breast MRI screening to supplement mammography, irrespective of age. In patients less than 40 years, mammography is often avoided due to concerns about radiation and decreased performance. However, prior studies have been limited by large percentages of women above 40 with decreased breast density. Our purpose was to test whether adding mammography to breast MRI screening compared to breast MRI screening alone in women below 40 increases cancer detection rates. After obtaining IRB approval, chart review identified patients aged 25-40 years undergoing breast MR screening (2005-2014). Demographics, risk factors, BI-RADS assessments, background parenchymal enhancement, and mammographic breast tissue density were recorded. Cancer detection rates, short-term follow-up (BIRADS 3), image-guided biopsy (BIRADS 4,5), and PPV1-3 were calculated. 342 breast MRI exams were identified (average age was 33, 37 % were nulliparous, and 64 % had prior benign biopsy), 226 (66 %) of which underwent concurrent mammography. Risk factors included 64 % with breast cancer in first-degree relative(s), 90 % had heterogeneous or extremely dense breast tissue on mammography, and 16 % were BRCA carriers. Four invasive cancers were detected by MRI (11.7 cancers/1000 examinations, 95 % CI 8.3, 15.1). None of these was detected by mammography, and no cancers were independently identified by mammography. Breast MRI screening in high-risk women under 40 yielded elevated cancer detection rates (11.7/1000). The cancer detection rate for mammography was 0 %, suggesting that MRI alone may be useful in screening high-risk women under 40.

  8. Informed Choice in the German Mammography Screening Program by Education and Migrant Status: Survey among First-Time Invitees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Berens

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among women and mammography screening programs are seen as a key strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality. In Germany, women are invited to the population-based mammography screening program between ages 50 to 69. It is still discussed whether the benefits of mammography screening outweigh its harms. Therefore, the concept of informed choice comprising knowledge, attitude and intention has gained importance. The objective of this observational study was to assess the proportion of informed choices among women invited to the German mammography screening program for the first time. A representative sample of 17,349 women aged 50 years from a sub-region of North Rhine Westphalia was invited to participate in a postal survey. Turkish immigrant women were oversampled. The effects of education level and migration status on informed choice and its components were assessed. 5,847 (33.7% women responded to the postal questionnaire of which 4,113 were used for analyses. 31.5% of the women had sufficient knowledge. The proportion of sufficient knowledge was lower among immigrants and among women with low education levels. The proportion of women making informed choices was low (27.1%, with similar associations with education level and migration status. Women of low (OR 2.75; 95% CI 2.18-3.46 and medium education level (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.27-1.75 were more likely to make an uninformed choice than women of high education level. Turkish immigrant women had the greatest odds for making an uninformed choice (OR 5.30, 95% CI 1.92-14.66 compared to non-immigrant women. Other immigrant women only had slightly greater odds for making an uninformed choice than non-immigrant women. As immigrant populations and women with low education level have been shown to have poor knowledge, they need special attention in measures to increase knowledge and thus informed choices.

  9. Where's Maria? A video to increase awareness about breast cancer and mammography screening among low-literacy Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrayo, Evelinn A

    2004-07-01

    The need exists to educate and motivate medically disadvantaged Latinas to engage in regular mammography screening to reduce their high breast cancer (BC) mortality risk due to the illness' late detection. Qualitative research methods [e.g., focus groups, key informants] were primarily used during the basic and formative research phases in preproducing and producing a breast cancer educational video for low-literacy Latinas. An 8-min video was created in an Entertainment-Education soap opera format. The purpose of the video is to create awareness about breast cancer and to motivate low-literacy Latinas who are at the precontemplation stage of behavior change to consider engaging in mammography screening. Thus, the video presents a compelling story of a Latina with whom the target audience can identify and become involved with the unfolding events of her story as she realizes her risk for breast cancer and struggles with the decision to engage in mammography. The content and format of the video include culturally relevant clues and modeling to influence Latinas' cognitive and subjective processes involved in making the decision to change. Complex attitudinal and behavioral issues can be effectively targeted to decrease the influence that psychological barriers exert in Latinas low breast cancer screening rates. Copyright 2004 The Institute for Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc.

  10. Peer reviewing of screening mammography in Taiwan: its reliability and the improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Huay-ben; HSU Giu-cheng; YANG Tsung-lung; HUANG Jer-shyung; CHOU Chen-pin; LIANG Huei-lung; LEE San-kan

    2013-01-01

    Background Early detection with screening mammography can potentially reduce breast cancer mortality rates.To achieve an efficient screening,a peer review system provides a compensatory double-check reviewing,will hopefully to prevent the omission of detectable lesions and reduce unnecessary recall.Methods In 2009,4643 initial mammographic screenings reported by 74 screening radiologists had negative results with a recall rate of less than 5%.In the same year,2538 initial positives screened by 18 screening radiologists had a recall rate higher than 15%.Those 7181 randomized screenings were evenly distributed for reassessment by 39 reviewing radiologists.The disagreement of assessments between the reviewers and screening radiologists was recorded.The differential rate was defined as the number of the disagreements divided by the number of audited films reviewed by a screening radiologist.The equality of the differential rates for each screening radiologists with negative and positive assessments was compared by a Chi-square test.The performance of the 39 auditors was measured by the Kendall's tau statistic.P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results The mean differential rate for screening radiologists of negative assessments was 6.7% (P=-0.588),while 35.0% for positive assessments were significant (P <0.001).The result indicated that most of the initial negative assessments reported by the screening radiologists were generally accepted by the reviewers but not the positive assessments.With respect to the 39 reviewers,there was no significant evidence for the association of the difference rates between negative and positive assessments.Nine reviewers were found to have their differential rate for negative and positive assessments larger than the average of the population.Eleven reviewers were found to have their differential rates smaller than the average for both.Thirteen reviewers had their differential rates smaller than

  11. An international review of the main cost-effectiveness drivers of virtual colonography versus conventional colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening: Is the tide changing due to adherence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriza, Christine, E-mail: Christine.kriza@uk-erlangen.de [Interdisciplinary Centre for Health Technology Assessment and Public Health, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, National BMBF-Cluster of Excellence, “Medical Technologies - Medical Valley EMN”, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Emmert, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Emmert@fau.de [School of Business and Economics, Institute of Management, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Lange Gasse 20, 90403 Nuremberg (Germany); Wahlster, Philip, E-mail: Philip.wahlster@uk-erlangen.de [Interdisciplinary Centre for Health Technology Assessment and Public Health, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, National BMBF-Cluster of Excellence, “Medical Technologies - Medical Valley EMN”, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Niederländer, Charlotte, E-mail: Charlotte.niederlaender@uk-erlangen.de [Interdisciplinary Centre for Health Technology Assessment and Public Health, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, National BMBF-Cluster of Excellence, “Medical Technologies - Medical Valley EMN”, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Kolominsky-Rabas, Peter, E-mail: Peter.kolominsky@uk-erlangen.de [Interdisciplinary Centre for Health Technology Assessment and Public Health, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, National BMBF-Cluster of Excellence, “Medical Technologies - Medical Valley EMN”, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Objectives: The majority of recent cost-effectiveness reviews concluded that computerised tomographic colonography (CTC) is not a cost-effective colorectal cancer (CRC) screening strategy yet. The objective of this review is to examine cost-effectiveness of CTC versus optical colonoscopy (COL) for CRC screening and identify the main drivers influencing cost-effectiveness due to the emergence of new research. Methods: A systematic review was conducted for cost-effectiveness studies comparing CTC and COL as a screening tool and providing outcomes in life-years saved, published between January 2006 and November 2012. Results: Nine studies were included in the review. There was considerable heterogeneity in modelling complexity and methodology. Different model assumptions and inputs had large effects on resulting cost-effectiveness of CTC and COL. CTC was found to be dominant or cost-effective in three studies, assuming the most favourable scenario. COL was found to be not cost effective in one study. Conclusions: CTC has the potential to be a cost-effective CRC screening strategy when compared to COL. The most important assumptions that influenced the cost-effectiveness of CTC and COL were related to CTC threshold-based reporting of polyps, CTC cost, CTC sensitivity for large polyps, natural history of adenoma transition to cancer, AAA parameters and importantly, adherence. There is a strong need for a differential consideration of patient adherence and compliance to CTC and COL. Recent research shows that laxative-free CTC screening has the potential to become a good alternative screening method for CRC as it can improve patient uptake of screening.

  12. Changing behavior and accuracy with time on task in mammography screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Jenkinson, David; Stinton, Chris; Wallis, Matthew G.; Clarke, Aileen

    2017-03-01

    Background: The vigilance decrement and prevalence effect both describe changes to speed and accuracy with time on task. Whilst there is much laboratory based research on these effects, little is known about whether they occur in real world mammography practice. Methods: The Changing Case Order to Optimise Patterns of Performance in Screening (CO-OPS) trial randomised 37,724 batches containing 1.2 million women attending breast screening to intervention or control (222,208 from the Midlands of England). In the control arm the batch was examined in the same order by both readers, in the intervention arm it was examined in a different order by both readers. Time taken, recall decision by both readers, and cancers detected were recorded for each case, and used to examine patterns of performance with time on task. Results: 49,575 women were recalled and 10,484 had cancer detected. Median time taken to examine each case was 35 seconds (out of cases where time taken was 10 minutes or less). The intervention did not affect overall cancer detection rates or recall rates. A more detailed analysis of the Midlands data indicates cancer detection rate did not change when reading up to 60 cases in a batch, but recall rate reduced. Time taken per case reduced with time on task, from a median 41 seconds when examining the second case in the batch to 28.5 seconds examining the 60th case. Conclusion: Reader behavior and performance systematically changes with time on task in breast screening.

  13. Exploring the potential of context-sensitive CADe in screening mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourassi, Georgia D.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A. [Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional computer-assisted detection (CADe) systems in screening mammography provide the same decision support to all users. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of a context-sensitive CADe system which provides decision support guided by each user's focus of attention during visual search and reporting patterns for a specific case. Methods: An observer study for the detection of malignant masses in screening mammograms was conducted in which six radiologists evaluated 20 mammograms while wearing an eye-tracking device. Eye-position data and diagnostic decisions were collected for each radiologist and case they reviewed. These cases were subsequently analyzed with an in-house knowledge-based CADe system using two different modes: Conventional mode with a globally fixed decision threshold and context-sensitive mode with a location-variable decision threshold based on the radiologists' eye dwelling data and reporting information. Results: The CADe system operating in conventional mode had 85.7% per-image malignant mass sensitivity at 3.15 false positives per image (FPsI). The same system operating in context-sensitive mode provided personalized decision support at 85.7%-100% sensitivity and 0.35-0.40 FPsI to all six radiologists. Furthermore, context-sensitive CADe system could improve the radiologists' sensitivity and reduce their performance gap more effectively than conventional CADe. Conclusions: Context-sensitive CADe support shows promise in delineating and reducing the radiologists' perceptual and cognitive errors in the diagnostic interpretation of screening mammograms more effectively than conventional CADe.

  14. Cost effectiveness analysis of a population based screening programme for asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women by means of home obtained urine specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valkengoed, IGM; Postma, MJ; Morre, SA; van den Brule, AJC; Meijer, CJLM; Bouter, LM; Boeke, AJP

    Objectives: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of a systematic screening programme for asymptomatic Chlamydia, trachomatis infections in a female inner city population. To determine the sensitivity of the cost effectiveness analysis to variation in the probability of developing sequelae. Methods: A

  15. Cost effectiveness analysis of a population based screening programme for asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women by means of home obtained urine specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valkengoed, IGM; Postma, MJ; Morre, SA; van den Brule, AJC; Meijer, CJLM; Bouter, LM; Boeke, AJP

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of a systematic screening programme for asymptomatic Chlamydia, trachomatis infections in a female inner city population. To determine the sensitivity of the cost effectiveness analysis to variation in the probability of developing sequelae. Methods: A

  16. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Pilot Neonatal Screening Program for Sickle Cell Anemia in the Republic of Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Patrick T; Grosse, Scott D; Santos, Brigida; de Oliveira, Vysolela; Bernardino, Luis; Kassebaum, Nicholas J; Ware, Russell E; Airewele, Gladstone E

    2015-12-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of a pilot newborn screening (NBS) and treatment program for sickle cell anemia (SCA) in Luanda, Angola. In July 2011, a pilot NBS and treatment program was implemented in Luanda, Angola. Infants identified with SCA were enrolled in a specialized SCA clinic in which they received preventive care and sickle cell education. In this analysis, the World Health Organization (WHO) and generalized cost-effectiveness analysis methods were used to estimate gross intervention costs of the NBS and treatment program. To determine healthy life-years (HLYs) gained by screening and treatment, we assumed NBS reduced mortality to that of the Angolan population during the first 5 years based upon WHO and Global Burden of Diseases Study 2010 estimates, but provided no significant survival benefit for children who survive through age 5 years. A secondary sensitivity analysis with more conservative estimates of mortality benefits also was performed. The costs of downstream medical costs, including acute care, were not included. Based upon the costs of screening 36,453 infants and treating the 236 infants with SCA followed after NBS in the pilot project, NBS and treatment program is projected to result in the gain of 452-1105 HLYs, depending upon the discounting rate and survival assumptions used. The corresponding estimated cost per HLY gained is $1380-$3565, less than the gross domestic product per capita in Angola. These data demonstrate that NBS and treatment for SCA appear to be highly cost-effective across all scenarios for Angola by the WHO criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interventions to Promote Repeat Breast Cancer Screening With Mammography: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Amy; Tiro, Jasmin A.; del Junco, Deborah J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Various interventions to promote repeat use of mammography have been evaluated, but the efficacy of such interventions is not well understood. Methods We searched electronic databases through August 15, 2009, and extracted data to calculate unadjusted effect estimates (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence intervals [CIs]). Eligible studies were those that reported estimates of repeat screening for intervention and control groups. We tested homogeneity and computed summary odds ratios. To explore possible causes of heterogeneity, we performed stratified analyses, examined meta-regression models for 15 a priori explanatory variables, and conducted influence analyses. We used funnel plots and asymmetry tests to assess publication bias. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results The 25 eligible studies (27 effect estimates) were statistically significantly heterogeneous (Q = 69.5, I  2 = 63%, P < .001). Although there were homogeneous subgroups in some categories of the 15 explanatory variables, heterogeneity persisted after stratification. For all but one explanatory variable, subgroup summary odds ratios were similar with overlapping confidence intervals. The summary odds ratio for the eight heterogeneous reminder-only studies was the largest observed (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.41 to 2.29) and was statistically significantly greater than the summary odds ratio (Pdiff = .008) for the homogeneous group of 17 studies that used the more intensive strategies of education/motivation or counseling (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.37). However, reminder-only studies remained statistically significantly heterogeneous, whereas the studies classified as education/motivation or counseling were homogeneous. Similarly, in meta-regression modeling, the only statistically significant predictor of the intervention effect size was intervention strategy (reminder-only vs the other two combined as the referent). Publication bias was not apparent. Conclusions The observed

  18. Cost-effectiveness of HPV-based cervical cancer screening in the public health system in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Nicole G; Mvundura, Mercy; Jeronimo, Jose; Holme, Francesca; Vodicka, Elisabeth; Kim, Jane J

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing (versus Papanicolaou (Pap)-based screening) for cervical cancer screening in Nicaragua. A previously developed Monte Carlo simulation model of the natural history of HPV infection and cervical cancer was calibrated to epidemiological data from Nicaragua. Cost data inputs were derived using a micro-costing approach in Carazo, Chontales and Chinandega departments; test performance data were from a demonstration project in Masaya department. Nicaragua's public health sector facilities. Women aged 30-59 years. Screening strategies included (1) Pap testing every 3 years, with referral to colposcopy for women with an atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or worse result ('Pap'); (2) HPV testing every 5 years, with referral to cryotherapy for HPV-positive eligible women (HPV cryotherapy or 'HPV-Cryo'); (3) HPV testing every 5 years, with referral to triage with visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) for HPV-positive women ('HPV-VIA'); and (4) HPV testing every 5 years, with referral to Pap testing for HPV-positive women ('HPV-Pap'). Reduction in lifetime risk of cancer and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER; 2015 US$ per year of life saved (YLS)). HPV-based screening strategies were more effective than Pap testing. HPV-Cryo was the least costly and most effective strategy, reducing lifetime cancer risk by 29.5% and outperforming HPV-VIA, HPV-Pap and Pap only, which reduced cancer risk by 19.4%, 12.2% and 10.8%, respectively. With an ICER of US$320/YLS, HPV-Cryo every 5 years would be very cost-effective using a threshold based on Nicaragua's per capita gross domestic product of US$2090. Findings were robust across sensitivity analyses on test performance, coverage, compliance and cost parameters. HPV testing is very cost-effective compared with Pap testing in Nicaragua, due to higher test sensitivity and the relatively lower number of visits required. Increasing

  19. Cost-effective multiplexing before capture allows screening of 25 000 clinically relevant SNPs in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesolowska, Agata; Dalgaard, M. D.; Borst, L.;

    2011-01-01

    a model disease for exploring the impact of genetic variation due to well-characterized cytogenetics, drug response pathways and precise monitoring of minimal residual disease. Here, we have selected clinically relevant genes and SNPs through literature screening, and on the basis of associations with key...... designed a cost-effective, high-throughput capture assay of â¼25â000 clinically relevant SNPs, and demonstrated that multiple samples can be tagged and pooled before genome capture in targeted enrichment with a sufficient sequencing depth for genotyping. This multiplexed, targeted sequencing method allows...

  20. Mass scale screening of common arboviral infections by an affordable, cost effective RT-PCR method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debjani Taraphdar; Arindam Sarkar; Shyamalendu Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To develop a rapid, cost effective RT-PCR method for the mass scale diagnosis of such diseases at the viremia stage to find out the actual disease burden in that area. Methods:For this purpose, cases with the history of only short febrile illness were considered. Thus 157 samples with the history of dengue/chikungunya like illness and only 58 samples with a history of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) were selected. Results:Out of 157 samples, 42 and 74 were detected as dengue and chikungunya, respectively and out of 58 AES cases only 23 could be detected as Japanese encephalitis by this RT-PCR method. Conclusions:This cost effective RT-PCR method can detect the total positive cases that remain undetected by ELISA method. Moreover, this method is capable to detect the viral RNA from patients’ sera even after the appearance of IgM antibody at one fifth costs as compared with the other commercially available kits.

  1. Parameter optimization of parenchymal texture analysis for prediction of false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology to obtain optimal parameter values for a locally-adaptive texture analysis algorithm that extracts mammographic texture features representative of breast parenchymal complexity for predicting falsepositive (FP) recalls from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. The algorithm has two components: (1) adaptive selection of localized regions of interest (ROIs) and (2) Haralick texture feature extraction via Gray- Level Co-Occurrence Matrices (GLCM). The following parameters were systematically varied: mammographic views used, upper limit of the ROI window size used for adaptive ROI selection, GLCM distance offsets, and gray levels (binning) used for feature extraction. Each iteration per parameter set had logistic regression with stepwise feature selection performed on a clinical screening cohort of 474 non-recalled women and 68 FP recalled women; FP recall prediction was evaluated using area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and associations between the extracted features and FP recall were assessed via odds ratios (OR). A default instance of mediolateral (MLO) view, upper ROI size limit of 143.36 mm (2048 pixels2), GLCM distance offset combination range of 0.07 to 0.84 mm (1 to 12 pixels) and 16 GLCM gray levels was set. The highest ROC performance value of AUC=0.77 [95% confidence intervals: 0.71-0.83] was obtained at three specific instances: the default instance, upper ROI window equal to 17.92 mm (256 pixels2), and gray levels set to 128. The texture feature of sum average was chosen as a statistically significant (p<0.05) predictor and associated with higher odds of FP recall for 12 out of 14 total instances.

  2. Single-screen single-emulsion versus dual-screen dual-emulsion system in mammography; Comparison of imaging properties and detection of microcalcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuda, Noboru; Hiai, Yasuhiro (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital); Higashida, Yoshiharu (and others)

    1993-05-01

    A dual-screen/dual-emulsion film combination (Kodak MinR Fast screen/TMG film) that allows for a decrease in patient exposure was evaluated with widely used single-screen/single-emulsion systems (Kodak MinR/OM, Kodak MinR/MinR, and Toshiba MM6/MINC film) in contrast to mammography. Clustered microcalcifications randomly superimposed on a breast specimen were detected, and the locations were determined by eight observers. The dual screen-film system provided about a 64% reduction in patient exposure compared with the single-screen/single-emulsion system (MM6/MINC), but it failed to equal the single-system in detection of simulated microcalcifications. Our results suggested that the conventional single-screen/single-emulsion systems showed better detectability of microcalcifications than the dual-screen/dual-emulsion film combinations. (author).

  3. Clarifying the debate on population-based screening for breast cancer with mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Gordon, Paula; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Chang, King-Jen; Lee, Won-Chul; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Saito, Hiroshi; Promthet, Supannee; Hamashima, Chisato; Maidin, Alimin; Robinson, Fredie; Zhao, Li-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The recent controversy about using mammography to screen for breast cancer based on randomized controlled trials over 3 decades in Western countries has not only eclipsed the paradigm of evidence-based medicine, but also puts health decision-makers in countries where breast cancer screening is still being considered in a dilemma to adopt or abandon such a well-established screening modality. Methods: We reanalyzed the empirical data from the Health Insurance Plan trial in 1963 to the UK age trial in 1991 and their follow-up data published until 2015. We first performed Bayesian conjugated meta-analyses on the heterogeneity of attendance rate, sensitivity, and over-detection and their impacts on advanced stage breast cancer and death from breast cancer across trials using Bayesian Poisson fixed- and random-effect regression model. Bayesian meta-analysis of causal model was then developed to assess a cascade of causal relationships regarding the impact of both attendance and sensitivity on 2 main outcomes. Results: The causes of heterogeneity responsible for the disparities across the trials were clearly manifested in 3 components. The attendance rate ranged from 61.3% to 90.4%. The sensitivity estimates show substantial variation from 57.26% to 87.97% but improved with time from 64% in 1963 to 82% in 1980 when Bayesian conjugated meta-analysis was conducted in chronological order. The percentage of over-detection shows a wide range from 0% to 28%, adjusting for long lead-time. The impacts of the attendance rate and sensitivity on the 2 main outcomes were statistically significant. Causal inference made by linking these causal relationships with emphasis on the heterogeneity of the attendance rate and sensitivity accounted for the variation in the reduction of advanced breast cancer (none-30%) and of mortality (none-31%). We estimated a 33% (95% CI: 24–42%) and 13% (95% CI: 6–20%) breast cancer mortality reduction for the best scenario (90

  4. Cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care for individuals with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, L; Wilson, E C F; Wareham, N J

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine the short- and long-term cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care among people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Cost–utility analysis in ADDITION-UK, a cluster-randomized controlled trial of early intensive treatment in people...... with screen-detected diabetes in 69 UK general practices. Unit treatment costs and utility decrement data were taken from published literature. Accumulated costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated using ADDITION-UK data from 1 to 5 years (short-term analysis, n = 1024); trial data were...... extrapolated to 30 years using the UKPDS outcomes model (version 1.3) (long-term analysis; n = 999). All costs were transformed to the UK 2009/10 price level. Results Adjusted incremental costs to the NHS were £285, £935, £1190 and £1745 over a 1-, 5-, 10- and 30-year time horizon, respectively (discounted...

  5. Colorectal Cancer Screening: How Health Gains and Cost-Effectiveness Vary by Ethnic Group, the Impact on Health Inequalities, and the Optimal Age Range to Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Melissa; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Boyd, Matt; Barendregt, Jan; Sarfati, Diana; Wilson, Nick; Blakely, Tony

    2017-09-01

    Background: Screening programs consistently underserve indigenous populations despite a higher overall burden of cancer. In this study, we explore the likely health gains and cost-effectiveness of a national colorectal cancer screening program for the indigenous Māori population of New Zealand (NZ).Methods: A Markov model estimated: health benefits (quality-adjusted life-year; QALY), costs, and cost-effectiveness of biennial immunochemical fecal occult blood testing (FOBTi) of 50- to 74-year-olds from 2011. Input parameters came from literature reviews, the NZ Bowel Screening Programme Pilot, and NZ linked health datasets. Equity analyses substituted non-Māori values for Māori values of background (noncolorectal cancer) morbidity and mortality, colorectal cancer survival and incidence, screening coverage, and stage-specific survival. We measured the change in "quality-adjusted life expectancy" (QALE) as a result of the intervention.Results: Based upon a threshold of GDP per capita (NZ$45,000), colorectal cancer screening in NZ using FOBTi is cost-effective: NZ$2,930 (US$1,970) per QALY gained [95% uncertainty interval: cost saving to $6,850 (US$4,610)]. Modeled health gains per capita for Māori were less than for non-Māori: half for 50- to 54-year-olds (0.031 QALYs per person for Māori vs. 0.058 for non-Māori), and a fifth (0.003 c.f. 0.016) for 70- to 74-year-olds and ethnic inequalities in QALE increased with colorectal cancer screening.Conclusions: Colorectal cancer screening in NZ using FOBTi is likely to be cost-effective but risks increasing inequalities in health for Māori.Impact: To avoid or mitigate the generation of further health inequalities, attention should be given to underserved population groups when planning and implementing screening programs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1391-400. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of screening and treating Helicobacter pylori for gastric cancer prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); L. Sharp

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. A meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials concluded that Helicobacter pylori eradication reduces gastric cancer incidence by 35%. Current consensus is that H. pylori screening and treatment is cost-

  7. Cost-effectiveness of screening and treating Helicobacter pylori for gastric cancer prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); L. Sharp

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. A meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials concluded that Helicobacter pylori eradication reduces gastric cancer incidence by 35%. Current consensus is that H. pylori screening and treatment is

  8. Epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women and the cost-effectiveness of screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Land, Jolande; Van Bergen, J E A M; Morré, S A; Postma, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women are asymptomatic, but may give rise to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and tubal infertility. Screening programmes aim at reducing morbidity in individuals by early detection and treatment, and at decreasing the overall

  9. Cost-effectiveness and harm-benefit analyses of risk-based screening strategies for breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Vilaprinyo

    Full Text Available The one-size-fits-all paradigm in organized screening of breast cancer is shifting towards a personalized approach. The present study has two objectives: 1 To perform an economic evaluation and to assess the harm-benefit ratios of screening strategies that vary in their intensity and interval ages based on breast cancer risk; and 2 To estimate the gain in terms of cost and harm reductions using risk-based screening with respect to the usual practice. We used a probabilistic model and input data from Spanish population registries and screening programs, as well as from clinical studies, to estimate the benefit, harm, and costs over time of 2,624 screening strategies, uniform or risk-based. We defined four risk groups, low, moderate-low, moderate-high and high, based on breast density, family history of breast cancer and personal history of breast biopsy. The risk-based strategies were obtained combining the exam periodicity (annual, biennial, triennial and quinquennial, the starting ages (40, 45 and 50 years and the ending ages (69 and 74 years in the four risk groups. Incremental cost-effectiveness and harm-benefit ratios were used to select the optimal strategies. Compared to risk-based strategies, the uniform ones result in a much lower benefit for a specific cost. Reductions close to 10% in costs and higher than 20% in false-positive results and overdiagnosed cases were obtained for risk-based strategies. Optimal screening is characterized by quinquennial or triennial periodicities for the low or moderate risk-groups and annual periodicity for the high-risk group. Risk-based strategies can reduce harm and costs. It is necessary to develop accurate measures of individual risk and to work on how to implement risk-based screening strategies.

  10. Cost-effectiveness and harm-benefit analyses of risk-based screening strategies for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaprinyo, Ester; Forné, Carles; Carles, Misericordia; Sala, Maria; Pla, Roger; Castells, Xavier; Domingo, Laia; Rue, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    The one-size-fits-all paradigm in organized screening of breast cancer is shifting towards a personalized approach. The present study has two objectives: 1) To perform an economic evaluation and to assess the harm-benefit ratios of screening strategies that vary in their intensity and interval ages based on breast cancer risk; and 2) To estimate the gain in terms of cost and harm reductions using risk-based screening with respect to the usual practice. We used a probabilistic model and input data from Spanish population registries and screening programs, as well as from clinical studies, to estimate the benefit, harm, and costs over time of 2,624 screening strategies, uniform or risk-based. We defined four risk groups, low, moderate-low, moderate-high and high, based on breast density, family history of breast cancer and personal history of breast biopsy. The risk-based strategies were obtained combining the exam periodicity (annual, biennial, triennial and quinquennial), the starting ages (40, 45 and 50 years) and the ending ages (69 and 74 years) in the four risk groups. Incremental cost-effectiveness and harm-benefit ratios were used to select the optimal strategies. Compared to risk-based strategies, the uniform ones result in a much lower benefit for a specific cost. Reductions close to 10% in costs and higher than 20% in false-positive results and overdiagnosed cases were obtained for risk-based strategies. Optimal screening is characterized by quinquennial or triennial periodicities for the low or moderate risk-groups and annual periodicity for the high-risk group. Risk-based strategies can reduce harm and costs. It is necessary to develop accurate measures of individual risk and to work on how to implement risk-based screening strategies.

  11. The interplay of attention economics and computer-aided detection marks in screening mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Tayler M.; Sridharan, Radhika; Wei, Wei; Lukyanchenko, Olga; Geiser, William; Whitman, Gary J.; Haygood, Tamara Miner

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: According to attention economists, overabundant information leads to decreased attention for individual pieces of information. Computer-aided detection (CAD) alerts radiologists to findings potentially associated with breast cancer but is notorious for creating an abundance of false-positive marks. We suspected that increased CAD marks do not lengthen mammogram interpretation time, as radiologists will selectively disregard these marks when present in larger numbers. We explore the relevance of attention economics in mammography by examining how the number of CAD marks affects interpretation time. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of bilateral digital screening mammograms obtained between January 1, 2011 and February 28, 2014, using only weekend interpretations to decrease distractions and the likelihood of trainee participation. We stratified data according to reader and used ANOVA to assess the relationship between number of CAD marks and interpretation time. Results: Ten radiologists, with median experience after residency of 12.5 years (range 6 to 24,) interpreted 1849 mammograms. When accounting for number of images, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category, and breast density, increasing numbers of CAD marks was correlated with longer interpretation time only for the three radiologists with the fewest years of experience (median 7 years.) Conclusion: For the 7 most experienced readers, increasing CAD marks did not lengthen interpretation time. We surmise that as CAD marks increase, the attention given to individual marks decreases. Experienced radiologists may rapidly dismiss larger numbers of CAD marks as false-positive, having learned that devoting extra attention to such marks does not improve clinical detection.

  12. Breast cancer incidence and mortality in the Nordic capitals, 1970-1998. Trends related to mammography screening programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toernberg, Sven; Kemetli, Levent [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Cancer Screening Unit, Oncologic Centre; Lynge, Elsebeth; Olsen, Anne Helene [Univ. of Copenhagen, (Denmark). Inst. of Public Health; Hofvind, Solveig; Wang, Hege [The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway); Anttila, Ahti [Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki (Finland); Hakama, Matti [Univ. of Tampere (Finland). School of Public Health; Nystroem, Lennarth [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Public Health and Clinical Medicine

    2006-07-15

    The aim of the present study was to relate the time trends in breast cancer incidence and mortality to the introduction of mammography screening in the Nordic capitals. Helsinki offered screening to women aged 50-59 starting in 1986. The other three capitals offered screening to women aged 50-69 starting in 1989 in Stockholm, 1991 in Copenhagen, and 1996 in Oslo. Prevalence peaks in breast cancer incidence depended on the age groups covered by the screening, the length of the implementation of screening, and the extent of background opportunistic screening. No mortality reduction following the introduction of screening was visible after seven to 12 years of screening in any of the three capitals where significant effects of the screening on the breast cancer mortality had already been demonstrated by using other analytical methods for the evaluation. No visible effect on mortality reduction was expected in Oslo due to too short an observation period. The study showed that the population-based breast cancer mortality trend is too crude a measure to detect the effect of screening on breast cancer mortality during the first years after the start of a programme.

  13. News media coverage of a women's health contraversy: how newspapers and TV outlets covered a recent debate over screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Whitney Randolph; Mebane, Felicia; Viswanath, K; Solomon, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been several highly visible debates about mammography that have captured professional, public and media attention. This paper looks at newspaper and television news coverage of a controversial research letter in The Lancet by Gøtzsche and Olsen (2001) that concluded that screening mammography did not prevent deaths from breast cancer. The news pieces examined for this project were published between October 2001 and March 2002 in one of eight U.S. newspapers or aired on one of six national or cable news networks. The six-month period was divided into one-week segments; the numbers of articles published or stories aired in each week were graphed to examine patterns. Each newspaper article and television transcript was then reviewed to identify its main content area and the amount of coverage for each major event was quantified. The highest number of newspaper articles appeared to result from several events during the end of January through the beginning of February. These events included the publication of another meta-analysis of mammography that disputed the original letter's conclusion and a full-page New York Times advertisement paid for by major medical organizations stating their continued support for mammography. The greatest amount of television news coverage was devoted to the announcement of the official federal guidelines by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in late February. We conclude by discussing how the flow of news coverage of medical controversies can potentially impact the actions and reactions of the public, the medical community and health policy makers.

  14. In Vitro Cell Death Discrimination and Screening Method by Simple and Cost-Effective Viability Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Katharina; Beyreis, Marlena; Mayr, Christian; Ritter, Markus; Jakab, Martin; Kiesslich, Tobias; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2017-01-01

    For in vitro cytotoxicity testing, discrimination of apoptosis and necrosis represents valuable information. Viability analysis performed at two different time points post treatment could serve such a purpose because the dynamics of metabolic activity of apoptotic and necrotic cells is different, i.e. a more rapid decline of cellular metabolism during necrosis whereas cellular metabolism is maintained during the entire execution phase of apoptosis. This study describes a straightforward approach to distinguish apoptosis and necrosis. A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were treated with different concentrations/doses of actinomycin D (Act-D), 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TBB), Ro 31-8220, H2O2 and photodynamic treatment (PDT). The resazurin viability signal was recorded at 2 and 24 hrs post treatment. Apoptosis and necrosis were verified by measuring caspase 3/7 and membrane integrity. Calculation of the difference curve between the 2 and 24 hrs resazurin signals yields the following information: a positive difference signal indicates apoptosis (i.e. high metabolic activity at early time points and low signal at 24 hrs post treatment) while an early reduction of the viability signal indicates necrosis. For all treatments, this dose-dependent sequence of cellular responses could be confirmed by independent assays. Simple and cost-effective viability analysis provides reliable information about the dose ranges of a cytotoxic agent where apoptosis or necrosis occurs. This may serve as a starting point for further in-depth characterisation of cytotoxic treatments. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Screening and rapid molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis in prisons in Russia and Eastern Europe: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Winetsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prisons of the former Soviet Union (FSU have high rates of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and are thought to drive general population tuberculosis (TB epidemics. Effective prison case detection, though employing more expensive technologies, may reduce long-term treatment costs and slow MDR-TB transmission. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed a dynamic transmission model of TB and drug resistance matched to the epidemiology and costs in FSU prisons. We evaluated eight strategies for TB screening and diagnosis involving, alone or in combination, self-referral, symptom screening, mass miniature radiography (MMR, and sputum PCR with probes for rifampin resistance (Xpert MTB/RIF. Over a 10-y horizon, we projected costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, and TB and MDR-TB prevalence. Using sputum PCR as an annual primary screening tool among the general prison population most effectively reduced overall TB prevalence (from 2.78% to 2.31% and MDR-TB prevalence (from 0.74% to 0.63%, and cost US$543/QALY for additional QALYs gained compared to MMR screening with sputum PCR reserved for rapid detection of MDR-TB. Adding sputum PCR to the currently used strategy of annual MMR screening was cost-saving over 10 y compared to MMR screening alone, but produced only a modest reduction in MDR-TB prevalence (from 0.74% to 0.69% and had minimal effect on overall TB prevalence (from 2.78% to 2.74%. Strategies based on symptom screening alone were less effective and more expensive than MMR-based strategies. Study limitations included scarce primary TB time-series data in FSU prisons and uncertainties regarding screening test characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: In prisons of the FSU, annual screening of the general inmate population with sputum PCR most effectively reduces TB and MDR-TB prevalence, doing so cost-effectively. If this approach is not feasible, the current strategy of annual MMR is both more effective and less expensive than strategies

  16. Survey of mammography practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, L.W.; Diamond, J.J.; Gold, R.H.; McLelland, R.

    1987-12-01

    Of the 319 radiologists who responded to a survey concerning mammography practices, 50% were employed in a private hospital and 26% in a private office. Film-screen mammography was used most often (54%) followed by xeromammography (30%) and a combination of film-screen and xeromammography (16%). Of the respondents, 62% had changed their method of performing mammography in the last 10 years. Of these, 50% had switched from xeromammography to film-screen, 23% from direct film to film-screen, 15% from direct film to xeromammography, and 6% from film-screen to xeromammography. Mammographic equipment had been purchased by 71% of respondents after 1983. Most respondents (71%) monitored mammography equipment doses, usually at 6- to 12-month intervals. Manual breast examinations were done at the time of mammography at 42% of the facilities, and breast self-examination was taught at 32%. For screening, 87.4% used a two-view examination, 92% required the name of a referring physician to whom the report could be sent, 28% accepted self-referred patients, and only 12% charged a reduced fee for screening. Breast sonography was performed by 53% (93% hand-held vs 7% automated), but none used sonography for screening. Only one respondent reported using thermography; three used light scanning. A need for postgraduate mammography courses for radiologists was indicated by 81%, while 69% recommended technologist courses and 64% recommended 1-week fellowships for radiologists.

  17. Cost-effective solutions for corrosion-resistant expandable-screen base pipe in sour/brine service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitwood, G. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada); Skogsberg, L. [Shell International E and P Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    In order to remain competitive, oilfield operators use the lowest-cost materials that meet the technical needs of an operation. As field development expands into deeper and more corrosive environments, there is a greater demand for corrosion-resistant alloys. The main environmental factors that affect stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of S31603 are hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) content, acidity, chloride concentration, oxygen contamination and temperature. In expandable sand control systems, new technology must compete with existing non-expandable screens that are low-cost to manufacture. The first choice for a corrosion-resistant alloy for base pipe in conventional sand screens is the low cost 13Cr which provides corrosion resistance in mild H{sub 2}S situations under a range of chloride and temperature conditions. The material, however, lacks ductility needed for 25 per cent expansion. Another option is to use 316L (UNS S31603), an alloy with sufficient ductility and strength, but with questionable corrosion resistance when it comes to chloride SCC. The potential application of S31603 in several projects was presented along with data needed to establish a performance envelope for this material which has been shown to be a cost-effective material for base pipes in sand-control screens. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  18. First epidemiological analysis of breast cancer incidence and tumor characteristics after implementation of population-based digital mammography screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, Stefanie; Heindel, Walter [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Referenzzentrum Mammographie Muenster, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany); Batzler, W.U. [Epidemiologisches Krebsregister, NRW (Germany); Decker, T. [Gerhard-Domagk-Inst. fuer Pathologie und Brust-Screening-Referenzpathologie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany); Hense, H.W. [Inst. fuer Epidemiologie und Sozialmedizin, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to epidemiologically evaluate the impact of digital mammography screening on incidence rates and tumor characteristics for breast cancer. Materials and methods: the first German digital screening units in the clinical routine were evaluated during the implementation period by using data from the cancer registry to compare the incidence rate of breast cancers and prognostic characteristics. 74% of women aged 50-69 within the region of Muenster/Coesfeld/Warendorf were invited between 10/2005 and 12/2007 for initial screening; 55% participated (n = 35961). Results: in 2002-2004 the average breast cancer incidence rate (per 100000) was 297.9. During the implementation of screening, the rate rose to 532.9 in 2007. Of the 349 cancers detected with screening, 76% (265/349) were invasive compared to 90% (546/608) of cases not detected with screening during the same period. 37% (97/265) of cancers detected in the screening program had a diameter of {<=} 10 mm and 75% (198/265) were node-negative compared to 15% (79/546) and 64% (322/503), respectively, in cancers detected outside the screening program. The distribution of invasive tumor size (pT categories) and the nodal status differed with statistical significance between cancers detected in and outside the program (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively). (orig.)

  19. Cost-effective screening of pooled faecal specimens from patients with nosocomial diarrhoea for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vaishnavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clostridium perfringens is a significant cause of nosocomial AAD. The prevalence of C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE-positive stool specimens in hospitalised patients is very low in the Indian setting making the diagnostics very expensive. Therefore, a cost-effective diagnostic approach to screen faecal specimens for CPE was devised. Materials and Methods: Faecal specimens from 540 hospitalised patients with various ailments and from 340 healthy subjects were investigated for CPE. An aliquot of pooled faecal supernatants was made by mixing 100 μl each of 10 specimens to be tested. Each aliquot was investigated for the presence of CPE by an enzyme immunoassay. A repetition of the assay was done with individual specimens of the pooled aliquots from each positive well as seen visually by colour development. Results: Of the 540 patient specimens tested, 405 (75% patients were on antibiotics, the predominant ones being cephalosporins, penicillin, quinolones, aminoglycosides, etc. During the time of sampling, diarrhoea was present in 481 (89%, abdomen pain in 203 (37.6% and fever in 242 (44.8% patients. C. perfringens enterotoxin was positive in nine wells of the 540 pooled test specimens whereas all of the pooled 340 control samples were negative. Repeat of individual specimens comprising the nine wells with positive samples helped to identify the individual patients positive for CPE. Conclusion: Only two CPE kits were needed for a total of 880 faecal specimens tested. The cost-effective diagnostic approach to screen faecal specimens for CPE, as described herein will help to save institutional resources.

  20. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Mobile Ear Screening and Surveillance Service versus an Outreach Screening, Surveillance and Surgical Service for Indigenous Children in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim-Huong Nguyen

    Full Text Available Indigenous Australians experience a high rate of ear disease and hearing loss, yet they have a lower rate of service access and utilisation compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. Screening, surveillance and timely access to specialist ear, nose and throat (ENT services are key components in detecting and preventing the recurrence of ear diseases. To address the low access and utilisation rate by Indigenous Australians, a collaborative, community-based mobile telemedicine-enabled screening and surveillance (MTESS service was trialled in Cherbourg, the third largest Indigenous community in Queensland, Australia. This paper aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the MTESS service using a lifetime Markov model that compares two options: (i the Deadly Ears Program alone (current practice involving an outreach ENT surgical service and screening program, and (ii the Deadly Ears Program supplemented with the MTESS service. Data were obtained from the Deadly Ears Program, a feasibility study of the MTESS service and the literature. Incremental cost-utility ratios were calculated from a societal perspective with both costs (in 2013-14 Australian dollars and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs discounted at 5% annually. The model showed that compared with the Deadly Ears Program, the probability of an acceptable cost-utility ratio at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY was 98% for the MTESS service. This cost effectiveness arises from preventing hearing loss in the Indigenous population and the subsequent reduction in associated costs. Deterministic and probability sensitivity analyses indicated that the model was robust to parameter changes. We concluded that the MTESS service is a cost-effective strategy. It presents an opportunity to resolve major issues confronting Australia's health system such as the inequitable provision and access to quality healthcare for rural and remotes communities, and for Indigenous Australians

  1. Is adding HCV screening to the antenatal national screening program in Amsterdam, the Netherlands cost-effective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, A.; Van Keep, M.; Matser, A.; Rozenbaum, M.; Weegink, C.; Van Den Hoek, A.; Prins, M.; Postma, M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) can lead to severe liver disease. Recently new improved treatment options have been introduced. Pregnant women are already routinely screened for several infectious diseases, however not yet for HCV infection. Here we examine whether adding HCV screeni

  2. Mammography Screening Among African-American Women With a Family History of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    gestalt that emerged was that women’s evaluations of mammography increased, and these results were not due to any differential component of the...transtheoretical approach: Crossing traditional boundaries of therapy . Chicago: Dow Jones/Irwin. 17. Prochaska, J.O., & DiClemente, C.C. (1983). Stages

  3. Mammography Screening in a Large Health System Following the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Heidi D; Weerasinghe, Roshanthi; Wang, Lian; Grunkemeier, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Practice recommendations for mammography screening were issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in 2009 and expansion of insurance coverage was provided under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act soon thereafter, yet the influence of these changes on screening practices in the United States is not known. To determine changes in mammography screening and their associations with new practice recommendations and the Affordable Care Act, we examined patient-level data from 249,803 screening mammograms from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012 in a large community-based health system in the northwestern United States. Associations were determined by an intervention analysis of time-series data method. Among women screened, 64% were age 50-74 years; 84% self-identified as white race; 62% had commercial insurance; and 70% were seen in facilities located in metropolitan areas. Practice recommendations were associated with decreased screening volumes among women age Act was associated with increased screening among women age 50-74 (+184.3 mammograms/month; +7.2% change; P=0.001), but not women Act was associated with increased screening for women with Medicare, Medicaid, or other noncommercial sources of payment. Mammography screening volumes in a large community health system decreased among women age Act were associated with increased screening volumes among women age 50-74.

  4. Performance and Cost-Effectiveness of Computed Tomography Lung Cancer Screening Scenarios in a Population-Based Setting: A Microsimulation Modeling Analysis in Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Ten Haaf

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST results indicate that computed tomography (CT lung cancer screening for current and former smokers with three annual screens can be cost-effective in a trial setting. However, the cost-effectiveness in a population-based setting with >3 screening rounds is uncertain. Therefore, the objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of lung cancer screening in a population-based setting in Ontario, Canada, and evaluate the effects of screening eligibility criteria.This study used microsimulation modeling informed by various data sources, including the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP, Ontario Cancer Registry, smoking behavior surveys, and the NLST. Persons, born between 1940 and 1969, were examined from a third-party health care payer perspective across a lifetime horizon. Starting in 2015, 576 CT screening scenarios were examined, varying by age to start and end screening, smoking eligibility criteria, and screening interval. Among the examined outcome measures were lung cancer deaths averted, life-years gained, percentage ever screened, costs (in 2015 Canadian dollars, and overdiagnosis. The results of the base-case analysis indicated that annual screening was more cost-effective than biennial screening. Scenarios with eligibility criteria that required as few as 20 pack-years were dominated by scenarios that required higher numbers of accumulated pack-years. In general, scenarios that applied stringent smoking eligibility criteria (i.e., requiring higher levels of accumulated smoking exposure were more cost-effective than scenarios with less stringent smoking eligibility criteria, with modest differences in life-years gained. Annual screening between ages 55-75 for persons who smoked ≥40 pack-years and who currently smoke or quit ≤10 y ago yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $41,136 Canadian dollars ($33,825 in May 1, 2015, United States dollars per life-year gained

  5. Prevention, screening and therapy of thyroid diseases and their cost-effectiveness; Praevention, Screening und Therapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen unter dem Aspekt von Kosten und Nutzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Schmidt, M.; Theissen, P.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2003-10-01

    Cost-effectivness analyses focused on benign thyroid diseases are under-represented in the literature. The calculation of costs per additionally gained life year is difficult: The benefit of prevention is shifted into the distant future. The influence of an untreated subclinical thyroid disease on life expectancy can only be demonstrated by a long-term follow-up and by epidemiological databases. Iodine supplementation and programs for the prevention of tobacco smoking (primary prevention) are very cost-effective. Smoking increases the risk both of multinodular goiter and of Graves' disease. Screening programs (secondary prevention) are discussed for the laboratory parameters thyrotropin (TSH), calcium and calcitonin. TSH testing seems to be very cost-effective for epidemiological considerations in a certain lifespan (newborn, pregnancy, postpartal), older persons, hospitalisation due to acute diseases and in persons with previously elevated TPO-antibodies for TSH-values >2 mU/l, but dedicated cost-effectiveness analyses are lacking. On the other hand, the cost-effectiveness of a routine TSH testing beyond the age of 35 years has been shown by a high-quality decision analysis. Therapeutic strategies (tertiary prevention) aim at the avoidance of complications (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and of iatrogenic complications. Examples of a tertiary prevention are: firstly the definitive therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have on increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), secondly the radioiodine therapy for subclinical hyperthyroidism and the radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant comorbidity. Cost-effectiveness analyses for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease were published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a fist line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds

  6. The Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Screening for Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Japan: A Markov Modeling Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tamura

    Full Text Available To investigate the cost-effectiveness of screening and subsequent intervention for age-related macular degeneration (AMD in Japan.The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening and subsequent intervention for AMD were assessed using a Markov model. The Markov model simulation began at the age of 40 years and concluded at the age of 90 years. The first-eye and second-eye combined model assumed an annual state-transition probability, development of prodromal symptoms, choroidal neovascularization (CNV, and reduction in visual acuity. Anti-vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (anti-VEGF intravitreal injection therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT were performed to treat CNV. Intake of supplements was recommended to patients who had prodromal symptoms and unilateral AMD. Data on prevalence, morbidity, transition probability, utility value of each AMD patient, and treatment costs were obtained from published clinical reports.In the base-case analysis, screening for AMD every 5 years, beginning at the age of 50 years, showed a decrease of 41% in the total number of blind patients. The screening program reduced the incidence of blindness more than did the additional intake of supplements. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of screening versus no screening was 27,486,352 Japanese yen (JPY, or 259,942 US dollars (USD per quality-adjusted life year (QALY. In the sensitivity analysis, prodromal symptom-related factors for AMD had great impacts on the cost-effectiveness of screening. The lowest ICER obtained from the best scenario was 4,913,717 JPY (46,470 USD per QALY, which was approximately equal to the willingness to pay in Japan.Ophthalmologic screening for AMD in adults is highly effective in reducing the number of patients with blindness but not cost-effective as demonstrated by a Markov model based on clinical data from Japan.

  7. Direct Interactive Public Education by Breast Radiologists About Screening Mammography: Impact on Anxiety and Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyon; Hardesty, Lara A; Kunzler, Nathan M; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety has been called a "harm" of screening mammography. The authors provided direct, interactive education to lay audiences and measured these sessions' impact on anxiety and any increased understanding of breast cancer screening. Academic breast radiologist provided seven 1-hour sessions of structured lectures and question-and-answer periods. Lay language and radiologic images were used to discuss disease background, screening guidelines, and areas of debate. One hundred seventeen participants (mean age, 45 ± 15 years) completed voluntary, anonymous, institutional review board-approved pre and postsession questionnaires relaying their attitudes regarding screening and the impact of the sessions. Results are summarized descriptively. Mean reported anxiety regarding screening (on a scale ranging from 1-5; 1 = no anxiety) was 2.5 ± 1.3. Anxiety was attributed to unknown results (56.4%), anticipation of pain (21.8%), known risk factors (14.5%), general uncertainty (12.7%), waiting for results (9.1%), possibility of more procedures (3.6%), and personal breast cancer history (3.6%). Ninety-seven percent reported that immediate results would lower anxiety (78% of those women indicated a 75%-100% decrease in anxiety); 93% reported that radiologist consultation with images would lower anxiety (75.6% indicated a 75%-100% decrease in anxiety). After the lecture, women reported (on a scale ranging from 1-5) increased understanding of the topic (4.7 ± 0.6), encouragement to screen (4.6 ± 0.7), and reduced anxiety (4.0 ± 1.1). Ninety-seven percent to 100% provided correct responses to these questions: rationale for screening in the absence of family history, recall does not equate to cancer diagnosis, benefit of prior films, and continued importance of physical examination. Attendees of radiologist-provided direct public lectures reported decreased anxiety and improved knowledge regarding screening mammography. The resultant reduced anxiety ("harm") and educational

  8. Applicability of DNA pools on 500 K SNP microarrays for cost-effective initial screens in genomewide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalkwyk Leonard C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic influences underpinning complex traits are thought to involve multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs of small effect size. Detection of such QTL associations requires systematic screening of large numbers of DNA markers within large sample populations. Using pooled DNA on SNP microarrays to screen for allelic frequency differences between groups such as cases and controls (called SNP Microarray and Pooling, or SNP-MaP has been validated as an efficient solution on both 10 k and 100 k platforms. We demonstrate that this approach can be effectively applied to the truly genomewide Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 500 K Array. Results In comparisons between five independent DNA pools (N ~200 per pool on separate Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 500 K Array sets, we show that, for SNPs with minor allele frequencies > 0.05, the reliability of the rank order of estimated allele frequencies, assessed as the average correlation between allele frequency estimates across the DNA pools, was 0.948 (average mean difference across the five pools = 0.069. Similarly, validity of the SNP-MaP approach was demonstrated by a rank-order correlation of 0.937 (average mean difference = 0.095 between the average DNA pool allele frequency estimates and the allele frequencies of an independent (CEPH sample of 60 unrelated individually genotyped subjects. Conclusion We conclude that SNP-MaP can be extended for use on the Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 500 K Array, providing a cost-effective, reliable and valid initial screen of 500 K SNP microarrays in genomewide association scans.

  9. Cost effectiveness analysis of population-based serology screening and 13C-Urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori to prevent gastric cancer: A markov model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xie; Nan Luo; Hin-Peng Lee

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the costs and effectiveness of no screening and no eradication therapy, the populationbased Hdlicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology screening with eradication therapy and 13C-Urea breath test (UBT)with eradication therapy.METHODS: A tarkov model simulation was carried out in all 237900 Chinese males with age between 35 and 44 from the perspective of the public healthcare provider in Singapore. The main outcome measures were the costs, number of gastric cancer cases prevented, life years saved, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs)gained from screening age to death. The uncertainty surrounding the cost-effectiveness ratio was addressed by one-way sensitivity analyses.RESULTS: Compared to no screening, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $16166 per life year saved or $13571 per QALY gained for the serology screening, and $38792 per life year saved and $32525 per QALY gained for the UBT. The ICER was $477079 per life year saved or $390337 per QALY gained for the UBT compared to the serology screening. The costeffectiveness of serology screening over the UBT was robust to most parameters in the model.CONCLUSION: The population-based serology screening for H pylori was more cost-effective than the UBT in prevention of gastric cancer in Singapore Chinese males.

  10. Resource utilization and cost-effectiveness of counselor- vs. provider-based rapid point-of-care HIV screening in the emergency department.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle P Walensky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Routine HIV screening in emergency department (ED settings may require dedicated personnel. We evaluated the outcomes, costs and cost-effectiveness of HIV screening when offered by either a member of the ED staff or by an HIV counselor. METHODS: We employed a mathematical model to extend data obtained from a randomized clinical trial of provider- vs. counselor-based HIV screening in the ED. We compared the downstream survival, costs, and cost-effectiveness of three HIV screening modalities: 1 no screening program; 2 an ED provider-based program; and 3 an HIV counselor-based program. Trial arm-specific data were used for test offer and acceptance rates (provider offer 36%, acceptance 75%; counselor offer 80%, acceptance 71%. Undiagnosed HIV prevalence (0.4% and linkage to care rates (80% were assumed to be equal between the screening modalities. Personnel costs were derived from trial-based resource utilization data. We examined the generalizability of results by conducting sensitivity analyses on offer and acceptance rates, undetected HIV prevalence, and costs. RESULTS: Estimated HIV screening costs in the provider and counselor arms averaged $8.10 and $31.00 per result received. The Provider strategy (compared to no screening had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $58,700/quality-adjusted life year (QALY and the Counselor strategy (compared to the Provider strategy had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $64,500/QALY. Results were sensitive to the relative offer and acceptance rates by strategy and the capacity of providers to target-screen, but were robust to changes in undiagnosed HIV prevalence and programmatic costs. CONCLUSIONS: The cost-effectiveness of provider-based HIV screening in an emergency department setting compares favorably to other US screening programs. Despite its additional cost, counselor-based screening delivers just as much return on investment as provider based-screening. Investment in

  11. Retrospective analysis on malignant calcification previously misdiagnosed as benign on screening mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Su Min [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Chung Ang University Hospital, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Chae, Eun Young; Choi, Woo Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the morphology and distribution of calcifications initially interpreted as benign or probably benign, but proven to be malignant by subsequent stereotactic biopsy, and to identify the reason for misinterpretation or underestimation at the initial diagnosis. Out of 567 women who underwent stereotactic biopsy for calcifications at our hospital between January 2012 and December 2014, 167 women were diagnosed with malignancy. Forty-six of these 167 women had previous mammography assessed as benign or probably benign which was changed to suspicious malignancy on follow-up mammography. Of these 46 women, three women with biopsy-proven benign calcifications at the site of subsequent cancer were excluded, and 43 patients were finally included. The calcifications (morphology, distribution, extent, associated findings) in the previous and follow-up mammography examinations were analyzed according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon and assessment category. We classified the patients into two groups: 1) group A patients who were still retrospectively re-categorized as less than or equal to BI-RADS 3 and 2) group B patients who were re-categorized as equal to or higher than BI-RADS 4a and whose results should have prompted previous diagnostic assessment. In the follow-up mammography examinations, change in calcification morphology (n = 27, 63%) was the most frequent cause of assessment change. The most frequent previous mammographic findings of malignant calcification were amorphous morphology (n = 26, 60%) and grouped distribution (n = 36, 84%). The most frequent calcification findings at reassessment were amorphous morphology (n = 4, 9%), fine pleomorphic calcification (n = 30, 70%), grouped distribution (n = 23, 53%), and segmental calcification (n = 12, 28%). There were 33 (77%) patients in group A, and 10 patients (23%) in group B. Amorphous morphology and grouped distribution were the most frequent

  12. Breast density as indicator for the use of mammography or MRI to screen women with familial risk for breast cancer (FaMRIsc) : a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saadatmand, Sepideh; Rutgers, Emiel J. T.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Zonderland, Hermien M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Keymeulen, Kristien B. M. I.; Schlooz-Vries, Margreet S.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Verhoef, Cees; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Obdeijn, Inge-Marie; de Koning, Harry J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To reduce mortality, women with a family history of breast cancer often start mammography screening at a younger age than the general population. Breast density is high in over 50% of women younger than 50 years. With high breast density, breast cancer incidence increases, but sensitivit

  13. Why did the breast cancer lymph node status distribution improve in Denmark in the pre-mammography screening period of 1978-1994?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, K.; Vaeth, M.; Rootzen, Helle;

    2010-01-01

    Background. Danish breast cancer patients diagnosed in 1978-1994 experienced a trend over time towards a more favourable distribution of lymph node status at time of diagnosis, which was not due to mammography screening. We investigated how this trend could be explained by patient characteristics...

  14. Design of linear anti-scatter grid geometry with optimum performance for screen-film and digital mammography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodajou-Chokami, H; Sohrabpour, M

    2015-08-01

    A detailed 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the grid geometrical parameters in screen-film mammography (SFM) and digital mammography (DM) systems has been performed. A combination of IEC 60627:2013 international standard conditions and other more clinically relevant parameters were used for this simulation. Accuracy of our results has been benchmarked with previously published data and good agreement has been obtained. Calculations in a wide range of linear anti-scatter grid geometries have been carried out. The evaluated parameters for the SFM system were the Bucky factor (BF) and contrast improvement factor (CIF) and for the DM system it was signal difference-to-noise ratio improvement factor (SIF). The CIF parameter was chosen to be nearly the same as the commercial grade, the BF and SIF were significantly improved compared to commercial grids in use today. Our optimized grid parameters for the SFM system were lead strip thickness d = 12 µm, grid ratio r = 5 and strip density N = 65 lines/cm. And for the DM system these parameters were d = 5 µm, r = 3 and N = 100 lines/cm. Both optimized grid sets have thinner d and higher N compared to the commercial grids.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Different Cervical Screening Strategies in Islamic Republic of Iran: A Middle-Income Country with a Low Incidence Rate of Cervical Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Nahvijou

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical cancer (ICC is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Cervical screening programs have reduced the incidence and mortality rates of ICC. We studied the cost-effectiveness of different cervical screening strategies in the Islamic Republic of Iran, a Muslim country with a low incidence rate of ICC.We constructed an 11-state Markov model, in which the parameters included regression and progression probabilities, test characteristics, costs, and utilities; these were extracted from primary data and the literature. Our strategies included Pap smear screening and human papillomavirus (HPV DNA testing plus Pap smear triaging with different starting ages and screening intervals. Model outcomes included lifetime costs, life years gained, quality-adjusted life years (QALY, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs. One-way sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the stability of the results.We found that the prevented mortalities for the 11 strategies compared with no screening varied from 26% to 64%. The most cost-effective strategy was HPV screening, starting at age 35 years and repeated every 10 years. The ICER of this strategy was $8,875 per QALY compared with no screening. We found that screening at 5-year intervals was also cost-effective based on GDP per capita in Iran.We recommend organized cervical screening with HPV DNA testing for women in Iran, beginning at age 35 and repeated every 10 or 5 years. The results of this study could be generalized to other countries with low incidence rates of cervical cancer.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of the Introduction of Low-dose CT Screening in Japanese Smokers Aged 55 to 74 Years Old

    OpenAIRE

    Tabata, Hiroki; Akita, Tomoyuki; Matsuura, Akiko; Kaishima, Terumi; Matsuoka, Toshihiko; Ohisa, Masayuki; Awai, Kazuo; Tanaka, Junko

    2014-01-01

    The validity of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in heavy smokers was supported by the results of National Lung Screening Trials (NLST) conducted in the U.S.A. The present study investigated the appropriateness of the introduction of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in Japanese smokers aged between 55 and 74 years old, in terms of cost-effectiveness and age. To examine changes in the shift from conventional chest radiography (CR) to low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer, we e...

  17. Differences in Patient Screening Mammography Rates Associated With Internist Gender and Level of Training and Change Following the 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Dawn J

    2016-06-01

    Significant discordance arose between screening mammography clinical practice guidelines published by different national health care organizations following the release of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines in 2009. This allowed for greater interprovider variation in clinical practice while remaining within standard of care. The objective of this study was to determine how differences in patient screening mammography rates between internal medicine physician subgroups defined by gender and level of training changed, if at all, following the release of the new guidelines. The study was an observational study including all internists and internal medicine residents at a single academic medical center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Screening mammography rates were determined for patients of subgroups of internists defined by gender and level of training (attending vs resident physician) for the 2 years before and after the release of the updated screening guidelines. Patients having female attending internists as their primary care provider were more likely to undergo screening mammography than those having male attending or resident internists of either gender both before and after the release of the new guidelines, with the difference in patient screening mammography rates between physician subgroups increasing following their release (rates before and after, respectively, by subgroup: female attending = 67%, 64%; male attending = 56%, 50%; female resident = 58%, 41%; male resident = 55%, 41%; PInternist gender and level of training are associated with differences in patient screening mammography rates at one academic medical center, with these differences increasing following the 2009 USPSTF guidelines. These findings suggest that the correlation between provider gender/level of training and a woman's likelihood of undergoing a screening mammogram strengthened as discordance arose between clinical guidelines published by different

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms based on five year results from a randomised hospital based mass screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.; Juul, Svend; Fasting, Helge

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All 12,639 men born in the years 1921-1933 (aged 64-73) living in Viborg County, Denmark, were randomly allocated either to receive an invitation...... according to complications in patient records. RESULTS: Mean follow-up time was 52 months. 76.6% of invited men attended screening, and 191 (4.0%) had an AAA. As previously reported, the cumulative 5-year AAA-specific mortality in the invited group was significantly reduced by 67% compared to the control...... group (P = 0.003). The costs were estimated to be Euro 11.23 per scan. The costs per life-year saved were Euro 9057 (Euro 5872-20,063) after 5 years, and were expected to decrease to Euro 2708 (Euro 1758-6031) after 10 years and to Euro 1825 (Euro 1185-4063) after 15 years. CONCLUSION: Screening of 64...

  19. Optimal Management Strategies for Primary HPV Testing for Cervical Screening: Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation for the National Cervical Screening Program in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michaela; Lew, Jie-Bin; Hughes, Suzanne; Yuill, Susan; Hammond, Ian; Saville, Marion; Canfell, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Background Several countries are implementing a transition to HPV testing for cervical screening in response to the introduction of HPV vaccination and evidence indicating that HPV screening is more effective than cytology. In Australia, a 2017 transition from 2-yearly conventional cytology in 18–20 to 69 years to 5-yearly primary HPV screening in 25 to 74 years will involve partial genotyping for HPV 16/18 with direct referral to colposcopy for this higher risk group. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal management of women positive for other high-risk HPV types (not 16/18) ('OHR HPV'). Methods We used a dynamic model of HPV transmission, vaccination, natural history and cervical screening to determine the optimal management of women positive for OHR HPV. We assumed cytology triage testing was used to inform management in this group and that those with high-grade cytology would be referred to colposcopy and those with negative cytology would receive 12-month surveillance. For those with OHR HPV and low-grade cytology (considered to be a single low-grade category in Australia incorporating ASC-US and LSIL), we evaluated (1) the 20-year risk of invasive cervical cancer assuming this group are referred for 12-month follow-up vs. colposcopy, and compared this to the risk in women with low-grade cytology under the current program (i.e. an accepted benchmark risk for 12-month follow-up in Australia); (2) the population-level impact of the whole program, assuming this group are referred to 12-month surveillance vs. colposcopy; and (3) the cost-effectiveness of immediate colposcopy compared to 12-month follow-up. Evaluation was performed both for HPV-unvaccinated cohorts and cohorts offered vaccination (coverage ~72%). Findings The estimated 20-year risk of cervical cancer is ≤1.0% at all ages if this group are referred to colposcopy vs. ≤1.2% if followed-up in 12 months, both of which are lower than the ≤2.6% benchmark risk in women with low

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cervical cancer prevention based on a rapid human papillomavirus screening test in a high-risk region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Carol E; Sellors, John; Shi, Ju-Fang; Ma, Li; Qiao, You-lin; Ortendahl, Jesse; O'Shea, Meredith K H; Goldie, Sue J

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of a new, rapid human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA screening test for cervical cancer prevention in the high-risk region of Shanxi, China. Using micro-costing methods, we estimated the resources needed to implement preventive strategies using cervical cytology or HPV-DNA testing, including the Hybrid Capture 2 (hc2) test (QIAGEN Corp., Gaithersburg, MD) and the rapid HPV-DNA careHPV test (QIAGEN). Data were used in a previously published model and empirically calibrated to country-specific epidemiological data. Strategies differed by initial test, targeted age, frequency of screening, number of clinic visits required (1, 2 or 3) and service delivery setting (national, county and township levels). Outcomes included lifetime risk of cancer, years of life saved (YLS), lifetime costs and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (cost per YLS). For all screening frequencies, the most efficient strategy used 2-visit rapid HPV-DNA testing at the county level, including screening and diagnostics in the first visit, and treatment in the second visit. Screening at ages 35, 40 and 45 reduced cancer risk by 50% among women compliant with all 3 screening rounds, and was US$ 150 per YLS, compared with this same strategy applied twice per lifetime. This would be considered very cost-effective evaluated against China's per-capita gross domestic product (US$ 1,702). By enhancing the linkage between screening and treatment through a reduced number of visits, rapid HPV-DNA testing 3 times per lifetime is more effective than traditional cytology, and is likely to be cost-effective in high-risk regions of China.

  1. Manual liquid based cytology in primary screening for cervical cancer--a cost effective preposition for scarce resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandini, N M; Nandish, S M; Pallavi, P; Akshatha, S K; Chandrashekhar, A P; Anjali, S; Dhar, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Conventional pap smear (CPS) examination has been the mainstay for early detection of cervical cancer. However, its widespread use has not been possible due to the inherent limitations, like presence of obscuring blood and inflammation, reducing its sensitivity considerably. Automated methods in use in developed countries may not be affordable in the developing countries due to paucity of resources. On the other hand, manual liquid based cytology (MLBC) is a technique that is cost effective and improves detection of precursor lesions and specimen adequacy. Therefore the aim of the study was to compare the utility of MLBC with that of CPS in cervical cancer screening. A prospective study of 100 cases through MLBC and CPS was conducted from October 2009 to July 2010, in a Medical College in India, by two independent pathologists and correlated with histopathology (22 cases). Morphological features as seen through MLBC and CPS were compared. Subsequently, all the cases were grouped based on cytological diagnosis according to two methods into 10 groups and a subjective comparison was made. In order to compare the validity of MLBC with CPS in case of major diagnoses, sensitivity and specificity of the two methods were estimated considering histological examination as the gold standard. Increased detection rate with MLBC was 150%. The concordance rate by LBC/histopathology v/s CPS/histopathology was also improved (86% vs 77%) The percentage agreement by the two methods was 68%. MLBC was more sensitive in diagnosis of LSIL and more specific in the diagnosis of inflammation. Thus, MLBC was found to be better than CPS in diagnosis of precursor lesions. It provided better morphology with increased detection of abnormalities and preservation of specimen for cell block and ancillary studies like immunocytochemistry and HPV detection. Therefore, it can be used as alternative strategy for cervical cancer prevention in limited resource settings.

  2. A novel case-control design to estimate the extent of over-diagnosis of breast cancer due to organised population-based mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Kerri R; Lynch, John W; Hiller, Janet E; Farshid, Gelareh; Houssami, Nehmat; Duffy, Stephen W; Roder, David M

    2015-03-15

    Debate about the extent of breast cancer over-diagnosis due to mammography screening has continued for over a decade, without consensus. Estimates range from 0 to 54%, but many studies have been criticized for having flawed methodology. In this study we used a novel study design to estimate over-diagnosis due to organised mammography screening in South Australia (SA). To estimate breast cancer incidence at and following screening we used a population-based, age-matched case-control design involving 4,931 breast cancer cases and 22,914 controls to obtain OR for yearly time intervals since women's last screening mammogram. The level of over-diagnosis was estimated by comparing the cumulative breast cancer incidence with and without screening. The former was derived by applying ORs for each time window to incidence rates in the absence of screening, and the latter, by projecting pre-screening incidence rates. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess potential biases. Over-diagnosis was estimated to be 8% (95%CI 2-14%) and 14% (95%CI 8-19%) among SA women aged 45 to 85 years from 2006-2010, for invasive breast cancer and all breast cancer respectively. These estimates were robust when applying various sensitivity analyses, except for adjustment for potential confounding assuming higher risk among screened than non-screened women, which reduced levels of over-diagnosis to 1% (95%CI 5-7%) and 8% (95%CI 2-14%) respectively when incidence rates for screening participants were adjusted by 10%. Our results indicate that the level of over-diagnosis due to mammography screening is modest and considerably lower than many previous estimates, including others for Australia.

  3. Impact of the digitalisation of mammography on performance parameters and breast dose in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Lore; Hauwere, An de; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, QCC-Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Bosmans, Hilde; Lemmens, Kim; Steen, Andre van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Bleyen, Luc; Mortier, Griet; Herck, Koen van [Ghent University, Centrum voor Preventie en Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Kanker, Ghent (Belgium); Limbergen, Erik van [Leuvens Universitair Centrum voor Kankerpreventie, Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Patrick [Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Borstklierkanker vzw, Bruges (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    To investigate the impact of digitalisation on performance parameters and breast dose of the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme. Both computed (CR) and direct radiography (DR) are compared with screen-film mammography (SFM). Data from 975,673 mammographic examinations were collected from units which underwent digitalisation from SFM to CR (41 units) or DR (72 units) in the period 2005-2011. Performance indicators were obtained by consulting the Screening Programme database. Phantom and patient dosimetry data were acquired from the physical technical quality assurance of the programme. Digitalisation induced no significant change in cancer detection rate (CDR), percentage of ductal carcinomas in situ and percentage of breast cancers smaller than 1 cm. A decrease in false-positive results and third readings was observed, which was a time-related observation. After digitalisation, positive predictive value (PPV) increased and recall rates decreased. Compared with SFM, an increase of 30 % in mean glandular dose (MGD) was found for CR, while a similar change in the opposite direction was found for DR. No major differences in performance parameters after digitalisation were found. Transition of SFM to CR resulted in a higher MGD and associated lower detection-over-induction ratio (DIR), while the change to DR induced an improvement of DIR. (orig.)

  4. Interobserver agreement and performance score comparison in quality control using a breast phantom: screen-film mammography vs computed radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Sawaki, Akiko; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2002-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate interobserver agreement and to compare the performance score in quality control of screen-film mammography and computed radiography (CR) using a breast phantom. Eleven radiologists interpreted a breast phantom image (CIRS model X) by four viewing methods: (a) original screen-film; (b) soft-copy reading of the digitized film image; (c) hard-copy reading of CR using an imaging plate; and (d) soft-copy reading of CR. For the soft-copy reading, a 17-in. CRT monitor (1024x1536x8 bits) was used. The phantom image was evaluated using a scoring system outlined in the instruction manual, and observers judged each object using a three-point rating scale: (a) clearly seen; (b) barely seen; and (c) not seen. For statistical analysis, the kappa statistic was employed. For "mass" depiction, interobserver agreement using CR was significantly lower than when using screen-film ( pscore of "microcalcification" on CR hard-copy was significantly lower than on the other three viewing methods ( pfilm or CR, soft-copy or hard-copy) could affect how the phantom image is judged. Paying special attention to viewing conditions is recommended for quality control of CR mammograms.

  5. Application of computer-extracted breast tissue texture features in predicting false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shonket; Choi, Jae Y.; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic texture features have been shown to have value in breast cancer risk assessment. Previous models have also been developed that use computer-extracted mammographic features of breast tissue complexity to predict the risk of false-positive (FP) recall from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. This work details a novel locallyadaptive parenchymal texture analysis algorithm that identifies and extracts mammographic features of local parenchymal tissue complexity potentially relevant for false-positive biopsy prediction. This algorithm has two important aspects: (1) the adaptive nature of automatically determining an optimal number of region-of-interests (ROIs) in the image and each ROI's corresponding size based on the parenchymal tissue distribution over the whole breast region and (2) characterizing both the local and global mammographic appearances of the parenchymal tissue that could provide more discriminative information for FP biopsy risk prediction. Preliminary results show that this locallyadaptive texture analysis algorithm, in conjunction with logistic regression, can predict the likelihood of false-positive biopsy with an ROC performance value of AUC=0.92 (pclinical implications of using prediction models incorporating these texture features may include the future development of better tools and guidelines regarding personalized breast cancer screening recommendations. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate our findings in larger screening populations and evaluate their clinical utility.

  6. Who needs labs and who needs statins? Comparative and cost effectiveness analyses of non-laboratory-based, laboratory-based, and staged primary cardiovascular disease screening guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Ankur; Weinstein, Milton C.; Salomon, Joshua A.; Cutler, David; Gaziano, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors produces significant clinical benefits, but no consensus exists on optimal screening algorithms. This study aimed to evaluate the comparative and cost effectiveness of staged laboratory-based and non-laboratory-based total cardiovascular disease risk assessment. Methods and Results We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and cost-effectiveness modeling methods to compare strategies with and without laboratory components, and using single-stage and multistage algorithms, including approaches based on Framingham risk scores (laboratory-based assessments for all individuals). Analyses were conducted using data from 5,998 adults in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey without history of CVD, using 10-year CVD death as the main outcome. A micro-simulation model projected lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for 60 Framingham-based, non-laboratory-based, and staged screening approaches. Across strategies the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.774–0.780 in men and 0.812–0.834 in women. There were no statistically significant differences in AUC between multistage and Framingham-based approaches. In cost-effectiveness analyses, multistage strategies had ICERs of $52,000/QALY and $83,000/QALY for men and women, respectively. Single-stage/Framingham-based strategies were dominated (higher cost and lower QALYs) or had unattractive ICERs (>$300,000/QALY) compared to single-stage/non-laboratory-based and multistage approaches. Conclusions Non-laboratory-based CVD risk assessment can be useful in primary CVD prevention, as a substitute for laboratory-based assessments or as the initial component of a multistage approach. Cost-effective multistage screening strategies could avoid 25–75% of laboratory testing used in CVD risk screening with predictive power comparable to Framingham risks

  7. Cost-effectiveness of adding vaccination with the AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine to cervical cancer screening in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vokó Zoltán

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cervical cancer screening program implemented in Hungary to date has not been successful. Along with screening, vaccination is an effective intervention to prevent cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of adding vaccination with the human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine to the current cervical cancer screening program in Hungary. Methods We developed a cohort simulation state-transition Markov model to model the life course of 12-year-old girls. Eighty percent participation in the HPV vaccination program at 12 years of age was assumed. Transitional probabilities were estimated using data from the literature. Local data were used regarding screening participation rates, and the costs were estimated in US $. We applied the purchasing power parity exchange rate of 129 HUF/$ to the cost data. Only direct health care costs were considered. We used a 3.7% discount rate for both the cost and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. The time horizon was 88 years. Results Inclusion of HPV vaccination at age 12 in the cervical cancer prevention program was predicted to be cost-effective. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of adding HPV vaccination to the current national cancer screening program was estimated to be 27 588 $/QALY. The results were sensitive to the price of the vaccine, the discount rate, the screening participation rate and whether herd immunity was taken into account. Conclusions Our modeling analysis showed that the vaccination of 12-year-old adolescent girls against cervical cancer with the AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine would be a cost-effective strategy to prevent cervical cancer in Hungary.

  8. Screening mammography: update and review of publications since our report in the New England Journal of Medicine on the magnitude of the problem in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyer, Archie

    2015-08-01

    After a half century of clinical trials, expansive observations, vigorous advocacy and debate, screening mammography could not be in a more controversial condition, especially the potential harm of overdiagnosis. Despite a simple rationale (catch the cancer early and either prevent death or at least decrease the amount of therapy needed for cure), the estimates to date of overdiagnosis rates are conflicting and the interpretations complex. Since the author's 2012 publication in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the peer-reviewed publications on overdiagnosis caused by screening mammography are reviewed and the NEJM analyses updated with three additional calendar years of results. The recent peer-reviewed medical literature on screening mammography induced overdiagnosis of breast cancer has increased exponentially, nearly 10-fold in 10 years. The average estimate of overdiagnosis is about 30%, but the range extends from 0% to 70+%. An update of the NEJM report estimates that in the US, 78,000 women and 30%-31% of those diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 40 years or older during 2011 were overdiagnosed. Until we have better screening procedures that identify who really has cancer and needs to be treated, the risk of overdiagnosis relative to the benefit of screening merits more effective public and professional education. Radiologists, pathologists, and other professionals involved with screening mammography should recognize that the potential harm of overdiagnosis is downplayed or not discussed with the patient and family, despite agreement that the objective is informed choice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness and cost effectiveness of screening immigrants schemes for tuberculosis (TB) on arrival from high TB endemic countries to low TB prevalent countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanneh, A F N S; Al-Shareef, A M

    2014-09-01

    Immigrants to developed countries are a major source of TB. Therefore amongst strategies adopted for TB control in developed countries include; 1) Screening immigrants at ports of entry referred to as "Port of Arrival Screening" (PoA) and 2) Passive screening (PS) for TB which means screening immigrants through general practices, hospitals, chest-clinics and emergency departments. Evidence of the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of these strategies is not consistent. Evaluate efficiency of active PoA TB screening for immigrants from TB endemic-regions compared with Passive Screening of immigrant-populations from TB endemic-regions. Major electronic-databases and reference lists of relevant studies were searched. Experts of immigrants' TB screening were contacted for additional studies published or unpublished. Systematic search of major databases identified only retrospective cohort-studies. Their qualities were assessed using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) methodological checklist for comparative cohort-studies. Systematic electronic searches identified 1443 citations. Of these 74 studies were retrieved for evaluation against the review's inclusion/exclusion criteria (see study inclusion/exclusion criteria). Four studies met the inclusion criteria (figure 2) which were low in the evidence hierarchy of primary effectiveness studies and had heterogeneities between them. Thus descriptive data-synthesis was performed. Proportionately PoA screening had the lowest percentage of receipt of tuberculin skin test (TST) and the highest percentage of non-attendance for TST reading (table 2). Active PoA screening reduced infectiousness by 34% compared to 30% by passive screening and new entrants screened at PoA were 80% less likely to be hospitalised Odds ratio (OR) = 0.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1 - 0.2). [Table: see text]. One cost effectiveness analysis was found that compared the costs of; active PoA screening, general practice screening and

  10. Cost-effectiveness of population-based screening for colorectal cancer: a comparison of guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing, faecal immunochemical testing and flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, L; Tilson, L; Whyte, S; O'Ceilleachair, A; Walsh, C; Usher, C; Tappenden, P; Chilcott, J; Staines, A; Barry, M; Comber, H

    2012-02-28

    Several colorectal cancer-screening tests are available, but it is uncertain which provides the best balance of risks and benefits within a screening programme. We evaluated cost-effectiveness of a population-based screening programme in Ireland based on (i) biennial guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) at ages 55-74, with reflex faecal immunochemical testing (FIT); (ii) biennial FIT at ages 55-74; and (iii) once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG) at age 60. A state-transition model was used to estimate costs and outcomes for each screening scenario vs no screening. A third party payer perspective was adopted. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken. All scenarios would be considered highly cost-effective compared with no screening. The lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER vs no screening euro 589 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained) was found for FSIG, followed by FIT euro 1696) and gFOBT (euro 4428); gFOBT was dominated. Compared with FSIG, FIT was associated with greater gains in QALYs and reductions in lifetime cancer incidence and mortality, but was more costly, required considerably more colonoscopies and resulted in more complications. Results were robust to variations in parameter estimates. Population-based screening based on FIT is expected to result in greater health gains than a policy of gFOBT (with reflex FIT) or once-only FSIG, but would require significantly more colonoscopy resources and result in more individuals experiencing adverse effects. Weighing these advantages and disadvantages presents a considerable challenge to policy makers.

  11. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress...

  12. Risk of breast cancer after false-positive test results in screening mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Risør, Louise Madeleine; Thorsted, Brian Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Screening for disease in healthy people inevitably leads to some false-positive tests in disease-free individuals. Normally, women with false-positive screening tests for breast cancer are referred back to routine screening. However, the long-term outcome for women with false-positive tests is un...

  13. In situ and invasive carcinoma identified through an opportunistic screening mammography in asymptomatic women of Mexico City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Reynoso-Noverón

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the mammographic findings and carcinoma detection rate in asymptomatic women of Mexico City, that participated in an opportunistic screening program. Materials and methods. 39 491 participants were included, with mammograms performed and interpreted in the National Cancer Institute, from 2008 to 2011. The mammographic findings, type of lesion and true positives (TP, are described by age groups. We calculated the crude effect of age on the classification BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 0 and the type of lesion. Results. The median age was 50 (45-57 years. 80.5% were classified as BIRADS 2, 11.4%(0, 4.1%(1, 3.5%(3, 0.5%(4 y 0.1%(5. Malignant lesions were detected in 1.3 and 3.3 per 1000 and the proportion of true positives (TP was 8.2% and 20.6%, in women of 41-50 and 51-70 years, respectively. Conclusions. Although some cases are detected in women 40 to 50 years, in women over 50 years the screening by mammography is more efficient, with a higher proportion of cases detected and fewer false positives.

  14. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of stroke prevention through community screening for atrial fibrillation using iPhone ECG in pharmacies. The SEARCH-AF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowres, Nicole; Neubeck, Lis; Salkeld, Glenn; Krass, Ines; McLachlan, Andrew J; Redfern, Julie; Bennett, Alexandra A; Briffa, Tom; Bauman, Adrian; Martinez, Carlos; Wallenhorst, Christopher; Lau, Jerrett K; Brieger, David B; Sy, Raymond W; Freedman, S Ben

    2014-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) causes a third of all strokes, but often goes undetected before stroke. Identification of unknown AF in the community and subsequent anti-thrombotic treatment could reduce stroke burden. We investigated community screening for unknown AF using an iPhone electrocardiogram (iECG) in pharmacies, and determined the cost-effectiveness of this strategy.Pharmacists performedpulse palpation and iECG recordings, with cardiologist iECG over-reading. General practitioner review/12-lead ECG was facilitated for suspected new AF. An automated AF algorithm was retrospectively applied to collected iECGs. Cost-effectiveness analysis incorporated costs of iECG screening, and treatment/outcome data from a United Kingdom cohort of 5,555 patients with incidentally detected asymptomatic AF. A total of 1,000 pharmacy customers aged ≥65 years (mean 76 ± 7 years; 44% male) were screened. Newly identified AF was found in 1.5% (95% CI, 0.8-2.5%); mean age 79 ± 6 years; all had CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2. AF prevalence was 6.7% (67/1,000). The automated iECG algorithm showed 98.5% (CI, 92-100%) sensitivity for AF detection and 91.4% (CI, 89-93%) specificity. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of extending iECG screening into the community, based on 55% warfarin prescription adherence, would be $AUD5,988 (€3,142; $USD4,066) per Quality Adjusted Life Year gained and $AUD30,481 (€15,993; $USD20,695) for preventing one stroke. Sensitivity analysis indicated cost-effectiveness improved with increased treatment adherence.Screening with iECG in pharmacies with an automated algorithm is both feasible and cost-effective. The high and largely preventable stroke/thromboembolism risk of those with newly identified AF highlights the likely benefits of community AF screening. Guideline recommendation of community iECG AF screening should be considered.

  15. Clinical relevance and cost-effectiveness of HLA genotyping in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in screening for coeliac disease in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, J; Hoorweg-Nijman, J J G; Balemans, W A

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the clinical relevance and cost-effectiveness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-genotyping in the Netherlands as a screening tool for the development of coeliac disease in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. A retrospective analysis was performed in 110 children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus diagnosed between January 1996 and January 2013. All children were screened for coeliac disease using coeliac disease-specific antibodies and HLA genotyping was performed in all children. One hundred and ten children were screened for coeliac disease, and coeliac disease could be confirmed in seven. Eighty-six per cent of the children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus had one of the variants of HLA-DQ2.5 and DQ8. HLA genotypes observed in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus children and coeliac disease were heterozygote DQ2.5, homozygote DQ2.5 and heterozygote DQ2.5/DQ8. HLA genotyping in coeliac disease screening in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus is more expensive than screening for coeliac disease with antibodies alone (€326 vs. €182 per child). The risk of coeliac disease development in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus is increased when they are heterozygote DQ2.5/DQ8, homozygote or heterozygote DQ2.5. The implementation of HLA genotyping as a first-line screening tool has to be reconsidered because it is not distinctive or cost-effective. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  16. Pain and discomfort during mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Absetz-Ylöstalo, P; Eerola, T

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate associations of mammography pain and discomfort with sociodemographics, personal history and psychological and situational factors. Subjects were women with a negative screening finding (n = 883) from a random sample of 50-year-old Finnish women...... was the most powerful factor explaining pain and discomfort among women with earlier mammography. However, it had no effect among women without earlier mammography, for whom screening-related nervousness and perceptions of staff were crucial. Suggested interventions include better information before screening...

  17. Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Hypertension Screening and Treatment in Adults with Hypertension in Rural Nigeria in the Context of a Health Insurance Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole T A Rosendaal

    Full Text Available High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for death and disability in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. We evaluated the costs and cost-effectiveness of hypertension care provided within the Kwara State Health Insurance (KSHI program in rural Nigeria.A Markov model was developed to assess the costs and cost-effectiveness of population-level hypertension screening and subsequent antihypertensive treatment for the population at-risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD within the KSHI program. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY averted in the KSHI scenario compared to no access to hypertension care. We used setting-specific and empirically-collected data to inform the model. We defined two strategies to assess eligibility for antihypertensive treatment based on 1 presence of hypertension grade 1 and 10-year CVD risk of >20%, or grade 2 hypertension irrespective of 10-year CVD risk (hypertension and risk based strategy and 2 presence of hypertension in combination with a CVD risk of >20% (risk based strategy. We generated 95% confidence intervals around the primary outcome through probabilistic sensitivity analysis. We conducted one-way sensitivity analyses across key model parameters and assessed the sensitivity of our results to the performance of the reference scenario.Screening and treatment for hypertension was potentially cost-effective but the results were sensitive to changes in underlying assumptions with a wide range of uncertainty. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the first and second strategy respectively ranged from US$ 1,406 to US$ 7,815 and US$ 732 to US$ 2,959 per DALY averted, depending on the assumptions on risk reduction after treatment and compared to no access to antihypertensive treatment.Hypertension care within a subsidized private health insurance program may be cost-effective in rural Nigeria and public-private partnerships such as the KSHI program may provide opportunities

  18. Decision-analytic modeling to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HPV-DNA testing in primary cervical cancer screening in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krämer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persistent infections with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV are associated with the development of cervical neoplasia. Compared to cytology HPV testing is more sensitive in detecting high-grade cervical cancer precursors, but with lower specificity. HPV based primary screening for cervical cancer is currently discussed in Germany. Decisions should be based on a systematic evaluation of the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HPV based primary screening. Research questions: What is the long-term clinical effectiveness (reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer and death due to cervical cancer, life years gained of HPV testing and what is the cost-effectiveness in Euro per life year gained (LYG of including HPV testing in primary cervical cancer screening in the German health care context? How can the screening program be improved with respect to test combination, age at start and end of screening and screening interval and which recommendations should be made for the German health care context? Methods: A previously published and validated decision-analytic model for the German health care context was extended and adapted to the natural history of HPV infection and cervical cancer in order to evaluate different screening strategies that differ by screening interval, and tests, including cytology alone, HPV testing alone or in combination with cytology, and HPV testing with cytology triage for HPV-positive women. German clinical, epidemiological and economic data were used. In the absence of individual data, screening adherence was modelled independently from screening history. Test accuracy data were retrieved from international meta-analyses. Predicted outcomes included reduction in lifetime-risk for cervical cancer cases and deaths, life expectancy, lifetime costs, and discounted incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER. The perspective of the third party payer and 3% annual discount rate were

  19. An observer study for a computer-aided reading protocol (CARP) in the screening environment for digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Paymann; Deshpande, Ruchi; Sayre, Jim; Messer, Ellen; Gupte, Sangeeta; Romsdahl, Harlan; Hasegawa, Akira; Liu, Brent J

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate improving work flow efficiency by shortening the reading time of digital mammograms using a computer-aided reading protocol (CARP) in the screening environment and to increase detection sensitivity using CARP, compared to the current protocol, commonly referred to as the quadrant view (QV). A total of 200 cases were selected for a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) study to evaluate two image display work flows, CARP and QV, in the screening environment. A Web-based tool was developed for scoring, reporting, and statistical analysis. Cases were scored for and stratified by difficulty. A total of six radiologists of differing levels of training ranging from dedicated mammographers to senior radiology residents participated. Each was timed while interpreting the 200 cases in groups of 50, first using QV and then, after a washout period, using CARP. The data were analyzed using ROC and κ analysis. Interpretation times were also assessed. Using QV, readers' average area under the ROC curve was 0.68 (range, 0.54-0.73). Using CARP, readers' average area under the ROC curve was 0.71 (range, 0.66-0.75). There was no statistically significant difference in reader performance using either work flow. However, there was a statistically significant reduction in the average interpretation time of negative cases from 64.7 seconds using QV to 58.8 seconds using CARP. CARP determines the display order of regions of interest depending on computer-aided detection findings. This is a variation of traditional computer-aided detection for digital mammography that has the potential to reduce interpretation times of studies with negative findings without significantly affecting sensitivity, thus allowing improved work flow efficiency in the screening environment, in which, in most settings, the majority of cases are negative. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of opportunistic screening and minimal contact psychotherapy to prevent depression in primary care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van den Berg (Merlijn); F. Smit (Filip); T. Vos (Theo); P.H.M. van Baal (Pieter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Depression causes a large burden of disease worldwide. Effective prevention has the potential to reduce that burden considerably. This study aimed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of minimal contact psychotherapy, based on Lewinsohn's 'Coping with depression' course, tar

  1. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracheboud, J.; Otto, S.J.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Broeders, M.J.M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Koning, H.J. de

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The Netherlands Can

  2. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fracheboud (Jacques); S.J. Otto (Suzie); J.A.A.M. van Dijck; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The Net

  3. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fracheboud (Jacques); S.J. Otto (Suzie); J.A.A.M. van Dijck; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The

  4. Blinded double reading yields a higher programme sensitivity than non-blinded double reading at digital screening mammography: a prospected population based study in the south of The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompenhouwer, E.G.; Voogd, A.C.; Heeten, GJ. den; Strobbe, L.J.A.; Haan, A.F.J. de; Wauters, C.A.; Broeders, M.J.; Duijm, L.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively determine the screening mammography outcome at blinded and non-blinded double reading in a biennial population based screening programme in the south of the Netherlands. METHODS: We included a consecutive series of 87,487 digital screening mammograms, obtained between July

  5. Breast cancer risk after diagnosis by screening mammography of nonproliferative or proliferative benign breast disease: a study from a population-based screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Xavier; Domingo, Laia; Corominas, Josep María; Torá-Rocamora, Isabel; Quintana, María Jesús; Baré, Marisa; Vidal, Carmen; Natal, Carmen; Sánchez, Mar; Saladié, Francina; Ferrer, Joana; Vernet, Mar; Servitja, Sonia; Rodríguez-Arana, Ana; Roman, Marta; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Sala, María

    2015-01-01

    Benign breast disease increases the risk of breast cancer. This association has scarcely been evaluated in the context of breast cancer screening programs although it is a prevalent finding in mammography screening. We assessed the association of distinct categories of benign breast disease and subsequent risk of breast cancer, as well as the influence of a family history of breast cancer. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 545,171 women aged 50-69 years biennially screened for breast cancer in Spain. The median of follow-up was 6.1 years. The age-adjusted rate ratio (RR) of breast cancer for women with benign breast disease, histologically classified into nonproliferative and proliferative disease with and without atypia, compared with women without benign breast disease was estimated by Poisson regression analysis. A stratified analysis by family history of breast cancer was performed in a subsample. All tests were two-sided. The age-adjusted RR of breast cancer after diagnosis of benign breast disease was 2.51 (95 % CI: 2.14-2.93) compared with women without benign breast disease. The risk was higher in women with proliferative disease with atypia (RR = 4.56, 95 % CI: 2.06-10.07) followed by those with proliferative disease without atypia (RR = 3.58; 95 % CI = 2.61-4.91). Women with nonproliferative disease and without a family history of breast cancer remained also at increased risk of cancer (OR = 2.23, 95 % CI: 1.86-2.68). An increased risk of breast cancer was observed among screening participants with proliferative or nonproliferative benign breast disease, regardless of a family history of breast cancer. This information may be useful to explore risk-based screening strategies.

  6. Cost effectiveness of intermittent screening followed by treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy in West Africa: analysis and modelling of results from a non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Silke; Sicuri, Elisa; Halimatou, Diawara; Akazili, James; Boiang, Kalifa; Chandramohan, Daniel; Coulibaly, Sheikh; Diawara, Sory Ibrahim; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ter Kuile, Feiko; Magnussen, Pascal; Tagbor, Harry; Williams, John; Woukeu, Arouna; Cairns, Matthew; Greenwood, Brian; Hanson, Kara

    2016-09-23

    Emergence of high-grade sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in parts of Africa has led to growing concerns about the efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) with SP. The incremental cost-effectiveness of intermittent screening and treatment (ISTp) with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative strategy to IPTp-SP was estimated followed by a simulation of the effects on cost-effectiveness of decreasing efficacy of IPTp-SP due to SP resistance. The analysis was based on results from a multi-centre, non-inferiority trial conducted in West Africa. A decision tree model was analysed from a health provider perspective. Model parameters for all trial countries with appropriate ranges and distributions were used in a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Simulations were performed in hypothetical cohorts of 1000 pregnant women who received either ISTp-AL or IPTp-SP. In addition a cost-consequences analysis was conducted. Trial estimates were used to calculate disability-adjusted-life-years (DALYs) for low birth weight and severe/moderate anaemia (both shown to be non-inferior for ISTp-AL) and clinical malaria (inferior for ISTp-AL). Cost estimates were obtained from observational studies, health facility costings and public procurement databases. Results were calculated as incremental cost per DALY averted. Finally, the cost-effectiveness changes with decreasing SP efficacy were explored by simulation. Relative to IPTp-SP, delivering ISTp-AL to 1000 pregnant women cost US$ 4966.25 more (95 % CI US$ 3703.53; 6376.83) and led to a small excess of 28.36 DALYs (95 % CI -75.78; 134.18), with LBW contributing 81.3 % of this difference. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -175.12 (95 % CI -1166.29; 1267.71) US$/DALY averted. Simulations show that cost-effectiveness of ISTp-AL increases as the efficacy of IPTp-SP decreases, though the specific threshold at which ISTp-AL becomes cost-effective depends on assumptions

  7. Does the Neighborhood Area of Residence Influence Non-Attendance in an Urban Mammography Screening Program? A Multilevel Study in a Swedish City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerlund, Magdalena; Merlo, Juan; Vicente, Raquel Pérez; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim The public health impact of population-based mammography screening programs depends on high participation rates. Thus, monitoring participation rates, as well as understanding and considering the factors influencing attendance, is important. With the goal to acquire information on the appropriate level of intervention for increasing screening participation our study aimed to (1) examine whether, over and above individual factors, the neighborhood of residence influences a woman’s mammography non-attendance, and (2) evaluate, whether knowing a woman’s neighborhood of residence would be sufficient to predict non-attendance. Methods We analyze all women invited to mammography screening in 2005–09, residing in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Information regarding mammography screening attendance was linked to data on area of residence, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics available from Statistics Sweden. The influence of individual and neighborhood factors was assessed by multilevel logistic regression analysis with 29,901 women nested within 212 neighborhoods. Results The prevalence of non-attendance among women was 18.3%. After adjusting for individual characteristics, the prevalence in the 212 neighborhoods was 3.6%. Neighborhood of residence had little influence on non-attendance. The multilevel analysis indicates that 8.4% of the total individual differences in the propensity of non-attendance were at the neighborhood level. However, when adjusting for specific individual characteristics this general contextual effect decreased to 1.8%. This minor effect was explained by the sociodemographic characteristic of the neighborhoods. The discriminatory accuracy of classifying women according to their non-attendance was 0.747 when considering only individual level variables, and 0.760 after including neighborhood level as a random effect. Conclusion Our results suggest that neighborhoods of residence in Malmö, Sweden (as defined by small

  8. Level and distribution of the radiation dose to the population from a mammography screening programme in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, S.M.; Nicoll, J.J. [Otago Univ., Dunedin (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    The Otago Southland Breast Screening Programme offers biennial mammography to 19,000 eligible women on the South Island of New Zealand. A Quality Assurance programme ensures that international performance standards are met, in particular the radiation dose for a mammogram of 5 cm CIRS-X phantom is 1.7 mGy and careful retake analysis undertaken. This however does not reveal the absorbed dose received by individuals, nor how this varies between individuals. Machine parameters and compressed breast thickness for each film were recorded for 310 women who attended one centre during the three months ending February 1993 and absorbed doses calculated using Monte Carlo data. The mean compressed breast thickness for the 310 women was 4.9 cm, doses received for individual films ranged from 0.7 to 8.5 mGy while patient total doses were in the range 4 to 29 mGy with 75% of women receiving a dose of 7.1 mGy or less. (Author).

  9. The cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment for hepatitis C in prisons in England and Wales: a cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, A J; Edmunds, W J; Sweeting, M J; Gill, O N

    2008-11-01

    Prisoners have a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection compared with the general population in England and Wales and in many locations throughout the world. This is because of large numbers of injecting drug users that engage in behaviours likely to transmit HCV being present within prison populations. It is, therefore, suggested that prison may be an appropriate location for HCV screening and treatment to be administered. Using cost-utility analysis, this study considers the costs and benefits of administering a single round of screening on reception into prison to all individuals followed by possible later screening in the community and comparing this to individuals who may only be tested and treated in the community at a later date. The cost/QALY of one round of prison testing and treatment was found to be 54,852 pounds sterling, although probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed extensive uncertainty about this estimate. One-way sensitivity analysis revealed the importance of the parameters describing the progression of chronic HCV and the discount rates. While the results presented here at baseline would suggest that screening and treatment for HCV in prisons is not cost-effective, these results are subject to much uncertainty. The importance of the rates describing the progression of chronic HCV on the cost-effectiveness of this intervention has been demonstrated and this suggests that future work should be undertaken to gain further insight into the rates that individuals progress to the later stages of chronic HCV infection.

  10. Applying the Fuzzy Delphi Method for determining socio-ecological factors that influence adherence to mammography screening in rural areas of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lezama, Ana Paola; Cavazos-Arroyo, Judith; Albavera-Hernández, Cidronio

    2014-02-01

    In Mexico, regular participation in mammography screening is low, despite higher survival rates. The objective of our research is to highlight healthcare procedures to be optimized and target areas to encourage investment and to raise awareness about the benefits of early diagnosis. Those socio-ecological factors (community, interpersonal and individual) were collected through a review of literature and based on the spatial interaction model of mammography use developed by Mobley et al. The opinion of diverse groups of experts on the importance of those factors was collected by survey. The Fuzzy Delphi Method helped to solve the inherent uncertainty of the survey process. Our findings suggest that population health behaviors, proximity-density to facilities/ physicians and predisposing factors are needed to increase the screening rate. Variations in expert group size could affect the accuracy of the conclusions. However, the application of the enhanced aggregation method provided a group consensus that is less susceptible to misinterpretation and that weighs the opinion of each expert according to their clinical experience in mammography research.

  11. Perinatal HIV transmission and the cost-effectiveness of screening at 14 weeks gestation, at the onset of labour and the rapid testing of infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves Nicholas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventing HIV transmission is a worldwide public health issue. Vertical transmission of HIV from a mother can be prevented with diagnosis and treatment, but screening incurs cost. The U.S. Virgin Islands follows the mainland policy on antenatal screening for HIV even though HIV prevalence is higher and rates of antenatal care are lower. This leads to many cases of vertically transmitted HIV. A better policy is required for the U.S. Virgin Islands. Methods The objective of this research was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of relevant HIV screening strategies for the antenatal population in the U.S. Virgin Islands. An economic model was used to evaluate the incremental costs and incremental health benefits of nine different combinations of perinatal HIV screening strategies as compared to existing practice from a societal perspective. Three opportunities for screening were considered in isolation and in combination: by 14 weeks gestation, at the onset of labor, or of the infant after birth. The main outcome measure was the cost per life year gained (LYG. Results Results indicate that all strategies would produce benefits and save costs. Universal screening by 14 weeks gestation and screening the infant after birth is the recommended strategy, with cost savings of $1,122,787 and health benefits of 310 LYG. Limitations include the limited research on the variations in screening acceptance of screening based on specimen sample, race and economic status. The benefits of screening after 14 weeks gestation but before the onset of labor were also not addressed. Conclusion This study highlights the benefits of offering screening at different opportunities and repeat screening and raises the question of generalizing these results to other countries with similar characteristics.

  12. Gold silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN): an imaging probe for breast cancer screening with dual-energy mammography or computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naha, Pratap C.; Lau, Kristen C.; Hsu, Jessica C.; Hajfathalian, Maryam; Mian, Shaameen; Chhour, Peter; Uppuluri, Lahari; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Cormode, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. DEM and computed tomography (CT) phantom imaging showed that GSAN produced robust contrast that was comparable to silver alone. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage results revealed that the formulations with 30% or higher gold content are cytocompatible to Hep G2 and J774A.1 cells. In vivo imaging was performed in mice with and without breast tumors. The results showed that GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast and accumulated in tumors. Furthermore, both in vivo imaging and ex vivo analysis indicated the excretion of GSAN via both urine and feces. In summary, GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast, and has potential for both blood pool imaging and for breast cancer screening.Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various

  13. Development of a model to assess the cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes mellitus screening and lifestyle change for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Marseille, Elliot; Kahn, James G

    2011-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasingly recognized as an opportunity for early prevention of diabetes and other diseases over the lifespan, and may be responsible for up to 30% of cases of type 2 diabetes. A newly developed mathematical model (the GDModel) provides provisional estimates of the cost and health impact of various GDM screening and management choices, and calculates averted disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). The model was piloted in 5 different healthcare facilities in India and Israel. Universal screening of pregnant women followed by postpartum lifestyle management yielded net savings of US$78 per woman with GDM in India and US$1945 per woman in Israel. The estimated DALYs averted were 2.33 in India and 3.10 in Israel. With lower GDM prevalence, intervention efficacy, and type 2 diabetes incidence, the intervention had a net cost in India, with a cost per DALY averted of US$11.32. This was far below the WHO definition of "very cost-effective," set at annual GDP per capita. The intervention in Israel remained cost-saving. GDM screening and postpartum lifestyle management are either cost-saving or have a net cost but an attractive cost-effectiveness ratio. Some input values are currently being refined. Nevertheless, the current findings of cost-savings or favorable cost-effectiveness are robust to a wide range of plausible input values, including highly unfavorable values. The GDModel will be further developed into a user-friendly tool that can guide policy-makers on decisions regarding GDM screening strategies and guidelines.

  14. Cancer screening with digital mammography for women at average risk for breast cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for women at high risk: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to determine the effectiveness of 2 separate modalities, digital mammography (DM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), relative to film mammography (FM), in the screening of women asymptomatic for breast cancer. A third analysis assesses the effectiveness and safety of the combination of MRI plus mammography (MRI plus FM) in screening of women at high risk. An economic analysis was also conducted. How does the sensitivity and specificity of DM compare to FM?How does the sensitivity and specificity of MRI compare to FM?How do the recall rates compare among these screening modalities, and what effect might this have on radiation exposure? What are the risks associated with radiation exposure?How does the sensitivity and specificity of the combination of MRI plus FM compare to either MRI or FM alone?What are the economic considerations? The effectiveness of FM with respect to breast cancer mortality in the screening of asymptomatic average- risk women over the age of 50 has been established. However, based on a Medical Advisory Secretariat review completed in March 2006, screening is not recommended for women between the ages of 40 and 49 years. Guidelines published by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Care recommend mammography screening every 1 to 2 years for women aged 50 years and over, hence, the inclusion of such women in organized breast cancer screening programs. In addition to the uncertainty of the effectiveness of mammography screening from the age of 40 years, there is concern over the risks associated with mammographic screening for the 10 years between the ages of 40 and 49 years. The lack of effectiveness of mammography screening starting at the age of 40 years (with respect to breast cancer mortality) is based on the assumption that the ability to detect cancer decreases with increased breast tissue density. As breast density is highest in the premenopausal years (approximately 23% of postmenopausal and 53% of

  15. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation s

  16. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, Truuske

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation s

  17. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, Truuske

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation

  18. BMI and breast cancer prognosis benefit: mammography screening reveals differences between normal weight and overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Amore, Alfonso; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Giudice, Aldo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Montella, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    Few studies are available on the potential impact of body weight on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected patients. Moreover, it is not known whether body mass index (BMI) could have a different prognostic impact in screen-detected versus symptomatic breast cancer patients. To investigate these unsolved issues, we carried out a retrospective study evaluating the effect of BMI on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected vs symptomatic breast cancer patients. We conducted a follow-up study on 448 women diagnosed with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer. Patients were categorized according to their BMI as normal weight, overweight and obese. Disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and BMI curves were compared according to mode of cancer detection. Among screen-detected patients, higher BMI was associated with a significant lower DFS, whereas no significant difference was observed among symptomatic patients. OS showed similar results. In the multivariate analysis adjusting for age, education, tumor size, nodal status, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and menopausal status, the risk for high level of BMI among screen-detected patients did not reach the statistical significance for either recurrence or survival. Our study highlights the potential impact of high bodyweight in breast cancer prognosis, the findings confirm that obesity plays a role in women breast cancer prognosis independently from diagnosis mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prospective trial comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) versus combined FFDM and tomosynthesis in a population-based screening programme using independent double reading with arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaane, Per; Bandos, Andriy I; Gullien, Randi; Eben, Ellen B; Ekseth, Ulrika; Haakenaasen, Unni; Izadi, Mina; Jebsen, Ingvild N; Jahr, Gunnar; Krager, Mona; Hofvind, Solveig

    2013-08-01

    To compare double readings when interpreting full field digital mammography (2D) and tomosynthesis (3D) during mammographic screening. A prospective, Ethical Committee approved screening study is underway. During the first year 12,621 consenting women underwent both 2D and 3D imaging. Each examination was independently interpreted by four radiologists under four reading modes: Arm A-2D; Arm B-2D + CAD; Arm C-2D + 3D; Arm D-synthesised 2D + 3D. Examinations with a positive score by at least one reader were discussed at an arbitration meeting before a final management decision. Paired double reading of 2D (Arm A + B) and 2D + 3D (Arm C + D) were analysed. Performance measures were compared using generalised linear mixed models, accounting for inter-reader performance heterogeneity (P reading radiologists detected 27 additional invasive cancers (P reading of 2D + 3D significantly improves the cancer detection rate in mammography screening. • Tomosynthesis-based screening was successfully implemented in a large prospective screening trial. • Double reading of tomosynthesis-based examinations significantly reduced false-positive interpretations. • Double reading of tomosynthesis significantly increased the detection of invasive cancers.

  20. Evaluation of primary HPV-DNA testing in relation to visual inspection methods for cervical cancer screening in rural China: an epidemiologic and cost-effectiveness modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Yoon-Jung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new lower-cost rapid-throughput human papillomavirus (HPV test (careHPV, Qiagen, Gaithersburg, USA has been shown to have high sensitivity for the detection of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Methods We assessed the outcomes and cost-effectiveness of careHPV screening in rural China, compared to visual inspection with acetic acid, when used alone (VIA or in combination with Lugol's iodine (VIA/VILI. Using data on sexual behaviour, test accuracy, diagnostic practices and costs from studies performed in rural China, we estimated the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER and associated lifetime outcomes for once-lifetime and twice-lifetime screening strategies, and for routine screening at 5-yearly, 10-yearly and IARC-recommended intervals. The optimal age range for once-lifetime screening was also assessed. Results For all strategies, the relative ordering of test technologies in reducing cervical cancer incidence and mortality was VIA (least effective; VIA/VILI; careHPV@1.0 pg/ml and careHPV@0.5 pg/ml (most effective. For once-lifetime strategies, maximum effectiveness was achieved if screening occurred between 35-50 years. Assuming a participation rate of ~70%, once-lifetime screening at age 35 years would reduce cancer mortality by 8% (for VIA to 12% (for careHPV@0.5 over the long term, with a CER of US$557 (for VIA to $959 (for careHPV@1.0 per life year saved (LYS compared to no intervention; referenced to a 2008 GDP per capita in Shanxi Province of $2,975. Correspondingly, regular screening with an age-standardised participation rate of 62% (which has been shown to be achievable in this setting would reduce cervical cancer mortality by 19-28% (for 10-yearly screening to 43-54% (using IARC-recommended intervals, with corresponding CERs ranging from $665 (for 10-yearly VIA to $2,269 (for IARC-recommended intervals using careHPV@1.0 per LYS. Conclusions This modelled analysis suggests that primary careHPV screening

  1. What is the most cost-effective strategy to screen for second primary colorectal cancers in male cancer survivors in Korea?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Min Park; Sun-Young Kim; Craig C Earle; Seung-Yong Jeong; Young Ho Yun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify a cost-effective strategy of second primary colorectal cancer (CRC) screening for cancer survivors in Korea using a decision-analytic model.METHODS: A Markov model estimated the clinical and economic consequences of a simulated 50-year-old male cancer survivors' cohort, and we compared the results of eight screening strategies: no screening, fecal occult blood test (FOBT) annually, FOBT every2 years, sigmoidoscopy every 5 years, double contrast barium enema every 5 years, and colonoscopy every 10 years (COL10), every 5 years (COL5), and every3 years (COL3). We included only direct medical costs, and our main outcome measures were discountedlifetime costs, life expectancy, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER).RESULTS: In the base-case analysis, the non-dominated strategies in cancer survivors were COL5, and COL3. The ICER for COL3 in cancer survivors was $5593/life-year saved (LYS), and did not exceed $10000/LYS in one-way sensitivity analyses. If the risk of CRC in cancer survivors is at least two times higher than that in the general population, COL5 had an ICER of less than $10500/LYS among both good and poor prognosis of index cancer. If the age of cancer survivors starting CRC screening was decreased to 40 years, the ICER of COL5 was less than $7400/LYS regardless of screening compliance.CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that more strict and frequent recommendations for colonoscopy such as COL5 and COL3 could be considered as economically reasonable second primary CRC screening strategies for Korean male cancer survivors.

  2. Increase in perceived case suspiciousness due to local contrast optimisation in digital screening mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Roelant; Schuur, Klaas H. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, P.O. Box 6873, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Veldkamp, Wouter J.H.; Bun, Petra A.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, P.O. Box 6873, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Beijerinck, David; Deurenberg, Jan J.M. [Centre/Mid-West, Utrecht (Netherlands); Imhof-Tas, Mechli W.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Karssemeijer, Nico [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Heeten, Gerard J. den [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, P.O. Box 6873, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Academical Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Broeders, Mireille J.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, P.O. Box 6873, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    To determine the influence of local contrast optimisation on diagnostic accuracy and perceived suspiciousness of digital screening mammograms. Data were collected from a screening region in the Netherlands and consisted of 263 digital screening cases (153 recalled,110 normal). Each case was available twice, once processed with a tissue equalisation (TE) algorithm and once with local contrast optimisation (PV). All cases had digitised previous mammograms. For both algorithms, the probability of malignancy of each finding was scored independently by six screening radiologists. Perceived case suspiciousness was defined as the highest probability of malignancy of all findings of a radiologist within a case. Differences in diagnostic accuracy of the processing algorithms were analysed by comparing the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (A{sub z}). Differences in perceived case suspiciousness were analysed using sign tests. There was no significant difference in A{sub z} (TE: 0.909, PV 0.917, P = 0.46). For all radiologists, perceived case suspiciousness using PV was higher than using TE more often than vice versa (ratio: 1.14-2.12). This was significant (P <0.0083) for four radiologists. Optimisation of local contrast by image processing may increase perceived case suspiciousness, while diagnostic accuracy may remain similar. (orig.)

  3. Automatically assessed volumetric breast density and breast cancer risk : The era of digital screening mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, J.O.P .

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among females worldwide. As the burden of breast cancer is high, many countries have introduced a breast cancer screening program with the aim to find and treat breast cancers in an early stage. In the Netherlands, women between the ages of 50

  4. Overdiagnosis in publicly organised mammography screening programmes: systematic review of incidence trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    . DATA SOURCES: PubMed (April 2007), reference lists, and authors. Review methods One author extracted data on incidence of breast cancer (including carcinoma in situ), population size, screening uptake, time periods, and age groups, which were checked independently by the other author. Linear regression...

  5. Patient doses and radiation risks in film-screen mammography in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T.; Komppa, T. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Screen-film mamography is the most sensitive method for the early detection of breast cancer. Breast doses in mamography should be measured for several reasons, especially for the evaluation of patient risk in a screening programme, but also for the assessment and comparison of imaging techniques and equipment performance. In this study, the factors affecting patient doses were assessed by making performance and patient dose measurements; about 50 mammographic units used for screening were included in the study. The lifetime risk as a function of age at exposure was calculated using the average glandular dose, the relative risk model shown in the BEIR V report, and the breast cancer mortality in Finland. The mean surface dose of a 4.5 cm thick phantom was 6.3 mGy, and the mean glandular dose 1.0 mGy. Analysis of the surface dose with respect to film optical density, relative speed of film processing, sensitivity of image receptors, and antiscatter grid showed that the mean surface dose could be decreased by more than 50%. For the screened age group of 50 to 59 years, the risk of exposure-induced death (REID) of breast cancer is about 1.4 x 10{sup -6} mSv{sup -1}, and the average loss of life expectancy due to the radiation-induced breast cancer deaths (LLE/REID) is about 9.5 years. (Author).

  6. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saslow, D.; Boetes, C.; Burke, W.; Harms, S.; Leach, M.O.; Lehman, C.D.; Morris, E.; Pisano, E.; Schnall, M.; Sener, S.; Smith, R.A.; Warner, E.; Yaffe, M.; Andrews, K.S.; Russell, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at differen

  7. Why mammography screening has not lived up to expectations from the randomised trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Zahl, Per-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We analysed the relation between tumour sizes and stages and the reported effects on breast cancer mortality with and without screening in trials and observational studies. The average tumour sizes in all the trials suggest only a 12% reduction in breast cancer mortality, which agrees with the 10...

  8. Analysis of participant factors that affect the diagnostic performance of screening mammography: A report of the alliance for breast cancer screening in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Joong [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eu Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-08-01

    To analyze participant factors that affect the diagnostic performance of screening mammography. We enrolled 128756 cases from 10 hospitals between 2005 and 2010. We analyzed recall rate, cancer detection rate (CDR) per 1000 examinations, positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, specificity, false positive rate (FPR), and interval cancer rate (ICR) per 1000 negative examinations according to participant factors including age, breast density, and number of visit to the same institution, and adjusted for confounding variables. Increasing age improved recall rates (27.4% in 40's, 17.5% in 50's, 11.1% in 60's, and 8.6% in 70's), CDR (2.7, 3.2, 2.0, and 2.4), PPV (1.0, 1.8, 1.8, and 2.8%), sensitivity (81.3, 88.8, 90.3, and 94.7%), specificity (72.7, 82.7, 89.0, and 91.7%), and FPR (27.3, 17.3, 11.0, and 8.4%) (p < 0.05). Higher breast density impaired recall rates (4.0% in P1, 9.0% in P2, 28.9% in P3, and 27.8% in P4), PPV (3.3, 2.3, 1.2, and 1.3%), specificity (96.1, 91.2, 71.4, and 72.5%), and FPR (3.9, 8.9, 28.6, and 27.6%) (p < 0.001). It also increased CDR (1.3, 2.1, 3.3, and 3.6) and ICR (0.2, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.6) (p < 0.05). Successive visits to the same institution improved recall rates (20.9% for one visit, 10.7% for two visits, 7.7% for more than three visits), PPV (1.6, 2.8, and 2.7%), specificity (79.4, 89.6, and 92.5%), and FPR (20.6, 10.4, and 7.5%) (p < 0.001). Young age and dense breasts negatively affected diagnostic performance in mammography screening, whereas successive visits to the same institution had a positive effect. Examinee education for successive visits to the same institution would improve the diagnostic performance.

  9. Routine HIV screening of sexually transmitted disease clinic attenders has favourable cost-effectiveness ratio in low HIV prevalence settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, JM; van der Meijden, WI; Swart, W; Postma, MJ

    2002-01-01

    HIV screening for attenders of clinics for sexually transmitted disease (STD) may identify individuals with high-risk sexual behaviour and avert HIV infections in partners. Extending our previous analysis in AIDS, we performed an economic evaluation of HIV screening of STD-clinic attenders in

  10. Routine HIV screening of sexually transmitted disease clinic attenders has favourable cost-effectiveness ratio in low HIV prevalence settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, JM; van der Meijden, WI; Swart, W; Postma, MJ

    2002-01-01

    HIV screening for attenders of clinics for sexually transmitted disease (STD) may identify individuals with high-risk sexual behaviour and avert HIV infections in partners. Extending our previous analysis in AIDS, we performed an economic evaluation of HIV screening of STD-clinic attenders in Rotter

  11. Breast cancer screening with imaging: recommendations from the Society of Breast Imaging and the ACR on the use of mammography, breast MRI, breast ultrasound, and other technologies for the detection of clinically occult breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol H; Dershaw, D David; Kopans, Daniel; Evans, Phil; Monsees, Barbara; Monticciolo, Debra; Brenner, R James; Bassett, Lawrence; Berg, Wendie; Feig, Stephen; Hendrick, Edward; Mendelson, Ellen; D'Orsi, Carl; Sickles, Edward; Burhenne, Linda Warren

    2010-01-01

    Screening for breast cancer with mammography has been shown to decrease mortality from breast cancer, and mammography is the mainstay of screening for clinically occult disease. Mammography, however, has well-recognized limitations, and recently, other imaging including ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have been used as adjunctive screening tools, mainly for women who may be at increased risk for the development of breast cancer. The Society of Breast Imaging and the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR are issuing these recommendations to provide guidance to patients and clinicians on the use of imaging to screen for breast cancer. Wherever possible, the recommendations are based on available evidence. Where evidence is lacking, the recommendations are based on consensus opinions of the fellows and executive committee of the Society of Breast Imaging and the members of the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR.

  12. Two distinct groups of non-attenders in an organized mammography screening program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; de Koning, H J; Absetz, P

    2001-01-01

    on personal first round invitations, with 89% attendance rate. PARTICIPANTS: Four hundred thirty six women with both pre-screening response to socioeconomic and psychosocial measures, and post-screening response reporting reasons of non-attendance. MAIN RESULTS: Most common single reason for non......, more socially isolated, depressed and anxious than ELSE. Level of depression among REAL was clearly higher (10.80) than the mean value (7.91, SD = 7.28) of the age group, and was also slightly above the cut-off score of 10 indicating mild or moderate depression. Trait anxiety was also markedly higher...... (40.18) than that of the same age group (37.76, SD = 8.95). CONCLUSIONS: Further research should clarify determinants and consequences of depression and anxiety among real non-attenders. Knowledge gaps and attitudinal barriers among non-attenders require more targeted campaigns....

  13. Consequences of a false-positive mammography result: drug consumption before and after screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My; Bæksted, Christina; Vejborg, Ilse; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-05-01

    Background Previous research showed women experiencing false-positive mammograms to have greater anxiety about breast cancer than women with normal mammograms. To elucidate psychological effects of false-positive mammograms, we studied impact on drug intake. Methods We calculated the ratio of drug use for women with false-positive versus women with normal mammograms, before and after the event, using population-based registers, 1997-2006. The ratio of the ratios (RRR) assessed the impact. Results Before the test, 40.3% of women from the false-positive group versus 36.2% from the normal group used anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs. There was no difference in use of beta blockers. Hormone therapy was used more frequently by the false-positive, 36.6% versus 28.7%. The proportion of women using anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs increased with 19% from the before to the after period in the false-positive group, and with 16% in the normal group, resulting in an RRR of 1.02 (95% CI 0.92-1.14). RRR was 1.03 for beta blockers, 0.97 for hormone therapy. Conclusion(s) Drugs used to mitigate mood disorders were used more frequently by women with false-positive than by women with normal mammograms already before the screening event, while the changes from before to after screening were similar for both groups. The results point to the importance of control for potential selection in studies of screening effects.

  14. Women's interest in a personal breast cancer risk assessment and lifestyle advice at NHS mammography screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, L.; Valencia, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Although mortality from breast cancer is declining, incidence continues to increase and is often detected at routine NHS screening. Most middle aged and older women in England attend for screening every 3 years. Assessing their personal breast cancer risk and providing preventative lifestyle advice could help to further reduce breast cancer incidence. Methods A cross-sectional, self-complete postal survey measured attendees' interest in having a personal risk assessment, expected impact on screening attendance, knowledge of associations between lifestyle and breast cancer and preferred ways of accessing preventative lifestyle advice. Results A total of 1803/4948 (36.4%) completed questionnaires were returned. Most participants (93.7%) expressed interest in a personal risk assessment and 95% (1713/1803) believed it would make no difference or encourage re-attendance. Two-thirds (1208/1803) associated lifestyle with breast cancer, but many were unaware of specific risks such as weight gain, obesity, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. NHS sourced advice was expected to be more credible than other sources, and booklets, brief counselling or an interactive website were most preferred for accessing this. Conclusions Attendees appear to welcome an intervention that would facilitate more proactive clinical and lifestyle prevention and address critical research gaps in breast cancer prevention and early detection. PMID:26834190

  15. Mammography - misunderstood and underutilized

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, R.V.; Reid, M.H.

    1981-12-01

    A mammography screening program for breast cancer carried out in Sacramento by the University of California Davis School of Medicine, Davis, was canceled because of negative public reaction to sensationalized reports in the lay press on the potential carcinogenic risks of the radiation exposure, along with passivity on the part of the medical community in defending the procedure and the program. Disappointment in this occurrence spurred us to explore physician's knowledge of and attitudes toward breast cancer and mammography. The results confirmed our suspicions that a significant number of physicians lack accurate knowledge of breast cancer and of the extremely high benefit-to-risk ratio of mammography as a means of early detection.

  16. Cost-effectiveness and harm-benefit analyses of risk-based screening strategies for breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vilaprinyo, Ester; Forné, Carles; Carles, Misericordia; Sala, Maria; Pla, Roger; Castells, Xavier; Domingo, Laia; Rue, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    .... The present study has two objectives: 1) To perform an economic evaluation and to assess the harm-benefit ratios of screening strategies that vary in their intensity and interval ages based on breast cancer risk; and 2...

  17. Cost-Effectiveness and Harm-Benefit Analyses of Risk-Based Screening Strategies for Breast Cancer: e86858

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ester Vilaprinyo; Carles Forné; Misericordia Carles; Maria Sala; Roger Pla; Xavier Castells; Laia Domingo; Montserrat Rue; Study Group

    2014-01-01

    .... The present study has two objectives: 1) To perform an economic evaluation and to assess the harm-benefit ratios of screening strategies that vary in their intensity and interval ages based on breast cancer risk; and 2...

  18. A systematic review of cost-effectiveness analysis of screening interventions for assessing the risk of venous thromboembolism in women considering combined oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademi, Zanfina; Sutherland, C Simone; Van Stiphout, Joris; Michaud, Jöelle; Tanackovic, Goranka; Schwenkglenks, Matthias

    2017-09-16

    Use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) by women increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which can have a major impact on an individuals' quality of life. VTE is also associated with an increase in healthcare costs. Our aim was to systematically review cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) considering any screening for risk of VTE in women using COCs. The quality of reporting in each study was assessed, a summary of results was prepared, and the key drivers of cost effectiveness in each of the eligible CEAs were identified. A search strategy using MeSH terms was performed in MEDLINE, Embase, the Centre for Review and Dissemination (CRD) database including the Economic Evaluation Database from the UK National Health Service, and Cochrane reviews. Two reviewers independently screened and determined the final articles, and a third reviewer resolved any discrepancies. Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards was used to assess the quality of reporting in terms of perspective, effectiveness measures, model structure, cost, time-horizon and discounting. Four publications (three from Europe, one from the United States) were eligible for inclusion in the review. According to current criteria, relevant elements were sometimes not captured and the sources of epidemiological and effectiveness data used in the CEAs were of limited quality. The studies varied in terms of type of costs assessed, country settings, model assumptions and uncertainty around input parameters. Key drivers of CEAs were sensitivity and specificity of the test, incidence rate of VTE, relative risk of prophylaxis, and costs of the test. The reviewed studies were too dissimilar to draw a firm conclusion on cost-effectiveness analysis about universal and selective screening in high-risk groups. The new emerging diagnostic tools for identifying women at risk of developing VTE, that are more predictive and less costly, highlight the need for more studies that apply the latest

  19. Mortality from breast carcinoma among US women: the role and implications of socio-economics, heterogeneous insurance, screening mammography, and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunade, Albert A; Karakus, Mustafa C

    2003-11-01

    Despite rapid advances in medicine and beneficial lifestyle changes, the incidence and mortality rate of gynecologic carcinoma remains high worldwide. This paper presents the econometric model findings of the major drivers of breast cancer mortality among US women. The results have implications for public health policy formulation on disease incidence and the drivers of mortality risks. The research methodology is a fixed-effects GLS regression model of breast cancer mortality in US females age 25 and above, using 1990-1997 time-series data pooled across 50 US states and DC. The covariates are age, years schooled, family income, 'screening' mammography, insurance coverage types, race, and US census region. The regressions have strong explanatory powers. Finding education and income to be significantly and positively correlated with mortality supports the 'life in the fast lanes' hypothesis of Phelps. The policy of raising a woman's education at a given income appears more beneficial than raising her income at a given education level. The relatively higher mortality rate for Blacks suggests implementing culturally appropriate set of disease prevention and health promotion programs and policies. Mortality differs across insurance types with Medicaid the worst suggesting need for program reform. Mortality is greater for women ages 25-44 years, females 40-49 years who have had screening mammography, smokers, and residents of some US states. These findings suggest imposing more effective tobacco use control policies (e.g., imposing a special tobacco tax on adult smokers), creating a more tractable screening mammography surveillance system, and designing region-specific programs to cut breast cancer mortality risks.

  20. Screening of breast lesions: a comparative study between mammography, B-mode ultrasonography, sonoelastography and histological results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Constantino Pardal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the capacity of mammography, sonoelastography, B-mode ultrasonography and histological analysis to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions. Materials and Methods A total of 12 histopathologically confirmed breast lesions were documented. The lesions were assessed by means of mammography, B-mode ultrasonography and sonoelastography, and histopathological analysis was utilized as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the mentioned techniques. Results Sensitivity and specificity in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions were respectively 100% and 50% for mammography, 100% and 71% for B-mode ultrasonography, and 67% and 83% for sonoelastography. The area under the ROC curve was calculated for the three imaging modalities and corresponded to 0.792 for mammography, 0.847 for B-mode ultrasonography, and 0.806 for sonoelastography. Conclusion Sonoelastography demonstrated higher specificity and lower sensitivity as compared with mammography and B-mode ultrasonography. On the other hand, B-mode ultrasonography had the largest area under the ROC curve. Sonoelastography has demonstrated to be a promising technique to detect and evaluate breast lesions, and could potentially reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  1. Retrospective observation on contribution and limitations of screening for breast cancer with mammography in Korea: detection rate of breast cancer and incidence rate of interval cancer of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits and limitations of screening for breast cancer using mammography. Methods Descriptive design with follow-up was used in the study. Data from breast cancer screening and health insurance claim data were used. The study population consisted of all participants in breast cancer screening from 2009 to 2014. Crude detection rate, positive predictive value and sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer screening and, incidence rat...

  2. Measuring breast cancer and mammography screening beliefs among Chinese American immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Lin, Frances; Menon, Usha; Pett, Marjorie; Nail, Lillian; Lee, Sharon; Mooney, Kathi

    2008-11-01

    Disparities in breast cancer outcomes persist among Asian American women. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Chinese American women. This article describes the psychometric evaluation of an instrument measuring knowledge and beliefs related to breast cancer and screening among Chinese American women aged 40 or older. A sample of 100 foreign-born Chinese American women were recruited from an Asian community. Guided by the health belief model, a questionnaire was adapted from three existing questionnaires. Principal axis factoring analyses yielded a three-factor solution that accounted for 53% of the variance in the breast cancer items and a four-factor solution that accounted for 69% of the variance in the cultural items (Cronbach's alphas = .71-.89). Whereas these findings contribute to the understanding of the psychometric properties of an instrument targeted for Chinese American women, additional research is needed to evaluate its utility and efficacy for other Asian Americans.

  3. Inequity of healthcare utilization on mammography examination and Pap smear screening in Thailand: Analysis of a population-based household survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare in Thailand is not equally distributed, and not all people can equally access healthcare resources even if they are covered by health insurance. To examine factors associated with the utilization of mammography examination for breast cancer and Pap smear screening for cervical cancer, data from the national reproductive health survey conducted by the National Statistical Office of Thailand in 2009 was examined. The survey was carried out on 15,074,126 women aged 30–59 years. The results showed that the wealthier respondents had more mammograms than did the lower-income groups. The concentration index was 0.144. The data on Pap smears for cervical cancer also showed that the wealthier respondents were more likely to have had a Pap smear than their lower-income counterparts. The concentration index was 0.054. Determinants of mammography examination were education, followed by health welfare and wealth index, whereas the determinants of Pap smear screening were wealth index, followed by health welfare and education. The government should support greater education for women because education was associated with socioeconomic status and wealth. There should be an increase in the number of screening campaigns, mobile clinics, and low-cost mammograms and continued support for accessibility to mammograms, especially in rural areas and low-income communities. PMID:28282430

  4. Association of adipokines and adhesion molecules with indicators of obesity in women undergoing mammography screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isoppo de Souza Caroline

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soluble cell adhesion molecules and adipokines are elevated in patients with obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, breast cancer and atherosclerosis. Objective To investigate the relationship between anthropometric profile, dietary intake, lipid profile and fasting glycemia with serum levels of adipokines (adiponectin and PAI-1 and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in women without breast cancer undergoing routine mammographic screening. Design Transversal study. Subjects One hundred and forty-five women over 40-years old participated in this study. Results In 39.3% of cases the BMI was above 30 kg/m2; 46.9% had hypertension, 14.5% had type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, 31.7% had dyslipidemia and 88.3% presented a waist-to-hip ratio ≥ 0.8. A linear correlation was found between serum levels of PAI-1 and triglycerides, between serum levels of PAI-1 and WHR and between serum levels of VCAM-1 and BMI. Conclusion We found a high prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. PAI-1 and VCAM-1 levels were correlated with clinical indicators of obesity and overweight.

  5. Update on new technologies in digital mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson SK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie K Patterson, Marilyn A Roubidoux Division of Breast Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Despite controversy regarding mammography's efficacy, it continues to be the most commonly used breast cancer-screening modality. With the development of digital mammography, some improved benefit has been shown in women with dense breast tissue. However, the density of breast tissue continues to limit the sensitivity of conventional mammography. We discuss the development of some derivative digital technologies, primarily digital breast tomosynthesis, and their strengths, weaknesses, and potential patient impact. Keywords: screening mammography, breast cancer, contrast media, digital breast tomosynthesis

  6. Cost effectiveness of intermittent screening followed by treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Silke; Sicuri, Elisa; Halimatou, Diawara

    2016-01-01

    in West Africa.  Methods: A decision tree model was analysed from a health provider perspective. Model parameters for all trial countries with appropriate ranges and distributions were used in a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Simulations were performed in hypothetical cohorts of 1000 pregnant women...... who received either ISTp-AL or IPTp-SP. In addition a cost-consequences analysis was conducted. Trial estimates were used to calculate disability-adjusted-life-years (DALYs) for low birth weight and severe/moderate anaemia (both shown to be non-inferior for ISTp-AL) and clinical malaria (inferior...... to IPTp-SP, delivering ISTp-AL to 1000 pregnant women cost US$ 4966.25 more (95 % CI US$ 3703.53; 6376.83) and led to a small excess of 28.36 DALYs (95 % CI -75.78; 134.18), with LBW contributing 81.3 % of this difference. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -175.12 (95 % CI -1166.29; 1267.71) US...

  7. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  8. Cost-effectiveness of breast cancer control strategies in Central America: the cases of Costa Rica and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niëns, Laurens M; Zelle, Sten G; Gutiérrez-Delgado, Cristina; Rivera Peña, Gustavo; Hidalgo Balarezo, Blanca Rosa; Rodriguez Steller, Erick; Rutten, Frans F H

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the most cost-effective policy options to support and improve breast cancer control in Costa Rica and Mexico. Total costs and effects of breast cancer interventions were estimated using the health care perspective and WHO-CHOICE methodology. Effects were measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted. Costs were assessed in 2009 United States Dollars (US$). To the extent available, analyses were based on locally obtained data. In Costa Rica, the current strategy of treating breast cancer in stages I to IV at a 80% coverage level seems to be the most cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$4,739 per DALY averted. At a coverage level of 95%, biennial clinical breast examination (CBE) screening could improve Costa Rica's population health twofold, and can still be considered very cost-effective (ICER US$5,964/DALY). For Mexico, our results indicate that at 95% coverage a mass-media awareness raising program (MAR) could be the most cost-effective (ICER US$5,021/DALY). If more resources are available in Mexico, biennial mammography screening for women 50-70 yrs (ICER US$12,718/DALY), adding trastuzumab (ICER US$13,994/DALY) or screening women 40-70 yrs biennially plus trastuzumab (ICER US$17,115/DALY) are less cost-effective options. We recommend both Costa Rica and Mexico to engage in MAR, CBE or mammography screening programs, depending on their budget. The results of this study should be interpreted with caution however, as the evidence on the intervention effectiveness is uncertain. Also, these programs require several organizational, budgetary and human resources, and the accessibility of breast cancer diagnostic, referral, treatment and palliative care facilities should be improved simultaneously. A gradual implementation of early detection programs should give the respective Ministries of Health the time to negotiate the required budget, train the required human resources and understand possible

  9. Cost-effectiveness of breast cancer control strategies in Central America: the cases of Costa Rica and Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens M Niëns

    Full Text Available This paper reports the most cost-effective policy options to support and improve breast cancer control in Costa Rica and Mexico. Total costs and effects of breast cancer interventions were estimated using the health care perspective and WHO-CHOICE methodology. Effects were measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs averted. Costs were assessed in 2009 United States Dollars (US$. To the extent available, analyses were based on locally obtained data. In Costa Rica, the current strategy of treating breast cancer in stages I to IV at a 80% coverage level seems to be the most cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of US$4,739 per DALY averted. At a coverage level of 95%, biennial clinical breast examination (CBE screening could improve Costa Rica's population health twofold, and can still be considered very cost-effective (ICER US$5,964/DALY. For Mexico, our results indicate that at 95% coverage a mass-media awareness raising program (MAR could be the most cost-effective (ICER US$5,021/DALY. If more resources are available in Mexico, biennial mammography screening for women 50-70 yrs (ICER US$12,718/DALY, adding trastuzumab (ICER US$13,994/DALY or screening women 40-70 yrs biennially plus trastuzumab (ICER US$17,115/DALY are less cost-effective options. We recommend both Costa Rica and Mexico to engage in MAR, CBE or mammography screening programs, depending on their budget. The results of this study should be interpreted with caution however, as the evidence on the intervention effectiveness is uncertain. Also, these programs require several organizational, budgetary and human resources, and the accessibility of breast cancer diagnostic, referral, treatment and palliative care facilities should be improved simultaneously. A gradual implementation of early detection programs should give the respective Ministries of Health the time to negotiate the required budget, train the required human resources and understand

  10. High-grade histologic features of DCIS are associated with R5 rather than R3 calcifications in breast screening mammography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    Mammographic calcification is an important radiologic feature of early breast carcinoma whose index of suspicion for malignancy may be reported by a five-tier R-category system. This study aims to describe the histologic diagnoses underlying screen-detected mammographic calcifications using both digital and screen-film mammography, and to correlate these findings with radiologic R-categories. Patients attending the Merrion Breast Screening Unit in Dublin between 2000 and 2011 were identified, who underwent needle-core biopsy for assessment of mammographic calcifications without associated mass or architectural distortion. Radiologic R-category was correlated with biopsy and excision histology reports. A total of 776 cases of calcification were identified, involving 769 individual patients. The radiologic R-categories were as follows: R3 513 (66.1%), R4 192 (24.7%), R5 71 (9.1%). The positive predictive values for malignancy were R3 32.6%, R4 69.8%, R5 95.8%. Several histologic features of DCIS were associated with R5 rather than R3 radiology: high nuclear grade, solid or cribriform architecture, necrosis, periductal inflammation or fibrosis, and associated microinvasive or invasive carcinoma. Mammographic lesions and histologic whole and invasive tumors increased in size from R3 to R5. Radiologic size of calcifications correlated with whole (but not invasive) tumor size, although it tended to underestimate it by several millimeters. Digital-detected calcifications were more likely than screen-film detected to be categorized as R3 and less likely R4 or R5, and there was no significant difference in positive predictive value between the two imaging techniques in any R-category. In conclusion, histologic features of DCIS, in particular those associated with high grade, are associated with R5 radiology. There is no significant difference in positive predictive value for malignancy in any R-category between digital and screen-film mammography.

  11. The impact of healthcare costs in the last year of life and in all life years gained on the cost-effectiveness of cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kok, I M C M; Polder, J J; Habbema, J D F;

    2009-01-01

    It is under debate whether healthcare costs related to death and in life years gained (LysG) due to life saving interventions should be included in economic evaluations. We estimated the impact of including these costs on cost-effectiveness of cancer screening. We obtained health insurance, home...... care, nursing homes, and mortality data for 2.1 million inhabitants in the Netherlands in 1998-1999. Costs related to death were approximated by the healthcare costs in the last year of life (LastYL), by cause and age of death. Costs in LYsG were estimated by calculating the healthcare costs in any...... life year. We calculated the change in cost-effectiveness ratios (CERs) if unrelated healthcare costs in the LastYL or in LYsG would be included. Costs in the LastYL were on average 33% higher for persons dying from cancer than from any cause. Including costs in LysG increased the CER by 4040 euro...

  12. A randomised controlled trial and cost effectiveness study of systematic screening (targeted and total population screening versus routine practice for the detection of atrial fibrillation in the over 65s: (SAFE [ISRCTN19633732

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raftery James

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF has been recognised as an important independent risk factor for thromboembolic disease, particularly stroke for which it provides a five-fold increase in risk. This study aimed to determine the baseline prevalence and the incidence of AF based on a variety of screening strategies and in doing so to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of different screening strategies, including targeted or whole population screening, compared with routine clinical practice, for detection of AF in people aged 65 and over. The value of clinical assessment and echocardiography as additional methods of risk stratification for thromboembolic disease in patients with AF were also evaluated. Methods The study design was a multi-centre randomised controlled trial with a study population of patients aged 65 and over from 50 General Practices in the West Midlands. These purposefully selected general practices were randomly allocated to 25 intervention practices and 25 control practices. GPs and practice nurses within the intervention practices received education on the importance of AF detection and ECG interpretation. Patients in the intervention practices were randomly allocated to systematic (n = 5000 or opportunistic screening (n = 5000. Prospective identification of pre-existing risk factors for AF within the screened population enabled comparison between high risk targeted screening and total population screening. AF detection rates in systematically screened and opportunistically screened populations in the intervention practices were compared to AF detection rate in 5,000 patients in the control practices.

  13. Screening HIV-Infected Patients with Low CD4 Counts for Cryptococcal Antigenemia prior to Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy: Cost Effectiveness of Alternative Screening Strategies in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Larson

    Full Text Available In 2015 South Africa established a national cryptococcal antigenemia (CrAg screening policy targeted at HIV-infected patients with CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4 counts <100 cells/ μl who are not yet on antiretroviral treatment (ART. Two screening strategies are included in national guidelines: reflex screening, where a CrAg test is performed on remnant blood samples from CD4 testing; and provider-initiated screening, where providers order a CrAg test after a patient returns for CD4 test results. The objective of this study was to compare costs and effectiveness of these two screening strategies.We developed a decision analytic model to compare reflex and provider-initiated screening in terms of programmatic and health outcomes (number screened, number identified for preemptive treatment, lives saved, and discounted years of life saved and screening and treatment costs (2015 USD. We estimated a base case with prevalence and other parameters based on data collected during CrAg screening pilot projects integrated into routine HIV care in Gauteng, Free State, and Western Cape Provinces. We conducted sensitivity analyses to explore how results change with underlying parameter assumptions.In the base case, for each 100,000 CD4 tests, the reflex strategy compared to the provider-initiated strategy has higher screening costs ($37,536 higher but lower treatment costs ($55,165 lower, so overall costs of screening and treatment are $17,629 less with the reflex strategy. The reflex strategy saves more lives (30 lives, 647 additional years of life saved. Sensitivity analyses suggest that reflex screening dominates provider-initiated screening (lower total costs and more lives saved or saves additional lives for small additional costs (< $125 per life year across a wide range of conditions (CrAg prevalence, patient and provider behavior, patient survival without treatment, and effectiveness of preemptive fluconazole treatment.In countries with substantial numbers

  14. New tools for cost-effective delivery of breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Gerald R

    2002-01-01

    Breast imaging has a deserved reputation as a very difficult financial proposition for hospitals. Regulation, low reimbursement, costly new technologies and staff shortages all combine to create an operational environment that is difficult, at best. While it may not be possible for every hospital to make breast imaging profitable, it is the obligation of every hospital to make this and all service lines as cost-effective as possible. While the typical care episode in a hospital will include several different services or procedures, the breast-imaging patient is typically in the department or breast center for a single procedure. Consequently, all of the administrative and facility costs of the patient encounter must be borne by the reimbursement for the single procedure. Breast imaging involves relatively expensive technology and highly-trained, and costly, technologists in its delivery. The costs of these inputs are relatively fixed; therefore material improvement can only be realized through the redesign of process. Analysis of the process of care delivery is critical to any discussion of the economics of breast imaging. Breast imaging can basically be divided into two categories: screening mammography and diagnostic procedures. This is a very important distinction, because screening mammography requires only general supervision, while the balance of breast imaging requires the direct supervision of the physician. Decoupling the physician from the examination allows the organization of screening delivery programs in highly efficient, high-throughput systems. On the diagnostic side of breast imaging, the primary economic enhancement that can be realized is from the delivery of more than one procedure during the patient visit. Mammography has high fixed costs (technology and technologist) and, where high fixed costs are found, profitability is determined by process and volume. Where process can be optimized to a level that will allow a positive return for each

  15. Screening HIV-Infected Patients with Low CD4 Counts for Cryptococcal Antigenemia prior to Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy: Cost Effectiveness of Alternative Screening Strategies in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Bruce A; Rockers, Peter C; Bonawitz, Rachael; Sriruttan, Charlotte; Glencross, Deborah K; Cassim, Naseem; Coetzee, Lindi M; Greene, Gregory S; Chiller, Tom M; Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; Long, Lawrence; van Rensburg, Craig; Govender, Nelesh P

    2016-01-01

    In 2015 South Africa established a national cryptococcal antigenemia (CrAg) screening policy targeted at HIV-infected patients with CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4) counts strategies are included in national guidelines: reflex screening, where a CrAg test is performed on remnant blood samples from CD4 testing; and provider-initiated screening, where providers order a CrAg test after a patient returns for CD4 test results. The objective of this study was to compare costs and effectiveness of these two screening strategies. We developed a decision analytic model to compare reflex and provider-initiated screening in terms of programmatic and health outcomes (number screened, number identified for preemptive treatment, lives saved, and discounted years of life saved) and screening and treatment costs (2015 USD). We estimated a base case with prevalence and other parameters based on data collected during CrAg screening pilot projects integrated into routine HIV care in Gauteng, Free State, and Western Cape Provinces. We conducted sensitivity analyses to explore how results change with underlying parameter assumptions. In the base case, for each 100,000 CD4 tests, the reflex strategy compared to the provider-initiated strategy has higher screening costs ($37,536 higher) but lower treatment costs ($55,165 lower), so overall costs of screening and treatment are $17,629 less with the reflex strategy. The reflex strategy saves more lives (30 lives, 647 additional years of life saved). Sensitivity analyses suggest that reflex screening dominates provider-initiated screening (lower total costs and more lives saved) or saves additional lives for small additional costs (provider behavior, patient survival without treatment, and effectiveness of preemptive fluconazole treatment). In countries with substantial numbers of people with untreated, advanced HIV disease such as South Africa, CrAg screening before initiation of ART has the potential to reduce cryptococcal meningitis and save

  16. Using stool antigen to screen for Helicobacter pylori in immigrants and refugees from high prevalence countries is relatively cost effective in reducing the burden of gastric cancer and peptic ulceration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Schulz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Refugees and immigrants from developing countries settling in industrialised countries have a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Screening these groups for H. pylori and use of eradication therapy to reduce the future burden of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease is not currently recommended in most countries. We investigated whether a screening and eradication approach would be cost effective in high prevalence populations. METHODS: Nine different screening and follow-up strategies for asymptomatic immigrants from high H. pylori prevalence areas were compared with the current approach of no screening. Cost effectiveness comparisons assumed population prevalence's of H. pylori of 25%, 50% or 75%. The main outcome measure was the net cost for each cancer prevented for each strategy. Total costs of each strategy and net costs including savings from reductions in ulcers and gastric cancer were also calculated. RESULTS: Stool antigen testing with repeat testing after treatment was the most cost effective approach relative to others, for each prevalence value. The net cost per cancer prevented with this strategy was US$111,800 (assuming 75% prevalence, $132,300 (50% and $193,900 (25%. A test and treat strategy using stool antigen remained relatively cost effective, even when the prevalence was 25%. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori screening and eradication can be an effective strategy for reducing rates of gastric cancer and peptic ulcers in high prevalence populations and our data suggest that use of stool antigen testing is the most cost effective approach.

  17. Scratch Cell Test: A Simple, Cost Effective Screening Tool to Evaluate Self-Healing in Anti-Corrosion Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Amitha; Somaiah, Durga; Megha; Poddar, Mitalee

    2014-09-01

    A quick and simple scratch cell set up to evaluate the self-healing of an hybrid sol-gel (ormosil) coating was fabricated. This methacrylate-based anti-corrosion coating was applied on the aerospace aluminium alloy AA2024-T3, and cured at room temperature. This technique of evaluation requires minimum instrumentation. The inhibitors cerium nitrate, benzotriazole and 8-hydroxy quinoline (8-HQ) were used in the study. The self-healing ability of the inhibitors decreased in the following order: 8-HQ, BTZ and Ce. 8-HQ showed the highest self-healing ability and was comparable to the commercial hexavalent chromium conversion coating—Alodine. Spectroscopic analysis of the electrolyte and EDX of the coatings indicated the movement of the inhibitor from the coating to the site of damage, thereby effecting self-healing. It was observed that an increased inhibitor concentration in the coatings did not accelerate the healing process. Inhibitor release was slower in the coatings doped with inhibitor-loaded nano-containers, when compared to inhibitor-spiked coatings. This property of controlled release is desirable in self-healing coatings. Electro impedance studies further confirmed self-healing efficiency of the coatings. The scratch cell study reported here is the first of its kind with the ormosil under study on AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The results are encouraging and warranty a quick and simple qualitative screening of the self-healing potential of the inhibitors with minimum instrumentation.

  18. CADx Mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costaridou, Lena

    Although a wide variety of Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) schemes have been proposed across breast imaging modalities, and especially in mammography, research is still ongoing to meet the high performance CADx requirements. In this chapter, methodological contributions to CADx in mammography and adjunct breast imaging modalities are reviewed, as they play a major role in early detection, diagnosis and clinical management of breast cancer. At first, basic terms and definitions are provided. Then, emphasis is given to lesion content derivation, both anatomical and functional, considering only quantitative image features of micro-calcification clusters and masses across modalities. Additionally, two CADx application examples are provided. The first example investigates the effect of segmentation accuracy on micro-calcification cluster morphology derivation in X-ray mammography. The second one demonstrates the efficiency of texture analysis in quantification of enhancement kinetics, related to vascular heterogeneity, for mass classification in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Minimal invasive biopsy results of 'uncertain malignant potential' in digital mammography screening. High prevalence but also high predictive value for malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, S.; Heindel, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Referenzzentrum Mammographie; Decker, T. [Dietrich Bonhoeffer Klinikum, Neubrandenburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie; Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Referenzzentrum Mammographie; Korsching, E. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Bioinformatik; Biesheuvel, C.; Woestmann, A.; Boecker, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Referenzzentrum Mammographie; Hungermann, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Gerhard-Domagk-Inst. fuer Pathologie; Roterberg, K.; Tio, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Bereich Senologie

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate, the histological spectrum and the positive predictive value (PPV) for malignancy of minimally invasive biopsies with 'uncertain malignant potential (B3)' in digital mammography screening. Methods and Materials: Consecutive data of 37 178 participants of one digital unit of the German screening program were included. Results: The B 3 rate was 15.1 % (148/979). The frequencies of lesion subtypes were as follows: atypical epithelial proliferation of ductal type (AEPDT) 35.1 % (52/148), radial scar (RS) 28.4 % (42/148), papillary lesions (PAP) 20.3 % (30/148), lobular carcinoma in situ 8.8 % (13/148), flat epithelial atypia 5.4 % (8/148), and mucocele-like lesions 2.0 % (3/148). The PPV for malignancy in surgical excisions was overall 0.28 (25/91); in detail 0.40 (19/47) for AEPDT, 0.20 (5/25) for RS, 0.08 (1/12) for PAP. Conclusion: Despite a higher B 3 rate of minimally invasive biopsies with 'uncertain malignant potential' in digital screening, the benign surgical biopsy rate is not disproportionally increased compared with analog screening programs. Together with defined management protocols, this results in an increased cancer detection rate per screening participant with surgical excision. (orig.)

  20. Prospective trial comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) versus combined FFDM and tomosynthesis in a population-based screening programme using independent double reading with arbitration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaane, Per [Oslo University Hospital, University of Oslo, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Oslo University Hospital Ullevaal, Department of Radiology, Breast Imaging Center, Oslo (Norway); Bandos, Andriy I. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Biostatistics, Pittsburgh (United States); Gullien, Randi; Eben, Ellen B.; Haakenaasen, Unni; Izadi, Mina; Jebsen, Ingvild N.; Jahr, Gunnar; Krager, Mona [Department of Radiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ekseth, Ulrika [Curato Roentgen Institute, Oslo (Norway); Hofvind, Solveig [The Cancer Registry, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-08-15

    To compare double readings when interpreting full field digital mammography (2D) and tomosynthesis (3D) during mammographic screening. A prospective, Ethical Committee approved screening study is underway. During the first year 12,621 consenting women underwent both 2D and 3D imaging. Each examination was independently interpreted by four radiologists under four reading modes: Arm A - 2D; Arm B - 2D + CAD; Arm C - 2D + 3D; Arm D - synthesised 2D + 3D. Examinations with a positive score by at least one reader were discussed at an arbitration meeting before a final management decision. Paired double reading of 2D (Arm A + B) and 2D + 3D (Arm C + D) were analysed. Performance measures were compared using generalised linear mixed models, accounting for inter-reader performance heterogeneity (P < 0.05). Pre-arbitration false-positive scores were 10.3 % (1,286/12,501) and 8.5 % (1,057/12,501) for 2D and 2D + 3D, respectively (P < 0.001). Recall rates were 2.9 % (365/12,621) and 3.7 % (463/12,621), respectively (P = 0.005). Cancer detection was 7.1 (90/12,621) and 9.4 (119/12,621) per 1,000 examinations, respectively (30 % increase, P < 0.001); positive predictive values (detected cancer patients per 100 recalls) were 24.7 % and 25.5 %, respectively (P = 0.97). Using 2D + 3D, double-reading radiologists detected 27 additional invasive cancers (P < 0.001). Double reading of 2D + 3D significantly improves the cancer detection rate in mammography screening. (orig.)

  1. Cost-effective screening methods for various single gene defects in single cells using high magnesium and total ionic strength and restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y H

    2000-12-01

    A reliable cost-effective protocol for the diagnosis of various defective genes in single blastomeres from preimplantation embryos has been established. Single cells were lysed in alkali buffer followed by neutralization and addition of a solution containing a high concentration of sulfhydryl reducing agents and MgCl(2) in relatively high ionic strength (0.45) (solution M) with or without restriction enzyme(s). The reaction mixture was incubated at 37 degrees C for 15 min followed by heat denaturation at 95 degrees C for 10 min. Respective polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture was then added to amplify each designated DNA region. The treatment of neutralized single cell lysate with adequate restriction enzyme(s) which do not cleave the target DNA sequences but shortens the genomic template DNA strands. This may facilitate primer-template annealing. The subsequent heat denaturation of the cell lysate in solution M indeed gave better signals of amplified DNA fragments on polyacrylamide gels. Defects in Tay Sachs exons 11 and 12, CF-DeltaF508 and CF-N1303K, and genomic sequences of ZFX/ZFY were successfully detected on gels after one-step PCR amplification, especially those cell lysates treated with restriction enzymes. In conclusion, a cost-effective one-step PCR method for amplifying various specific genomic regions containing a single gene defect in single cells has been established. This protocol may be applied to genetic screening for many single defective genes of biopsied single blastomeres from preimplantation in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos.

  2. The evolution of mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R H

    1992-01-01

    The history of mammography can be arbitrarily subdivided into three periods: The Age of Pioneers highlights the work of Salomon, Kleinschmidt, Warren, Vogel, Seabold, Gershon-Cohen, Leborgne, Egan, Gallager, Martin, Dodd, Strax and their colleagues; The Age of Technical Progress adds the names of Gould, Wolfe, and Gros and their co-workers; The Modern Era reflects the contributions of Price, Butler, Ostrum, Becker, Isard, Moskowitz, Sickles, Kopans, Homer, Tabár, and their associates. The ultimate success of mammography, the preeminent method of breast cancer screening, could not have been achieved without the intense vision, idealism, and scientific skill of its creators and nurturers. These investigators deserve a debt of gratitude that society can never adequately repay.

  3. 彩超联合钼靶x线在乳腺普查中的应用价值%The value of color Dopplor ultrasound and mammography combined for the diognsis of breast cancer in the breast image screening projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀荣; 朱长征

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the value of color Dopplor ultrasound and mammography combined for the diagnosis of breast cancer in the breast image screening project.Methods:7084 persons had undergone mammography and color Dopplor ultrasound and the suiting rate of diagnosis with pathology were statistical y analysed.Results:Suilting rate of diagnosis by mammography was 86.8%;suit ing rate by color Dopplor ultrasound was 88.7%,there isn’t statistical y difference between them (p>0.05),the suiting rate of diagnosis of color Dopplor ultrasound combined mammography was 96.2%,which had marked significant compared with mammography and color Dopplor ultrasound alone (p<0.05).Conclusion:Physical examination with color Dopplor ultrasound and mammography is the best method for breast cancer screening.%目的:探讨彩超与钼靶x线联合应用在乳腺筛查中的应用价值。方法:对7084人进行乳腺钼靶及彩超检查,并与病理诊断结果对照进行统计学分析。结果:彩超与病理诊断总符合率88.7%,钼靶与病理诊断总符合率86.8%,两者差异无显著性(p>0.05),彩超联合钼靶的符合率为96.2%,与单钼靶及单独彩超相比均有显著性差异(p<0.05)。结论:临床触诊+钼靶+彩超的模式是目前进行乳腺普查的最佳模式。

  4. Applying the European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening threshold contrast visibility assessment to digital systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metter, Richard; Heath, Michael; Fletcher-Heath, Lynn

    2006-03-01

    The need to assure the image quality of digital systems for mammography screening applications is now widely recognized. One approach is embodied in Part B of the European Protocol for the Quality Control of the Physical and Technical Aspects of Mammography Screening (EPQCM), which prescribes criteria for several interconnected image quality metrics. The focus of this study is on the "threshold contrast visibility" (TCV) protocol (section 2.4.1 of the EPQCM), in which human observers score images of a CDMAM or similar 4-AFC phantom. This section of the EPQCM currently omits many critical experimental details, which must be gleaned from ancillary documents. Given these, the purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of several remaining experimental variables, including phantom design, and the methods used for scoring and analysis, on the measured results. Preliminary studies of two CDMAM version 3.4 (CDMAM 3.4) phantoms have revealed a 17% difference in TCV when averaged over all target diameters from 0.1 to 2.0 mm. This indicates phantom variability may affect results at some sites. More importantly, we have shown that the current CDMAM phantom design, methods for scoring, and analysis, substantially limit the ability to measure system performance accurately and precisely. An improved phantom design has been shown to avoid these limitations. Viewing environment and presentation context affect the performance and efficiency of visual scoring of phantom images. An automated display tool has been developed that isolates individual 4-AFC targets of CDMAM phantom images, automatically optimizes window/level, and automatically records observers' scores. While not substantially changing TCV, the tool has increased scoring efficiency while mitigating several of the limitations associated with unassisted visual scoring. For example, learning bias and navigational issues are completely avoided. Ultimately, software-based ideal observer scoring will likely prove to be

  5. Computerised decision support systems in order communication for diagnostic, screening or monitoring test ordering: systematic reviews of the effects and cost-effectiveness of systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, C; Moxham, T; Wyatt, J C; Kay, J; Anderson, R; Stein, K

    2010-10-01

    Order communication systems (OCS) are computer applications used to enter diagnostic and therapeutic patient care orders and to view test results. Many potential benefits of OCS have been identified including improvements in clinician ordering patterns, optimisation of clinical time, and aiding communication processes between clinicians and different departments. Many OCS now include computerised decision support systems (CDSS), which are information systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. CDSS match individual patient characteristics to a computerised knowledge base, and software algorithms generate patient-specific recommendations. To investigate which CDSS in OCS are in use within the UK and the impact of CDSS in OCS for diagnostic, screening or monitoring test ordering compared to OCS without CDSS. To determine what features of CDSS are associated with clinician or patient acceptance of CDSS in OCS and what is known about the cost-effectiveness of CDSS in diagnostic, screening or monitoring test OCS compared to OCS without CDSS. A generic search to identify potentially relevant studies for inclusion was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CCTR), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects), Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database, IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) Xplore digital library, NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) and EconLit, searched between 1974 and 2009 with a total of 22,109 titles and abstracts screened for inclusion. CDSS for diagnostic, screening and monitoring test ordering OCS in use in the UK were identified through contact with the 24 manufacturers/suppliers currently contracted by the National Project for Information Technology (NpfIT) to provide either national or specialist decision support. A generic search to identify potentially relevant studies for inclusion in the review was

  6. Mammography activity in Norway 1983 to 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Braaten, Tonje; Njor, Sisse H

    2011-01-01

    In Norway, an organized screening mammography program, the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) started in four counties in 1996 and became nationwide in 2004. We collected data on pre-program screening activity, and in view of this activity we evaluated the potential impact of the p......In Norway, an organized screening mammography program, the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) started in four counties in 1996 and became nationwide in 2004. We collected data on pre-program screening activity, and in view of this activity we evaluated the potential impact...... of the program on breast cancer mortality in Norway....

  7. The cost-effectiveness of brief intervention versus brief treatment of Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Carolina; Cowell, Alexander; Dowd, William; Landwehr, Justin; Aldridge, Arnie; Bray, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) comparing the delivery of brief intervention (BI) with brief treatment (BT) within Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) programs. Quasi-experimental differences in observed baseline characteristics between BI and BT patients were adjusted using propensity score techniques. Incremental comparison of costs and health outcomes associated with BI and BT. Health-care settings in four US states participating in Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration SBIRT grant programs. Ninety patients who received BT and 878 who received BI. Per-patient cost of SBIRT, patient demographics and six measures of substance use: proportion using alcohol, proportion using alcohol to intoxication, days of alcohol use, days of alcohol use to intoxication, proportion using drugs and days using drugs. BI and BT were associated with better outcomes. The cost of SBIRT was significantly higher for BT patients ($75.54 versus 16.32, 95% confidence interval, P brief treatment if the goal is to abstain from alcohol. However, the higher effectiveness of brief treatment for this outcome is associated with considerable uncertainty and, because both brief intervention and brief treatment improve all outcomes, brief treatment does not appear to be a good use of resources. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care for individuals with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes : analysis of the ADDITION-UK cluster-randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, L.; Wilson, E. C. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Sandbaek, A.; Rutten, G. E. H. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074622781; Lauritzen, T.; Khunti, K.; Davies, M. J.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Griffin, S. J.; Simmons, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine the short- and long-term cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care among people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Cost-utility analysis in ADDITION-UK, a cluster-randomized controlled trial of early intensive treatment in people w

  9. Cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care for individuals with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes : analysis of the ADDITION-UK cluster-randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, L.; Wilson, E. C. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Sandbaek, A.; Rutten, G. E. H. M.; Lauritzen, T.; Khunti, K.; Davies, M. J.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Griffin, S. J.; Simmons, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine the short- and long-term cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care among people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Cost-utility analysis in ADDITION-UK, a cluster-randomized controlled trial of early intensive treatment in people w

  10. Mammography; Mamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U.; Baum, F. [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The book covers the stat-of-the art of mammographic diagnostics. The first chapter on the diagnostic methods, i.e. sonography and mammography, includes a short definition of the specific methods, technical device descriptions, information on radiation exposure and radiation protection, quality criteria and data analysis methods. The other chapters contain a variety of demonstrating images on the respective topics: definitions and indications, benign changes, evaluation criteria and borderline findings, mammal carcinomas, other malignomas, post-traumatic lesions, and prosthetics.

  11. Dual-Energy Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography: Enhancement Analysis on BI-RADS 4 Non-Mass Microcalcifications in Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yun-Chung; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Yu-Ching; Lo, Yung-Feng; Tsai, Hsiu-Pei; Ueng, Shir-Hwa; Chen, Shin-Cheh

    2016-01-01

    Background Mammography screening is a cost-efficient modality with high sensitivity for detecting impalpable cancer with microcalcifications, and results in reduced mortality rates. However, the probability of finding microcalcifications without associated cancerous masses varies. We retrospectively evaluated the diagnosis and cancer probability of the non-mass screened microcalcifications by dual-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (DE-CESM). Patients and Methods With ethical approval from our hospital, we enrolled the cases of DE-CESM for analysis under the following inclusion criteria: (1) referrals due to screened BI-RADS 4 microcalcifications; (2) having DE-CESM prior to stereotactic biopsy; (3) no associated mass found by sonography and physical examination; and (4) pathology-based diagnosis using stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy. We analyzed the added value of post-contrast enhancement on DE-CESM. Results A total of 94 biopsed lesions were available for analysis in our 87 women, yielding 27 cancers [19 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and 8 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC)], 32 pre-malignant and 35 benign lesions. Of these 94 lesions, 33 showed associated enhancement in DE-CESM while the other 61 did not. All 8 IDC (100%) and 16 of 19 DCIS (84.21%) showed enhancement, but the other 3 DCIS (15.79%) did not. Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were 88.89%, 86.56%, 72.72%, 95.08% and 87.24%, respectively. The performances of DE-CESM on both amorphous and pleomorphic microcalcifications were satisfactory (AUC 0.8 and 0.92, respectively). The pleomorphous microcalcifications with enhancement showed higher positive predictive value (90.00% vs 46.15%, p = 0.013) and higher cancer probability than the amorphous microcalcifications (46.3% VS 15.1%). The Odds Ratio was 4.85 (95% CI: 1.84–12.82). Conclusion DE-CESM might provide added value in assessing the non-mass screened breast

  12. Advanced Breast Cancer as Indicator of Quality Mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, Enrique

    2003-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the Mexican Republic. Mammography is the more important screening tool for detecting early breast cancer. Screening mammography involves taking x-rays from two views from each breast, typically from above (cranial-caudal view, CC) and from an oblique or angled view (mediolateral-oblique, MLO). The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the issue of patients with advanced breast cancer who have had a screening mammography. A general result of the survey is that 22.5% of all patients (102) with advanced breast cancer that participated in the study had previous screening mammography. But we should consider that 10% of breast cancers are not detected by mammography. Only 70% of the family doctors prescribed a diagnostic mammography when the first symptoms were diagnosed.

  13. Breast Density Awareness and Knowledge, and Intentions for Breast Cancer Screening in a Diverse Sample of Women Age Eligible for Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rivas, Marimer; Benjamin, Shayna; Andrews, Janna Z; Jandorf, Lina

    2017-08-14

    The objectives of this study were to assess breast density knowledge and breast density awareness, and to identify information associated with intention to complete routine and supplemental screening for breast cancer in a diverse sample of women age eligible for mammography. We quantitatively (self-report) assessed breast density awareness and knowledge (N = 264) in black (47.7%), Latina (35.2%), and white (17%) women recruited online and in the community. Most participants reported having heard about breast density (69.2%); less than one third knew their own breast density status (30.4%). Knowing their own breast density, believing that women should be notified of their breast density in their mammogram report, and feeling informed if being provided this information are associated with likelihood of completing mammogram. Intending mammogram completion and knowledge regarding the impact of breast density on mammogram accuracy are associated with likelihood of completing supplemental ultrasound tests of the breast. These findings help inform practitioners and policy makers about information and communication factors that influence breast cancer screening concerns and decisions. Knowing this information should prepare practitioners to better identify women who may have not been exposed to breast density messages.

  14. Transition from film to digital mammography: Impact for breast cancer screening through the national breast and cervical cancer early detection program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); L. Van Lier (Lisanne); C.B. Schechter (Clyde); D.U. Ekwueme (Donatus U.); J. Royalty (Janet); J.W. Miller (Jacqueline W.); A.M. Near (Aimee); K.A. Cronin (Kathleen); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); J.S. Mandelblatt (Jeanne); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides mammograms and diagnostic services for low-income, uninsured women aged 40-64 years. Mammography facilities within the NBCCEDP gradually shifted from plain-film to digital mammography. The pur

  15. Mammographic density and structural features can individually and jointly contribute to breast cancer risk assessment in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My; Nielsen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammographic density is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer. We investigated the association between three different methods of measuring density or parenchymal pattern/texture on digitized film-based mammograms, and examined to what extent textural features independently......-RADS alone). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the (relative) amount of fibroglandular tissue (density) and mammographic structural features (texture/parenchymal pattern) jointly can improve risk segregation of screening women, using information already available from normal screening routine, in respect...... to future personalized screening strategies....

  16. Establishing daily quality control (QC) in screen-film mammography using leeds tor (max) phantom at the breast imaging unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acaba, K. J. C.; Cinco, L. D.; Melchor, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    Daily QC tests performed on screen film mammography (SFM) equipment are essential to ensure that both SFM unit and film processor are working in a consistent manner. The Breast Imaging Unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute has been conducting QC following the test protocols in the IAEA Human Health Series No.2 manual. However, the availability of Leeds breast phantom (CRP E13039) in the facility made the task easier. Instead of carrying out separate tests on AEC constancy and light sensitometry, only one exposure of the phantom is done to accomplish the two tests. It was observed that measurements made on mAs output and optical densities (ODs) using the Leeds TOR (MAX) phantom are comparable with that obtained from the usual conduct of tests, taking into account the attenuation characteristic of the phantom. Image quality parameters such as low contrast and high contrast details were also evaluated from the phantom image. The authors recognize the usefulness of the phantom in determining technical factors that will help improve detection of smallest pathological details on breast images. The phantom is also convenient for daily QC monitoring and economical since less number of films is expended.

  17. SweDCIS: Radiotherapy after sector resection for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Results of a randomised trial in a population offered mammography screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emdin, Stefan O.; Granstrand, Bengt [Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Surgery; Ringberg, Anita [Malmoe Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; Sandelin, Kerstin [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar [Linkoeping Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Surgery; Nordgren, Hans [Uppsala Univ. Hospital (Sweden). CLM; Anderson, Harald [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Cancer Epidemiology; Garmo, Hans; Holmberg, Lars [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Regional Oncologic Centre; Wallgren, Arne [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2006-07-15

    We studied the effect of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) after breast sector resection for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The study protocol stipulated radical surgery but microscopically clear margins were not mandatory. We randomised 1,046 operated women to postoperative RT or control between 1987 and 1999. The primary endpoint was ipsilateral local recurrence. Secondary endpoints were contralateral breast cancer, distant metastasis and death. After a median follow-up of 5.2 years (range 0.1-13.8) there were 44 recurrences in the RT group corresponding to a cumulative incidence of 0.07 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05-0.10). In the control group there were 117 recurrences giving a cumulative incidence of 0.22 (95% CI 0.18-0.26) giving an overall hazard ratio of 0.33 (95% CI 0.24-0.47, p<0.0001). Twenty two percent of the patients had microscopically unknown or involved margins. We found no evidence for different effects of RT on the relative risk of invasive or in situ recurrence. Secondary endpoints did not differ. Women undergoing sector resection for DCIS under conditions of population based screening mammography benefit from postoperative RT to the breast. Seven patients needed RT-treatment to prevent one recurrence.

  18. False-positive findings in mammography screening induces short-term distress - breast cancer-specific concern prevails longer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Pilvikki Absetz, S; van Elderen, T M

    2000-01-01

    -ups at 2 and 12 months postscreening. At 2 months, there was a moderate multivariate effect of group on distress; and intrusive thinking and worry about breast cancer, in particular, were most frequent amongst the false positives. Intrusive thinking still prevailed at 12 months, in addition to a higher...... perceived breast cancer risk and susceptibility. Distress related to screening and false-positive findings seems to be moderate, but prevailing cancer-specific concerns call for improvements in screening programmes....... findings (n=1407), false-positive findings (n=492) and referents from outside the screening programme (n=1718, age 48-49 years). Distress was measured as illness worry, anxiety, depression, cancer beliefs and early detection behaviour. Measurements were one month before screening invitation with follow...

  19. Imaging evaluation of digital mammography X line camera operation in breast cancer screening%数字钼靶X线摄像术在乳腺癌筛查中的影像学评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏秀梅

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨数字化钼靶X线在乳腺癌筛查中的作用。方法:收治乳腺癌患者84例,对其数字X线钼靶摄片资料作回顾性分析。结果:X线征象与病理诊断结果基本相似。结论:乳腺钼靶X线摄影在女性乳腺癌的筛查中发挥重要的作用,准确率较高。%Objective:To investigate the effect of digital mammography in breast cancer screening.Methods:84 patients with breast cancer were selected,then we analyzed the digital mammography data retrospectively.Results:The X-ray findings and pathological diagnosis results were basically similar.Conclusion:Mammography plays an important role in the screening of breast cancer in women,and it also has high accuracy.

  20. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  1. Impact of intermediate mammography assessment on the likelihood of false-positive results in breast cancer screening programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascunce, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Instituto de Salud Publica, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Ederra, Maria; Delfrade, Josu; Erdozain, Nieves [Public Health Institute, CIBERESP, Navarra Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Pamplona (Spain); Baroja, Araceli [Fundacion Rioja Salud, Logrono (Spain); Zubizarreta, Raquel [Public Health and Planning Directorate, Health Office, Galician Breast Cancer Screening Programme, Galicia (Spain); Salas, Dolores [General Directorate Public Health and Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP), Valencia (Spain); Castells, Xavier [Mar Teaching Hospital, CIBERESP, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Breast cancer screening is offered to 100% of the target population in Spain and intermediate mammograms (IMs) are sometimes indicated. This study was aimed at analysing the frequency of IMs, the factors determining their recommendation, and their impact on the risk of false-positive results and the detection rate. Data from 3,471,307 mammograms from Spanish breast cancer screening programmes were included. 3.36% of the mammograms were IMs. The factors associated with the use of IMs were age, initial screening, previous invasive tests, a familial history of breast cancer and use of hormone replacement therapy. In screening episodes with an IM, the probability of a false-positive result was 13.74% (95% CI: 13.43-14.05), almost double that in episodes without IMs (6.02%, 95% CI 5.99-6.05). In young women with previous invasive procedures, a familial history of breast cancer or hormone replacement therapy use who were undergoing their initial screen, this probability was lower when IMs were performed. IMs always increased the detection rate. The factors prompting IMs should be characterised so that radiologists can systematise their recommendations according to the presence of the factors maximising the benefits and minimising the adverse effects of this procedure. (orig.)

  2. Cost effectiveness of adding nucleic acid testing to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus screening of blood donations in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Mapako, Tonderai; Khoza, Star; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Marowa, Lucy; Mvere, David; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUNDThe aim of this study was to assess the cost effectiveness of introducing individual-donation nucleic acid testing (ID-NAT), in addition to serologic tests, compared with the exclusive use of serologic tests for the identification of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hu

  3. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) ... it Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on ...

  4. A prospective assessment of racial/ethnic differences in future mammography behavior among women who had early mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Julie M.; Walker, Rod; Haneuse, Sebastien; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND 29% of women aged 30-39 report having had a mammogram though sensitivity and specificity are low. We investigate racial/ethnic differences in future mammography behavior among women who had a baseline screening mammogram prior to age 40. METHODS Using 1994-2008 data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC), we identified 29,390 women ages 35-39 with a baseline screening mammogram. We followed this cohort for two outcomes: (1) future BCSC mammography between ages 40-45; and (2) among those, delay in screening mammography until ages 43-45 compared to 40-42. Using adjusted log-linear models, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of these outcomes by race/ethnicity, while also considering the impact of false positive/true negative (FP/TN) baseline mammography results on these outcomes. RESULTS Relative to non-Hispanic white women, Hispanic women had an increased risk of no future BCSC mammography (RR: 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.30); Asian women had a decreased risk (RR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.61-0.74). Women with a FP, compared to TN, had a decreased risk of no future BCSC mammography (RR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.85-0.95). Among those with future BCSC screening mammography, African American women were more likely to delay the timing (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.09-1.45). The interaction between race/ethnicity and FP/TN baseline results was not significant. CONCLUSIONS Race/ethnicity is differentially associated with future BCSC mammography and the timing of screening mammography after age 40. IMPACT These findings introduce the need for research that examines disparities in lifetime mammography use patterns from the initiation of mammography screening. PMID:21242330

  5. Mass screening on abdominal aortic aneurysm in men aged 60 to 65 years in The Netherlands. Impact on life expectancy and cost-effectiveness using a Markov model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boll, A.P.M.; Severens, J.L.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Vliet, J.A. van der

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To predict the costs and effects on life expectancy of an AAA screening programme. METHODS: A Markov model was designed to compare the effects of a single screening for a cohort of men 60-65 years with the current no screening strategy. The following health states were distinguished: no

  6. CONTRAST ENHANCED SPECTRAL MAMMOGRAPHY (CESM (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Rozhkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of early diagnosis of a breast cancer is extremely actual. Growth of incidence at women from 19 to 39 years increased for 34% over the last 10 years. It defines need of acceleration of development and deployment of the latest technologies of identification of the earliest symptoms of diseases. The x-ray mammography is the conducting method among of all radiological methods of diagnostics. Nevertheless a number of restrictions of method reduces its efficiency. The technologies increasing informational content of x-ray mammography – the leading method of screening – due to use of artificial contrasting and advantages of digital technologies are constantly developed. In this review it is described works, in which the authors having clinical experience of application of CESM – contrastenhanced spectral mammography on representative group of women. Positive sides and restrictions of new technology in comparison with mammography, ultrasonography and MRT are shown in this article.

  7. The Assessment of the Likelihood of Mammography Usage with Relevant Factors among Women with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Pei-Tseng; Tsai, Wen-Chen; Chiou, Shang-Jyh

    2012-01-01

    Research that identifies the determinants of low mammography use among disabled people is scant. This study examines the determining factors related to the low usage of mammography among women with disabilities. To identify the barriers that prevent women with disabilities from participating in mammography screening can help authorities conceive…

  8. The Design of a Multi-component Intervention to Promote Screening Mammography in an American Indian Community: The Native Women’s Health Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni L. Tolma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is an important public health issue among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN women in the US. This article describes the design and implementation of a culturally sensitive intervention to promote breast health among AI/AN women through a hybrid model that incorporates clinical and community-based approaches. This is one of the first studies using this model addressing breast cancer disparities among AI/AN populations in the US. Methods: The Theory of Planned Behavior was used as the guiding framework of the intervention and Community Based Participatory Research was the primary vehicle for the intervention planning and implementation. Three preliminary studies took place that aimed to identify qualitatively and quantitatively what deterred or encouraged AI women to get past or future mammograms. The research results were shared with community members who, through a prioritization process, identified the theoretical focus of the intervention and its corresponding activities. The priority population consisted of AI women ages 40–74, with no recent mammogram, and no breast cancer history. Results: The intervention centered on the promotion of social modeling and physician recommendation. The main corresponding activities included enhancing patient-physician communication about screening mammography through a structured dialogue, receipt of a breast cancer brochure, participation in an inter-generational discussion group, and a congratulatory bracelet upon receipt of a mammogram. Environmental and policy related changes also were developed. Conclusion: Creating a theory-based, culturally-sensitive intervention through tribal participatory research is a challenging approach towards eliminating breast cancer disparities among hard-to-reach populations.

  9. Impact on the recall rate of digital breast tomosynthesis as an adjunct to digital mammography in the screening setting. A double reading experience and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Luca A; Di Leo, Giovanni; Clauser, Paola; Trimboli, Rubina M; Verardi, Nicola; Fedeli, Maria P; Girometti, Rossano; Tafà, Alfredo; Bruscoli, Paola; Saguatti, Gianni; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the impact on recall rate (RR) of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) associated with digital mammography (DM+DBT), compared to DM alone, evaluate the impact of double reading (DR) and review the literature. Ethics committees approved this multicenter study. Patients gave informed consent. Women recalled from population-based screening reading were included. Reference standard was histology and/or ≥ 1 year follow up. Negative multiple assessment was considered for patients lost at follow up. Two blinded readers (R1, R2) evaluated first DM and subsequently DM+DBT. RR, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), were calculated for R1, R2, and DR. Cohen κ and χ(2) were used for R1-R2 agreement and RR related to breast density. We included 280 cases (41 malignancies, 66 benign lesions, and 173 negative examinations). The RR reduction was 43% (R1), 58% (R2), 43% (DR). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV were: 93%, 67%, 71%, 33%, 98% for R1; 88%, 73%, 75%, 36%, 97% for R2; 98%, 55%, 61%, 27%, 99% for DR. The agreement was higher for DM+DBT (κ=0.459 versus κ=0.234). Reduction in RR was independent from breast density (p=0.992). DBT was confirmed to reduce RR, as shown by 13 of 15 previous studies (reported reduction 6-82%, median 31%). This reduction is confirmed when using DR. DBT allows an increased inter-reader agreement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of the radiographer on the pain felt during mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, M. van; Verslegers, I.; Biltjes, I.; De Schepper, A. [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp (UZA), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem (Belgium); Mortelmans, D.; Bruyninckx, E.; Hove, E. Van [Department of Political and Social Sciences, Department PSW, University of Antwerp (UIA), Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2003-10-01

    Mammography is the only useful examination in screening for breast cancer. Mortality from breast cancer can be reduced if women go regularly for a screening mammography. Moreover, it is still the key examination in diagnosis of breast diseases and in the follow-up of patients treated for breast cancer. Pain with mammography can deter women from going for regular screening or follow-up; therefore, it is important to reduce pain experience or discomfort from mammography. In this study we evaluate the impact of the ''radiographer'' on the pain risk during mammography by analysing questionnaires filled in by women and radiographers. Study results reveal that the opinion of the radiographer, the information and communication during the examination and the number of years of experience are important factors in pain and discomfort experience. The attitude of the radiographer plays an important role in the pain experience. (orig.)

  11. Influence of the radiographer on the pain felt during mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Goethem, M; Mortelmans, D; Bruyninckx, E; Verslegers, I; Biltjes, I; Van Hove, E; De Schepper, A

    2003-10-01

    Mammography is the only useful examination in screening for breast cancer. Mortality from breast cancer can be reduced if women go regularly for a screening mammography. Moreover, it is still the key examination in diagnosis of breast diseases and in the follow-up of patients treated for breast cancer. Pain with mammography can deter women from going for regular screening or follow-up; therefore, it is important to reduce pain experience or discomfort from mammography. In this study we evaluate the impact of the "radiographer" on the pain risk during mammography by analysing questionnaires filled in by women and radiographers. Study results reveal that the opinion of the radiographer, the information and communication during the examination and the number of years of experience are important factors in pain and discomfort experience. The attitude of the radiographer plays an important role in the pain experience.

  12. Screening mammography interpretation test: more frequent mistakes; Laboratorio di radiologia-Modulo di senologia: errori piu' frequenti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozzi, Gino; Ganzetti, Alessandra [U.O. Radiologia P.O. Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Genova Univ., Genova (Italy). U.O. Radiologia Clinica; Conti, Giovanni Maria [Istituto di Radiologia Ospedali Riuniti, Parma (Italy); Bodini, Maria; Fiorentino, Carla; Marini, Ugo Paolo [P.O. Cremonese Azienda Istituti Ospedalieri, Cremona (Italy). Servizio di Radiologia; Santini, Dolores [Azienda USL Modena Poliambulatori Distretto 3, Modena (Italy). Screening Mammografico

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To present the mammographic cases most commonly misinterpreted by the participants in the mammography self-test proposed by the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) National Congress in Rimini, Italy, 2002, by analysing the findings responsible for errors, suggesting reasons for the errors, and assessing possible inadequacies in the format of the test. Materials and methods: The self-test was performed on the mammograms of 160 cases (32 positive and 128 negative for cancer as confirmed by histology). The mammograms had been taken in the four standard projections and placed on four multi-panel diaphanoscopes, each displaying a set of 40 cases comprising benign and malignant cases in equal proportions. The participants were given pre-printed forms on which to note down their diagnostic judgement. We evaluated a total of 134 fully-completed forms. Among these, we identified the 23 cases most frequently misread by over 15 participants in percentages varying between 40-90%. Of these cases, 10 were malignancies and 13 were negative mammograms. On review, we also assessed the diagnostic contribution of complementary investigations (not available the participants). The 134 fully-completed forms (all of the 40 cases) yielded a total of 5360 responses, 1180 of which (22.01%) were incorrect. Of these 823 out of the 4288 cases expected to be negative (19.2%) were false positive, and 357 out of the 1072 cases expected to be positive (33.3%) were false negative. As regards the 23 most frequently misread cases, these were 10/32 (31.25%) mammograms positive for malignancy and 13/128 (10.15%) negative mammograms or mammograms showing benign disease. The 10 malignancies included 7 infiltrating ductal carcinomas, 1 infiltrating cribriform carcinoma, 1 infiltrating tubular carcinoma, and 1 carcinoma in situ. The 13 cases of benign disease - as established by histology or long-term follow-up - mistaken for malignancies by the test participants were fibrocystic breast

  13. BIRADS classification in mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleyguier, Corinne; Ayadi, Salma; Van Nguyen, Kim; Vanel, Daniel; Dromain, Clarisse; Sigal, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The Breast Imaging Report and Data System (BIRADS) of the American College of Radiology (ACR) is today largely used in most of the countries where breast cancer screening is implemented. It is a tool defined to reduce variability between radiologists when creating the reports in mammography, ultrasonography or MRI. Some changes in the last version of the BIRADStrade mark have been included to reduce the inaccuracy of some categories, especially for category 4. The BIRADStrade mark includes a lexicon and descriptive diagrams of the anomalies, recommendations for the mammographic report as well as councils and examples of mammographic cases. This review describes the mammographic items of the BIRADS classification with its more recent developments, while detailing the advantages and limits of this classification.

  14. Mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyers, S., E-mail: steven.weyers@ugent.b [Department of Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Villeirs, G.; Vanherreweghe, E. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Verstraelen, H. [Department of Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Monstrey, S. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Van den Broecke, R.; Gerris, J. [Department of Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Data on the necessity of performing screening mammographies in transsexual women are lacking. The main objective of this study was to assess the possibility to perform mammography and breast sonography in transsexual women. Fifty Dutch-speaking transsexual women were interviewed about the following: attitude towards mammography and breast sonography, importance attributed to and satisfaction with breast appearance, opinion about the necessity of breast check-up, expectations regarding discomfort during the exams and knowledge about the breast surgery. A fasting blood sample, clinical breast exam, mammography and breast sonography were performed. At mammography the following parameters were noted: density, technical quality, location of the prostheses, presence of any abnormalities and painfulness. At sonography the following parameters were recorded: density, presence of cysts, visualisation of retro-areolar ducts or any abnormalities. Twenty-three percent of patients are not aware of the type of breast implants and 79% do not know their position to the pectoral muscles. Patient satisfaction with the appearance of their breasts was rather high (7.94 on a scale of 0-10). Mean expected and experienced pain from mammography was low (4.37 and 2.00 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in expected pain between those who already had mammography and those who did not. There was a significant positive correlation between the expected and the experienced pain. Mammography and breast sonography were technically feasible and no gross anomalies were detected. Since both exams were judged as nearly painless, 98% of transsexual women intended to come back if they would be invited. Since breast cancer risk in transsexual women is largely unknown and breast exams are very well accepted, breast screening habits in this population should not differ from those of biological women.

  15. Audit of mammography requests in Abakaliki, South-East Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eni, U E; Ekwedigwe, K C; Sunday-Adeoye, I; Daniyan, Abc; Isikhuemen, M E

    2017-03-07

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer in women in both developed and developing countries. Screening mammography detects breast cancer even before a lump can be palpated, with better prognosis. The introduction of mammographic technique for screening breast cancer, despite its importance, has been slow to adopt and virtually non-existent in many parts of Sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. For this reason, the indications of mammography have not been well defined in our setting. The aim of this study was to audit our mammography requests, with a view to improving its application in our setting. This is a descriptive study carried out on 69 female patients who had mammography at the National Obstetric Fistula Centre, Abakaliki, from January 2014 to December 2015. Findings on clinical examination were entered in a proforma. Mammography was performed in craniocaudal and mediolateral views using the Lorad M-IV (film-screen) mammography machine. Data was analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 21. All 69 patients were females. Their mean age was 42.1 ± 11 years. Majority of the patients (69.6%) were between 30 and 49 years. The commonest indication for mammography was breast lump which was found in 46 patients (66.7%). Breast pain was present in 36 (52.2%) of patients. The different Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categories were BIRADS 0: 20 (28.99%), BIRADS 1: 8 (11.59%), BIRADS 2: 9 (13.04%), BIRADS 3: 4 (5.8%), BIRADS 4: 19 (27.54%) and BIRADS 5: 9 (13.04%). Diagnostic mammography remains the commonest indication for mammography in our setting. Public awareness, poverty reduction and ready availability of mammography facilities are required to improve screening mammography in our setting.

  16. Towards Universal Screening for Toxoplasmosis: Rapid, Cost-Effective, and Simultaneous Detection of Anti-Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA Antibodies by Use of Very Small Serum Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Swinburne A J

    2016-07-01

    Rapid, cost-effective, and early determination of the serological status of potentially infected individuals, particularly pregnant women, can be critical in preventing life-threatening infections and subsequent fetal congenital abnormalities. An article in this issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology (X. Li, C. Pomares, G. Gonfrier, B. Koh, S. Zhu, M. Gong, J. G. Montoya, and H. Dai, J Clin Microbiol 54:1726-1733, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.03371-15) describes an innovative multiplexed immunoassay that offers a path toward universal screening.

  17. Breast Cancer Risk Assessment at the Time of Screening Mammography: Perceptions and Clinical Management Outcomes for Women at High Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Nichole A; Byrne, Lindsey; Collins, Christy; Reynolds, Kelly; Bell, Jeffrey G

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of a breast cancer risk assessment (BCRA) at the time of screening mammogram. Women whose BCRA indicated a high risk for cancer received a letter with instructions for breast health care and genetic counseling if appropriate. After 6 months this group received surveys to evaluate their risk perception and their recall of, and compliance with, recommendations. We also explored the impact of other variables such as a recommendation for genetic counseling and physician communication with the women. After the BCRA, the majority of high risk women reported no change in their perceived risk of cancer. A woman's perceived risk of cancer after a BCRA was significantly associated with her recall of recommendations for breast health care, but not with compliance. A recommendation for genetic counseling was not significantly related to women's perceived risk of cancer after the BCRA. Ten percent of women who should have obtained genetic counseling actually completed an appointment. Women who discussed their BCRA results with their physicians were more compliant with a six month breast exam with a doctor (53% vs 17%, p = 0.018). Overall, women felt that the BCRA was helpful and did not cause undue stress or anxiety. Although the cohort's compliance with recommendations was suboptimal, physicians' interactions with their patients may have a positive influence on their compliance.

  18. CT colonography and cost-effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavranezouli, Ifigeneia [University College London, National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, Centre for Outcomes Research and Effectiveness, Sub-department of Clinical Health Psychology, London (United Kingdom); East, James E. [St Marks Hospital, Imperial College London, Wolfson Unit for Endoscopy, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Stuart A. [University College Hospital, Specialist X-Ray, London (United Kingdom); University College Hospital, Department of Imaging, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    CT colonography (CTC) is increasingly advocated as an effective initial screening tool for colorectal cancer. Nowadays, policy-makers are increasingly interested in cost-effectiveness issues. A number of studies assessing the cost-effectiveness of CTC have been published to date. The majority of findings indicate that CTC is probably not cost-effective when colonoscopy is available, but this conclusion is sensitive to a number of key parameters. This review discusses the findings of these studies, and considers those factors which most influence final conclusions, notably intervention costs, compliance rates, effectiveness of colonoscopy, and the assumed prevalence and natural history of diminutive advanced polyps. (orig.)

  19. Costo-efectividad de políticas para el tamizaje de cáncer de mama en México Cost-effectiveness of breast cancer screening policies in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanacio Valencia-Mendoza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Generar información de costo-efectividad para optimizar las políticas para el cáncer de mama (CaMa en México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se construyó un modelo Markov que incorpora cuatro procesos interrelacionados del CaMa: la evolución natural, la detección con mamografía, el tratamiento y la dinámica de mortalidad por otras causas, a partir del cual se modelaron 13 estrategias. RESULTADOS: Las estrategias (edad de inicio, porcentaje de cobertura, periodicidad en años= (48, 25, 2, (40, 50, 2 y (40, 50, 1 representan la ruta óptima de expansión del programa, con un costo por año de vida ganado de 75.3, 116.4 y 171.1 (miles de pesos, respectivamente. CONCLUSIONES: Las estrategias sobre la vía óptima de expansión del programa producen una razón de costo por año de vida ganado menor a dos veces el PIB per cápita, por lo que se encuentran dentro de lo que se considera una intervención costo-efectiva según los criterios de la OMS.OBJECTIVE: Generate cost-effectiveness information to allow policy makers optimize breast cancer (BC policy in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We constructed a Markov model that incorporates four interrelated processes of the disease: the natural history; detection using mammography; treatment; and other competing-causes mortality, according to which 13 different strategies were modeled. RESULTS: Strategies (starting age, % of coverage, frequency in years= (48, 25, 2, (40, 50, 2 and (40, 50, 1 constituted the optimal method for expanding the BC program, yielding 75.3, 116.4 and 171.1 thousand pesos per life-year saved, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The strategies included in the optimal method for expanding the program produce a cost per life-year saved of less than two times the GNP per capita and hence are cost-effective according to WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health criteria.

  20. Dual-energy in mammography: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafroudi, Hamid; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Li, Huai; Steller Artz, Dorothy E.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the feasi