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Sample records for cost effective hydrogen

  1. Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liwei [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Deng, Xunming [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Abken, Anka [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Cao, Xinmin [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Du, Wenhui [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Vijh, Aarohi [Xunlight Corporation, Toledo, OH (United States); Ingler, William [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Chen, Changyong [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Fan, Qihua [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Collins, Robert [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Compaan, Alvin [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Yan, Yanfa [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Giolando, Dean [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-10-29

    The objective of this project is to develop critical technologies required for cost-effective production of hydrogen from sunlight and water using a-Si triple junction solar cell based photo-electrodes. In this project, Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE) and its collaborating organizations utilize triple junction a-Si thin film solar cells as the core element to fabricate photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Triple junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe solar cell is an ideal material for making cost-effective PEC system which uses sun light to split water and generate hydrogen. It has the following key features: 1) It has an open circuit voltage (Voc ) of ~ 2.3V and has an operating voltage around 1.6V. This is ideal for water splitting. There is no need to add a bias voltage or to inter-connect more than one solar cell. 2) It is made by depositing a-Si/a-SiGe/aSi-Ge thin films on a conducting stainless steel substrate which can serve as an electrode. When we immerse the triple junction solar cells in an electrolyte and illuminate it under sunlight, the voltage is large enough to split the water, generating oxygen at the Si solar cell side (for SS/n-i-p/sunlight structure) and hydrogen at the back, which is stainless steel side. There is no need to use a counter electrode or to make any wire connection. 3) It is being produced in large rolls of 3ft wide and up to 5000 ft long stainless steel web in a 25MW roll-to-roll production machine. Therefore it can be produced at a very low cost. After several years of research with many different kinds of material, we have developed promising transparent, conducting and corrosion resistant (TCCR) coating material; we carried out extensive research on oxygen and hydrogen generation catalysts, developed methods to make PEC electrode from production-grade a-Si solar cells; we have designed and tested various PEC module cases and carried out extensive outdoor testing; we were able to obtain a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH

  2. Solar to hydrogen: Compact and cost effective CPV field for rooftop operation and hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-11-25

    Current commercial CPV systems are designed as large units which are targeted to be installed in open desert fields with high DNI availability. It appeared that the CPV is among some of those technologies which gained very little attention of people, with less customers and market. For conventional PV systems, the installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings have a significant share in the total installed capacity of PV systems. That is why for most of the countries, the PV installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings are aimed to be increased to half of total installed PV. On the other hand, there is no commercial CPV system available to be suitable for rooftop operation, giving motivation for the development of CPV field of compact systems. This paper discusses the development of a CPV field for the rooftop operation, comprising of compact CPV system with cost effective but highly accurate solar tracking sensor and wireless master slave control. In addition, the performance of the developed CPV systems is evaluated for production of hydrogen, which can be used as energy carrier or energy storage and a maximum solar to hydrogen efficiency of 18% is obtained. However, due to dynamic nature of the weather data and throughout the day variations in the performance of CPV and electrolyser, the solar to hydrogen performance is proposed to be reported as daily and long term average efficiency. The CPV-Hydrogen system showed daily average conversion efficiency of 15%, with solar to hydrogen production rate of 218 kW h/kg.

  3. Extensive analysis of hydrogen costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinea, D M; Martin, D; Garcia-Alegre, M C; Guinea, D [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Arganda, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Automatica Industrial; Agila, W E [Acciona Infraestructuras, Alcobendas, Madrid (Spain). Dept. I+D+i

    2010-07-01

    Cost is a key issue in the spreading of any technology. In this work, the cost of hydrogen is analyzed and determined, for hydrogen obtained by electrolysis. Different contributing partial costs are taken into account to calculate the hydrogen final cost, such as energy and electrolyzers taxes. Energy cost data is taken from official URLs, while electrolyzer costs are obtained from commercial companies. The analysis is accomplished under different hypothesis, and for different countries: Germany, France, Austria, Switzerland, Spain and the Canadian region of Ontario. Finally, the obtained costs are compared to those of the most used fossil fuels, both in the automotive industry (gasoline and diesel) and in the residential sector (butane, coal, town gas and wood), and the possibilities of hydrogen competing against fuels are discussed. According to this work, in the automotive industry, even neglecting subsidies, hydrogen can compete with fossil fuels. Hydrogen can also compete with gaseous domestic fuels. Electrolyzer prices were found to have the highest influence on hydrogen prices. (orig.)

  4. Multi-Scale Ordered Cell Structure for Cost Effective Production of Hydrogen by HTWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, Elango [Ceramatec, Inc., West Valley City, UT (United States); Rao, Ranjeet [PARC, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Colella, Whitney [Gaia Energy Research Inst. LLC, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2017-12-20

    Production of hydrogen using an electrochemical device provides for large scale, high efficiency conversion and storage of electrical energy. When renewable electricity is used for conversion of steam to hydrogen, a low-cost and low emissions pathway to hydrogen production emerges. This project was intended to demonstrate a high efficiency High Temperature Water Splitting (HTWS) stack for the electrochemical production of low cost H2. The innovations investigated address the limitations of the state of the art through the use of a novel architecture that introduces macro-features to provide mechanical support of a thin electrolyte, and micro-features of the electrodes to lower polarization losses. The approach also utilizes a combination of unique sets of fabrication options that are scalable to achieve manufacturing cost objectives. The development of HTWS process and device is guided by techno-economic and life cycle analyses.

  5. Semi-solid state fermentation of bagasse for hydrogen production; the cost-effective approach in Indian context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.; Asthana, R.K.; Singh, A.P.

    2006-01-01

    Semi-solid state fermentation route of hydrogen production from agro-waste sugar cane bagasse was tried using the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas (BHU strain-1) and the non-photosynthetic Enterobacter aerogenes MTCC2822. The process seems an alternative to submerged fermentation that requires high volumes of nutrient broth. Bagasse (10 g) pre-hydrolyzed with NaOH (2%, w/v) was coated with Ca-alginate (1.5%, v/v) containing Rhodopseudomonas and E. aerogenes in the co-immobilized state (300 μg bacterial biomass ml -1 ). The fermenting medium was just 150 ml to sustain the moistened bagasse in a 0.5 L fermenter kept in light. A parallel set of free bacterial cells served as control. Hydrogen production by the immobilized sets reached 30 L within 60 h with the average rate of 0.177 L H 2 h -1 . For free cells, the values for hydrogen output (20 L) or the rate 0.1125 L H 2 h -1 were approximately 1.5-fold low. It is proposed that semi-solid fermentation route of hydrogen production from bagasse will be a cost-effective technology in countries generating this agro-waste. (authors)

  6. Semi-solid state fermentation of bagasse for hydrogen production; the cost-effective approach in Indian context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Asthana, R.K.; Singh, A.P. [Centre of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, (India)

    2006-07-01

    Semi-solid state fermentation route of hydrogen production from agro-waste sugar cane bagasse was tried using the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas (BHU strain-1) and the non-photosynthetic Enterobacter aerogenes MTCC2822. The process seems an alternative to submerged fermentation that requires high volumes of nutrient broth. Bagasse (10 g) pre-hydrolyzed with NaOH (2%, w/v) was coated with Ca-alginate (1.5%, v/v) containing Rhodopseudomonas and E. aerogenes in the co-immobilized state (300 {mu}g bacterial biomass ml{sup -1}). The fermenting medium was just 150 ml to sustain the moistened bagasse in a 0.5 L fermenter kept in light. A parallel set of free bacterial cells served as control. Hydrogen production by the immobilized sets reached 30 L within 60 h with the average rate of 0.177 L H{sub 2} h{sup -1}. For free cells, the values for hydrogen output (20 L) or the rate 0.1125 L H{sub 2} h{sup -1} were approximately 1.5-fold low. It is proposed that semi-solid fermentation route of hydrogen production from bagasse will be a cost-effective technology in countries generating this agro-waste. (authors)

  7. Hydrogen Station Cost Estimates: Comparing Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator Results with other Recent Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This report compares hydrogen station cost estimates conveyed by expert stakeholders through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculation (HSCC) to a select number of other cost estimates. These other cost estimates include projections based upon cost models and costs associated with recently funded stations.

  8. Comparative costs and benefits of hydrogen vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The costs and benefits of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel are compared to gasoline, natural gas, and battery-powered vehicles. Costs, energy, efficiency, and tail-pipe and full fuel cycle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases were estimated for hydrogen from a broad range of delivery pathways and scales: from individual vehicle refueling systems to large stations refueling 300 cars/day. Hydrogen production from natural gas, methanol, and ammonia, as well as water electrolysis based on alkaline or polymer electrolytes and steam electrolysis using solid oxide electrolytes are considered. These estimates were compared to estimates for competing fuels and vehicles, and used to construct oil use, air pollutant, and greenhouse gas emission scenarios for the U.S. passenger car fleet from 2005-2050. Fuel costs need not be an overriding concern in evaluating the suitability of hydrogen as a fuel for passenger vehicles. The combined emissions and oil import reduction benefits of hydrogen cars are estimated to be significant, valued at up to {approximately}$400/yr for each hydrogen car when primarily clean energy sources are used for hydrogen production. These benefits alone, however, become tenuous as the basis supporting a compelling rationale for hydrogen fueled vehicles, if efficient, advanced fossil-fuel hybrid electric vehicles (HEV`s) can achieve actual on-road emissions at or below ULEV standards in the 2005-2015 timeframe. It appears a robust rationale for hydrogen fuel and vehicles will need to also consider unique, strategic, and long-range benefits of hydrogen vehicles which can be achieved through the use of production, storage, delivery, and utilization methods for hydrogen which are unique among fuels: efficient use of intermittent renewable energy sources, (e,g, wind, solar), small-scale feasibility, fuel production at or near the point of use, electrolytic production, diverse storage technologies, and electrochemical conversion to electricity.

  9. Cost reductions in nickel-hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Richard L.; Sindorf, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    Significant progress was made toward the development of a commercially marketable hydrogen nickel oxide battery. The costs projected for this battery are remarkably low when one considers where the learning curve is for commercialization of this system. Further developmental efforts on this project are warranted as the H2/NiO battery is already cost competitive with other battery systems.

  10. Development & Optimization of Materials and Processes for a Cost Effective Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production System. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, Eric W

    2011-01-17

    The overall project objective was to apply high throughput experimentation and combinatorial methods together with novel syntheses to discover and optimize efficient, practical, and economically sustainable materials for photoelectrochemical production of bulk hydrogen from water. Automated electrochemical synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening systems were designed and constructed and used to study a variety of new photoelectrocatalytic materials. We evaluated photocatalytic performance in the dark and under illumination with or without applied bias in a high-throughput manner and did detailed evaluation on many materials. Significant attention was given to -Fe2O3 based semiconductor materials and thin films with different dopants were synthesized by co-electrodeposition techniques. Approximately 30 dopants including Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Ti, Pt, etc. were investigated. Hematite thin films doped with Al, Ti, Pt, Cr, and Mo exhibited significant improvements in efficiency for photoelectrochemical water splitting compared with undoped hematite. In several cases we collaborated with theorists who used density functional theory to help explain performance trends and suggest new materials. The best materials were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visual spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoelectrocatalytic performance of the thin films was evaluated and their incident photon

  11. Characterization of leaf waste based biochar for cost effective hydrogen sulphide removal from biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Shivali; Vijay, Virendra Kumar; Subbarao, P M V; Chandra, Ram; Ghosh, Pooja; Shah, Goldy; Kapoor, Rimika; Vijay, Vandit; Koutu, Vaibhav; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2018-02-01

    Installation of decentralized units for biogas production along with indigenous upgradation systems can be an effective approach to meet growing energy demands of the rural population. Therefore, readily available leaf waste was used to prepare biochar at different temperatures and employed for H 2 S removal from biogas produced via anaerobic digestion plant. It is found that biochar prepared via carbonization of leaf waste at 400 °C effectively removes 84.2% H 2 S (from 1254 ppm to 201 ppm) from raw biogas for 25 min in a continuous adsorption tower. Subsequently, leaf waste biochar compositional, textural and morphological properties before and after H 2 S adsorption have been analyzed using proximate analysis, CHNS, BET surface area, FTIR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. It is found that BET surface area, pore size, and textural properties of leaf waste biochar plays a crucial role in H 2 S removal from the biogas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Final Report: Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Houchins, Cassidy [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel A. [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) has identified hydrogen storage as a key enabling technology for advancing hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in transportation, stationary, and portable applications. Consequently, FCTO has established targets to chart the progress of developing and demonstrating viable hydrogen storage technologies for transportation and stationary applications. This cost assessment project supports the overall FCTO goals by identifying the current technology system components, performance levels, and manufacturing/assembly techniques most likely to lead to the lowest system storage cost. Furthermore, the project forecasts the cost of these systems at a variety of annual manufacturing rates to allow comparison to the overall 2017 and “Ultimate” DOE cost targets. The cost breakdown of the system components and manufacturing steps can then be used to guide future research and development (R&D) decisions. The project was led by Strategic Analysis Inc. (SA) and aided by Rajesh Ahluwalia and Thanh Hua from Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Lin Simpson at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Since SA coordinated the project activities of all three organizations, this report includes a technical description of all project activity. This report represents a summary of contract activities and findings under SA’s five year contract to the US Department of Energy (Award No. DE-EE0005253) and constitutes the “Final Scientific Report” deliverable. Project publications and presentations are listed in the Appendix.

  13. COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Lanning; J. Arps

    2005-08-31

    Efforts in this quarter were concentrated on developing vacuum processing procedures to produce thinner (<4 {micro}m-thick), defect-free films over larger areas (>100 cm{sup 2}). We continued to test three different types of rigid supporting substrates, thermally oxidized silicon (10 cm diameter), polished borosilicate glass (10 cm diameter), and soda-lime glass (>100 cm{sup 2} areas), each representing a different cost, surface roughness, and chemistry. Mechanical integrity, defect density, and release characteristics of the films, though similar for the oxidized silicon and borosilicate glass, were distinctly different for the inexpensive soda-lime (float) glass; i.e., more sensitive to surface impurities. In general, films less than 4 {micro}m-thick were shown to be very sensitive to surface condition of the supporting substrate, particularly in the case of the soda-lime glass, to the point where surface strain overrode and dominated the intrinsic bulk stresses that are produced during the growth process. Therefore, in the near term (over the next quarter), large area films (>100 cm{sup 2}) will be produced at a minimum thickness of 5 {micro}m while further development will be conducted in subsequent quarters to reduce membrane thickness in large area films. Continued hydrogen permeation experiments and characterization of 5 and 10 {micro}m-thick, Pd-Cu films, with compositions near the 60/40 (Pd/Cu phase boundary) in combination with air oxidation treatments to improve performance. Pure hydrogen permeability for an as-received, 5 {micro}m film at 400 C was determined to be 1.3 x 10{sup -4} cm{sup 3}(STP) {center_dot} cm/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s {center_dot} cmHg{sup 0.5} at steady state. Even a membrane {approx} 10 {micro}m-thick, exhibited a steady state hydrogen flux of 32 cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2}min after air exposure, which, when normalized for DOE's Office of Fossil Energy's specified hydrogen flux with a {Delta}P of 100 psi and a permeate

  14. Development of a market penetration forecasting model for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles considering infrastructure and cost reduction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yong; Kim, Jong Wook; Lee, Duk Hee

    2011-01-01

    In order to cope with climate change, the development and deployment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (HFCVs) is becoming more important. In this study, we developed a forecasting model for HFCVs based on the generalized Bass diffusion model and a simulation model using system dynamics. Through the developed model, we could forecast that the saturation of HFCVs in Korea can be moved up 12 years compared with the US. A sensitivity analysis on external variables such as price reduction rates of HFCVs and number of hydrogen refueling stations is also conducted. The results of this study can give insights on the effects of external variables on the market penetration of HFCVs, and the developed model can also be applied to other studies in analyzing the diffusion effects of HFCVs. - Highlights: → A forecasting model for HFCVs was developed using the generalized Bass diffusion model. → A simulation model using system dynamics was also developed. → The empirical study shows that the infrastructure is an important factor to the initial purchase. → The results of this study can promote research related to the diffusion of innovation.

  15. Hydrogen for buses in London: A scenario analysis of changes over time in refuelling infrastructure costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayegan, S.; Pearson, P.J.G.; Hart, D.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of a hydrogen refuelling infrastructure is one of the major obstacles to the introduction of the hydrogen vehicles to the road transport market. To help overcome this hurdle a likely transitional solution is to introduce hydrogen for niche applications such as buses or other types of fleet vehicles for which fuel demand is predictable and localised. This paper analyses the costs of different hydrogen production-delivery pathways, via a case study of buses in London. Scenario analysis over time (2007-2025) is used to investigate potential changes to the cost of hydrogen as a result of technology development, growing demand for hydrogen and changes in energy prices (gas and electricity). It is found that factors related to hydrogen demand have the greatest effect on the unit cost of hydrogen, while for the whole of the analysis period, on-site SMR (steam methane reforming) remains the least-cost production-delivery pathway. (author)

  16. The cost analysis of hydrogen life cycle in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Fei; Jia, Yuan; Mao, Zongqiang

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the increasing price of oil and the possibility of global energy crisis demand for substitutive energy to replace fossil energy. Many kinds of renewable energy have been considered, such as hydrogen, solar energy, and wind energy. Many countries including China have their own plan to support the research of hydrogen, because of its premier features. But, at present, the cost of hydrogen energy production, storage and transportation process is higher than that of fossil energy and its commercialization progress is slow. Life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) was used in this paper to evaluate the cost of hydrogen energy throughout the life cycle focused on the stratagem selection, to demonstrate the costs of every step and to discuss their relationship. Finally, the minimum cost program is as follows: natural gas steam reforming - high-pressure hydrogen bottles transported by car to hydrogen filling stations - hydrogen internal-combustion engines. (author)

  17. Preliminary Cost Estimates for Nuclear Hydrogen Production: HTSE System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    KAERI is now focusing on the research and development of the key technologies required for the design and realization of a nuclear hydrogen production system. As a preliminary study of cost estimates for nuclear hydrogen systems, the hydrogen production costs of the nuclear energy sources benchmarking GTMHR and PBMR are estimated in the necessary input data on a Korean specific basis. G4-ECONS was appropriately modified to calculate the cost for hydrogen production of HTSE (High Temperature Steam Electrolysis) process with VHTR (Very High Temperature nuclear Reactor) as a thermal energy source. The estimated costs presented in this paper show that hydrogen production by the VHTR could be competitive with current techniques of hydrogen production from fossil fuels if CO 2 capture and sequestration is required. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow large-scale production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding the release of CO 2 . Nuclear production of hydrogen could thus become the enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. The major factors that would affect the cost of hydrogen were also discussed

  18. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.

    2011-10-01

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  19. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  20. Low-cost storage options for solar hydrogen systems for remote area power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaib Muhammad Ali; John Andrews

    2006-01-01

    Equipment for storing hydrogen gas under pressure typically accounts for a significant proportion of the total capital cost of solar-hydrogen systems for remote area power supply (RAPS). RAPS remain a potential early market for renewable energy - hydrogen systems because of the relatively high costs of conventional energy sources in remote regions. In the present paper the storage requirements of PV-based solar-hydrogen RAPS systems employing PEM electrolysers and fuel cells to meet a range of typical remote area daily and annual demand profiles are investigated using a spread sheet-based simulation model. It is found that as the costs of storage are lowered the requirement for longer-term storage from summer to winter is increased with consequent potential gains in the overall economics of the solar-hydrogen system. In many remote applications, there is ample space for hydrogen storages with relatively large volumes. Hence it may be most cost-effective to store hydrogen at low to medium pressures achievable by using PEM electrolysers directly to generate the hydrogen at the pressures required, without a requirement for separate electrically-driven compressors. The latter add to system costs while requiring significant parasitic electricity consumption. Experimental investigations into a number of low-cost storage options including plastic tanks and low-to-medium pressure metal and composite cylinders are reported. On the basis of these findings, the economics of solar-hydrogen RAPS systems employing large-volume low-cost storage are investigated. (authors)

  1. Co-generation of hydrogen from nuclear and wind: the effect on costs of realistic variations in wind capacity and power prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.I.; Duffey, R.

    2005-01-01

    Can electricity from high-capacity nuclear reactors be blended with the variable output of wind turbines to produce electrolytic hydrogen competitively? Future energy hopes and emissions reduction scenarios place significant reliance on renewables, actually meaning largely new wind power both onshore and offshore. The opportunity exists for a synergy between high capacity factor nuclear plants and wind power using hydrogen by both as a 'currency' for use in transportation and industrial processing. But this use of hydrogen needs to be introduced soon. To be competitive with alternative sources, hydrogen produced by conventional electrolysis requires low-cost electricity (likely <2.5 Cent US/kW.h). One approach is to operate interruptibly allowing an installation to sell electricity when the grid price is high and to make hydrogen when it is low. Our previous studies have shown that this could be a cost-competitive approach with a nuclear power generator producing electricity around 3 Cent US/kW.h. Although similar unit costs are projected for wind-generated electricity, idleness of the hydrogen production (electrolysis) facility due to the variability of wind generated electricity imposes a serious cost penalty. This paper reports our latest results on the potential economics of blending electricity from nuclear and wind sources by using wind-generated power, when available, to augment the current through electrolysis equipment that is primarily nuclear-powered. A voltage penalty accompanies the higher current. A 10% increase in capital cost for electrolysis equipment enables it to accommodate the higher rate of hydrogen generation, while still being substantially cheaper than the capital cost of wind-dedicated electrolysis. Real-time data for electricity costs have been combined with real-time wind variability in our NuWind model. The variability in wind fields between sites was accommodated by assuming an average wind speed that produced an average electricity

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a bottom-up costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with ® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target

  3. The least-cost hydrogen for Southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Ogden, Joan; Fan, Yueyue

    2008-01-01

    Optimization is applied to identify the least-cost sequence of hydrogen infrastructure build-up in Southern California during 2010-2060. Given an exogenous demand, the model generates temporal and spatial decisions for building a hydrogen infrastructure, in terms of when, where, at what sizes and by what technologies, that minimize the net present value of technology, environment, and fuel accessibility costs. The least-cost sequence is then analyzed with respect to technology deployment, delivered hydrogen cost, capital requirements, subsidy need, subsidy capacity, and CO 2 mitigation. It is found that industrial hydrogen could play a critical role in initiating hydrogen transition, temporally bridged by onsite SMR to central production dominated at first by biomass gasification and later by coal gasification with carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). While a non-discounted capital investment of $24.43 billion is needed for the 50-year build-up, a hydrogen price below 3$/kg could pay back the costs in 20 years earning a 10% IRR. If hydrogen is purchased at the current equivalent gasoline price (2.517 $/gallon), the hydrogen industry could potentially provide $4715 as subsidy for each new FCV purchase. With CCS, 50% of 50-year CO 2 emissions could be avoided. (author)

  4. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  5. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linehan, Suzanne W.; Chin, Arthur A.; Allen, Nathan T.; Butterick, Robert; Kendall, Nathan T.; Klawiter, I. Leo; Lipiecki, Francis J.; Millar, Dean M.; Molzahn, David C.; November, Samuel J.; Jain, Puja; Nadeau, Sara; Mancroni, Scott

    2010-01-01

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH 4 from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H 2 ) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH 4 as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH 4 is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH 4 in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project utilized an engineering

  6. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

    2010-12-31

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This

  7. Co-generation of hydrogen from nuclear and wind: the effect on costs of realistic variations in wind generation. Paper no. IGEC-1-094

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.I.; Duffey, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Can electricity from high-capacity nuclear reactors be blended with the variable output of wind turbines to produce electrolytic hydrogen competitively? To be competitive with alternative sources, hydrogen produced by conventional electrolysis requires low-cost electricity (likely <2.5 cents US/kW.h). One approach is to operate interruptibly, allowing an installation to sell electricity when the grid price is high and to make hydrogen when it is low. Our previous studies show that this could be cost-competitive using nuclear power generator producing electricity around 3 cents US/kW.h. Although similar unit costs are projected for wind-generated electricity, idleness of the electrolysis facility due to the variability of wind-generated electricity imposes a significant cost penalty. This paper reports on ongoing work on the economics of blending electricity from nuclear and wind sources by using wind-generated power, when available, to augment the current through electrolysis equipment that is primarily nuclear-powered - a concept we call NuWind. A voltage penalty accompanies the higher current. A 10% increase in capital cost for electrolysis equipment to enable it to accommodate the higher rate of hydrogen generation is still substantially cheaper than the capital cost of wind-dedicated electrolysis. Real-time data for electricity costs have been combined with real-time wind variability. The variability in wind fields between sites was accommodated by assigning average wind speeds that produced an average electricity generation from wind of between 32 and 42% of peak capacity, which is typical of the expectations for superior wind-generation sites. (author)

  8. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  9. Low-Cost alpha Alane for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabian, Tibor [Ardica Technologies, San Francisco, CA (United States); Petrie, Mark [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Crouch-Baker, Steven [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fong, Henry [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-10-10

    This project was directed towards the further development of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) lab-scale electrochemical synthesis of the hydrogen storage material alpha-alane and Ardica Technologies-SRI International (SRI) chemical downstream processes that are necessary to meet DoE cost metrics and transition alpha-alane synthesis to an industrial scale. Ardica has demonstrated the use of alpha-alane in a fuel-cell system for the U.S. Army WFC20 20W soldier power system that has successfully passed initial field trials with individual soldiers. While alpha-alane has been clearly identified as a desirable hydrogen storage material, cost-effective means for its production and regeneration on a scale of use applicable to the industry have yet to be established. We focused on three, principal development areas: 1. The construction of a comprehensive engineering techno-economic model to establish the production costs of alpha-alane by both electrochemical and chemical routes at scale. 2. The identification of critical, cost-saving design elements of the electrochemical cell and the quantification of the product yields of the primary electrochemical process. A moving particle-bed reactor design was constructed and operated. 3. The experimental quantification of the product yields of candidate downstream chemical processes necessary to produce alpha-alane to complete the most cost-effective overall manufacturing process. Our techno-economic model shows that under key assumptions most 2015 and 2020 DOE hydrogen storage system cost targets for low and medium power can be achieved using the electrochemical alane synthesis process. To meet the most aggressive 2020 storage system cost target, $1/g, our model indicates that 420 metric tons per year (MT/y) production of alpha-alane is required. Laboratory-scale experimental work demonstrated that the yields of two of the three critical component steps within the overall “electrochemical process” were

  10. Hydrogen Production Costs of Various Primary Energy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Tak, Nam Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Won Seok

    2005-01-01

    The limited resource and environmental impacts of fossil fuels are becoming more and more serious problems in the world. Consequently, hydrogen is in the limelight as a future alternative energy due to its clean combustion and inexhaustibility and a transition from the traditional fossil fuel system to a hydrogen-based energy system is under considerations. Several countries are already gearing the industries to the hydrogen economy to cope with the limitations of the current fossil fuels. Unfortunately, hydrogen has to be chemically separated from the hydrogen compounds in nature such as water by using some energy sources. In this paper, the hydrogen production costs of major primary energy sources are compared in consideration of the Korean situations. The evaluation methodology is based on the report of the National Academy of Science (NAS) of U.S

  11. Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

  12. The cost of electrolytic hydrogen from off-peak power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucki, S.

    1991-01-01

    The cost of electrolytic hydrogen depends on the capacity factor of the plant and the cost of electricity. Both these parameters are correlated if off-peak power is to be used for hydrogen production. Based on assumptions regarding the correlation between the electricity price and the availability of electric power, optimizations were run using a simple cost model for the electrolysis plant. The current density at which the electrolysis plant would be run is taken as a variable for optimization as well as the annual time of availability of electric power. The results of the optimizations show for a number of hypothetical electrolyser types that the optimum operation time or electricity price do not depend much on the technology used. Production cost of electrolytic hydrogen can, however, be cut by 30% by using advanced electrolysis technology. (author)

  13. Hydrogen Production Costs of Various Primary Energy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Tak, Nam Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Won Seok

    2005-11-01

    Many studies on the economical aspects of hydrogen energy technologies have been conducted with the increase of the technical and socioeconomic importance of the hydrogen energy. However, there is still no research which evaluates the economy of hydrogen production from the primary energy sources in consideration of Korean situations. In this study, the hydrogen production costs of major primary energy sources are compared in consideration of the Korean situations such as feedstock price, electricity rate, and load factor. The evaluation methodology is based on the report of the National Academy of Science (NAS) of U.S. The present study focuses on the possible future technology scenario defined by NAS. The scenario assumes technological improvement that may be achieved if present research and development (R and D) programs are successful. The production costs by the coal and natural gas are 1.1 $/kgH 2 and 1.36 $/kgH 2 , respectively. However, the fossil fuels are susceptible to the price variation depending on the oil and the raw material prices, and the hydrogen production cost also depends on the carbon tax. The economic competitiveness of the renewable energy sources such as the wind, solar, and biomass are relatively low when compared with that of the other energy sources. The estimated hydrogen production costs from the renewable energy sources range from 2.35 $/kgH 2 to 6.03 $/kgH 2 . On the other hand, the production cost by nuclear energy is lower than that of natural gas or coal when the prices of the oil and soft coal are above $50/barrel and 138 $/ton, respectively. Taking into consideration the recent rapid increase of the oil and soft coal prices and the limited fossil resource, the nuclear-hydrogen option appears to be the most economical way in the future

  14. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  15. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Dexter, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D 2 / = 1.9 x 10 -2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup -- 1 / 2 / s -1 cm -1 . The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  16. Exploiting synergies in European wind and hydrogen sectors: A cost-benefit assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Suzanne; Peteves, Estathios

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a 'wind-hydrogen strategy', is analysed using a cost-benefit approach to evaluate the final impact at the level of the end-consumer when this strategy is implemented. The analysis is conducted for four scenarios, based on different levels of: wind energy penetration in the electricity network area, hydrogen energy price, and environmental taxation on fuels. The effect of technological learning on the outcome is also analysed for the period up to 2050. The results of the analysis indicate that the relative value of the wind energy in the electricity market compared to the hydrogen market is a deciding factor in the attractiveness of the strategy; here the wind energy penetration in the network is a key consideration. Finally, in order to exploit learning effects from linking European wind and hydrogen sectors, action would need to be taken in the short term. (author)

  17. Final Report: Hydrogen Production Pathways Cost Analysis (2013 – 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel Allan [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report summarizes work conducted under a three year Department of Energy (DOE) funded project to Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) to analyze multiple hydrogen (H2) production technologies and project their corresponding levelized production cost of H2. The analysis was conducted using the H2A Hydrogen Analysis Tool developed by the DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The project was led by SA but conducted in close collaboration with the NREL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In-depth techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five different H2 production methods was conducted. These TEAs developed projections for capital costs, fuel/feedstock usage, energy usage, indirect capital costs, land usage, labor requirements, and other parameters, for each H2 production pathway, and use the resulting cost and system parameters as inputs into the H2A discounted cash flow model to project the production cost of H2 ($/kgH2). Five technologies were analyzed as part of the project and are summarized in this report: Proton Exchange Membrane technology (PEM), High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cell technology (SOEC), Dark fermentation of biomass for H2 production, H2 production via Monolithic Piston-Type Reactors with rapid swing reforming and regeneration reactions, and Reformer-Electrolyzer-Purifier (REP) technology developed by Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. (FCE).

  18. Controlling Healthcare Costs: Just Cost Effectiveness or "Just" Cost Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Leonard M

    2018-04-01

    Meeting healthcare needs is a matter of social justice. Healthcare needs are virtually limitless; however, resources, such as money, for meeting those needs, are limited. How then should we (just and caring citizens and policymakers in such a society) decide which needs must be met as a matter of justice with those limited resources? One reasonable response would be that we should use cost effectiveness as our primary criterion for making those choices. This article argues instead that cost-effectiveness considerations must be constrained by considerations of healthcare justice. The goal of this article will be to provide a preliminary account of how we might distinguish just from unjust or insufficiently just applications of cost-effectiveness analysis to some healthcare rationing problems; specifically, problems related to extraordinarily expensive targeted cancer therapies. Unconstrained compassionate appeals for resources for the medically least well-off cancer patients will be neither just nor cost effective.

  19. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University

    2014-02-05

    Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

  20. Life cycle cost analysis to examine the economical feasibility of hydrogen as an alternative fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji-Yong; Yoo, Moosang; Cha, Kyounghoon; Hur, Tak; Lim, Tae Won

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a life cycle costing (LCC) methodology to identify when hydrogen can become economically feasible compared to the conventional fuels and which energy policy is the most effective at fostering the penetration of hydrogen in the competitive fuel market. The target hydrogen pathways in this study are H 2 via natural gas steam reforming (NG SR), H 2 via naphtha steam reforming (Naphtha SR), H 2 via liquefied petroleum gas steam reforming (LPG SR), and H 2 via water electrolysis (WE). In addition, the conventional fuels (gasoline, diesel) are also included for the comparison with the H 2 pathways. The life cycle costs of the target fuels are computed and several key factors are examined to identify the economical feasibilities of the target systems: fuel cell vehicle (FCV) price, social cost of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and regulated air emissions (CO, VOC, SO x , NO x , PM), fuel efficiency of FCV, capital costs of H 2 equipments at a H 2 fueling station. The life cycle costs of a H 2 pathway also depend on the production capacity. Although, at present, all H 2 pathways are more cost efficient than the conventional fuels in the fuel utilization stage, the H 2 pathways have lack competitiveness against the conventional fuels in the life cycle (well to wheel) costs due to the high price of FCV. From future scenario analyses in 2015, all H 2 pathways are expected to have lower life cycle costs than the conventional fuels as a transportation fuel. It is evident that the FCV price is the most important factor for encouraging the hydrogen economy and FCVs. Unless the FCV price is below US $62,320, it is necessary for the institution to subsidize the FCV price by any amount over US $62,320 in order to inject H 2 into the market of transportation fuel. The incentive or taxes on GHGs and regulated air emissions are also expected to effectively encourage the diffusion of H 2 and FCV, especially for the H 2 pathway of WE with wind power (WE[Wind]). The uncertainties

  1. Comparative costs of hydrogen produced from photovoltaic electrolysis and from photoelectrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The need for hydrogen produced from renewable energy sources is the key element to the world's large-scale usage of hydrogen and to the hydrogen economy envisioned by the World Hydrogen Energy Association. Renewables-produced hydrogen is also the most technically difficult problem to be solved. Hydrogen will never achieve large-scale usage until it can be competitively produced from renewable energy. One of the important questions that has to be addressed is: What are the economics of present and expected future technologies that will be used to produce hydrogen from renewables? The objective of this study is to give an answer to this question by determining the cost of hydrogen (in U.S.$/MBtu) from competing renewable production technologies. It should be noted that the costs and efficiencies assumed in this paper are assumptions of the author, and that the values are expected to be achieved after additional research on photoelectrochemical process technologies. The cost analysis performed is for three types of hydrogen (H 2 ) produced from five different types of renewable processes: photovoltaic (PV) electrolysis, three photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes and higher temperature electrolysis (HTE). The costs and efficiencies for PV, PEC and HTE processes are established for present day, and for expected costs and efficiencies 10 years into the future. A second objective of this analysis is to set base case costs of PV electrolysis. For any other renewable process, the costs for PV electrolysis, which is existing technology, sets the numbers which the other processes must better. (author)

  2. Exploiting Synergies in European Wind and Hydrogen Sectors: A Cost-benefit Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    SHAW SUZANNE; PETEVES ESTATHIOS

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a ¿¿wind-hydrogen strategy¿¿, is analysed using a costbenefit approach to evaluate the final impact...

  3. A Fast and Cost-Effective Detection of Melamine by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Using a Novel Hydrogen Bonding-Assisted Supramolecular Matrix and Gold-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Neng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A fast and cost-effective melamine detection approach has been developed based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS using a novel hydrogen bonding-assisted supramolecular matrix. The detection utilizes Fe3O4/Au magnetic nanoparticles coated with 5-aminoorotic acid (AOA as a SERS active substrate (Fe3O4/Au–AOA, and Rhodamine B (RhB conjugated AOA as a Raman reporter (AOA–RhB. Upon mixing the reagents with melamine, a supramolecular complex [Fe3O4/Au–AOA•••melamine•••AOA–RhB] was formed due to the strong multiple hydrogen bonding interactions between AOA and melamine. The complex was separated and concentrated to a pellet by an external magnet and used as a supramolecular matrix for the melamine detection. Laser excitation of the complex pellet produced a strong SERS signal diagnostic for RhB. The logarithmic intensity of the characteristic RhB peaks was found to be proportional to the concentration of melamine with a limit of detection of 2.5 µg/mL and a detection linearity range of 2.5~15.0 µg/mL in milk. As Fe3O4 nanoparticles and AOA are thousands of times less expensive than the monoclonal antibody used in a traditional sandwich immunoassay, the current assay drastically cut down the cost of melamine detection. The current approach affords promise as a biosensor platform that cuts down sample pre-treatment steps and measurement expense.

  4. Cost benefit analysis cost effectiveness analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.

    1986-09-01

    The comparison of various protection options in order to determine which is the best compromise between cost of protection and residual risk is the purpose of the ALARA procedure. The use of decision-aiding techniques is valuable as an aid to selection procedures. The purpose of this study is to introduce two rather simple and well known decision aiding techniques: the cost-effectiveness analysis and the cost-benefit analysis. These two techniques are relevant for the great part of ALARA decisions which need the use of a quantitative technique. The study is based on an hypothetical case of 10 protection options. Four methods are applied to the data

  5. Catalyst support effects on hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Waiz; Spreafico, Clelia; Kleibert, Armin; Gobrecht, Jens; Vandevondele, Joost; Ekinci, Yasin; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen spillover is the surface migration of activated hydrogen atoms from a metal catalyst particle, on which they are generated, onto the catalyst support. The phenomenon has been much studied and its occurrence on reducible supports such as titanium oxide is established, yet questions remain about whether hydrogen spillover can take place on nonreducible supports such as aluminium oxide. Here we use the enhanced precision of top-down nanofabrication to prepare controlled and precisely tunable model systems that allow us to quantify the efficiency and spatial extent of hydrogen spillover on both reducible and nonreducible supports. We place multiple pairs of iron oxide and platinum nanoparticles on titanium oxide and aluminium oxide supports, varying the distance between the pairs from zero to 45 nanometres with a precision of one nanometre. We then observe the extent of the reduction of the iron oxide particles by hydrogen atoms generated on the platinum using single-particle in situ X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy applied simultaneously to all particle pairs. The data, in conjunction with density functional theory calculations, reveal fast hydrogen spillover on titanium oxide that reduces remote iron oxide nanoparticles via coupled proton-electron transfer. In contrast, spillover on aluminium oxide is mediated by three-coordinated aluminium centres that also interact with water and that give rise to hydrogen mobility competing with hydrogen desorption; this results in hydrogen spillover about ten orders of magnitude slower than on titanium oxide and restricted to very short distances from the platinum particle. We anticipate that these observations will improve our understanding of hydrogen storage and catalytic reactions involving hydrogen, and that our approach to creating and probing model catalyst systems will provide opportunities for studying the origin of synergistic effects in supported catalysts that combine multiple functionalities.

  6. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use

    2004-08-31

    The announcement of a hydrogen fuel initiative in the President’s 2003 State of the Union speech substantially increased interest in the potential for hydrogen to play a major role in the nation’s long-term energy future. Prior to that event, DOE asked the National Research Council to examine key technical issues about the hydrogen economy to assist in the development of its hydrogen R&D program. Included in the assessment were the current state of technology; future cost estimates; CO2 emissions; distribution, storage, and end use considerations; and the DOE RD&D program. The report provides an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel in the nation’s future energy economy and describes a number of important challenges that must be overcome if it is to make a major energy contribution. Topics covered include the hydrogen end-use technologies, transportation, hydrogen production technologies, and transition issues for hydrogen in vehicles.

  7. Potential and costs of electrolytical hydrogen production by secondary energy in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, S. N. M. de; Silva, E. P. da

    1998-01-01

    This paper makes a description of the availability supply secondary hydroelectric power (secondary energy) in the Brazilian interconnected hydroelectric systems, then with the data attained it is made an estimation of electrolytical hydrogen that can be produced by means of Brazilian secondary hydroelectric power. Also are determined the costs of electrolytical hydrogen production, by way of utilisation of the secondary hydroelectric power availability in the hydroelectric system of the South and Southeastern regions, with the variation of hydrogen plant capacity that allow identify the cases where hydrogen can be produced at a lower costs. (author)

  8. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H + in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H 2 . Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs

  9. Cost-effective flow injection amperometric system with metal nanoparticle loaded carbon nanotube modified screen printed carbon electrode for sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reanpang, Preeyaporn; Themsirimongkon, Suwaphid; Saipanya, Surin; Chailapakul, Orawon; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2015-11-01

    Various metal nanoparticles (NPs) decorated on carbon nanotube (CNT) was modified on the home-made screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) in order to enhances sensitivity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determination. The simple casting method was used for the electrode modification. The monometallic and bimetallic NPs modified electrodes were investigated for their electrochemical properties for H2O2 reduction. The Pd-CNT/SPCE is appropriated to measure the H2O2 reduction at a potential of -0.3 V, then this modified electrode was incorporated with a home-made flow through cell and applied in a simple flow injection amperometry (FI-Amp). Some parameters influencing the resulted modified electrode and the FI-Amp system were studied. The proposed detection system was able to detect H2O2 in the range of 0.1-1.0 mM, with detection limit of 20 µM. Relative standard deviation for 100 replicated injections of 0.6 mM H2O2 was 2.3%. The reproducibility of 6 electrodes preparing in 3 different lots was 8.2%. It was demonstrated for determination of H2O2 in disinfectant, hair colorant and milk samples. Recoveries in the range of 90-109% were observed. The developed system provided high stability, good repeatability, high sample throughput and low reagent consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Historical Cost Curves for Hydrogen Masers and Cesium Beam Frequency and Timing Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  11. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  12. Measuring the environmental benefits of hydrogen transportation fuel cycles under uncertainty about external costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyavs'ka, Liliya; Gulli, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to measure the environmental benefits of hydrogen deployment in the transportation sector. We compare the hydrogen pathways to the conventional transportation fuel cycles in terms of external costs, estimated using the results of the most accurate methodologies available in this field. The central values of performed analysis bring us ambiguous results. The external cost of the best conventional solution ('oil to diesel hybrid internal-combustion engine') in some cases is just higher and in others just lower than that of the best fossil fuel to hydrogen solution ('natural gas to hydrogen fuel cell'). Nevertheless, by accounting for the uncertainty about external costs, we are able to remove this ambiguity highlighting that the hydrogen pathway provides significant environmental benefits ,especially in densely populated areas, assuming 100% city driving.

  13. Nickel brittling by hydrogen. Temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapitz, P.A; Fernandez, S; Alvarez, M.G

    2006-01-01

    The results of a study on the effect of different variables on the susceptibility to brittling by hydrogen and the velocity of propagation of fissures in nickel wire (99.7% purity) are described. The hydrogen load was carried out by cathodic polarization in H 2 SO 4 0.5m solution. The susceptibility to brittling by hydrogen was determined with traction tests at slow deformation speed and constant cathodic potential, and the later observation of the fracture surface by scanning electron microscopy. The variables studied were: applied cathodic overpower, speed of initial deformation and temperature. The results showed that the speed of fissure propagation in the nickel by brittleness from hydrogen is a function of the applied potential and the speed of deformation used. Without tension, the hydrogen load by cathodic polarization at room temperature leads to the formation of cavities similar to those observed when the hydrogenation is performed in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at high pressure and temperature (CW)

  14. Hydrogen isotope effect through Pd in hydrogen transport pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    This investigation concerns hydrogen system with hydrogen transport pipes for transportation, purification, isotope separation and storage of hydrogen and its isotopes. A principle of the hydrogen transport pipe (heat pipe having hydrogen transport function) was proposed. It is comprised of the heat pipe and palladium alloy tubes as inlet, outlet, and the separation membrane of hydrogen. The operation was as follows: (1) gas was introduced into the heat pipe through the membrane in the evaporator; (2) the introduced gas was transported toward the condenser by the vapor flow; (3) the transported gas was swept and compressed to the end of the condenser by the vapor pressure; and (4) the compressed gas was exhausted from the heat pipe through the membrane in the condenser. The characteristics of the hydrogen transport pipe were examined for various working conditions. Basic performance concerning transportation, evacuation and compression was experimentally verified. Isotopic dihydrogen gases (H 2 and D 2 ) were used as feed gas for examining the intrinsic performance of the isotope separation by the hydrogen transport pipe. A simulated experiment for hydrogen isotope separation was carried out using a hydrogen-helium gas mixture. The hydrogen transport pipe has a potential for isotope separation and purification of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium in fusion reactor technology. (author)

  15. Cost Evaluation with G4-ECONS Program for SI based Nuclear Hydrogen Production Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-ho; Lee, Ki-young; Kim, Yong-wan

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary hydrogen is production is primarily based on fossil fuels, which is not considered as environments friendly and economically efficient. To achieve the hydrogen economy, it is very important to produce a massive amount of hydrogen in a clean, safe and efficient way. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow massive production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding environments pollution reducing the release of carbon dioxide. Nuclear production of hydrogen could thus become the enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. The economic assessment was performed for nuclear hydrogen production plant consisting of VHTR coupled with SI cycle. For the study, G4-ECONS developed by EMWG of GIF was appropriately modified to calculate the LUHC, assuming 36 months of plant construction time, 5 % of annual interest rate and 12.6 % of fixed charge rate. In G4-ECONS program, LUHC is calculated by the following formula; LUHC = (Annualized TCIC + Annualized O-M Cost + Annualized Fuel Cycle Cost + Annualized D-D Cost) / Annual Hydrogen Production Rate

  16. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  17. Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

    2014-05-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

  18. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liess, Martin [Rhein Main University of Applied Sciences, Rüsselsheim, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2014-03-24

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

  19. Life cycle costs for the optimized production of hydrogen and biogas from microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Markus A.; Weiss, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Despite the known advantages of microalgae compared with other biomass providers or fossil fuels, microalgae are predominately produced for high-value products. Economic constraints might limit the commercial energetic use of microalgae. Therefore, we identify the LCCs (life cycle costs) and economic hot spots for photoautotrophic hydrogen generation from photoautotrophically grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in a novel staggered PBR (photobioreactor) and the anaerobic digestion of the residual biomass to obtain biogas. The novel PBR aims at minimizing energy consumption for mixing and aeration and at optimizing the light conditions for algal growth. The LCCs per MJ amounted to 12.17 Euro for hydrogen and 0.99 Euro for biogas in 2011 for Germany. Market prices per MJ of 0.02 Euro for biogas and 0.04 Euro for hydrogen are considerably exceeded. Major contributors to operating costs, about 70% of total LCCs, are personnel and overhead costs. The investment costs consist to about 92% of those for the PBR with a share of 61% membrane costs. The choice of Madrid as another production location with higher incident solar irradiation and lower personnel costs reduces LCCs by about 40%. Projecting LCCs to 2030 with experience curves, the LCCs still exceed future market prices. - Highlights: • Life cycle cost assessment of hydrogen and biogas from microalgae in a novel photobioreactor. • Current and future (2030) economically viable production unlikely in Germany. • Personnel and photobioreactor costs are major cost drivers. • Changing the production location may significantly reduce the life cycle costs

  20. Greenhouse gas reduction benefits and costs of a large-scale transition to hydrogen in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, William; Kartha, Sivan; Lazarus, Michael; Fencl, Amanda; Rajan, Chella; Bailie, Alison; Runkle, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier able to be produced from domestic, zero-carbon sources and consumed by zero-pollution devices. A transition to a hydrogen-based economy could therefore potentially respond to climate, air quality, and energy security concerns. In a hydrogen economy, both mobile and stationary energy needs could be met through the reaction of hydrogen (H 2 ) with oxygen (O 2 ). This study applies a full fuel cycle approach to quantify the energy, greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), and cost implications associated with a large transition to hydrogen in the United States. It explores a national and four metropolitan area transitions in two contrasting policy contexts: a 'business-as-usual' (BAU) context with continued reliance on fossil fuels, and a 'GHG-constrained' context with policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A transition in either policy context faces serious challenges, foremost among them from the highly inertial investments over the past century or so in technology and infrastructure based on petroleum, natural gas, and coal. A hydrogen transition in the USA could contribute to an effective response to climate change by helping to achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions by mid-century across all sectors of the economy; however, these reductions depend on the use of hydrogen to exploit clean, zero-carbon energy supply options. (author)

  1. Greenhouse gas reduction benefits and costs of a large-scale transition to hydrogen in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, William; Kartha, Sivan; Lazarus, Michael; Fencl, Amanda [Stockholm Environment Institute - US Center, 11 Curtis Avenue, Somerville, MA 02143 (United States); Rajan, Chella [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, I.I.T. Post Office, Chennai 600 036 (India); Bailie, Alison [The Pembina Institute, 200, 608 - 7th Street, S.W. Calgary, AB (Canada); Runkle, Benjamin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier able to be produced from domestic, zero-carbon sources and consumed by zero-pollution devices. A transition to a hydrogen-based economy could therefore potentially respond to climate, air quality, and energy security concerns. In a hydrogen economy, both mobile and stationary energy needs could be met through the reaction of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) with oxygen (O{sub 2}). This study applies a full fuel cycle approach to quantify the energy, greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), and cost implications associated with a large transition to hydrogen in the United States. It explores a national and four metropolitan area transitions in two contrasting policy contexts: a 'business-as-usual' (BAU) context with continued reliance on fossil fuels, and a 'GHG-constrained' context with policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A transition in either policy context faces serious challenges, foremost among them from the highly inertial investments over the past century or so in technology and infrastructure based on petroleum, natural gas, and coal. A hydrogen transition in the USA could contribute to an effective response to climate change by helping to achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions by mid-century across all sectors of the economy; however, these reductions depend on the use of hydrogen to exploit clean, zero-carbon energy supply options. (author)

  2. Cost effectiveness analysis in radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, N.; Verbeke, S.; Ducloux, T.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the cost effectiveness of radiopharmaceuticals and their quality control. Materials and methods: this retrospective study was made in the Nuclear Medicine Department of the University Hospital of Limoges. Radiopharmaceutical costs were obtained with adding the price of the radiotracer, the materials, the equipments, the labour, the running expenses and the radioisotope. The costs of quality control were obtained with adding the price of labour, materials, equipments, running expenses and the cost of the quality control of 99m Tc eluate. Results: during 1998, 2106 radiopharmaceuticals were prepared in the Nuclear Medicine Department. The mean cost effectiveness of radiopharmaceutical was 1430 francs (846 to 4260). The mean cost effectiveness of quality control was 163 francs (84 to 343). The rise of the radiopharmaceutical cost induced by quality control was 11%. Conclusion: the technical methodology of quality control must be mastered to optimize the cost of this operation. (author)

  3. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  4. Production cost comparisons of hydrogen from fossil and nuclear fuel and water decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    The comparative costs entailed in producing hydrogen by major technologies that rely on petroleum, natural gas, coal, thermochemical cycles, and electrolysis are examined. Techniques were developed for comparing these processes by formulating the process data and economic assessments on a uniform and consistent basis. These data were normalized to permit a meaningful comparative analysis of product costs of these processes.

  5. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  6. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, Tania M. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  7. Cost estimation of hydrogen and DME produced by nuclear heat utilization system. Joint research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2003-09-01

    Research of hydrogen energy has been performed in order to spread use of the hydrogen energy in 2020 or 2030. It will take, however, many years for the hydrogen energy to be used very easily like gasoline, diesel oil and city gas in all of countries. During the periods, low CO 2 release liquid fuels would be used together with hydrogen. Recently, di-methyl-either (DME) has been noticed as one of the substitute liquid fuels of petroleum. Such liquid fuels can be produced from the mixed gas such as hydrogen and carbon oxide which are produced by steam reforming hydrogen generation system by the use of nuclear heat. Therefore, the system would be one of the candidates of future system of nuclear heat utilization. In the present study, we focused on the production of hydrogen and DME. Economic evaluation was estimated for hydrogen and DME production in commercial and nuclear heat utilization plant. At first, heat and mass balance of each process in commercial plant of hydrogen production was estimated and commercial prices of each process were derived. Then, price was estimated when nuclear heat was used instead of required heat of commercial plant. Results showed that the production prices produced by nuclear heat were cheaper by 10% for hydrogen and 3% for DME. With the consideration of reduction effect of CO 2 release, utilization of nuclear heat would be more effective. (author)

  8. REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

    2003-07-31

    This report describes activities for the third quarter of work performed under this agreement. Atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on June 5 through June 13, 2003. The test results were encouraging, however, the rate of carbon dissolution was below expectations. Additional atmospheric testing is scheduled for the first week of September 2003. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product stream. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

  9. Small-scale uses and costs of hydrogen derived from OTEC ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, G.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plantships could produce NH3 from air and water, using energy derived from thermal gradients in tropical oceans. NH3 can serve both as a commodity, for the fertilizer and chemical industries, and as a liquid energy carrier for fuel use. Attention is given to the economic prospects for using OTEC NH3 as a hydrogen transport and storage medium for small users who want to assess the purchase of hydrogen vs. the cost of producing hydrogen at their sites. Hydrogen is readily obtained from NH3 at the point of end use, by dissociation and purification as required, for use as a chemical commodity or fuel. It is shown that high-purity H2 derived from OTEC NH3 might be competitive with H2 made at the point of end use via water electrolysis, or via steam reforming of natural gas.

  10. Costs and cost-effectiveness of periviable care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, Aaron B; Burchfield, David J

    2014-02-01

    With increasing concerns regarding rapidly expanding healthcare costs, cost-effectiveness analysis allows assessment of whether marginal gains from new technology are worth the increased costs. Particular methodologic issues related to cost and cost-effectiveness analysis in the area of neonatal and periviable care include how costs are estimated, such as the use of charges and whether long-term costs are included; the challenges of measuring utilities; and whether to use a maternal, neonatal, or dual perspective in such analyses. A number of studies over the past three decades have examined the costs and the cost-effectiveness of neonatal and periviable care. Broadly, while neonatal care is costly, it is also cost effective as it produces both life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). However, as the gestational age of the neonate decreases, the costs increase and the cost-effectiveness threshold is harder to achieve. In the periviable range of gestational age (22-24 weeks of gestation), whether the care is cost effective is questionable and is dependent on the perspective. Understanding the methodology and salient issues of cost-effectiveness analysis is critical for researchers, editors, and clinicians to accurately interpret results of the growing body of cost-effectiveness studies related to the care of periviable pregnancies and neonates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Projected hydrogen cost from methane reforming for North America 2015-2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderveen, K.; Lutz, A.; Klebanoff, L.; Drennen, T.; Keller, J.; Drennen, T.; Kamery, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H 2 Sim) was used to project the cost for hydrogen at the point of sale to light duty vehicles for distributed, small-scale steam methane reforming. Projections cover the period from 2010-2050 in North America, and take into account assumptions about the quantity of recoverable natural gas remaining in North America. We conclude that there is a window for distributed reforming to play a positive role in supplying a H 2 fuel infrastructure, but this window is closing rapidly. The analysis assumes that production from natural gas reserves in North America will peak sometime before 2050 and demand will cause the price to rise after the peak of production in a manner consistent with Hotelling's model. We consider three scenarios for when the peak occurs, and evaluate the impact on the cost of hydrogen fuel produced via distributed small scale reforming in these three scenarios. (authors)

  12. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the

  13. The effect of pearlite on the hydrogen-induced ductility loss in ductile cast irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T.

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen energy systems, such as a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and a hydrogen station, are rapidly developing to solve global environmental problems and resource problems. The available structural materials used for hydrogen equipments have been limited to only a few relatively expensive metallic materials that are tolerant for hydrogen embrittlement. Therefore, for the realization of a hydrogen society, it is important to expand the range of materials available for hydrogen equipment and thereby to enable the use of inexpensive common materials. Therefore, ductile cast iron was, in this study, focused as a structural material that could contribute to cost reduction of hydrogen equipment, because it is a low-cost material having good mechanical property comparable to carbon steels in addition to good castability and machinability. The strength and ductility of common ductile cast irons with a ferritic-pearlitic matrix can be controlled by the volume fraction of pearlitic phase. In the case of carbon steels, the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement increases with increase in the pearlite fraction. Toward the development of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron with reasonable strength for hydrogen equipment, it is necessary to figure out the effect of pearlite on the hydrogen embrittlement of this cast iron. In this study, the tensile tests were conducted using hydrogen-precharged specimens of three kinds of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast irons, JIS-FCD400, JIS-FCD450 and JIS-FCD700. Based on the results, the role of pearlite in characterizing the hydrogen embrittlement of ductile cast iron was discussed.

  14. Economic analysis of hydrogen production through a bio-ethanol steam reforming process: Sensitivity analyses and cost estimations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hua; Ozkan, Umit S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the hydrogen selling price from ethanol steam reforming has been estimated for two different production scenarios in the United States, i.e. central production (150,000 kg H 2 /day) and distributed (forecourt) production (1500 kg H 2 /day), based on a process flowchart generated by Aspen Plus registered including downstream purification steps and economic analysis model template published by the U.S Department of Energy (DOE). The effect of several processing parameters as well as catalyst properties on the hydrogen selling price has been evaluated. 2.69/kg is estimated as the selling price for a central production process of 150,000 kg H 2 /day and 4.27/kg for a distributed hydrogen production process at a scale of 1500 kg H 2 /day. Among the parameters investigated through sensitivity analyses, ethanol feedstock cost, catalyst cost, and catalytic performance are found to play a significant role on determining the final hydrogen selling price. (author)

  15. Reverse mechanical after effect during hydrogenation of zone refined iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, L.V.; Skryabina, N.E.; Kurmaeva, L.D.; Smirnov, L.V. (Permskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR); AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1984-12-01

    The relationship between the process of hydrogenation and the reverse mechanical after effect (RMA) microplastic deformation in the zone refined iron has been studied. Metallographic investigations and mechanical testing of the samples hydrogenated under torsional strain have been performed. It is shown that in the zone refined iron the formation of voids responsible for irreversible hydrogen embrittlement does not occur, but the hydrogen-initiated RMA strain is conserved, i. e. the RMA effects are independent of the presence of discontinuities.

  16. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  17. Levelized cost of energy and sensitivity analysis for the hydrogen-bromine flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric W.

    2015-08-01

    The technoeconomics of the hydrogen-bromine flow battery are investigated. Using existing performance data the operating conditions were optimized to minimize the levelized cost of electricity using individual component costs for the flow battery stack and other system units. Several different configurations were evaluated including use of a bromine complexing agent to reduce membrane requirements. Sensitivity analysis of cost is used to identify the system elements most strongly influencing the economics. The stack lifetime and round-trip efficiency of the cell are identified as major factors on the levelized cost of electricity, along with capital components related to hydrogen storage, the bipolar plate, and the membrane. Assuming that an electrocatalyst and membrane with a lifetime of 2000 cycles can be identified, the lowest cost market entry system capital is 220 kWh-1 for a 4 h discharge system and for a charging energy cost of 0.04 kWh-1 the levelized cost of the electricity delivered is 0.40 kWh-1. With systems manufactured at large scales these costs are expected to be lower.

  18. Cost estimation of hydrogen and DME produced by nuclear heat utilization system II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2004-09-01

    Utilization and production of hydrogen has been studied in order to spread utilization of the hydrogen energy in 2020 or 2030. It will take, however, many years for the hydrogen energy to be used very easily like gasoline, diesel oil and city gas in the world. During the periods, low CO 2 release liquid fuels would be used together with hydrogen. Recently, di-methyl-ether (DME). has been noticed as one of the substitute liquid fuels of petroleum. Such liquid fuels can be produced from the mixed gas such as hydrogen and carbon oxide which are produced from natural gas by steam reforming. Therefore, the system would become one of the candidates of future system of nuclear heat utilization. Following the study in 2002, we performed economic evaluation of the hydrogen and DME production by nuclear heat utilization plant where heat generated by HTGR is completely consumed for the production. The results show that hydrogen price produced by nuclear was about 17% cheaper than the commercial price by increase in recovery rate of high purity hydrogen with increased in PSA process. Price of DME in indirect method produced by nuclear heat was also about 17% cheaper than the commercial price by producing high purity hydrogen in the DME producing process. As for the DME, since price of DME produced near oil land in petroleum exporting countries is cheaper than production in Japan, production of DME by nuclear heat in Japan has disadvantage economically in this time. Trial study to estimate DME price produced by direct method was performed. From the present estimation, utilization of nuclear heat for the production of hydrogen would be more effective with coupled consideration of reduction effect of CO 2 release. (author)

  19. Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen: Production costs, Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaquaniello, G; Cosenza, S [Technip-KTI S.p.A., via Castello della Magliana 75, Rome (Italy); Giacobbe, F; Morico, B; Farace, A [Processi Innovativi s.r.l., L' Aquila (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    This paper evaluates the production costs of a hybrid system based on a new membrane reforming MRR concept to convert natural gas to hydrogen and electricity. Membrane reforming with hydrogen-selective, palladium-silver membranes pushes the chemical equilibrium and allows higher methane conversions at lower temperature such as 650 C. The new MRR concept formed of a series of modules is put forward herein. Each module is made up of a reforming step and an external membrane separation unit. The estimates, based on utilities costs of a typical Italian refinery (end of 2006), show that the production costs for the hybrid system are 30% less than conventional tubular steam reforming technology, and 13% less than a gas-fired cogeneration plant coupled with a conventional H{sub 2} plant. (author)

  20. Transportation cost of nuclear off-peak power for hydrogen production based on water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Saburo; Ueno, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes transportation cost of the nuclear off-peak power for a hydrogen production based on water electrolysis in Japan. The power could be obtainable by substituting hydropower and/or fossil fueled power supplying peak and middle demands with nuclear power. The transportation cost of the off-peak power was evaluated to be 1.42 yen/kWh when an electrolyser receives the off-peak power from a 6kV distribution wire. Marked reduction of the cost was caused by the increase of the capacity factor. (author)

  1. Compressor-less Hydrogen Transmission Pipelines Deliver Large-scale Stranded Renewable Energy at Competitive Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W Leighty; J Holloway; R Merer; B Somerday; C San Marchi; G Keith; D White

    2006-01-01

    We assume a transmission-constrained world, where large new wind plants and other renewable energies must pay all transmission costs for delivering their energy to distant markets. We modeled a 1,000 MW (1 GW) (name plate) wind plant in the large wind resource of the North America Great Plains, delivering exclusively hydrogen fuel, via a new gaseous hydrogen (GH2) pipeline, to an urban market at least 300 km distant. All renewable electric energy output would be converted, at the source, to hydrogen, via 100 bar output electrolyzers, directly feeding the GH2 transmission pipeline without costly compressor stations at inlet or at midline. The new GH2 pipeline is an alternative to new electric transmission lines. We investigate whether the pipeline would provide valuable energy storage. We present a simple model by which we estimate the cost of wind-source hydrogen fuel delivered to the distant city gate in year 2010, at GW scale. Ammonia, synthetic hydrocarbons, and other substances may also be attractive renewable-source energy carriers, storage media, and fuels; they are not considered in this paper. (authors)

  2. Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2013-03-01

    This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

  3. H2POWER: Development of a methodology to calculate life cycle cost of small and medium-scale hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verduzco, Laura E.; Duffey, Michael R.; Deason, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    At this time, hydrogen-based power plants and large hydrogen production facilities are capital intensive and unable to compete financially against hydrocarbon-based energy production facilities. An option to overcome this problem and foster the introduction of hydrogen technology is to introduce small and medium-scale applications such as residential and community hydrogen refueling units. Such units could potentially be used to generate both electricity and heat for the home, as well as hydrogen fuel for the automobile. Cost modeling for the integration of these three forms of energy presents several methodological challenges. This is particularly true since the technology is still in the development phase and both the financial and the environmental cost must be calculated using mainly secondary sources. In order to address these issues and aid in the design of small and medium-scale hydrogen systems, this study presents a computer model to calculate financial and environmental costs of this technology using different hydrogen pathways. The model can design and compare hydrogen refueling units against hydrocarbon-based technologies, including the 'gap' between financial and economic costs. Using the methodology, various penalties and incentives that can foster the introduction of hydrogen-based technologies can be added to the analysis to study their impact on financial cost

  4. Effects of methanogenic effluent recycle on fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, J.T.; Bagley, D.M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Most research on fermentative hydrogen production has focused on optimizing the process and not on the practicalities of pH control although active pH control in a hydrogen reactor is necessary for stable and efficient performance. Batch experiments have shown that hydrogen ceases to be produced when there is no pH control. This study determined if recycle effluent from the methane reactor of a two-phase hydrogen-producing system would reduce the external alkali needed for pH control in a hydrogen reactor. It also determined if recycle affected the performance of the hydrogen reactor and the overall two-phase system. This paper describes the experimental laboratory-scale, two-phase hydrogen producing system which was operated alternately with and without effluent recycle from a methane reactor to the hydrogen reactor. The two-phase hydrogen producing system yielded 5.7 times more energy recovery than that obtained by the fermentative hydrogen producing reactor alone. The use of effluent from the methane reactor can reduce the operational cost of external alkali for pH control. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Magnetic effects of interstitial hydrogen in nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, Andrea [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso (Chile); Velásquez, E.A. [Facultad de Física y Centro de Investigación en Nanotecnología y Materiales Avanzados CIEN-UC, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Grupo de Investigación en Modelamiento y Simulación Computacional, Universidad de San Buenaventura Sec. Medellín, Medellín (Colombia); Mazo-Zuluaga, J. [Grupo de Instrumentación Científica y Microelectrónica, Grupo de Estado Sólido, IF-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Mejía-López, J. [Facultad de Física y Centro de Investigación en Nanotecnología y Materiales Avanzados CIEN-UC, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Florez, J.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso (Chile); and others

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen storage in materials is among the most relevant fields when thinking about energy conversion and storage. In this work we present a study that responds to a couple of questions concerning induced electronic changes that H produces in ferromagnetic nickel (Ni) host. We calculate and explain the change of magnetic properties of Ni with different concentrations of H. Density functional theory calculations (DFT) were performed for super-cells of fcc Ni with interstitial H in octahedral sites at different concentrations. In order to physically explain the effect of magnetization diminishing as the hydrogen concentration increases, we propose a simple Stoner type of model to describe the influence of the H impurity on the magnetic properties of Ni. The exchange splitting reduction, as shown in first principles calculations, is clearly explained within this physical model. Using a paramagnetic Ni fcc band with variable number of electrons and a Stoner model allow us to obtain the correct trend for the magnetic moment of the system as a function of the H concentration. - Highlights: • We calculate and explain the change of magnetic properties of Ni with different concentrations of H. • We propose a simple Stoner type of model to describe the influence of the H impurity on the magnetic properties of Ni. • The band exchange splitting reduction as the H concentration increases, is a consequence of the competition between the band energy term (kinetic energy) and the ferromagnetic energy term (Weiss field).

  6. Breaking through the hydrogen cost barrier by using electrolysis loads to access ancillary services and demand response programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.; McGillivray, R.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation described the use of hydrogen electrolysis as a load resource for handling grid instability resulting from the increased penetration of intermittent renewable power. In particular, it focused on Hydrogenics, the leading global supplier of industrial scale electrolysis equipment and fuel cells. The presentation included an overview of the current incentive and market value of ancillary services provided by the company and demand responses in a number of grids around the world. There is a link between the amount of ancillary services required by the grid and the penetration level of renewable energy power such as wind and solar. The ability of hydrogen generation from electrolysis to satisfy all the requirements of ancillary services markets was also demonstrated. The economic analysis of hydrogen generation was discussed with particular reference to the cost of hydrogen fully loading all capital, energy and operating costs. The resulting reduction in the cost of hydrogen was compared to the existing markets for hydrogen, including use of hydrogen as a fuel for municipal bus fleets relative to the existing cost of fossil fuel fleets. Current industrial hydrogen merchant and bulk market prices were also compared

  7. Can a Costly Intervention Be Cost-effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael; Jones, Damon

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine the cost-effectiveness of the Fast Track intervention, a multi-year, multi-component intervention designed to reduce violence among at-risk children. A previous report documented the favorable effect of intervention on the highest-risk group of ninth-graders diagnosed with conduct disorder, as well as self-reported delinquency. The current report addressed the cost-effectiveness of the intervention for these measures of program impact. Design Costs of the intervention were estimated using program budgets. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were computed to determine the cost per unit of improvement in the 3 outcomes measured in the 10th year of the study. Results Examination of the total sample showed that the intervention was not cost-effective at likely levels of policymakers' willingness to pay for the key outcomes. Subsequent analysis of those most at risk, however, showed that the intervention likely was cost-effective given specified willingness-to-pay criteria. Conclusions Results indicate that the intervention is cost-effective for the children at highest risk. From a policy standpoint, this finding is encouraging because such children are likely to generate higher costs for society over their lifetimes. However, substantial barriers to cost-effectiveness remain, such as the ability to effectively identify and recruit such higher-risk children in future implementations. PMID:17088509

  8. A Departmental Cost-Effectiveness Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Thomas, Jr.

    In establishing a departmental cost-effectiveness model, the traditional cost-effectiveness model was discussed and equipped with a distant and deflation equation for both benefits and costs. Next, the economics of costing was examined and program costing procedures developed. Then, the model construct was described as it was structured around the…

  9. Inspections - a cost effective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a cost effective approach for inspections of Computerized Nuclear Materials Control and Accounting Systems (CNMCAS). Highlighted is the capability to conduct an inspection program via portable telephone terminals from off-site locations. The program can be applied to various materials management functions including materials control, quality assurance, and materials accounting. The system is designed to facilitate inspections by both external and internal groups

  10. Effects of Internal and External Hydrogen on Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, R. J.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) tensile and bend crack growth tests were performed on Inconel 718. For the IHE tests, the specimens were precharged to approximately 90 ppm hydrogen by exposure to 34.5 MPa H2 at 650 C. The HEE tests were performed in 34.5 MPa H2. Parameters evaluated were test temperature, strain rate for smooth and notch specimen geometries. The strain rate effect was very significant at ambient temperature for both IHE and HEE and decreased with increasing temperatures. For IHE, the strain rate effect was neglible at 260'C, and for HEE the strain rate effect was neglible at 400 C. At low temperatures, IHE was more severe than HEE, and at high temperatures HEE was more severe than IHE with a cross over temperature about 350 C. At 350 C, the equilibrium hydrogen concentration in Inconel 718 is about 50% lower than the hydrogen content of the precharged IHE specimens. Dislocation hydrogen sweeping of surface absorbed hydrogen was the likely transport mechanism for increasing the hydrogen concentration in the HEE tests sufficiently to produce the same degree of embrittlement as that of the more highly hydrogen charged IHE specimens. The main IHE fracture characteristic was formation of large, brittle flat facets, which decreased with increasing test temperature. The IHE fracture matrix surrounding the large facets ranged between brittle fine faceted to microvoid ductility depending upon strain rate, specimen geometry as well as temperature. The HEE fractures were characteristically fine featured, transgranular and brittle with a significant portion forming a "saw tooth" crystallographic pattern. Both IHE and HEE fractures were predominantly along the {1 1 1) slip and twin boundaries. With respect to embrittlement mechanism, it was postulated that dislocation hydrogen sweeping and hydrogen enhanced localized plasticity were active in HEE and IHE for concentrating hydrogen along (1 1 1) slip and twin

  11. Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Plasmodium vivax Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael T; Yeung, Shunmay; Patouillard, Edith; Cibulskis, Richard

    2016-12-28

    The continued success of efforts to reduce the global malaria burden will require sustained funding for interventions specifically targeting Plasmodium vivax The optimal use of limited financial resources necessitates cost and cost-effectiveness analyses of strategies for diagnosing and treating P. vivax and vector control tools. Herein, we review the existing published evidence on the costs and cost-effectiveness of interventions for controlling P. vivax, identifying nine studies focused on diagnosis and treatment and seven studies focused on vector control. Although many of the results from the much more extensive P. falciparum literature can be applied to P. vivax, it is not always possible to extrapolate results from P. falciparum-specific cost-effectiveness analyses. Notably, there is a need for additional studies to evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of radical cure with primaquine for the prevention of P. vivax relapses with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase testing. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. Field effect-gas sensor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plihal, M [Siemens A.G., Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Forschungslaboratorium

    1977-01-01

    MIS diodes with palladium gate can be used to detect and to measure quantitatively the hydrogen concentration in gas mixtures. The dependence of the differential capacitance of these diodes on the partial pressure of hydrogen in nitrogen, oxygen and air is investigated. A theoretical model is developed which gives satisfactory agreement with most of the experimental results.

  13. System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-11-01

    Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

  14. Human health cost of hydrogen sulfide air pollution from an oil and gas Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenessary, Dinara; Kenessary, Almas; Kenessariyev, Ussen Ismailovich; Juszkiewicz, Konrad; Amrin, Meiram Kazievich; Erzhanova, Aya Eralovna

    2017-06-08

    Introduction and objective. The Karachaganak oil and gas condensate field (KOGCF), one of the largest in the world, located in the Republic of Kazakhstan (RoK) in Central Asia, is surrounded by 10 settlements with a total population of 9,000 people. Approximately73% of this population constantly mention a specific odour of rotten eggs in the air, typical for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions, and the occurrence of low-level concentrations of hydrogen sulfide around certain industrial installations (esp. oil refineries) is a well known fact. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the impact on human health and the economic damage to the country due to H2S emissions. Materials and method. Dose-response dependency between H2S concentrations in the air and cardiovascular morbidity using multiple regression analysis was applied. Economic damage from morbidity was derived with a newly-developed method, with Kazakhstani peculiarities taken into account. Results.Hydrogen sulfide air pollution due to the KOGCF activity costs the state almost $60,000 per year. Moreover, this is the reason for a more than 40% rise incardiovascular morbidity in the region. Conclusion. The reduction of hydrogen sulfide emissions into the air is recommended, as well as successive constant ambient air monitoring in future. Economic damage evaluation should be made mandatory, on a legal basis, whenever an industrial facility operation results in associated air pollution.

  15. Hydrogen effect on embrittlement of iron and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shved, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some existing hypothesis brittleness of metals are considered. The following explanation of reversible hydrogen brittleness is suggested: hydrogen presence in iron and steel brings about the increase in the critical shear stress and the yield stress at all stages of plastic deformation (hydrogen, blocking dislocations hinders plastic shears) and the decrease of rupture strength. Decreasing forces of interatomic interaction of the surface layer some scores interatomic distances thick, hydrogen decreases the resistance of normal stresses to its effect. Thus, whatever mechanism brings about the formation of the first cracks in the metal in the presence of absorbed hydrogen, they appear at lower outside applied stresses. In the framework of the model suggested one can explain experimentally observed changes of mechanical properties of iron and steel under hydrogen effect

  16. Pursuing Photovoltaic Cost-Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Koutroulis, Eftichios; Sangwongwanich, Ariya

    2017-01-01

    loading of the power devices. However, its feasibility is challenged by the associated energy losses. An increase of the inverter lifetime and a reduction of the energy yield can alter the cost of energy, demanding an optimization of the power limitation. Therefore, aiming at minimizing the Levelized Cost...... be flexibly performed. As an advanced control strategy, the Absolute Active Power Control (AAPC) can effectively solve the overloading issues by limiting the maximum possible PV power to a certain level (i.e., the power limitation), and also benefit the inverter reliability due to the reduction in the thermal...... performance in terms of LCOE and energy production can be obtained by enabling the AAPC strategy, compared to the conventional PV inverter operating only in the maximum power point tracking mode. In the presented case study, the minimum of the LCOE is achieved for the PV system when the power limit...

  17. System optimization of solar hydrogen energy system based on hydrogen production cost. 2; Suiso seizo cost wo hyoka shihyo to shita taiyo suiso energy system no saiteki sekkei. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, D; Yamagami, Y; Tani, T [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    In this paper, to evaluate the hydrogen production cost per unit volume, system optimization of solar hydrogen energy system is discussed. Based on the simulation of the I-V characteristics of amorphous Si (a-Si) photovoltaic array, the working point between the array and hydrogen generator was determined. The cost ratio of each design point was calculated. The optimum design points were 500 W/m{sup 2} for the single crystal Si system, and 600 W/m{sup 2} for the a-Si system. When the rating capacity of design point was constant, almost constant cost ratio was obtained independent of the type of photovoltaic cells. It was found that the photovoltaic cells can be fabricated in about 15% lower cost at maximum. It was also found that the optimum design point sifts to the lower insolation site due to reduction of the photovoltaic cell cost. Since the annual hydrogen generation quantity does not depend on the type of photovoltaic cells under the constant rating capacity of design point, hydrogen can be produced in lower cost by using photovoltaic cell of lower cost. 5 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Influence of screening effect on hydrogen passivation of hole silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, O V

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of hole silicon passivation during hydrogen diffusion with account of hydrogen-acceptor pairs formation, internal electrical field and screening effect has been carried out. Screening by free carriers of hydrogen and acceptor ions results in shortening their interaction radii and slacking the concentration dependence of hydrogen diffusivity at high level of silicon doping. The consistency of simulated and experimental profiles of holes and hydrogen-acceptor pairs is reached in a broad band of doping levels from 4 x 10 sup 1 sup 4 to 1.2 x 10 sup 2 sup 0 cm sup - sup 3 at the pair binding energy of 0.70-0.79 eV while the radius of the Coulomb interaction of hydrogen and boron ions is equal to 35 A under low doping and decrease with increasing doping level

  19. Influence of screening effect on hydrogen passivation of hole silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, O.V.

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of hole silicon passivation during hydrogen diffusion with account of hydrogen-acceptor pairs formation, internal electrical field and screening effect has been carried out. Screening by free carriers of hydrogen and acceptor ions results in shortening their interaction radii and slacking the concentration dependence of hydrogen diffusivity at high level of silicon doping. The consistency of simulated and experimental profiles of holes and hydrogen-acceptor pairs is reached in a broad band of doping levels from 4 x 10 14 to 1.2 x 10 20 cm -3 at the pair binding energy of 0.70-0.79 eV while the radius of the Coulomb interaction of hydrogen and boron ions is equal to 35 A under low doping and decrease with increasing doping level [ru

  20. Effect of hydrogen on aluminium and aluminium alloys: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Susceptibility of aluminium and its alloys towards hydrogen embrittlement has been well established. Still a lot of confusion exists on the question of transport of hydrogen and its possible role in stress corrosion cracking. This paper reviews some of the fundamental properties of hydrogen...... in aluminium and its alloys and its effect on mechanical properties. The importance of hydrogen embrittlement over anodic dissolution to explain the stress corrosion cracking mechanism of these alloys is also examined in considerable detail. The various experimental findings concerning the link between...

  1. Development of advanced manufacturing technologies for low cost hydrogen storage vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, Mark [Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Lam, Patrick [Boeing Research and Technology (BR& T), Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-12-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defined a need for low-cost gaseous hydrogen storage vessels at 700 bar to support cost goals aimed at 500,000 units per year. Existing filament winding processes produce a pressure vessel that is structurally inefficient, requiring more carbon fiber for manufacturing reasons, than would otherwise be necessary. Carbon fiber is the greatest cost driver in building a hydrogen pressure vessel. The objective of this project is to develop new methods for manufacturing Type IV pressure vessels for hydrogen storage with the purpose of lowering the overall product cost through an innovative hybrid process of optimizing composite usage by combining traditional filament winding (FW) and advanced fiber placement (AFP) techniques. A numbers of vessels were manufactured in this project. The latest vessel design passed all the critical tests on the hybrid design per European Commission (EC) 79-2009 standard except the extreme temperature cycle test. The tests passed include burst test, cycle test, accelerated stress rupture test and drop test. It was discovered the location where AFP and FW overlap for load transfer could be weakened during hydraulic cycling at 85°C. To design a vessel that passed these tests, the in-house modeling software was updated to add capability to start and stop fiber layers to simulate the AFP process. The original in-house software was developed for filament winding only. Alternative fiber was also investigated in this project, but the added mass impacted the vessel cost negatively due to the lower performance from the alternative fiber. Overall the project was a success to show the hybrid design is a viable solution to reduce fiber usage, thus driving down the cost of fuel storage vessels. Based on DOE’s baseline vessel size of 147.3L and 91kg, the 129L vessel (scaled to DOE baseline) in this project shows a 32% composite savings and 20% cost savings when comparing Vessel 15 hybrid design and the Quantum

  2. effect of hydrogen peroxide and thiourea on dormancy breaking of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (Claassens and. Vreugdenhil, 2000; Suttle, 2004). Hence, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide and thiourea on dormancy and sprouting of potato microtubers and field grown tubers is described. MATERIELS AND METHODS. Production of microtubers.

  3. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...... areas. Multi-level fusion and surgical technique significantly affected the net-benefit as well. Surprisingly, no correlation was found between treatment costs and treatment effects. Incremental analysis suggested that the probability of posterior instrumentation being cost-effective was limited......Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient...

  4. Development of a low-cost oxy-hydrogen bio-fuel cell for generation of electricity using Nostoc as a source of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeeta Dawar; Behera, B.K. [Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak (India). Dept. of Biosciences; Prasanna Mohanty [Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India). School of Life Sciences

    1998-10-10

    An oxy-hydrogen bio-fuel cell, based on a carbon-carbon electrode has been fabricated. The electrode pellets were prepared by taking carbon powder mixed with polyvinylalcohol as a binder. The anode was charged with Co-Al spinel mixed oxide at 700{sup o}C, 30% KOH acted as an electrolyte. For the cyanobacterial bioreactor, a potential heterocystous blue green alga of Nostoc spp. has been used for hydrogen production and electrical energy generation. Various nutrient enrichment techniques are employed to increase the hydrogen generation efficiency of the algae. One litre free cell algal reactor attached to the fuel cell, at the anode end for hydrogen gas input, generated about 300 mV of voltage and 100 mA of current. Our present findings on the development of a low cost fuel cell with high efficiency of current output may be helpful in commercializing this technology. (author)

  5. Costs, health effects and cost-effectiveness of alcohol and tobacco control strategies in Estonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, T.; Habicht, J.; Reinap, M.; Chisholm, D.; Baltussen, R.M.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the population-level costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of different alcohol and tobacco control strategies in Estonia. DESIGN: A WHO cost-effectiveness modelling framework was used to estimate the total costs and effects of interventions. Costs were assessed in Estonian

  6. Graphene sheets/cobalt nanocomposites as low-cost/high-performance catalysts for hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fei; Hou, Chengyi; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang

    2012-01-01

    The production of clean and renewable hydrogen through the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride has received much attention owing to increasing global energy demands. Graphene sheets/cobalt (GRs/Co) nanocomposites, which are highly efficient catalysts, have been prepared using a one-step solvothermal method in ethylene glycol. Co 2+ salts were converted to Co nanoparticles, which were simultaneously inserted into the graphene layers with the reduction of graphite oxide sheets to GRs. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The maximum saturation magnetization value reached 80.8 emu g −1 , meaning they are more suitable for magnet-controlled generation of H 2 than noble metal catalysts. The catalytic activity of the composite was investigated by the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in aqueous solution both with and without a GRs support. It was found that the high electronic conductive GRs support increased the hydrogen generation rate (about two times) compared with pure cobalt. The improved hydrogen generation rate, low cost and uncomplicated recycling makes the GRs/Co nanocomposites promising candidates as catalysts for hydrogen generation. Highlights: ► Graphene sheets/cobalt nanocomposites were prepared by a one-step solvothermal method. ► The maximum saturation magnetization value of the composites reached 80.8 emu g −1 . ► The graphene support greatly increased the catalytic activity of cobalt. ► An easily removed, recycled and controlled functional filter was obtained.

  7. Transport hysteresis and hydrogen isotope effect on confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2018-03-01

    A Gedankenexperiment on hydrogen isotope effect is developed, using the transport model with transport hysteresis. The transport model with hysteresis is applied to case where the modulational electron cyclotron heating is imposed near the mid-radius of the toroidal plasmas. The perturbation propagates either outward or inward, being associated with the clockwise (CW) hysteresis or counter-clockwise (CCW) hysteresis, respectively. The hydrogen isotope effects on the CW and CCW hysteresis are investigated. The local component of turbulence-driven transport is assumed to be the gyro-Bohm diffusion. While the effect of hydrogen mass number is screened in the response of CW hysteresis, it is amplified in CCW hysteresis. This result motivates the experimental studies to compare CW and CCW cases in order to obtain further insight into the physics of hydrogen isotope effects.

  8. Effects of External Hydrogen on Hydrogen Transportation and Distribution Around the Fatigue Crack Tip in Type 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyang; Zhou, Chengshuang; Cai, Xiao; Zheng, Jinyang; Zhang, Lin

    2017-10-01

    The effects of external hydrogen on hydrogen transportation and distribution around the fatigue crack tip in type 304 stainless steel were investigated by using hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and thermal desorption spectrometry. HMT results show that some silver particles induced by hydrogen release are located near the fatigue crack and more silver particles are concentrated around the crack tip, which indicates that hydrogen accumulates in the vicinity of the crack tip during the crack growth in hydrogen gas environment. Along with the crack propagation, strain-induced α' martensite forms around the crack tip and promotes hydrogen invasion into the matrix, which will cause the crack initiation and propagation at the austenite/ α' martensite interface. In addition, the hydrogen content in the vicinity of the crack tip is higher than that at the crack edge far away from the crack tip, which is related to the stress state and strain-induced α' martensite.

  9. Effect of high pressure hydrogen on low-cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rie, K.T.; Kohler, W.

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that the fatigue life can be influenced in low-cycle range by high pressure hydrogen while the effect of high pressure hydrogen on high-cycle fatigue will not be as significant. The paper reports the details and the results of the investigations of the effect of high pressure hydrogen on the low-cycle endurance of commercially pure titanium. The results of this study indicate that: 1. The degradation of the fatigue life in low-cycle region for commercially pure titanium under high pressure hydrogen can be described by Nsub(cr)sup(α x Δepsilon)sub(pl)sup(=c) 2. The fatigue life decreases with decreasing strain rate. 3. The fatigue life decreases with increasing hydrogen pressure. It was found that the semilogarithmic plot of the fatigue life versus the hydrogen pressure gives a linear relationship. The Sievert's law does not hold in low-cycle fatigue region. 4. HAC in titanium in low-cycle fatigue region is the result of the disolution of hydrogen at the crack tip and of the strain-induced hybride formation. (orig.) 891 RW/orig. 892 RKD [de

  10. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, F

    1970-07-15

    Symptoms of fluorosis in plants are chlorotic markings around the tip or edges of young leaves. Examples of damage to plants and livestock by fluorides are listed, including the retarded growth of silkworms fed on mulberry leaves polluted by more than 30 ppm fluorides. Plants can be classified into six groups according to their resistance to hydrogen fluoride. Threshold values of the fluoride concentration range from 5-10 ppb for the plants. Gladiolus is normally employed as a plant indicator for hydrogen fluoride and silkworms as indicator insects. The relationship between plant damage by fluorides and exposure time, density, soil, fertilizer, meteorology and location are examined. Several preventive measures are listed, including the spraying of water or lime on plant leaves. It is concluded that the establishment of an environmental standard is difficult because of the extremely high sensitivity of the plants to the gas. 8 references.

  11. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischman, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of hydrogenation on the microstructure of a pressureless sintered silicon carbide was studied. Samples which were annealed in a 40:60 mole % H 2 :Ar atmosphere at 1400 0 C for 50 hours were microstructurally compared with unannealed samples and samples that had been annealed in a similar manner but using an argon atmosphere. The results were also compared with microstructural results obtained from in situ studies using both hydrogen and argon atmospheres. These results were compared with a thermodynamic model which was constructed using a free energy minimization technique. The observed effects of hydrogenation were surface decarburization and amorphization throughout the silicon carbide material. Other observations include the thermally induced growth of microcrystalline silicon and accelerated amorphization around the silicon microcrystals in samples used in hydrogen in situ studies. An analysis of the microstructure of the reference material was also performed

  12. Advanced gasifier and water gas shift technologies for low cost coal conversion to high hydrogen syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Andrew Kramer [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and team members RTI International (RTI), Coanda Research and Development, and Nexant, are developing and maturing a portfolio of technologies to meet the United States Department of Energy (DOE) goals for lowering the cost of producing high hydrogen syngas from coal for use in carbon capture power and coal-to-liquids/chemicals. This project matured an advanced pilot-scale gasifier, with scalable and commercially traceable components, to readiness for use in a first-of-a-kind commercially-relevant demonstration plant on the scale of 500-1,000 tons per day (TPD). This was accomplished through cold flow simulation of the gasifier quench zone transition region at Coanda and through an extensive hotfire gasifier test program on highly reactive coal and high ash/high ash fusion temperature coals at GTI. RTI matured an advanced water gas shift process and catalyst to readiness for testing at pilot plant scale through catalyst development and testing, and development of a preliminary design basis for a pilot scale reactor demonstrating the catalyst. A techno-economic analysis was performed by Nexant to assess the potential benefits of the gasifier and catalyst technologies in the context of power production and methanol production. This analysis showed an 18%reduction in cost of power and a 19%reduction in cost of methanol relative to DOE reference baseline cases.

  13. Cost, cost-efficiency and cost-effectiveness of integrated family planning and HIV services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Starley B; Kevany, Sebastian; Onono, Maricianah; Ochieng, George; Steinfeld, Rachel L; Grossman, Daniel; Newmann, Sara J; Blat, Cinthia; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate costs, cost-efficiency and cost-effectiveness of integration of family planning into HIV services. Integration of family planning services into HIV care and treatment clinics. A cluster-randomized trial. Twelve health facilities in Nyanza, Kenya were randomized to integrate family planning into HIV care and treatment; six health facilities were randomized to (nonintegrated) standard-of-care with separately delivered family planning and HIV services. We assessed costs, cost-efficiency (cost per additional use of more effective family planning), and cost-effectiveness (cost per pregnancy averted) associated with the first year of integration of family planning into HIV care. More effective family planning methods included oral and injectable contraceptives, subdermal implants, intrauterine device, and female and male sterilization. We collected cost data through interviews with study staff and review of financial records to determine costs of service integration. Integration of services was associated with an average marginal cost of $841 per site and $48 per female patient. Average overall and marginal costs of integration were associated with personnel costs [initial ($1003 vs. $872) and refresher ($498 vs. $330) training, mentoring ($1175 vs. $902) and supervision ($1694 vs. $1636)], with fewer resources required for other fixed ($18 vs. $0) and recurring expenses ($471 vs. $287). Integration was associated with a marginal cost of $65 for each additional use of more effective family planning and $1368 for each pregnancy averted. Integration of family planning and HIV services is feasible, inexpensive to implement, and cost-efficient in the Kenyan setting, and thus supports current Kenyan integration policy.

  14. Quantum effects on the formation of negative hydrogen ion by polarization electron capture in partially ionized dense hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Young-Dae; Kato, Daiji

    2009-05-01

    The quantum effects on the formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H - ) by the polarization electron capture process are investigated in partially ionized dense hydrogen plasmas. It is shown that the quantum effect strongly suppresses the electron capture radius as well as the cross section for the formation of the negative hydrogen ion. In addition, it has been found that the electron capture position is receded from the center of the projectile with decreasing the quantum effect of the plasma. (author)

  15. CT colonography and cost-effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavranezouli, Ifigeneia [University College London, National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, Centre for Outcomes Research and Effectiveness, Sub-department of Clinical Health Psychology, London (United Kingdom); East, James E. [St Marks Hospital, Imperial College London, Wolfson Unit for Endoscopy, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Stuart A. [University College Hospital, Specialist X-Ray, London (United Kingdom); University College Hospital, Department of Imaging, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    CT colonography (CTC) is increasingly advocated as an effective initial screening tool for colorectal cancer. Nowadays, policy-makers are increasingly interested in cost-effectiveness issues. A number of studies assessing the cost-effectiveness of CTC have been published to date. The majority of findings indicate that CTC is probably not cost-effective when colonoscopy is available, but this conclusion is sensitive to a number of key parameters. This review discusses the findings of these studies, and considers those factors which most influence final conclusions, notably intervention costs, compliance rates, effectiveness of colonoscopy, and the assumed prevalence and natural history of diminutive advanced polyps. (orig.)

  16. CT colonography and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavranezouli, Ifigeneia; East, James E.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01

    CT colonography (CTC) is increasingly advocated as an effective initial screening tool for colorectal cancer. Nowadays, policy-makers are increasingly interested in cost-effectiveness issues. A number of studies assessing the cost-effectiveness of CTC have been published to date. The majority of findings indicate that CTC is probably not cost-effective when colonoscopy is available, but this conclusion is sensitive to a number of key parameters. This review discusses the findings of these studies, and considers those factors which most influence final conclusions, notably intervention costs, compliance rates, effectiveness of colonoscopy, and the assumed prevalence and natural history of diminutive advanced polyps. (orig.)

  17. Cost-effectiveness of monitoring free flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shiva; Sharp, David; Jardim, Christopher; Batstone, Martin D

    2016-06-01

    Methods of free flap monitoring have become more sophisticated and expensive. This study aims to determine the cost of free flap monitoring and examine its cost effectiveness. We examined a group of patients who had had free flaps to the head and neck over a two-year period, and combined these results with costs obtained from business managers and staff. There were 132 free flaps with a success rate of 99%. The cost of monitoring was Aus $193/flap. Clinical monitoring during this time period cost Aus$25 476 and did not lead to the salvage of any free flaps. Cost equivalence is reached between monitoring and not monitoring only at a failure rate of 15.8%. This is to our knowledge the first study to calculate the cost of clinical monitoring of free flaps, and to examine its cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  18. Atomic hydrogen effects on high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantskevich, N.V.; Ulyashin, A.G.; Alifanov, A.V.; Stepanenko, A.V.; Fedotova, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic hydrogen effects on the properties of bulk high-temperature superconductors were investigated. It is shown that the insertion of the atomic hydrogen into the bulk of these materials from a DC plasma leads to the increase of the critical current density J c for YBaCuO(123) as well as for BiSrCaCuO(2223) high-temperature superconductors. It is found that the hydrogenation of the He implanted samples with following annealing leads to the optically detected blistering on the surface. It means that the textured thin subsurface layers of high-temperature superconductors can be formed by this method. The improvement of superconductivity by atomic hydrogen can be explained by the passivation of dangling bonds and defects on grain boundaries of these materials

  19. Effect of composition on diffusible hydrogen content and hydrogen assisted cracking of steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, S.K.; Ramasubbu, V.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Parvathavarthini, N.

    2008-01-01

    Study of hydrogen assisted cracking and measurement of diffusible hydrogen content in different Cr-Mo steel welds showed that for identical conditions, susceptibility to cracking increased and diffusible hydrogen content decreased with increase in alloy content. Hydrogen permeation studies showed that hydrogen diffusivity decreases and solubility increases with increase in alloy content. Thus decrease in diffusible hydrogen content with increase in alloying is attributed to increase in apparent solubility and decrease in apparent diffusivity of hydrogen with increase in alloy content. Analysis of the results indicates that variation of diffusible hydrogen content and apparent diffusivity of hydrogen with alloy content can be represented as a function of alloy composition. (author)

  20. FIRM SIZE EFFECTS ON TRANSACTION COSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NOOTEBOOM, B

    1993-01-01

    Associated with effects of scale, scope, experience and learning there are effects of firm size on transaction costs; in the stages of contact, contract and control. These effects are due to ''threshold costs'' in setting up contacts, contracts and governance schemes, and to differences with respect

  1. Biosimilar medicines and cost-effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Simoens

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven SimoensResearch Centre for Pharmaceutical Care and Pharmaco-economics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Given that biosimilars are agents that are similar but not identical to the reference biopharmaceutical, this study aims to introduce and describe specific issues related to the economic evaluation of biosimilars by focusing on the relative costs, relative effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of biosimilars. Economic evaluation assesses the cost-effectiveness of a medicine by comparing the costs and outcomes of a medicine with those of a relevant comparator. The assessment of cost-effectiveness of a biosimilar is complicated by the fact that evidence needed to obtain marketing authorization from a registration authority does not always correspond to the data requirements of a reimbursement authority. In particular, this relates to the availability of adequately powered equivalence or noninferiority studies, the need for comparative data about the effectiveness in a real-world setting rather than the efficacy in a structured setting, and the use of health outcome measures instead of surrogate endpoints. As a biosimilar is likely to be less expensive than the comparator (eg, the reference biopharmaceutical, the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of a biosimilar depends on the relative effectiveness. If appropriately designed and powered clinical studies demonstrate equivalent effectiveness between a biosimilar and the comparator, then a cost-minimization analysis identifies the least expensive medicine. If there are differences in the effectiveness of a biosimilar and the comparator, other techniques of economic evaluation need to be employed, such as cost-effectiveness analysis or cost-utility analysis. Given that there may be uncertainty surrounding the long-term safety (ie, risk of immunogenicity and rare adverse events and effectiveness of a biosimilar, the cost-effectiveness

  2. Investigating attitudes to hydrogen refuelling facilities and the social cost to local residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Garra, Tanya; Mourato, Susana; Pearson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Vehicles fuelled by hydrogen (H 2 ) have attracted increasing attention because of their potentially enhanced environmental profiles. Their penetration into the vehicle stock will be influenced by the spread of refuelling facilities. This study investigates local attitudes towards the proposed installation of H 2 storage facilities at existing refuelling stations throughout London. Using multinomial logit analysis, we identify the determinants of attitudes. Results suggest that residents living very close to a proposed H 2 facility are less likely to be opposed than residents living 200-500 m away. Opposition appears to be determined by a lack of trust in safety regulations, non-environmental attitudes, and concerns about the existing local refuelling station. The social cost to local residents of a local H 2 storage facility was estimated using a method developed by Atkinson et al. [2004. 'Amenity' or 'eyesore'? Negative willingness to pay for options to replace electricity transmission towers. Applied Economics Letters 11(4), 203-208], which elicits the amount of time respondents are willing to commit to oppose a new facility development. Using the leisure rate of time, the social cost is estimated at just under Pounds 14 per local opposed resident. Add to this the WTP to support opposition efforts by a local group, and the value comes to just under Pounds 25 per opposed resident

  3. Cost-effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost-effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost-effectiveness thresholds allow cost-effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization's Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost-effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country's per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this - in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost-effectiveness ratios - can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost-effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations - e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations - in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost-effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair.

  4. The hydrogen value chain: applying the automotive role model of the hydrogen economy in the aerospace sector to increase performance and reduce costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischauf, Norbert; Acosta-Iborra, Beatriz; Harskamp, Frederik; Moretto, Pietro; Malkow, Thomas; Honselaar, Michel; Steen, Marc; Hovland, Scott; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Schautz, Max; Wittig, Manfred; Soucek, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    satellites. Similar trends can be expected in the future for RADAR Earth Observation satellites and space infrastructure concepts of great scale. This paper examines current activities along the hydrogen value chain, both in the terrestrial and the aerospace sector. A general assessment of the synergy potential is complemented by a thorough analysis of specific applications serving as role models like a lunar manned base or pressurised rover, an aircraft APU or a high power telecommunications satellite. Potential performance improvements and cost savings serve as key performance indicators in these comparisons and trade-offs.

  5. [Cost-effectiveness of addiction care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suijkerbuijk, A W M; van Gils, P F; Greeven, P G J; de Wit, G A

    2015-01-01

    A large number of interventions are available for the treatment of addiction. Professionals need to know about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interventions so they can prioritise appropriate interventions for the treatment of addiction. To provide an overview of the scientific literature on the cost-effectiveness of addiction treatment for alcohol- and drug-abusers. We searched the databases Medline and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. To be relevant for our study, articles had to focus on interventions in the health-care setting, have a Western context and have a health-related outcome measure such as quality adjusted life years (QALY). Twenty-nine studies met our inclusion criteria: 15 for alcohol and 14 for drugs. The studies on alcohol addiction related mainly to brief interventions. They proved to be cost-saving or had a favourable incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), remaining below the threshold of € 20,000 per QALY. The studies on drug addiction all involved pharmacotherapeutic interventions. In the case of 10 out of 14 interventions, the ICER was less than € 20,000 per QALY. Almost all of the interventions studied were cost-saving or cost-effective. Many studies consider only health-care costs. Additional research, for instance using a social cost-benefit analysis, could provide more details about the costs of addiction and about the impact that an intervention could have in these/the costs.

  6. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev; Ares, Jos Ramon; Bals, Sara; Biliskov, Nikola; Chakraborty, Sudip; Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Chaudhary, Anna Lisa; Cuevas, Fermin; Dam, Bernard; de Jongh, Petra; Dornheim, Martin; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Novakovic, Jasmina G.; Hirscher, Michael; Hirscher, M.; Jensen, Torben R.; Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Novakovic, Nikola; Lai, Qiwen; Leardini, Fabrice; Gattia, Daniele Mirabile; Pasquini, Luca; Steriotis, Theodore; Turner, Stuart; Vegge, Tejs; Zuttel, Andreas; Montone, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated

  7. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated...

  8. Cost-effectiveness Analysis for Technology Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, A; Naware, S S

    2008-01-01

    In a developing country with limited resources, it is important to utilize the total cost visibility approach over the entire life-cycle of the technology and then analyse alternative options for acquiring technology. The present study analysed cost-effectiveness of an "In-house" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan facility of a large service hospital against outsourcing possibilities. Cost per unit scan was calculated by operating costing method and break-even volume was calculated. Then life-cycle cost analysis was performed to enable total cost visibility of the MRI scan in both "In-house" and "outsourcing of facility" configuration. Finally, cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to identify the more acceptable decision option. Total cost for performing unit MRI scan was found to be Rs 3,875 for scans without contrast and Rs 4,129 with contrast. On life-cycle cost analysis, net present value (NPV) of the "In-house" configuration was found to be Rs-(4,09,06,265) while that of "outsourcing of facility" configuration was Rs-(5,70,23,315). Subsequently, cost-effectiveness analysis across eight Figures of Merit showed the "In-house" facility to be the more acceptable option for the system. Every decision for acquiring high-end technology must be subjected to life-cycle cost analysis.

  9. Polyacrylonitrile Fibers Anchored Cobalt/Graphene Sheet Nanocomposite: A Low-Cost, High-Performance and Reusable Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Huang, Guoji; Hou, Chengyi; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang

    2016-06-01

    Cobalt and its composites are known to be active and inexpensive catalysts in sodium borohydride (NaBH4) hydrolysis to generate clean and renewable hydrogen energy. A novel fiber catalyst, cobalt/graphene sheet nanocomposite anchored on polyacrylonitrile fibers (Co/GRs-PANFs), which can be easily recycled and used in any reactor with different shapes, were synthesized by anchoring cobalt/graphene (Co/GRs) on polyacrylonitrile fibers coated with graphene (GRs-PANFs) at low temperature. The unique structure design effectively prevents the inter-sheet restacking of Co/GRs and fully exploits the large surface area of novel hybrid material for generate hydrogen. And the extra electron transfer path supplied by GRs on the surface of GRs-PANFs can also enhance their catalysis performances. The catalytic activity of the catalyst was investigated by the hydrolysis of NaBH4 in aqueous solution with GRs-PANFs. GRs powders and Co powders were used as control groups. It was found that both GRs and fiber contributed to the hydrogen generation rate of Co/GRs-PANFs (3222 mL x min(-1) x g(-1)), which is much higher than that of cobalt powders (915 mL x min(-1) x g(-1)) and Co/GRs (995 mL x min(-1) x g(-1)). The improved hydrogen generation rate, low cost and uncomplicated recycling make the Co/GRs-PANFs promising candidate as catalysts for hydrogen generation.

  10. Effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient for solidifying aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felberbaum, M.; Landry-Desy, E.; Weber, L.; Rappaz, M.

    2011-01-01

    An effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient has been calculated for two solidifying Al - 4.5 wt.% Cu and Al - 10 wt.% Cu alloys as a function of the volume fraction of solid. For this purpose, in situ X-ray tomography was performed on these alloys. For each volume fraction of solid between 0.6 and 0.9, a representative volume element of the microstructure was extracted. Solid and liquid voxels were assimilated to solid and liquid nodes in order to solve the hydrogen diffusion equation based on the chemical potential and using a finite volume formulation. An effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient based on the volume fraction of solid only could be deduced from the results of the numerical model at steady state. The results are compared with various effective medium theories.

  11. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  12. Gedanken Experiments in Educational Cost Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudner, Harvey J.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the effectiveness of cost determining techniques in education. The areas discussed are: education and management; cost-effectiveness models; figures of merit determination; and the implications as they relate to the areas of audio-visual and computer educational technology. (Author/GA)

  13. Tuition fees and sunk-cost effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketel, N.; Linde, J.; Oosterbeek, H.; van der Klaauw, B.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a field experiment testing for sunk-cost effects in an education setting. Students signing up for extra-curricular tutorial sessions randomly received a discount on the tuition fee. The sunk-cost effect predicts that students who pay more will attend more tutorial sessions,

  14. Cost effectiveness of radon mitigation in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, E.G.; Krewski, D.; Zielinski, J.M.; McGregor, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the cost effectiveness of comprehensive strategies for reducing exposure to radon gas in indoor air in Canadian homes. The analysis is conducted within the context of a general framework for risk management programme evaluation which includes well-known evaluation techniques such as cost effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses as special cases. Based on this analysis, it is clear that any comprehensive programme to reduce exposure to environmental radon will be extremely expensive, and may not be justifiable in terms of health impact, particularly when considered in relation to other public health programmes. Testing of homes at the point of sale and installing sub-slab suction equipment to reduce exposure to indoor radon where necessary appears to be a relatively cost-effective radon mitigation strategy. In general, radon mitigation was found to be most cost effective in cities with relatively high levels of radon. (author)

  15. Generation of oxy-hydrogen gas and its effect on performance of spark ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, N. N.; Chavan, C. B.; More, A. S.; Baskar, P.

    2017-11-01

    Considering the current scenario of petroleum fuels, it has been observed that, they will last for few years from now. On the other hand, the ever increasing cost of a gasoline fuels and their related adverse effects on environment caught the attention of researchers to find a supplementary source. For commercial fuels, supplementary source is not about replacing the entire fuel, instead enhancing efficiency by simply making use of it in lesser amount. From the recent research that has been carried out, focus on the use of Hydrogen rich gas as a supplementary source of fuel has increased. But the problem related to the storage of hydrogen gas confines the application of pure hydrogen in petrol engine. Using oxy-hydrogen gas (HHO) generator the difficulties of storing the hydrogen have overcome up to a certain limit. The present study highlights on performance evaluation of conventional petrol engine by using HHO gas as a supplementary fuel. HHO gas was generated from the electrolysis of water. KOH solution of 3 Molar concentration was used which act as a catalyst and accelerates the rate of generation of HHO gas. Quantity of gas to be supplied to the engine was controlled by varying amount of current. It was observed that, engine performance was improved on the introduction of HHO gas.

  16. Effect of microplastic strain on hydrogen behaviour in steel and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribanova, L.I.; Sarrak, V.I.; Filippov, G.A.; Shlyafirner, A.M. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii, Moscow (USSR))

    1981-01-01

    A connection between the tendency to delayed fracture and resistance to microplastic deformation is studied in the presence of hydrogen on smooth samples of the 40Kh steel. Tests for delayed fracture have been carried out at the ''Instron'' machine. Two critical levels of strains during delayed fracture in the hydridation process are found out (sigmasub(cr1)=0.3sigmasub(0.2) and sigmasub(cr2)=0.5sigmasub(0.2)). At stresses below the sigmasub(cr1) hydrogen does not influence on the resistance to microplastic deformation of steel and does not cause delayed fracture. Propagation of cracks arising from defects occurring as a result of mutual effect of hydrogen and elastic stresses runs in the stress range from sigmasub(cr1) up to sigmasub(cr2). At stresses higher than sigmasub(cr2) the crack propagates from defects existing in the moment of hydridation process beginning.

  17. Effect of residual stresses on hydrogen permeation in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouanga, M.; Bercot, P.; Takadoum, J.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of residual stresses on electrochemical permeation in iron membrane was investigated. Four thermal and mechanical treatments were chosen to obtain different surface states in relation to the residual stresses. Residual stresses were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Macherauch and Mueller method. The results were completed by the microhardness measurements. For all iron membranes, compressive residual stresses were obtained. Electrochemical permeation experiments using a Devanathan and Stachurski cell were employed to determine the hydrogen permeation behaviour of the various iron membranes. The latter was charged with hydrogen by galvanostatic cathodic polarization in 0.1 M NaOH at 25 deg. C. The experimental results revealed that hydrogen permeation rate increases with increasing residual stresses introduced in iron membranes.

  18. The effects of incubation period and temperature on the Hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of incubation period and temperature on the Hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) technique for detection of faecal contamination in water. ... African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. Journal Home ... A total of 171 water samples from 3 sources were analyzed for the presence of faecal contamination by

  19. Effect of oxygen on the hydrogenation properties of magnesium films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2006-01-01

    The effect of magnesium oxide on the magnesium and hydrogen desorption properties of magnesium films have been investigated. We find that by capping metallic magnesium films with oxide overlayers the apparent desorption energy of magnesium is increased from 146 kJ/mol to 314 kJ/mol. The results...... are discussed in light of previous investigations of ball-milled magnesium powders....

  20. Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of water in the vicinity of ions in aqueous NaCl solutions. A NAG. 1. , D CHAKRABORTY and A CHANDRA*. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016. 1. Present address: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,.

  1. Effect of foliar application of salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 2. Effect of foliar application of salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a xyloglucan oligosaccharide on capsiate content and gene expression associatedwith capsinoids synthesis in Capsicum annuum L. AY ZUNUN-PÉREZ T GUEVARA-FIGUEROA SN ...

  2. Effect of hydrogen on hydrogen-methane turbulent non-premixed flame under MILD condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardani, Amir; Tabejamaat, Sadegh [Department of Aerospace engineering, Amirkabir university of technology (Tehran polytechnic), Hafez Ave., PO. Box: 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    Energy crises and the preservation of the global environment are placed man in a dilemma. To deal with these problems, finding new sources of fuel and developing efficient and environmentally friendly energy utilization technologies are essential. Hydrogen containing fuels and combustion under condition of the moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD) are good choices to replace the traditional ones. In this numerical study, the turbulent non-premixed CH{sub 4}+H{sub 2} jet flame issuing into a hot and diluted co-flow air is considered to emulate the combustion of hydrogen containing fuels under MILD conditions. This flame is related to the experimental condition of Dally et al. [Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 1147-1154]. In general, the modelling is carried out using the EDC model, to describe turbulence-chemistry interaction, and the DRM-22 reduced mechanism and the GRI2.11 full mechanism to represent the chemical reactions of H{sub 2}/methane jet flame. The effect of hydrogen content of fuel on flame structure for two co-flow oxygen levels is studied by considering three fuel mixtures, 5%H{sub 2}+95%CH{sub 4}, 10%H{sub 2}+90%CH{sub 4} and 20% H{sub 2}+80%CH{sub 4}(by mass). In this study, distribution of species concentrations, mixture fraction, strain rate, flame entrainment, turbulent kinetic energy decay and temperature are investigated. Results show that the hydrogen addition to methane leads to improve mixing, increase in turbulent kinetic energy decay along the flame axis, increase in flame entrainment, higher reaction intensities and increase in mixture ignitability and rate of heat release. (author)

  3. Low-cost carriers fare competition effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona Benitez, R.B.; Lodewijks, G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the effects that low-cost carriers (LCC’s) produce when entering new routes operated only by full-service carriers (FSC’s) and routes operated by low-cost carriers in competition with full-service carriers. A mathematical model has been developed to determine what routes should

  4. Low-cost fabrication of highly sensitive room temperature hydrogen sensor based on ordered mesoporous Co-doped TiO2 structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Haidry, Azhar Ali; Wang, Tao; Yao, Zheng Jun

    2017-07-01

    The development of cost-effective gas sensors with improved sensing properties and minimum power consumption for room temperature hydrogen leakage monitoring is in increasing demand. In this context, this report focus on the facile fabrication of ordered mesoporous TiO2 via evaporation-induced self-assembly route. With the controlled doping threshold (3%Co-TiO2), the output resistance change to 1000 ppm H2 is ˜4.1 × 103 with the response time of 66 s. The sensor response exhibits power law dependence with an increase in the hydrogen concentration, where the power law coefficient was found not only specific to the kind of target gas but also related to temperature. Further, the effect of structure integrity with doping level and humidity on sensing characteristics is interpreted in terms of variation in surface potential eVS and depletion region w caused by the adsorption of molecular oxygen O2-.

  5. Resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-48, ''Hydrogen control measures and effects of hydrogen burns on safety equipment''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrell, C.M.; Soffer, L.

    1989-09-01

    Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-48 arose as a result of the large amount of hydrogen generated and burned within containment during the Three Mile Island accident. This issue covers hydrogen control measures for recoverable degraded-core accidents for all boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and those pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) with ice-condenser containments. The Commission and the nuclear industry have sponsored extensive research in this area, which has led to significant revision of the Commission's hydrogen control regulations, given in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Section 50.44. BWRs having Mark I and II containments are presently required to operate with inerted containment atmospheres that effectively prevent hydrogen combustion. BWRs with Mark III containments and PWRs with ice-condenser containments are now required to be equipped with hydrogen control systems to protect containment integrity and safety systems inside containment. Industry has chosen to use hydrogen igniter systems to burn hydrogen produced in a controlled fashion to prevent damage. An independent review by a Committee of the National Research Council concluded that, for most accident scenarios, current regulatory requirements make it highly unlikely that hydrogen detonation would be the cause of containment failure. On the basis of the extensive research effort conducted and current regulatory requirements, including their implementation, the staff concludes that no new regulatory guidance on hydrogen control for recoverable degraded-core accidents for these types of plants is necessary and that USI A-48 is resolved

  6. The Interpersonal Sunk-Cost Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivola, Christopher Y

    2018-05-01

    The sunk-cost fallacy-pursuing an inferior alternative merely because we have previously invested significant, but nonrecoverable, resources in it-represents a striking violation of rational decision making. Whereas theoretical accounts and empirical examinations of the sunk-cost effect have generally been based on the assumption that it is a purely intrapersonal phenomenon (i.e., solely driven by one's own past investments), the present research demonstrates that it is also an interpersonal effect (i.e., people will alter their choices in response to other people's past investments). Across eight experiments ( N = 6,076) covering diverse scenarios, I documented sunk-cost effects when the costs are borne by someone other than the decision maker. Moreover, the interpersonal sunk-cost effect is not moderated by social closeness or whether other people observe their sunk costs being "honored." These findings uncover a previously undocumented bias, reveal that the sunk-cost effect is a much broader phenomenon than previously thought, and pose interesting challenges for existing accounts of this fascinating human tendency.

  7. Study of Supported Nickel Catalysts Prepared by Aqueous Hydrazine Method. Hydrogenating Properties and Hydrogen Storage: Support Effect. Silver Additive Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcieszak, R.

    2006-06-01

    We have studied Ni or NiAg nano-particles obtained by the reduction of nickel salts (acetate or nitrate) by hydrazine and deposited by simple or EDTA-double impregnation on various supports (γ-Al 2 O 3 , amorphous or crystallized SiO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , CeO 2 and carbon). Prepared catalysts were characterized by different methods (XRD, XPS, low temperature adsorption and desorption of N 2 , FTIR and FTIR-Pyridine, TEM, STEM, EDS, H 2 -TPR, H 2 -adsorption, H 2 -TPD, isopropanol decomposition) and tested in the gas phase hydrogenation of benzene or as carbon materials in the hydrogen storage at room temperature and high pressure. The catalysts prepared exhibited better dispersion and activity than classical catalysts. TOF's of NiAg/SiO 2 or Ni/carbon catalysts were similar to Pt catalysts in benzene hydrogenation. Differences in support acidity or preparation method and presence of Ag as metal additive play a crucial role in the chemical reduction of Ni by hydrazine and in the final properties of the materials. Ni/carbon catalysts could store significant amounts of hydrogen at room temperature and high pressure (0.53%/30 bars), probably through the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  8. Green Infrastructure Siting and Cost Effectiveness Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Parcel scale green infrastructure siting and cost effectiveness analysis. You can find more details at the project's website.

  9. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions; Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; Steward, D.; Penev, M.; McQueen, S.; Jaffe, S.; Talon, C.

    2012-08-01

    Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on 2015 as a target timeframe for global FCEV commercialization, the window of opportunity is short for establishing a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. This report describes expert feedback on the market readiness of hydrogen infrastructure technology from two activities.

  10. [Incremental cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, N; Dick, H B; Krummenauer, F

    2007-02-01

    Supplementation of cataract patients with multifocal intraocular lenses involves an additional financial investment when compared to the corresponding monofocal supplementation, which usually is not funded by German health care insurers. In the context of recent resource allocation discussions, however, the cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery could become an important rationale. Therefore an evidence-based estimation of its cost effectiveness was carried out. Three independent meta-analyses were implemented to estimate the gain in uncorrected near visual acuity and best corrected visual acuity (vision lines) as well as the predictability (fraction of patients without need for reading aids) of multifocal supplementation. Study reports published between 1995 and 2004 (English or German language) were screened for appropriate key words. Meta effects in visual gain and predictability were estimated by means and standard deviations of the reported effect measures. Cost data were estimated by German DRG rates and individual lens costs; the cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery was then computed in terms of its marginal cost effectiveness ratio (MCER) for each clinical benefit endpoint; the incremental costs of multifocal versus monofocal cataract surgery were further estimated by means of their respective incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). An independent meta-analysis estimated the complication profiles to be expected after monofocal and multifocal cataract surgery in order to evaluate expectable complication-associated additional costs of both procedures; the marginal and incremental cost effectiveness estimates were adjusted accordingly. A sensitivity analysis comprised cost variations of +/- 10 % and utility variations alongside the meta effect estimate's 95 % confidence intervals. Total direct costs from the health care insurer's perspective were estimated 3363 euro, associated with a visual meta benefit in best corrected visual

  11. The design of a low-cost device for the production of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal NASSAR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to design a generator for hydrogen gas. In this generator no need to storage the output gas, by controlling in the gas flow rate (according to usage needs so, we did not need to hydrogen storage. The prototype is developed and tested and the idea can implement practically to save time and money.

  12. Variable scaling method and Stark effect in hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, R.K.R.; Ghosh, B.

    1983-09-01

    By relating the Stark effect problem in hydrogen-like atoms to that of the spherical anharmonic oscillator we have found simple formulas for energy eigenvalues for the Stark effect. Matrix elements have been calculated using 0(2,1) algebra technique after Armstrong and then the variable scaling method has been used to find optimal solutions. Our numerical results are compared with those of Hioe and Yoo and also with the results obtained by Lanczos. (author)

  13. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  14. Cost-effectiveness Analysis with Influence Diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M; Díez, F J

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is used increasingly in medicine to determine whether the health benefit of an intervention is worth the economic cost. Decision trees, the standard decision modeling technique for non-temporal domains, can only perform CEA for very small problems. To develop a method for CEA in problems involving several dozen variables. We explain how to build influence diagrams (IDs) that explicitly represent cost and effectiveness. We propose an algorithm for evaluating cost-effectiveness IDs directly, i.e., without expanding an equivalent decision tree. The evaluation of an ID returns a set of intervals for the willingness to pay - separated by cost-effectiveness thresholds - and, for each interval, the cost, the effectiveness, and the optimal intervention. The algorithm that evaluates the ID directly is in general much more efficient than the brute-force method, which is in turn more efficient than the expansion of an equivalent decision tree. Using OpenMarkov, an open-source software tool that implements this algorithm, we have been able to perform CEAs on several IDs whose equivalent decision trees contain millions of branches. IDs can perform CEA on large problems that cannot be analyzed with decision trees.

  15. Cost and effectiveness of radon barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-12-01

    Earthen, asphalt, and multilayer radon barrier systems can all provide reduction in the amount of radon gas released from uranium mill tailings. Pacific Northwest Laboratory field tested all three types of covers at Grand Junction, Colorado during the summer of 1981. All nine individual radon barrier systems tested currently meet the EPA standard for radon flux of 20 pCi m - 2 s - 1 . The cost of the asphalt and 3m earthen covers were about the same at the field test. Multilayer covers were significantly more costly. Cost estimates for three high priority western sites indicate 3m of earthen cover is the least costly radon barrier when earthen material is available at or near the disposal site. If earthen material must be imported more than 8 to 10 km asphalt and possibly multilayer radon barriers can be cost effective

  16. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino

  17. Low cost AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloys for a nickel-metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Lijun [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Zhan Feng [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Bao Deyou [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Qing Guangrong [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Li Yaoquan [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China); Wei Xiuying [General Res. Inst. for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing (China)

    1995-12-15

    The studies have been carried out on utilizing Ml(NiAl){sub 5}-based alloys as a low cost negative battery electrode. The replacement of nickel by copper improved the cycle lifetime to some extent without a decrease in capacity. Using Ml(NiAlCu){sub 5} alloys, hydrogen storage alloys with good overall characteristics and low cost were obtained through substituting cobalt or silicon for nickel. The discharge capacity was further increased by increasing the lanthanum content in lanthanum-rich mischmetal. (orig.)

  18. Thermodynamics of silicon nitridation - Effect of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.; Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Equilibrium compositions for the nitridization of Si were calculated to detect the effectiveness of H2 in removal of the oxide film and in increasing the concentration of SiO and reducing the proportions of O2. Gibbs free energy for the formation of SiN2O was computed above 1685 K, and at lower temperatures. The thermodynamic properties of SiN2O2 were then considered from 1000-3000 K, taking into account the known thermodynamic data for 39 molecular combinations of the Si, Ni, and O. The gases formed were assumed ideal mixtures with pure phase condensed species. The mole fractions were obtained for a system of SiO2 with each Si particle covered with a thin layer of SiO2 before nitridation, and a system in which the nitriding atmosphere had access to the Si. The presence of H2 was determined to enhance the removal of NiO2 in the first system, decrease the partial pressure of O2, increase the partial pressures of SiO, Si, H2O, NH3, and SiH4, while its effects were negligible in the Si system.

  19. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  20. Deregulation and Nuclear Training: Cost Effective Alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard P. Coe; Patricia A. Lake

    2000-01-01

    Training is crucial to the success of any organization. It is also expensive, with some estimates exceeding $50 billion annually spent on training by U.S. corporations. Nuclear training, like that of many other highly technical organizations, is both crucial and costly. It is unlikely that the amount of training can be significantly reduced. If anything, current trends indicate that training needs will probably increase as the industry and workforce ages and changes. With the advent of energy deregulation in the United States, greater pressures will surface to make the costs of energy more cost-competitive. This in turn will drive businesses to more closely examine existing costs and find ways to do things in a more cost-effective way. The commercial nuclear industry will be no exception, and nuclear training will be equally affected. It is time for nuclear training and indeed the entire nuclear industry to begin using more aggressive techniques to reduce costs. This includes the need for nuclear training to find alternatives to traditional methods for the delivery of cost-effective high-quality training that meets regulatory requirements and produces well-qualified personnel capable of working in an efficient and safe manner. Computer-based and/or Web-based training are leading emerging technologies

  1. Is expanding Medicare coverage cost-effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muennig Peter

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proposals to expand Medicare coverage tend to be expensive, but the value of services purchased is not known. This study evaluates the efficiency of the average private supplemental insurance plan for Medicare recipients. Methods Data from the National Health Interview Survey, the National Death Index, and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were analyzed to estimate the costs, changes in life expectancy, and health-related quality of life gains associated with providing private supplemental insurance coverage for Medicare beneficiaries. Model inputs included socio-demographic, health, and health behavior characteristics. Parameter estimates from regression models were used to predict quality-adjusted life years (QALYs and costs associated with private supplemental insurance relative to Medicare only. Markov decision analysis modeling was then employed to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results Medicare supplemental insurance is associated with increased health care utilization, but the additional costs associated with this utilization are offset by gains in quality-adjusted life expectancy. The incremental cost-effectiveness of private supplemental insurance is approximately $24,000 per QALY gained relative to Medicare alone. Conclusion Supplemental insurance for Medicare beneficiaries is a good value, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio comparable to medical interventions commonly deemed worthwhile.

  2. Origin of reverse annealing effect in hydrogen-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Zengfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In contradiction to conventional damage annealing, thermally annealed H-implanted Si exhibits an increase in damage or reverse annealing behavior, whose mechanism has remained elusive. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with channeling Rutherford backscattering analysis, we conclusively elucidate that the reverse annealing effect is due to the nucleation and growth of hydrogen-induce platelets. Platelets are responsible for an increase in the height and width the channeling damage peak following increased isochronal anneals.

  3. Finite size effects on hydrogen bonds in confined water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musat, R.; Renault, J.P.; Le Caer, S.; Pommeret, S.; Candelaresi, M.; Palmer, D.J.; Righini, R.

    2008-01-01

    Femtosecond IR spectroscopy was used to study water confined in 1-50 nm pores. The results show that even large pores induce significant changes (for example excited-state lifetimes) to the hydrogen-bond network, which are independent of pore diameter between 1 and 50 nm. Thus, the changes are not surface-induced but rather finite size effects, and suggest a confinement-induced enhancement of the acidic character of water. (authors)

  4. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  5. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Augsburger, M.; Borchert, G.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; El-Khoury, P.; Egger, J.-P.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O. W. B.; Siems, Th.; Simons, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction

  6. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); H. Brenner (Hermann)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is an important public health problem. Several screening methods have been shown to be effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality. The objective of this review was to assess the cost-effectiveness of the different colorectal cancer screening methods and to

  7. Cost-Effective Fuel Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, J.; Thompson, M.; Vaillant, N.

    2014-12-01

    The cost of fighting large wildland fires in the western United States has grown dramatically over the past decade. This trend will likely continue with growth of the WUI into fire prone ecosystems, dangerous fuel conditions from decades of fire suppression, and a potentially increasing effect from prolonged drought and climate change. Fuel treatments are often considered the primary pre-fire mechanism to reduce the exposure of values at risk to wildland fire, and a growing suite of fire models and tools are employed to prioritize where treatments could mitigate wildland fire damages. Assessments using the likelihood and consequence of fire are critical because funds are insufficient to reduce risk on all lands needing treatment, therefore prioritization is required to maximize the effectiveness of fuel treatment budgets. Cost-effectiveness, doing the most good per dollar, would seem to be an important fuel treatment metric, yet studies or plans that prioritize fuel treatments using costs or cost-effectiveness measures are absent from the literature. Therefore, to explore the effect of using costs in fuel treatment planning we test four prioritization algorithms designed to reduce risk in a case study examining fuel treatments on the Sisters Ranger District of central Oregon. For benefits we model sediment retention and standing biomass, and measure the effectiveness of each algorithm by comparing the differences among treatment and no treat alternative scenarios. Our objective is to maximize the averted loss of net benefits subject to a representative fuel treatment budget. We model costs across the study landscape using the My Fuel Treatment Planner software, tree list data, local mill prices, and GIS-measured site characteristics. We use fire simulations to generate burn probabilities, and estimate fire intensity as conditional flame length at each pixel. Two prioritization algorithms target treatments based on cost-effectiveness and show improvements over those

  8. Effect of hydrogen coverage on hydrogenation of o-cresol on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C.; Wang, Sanwu

    2018-06-01

    The conversion of phenolics over metal catalysts is an important process for upgrading biofuels. With density functional calculations, hydrogenation of o-cresol on the hydrogen-covered Pt(111) surface was investigated. The results show that the coverage of hydrogen plays a significant role in the reaction rate while it does not affect the reaction selectivity. The reaction barriers of the hydrogenation process leading to the formation of both 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (the intermediate product) and 2-methyl-cyclohexanol (the final product) at high H coverages (∼1 ML) are found to be smaller by 0.14-0.69 eV than those at lower H coverages (∼1/25 ML). After both hydrogen and cresol are adsorbed on Pt(111) from their initial gas phase state, the reaction energy of each hydrogenation step on the surface is also dependent on the hydrogen coverage. On the H-covered Pt(111) surface, most steps of hydrogenation involve exothermic reactions when the hydrogen coverage is high while they are endothermic reactions at low hydrogen coverages. The differences in reaction rate and reaction energy between high and low H coverages can be understood with the coverage-dependent bonding strength and configurations.

  9. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bond fluctuations in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Cuny, Jérôme; Parrinello, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogen bond (HB) is central to our understanding of the properties of water. However, despite intense theoretical and experimental study, it continues to hold some surprises. Here, we show from an analysis of ab initio simulations that take proper account of nuclear quantum effects that the hydrogen-bonded protons in liquid water experience significant excursions in the direction of the acceptor oxygen atoms. This generates a small but nonnegligible fraction of transient autoprotolysis events that are not seen in simulations with classical nuclei. These events are associated with major rearrangements of the electronic density, as revealed by an analysis of the computed Wannier centers and 1H chemical shifts. We also show that the quantum fluctuations exhibit significant correlations across neighboring HBs, consistent with an ephemeral shuttling of protons along water wires. We end by suggesting possible implications for our understanding of how perturbations (solvated ions, interfaces, and confinement) might affect the HB network in water. PMID:24014589

  10. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims . The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results . H 2 S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H 2 S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ -lyase (CSE) and cystathionine- β -synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H 2 S donor (NaHS, 50  μ mol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H 2 S administration and contributed to elevated H 2 S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions . Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H 2 S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  11. Physiological behavior of hydrogen sulfide in rice plant. Part 5. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on respiration of rice roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, H; Takagi, S

    1955-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of hydrogen sulfide on the respiration of rice plant roots were investigated using Warburg's manometory technique. Hydrogen sulfide inhibited not only aerobic respiration but anaerobic respiration process of roots. Inhibitory action of hydrogen sulfide and potassium cyanide on the respiration were apparently reversible, but the style of recovery reaction from inhibition was somewhat different in each case. Oxygen consumption of roots was increased by addition of ammonium salts, but the same effects were not recognized by the addition of any other salt examined (except nitrate salts). There was close relationship between respiration of roots and assimilation of nitrogen by roots. The increased oxygen uptake by addition of ammonium salt was also inhibited by hydrogen sulfide. The reactivation of this reaction occurred with the recovery of endogenous respiration of roots. 19 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Some Observations on Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Terry G.

    1979-01-01

    The general nature of cost-effectiveness analysis is discussed, analytical frameworks for conducting cost-effectiveness studies are described, and some of the problems inherent in measuring educational costs and in assessing program effectiveness are addressed. (Author/IRT)

  13. Effects of microstructures on hydrogen induced cracking of electrochemically hydrogenated double notched tensile sample of 4340 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sk, Mobbassar Hassan, E-mail: Skmobba@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Overfelt, Ruel A. [Materials Research and Education Center, Materials Engineer, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Abdullah, Aboubakr M. [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar)

    2016-04-06

    Quantitative fractographic characteristics of 4340 steel is demonstrated for a grain size range of 10−100 µm and hardness range of 41–52 HRC. Double-notched tensile samples were electrochemically charged in-situ with hydrogen in 0.5 m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+5 mg/l As{sub 2}O{sub 3} solution for 0–40 min charging time. Hydrogen induced fracture initiations were analyzed by novel metallographic investigation of the “unbroken” notch while the overall fractographic behaviors were examined by the scanning electron microscopic imaging of the fracture surfaces of the actually broken notch. Effect of hydrogen was predominantly manifested as intergranular fracture for the harder samples and quasi-cleavage fracture for the softer counterparts. 10–40 µm samples showed the maximum intensity of the hydrogen induced fracture features (intergranular and/or quasi-cleavage) close to the notch which gradually reduced with increasing distance from the notch. The largest grained samples (100 µm) however showed brittle behavior even in absence of hydrogen with similar intensity of percent fracture features at all distance from the notch, while presence of hydrogen intensified the overall percent brittle fractures with their intensities being highest close to the notch. Finally, the brittle fracture characteristics of the hydrogen embrittled samples were shown to be distinguishably different from that of the liquid nitrogen treated samples of same grain sizes and hardnesses.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of tubal patency tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeve, H R; Moolenaar, L M; Hompes, P; van der Veen, F; Mol, B W J

    2013-04-01

    Guidelines are not in agreement on the most effective diagnostic scenario for tubal patency testing; therefore, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of invasive tubal testing in subfertile couples compared with no testing and treatment. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Decision analytic framework. Computer-simulated cohort of subfertile women. We evaluated six scenarios: (1) no tests and no treatment; (2) immediate treatment without tubal testing; (3) delayed treatment without tubal testing; (4) hysterosalpingogram (HSG), followed by immediate or delayed treatment, according to diagnosis (tailored treatment); (5) HSG and a diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) in case HSG does not prove tubal patency, followed by tailored treatment; and (6) DL followed by tailored treatment. Expected cumulative live births after 3 years. Secondary outcomes were cost per couple and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. For a 30-year-old woman with otherwise unexplained subfertility for 12 months, 3-year cumulative live birth rates were 51.8, 78.1, 78.4, 78.4, 78.6 and 78.4%, and costs per couple were €0, €6968, €5063, €5410, €5405 and €6163 for scenarios 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios compared with scenario 1 (reference strategy), were €26,541, €19,046, €20,372, €20,150 and €23,184 for scenarios 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed the model to be robust over a wide range of values for the variables. The most cost-effective scenario is to perform no diagnostic tubal tests and to delay in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment for at least 12 months for women younger than 38 years old, and to perform no tubal tests and start immediate IVF treatment from the age of 39 years. If an invasive diagnostic test is planned, HSG followed by tailored treatment, or a DL if HSG shows no tubal patency, is more cost-effective than DL. © 2013 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2013

  15. Balancing low cost with reliable operation in the rotordynamic design of the ALS Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force/NASA Advanced Launch System (ALS) Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump (FTP) has primary design goals of low cost and high reliability, with performance and weight having less importance. This approach is atypical compared with other rocket engine turbopump design efforts, such as on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), which emphasized high performance and low weight. Similar to the SSME turbopumps, the ALS FTP operates supercritically, which implies that stability and bearing loads strongly influence the design. In addition, the use of low cost/high reliability features in the ALS FTP such as hydrostatic bearings, relaxed seal clearances, and unshrouded turbine blades also have a negative influence on rotordynamics. This paper discusses the analysis conducted to achieve a balance between low cost and acceptable rotordynamic behavior, to ensure that the ALS FTP will operate reliably without subsynchronous instabilities or excessive bearing loads.

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Anupam B; Philipson, Tomas J

    2008-09-01

    While cost-effectiveness (CE) analysis has provided a guide to allocating often scarce resources spent on medical technologies, less emphasis has been placed on the effect of such criteria on the behavior of innovators who make health care technologies available in the first place. A better understanding of the link between innovation and cost-effectiveness analysis is particularly important given the large role of technological change in the growth in health care spending and the growing interest of explicit use of CE thresholds in leading technology adoption in several Westernized countries. We analyze CE analysis in a standard market context, and stress that a technology's cost-effectiveness is closely related to the consumer surplus it generates. Improved CE therefore often clashes with interventions to stimulate producer surplus, such as patents. We derive the inconsistency between technology adoption based on CE analysis and economic efficiency. Indeed, static efficiency, dynamic efficiency, and improved patient health may all be induced by the cost-effectiveness of the technology being at its worst level. As producer appropriation of the social surplus of an innovation is central to the dynamic efficiency that should guide CE adoption criteria, we exemplify how appropriation can be inferred from existing CE estimates. For an illustrative sample of technologies considered, we find that the median technology has an appropriation of about 15%. To the extent that such incentives are deemed either too low or too high compared to dynamically efficient levels, CE thresholds may be appropriately raised or lowered to improve dynamic efficiency.

  17. A Novel Hybrid Reformer-Electrolyzer-Purifier (REP) for Distributed Production of Low-Cost, Low Greenhouse Gas Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnke, Fred C. [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2017-03-28

    FuelCell Energy with support from the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has investigated the production of low-cost, low CO2 hydrogen using a molten carbonate fuel cell operating as an electrolyzer. We confirmed the feasibility of the technology by testing a large-scale short stack. Economic analysis was done with the assistance of the National Fuel Cell Center at the University of California, Irvine and we found the technology to be attractive, especially for distributed hydrogen. We explored the performance under various operating parameters and developed an accurate model for further analysis and development calculations. We achieved the expected results, meeting all program goals. We identified additional uses of the technology such as for CO2 capture, power storage, and power load leveling.

  18. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on the properties of double wall BN and (BN){sub x}C{sub y} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58059-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Azevedo, S., E-mail: sazevedo@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58059-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Kaschny, J.R. [Instituto Federal da Bahia – Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Avenida Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitória da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    In the present contribution, we apply first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to study the effects of hydrogen adsorption on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride and hybrid carbon–boron nitride double wall nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the hydrogen decoration induces significant structural deformation and an appreciable reduction in the gap energy. When the number of hydrogen atoms introduced on the outer wall is increased, desorption of hydrogen pairs are observed. The calculations indicate that each adsorbed hydrogen atom induces a structural deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. It is also found that the introduction of hydrogen atoms can be applied as an efficient tool for tuning the electronic properties of such structures. - Graphical abstract: Localized density of states of a hydrogenated double wall boron nitride nanotube. Some hydrogen pairs are desorbed, forming H{sub 2} molecules. - Highlights: • Hydrogenation induces structural deformation and reduction in the gap energy. • Each H atom induces a deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. • In some cases, desorption of H pairs from the outer wall is observed.

  19. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  20. Making choices in health: WHO guide to cost effectiveness analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tan Torres Edejer, Tessa

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XXI PART ONE: METHODS COST-EFFECTIVENESS FOR GENERALIZED ANALYSIS 1. 2. What is Generalized Cost-Effectiveness Analysis? . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Undertaking...

  1. Hydrogen induced surface effects on the mechanical properties of type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.C.V. da; Pascual, R.; Miranda, P.E.V. de.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities of modifying the mechanical properties of type 304 stainless steel by cathodic hydrogen charging were studied. The situations analysed included hydrogen embrittlement itself in tensile tests of hydrogen containing samples and the effects of delayed cracks in fatigue tests of hydrogenated and outgassed samples. SEM and TEM observations were also performed. It was found that hydrogen induced surface delayed cracks appear in great quantity during outgassing (of the order of several millions in a square centimeter). Hydrogen embrittlement was responsible for drastic losses in ductility in tension, while surface cracks severely reduced fatigue life. (author) [pt

  2. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.18 Measuring cost-effectiveness. (a) In accordance with this section, each Federal agency shall measure cost-effectiveness by combining cost data established under...

  3. 42 CFR 457.1015 - Cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost-effectiveness. 457.1015 Section 457.1015... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1015 Cost-effectiveness. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart... may demonstrate cost-effectiveness by comparing the cost of coverage for the family to the cost of...

  4. A cost effective CO2 strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , a scenario-part and a cost-benefit part. Air and sea modes are not analyzed. The model adopts a bottom-up approach to allow a detailed assessment of transport policy measures. Four generic areas of intervention were identified and the likely effect on CO2 emissions, socioeconomic efficiency and other...... are evaluated according to CO2 reduction potential and according to the ‘shadow price’ on a reduction of one ton CO2. The shadow price reflects the costs (and benefits) of the different measures. Comparing the measures it is possible to identify cost effective measures, but these measures are not necessarily...... by the Ministry of Transport, with the Technical University of Denmark as one of the main contributors. The CO2-strategy was to be based on the principle of cost-effectiveness. A model was set up to assist in the assessment. The model consists of a projection of CO2-emissions from road and rail modes from 2020...

  5. Human health cost of hydrogen sulfide air pollution from an oil and gas Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinara Kenessary

    2017-06-01

    The reduction of hydrogen sulfide emissions into the air is recommended, as well as successive constant ambient air monitoring in future. Economic damage evaluation should be made mandatory, on a legal basis, whenever an industrial facility operation results in associated air pollution.

  6. Cost effectiveness of transportation fuels from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jager, D.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Troelstra, W.P.

    1998-06-01

    The aim of the study on the title subject was to investigate whether stimulation of the production and use of biofuels for transportation is worthwhile compared to the production of electricity from biomass. Several options are compared to each other and with reference technologies on the basis of the consumption or the avoided input of fossil fuels, emissions of greenhouse gases, specific costs and cost effectiveness. For each phase in the biomass conversion process (cultivation, pretreatment, transportation, conversion, distribution and final consumption) indicators were collected from the literature. Next to costs of the bioconversion routes attention is paid to other relevant aspects that are important for the introduction of the technological options in the Netherlands. 41 refs

  7. Effect of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of the Mg–xZn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Song

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen evolution reaction is inevitable during the corrosion of Mg alloys. The effect of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of the Mg–2Zn and Mg–5Zn alloys is investigated by charging hydrogen treatment. The surface morphologies of the samples after charging hydrogen were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the corrosion resistance was evaluated by polarization curves. It is found that there are oxide films formed on the surface of the charged hydrogen samples. The low hydrogen evolution rate is helpful to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys, while the high hydrogen evolution rate can increases the defects in the films and further deteriorates their protection ability. Also, the charging hydrogen effect is greatly associated with the microstructure of Mg substrate.

  8. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  9. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-01-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends

  10. Economic feasibility of hydrogen enrichment for reducing NOx emissions from landfill gas power generation alternatives: A comparison of the levelized cost of electricity with present strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornbluth, Kurt; Greenwood, Jason; Jordan, Eddie; McCaffrey, Zach; Erickson, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent research showing that hydrogen enrichment can lower NO x emissions from landfill gas combustion below future NO x emission control standards imposed by both federal and California state regulations, an investigation was performed to compare the levelized cost of electricity of this technology with other options. In this cost study, a lean-burn reciprocating engine with no after-treatment was the baseline case to compare six other landfill gas-to-energy projects. These cases include a lean burn engine with selective catalytic reduction after treatment, a lean-burn microturbine, and four variations on an ultra-lean-burn engine utilizing hydrogen enrichment with each case using a different method of hydrogen production. Only hydrogen enrichment with an in-stream autothermal fuel reformer was shown to be potentially cost-competitive with current strategies for reaching the NO x reduction target in IC engines. - Highlights: ► Levelized cost of electricity for hydrogen enriched combustion was compared. ► Various ultra-lean-burn engines and microturbines with hydrogen were analyzed. ► Combustion with an autothermal fuel reformer was potentially cost-competitive.

  11. Clinical evaluation based on cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    We carried out two Phase III clinical trials using high dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy unit. We evaluated the clinical results based not only on the medical but also the economical standpoint. The first trial is the Phase III trial for cervical cancer treated with HDR or medium dose rate (MDR) intracavitary radiotherapy. The second one is the Phase III trial for tongue cancer treated with HDR or low dose rate (LDR) interstitial radiation. For cervical cancer, the survival rate of patients treated with HDR brachytherapy is the some as for LDR brachytherapy. The average total cost of treatment for the HDR group was 1.47 million yen, while that for the MDR group was 1.58 million yen. The average total admission days was 63. For tongue cancer, the local control rate of the HDR group is almost the same as that of the LDR groups. The average total cost for the HDR group was 780 thousand yen, and that for the LDR group was 830 thousand yen. The average total admission days was 34. According to the cost-effectiveness, HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer has the same result as MDR, and HDR brachytherapy for tongue cancer has the same result as LDR. However, HDR can be treated without admission for patients who live near the hospital. HDR can be applied for these patients with less expense. We must be aware of not only the medical results but also the cost-effectiveness. (author)

  12. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soylu, A.

    2012-01-01

    A more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used for the first time to investigate the screening effects on the hydrogen atom in plasmas. This potential is examined for four different cases that correspond to four different type potentials when the different parameters are used in the potential within the framework of the well-known asymptotic iteration method. By solving the corresponding the radial Schrödinger equation with the screened and exponential cosine screened Coulomb potentials and comparing the obtained energy eigenvalues with the results of other studies, the applicability of the method to this kind of plasma physics problem is shown. The energy values of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential are presented for various parameters in the potential. One of the advantages of the present potential is that it exhibits stronger screening effect than that of the exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and it is also reduced to screened Coulomb and exponential cosine screened Coulomb as well as Coulomb potentials for special values of parameters. The parameters in the potential would be useful to model screening effects which cause an increase or decrease in the energy values of hydrogen atom in both Debye and quantum plasmas and in this manner this potential would be useful for the investigations of the atomic structure and collisions in plasmas.

  13. Cost effectiveness of surveillance for GI cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Meester, Reinier G S; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases are among the leading causes of death in the world. To reduce the burden of GI diseases, surveillance is recommended for some diseases, including for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, Barrett's oesophagus, precancerous gastric lesions, colorectal adenoma, and pancreatic neoplasms. This review aims to provide an overview of the evidence on cost-effectiveness of surveillance of individuals with GI conditions predisposing them to cancer, specifically focussing on the aforementioned conditions. We searched the literature and reviewed 21 studies. Despite heterogeneity of studies in terms of settings, study populations, surveillance strategies and outcomes, most reviewed studies suggested at least some surveillance of patients with these GI conditions to be cost-effective. For some high-risk conditions frequent surveillance with 3-month intervals was warranted, while for other conditions, surveillance may only be cost-effective every 10 years. Further studies based on more robust effectiveness evidence are needed to inform and optimise surveillance programmes for GI cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of effect of hydrogen atoms on crack propagation behavior of α-Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H.Y., E-mail: gsfshy@sohu.com; Zhang, L.; Xiao, M.X.

    2016-12-16

    The effect of the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen distribution on the mechanical properties of α-Fe with a pre-existing unilateral crack under tensile loading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The results reveal that the models present good ductility when the front region of crack tip has high local hydrogen concentration. The peak stress of α-Fe decreases with increasing hydrogen concentration. The studies also indicate that for the samples with hydrogen atoms, the crack propagation behavior is independent of the model size and boundaries. In addition, the crack propagation behavior is significantly influenced by the distribution of hydrogen atoms. - Highlights: • The distribution of hydrogen plays a critical role in the crack propagation. • The peak stress decrease with the hydrogen concentration increasing. • The crack deformation behavior is disclosed and analyzed.

  16. Making choices in health: WHO guide to cost effectiveness analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tan Torres Edejer, Tessa

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 6. Uncertainty in cost-effectiveness analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 7. 8. Policy uses of Generalized CEA...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of the fenceline cow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichholz, G G; Lando, A V [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA). School of Nuclear Engineering

    1979-07-01

    The grass-cow-milk pathway for /sup 131/I is one of the main contributers to estimated population dose from BWR's and PWR's. Such estimates assume a cow at the fenceline grazing for 12 months of the year. Reductions in the population dose would require a trade-off, based on cost-effectiveness criteria, between additions to the effluent treatment system, expanding the exclusion area, or raising the stack height. It is suggested that a more practical and more cost-effective means may be provided by redistribution of nearby dairy cattle (or goats), and that the plant operator buy these animals and/or contract with the land owner(s) to use the land for alternative crops. Even a subsidy to compensate the farmer for any financial losses entailed in these changes might be less expensive than alternative technical installations to lower iodine effluent levels. Figures are provided to illustrate these points.

  18. Numerical investigation on the effects of natural gas and hydrogen blends on engine combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrone, Biagio; Unich, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale e Meccanica (DIAM), Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (CE) (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    The use of hydrogen blended with natural gas is a viable alternative to pure fossil fuels because of the expected reduction of the total pollutant emissions and increase of efficiency. These blends offer a valid opportunity for tackling sustainable transportation, in view of the future stringent emission limits for road vehicles. The aim of the present paper is the investigation of the performance of internal combustion engines fuelled by such blends. A numerical investigation on the characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen blends as well as their effect on engine performance is carried out. The activity is focused on the influence of such blends on flame propagation speed. Combustion pattern modelling allows the comparison of engine brake efficiency and power output using different fuels. Results showed that there is an increase in engine efficiency only if Maximum Brake Torque (MBT) spark advance is used for each fuel. Moreover, an economic analysis has been carried out to determine the over cost of hydrogen in such blends, showing percent increments by using these fuels about between 10 and 34%. (author)

  19. The introduction of hydrogen in London and Tokyo: costs and strategic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, David; Hutchinson, David

    1998-01-01

    While the proposals made in this work are no more than tentative at this stage, especially in the light of unfinished analysis of the situation in Tokyo, they represent an initial perspective on some strategies and policies affecting the potential introduction of hydrogen into the energy system of an urban area. It has been shown that given certain assumptions the introduction of hydrogen into an urban energy infrastructure could be both environmentally beneficial and economically viable. In order to achieve this introduction several possible strategies have been proposed, although none of these has been tested in detail. These strategies are highly likely to vary between different urban areas depending on the prevailing conditions. Specific analysis on the conditions in Tokyo will be carried out in the near future. This should enable the qualitative evaluation of some of the proposals already made, and suggestion of new ones. At the same time, the transferability both of the methodology used for analysing London and the strategies suggested for the early introduction of hydrogen will be examined. (author)

  20. Effect of piperidones on hydrogen permeation and corrosion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corrosion inhibition. 3.5 Hydrogen permeation measurements. Hydrogen can enter into the metal during various industrial operations like melting, heat treatment, or pickling and electrochemical processes such as cathodic cleaning and electrolytic machining. Of the various sources of entry of hydrogen into the metal,.

  1. Hydrogen Production by Thermophilic Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Willquist, K.; Zeidan, A.A.; Vrije, de T.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the many ways hydrogen can be produced, this chapter focuses on biological hydrogen production by thermophilic bacteria and archaea in dark fermentations. The thermophiles are held as promising candidates for a cost-effective fermentation process, because of their relatively high yields and broad

  2. Hydrogen and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, N J.D.

    1976-03-01

    There is much debate about the form and availability of energy supplies in the future. It is assumed that nuclear fuel is the only source of controlled energy. Energy inputs from the sun, the wind, the waves, the tides, and other sources not available in the form of fuels are not excluded. In this situation it has been argued that because the cost of transporting energy as a liquid or gaseous fuel is lower than the cost of transmitting energy as electricity it would be more effective to transmit and distribute energy from nuclear fuel in the form of a chemical fuel such as hydrogen. This argument has been critized by Hampson et al., (EAPA 1: 2200) who calculate that the reduced costs of transmission only outweigh the costs of production over distances so large that there appears no realistic application. These calculations neglect the time variation of electricity supply which is fundamental to the planning of an electricity supply system; they also do not appear to do justice to the relationship between the costs of hydrogen and electricity production in an integrated system. These points are included in the analysis presented here by means of the observation that hydrogen generated by nuclear plants with high capital cost and low running cost will be burned by the supply system itself in low-capital-cost plants, suitable for chemical fuels, in order to meet peak demands on the system. This establishes a relationship between the long-run marginal costs of electricity at various times of the day and the long-run marginal cost of hydrogen. These costs are then used to show that, in certain favorable, but common, circumstances, electrolytic hydrogen is the lower-cost source of energy. (from Introduction)

  3. Cost effects of hospital mergers in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Helda; Mateus, Céu

    2014-12-01

    The Portuguese hospital sector has been restructured by wide-ranging hospital mergers, following a conviction among policy makers that bigger hospitals lead to lower average costs. Since the effects of mergers have not been systematically evaluated, the purpose of this article is to contribute to this area of knowledge by assessing potential economies of scale to explore and compare these results with realized cost savings after mergers. Considering the period 2003-2009, we estimate the translog cost function to examine economies of scale in the years preceding restructuring. Additionally, we use the difference-in-differences approach to evaluate hospital centres (HC) that occurred between 2004 and 2007, comparing the years after and before mergers. Our findings suggest that economies of scale are present in the pre-merger configuration with an optimum hospital size of around 230 beds. However, the mergers between two or more hospitals led to statistically significant post-merger cost increases, of about 8 %. This result indicates that some HC become too large to explore economies of scale and suggests the difficulty of achieving efficiencies through combining operations and service specialization.

  4. Effect of some environmental parameters on fermentative hydrogen production by Enterobacter cloacae DM11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, K.; Kumar, A.; Das, D. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Biotechnology, Fermentation Technology Laboratory

    2006-06-15

    This study addressed the issue of using biological systems for hydrogen production as an environmentally sound alternative to conventional thermochemical and electrochemical processes. In particular, it examined the potential for anaerobic fermentation for biological hydrogen production and the possibility of coupling gaseous energy generation with simultaneous treatment of biodegradable waste materials. The study focused on hydrogen production by anaerobic fermentation using Enterobacter cloacae DM11, a Gram-negative, motile facultative anaerobe. Although hydrogen production by these bacteria depends on many environmental parameters, there is very little information on the effects of these factors in the hydrogen production potential of this organism. For that reason, this study examined the effect of initial medium pH, reaction temperature, initial glucose concentration, and iron (Fe2+) concentration on the fermentative production of hydrogen. Fermentative hydrogen production was carried out by Enterobacter cloacae DM11, using glucose as the substrate. Batch cultivations were performed in a 500 ml custom-designed vertical tubular bioreactor. The maximum molar yield of hydrogen was 3.31 mol (mol glucose){sub 1}. The rate and cumulative volume of hydrogen production decreased at higher initial glucose concentration. The pH of 6.5 at a temperature of 37 degrees C was most suitable for maximum rate of production of hydrogen in batch fermentation. The addition of Fe2+ on hydrogen production had a marginal enhancing effect on total hydrogen production. A simple model developed from the modified Gompertz equation was used to fit the cumulative hydrogen production curve and to estimate the hydrogen production potential, maximum production rate, and lag time. It was concluded that these study results could be used in the development of a high rate continuous hydrogen production process. 30 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  5. On cost-effective communication network designing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2010-02-01

    How to efficiently design a communication network is a paramount task for network designing and engineering. It is, however, not a single objective optimization process as perceived by most previous researches, i.e., to maximize its transmission capacity, but a multi-objective optimization process, with lowering its cost to be another important objective. These two objectives are often contradictive in that optimizing one objective may deteriorate the other. After a deep investigation of the impact that network topology, node capability scheme and routing algorithm as well as their interplays have on the two objectives, this letter presents a systematic approach to achieve a cost-effective design by carefully choosing the three designing aspects. Only when routing algorithm and node capability scheme are elegantly chosen can BA-like scale-free networks have the potential of achieving good tradeoff between the two objectives. Random networks, on the other hand, have the built-in character for a cost-effective design, especially when other aspects cannot be determined beforehand.

  6. 49 CFR 639.21 - Determination of cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination of cost-effectiveness. 639.21... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CAPITAL LEASES Cost-Effectiveness § 639.21 Determination of cost...-effectiveness comparison as described in this subpart, it may ask FTA to approve an alternate form of cost...

  7. Custom LSI plus hybrid equals cost effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, S. N.

    The possibility to combine various technologies, such as Bi-Polar linear and CMOS/Digital makes it feasible to create systems with a tailored performance not available on a single monolithic circuit. The custom LSI 'BLOCK', especially if it is universal in nature, is proving to be a cost effective way for the developer to improve his product. The custom LSI represents a low price part in contrast to the discrete components it will replace. In addition, the hybrid assembly can realize a savings in labor as a result of the reduced parts handling and associated wire bonds. The possibility of the use of automated system manufacturing techniques leads to greater reliability as the human factor is partly eliminated. Attention is given to reliability predictions, cost considerations, and a product comparison study.

  8. The effect of internal hydrogen on surface slip localisation on polycrystalline AISI 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Isabelle; Olive, Jean-Marc; Saintier, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the effect of internal hydrogen on the surface slip morphology of relatively high nickel content AISI 316L type austenitic stainless steel was carried out on high resolution data obtained by atomic force microscopy. Surface plastic strain localisation was studied for different hydrogen contents, two grain sizes, and two plastic strain levels. The height and spacing of approximately 8000 slip bands, observed on 12 specimens, are shown to follow log-normal distributions. Hydrogen increased the mean slip-band height and the mean slip-band spacing for the two macroscopic plastic strain levels considered, and for the two hydrogen concentrations in coarse-grained specimens. The hydrogen effect was also observed for fine-grained specimens, but only for the highest hydrogen concentration. In addition, the emerging dislocation velocity increased by a factor 3 for high hydrogen content.

  9. Effect of cesium seeding on hydrogen negative ion volume production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacal, M.; Balghiti-Sube, F. El; Elizarov, L. I.; Tontegode, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cesium vapor partial pressure on the plasma parameters has been studied in the dc hybrid negative ion source ''CAMEMBERT III.'' The cesium vapor pressure was varied up to 10 -5 Torr and was determined by a surface ionization gauge in the absence of the discharge. The negative ion relative density measured by laser photodetachment in the center of the plasma extraction region increases by a factor of four when the plasma is seeded with cesium. However the plasma density and the electron temperature (determined using a cylindrical electrostatic probe) are reduced by the cesium seeding. As a result, the negative ion density goes up by a factor of two at the lowest hydrogen pressure studied. The velocity of the directed negative ion flow to the plasma electrode, determined from two-laser beam photodetachment experiments, appears to be affected by the cesium seeding. The variation of the extracted negative ion and electron currents versus the plasma electrode bias will also be reported for pure hydrogen and cesium seeded plasmas. The cesium seeding leads to a dramatic reduction of the electron component, which is consistent with the reduced electron density and temperature. The negative ion current is enhanced and a goes through a maximum at plasma electrode bias lower than 1 V. These observations lead to the conclusion that the enhancement of pure volume production occurs in this type of plasma. Possible mechanisms for this type of volume process will be discussed

  10. Effect of hydrogen on reduction of burden materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooey, P L [Rautaruukki Oy, Raahe (Finland). Raahe Steel

    1997-12-31

    Efficient operation of iron blast furnaces requires that the iron bearing burden material have good reduction, softening and melting characteristics. These characteristics are determined by the physical operation of the blast furnace and the mineralogical composition of the agglomerate. Increasing oil injection rates will increase the hydrogen content of the reducing gas significantly. The aim of this work is to establish how different burden materials react to this change in gas environment, and develop sinters which have optimal properties. The testing of sinter and pellets is broken into two areas: development of the test methods; and determination of sinter and pellet characteristics. The test method requires development because recent testwork has shown that the reducibility of the sinter is now so high that the reduction under load test is no longer sensitive. A new control program and more realistic gas compositions are currently being tested. The softening and melting characteristics of sinters of varying composition, acid pellets and olivine pellets have been tested using the reduction under load test at Rautaruukki Oy Research Centre. The effect of hydrogen in the reducing gas on the different iron ore agglomerates has been evaluated SULA 2 Research Programme; 6 refs.

  11. Effect of hydrogen on reduction of burden materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooey, P.L. [Rautaruukki Oy, Raahe (Finland). Raahe Steel

    1996-12-31

    Efficient operation of iron blast furnaces requires that the iron bearing burden material have good reduction, softening and melting characteristics. These characteristics are determined by the physical operation of the blast furnace and the mineralogical composition of the agglomerate. Increasing oil injection rates will increase the hydrogen content of the reducing gas significantly. The aim of this work is to establish how different burden materials react to this change in gas environment, and develop sinters which have optimal properties. The testing of sinter and pellets is broken into two areas: development of the test methods; and determination of sinter and pellet characteristics. The test method requires development because recent testwork has shown that the reducibility of the sinter is now so high that the reduction under load test is no longer sensitive. A new control program and more realistic gas compositions are currently being tested. The softening and melting characteristics of sinters of varying composition, acid pellets and olivine pellets have been tested using the reduction under load test at Rautaruukki Oy Research Centre. The effect of hydrogen in the reducing gas on the different iron ore agglomerates has been evaluated SULA 2 Research Programme; 6 refs.

  12. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  13. A possible explanation for the contradictory results of hydrogen effects on macroscopic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miresmaeili, Reza; Liu, Lijun; Kanayama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research, there have been many controversies on whether hydrogen hardens or softens iron and steels. Conventional application of hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP) theory – including a decrease in the local flow stress in the presence of hydrogen – results in an expansion in the plastic zone ahead of a blunting crack tip rather than the localization of plastic deformation. Therefore, we propose a model to interpret the criterion for the application of local softening concept. According to our physical model, called pinning-softening model, the hydrogen-induced softening merely occurs in the large shear stress regions, e.g. in the vicinity of the crack tip. The remote areas from the stress raisers do not satisfy the critical condition of slip; as such, hydrogen-induced hardening occurs. Our model not only explains the contradictory results of hydrogen effects on the macroscopic deformation, but also gives more insight into the mechanistic understanding of hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon. Highlights: ► A model to interpret the criterion for the application of hydrogen-induced softening. ► Hydrogen-induced softening at the crack tip and hardening at the remote regions. ► Shear stresses and hydrogen contents-important factors on transition from hardening to softening. ► In BCC iron, as the hydrogen concentration increases, the local flow stress decreases. ► In 316L, depending on the hydrogen contents, we observe both softening and hardening.

  14. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  15. Effect of helium ion bombardment on hydrogen behaviour in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Gorbatov, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of helium ion bombardment on hydrogen behaviour in 12Kh18N10T stainless steel is investigated. Helium and hydrogen ion bombardment was conducted in the ILU-3 ion accelerator; the fluence and energy made up 10 16 -5x10 17 cm -2 , 30 keV and 10 16 -5x10 18 cm -2 , 10 keV respectively. The method of recoil nuclei was used for determination of helium and hydrogen content. Successive implantation of helium and hydrogen ions into 12Kh18N10T stainless steel results in hydrogen capture by defects formed by helium ions

  16. Mössbauer spectroscopic study of cobalt hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles: Effect of hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Asheesh; Kanagare, A. B.; Meena, Sher Singh; Banerjee, S.; Kumar, P.; Sudarsan, V.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports Mössbauer study of cobalt hexacyanoferrate (CoHCF) before and after hydrogenation. The CoHCF was synthesised by chemical precipitation method. The sample was characterized by using various techniques (XRD, TG, EDX and FTIR). The CoHCF paricles show fcc structure. The hydrogen storage property was measured at different temperature. The COHCF shows maximum 0.93 wt% hydrogen storage capacity at 223K. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopic study shows the effect of hydrogenation on the electronic structure in terms of electronic charge distribution and volume expansion. Isomer shift and quadrupole splitting values were found to be increased after hydrogenation.

  17. Cost effects of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal costs of an HLW repository in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Lee, Min Soo; Lee, Jong Youl; Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides the cost effect results of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal cost for an HLW repository in Korea. In the cost analysis for both of these cost drivers, the price of Cu powder and the bentonite can affect the canister cost and the bentonite cost of the disposal holes as well as backfilling cost of the tunnels, respectively. Finally, we found that the unit cost of Cu and bentonite was the dominant cost drivers for the surface and underground facilities of an HLW repository. Therefore, an optimization of a canister and the layout of a disposal hole and disposal tunnels are essential to decrease the direct disposal cost of spent fuels. The disposal costs can be largely divided into two parts such as a surface facilities' cost and an underground facilities' cost. According to the KRS' cost analysis, the encapsulation material as well as the buffering and backfilling cost were the significant costs. Especially, a canister's cost was approximately estimated to be more than one fourth of the overall disposal costs. So it can be estimated that the unit cost of Cu powder is an important cost diver. Because the outer shell of the canister was made of Cu powder by a cold spray coating method. In addition, the unit cost of bentonite can also affect the buffering and the backfilling costs of the disposal holes and the disposal tunnels. But, these material costs will be highly expensive and unstable due to the modernization of the developing countries. So the studies for a material cost should be continued to identify the actual cost of an HLW repository

  18. Aid Effectiveness, Transaction Costs and Conditionality in the Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Richard; Biswas, Shampa

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of transaction costs is a commonly mentioned yet rarely elaborated goal for aid effectiveness in educational development. The casual use of the concept of transaction costs conceals which costs may be reduced, which costs are required and, indeed, what transaction costs actually are. Examining issues related to harmonizing the…

  19. Possibilities of hydrogen removal. Phase 2: Limitation of hydrogen effects in hypothetical severe accidents in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.; Koehling, A.; Nikodem, H.

    1984-01-01

    In the event of hypothetical severe accidents in light-water reactors, considerable amounts of hydrogen may be produced and released into the containment. Combustion of the hydrogen may jeopardize the integrity of the containment. The study reported here aimed to identify methods to mitigate the hydrogen problem. These methods should either prevent hydrogen combustion, or limit its effects. The following methods have been investigated: pre-inerting; chemical oxygen absorption; removal of oxygen by combustion; post-inerting with N 2 , CO 2 , or halon; aqueous foam; water fog; deliberate ignition; containment purging; and containment venting. The present state of the art in both nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, has been identified. The assessment of the methods was based on accident scenarios assuming significant release of hydrogen and the spectrum of requirements derived from these scenarios was used to determine the advantages and drawbacks of the various methods, assuming their application in a pressurized water reactor of German design. (orig./RW) [de

  20. Impact of generic alendronate cost on the cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis screening and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Nayak

    Full Text Available Since alendronate became available in generic form in the Unites States in 2008, its price has been decreasing. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of alendronate cost on the cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis screening and treatment in postmenopausal women.Microsimulation cost-effectiveness model of osteoporosis screening and treatment for U.S. women age 65 and older. We assumed screening initiation at age 65 with central dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA, and alendronate treatment for individuals with osteoporosis; with a comparator of "no screening" and treatment only after fracture occurrence. We evaluated annual alendronate costs of $20 through $800; outcome measures included fractures; nursing home admission; medication adverse events; death; costs; quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs in 2010 U.S. dollars per QALY gained. A lifetime time horizon was used, and direct costs were included. Base-case and sensitivity analyses were performed.Base-case analysis results showed that at annual alendronate costs of $200 or less, osteoporosis screening followed by treatment was cost-saving, resulting in lower total costs than no screening as well as more QALYs (10.6 additional quality-adjusted life-days. When assuming alendronate costs of $400 through $800, screening and treatment resulted in greater lifetime costs than no screening but was highly cost-effective, with ICERs ranging from $714 per QALY gained through $13,902 per QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses revealed that the cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis screening followed by alendronate treatment was robust to joint input parameter estimate variation at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY at all alendronate costs evaluated.Osteoporosis screening followed by alendronate treatment is effective and highly cost-effective for postmenopausal women across a range of alendronate costs, and may be cost

  1. Effect of trapping and temperature on the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of alloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galliano, Florian; Andrieu, Eric; Blanc, Christine; Cloue, Jean-Marc; Connetable, Damien; Odemer, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.odemer@ensiacet.fr

    2014-08-12

    Ni-based alloy 718 is widely used to manufacture structural components in the aeronautic and nuclear industries. Numerous studies have shown that alloy 718 may be sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement. In the present study, the susceptibilities of three distinct metallurgical states of alloy 718 to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated to identify both the effect of hydrogen trapping on hydrogen embrittlement and the role of temperature in the hydrogen-trapping mechanism. Cathodic charging in a molten salt bath was used to saturate the different hydrogen traps of each metallurgical state. Tensile tests at different temperatures and different strain rates were carried out to study the effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties and failure modes, in combination with hydrogen content measurements. The results demonstrated that Ni-based superalloy 718 was strongly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement between 25 °C and 300 °C, and highlighted the dominant roles played by the hydrogen solubility and the hydrogen trapping on mechanical behavior and fracture modes.

  2. How rebates, copayments, and administration costs affect the cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferko, Nicole C; Borisova, Natalie; Airia, Parisa; Grima, Daniel T; Thompson, Melissa F

    2012-11-01

    Because of rising drug expenditures, cost considerations have become essential, necessitating the requirement for cost-effectiveness analyses for managed care organizations (MCOs). The study objective is to examine the impact of various drug-cost components, in addition to wholesale acquisition cost (WAC), on the cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis therapies. A Markov model of osteoporosis was used to exemplify different drug cost scenarios. We examined the effect of varying rebates for oral bisphosphonates--risedronate and ibandronate--as well as considering the impact of varying copayments and administration costs for intravenous zoledronate. The population modeled was 1,000 American women, > or = 50 years with osteoporosis. Patients were followed for 1 year to reflect an annual budget review of formularies by MCOs. The cost of therapy was based on an adjusted WAC, and is referred to as net drug cost. The total annual cost incurred by an MCO for each drug regimen was calculated using the net drug cost and fracture cost. We estimated cost on a quality adjusted life year (QALY) basis. When considering different rebates, results for risedronate versus ibandronate vary from cost-savings (i.e., costs less and more effective) to approximately $70,000 per QALY. With no risedronate rebate, an ibandronate rebate of approximately 65% is required before cost per QALY surpasses $50,000. With rebates greater than 25% for risedronate, irrespective of ibandronate rebates, results become cost-saving. Results also showed the magnitude of cost savings to the MCO varied by as much as 65% when considering no administration cost and the highest coinsurance rate for zoledronate. Our study showed that cost-effectiveness varies considerably when factors in addition to the WAC are considered. This paper provides recommendations for pharmaceutical manufacturers and MCOs when developing and interpreting such analyses.

  3. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  4. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  5. Solar to hydrogen: Compact and cost effective CPV field for rooftop operation and hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad; Oh, Seung Jin; Chua, Kian Jon Ernest; Ng, Kim Choon

    2016-01-01

    installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings are aimed to be increased to half of total installed PV. On the other hand, there is no commercial CPV system available to be suitable for rooftop operation, giving motivation

  6. Training effectiveness vs. cost effectiveness: The next millennium challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    With the advent of the new millennium and energy deregulation, organizations will be challenged to be cost competitive and profitable. Deregulation in the US energy industry will force utilities and, more specifically, commercial nuclear power production to unprecedented cost control measures. It will also renew the fires of debate about costs vs. safety. With personnel costs being the single largest expenditure for most organizations management will be faced with constant dilemmas of competition for scarce resources. Salaries, benefits and training costs will be under greater scrutiny. Training resources and programs will face increased pressure to be job related, based on conservative requirements and more cost effective than in the past. For nearly two decades the US National Academy for Nuclear Training (NANT) has developed and used industry-wide accreditation and evaluation standards based on the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). This process assures that existing and emerging technical training is constantly reviewed and evaluated against standardized criteria to assure job relatedness and enhanced job performance. The process also requires management to approve, actively participate in and support the training of NPP personnel. Instructors must be highly skilled and well trained in the SAT process and various instructional strategies. The SAT process is grounded in five interlocking keystone steps; Analysis - Design - Development - Implementation - Evaluation (ADDIE). Evaluation of training is often said to be the most crucial and most difficult step. Here is where an organization determines if the training is effective and meeting the legitimate needs of all of the stakeholders. This QA/QC aspect of training must be an ongoing process involving management, instructors and the students. It is only through the discipline of an SAT based evaluation process that an organization can truly determine if the training is efficient, effective, cost effective and

  7. Cost effective material control and accountability training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robichaux, J.J.; Shull, L.M.; Salizzoni, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    DOE Order 5630.15, ''Safeguards and Security Training Program'' is being implemented at the Savannah River Site within the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's material control and accountability program. This paper reviews the development of a material control and accountability task analysis, the development of specific material control and accountability courses, and the cost effective and innovative strategies employed to implement the training program. The paper also discusses how the site material control and accountability policies and procedures are incorporated into the Westinghouse Savannah River Company training program to ensure that personnel receive the most current information

  8. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  9. Hydrogen-tritium exchange survey of allosteric effects in hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, J.J.; Englander, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    The oxy and deoxy forms of hemoglobin display major differences in H-exchange behavior. Hydrogen-tritium exchange experiments on hemoglobin were performed in the low-resolution mode to observe the dependence of these differences on pH (Bohr effect), organic phosphates, and salt. Unlike a prior report, increasing pH was found to decrease the oxy-deoxy difference monotonically, in general accordance with the alkaline Bohr effect. A prior report that the H-exchange difference between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin vanishes at pH 9, and thus appears to reflect the Bohr effect alone, was found to be due to the borate buffer used, which at high pH tends to abolish the oxy-deoxy difference in a limited region of the H-exchange curve. Effects on hemoglobin H exchange due to organic phosphates parallel the differential binding of these agents (inositol hexaphosphate more than diphosphoglycerate, deoxy more than oxy, at low pH more than at high pH). Added salt slows H exchange of deoxyhemoglobin and has no effect on the oxy form. These results display the sensitivity of simple H-exchange measurements for finding and characterizing effects on structure and dynamics that may occur anywhere in the protein and help to define conditions for higher resolution approaches that can localize the changes observed

  10. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  11. The impact of carbon sequestration on the production cost of electricity and hydrogen from coal and natural-gas technologies in Europe in the medium term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzimas, Evangelos; Peteves, Stathis D.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon sequestration is a distinct technological option with a potential for controlling carbon emissions; it complements other measures, such as improvements in energy efficiency and utilization of renewable energy sources. The deployment of carbon sequestration technologies in electricity generation and hydrogen production will increase the production costs of these energy carriers. Our economic assessment has shown that the introduction of carbon sequestration technologies in Europe in 2020, will result in an increase in the production cost of electricity by coal and natural gas technologies of 30-55% depending on the electricity-generation technology used; gas turbines will remain the most competitive option for generating electricity; and integrated gasification combined cycle technology will become competitive. When carbon sequestration is coupled with natural-gas steam reforming or coal gasification for hydrogen production, the production cost of hydrogen will increase by 14-16%. Furthermore, natural-gas steam reforming with carbon sequestration is far more economically competitive than coal gasification

  12. Assessment of Effective Factor of Hydrogen Diffusion Equation Using FE Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2010-01-01

    The coupled model with hydrogen transport and elasto-plasticity behavior was introduced. In this paper, the effective factor of the hydrogen diffusion equation has been described. To assess the effective factor, finite element (FE) analyses including hydrogen transport and mechanical loading for boundary layer specimens with low-strength steel properties are carried out. The results of the FE analyses are compared with those from previous studies conducted by Taha and Sofronis (2001)

  13. Higher order Stark effect and transition probabilities on hyperfine structure components of hydrogen like atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' chikov, V.G. [National Research Institute for Physical-Technical and Radiotechnical Measurements - VNIIFTRI (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vitpal@mail.ru

    2000-08-15

    A quantum-electrodynamical (QED) perturbation theory is developed for hydrogen and hydrogen-like atomic systems with interaction between bound electrons and radiative field being treated as the perturbation. The dependence of the perturbed energy of levels on hyperfine structure (hfs) effects and on the higher-order Stark effect is investigated. Numerical results have been obtained for the transition probability between the hfs components of hydrogen-like bismuth.

  14. Hydrogen-induced delayed cracking: 1. Strain energy effects on hydrogen solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, M.P.

    1978-08-01

    Based on Li, Oriani and Darken's derivation of the chemical potential of a solute in a stressed solid and Eshelby's method for obtaining the strain energy of solids containing coherent inhomogeneous inclusions, we have carried out a detailed theoretical analysis of the factors governing hydrogen solubility in stressed and unstressed zirconium and its alloys. Specifically, the analysis demonstrates the strong influence hydride self-stresses may have on the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in zirconium. The self-energy arises due to the misfit strains between matrix and precipitate. We have calculated the total molal self-strain energy of some commonly observed δ and γ-hydride shapes and orientations. The magnitude of this energy is substantial. Thus for γ-hydride plates lying on basal planes, it is 4912 J/mol, while for γ-hydride needles with the needle axis parallel to the directions of the α-zirconium matrix, it is 2662 J/mol. This self-strain energy causes a shift in the terminal solid solubility. For example, at 77 o C, assuming fully constrained basal plane δ-hydride plates, the terminal solid solubility is increased 5.4 times over the stress-free case. We have also calculated the effect of external stress on the terminal solid solubility. This is governed by the interaction energy arising from the interaction of the applied stresses with the precipitate's misfit strain components. The interaction energy has been calculated for δ and γ-hydride plates and needles, taking full account of the anisotropy of the misfit. The interaction energy is negative for tensile applied stresses and, as a result of the anisotropic misfit, is texture-dependent. Its magnitude is small for most applied stresses but can achieve values of the order of the self-strain energy in the plastic zone of a plane-strain crack. We have also carried out a careful analysis of the solubility data of Kearns and Erickson and Hardie. This analysis is based partly on the theoretical

  15. 10 CFR 436.13 - Presuming cost-effectiveness results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presuming cost-effectiveness results. 436.13 Section 436... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.13 Presuming cost-effectiveness results. (a) If the investment and other costs for an energy or water conservation measure considered for retrofit to...

  16. Alloying effect on the electronic structures of hydrogen storage compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, H.; Moringa, M.; Takahashi, Y. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mater. Sci. and Eng.

    1997-05-20

    The electronic structures of hydrogenated LaNi{sub 5} containing various 3d transition elements were investigated by the DV-X{alpha} molecular orbital method. The hydrogen atom was found to form a strong chemical bond with the Ni rather than the La atoms. The alloying modified the chemical bond strengths between atoms in a small metal octahedron containing a hydrogen atom at the center, resulting in the change in the hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of LaNi{sub 5} with alloying. (orig.) 7 refs.

  17. Hydrogen effect on the fatigue behavior of LBM Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puydebois Simon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For several years, Inconel 718 made by Laser Beam Melting (LBM has been used for components of the Ariane propulsion systems manufactured by ArianeGroup. In the aerospace field, many components of space engines are used under hydrogen environment. The risk of hydrogen embrittlement (HE can be therefore a first order problem. Consequently, to improve the HE sensitivity of LBM Inconel 718, a systematic approach needs to be developed to characterize the microstructure at different scales and its interaction with hydrogen. This study addresses the impact of gaseous hydrogen on the material mechanical behavior under fatigue loadings. In a first step, the low cycle fatigue behavior under 300 bar of hydrogen gas has been evaluated with specimen loaded at a constant load ratio of R=0.1 and a frequency of 0.5 Hz. A reduction in the cycle number of fracture is shown. This reduction of fatigue life is a consequence of the impact of hydrogen damage processes. The impact of hydrogen is evaluated at the stages of crack initiation, crack propagation. These results are discussed in relation with the hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms and particularly in terms of hydrogen / plasticity interactions. To achieve this, the fracture surface morphology was first examined using scanning electron microscopy and second samples near the fracture surface were extracted using Focused-Ion Beam machining from regions containing striation. The main result observed is a reduction of the size of dislocation organization in relation with a decrease of the striation distance.

  18. A Simple, Low-cost, and Robust System to Measure the Volume of Hydrogen Evolved by Chemical Reactions with Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Paul; Dann, Sandie; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Adcock, Paul; Foster, Simon

    2016-08-17

    There is a growing research interest in the development of portable systems which can deliver hydrogen on-demand to proton exchange membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells. Researchers seeking to develop such systems require a method of measuring the generated hydrogen. Herein, we describe a simple, low-cost, and robust method to measure the hydrogen generated from the reaction of solids with aqueous solutions. The reactions are conducted in a conventional one-necked round-bottomed flask placed in a temperature controlled water bath. The hydrogen generated from the reaction in the flask is channeled through tubing into a water-filled inverted measuring cylinder. The water displaced from the measuring cylinder by the incoming gas is diverted into a beaker on a balance. The balance is connected to a computer, and the change in the mass reading of the balance over time is recorded using data collection and spreadsheet software programs. The data can then be approximately corrected for water vapor using the method described herein, and parameters such as the total hydrogen yield, the hydrogen generation rate, and the induction period can also be deduced. The size of the measuring cylinder and the resolution of the balance can be changed to adapt the setup to different hydrogen volumes and flow rates.

  19. Effect of coexistent hydrogen isotopes on tracer diffusion of tritium in alpha phase of group-V metal-hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kan; Hashizume, Kenichi; Sugisaki, Masayasu

    2009-01-01

    Tracer diffusion coefficients of tritium in the alpha phase of group-V metal-hydrogen systems, α-MH(D)xTy (M=V and Ta; x>>y), were measured in order to clarify the effects of coexistent hydrogen isotopes on the tritium diffusion behavior. The hydrogen concentration dependence of such behavior and the effects of the coexistent hydrogen isotopes (protium and deuterium) were determined. The results obtained in the present (for V and Ta) and previous (for Nb) studies revealed that tritium diffusion was definitely dependent on hydrogen concentration but was not so sensitive to the kind of coexistent hydrogen isotopes. By summarizing those data, it was found that the hydrogen concentration dependence of the tracer diffusion coefficient of tritium in the alpha phase of group-V metals could be roughly expressed by a single empirical curve. (author)

  20. Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Xerogel: Low-Cost Cathodes for Hydrogen Production by Alkaline Water Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šljukić, Biljana; Santos, Diogo M F; Vujković, Milica; Amaral, Luís; Rocha, Raquel P; Sequeira, César A C; Figueiredo, José L

    2016-05-23

    Low-cost molybdenum carbide (Mo2 C) nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and on carbon xerogel (CXG) were prepared and their activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was evaluated in 8 m KOH aqueous electrolyte at 25-85 °C. Measurements of the HER by linear scan voltammetry allowed us to determine Tafel slopes of 71 and 74 mV dec(-1) at 25 °C for Mo2 C/CNT and Mo2 C/CXG, respectively. Stability tests were also performed, which showed the steady performance of the two electrocatalysts. Moreover, the HER kinetics at Mo2 C/CNT was enhanced significantly after the long-term stability tests. The specific activity of both materials was high, and a higher stability was obtained for the activated Mo2 C/CNT (40 A g(-1) at -0.40 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effects of hydrogen burning and associated engineered safety features on containment building response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, S.S.; Deem, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    It is established that large amounts of hydrogen can be generated during degraded core events. The burning of this hydrogen can produce resulting loads which may represent a serious challenge to containment integrity. This paper presents some perspectives on hydrogen behavior during various degraded core events for a large dry containment. The analysis addresses the hydrogen transport and its subsequent diffusion once released to the containment. Since the distribution of hydrogen in the containment depends on the rate of release and various driving forces, the effects from various subsystems (i.e. fan coolers, sprays, heat structures, etc.) are examined to determine the sensitivity of each effect on the overall containment response. The sensitivity of results due to subcompartmentalization of the containment is also examined. Effects from localized hydrogen pocketing and burning will be addressed with emphasis on its relative impact on containment integrity

  2. Effects of hydrogen rich water on prolonged intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ponte, Alessandro; Giovanelli, Nicola; Nigris, Daniele; Lazzer, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    Recent studies showed a positive effect of hydrogen rich water (HRW) intake on acid-base homeostasis at rest. We investigated 2-weeks of HRW intake on repeated sprint performance and acid-base status during prolonged intermittent cycling exercise. In a cross over single-blind protocol, 8 trained male cyclists (age [mean±SD] 41±7 years, body mass 72.3±4.4 kg, height 1.77±0.04 m, maximal oxygen uptake [V̇O2max] 52.6±4.4 mL·kg-1·min-1) were provided daily with 2 liters of placebo normal water (PLA, pH 7.6, oxidation/reduction potential [ORP] +230 mV, free hydrogen content 0 ppb) or HRW (pH 9.8, ORP -180 mV, free Hydrogen 450 ppb). Tests were performed at baseline and after each period of 2 weeks of treatment. The treatments were counter-balanced and the sequence randomized. The 30-minute intermittent cycling trial consisted in 10 3-minute blocks, each one composed by 90 seconds at 40% V̇O2max, 60 seconds at 60% V̇O2max, 16 seconds all out sprint, and 14 seconds active recovery. Oxygen uptake (V̇O2), heart rate and power output were measured during the whole test, while mean and peak power output (PPO), time to peak power and Fatigue Index (FI) were determined during all the 16 seconds sprints. Lactate, pH and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were determined at rest and after each sprint on blood obtained by an antecubital vein indwelling catheter. In the PLA group, PPO in absolute values decreased significantly at the 8th and 9th of 10 sprints and in relative values, ΔPPO, decreased significantly at 6th, 8th and 9th of 10 sprints (by mean: -12±5%, Pmay help to maintain PPO in repetitive sprints to exhaustion over 30 minutes.

  3. Cost-effective analysis of PET application in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Aichun; Liu Jianjun; Sun Xiaoguang; Shi Yiping; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of PET and CT application for diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. Methods: Using decision analysis method the diagnostic efficiency of PET and CT for diagnosis of NSCLC in china was analysed. And also the value of cost for accurate diagnosis (CAD), cost for accurate staging (CAS) and cost for effective therapy (CAT) was calculated. Results: (1) For the accurate diagnosis, CT was much more cost-effective than PET. (2) For the accurate staging, CT was still more cost-effective than PET. (3) For the all over diagnostic and therapeutic cost, PET was more cost-effective than CT. (4) The priority of PET to CT was for the diagnosis of stage I NSCLC. Conclusion: For the management of NSCLC patient in China, CT is more cost-effective for screening, whereas PET for clinical staging and monitoring therapeutic effect. (authors)

  4. Costs of diarrheal disease and the cost-effectiveness of a rotavirus vaccination program in kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flem, Elmira T; Latipov, Renat; Nurmatov, Zuridin S; Xue, Yiting; Kasymbekova, Kaliya T; Rheingans, Richard D

    2009-11-01

    We examined the cost-effectiveness of a rotavirus immunization program in Kyrgyzstan, a country eligible for vaccine funding from the GAVI Alliance. We estimated the burden of rotavirus disease and its economic consequences by using national and international data. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted from government and societal perspectives, along with a range of 1-way sensitivity analyses. Rotavirus-related hospitalizations and outpatient visits cost US$580,864 annually, of which $421,658 (73%) is direct medical costs and $159,206 (27%) is nonmedical and indirect costs. With 95% coverage, vaccination could prevent 75% of rotavirus-related hospitalizations and deaths and 56% of outpatient visits and could avert $386,193 (66%) in total costs annually. The medical break-even price at which averted direct medical costs equal vaccination costs is $0.65/dose; the societal break-even price is $1.14/dose for a 2-dose regimen. At the current GAVI Alliance-subsidized vaccine price of $0.60/course, rotavirus vaccination is cost-saving for the government. Vaccination is cost-effective at a vaccine price $9.41/dose, according to the cost-effectiveness standard set by the 2002 World Health Report. Addition of rotavirus vaccines to childhood immunization in Kyrgyzstan could substantially reduce disease burden and associated costs. Vaccination would be cost-effective from the national perspective at a vaccine price $9.41 per dose.

  5. Health economic studies: an introduction to cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, Peter D; Berven, Sigurd

    2014-10-15

    Narrative overview. To provide clinicians with a basic understanding of economic studies, including cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility analyses. As decisions regarding public health policy, insurance reimbursement, and patient care incorporate factors other than traditional outcomes such as satisfaction or symptom resolution, health economic studies are increasingly prominent in the literature. This trend will likely continue, and it is therefore important for clinicians to have a fundamental understanding of the common types of economic studies and be able to read them critically. In this brief article, the basic concepts of economic studies and the differences between cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility studies are discussed. An overview of the field of health economic analysis is presented. Cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility studies all integrate cost and outcome data into a decision analysis model. These different types of studies are distinguished mainly by the way in which outcomes are valued. Obtaining accurate cost data is often difficult and can limit the generalizability of a study. With a basic understanding of health economic analysis, clinicians can be informed consumers of these important studies.

  6. An improved set of standards for finding cost for cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Paul G

    2009-07-01

    Guidelines have helped standardize methods of cost-effectiveness analysis, allowing different interventions to be compared and enhancing the generalizability of study findings. There is agreement that all relevant services be valued from the societal perspective using a long-term time horizon and that more exact methods be used to cost services most affected by the study intervention. Guidelines are not specific enough with respect to costing methods, however. The literature was reviewed to identify the problems associated with the 4 principal methods of cost determination. Microcosting requires direct measurement and is ordinarily reserved to cost novel interventions. Analysts should include nonwage labor cost, person-level and institutional overhead, and the cost of development, set-up activities, supplies, space, and screening. Activity-based cost systems have promise of finding accurate costs of all services provided, but are not widely adopted. Quality must be evaluated and the generalizability of cost estimates to other settings must be considered. Administrative cost estimates, chiefly cost-adjusted charges, are widely used, but the analyst must consider items excluded from the available system. Gross costing methods determine quantity of services used and employ a unit cost. If the intervention will affect the characteristics of a service, the method should not assume that the service is homogeneous. Questions are posed for future reviews of the quality of costing methods. The analyst must avoid inappropriate assumptions, especially those that bias the analysis by exclusion of costs that are affected by the intervention under study.

  7. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  8. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  9. Effect of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene nano-flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene have been investigated by means of density functional theory method. It is generally considered that the band gap increases with increasing coverage of hydrogen atom on the graphene. However, the present study shows that the band gap decreases first with increasing hydrogen coverage and reaches the lowest value at finite coverage (γ = 0.3). Next, the band gap increases to that of insulator with coverage from 0.3 to 1.0. This specific feature of the band gap is reasonably explained by broken symmetry model and the decrease of pi-conjugation. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphene are discussed. - Highlights: • Density functional theory calculations were carried out for hydrogen on graphene • Effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene were examined. • The band gap showed a minimum at a finite coverage. • Mechanism of specific band gap feature was discussed

  10. Effect of organic loading on a novel hydrogen bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafez, Hisham; El Naggar, M. Hesham; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Nakhla, George [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Baghchehsaraee, Bita [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    This study investigated the impact of six organic loading rates (OLR) ranging from 6.5 gCOD/L-d to 206 gCOD/L-d on the performance of a novel integrated biohydrogen reactor clarifier systems (IBRCSs) comprised a continuously stirred reactor (CSTR) for biological hydrogen production, followed by an uncovered gravity settler for decoupling of solids retention time (SRT) from hydraulic retention time (HRT). The system was able to maintain a high molar hydrogen yield of 2.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose at OLR ranging from 6.5 to 103 gCOD/L-d, but dropped precipitously to approximately 1.2 and 1.1 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose for the OLRs of 154 and 206 gCOD/L-d, respectively. The optimum OLR at HRT of 8 h for maximizing both hydrogen molar yield and volumetric hydrogen production was 103 gCOD/L-d. A positive statistical correlation was observed between the molar hydrogen production and the molar acetate-to-butyrate ratio. Biomass yield correlated negatively with hydrogen yield, although not linearly. Analyzing the food-to-microorganisms (F/M) data in this study and others revealed that, both molar hydrogen yields and biomass specific hydrogen rates peaked at 2.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose and 2.3 L/gVSS-d at F/M ratios ranging from 4.4 to 6.4 gCOD/gVSS-d. Microbial community analysis for OLRs of 6.5 and 25.7 gCOD/L-d showed the predominance of hydrogen producers such as Clostridium acetobutyricum, Klebsiella pneumonia, Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium pasteurianum. While at extremely high OLRs of 154 and 206 gCOD/L-d, a microbial shift was clearly evident due to the coexistence of the non-hydrogen producers such as Lactococcus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. (author)

  11. OPCAB surgery is cost-effective for elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlind, Kim Christian; Kjeldsen, Bo Juul; Madsen, Susanne Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    To determine the cost-effective operative strategy for coronary artery bypass surgery in patients above 70 years.......To determine the cost-effective operative strategy for coronary artery bypass surgery in patients above 70 years....

  12. Understanding Cost-Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discusses the five standard tests used to assess the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency, how states are using these tests, and how the tests can be used to determine the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency measures.

  13. Vapour pressure isotope effects in liquid hydrogen chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, J.N.C.; Calado, J.C.G. (Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)); Jancso, Gabor (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Central Research Inst. for Physics)

    1992-08-10

    The difference between the vapour pressures of HCl and DCl has been measured over the temperature range 170-203 K by a differential manometric technique in a precision cryostat. In this range the vapour pressure of HCl is higher than that of DCl by 3.2% at 170 K, decreasing to 0.9% at 200 K. The reduced partition function ratios f[sub l]/f[sub g] derived from the vapour pressure data can be described by the equation ln(f[sub l]/f[sub g]) = (3914.57[+-]10)/T[sup 2] - (17.730[+-]0.055)/T. The experimentally observed H-D vapour pressure isotope effect, together with the values on the [sup 35]Cl-[sup 37]Cl isotope effect available in the literature, is interpreted in the light of the statistical theory of isotope effects in condensed systems by using spectroscopic data of the vapour and liquid phases. The results indicate that the rotation in liquid hydrogen chloride is hindered. Temperature-dependent force constants for the hindered translational and rotational motions were invoked in order to obtain better agreement between the model calculation and experiment. (author).

  14. Mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic reaction responsible for the high cost of hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Goddard, William A; An, Qi; Xiao, Hai; Merinov, Boris; Morozov, Sergey

    2017-01-25

    The sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a major impediment to the economic use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. In this work, we report the full ORR reaction mechanism for Pt(111) based on Quantum Mechanics (QM) based Reactive metadynamics (RμD) simulations including explicit water to obtain free energy reaction barriers at 298 K. The lowest energy pathway for 4 e - water formation is: first, *OOH formation; second, *OOH reduction to H 2 O and O*; third, O* hydrolysis using surface water to produce two *OH and finally *OH hydration to water. Water formation is the rate-determining step (RDS) for potentials above 0.87 Volt, the normal operating range. Considering the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism involving protons from the solvent, we predict the free energy reaction barrier at 298 K for water formation to be 0.25 eV for an external potential below U = 0.87 V and 0.41 eV at U = 1.23 V, in good agreement with experimental values of 0.22 eV and 0.44 eV, respectively. With the mechanism now fully understood, we can use this now validated methodology to examine the changes upon alloying and surface modifications to increase the rate by reducing the barrier for water formation.

  15. Final Technical Report for GO15052 Intematix: Combinatorial Synthesis and High Throughput Screening of Effective Catalysts for Chemical Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melman, Jonathan [Intematix Corporation, Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are: to discover cost-effective catalysts for release of hydrogen from chemical hydrogen storage systems; and to discover cost-effective catalysts for the regeneration of spent chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  16. A study of hydrogen effects on fracture behavior of radioactive waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; Elleman, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    Since the high-level radioactive waste at Savannah River and Hanford may have to occupy steel tanks for many years before processing, research was directed toward examination of hydrogen effects in carbon steels and identification of radiation-enhanced hydrogen uptake in steels. Results to date are too preliminary for any conclusions to be made; however, experimental methods for measuring hydrogen gradients appear to be satisfactory. 5 figs, 1 fig

  17. The Effect of Cold Rolling on the Hydrogen Susceptibility of 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Georgiou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses in investigating the effect of cold deformation on the cathodic hydrogen charging of 5083 aluminum alloy. The aluminium alloy was submitted to a cold rolling process, until the average thickness of the specimens was reduced by 7% and 15%, respectively. A study of the structure, microhardness, and tensile properties of the hydrogen charged aluminium specimens, with and without cold rolling, indicated that the cold deformation process led to an increase of hydrogen susceptibility of this aluminum alloy.

  18. Recruiting phobic research subjects: effectiveness and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakko, T; Murtomaa, H; Milgrom, P; Getz, T; Ramsay, D S; Coldwell, S E

    2001-01-01

    Efficiently enrolling subjects is one of the most important and difficult aspects of a clinical trial. This prospective study evaluated strategies used in the recruitment of 144 dental injection phobics for a clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of combining alprazolam with exposure therapy. Three types of recruitment strategies were evaluated: paid advertising, free publicity, and professional referral. Sixty-three percent of subjects were enrolled using paid advertising (the majority of them from bus advertisements [27.0%], posters on the University of Washington campus [20.1%], and newspaper advertisements [13.2%]). Free publicity (eg, television coverage, word of mouth) yielded 18.8% of enrolled subjects and professionaL referrals 14.6% of subjects. The average cost (1996 dollars) of enrolling 1 subject was $79. Bus and poster advertising attracted more initial contacts and yielded the greatest enrollment.

  19. Design And Implementation Of Cost Effective Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaz Morshedul Haque

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the design and construct of a 100 Watt 220 Volt and 50 Hz Inverter. The system is designed without any microcontroller and it has a cost-effective design architecture. The elementary purpose of this device is to transmute 12 V DC to 220 V AC. Snubber technology is used to diminish the reverse potential transients and excessive heat of transformer winding and transistor switches. Switching pulse generated by NE 555 timer circuit and comparator circuit was used to take signal strength input from its rear as well as from both sides for triggering the MOSFET switches. Another switch is used to invert pulse between two switching circuitries. A 5 volts regulator IC 7805 was used to supply fixed 5V for biasing the switching and amplifying circuitry.

  20. Cost-effective implementation of intelligent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Henry, Jr.; Heer, Ewald

    1990-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred during the last decade in knowledge-based engineering research and knowledge-based system (KBS) demonstrations and evaluations using integrated intelligent system technologies. Performance and simulation data obtained to date in real-time operational environments suggest that cost-effective utilization of intelligent system technologies can be realized. In this paper the rationale and potential benefits for typical examples of application projects that demonstrate an increase in productivity through the use of intelligent system technologies are discussed. These demonstration projects have provided an insight into additional technology needs and cultural barriers which are currently impeding the transition of the technology into operational environments. Proposed methods which addresses technology evolution and implementation are also discussed.

  1. 10 CFR 455.63 - Cost-effectiveness testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cost-effectiveness testing. 455.63 Section 455.63 Energy..., Hospitals, Units of Local Government, and Public Care Institutions § 455.63 Cost-effectiveness testing. (a... paragraph (a) of this section, if the State plan requires the cost effectiveness of an energy conservation...

  2. Cost Effectiveness of Premium Versus Regular Gasoline in MCPS Buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baacke, Clifford M.; Frankel, Steven M.

    The primary question posed in this study is whether premium or regular gasoline is more cost effective for the Montgomery County Public School (MCPS) bus fleet, as a whole, when miles-per-gallon, cost-per-gallon, and repair costs associated with mileage are considered. On average, both miles-per-gallon, and repair costs-per-mile favor premium…

  3. Beneficial effect of carbon on hydrogen desorption kinetics from Mg–Ni–In alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermak, J.; Kral, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Beneficial effect of graphitic carbon was observed. ► The effect is optimal up to c opt . ► Above c opt , phase decomposition occurs. ► Indium in studied Mg–Ni-based alloys prevents oxidation. - Abstract: In the present paper, hydrogen desorption kinetics from hydrided Mg–Ni–In–C alloys was investigated. A chemical composition that substantially accelerates hydrogen desorption was found. It was observed that carbon improves the hydrogen desorption kinetics significantly. Its beneficial effect was found to be optimum close to the carbon concentration of about c C ≅ 5 wt.%. With this composition, stored hydrogen can be desorbed readily at temperatures down to about 485 K, immediately after hydrogen charging. This can substantially shorten the hydrogen charging/discharging cycle of storage tanks using Mg–Ni-based alloys as hydrogen storage medium. For higher carbon concentrations, unwanted phases precipitated, likely resulting in deceleration of hydrogen desorption and lower hydrogen storage capacity.

  4. Controlling Campylobacter in the chicken meat chain - Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangen MJJ; Havelaar AH; Nauta MJ; Koeijer AA de; Wit GA de; LEI; Animal Sciences Group; PZO; MGB

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was the estimation of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of various interventions to control Campylobacter contamination of broiler meat. The relative risk, the intervention costs, the disease burden (expressed in Disability Adjusted Live Years (DALYs)) and the

  5. Costs and cost-effectiveness of delivering intermittent preventive treatment through schools in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukes Matthew CH

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Awareness of the potential impact of malaria among school-age children has stimulated investigation into malaria interventions that can be delivered through schools. However, little evidence is available on the costs and cost-effectiveness of intervention options. This paper evaluates the costs and cost-effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT as delivered by teachers in schools in western Kenya. Methods Information on actual drug and non-drug associated costs were collected from expenditure and salary records, government budgets and interviews with key district and national officials. Effectiveness data were derived from a cluster-randomised-controlled trial of IPT where a single dose of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and three daily doses of amodiaquine were provided three times in year (once termly. Both financial and economic costs were estimated from a provider perspective, and effectiveness was estimated in terms of anaemia cases averted. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the impact of key assumptions on estimated cost-effectiveness. Results The delivery of IPT by teachers was estimated to cost US$ 1.88 per child treated per year, with drug and teacher training costs constituting the largest cost components. Set-up costs accounted for 13.2% of overall costs (equivalent to US$ 0.25 per child whilst recurrent costs accounted for 86.8% (US$ 1.63 per child per year. The estimated cost per anaemia case averted was US$ 29.84 and the cost per case of Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia averted was US$ 5.36, respectively. The cost per case of anaemia averted ranged between US$ 24.60 and 40.32 when the prices of antimalarial drugs and delivery costs were varied. Cost-effectiveness was most influenced by effectiveness of IPT and the background prevalence of anaemia. In settings where 30% and 50% of schoolchildren were anaemic, cost-effectiveness ratios were US$ 12.53 and 7.52, respectively. Conclusion This

  6. FORECAST: Regulatory effects cost analysis software annual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, B.; Sciacca, F.W.

    1991-11-01

    Over the past several years the NRC has developed a generic cost methodology for the quantification of cost/economic impacts associated with a wide range of new or revised regulatory requirements. This methodology has been developed to aid the NRC in preparing Regulatory Impact Analyses (RIAs). These generic costing methods can be useful in quantifying impacts both to industry and to the NRC. The FORECAST program was developed to facilitate the use of the generic costing methodology. This PC program integrates the major cost considerations that may be required because of a regulatory change. FORECAST automates much of the calculations typically needed in an RIA and thus reduces the time and labor required to perform these analysis. More importantly, its integrated and consistent treatment of the different cost elements should help assure comprehensiveness, uniformity, and accuracy in the preparation of needed cost estimates

  7. Solvent Effects in the Hydrogenation of 2-Butanone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpa, B. S.; DAgostino, C.; Gladden, L. F.; Hindle, K.; Manyar, H.; McGregor, J.; Li, Ruoyu; Neurock, Matthew; Sinha, N.; Stitt, E. H.; Weber, D.; Zeitler, J. A.; Rooney, D. W.

    2012-03-27

    In liquid-phase reaction systems, the role of the solvent is often limited to the simple requirement of dissolving and/or diluting substrates. However, the correct choice, either pure or mixed, can significantly influence both reaction rate and selectivity. For multi-phase heterogeneously catalysed reactions observed variations may be due to changes in mass transfer rates, reaction mechanism, reaction kinetics, adsorption properties and combinations thereof. The liquid-phase hydrogenation of 2-butanone to 2- butanol over a Ru/SiO2 catalyst, for example, shows such complex rate behaviour when varying water/isopropyl alcohol (IPA) solvent ratios. In this paper, we outline a strategy which combines measured rate data with physical property measurements and molecular simulation in order to gain a more fundamental understanding of mixed solvent effects for this heterogeneously catalysed reaction. By combining these techniques, the observed complex behaviour of rate against water fraction is shown to be a combination of both mass transfer and chemical effects.

  8. Design and cost of the sulfuric acid decomposition reactor for the sulfur based hydrogen processes - HTR2008-58009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T. Y.; Connolly, S. M.; Lahoda, E. J.; Kriel, W.

    2008-01-01

    The key interface component between the reactor and chemical systems for the sulfuric acid based processes to make hydrogen is the sulfuric acid decomposition reactor. The materials issues for the decomposition reactor are severe since sulfuric acid must be heated, vaporized and decomposed. SiC has been identified and proven by others to be an acceptable material. However, SiC has a significant design issue when it must be interfaced with metals for connection to the remainder of the process. Westinghouse has developed a design utilizing SiC for the high temperature portions of the reactor that are in contact with the sulfuric acid and polymeric coated steel for low temperature portions. This design is expected to have a reasonable cost for an operating lifetime of 20 years. It can be readily maintained in the field, and is transportable by truck (maximum OD is 4.5 meters). This paper summarizes the detailed engineering design of the Westinghouse Decomposition Reactor and the decomposition reactor's capital cost. (authors)

  9. Study of Catalyst Variation Effect in Glycerol Conversion Process to Hydrogen Gas by Steam Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widayat; Hartono, R.; Elizabeth, E.; Annisa, A. N.

    2018-04-01

    Along with the economic development, needs of energy being increase too. Hydrogen as alternative energy has many usages. Besides that, hydrogen is one source of energy that is a clean fuel, but process production of hydrogen from natural gas as a raw material has been used for a long time. Therefore, there is need new invention to produce hydrogen from the others raw material. Glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel production, is a compound which can be used as a raw material for hydrogen production. By using glycerol as a raw material of hydrogen production, we can get added value of glycerol as well as an energy source solution. The process production of hydrogen by steam reforming is a thermochemical process with efficiency 70%. This process needs contribution of catalyst to improve its efficiency and selectivity of the process. In this study will be examined the effect variation of catalyst for glycerol conversion process to hydrogen by steam reforming. The method for catalyst preparation was variation of catalyst impregnation composition, catalyst calcined with difference concentration of hydrochloric acid and calcined with difference hydrochloric acid ratio. After that, all of catalyst which have been prepared, used for steam reforming process for hydrogen production from glycerol as a raw material. From the study, the highest yield of hydrogen gas showed in the process production by natural zeolite catalyst with 1:15 Hydrochloric acid ratio was 42.28%. Hydrogen yield for 2M calcined natural zeolite catalyst was 38.37%, for ZSM-5 catalyst was 15.83%, for 0.5M calcined natural zeolite was 13.09% and for ultrasonic natural zeolite was 11.43%. The lowest yield of hydrogen gas showed in catalyst 2Zn/ZSM-5 with 11.22%. This result showed that hydrogen yield product was affected by catalyst variation because of the catalyst has difference characteristic and difference catalytic activity after the catalyst preparation process.

  10. Cost and cost-effectiveness of PPM-DOTS for tuberculosis control: evidence from India.

    OpenAIRE

    Floyd, Katherine; Arora, V. K.; Murthy, K. J. R.; Lonnroth, Knut; Singla, Neeta; Akbar, Y.; Zignol, Matteo; Uplekar, Mukund

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost and cost-effectiveness of the Public-Private Mix DOTS (PPM-DOTS) strategy for tuberculosis (TB) control in India. METHODS: We collected data on the costs and effects of pilot PPM-DOTS projects in Delhi and Hyderabad using documentary data and interviews. The cost of PPM-DOTS was compared with public sector DOTS (i.e. DOTS delivered through public sector facilities only) and non-DOTS treatment in the private sector. Costs for 2002 in US$ were assessed for the publ...

  11. Hydrogen pick-up effect on the deformation characteristics of the 20 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steklov, O.I.; Perunov, B.Vs.; Krovyakova, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment aimed at ascertaining the possibility of using plasticity characteristis as a criterion of the resistance of a material to slow failure through hydrogenation is set up in a manner to permit an evaluation of the individual effects of mechanical stresses hydrogenation medium and their combined action upon the plasticity characteristics. It is shown that the variation of the rupturing load for hydrogenated specimens of grade 20 steel, held under load, takes place on the initial holding stage, after which the changes in the plasticity characteritics are immaterial. In consequence, the deformation characteristics allow no judgement to be made on the resistance to slow cracking of grade 20 steel due to hydrogenation

  12. Effect of reversible hydrogen alloying and plastic deformation on microstructure development in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzinova, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen leads to degradation in fracture-related mechanical properties of titanium alloys and is usually considered as a very dangerous element. Numerous studies of hydrogen interaction with titanium alloys showed that hydrogen may be considered not only as an impurity but also as temporary alloying element. This statement is based on the following. Hydrogen stabilizes high-temperature β-phase, leads to decrease in temperature of β→α transformation and extends (α + β )-phase field. The BCC β-phase exhibits lower strength and higher ductility in comparison with HCP α -phase. As a result, hydrogen improves hot workability of hard-to-deform titanium alloys. Hydrogen changes chemical composition of the phases, kinetics of phase transformations, and at low temperatures additional phase transformation (β→α + TiH 2 ) takes place, which is accompanied with noticeable change in volumes of phases. As a result, fine lamellar microstructure may be formed in hydrogenated titanium alloys after heat treatment. It was shown that controlled hydrogen alloying improves weldability and machinability of titanium alloys. After processing hydrogenated titanium preforms are subjected to vacuum annealing, and the hydrogen content decreases up to safe level. Hydrogen removal is accompanied with hydrides dissolution and β→α transformation that makes possible to control structure formation at this final step of treatment. Thus, reversible hydrogen alloying of titanium alloys allows to obtain novel microstructure with enhanced properties. The aim of the work was to study the effect of hydrogen on structure formation, namely: i) influence of hydrogen content on transformation of lamellar microstructure to globular one during deformation in (α+β)-phase field; ii) effect of dissolved hydrogen on dynamic recrystallization in single α- and β- phase regions; iii) influence of vacuum annealing temperature on microstructure development. The work was focused on the optimization of

  13. Consumer-Operated Service Programs: monetary and donated costs and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Brian T; Mannix, Danyelle; Freed, Michael C; Campbell, Jean; Johnsen, Matthew; Jones, Kristine; Blyler, Crystal R

    2011-01-01

    Examine cost differences between Consumer Operated Service Programs (COSPs) as possibly determined by a) size of program, b) use of volunteers and other donated resources, c) cost-of-living differences between program locales, d) COSP model applied, and e) delivery system used to implement the COSP model. As part of a larger evaluation of COSP, data on operating costs, enrollments, and mobilization of donated resources were collected for eight programs representing three COSP models (drop-in centers, mutual support, and education/advocacy training). Because the 8 programs were operated in geographically diverse areas of the US, costs were examined with and without adjustment for differences in local cost of living. Because some COSPs use volunteers and other donated resources, costs were measured with and without these resources being monetized. Scale of operation also was considered as a mediating variable for differences in program costs. Cost per visit, cost per consumer per quarter, and total program cost were calculated separately for funds spent and for resources donated for each COSP. Differences between COSPs in cost per consumer and cost per visit seem better explained by economies of scale and delivery system used than by cost-of-living differences between program locations or COSP model. Given others' findings that different COSP models produce little variation in service effectiveness, minimize service costs by maximizing scale of operation while using a delivery system that allows staff and facilities resources to be increased or decreased quickly to match number of consumers seeking services.

  14. Effect of Nb on hydrogen-induced delayed fracture in high strength hot stamping steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China); Huang, Yunhua, E-mail: huangyh@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Sun, Bintang, E-mail: bingtangsun@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liao, Qingliang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lu, Hongzhou [CITIC Metal Co. Ltd., Room 1901, Capital Mansion 6, Xin Yuan Nanlu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100004 (China); The School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Meilong road 130, Xujiahui District, Shanghai 200237 (China); Jian, Bian [Niobium Tech Asia, 068898 Singapore (Singapore); Mohrbacher, Hardy [NiobelCon bvba, 2970 Schilde (Belgium); Zhang, Wei; Guo, Aimin [CITIC Metal Co. Ltd., Room 1901, Capital Mansion 6, Xin Yuan Nanlu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100004 (China); Zhang, Yue [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); The State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-02-25

    The effect of Nb addition (0.022, 0.053, 0.078 wt%) on the hydrogen-induced delayed fracture resistance of 22MnB5 was studied by constant load test and electrochemical hydrogen permeation method. It is shown that the appropriate addition of Nb is beneficial to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance of tested steel, especially when the steel contains high concentration of hydrogen, and the maximum delayed fracture resistance is obtained at a Nb content of 0.053%.The result of hydrogen permeation test shows that the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the steel containing niobium is lower than that in steel without niobium, which indicates that it is harder for hydrogen in the steels containing niobium to diffuse and aggregate. In addition, the reason for Nb improving the delayed fracture resistance of steels is discussed from two aspects: hydrogen trap effect and grain refinement effect. The analysis shows that the main reason leading to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance is the hydrogen trapping effect of NbC while the grain refinement effect of Nb(C,N) secondary.

  15. Therapeutic effects of hydrogen on chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liren; Liu, Xiaopeng; Shen, Jianliang; Zhao, Defeng; Yin, Wenjie

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is rising recent years, which has been the leading cause of non-transplantation mortality post allogenetic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Imbalance of inflammatory cytokines and fibrosis plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of cGVHD. Recent studies showed that molecular hydrogen has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-fibrosis effects. Therefore, we hypothesized that molecular hydrogen may have therapeutic effects on cGVHD. To determine whether hydrogen could protect mice from cGVHD in an MHC-incompatible murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model, survival rates of mice were calculated, and skin lesions were also evaluated after BMT. This article demonstrated that administration of hydrogen-rich saline increased survival rate of cGVHD mice. Administration of hydrogen-rich saline after transplantation also reduced skin lesions of cGVHD mice. Previously, we reported the therapeutic effects of hydrogen on acute GVHD. However, there was no report on the therapeutic effects of hydrogen on cGVHD mice. It is suggested that hydrogen has a potential as an effective and safe therapeutic agent on cGVHD. This study will provide new ideas on the treatment of cGVHD and has important theoretical values. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. Effect of Nb on hydrogen-induced delayed fracture in high strength hot stamping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shiqi; Huang, Yunhua; Sun, Bintang; Liao, Qingliang; Lu, Hongzhou; Jian, Bian; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Aimin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Nb addition (0.022, 0.053, 0.078 wt%) on the hydrogen-induced delayed fracture resistance of 22MnB5 was studied by constant load test and electrochemical hydrogen permeation method. It is shown that the appropriate addition of Nb is beneficial to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance of tested steel, especially when the steel contains high concentration of hydrogen, and the maximum delayed fracture resistance is obtained at a Nb content of 0.053%.The result of hydrogen permeation test shows that the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the steel containing niobium is lower than that in steel without niobium, which indicates that it is harder for hydrogen in the steels containing niobium to diffuse and aggregate. In addition, the reason for Nb improving the delayed fracture resistance of steels is discussed from two aspects: hydrogen trap effect and grain refinement effect. The analysis shows that the main reason leading to the improvement of the delayed fracture resistance is the hydrogen trapping effect of NbC while the grain refinement effect of Nb(C,N) secondary

  17. Effect of heat treatments on the hydrogen embrittlement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pipe steel in as received (controlled rolled), normalized, and quenched and tempered conditions. The resistance to hydrogen embrittlement was found in the order of controlled rolled > quenched and tempered > normalized. The fracture mode ...

  18. Effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on the hydrogen bonding structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751 013, India e-mail: .... molecules are modeled by the 4-site P2 model of Luzar and Chandler9 which ..... lifetime of hydrogen bond acceptance by carbonyl oxy-.

  19. An effective temperature compensation approach for ultrasonic hydrogen sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaolong; Li, Min; Arsad, Norhana; Wen, Xiaoyan; Lu, Haifei

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen is a kind of promising clean energy resource with a wide application prospect, which will, however, cause a serious security issue upon the leakage of hydrogen gas. The measurement of its concentration is of great significance. In a traditional approach of ultrasonic hydrogen sensing, a temperature drift of 0.1 °C results in a concentration error of about 250 ppm, which is intolerable for trace amount of gas sensing. In order to eliminate the influence brought by temperature drift, we propose a feasible approach named as linear compensation algorithm, which utilizes the linear relationship between the pulse count and temperature to compensate for the pulse count error (ΔN) caused by temperature drift. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed approach is capable of improving the measurement accuracy and can easily detect sub-100 ppm of hydrogen concentration under variable temperature conditions.

  20. Requirements for low-cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multiunit inertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, G.B.; Moir, R.W.; Hoffmman, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The economy of scale for multiunit inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants is explored based on the molten salt HYLIFE-II fusion chamber concept, for the purpose of producing lower cost electricity and hydrogen fuel. The cost of electricity (CoE) is minimized with a new IFE systems code IFEFUEL5 for a matrix of plant cases with one to eight fusion chambers of 250 to 2000-MW (electric) net output each, sharing a common heavy-ion driver and target factory. Improvements to previous HYLIFE-II models include a recirculating induction linac driver optimized as a function of driver energy and rep-rate (average driver power), inclusion of beam switchyard costs, a fusion chamber cost scaling dependence on both thermal power and fusion yield, and a more accurate bypass pump power scaling with chamber rep-rate. A CoE less than 3 cents/kW(electric)-h is found for plant outputs greater than 2 GW(electric), allowing hydrogen fuel production by wafer electrolysis to provide lower fuel cost per mile for higher efficiency hydrogen engines compared with gasoline engines. These multiunit, multi-GW(electric) IFE plants allow staged utility plant deployment, lower optimum chamber rep-rates, less sensitivity to driver and target fabrication costs, and a CoE possibly lower than future fission, fossil, and solar competitors. 37 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Effect of hydrogen passivation on polycrystalline silicon thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honda, Shinya; Mates, Tomáš; Ledinský, Martin; Oswald, Jiří; Fejfar, Antonín; Kočka, Jan; Yamazaki, T.; Uraoka, Y.; Fuyuki, T.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 487, - (2005), s. 152-156 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010316; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010413; GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : hydrogen passivation * polycrystalline silicon * photoluminescence * Raman spectroscopy * Si-H 2 * hydrogen molecules Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.569, year: 2005

  2. Comparative costs and cost-effectiveness of behavioural interventions as part of HIV prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Justine; Zinsou, Cyprien; Parkhurst, Justin; N'Dour, Marguerite; Foyet, Léger; Mueller, Dirk H

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural interventions have been widely integrated in HIV/AIDS social marketing prevention strategies and are considered valuable in settings with high levels of risk behaviours and low levels of HIV/AIDS awareness. Despite their widespread application, there is a lack of economic evaluations comparing different behaviour change communication methods. This paper analyses the costs to increase awareness and the cost-effectiveness to influence behaviour change for five interventions in Benin. Cost and cost-effectiveness analyses used economic costs and primary effectiveness data drawn from surveys. Costs were collected for provider inputs required to implement the interventions in 2009 and analysed by 'person reached'. Cost-effectiveness was analysed by 'person reporting systematic condom use'. Sensitivity analyses were performed on all uncertain variables and major assumptions. Cost-per-person reached varies by method, with public outreach events the least costly (US$2.29) and billboards the most costly (US$25.07). Influence on reported behaviour was limited: only three of the five interventions were found to have a significant statistical correlation with reported condom use (i.e. magazines, radio broadcasts, public outreach events). Cost-effectiveness ratios per person reporting systematic condom use resulted in the following ranking: magazines, radio and public outreach events. Sensitivity analyses indicate rankings are insensitive to variation of key parameters although ratios must be interpreted with caution. This analysis suggests that while individual interventions are an attractive use of resources to raise awareness, this may not translate into a cost-effective impact on behaviour change. The study found that the extensive reach of public outreach events did not seem to influence behaviour change as cost-effectively when compared with magazines or radio broadcasts. Behavioural interventions are context-specific and their effectiveness influenced by a

  3. [Cost effectiveness of workplace smoking policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Tamara; van den Borne, Inge

    2003-01-01

    This study reviews the motivations of companies to set out a policy for controlling smoking, the economic benefits for the company resulting from such a policy and the costs, broken down by European Union countries. The literature on the costs of implementing a policy related to smoking at the workplace is reviewed. The main objective of policies related to smoking at the workplace is that of safeguarding employees from environmental tobacco smoke. Other reasons are cutting costs, improving the company image, and reducing absenteeism, occupational accidents, internal quarrels and extra costs due to cigarette smoking, protection against environmental tobacco smoke does not entail any higher costs for companies, and economic advantages are visible. The benefits are by far greater than the costs involved, particularly on a long-range basis, and seem to be greater when smoking at the workplace is completely prohibited and no smoking areas are set.

  4. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial temperature over 920 K, the threshold temperature for autoignition in methane jets, exhibited features typical of either a tribrachial edge or mild combustion depending on fuel mole fraction and the liftoff height increased with jet velocity. The liftoff height in the hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime was dependent on the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the addition of small amounts of hydrogen, as was the case for pure methane jets. When the initial temperature was below 920 K, where the methane fuel did not show autoignition behavior, the flame was autoignited by the addition of hydrogen, which is an ignition improver. The liftoff height demonstrated a unique feature in that it decreased nonlinearly as the jet velocity increased. The differential diffusion of hydrogen is expected to play a crucial role in the decrease in the liftoff height with increasing jet velocity.

  5. Research effects for the resolution of hydrogen risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Wan; Kim, Jong Tae; Kang, Hyung Seok; Na, Young Su; Song, Jin Ho [Division of Severe Accident and PHWR Safety Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    During the past 10 years, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has performed a study to control hydrogen gas in the containment of the nuclear power plants. Before the Fukushima accident, analytical activities for gas distribution analysis in experiments and plants were primarily conducted using a multidimensional code: the GASFLOW. After the Fukushima accident, the COM3D code, which can simulate a multidimensional hydrogen explosion, was introduced in 2013 to complete the multidimensional hydrogen analysis system. The code validation efforts of the multidimensional codes of the GASFLOW and the COM3D have continued to increase confidence in the use of codes using several international experimental data. The OpenFOAM has been preliminarily evaluated for APR1400 containment, based on experience from coded validation and the analysis of hydrogen distribution and explosion using the multidimensional codes, the GASFLOW and the COM3D. Hydrogen safety in nuclear power has become a much more important issue after the Fukushima event in which hydrogen explosions occurred. The KAERI is preparing a large-scale test that can be used to validate the performance of domestic passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) and can provide data for the validation of the severe accident code being developed in Korea.

  6. Research effects for the resolution of hydrogen risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong Wan; Kim, Jong Tae; Kang, Hyung Seok; Na, Young Su; Song, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    During the past 10 years, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has performed a study to control hydrogen gas in the containment of the nuclear power plants. Before the Fukushima accident, analytical activities for gas distribution analysis in experiments and plants were primarily conducted using a multidimensional code: the GASFLOW. After the Fukushima accident, the COM3D code, which can simulate a multidimensional hydrogen explosion, was introduced in 2013 to complete the multidimensional hydrogen analysis system. The code validation efforts of the multidimensional codes of the GASFLOW and the COM3D have continued to increase confidence in the use of codes using several international experimental data. The OpenFOAM has been preliminarily evaluated for APR1400 containment, based on experience from coded validation and the analysis of hydrogen distribution and explosion using the multidimensional codes, the GASFLOW and the COM3D. Hydrogen safety in nuclear power has become a much more important issue after the Fukushima event in which hydrogen explosions occurred. The KAERI is preparing a large-scale test that can be used to validate the performance of domestic passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) and can provide data for the validation of the severe accident code being developed in Korea.

  7. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis. Effect of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, M.Z.; Høj, M.; Schandel, C. B.

    2018-01-01

    fraction of 17 and 22% daf, corresponding to an energy recovery of between 40 and 53% in the organic product. The yield of the non-condensable gases varied between a mass fraction of 24 and 32% daf and the char yield varied between 9.6 and 18% daf. The condensed organics contained a mass fraction of 42....... The effect of varying the temperature (365–511 °C) and hydrogen pressure (1.6–3.6 MPa) on the product yield and organic composition was studied. The mass balance closed by a mass fraction between 90 and 101% dry ash free basis (daf). The yield of the combined condensed organics and C4+ varied between a mass......–75% aromatics, based on GC × GC-FID chromatographic peak area, and the remainder was primarily naphthenes with minor amounts of paraffins. The condensed organics were essentially oxygen free (mass fraction below 0.001%) when both reactors were used. Bypassing the HDO reactor increased the oxygen concentration...

  8. Final Project Report for DOE/EERE High-Capacity and Low-Cost Hydrogen-Storage Sorbents for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hong-Cai [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Liu, Di-Jia [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This report provides a review of the objectives, progress, and milestones of the research conducted during this project on the topic of developing innovative metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and porous organic polymers (POPs) for high-capacity and low-cost hydrogen-storage sorbents in automotive applications.1 The objectives of the proposed research were to develop new materials as next-generation hydrogen storage sorbents that meet or exceed DOE’s 2017 performance targets of gravimetric capacity of 0.055 kg H2/kgsystem and volumetric capacity of 0.040 kg H2/Lsystem at a cost of $400/kg H2 stored. Texas A&M University (TAMU) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) collaborated in developing low-cost and high-capacity hydrogen-storage sorbents with appropriate stability, sorption kinetics, and thermal conductivity. The research scope and methods developed to achieve the project’s goals include the following: Advanced ligand design and synthesis to construct MOF sorbents with optimal hydrogen storage capacities, low cost and high stability; Substantially improve the hydrogen uptake capacity and chemical stability of MOF-based sorbents by incorporating high valent metal ions during synthesis or through the post-synthetic metal metathesis oxidation approach; Enhance sorbent storage capacity through material engineering and characterization; Generate a better understanding of the H2-sorbent interaction through advanced characterization and simulation. Over the course of the project 5 different MOFs were developed and studied: PCN-250, PCN-12, PCN-12’, PCN-608 and PCN-609.2-3 Two different samples were submitted to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in order to validate their hydrogen adsorption capacity, PCN-250 and PCN-12. Neither of these samples reached the project’s Go/No-Go requirements but the data obtained did further prove the hypothesis that the presence of open metal

  9. The effect of fan-induced turbulence on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.K.; Tamm, H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of fan-induced turbulence on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures has been studied in a 2.3-m diameter sphere over a hydrogen concentration range of 4 to 42% (by volume). Two fans were used to produce the turbulence, which was measured at various lacations by hot-wire anemometry. For low hydrogen concentrations (< 7%), turbulence increases the rate and extent of combustion; for large turbulence intensities the extent of combustion approaches 100%, and combustion times are reduced by factors of 8 to 10 from those observed under quiescent conditions. At high hydrogen concentrations, the effect of turbulence on combustion time is less pronounced than at low hydrogen concentrations. Flame-generated turbulence has a significant effect on the combustion rate. (orig.)

  10. Effect of the annealing temperature for the hydrogen Q-degradation on superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Tomoko; Sukenobu, Satoru; Tanabe, Yoshio; Onishi, Yoshimichi; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yoshishige

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen Q-degradation was studied in niobium superconducting cavities prepared by barrel polishing, and electropolishing without annealing, though a fast cooling down of cavities. Cavity performance with various annealing temperature were tested using a 1.3GHz single-cell cavity to compare the effects of annealing temperature for hydrogen Q-degradation. (author)

  11. Effect of heat treatment and rotor steels composition on hydrogen solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Samojlenko, L.V.; Gorovaya, O.N.; Najdovskij, A.G.; Bilik, I.; Kret, Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of equilibrium hydrogen adsorption in samples of 27KhN3MFA and 25Kh2NMFA steels were conducted. Carbide inclusions and doping additions, typical for rotor steels, don't produce noticeable effect on hydrogen solubility in

  12. Effect of temperature and hydraulic retention time on hydrogen producing granules: Homoacetogenesis and morphological characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, A. A.; Danko, A. S.; Alves, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of temperature and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the homoacetogenesisi and on the morphological characteristics of hydrogen producing granules was investigated. Hydrogen was produced using an expanded granular sludge blanket (EGSB) reactor, fed with glucose and L-arabinose, under mesophilic (37 degree centigrade), thermophilic (55 degree centigrade), and hyper thermophilic (70 degree centigrade) conditions. (Author)

  13. Effect of hydrogen addition on the microstructure of TC21 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Tangkui; Li Miaoquan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The aim of this paper is to study the effect of hydrogen content (0-0.887 wt.%H) on microstructure, phase composition, microhardness and β transus temperature of TC21 alloy. The results show that, with increasing hydrogen content, the β phase increases, the α/β interfaces of lamellar transformed β phase disappear, the lattice parameter of β phase increases and the β transus temperature decreases for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy. In comparison to the as-received TC21 alloy, the contrasts of primary α phase and transformed β phase under optical microscope in the TC21 alloy with high hydrogen content are reversed completely. Furthermore, the γ and δ hydrides are detected in the hydrogenated TC21 alloy. In addition, the variations of phase compositions for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy have influence on microhardness and β transus temperature. → In conclusion, this paper shows some significant rules about the influence of hydrogen on TC21 alloy. - Abstract: TC21 alloy was hydrogenated at 750 deg. C with different hydrogen contents ranging from 0 to 0.873 wt.%H, and its microstructural evolution and phase transformations were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microhardness and the β transus temperature for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy were determined by microhardness testing and metallographical approach, respectively. The results show that, hydrogen addition has a noticeable influence on microstructure, phase composition, microhardness and β transus temperature of TC21 alloy. With increasing hydrogen content, the β phase increases, the α/β interfaces of lamellar transformed β phase disappear, the lattice parameter of β phase increases and the β transus temperature decreases for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy. In comparison to the as-received TC21 alloy, the contrasts of primary α phase and transformed β phase under optical microscope in the hydrogenated TC21 alloy with high hydrogen

  14. Future Costs, Fixed Healthcare Budgets, and the Decision Rules of Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baal, Pieter; Meltzer, David; Brouwer, Werner

    2016-02-01

    Life-saving medical technologies result in additional demand for health care due to increased life expectancy. However, most economic evaluations do not include all medical costs that may result from this additional demand in health care and include only future costs of related illnesses. Although there has been much debate regarding the question to which extent future costs should be included from a societal perspective, the appropriate role of future medical costs in the widely adopted but more narrow healthcare perspective has been neglected. Using a theoretical model, we demonstrate that optimal decision rules for cost-effectiveness analyses assuming fixed healthcare budgets dictate that future costs of both related and unrelated medical care should be included. Practical relevance of including the costs of future unrelated medical care is illustrated using the example of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Our findings suggest that guidelines should prescribe inclusion of these costs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The cost of preventing undernutrition: cost, cost-efficiency and cost-effectiveness of three cash-based interventions on nutrition outcomes in Dadu, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenouth, Lani; Colbourn, Timothy; Fenn, Bridget; Pietzsch, Silke; Myatt, Mark; Puett, Chloe

    2018-07-01

    Cash-based interventions (CBIs) increasingly are being used to deliver humanitarian assistance and there is growing interest in the cost-effectiveness of cash transfers for preventing undernutrition in emergency contexts. The objectives of this study were to assess the costs, cost-efficiency and cost-effectiveness in achieving nutrition outcomes of three CBIs in southern Pakistan: a 'double cash' (DC) transfer, a 'standard cash' (SC) transfer and a 'fresh food voucher' (FFV) transfer. Cash and FFVs were provided to poor households with children aged 6-48 months for 6 months in 2015. The SC and FFV interventions provided $14 monthly and the DC provided $28 monthly. Cost data were collected via institutional accounting records, interviews, programme observation, document review and household survey. Cost-effectiveness was assessed as cost per case of wasting, stunting and disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted. Beneficiary costs were higher for the cash groups than the voucher group. Net total cost transfer ratios (TCTRs) were estimated as 1.82 for DC, 2.82 for SC and 2.73 for FFV. Yet, despite the higher operational costs, the FFV TCTR was lower than the SC TCTR when incorporating the participation cost to households, demonstrating the relevance of including beneficiary costs in cost-efficiency estimations. The DC intervention achieved a reduction in wasting, at $4865 per case averted; neither the SC nor the FFV interventions reduced wasting. The cost per case of stunting averted was $1290 for DC, $882 for SC and $883 for FFV. The cost per DALY averted was $641 for DC, $434 for SC and $563 for FFV without discounting or age weighting. These interventions are highly cost-effective by international thresholds. While it is debatable whether these resource requirements represent a feasible or sustainable investment given low health expenditures in Pakistan, these findings may provide justification for continuing Pakistan's investment in national social safety

  16. Ethical objections against including life-extension costs in cost-effectiveness analysis: a consistent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjour, Afschin; Müller, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    One of the major ethical concerns regarding cost-effectiveness analysis in health care has been the inclusion of life-extension costs ("it is cheaper to let people die"). For this reason, many analysts have opted to rule out life-extension costs from the analysis. However, surprisingly little has been written in the health economics literature regarding this ethical concern and the resulting practice. The purpose of this work was to present a framework and potential solution for ethical objections against life-extension costs. This work found three levels of ethical concern: (i) with respect to all life-extension costs (disease-related and -unrelated); (ii) with respect to disease-unrelated costs only; and (iii) regarding disease-unrelated costs plus disease-related costs not influenced by the intervention. Excluding all life-extension costs for ethical reasons would require-for reasons of consistency-a simultaneous exclusion of savings from reducing morbidity. At the other extreme, excluding only disease-unrelated life-extension costs for ethical reasons would require-again for reasons of consistency-the exclusion of health gains due to treatment of unrelated diseases. Therefore, addressing ethical concerns regarding the inclusion of life-extension costs necessitates fundamental changes in the calculation of cost effectiveness.

  17. Cost effectiveness of Tuberculosis Treatment from the Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Directly Observed Treatment Short course is more cost effective from the patients' point of view. DOTS needs to be re-focused out of the hospitals and clinics and made community based in view of the increasing TB caseload occasioned by HI V/AIDS. Key Words: Cost effectiveness, Tuberculosis treatment, personal cost, ...

  18. Generalized transition state theory. Quantum effects for collinear reactions of hydrogen molecules and isotopically substituted hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Canonical variational transition state theory, microcanonical variational transition state theory, and Miller's unified statistical theory were used in an attempt to correct two major deficiencies of the conventional transition state theory. These are: (1) the necessity of extra assumptions to include quantum mechanical tunneling effects and (2) the fundamental assumption that trajectories crossing a dividing surface in phase space proceed directly to products. The accuracy of these approximate methods were tested by performing calculations for several collinear reactions of hydrogen, deuterium, chlorine, or iodine, with five isotopes of hydrogen molecules and comparison of these results with those from accurate quantitative calculations of the reaction probabilities as functions of energy and of the thermal rate constants as functions of temperature. 49 references, 28 figures, 17 tables

  19. Effects of internal hydrogen on the vacancy loop formation probability in Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, T.X.; Sirois, E.; Robertson, I.M.

    1990-04-01

    The effect of internal hydrogen on the formation of vacancy dislocation loops from heavy-ion generated displacement cascades in Al has been investigated. Samples of high-purity aluminum and aluminum containing 900 and 1300 appM of hydrogen were irradiated at room temperature with 50 keV Kr+ ions. The ion dose rate was typically 2 x 10 10 ions cm -2 sec -1 and the ion dose was between 10 11 and 10 13 ion cm -2 . Under these irradiation conditions, dislocation loops were observed in all compositions, although the formation probability was relatively low (less than 10 percent of the displacement cascades produced a vacancy loop). The loop formation probability was further reduced by the presence of hydrogen. No difference in the geometry or the size of the loops created in the hydrogen free and hydrogen charged samples was found. These results are difficult to interpret, and the explanation may lie in the distribution and form of the hydrogen. To account for the large hydrogen concentrations and from calculations of the energy associated with hydrogen entry into aluminum, it has been suggested that the hydrogen enters the aluminum lattice with an accompanying vacancy. This will create hydrogen-vacancy complexes in the material; two dimensional complexes have been detected in the hydrogen-charged, but unirradiated, samples by the small-angle x-ray scattering technique. The possibility of these complexes trapping the vacancies produced by the cascade process exists thus lowering the formation probability. However, such a mechanism must occur within the lifetime of the cascade. Alternatively, if a displacement cascade overlaps with the hydrogen-vacancy complexes, the lower atomic density of the region will result in an increase in the cascade volume (decrease in the local vacancy concentration) which will also reduce the loop formation probability

  20. Hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects in water and aqueous solutions of organic molecules and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, David L.; Fu, Ling; Bermejo, F. Javier; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydrogen/deuterium substitution has significant effects in hydrogenous materials. ► The effects can involve structure, phase behavior and protein stability. ► The effects must be kept in mind in the interpretation of scattering experiments. ► The effects may be mitigated by an appropriate choice of experimental conditions. - Abstract: It is pointed out that hydrogen/deuterium substitution, frequently used in neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of hydrogenous samples, can have significant effects on structure, phase behavior and protein stability. The effects must be kept in mind in the interpretation of such experiments. In suitable cases, these effects can be mitigated by an appropriate choice of experimental conditions

  1. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paunovic, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a microreactor is a safe and efficient process. Conventionally, hydrogen peroxide is produced using the anthraquinone autooxidation process, which is rather complex and can only be performed cost-effectively on a large scale. As a result, hydrogen

  2. Sunk costs equal sunk boats? The effect of entry costs in a transboundary sequential fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Punt, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    that for other fisheries substantial sunk investments are needed. In this paper I investigate the effect of such sunk entry costs in a sequential fisheries. I model the uncertainty as a shock to the stock dependent fishing costs, in a two player game, where one of the players faces sunk entry costs. I find that......, depending on parameters, sunk costs can i) increase the competitive pressure on the fish stock compared to a game where entry is free ii) act as a deterrence mechanism and iii) act as a commitment device. I conclude that entry costs can play a crucial role because they can change the outcome of the game...

  3. Bayesian models for cost-effectiveness analysis in the presence of structural zero costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, Gianluca

    2014-05-20

    Bayesian modelling for cost-effectiveness data has received much attention in both the health economics and the statistical literature, in recent years. Cost-effectiveness data are characterised by a relatively complex structure of relationships linking a suitable measure of clinical benefit (e.g. quality-adjusted life years) and the associated costs. Simplifying assumptions, such as (bivariate) normality of the underlying distributions, are usually not granted, particularly for the cost variable, which is characterised by markedly skewed distributions. In addition, individual-level data sets are often characterised by the presence of structural zeros in the cost variable. Hurdle models can be used to account for the presence of excess zeros in a distribution and have been applied in the context of cost data. We extend their application to cost-effectiveness data, defining a full Bayesian specification, which consists of a model for the individual probability of null costs, a marginal model for the costs and a conditional model for the measure of effectiveness (given the observed costs). We presented the model using a working example to describe its main features. © 2013 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Evaluating the Effect of Seed Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide on Anatomical and Physiological Characteristics of Wheat under Dry Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Jafarian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Water deficit is the major abiotic factor limiting plant growth and crop productivity around the world. In all agricultural regions, yields of rain-fed crops are periodically reduced by drought. Among various strategies, pre-sowing treatment and priming of seeds are easy, low cost, low risk and effective approaches to overcome the environmental stress problems. Various priming strategies include osmopriming, halopriming, hormonal priming or hydropriming, etc. Hydrogen peroxide, a stress signal molecule, was evaluated as seed treatment to produce the metabolic changes, which could lead to improved drought tolerance in wheat. The interaction of signals conferring stress tolerance in accomplishing better crop growth and yield is a priority area of research. Here we report some anatomical, physiological and biochemical changes induced by Hydrogen peroxide during seed treatment and their involvement in conferring drought tolerance upon wheat. Materials and Methods A field study was conducted out at the research farm of agricultural collage of Ilam university during 2014-2015 cropping season. This study was aimed to investigate the priming seed with hydrogen peroxide on two wheat genotypes (Cross Sabalan (bread wheat and Saji (durum wheat, under dryland farming system condition. Experimental design was factorial, arranged in randomized complete block, with three replications. Two main factors were wheat genotypes and four soaking treatments of seeds with different concentration (zero, 25, 50 and 80 Mm of Hydrogen Peroxide. Seeds of each genotype were sown at 6 rows of 3 m length with lines space of 20 cm in depth 5 cm. At heading stage physiological traits were measured on selected leaves and then samples were taken to determine leaf area, Leaf rolling, number and length of Stomata on the epidermis, RWC, electrolyte leakage, photosynthetic pigments concentrations (Chla, b and carotenoid and antioxidant enzyme contents (catalase, ascorbate

  5. The costs and cost-effectiveness of an integrated sepsis treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmor, Daniel; Greenberg, Dan; Howell, Michael D; Lisbon, Alan; Novack, Victor; Shapiro, Nathan

    2008-04-01

    Sepsis is associated with high mortality and treatment costs. International guidelines recommend the implementation of integrated sepsis protocols; however, the true cost and cost-effectiveness of these are unknown. To assess the cost-effectiveness of an integrated sepsis protocol, as compared with conventional care. Prospective cohort study of consecutive patients presenting with septic shock and enrolled in the institution's integrated sepsis protocol. Clinical and economic outcomes were compared with a historical control cohort. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Overall, 79 patients presenting to the emergency department with septic shock in the treatment cohort and 51 patients in the control group. An integrated sepsis treatment protocol incorporating empirical antibiotics, early goal-directed therapy, intensive insulin therapy, lung-protective ventilation, and consideration for drotrecogin alfa and steroid therapy. In-hospital treatment costs were collected using the hospital's detailed accounting system. The cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from the perspective of the healthcare system using a lifetime horizon. The primary end point for the cost-effectiveness analysis was the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year gained. Mortality in the treatment group was 20.3% vs. 29.4% in the control group (p = .23). Implementing an integrated sepsis protocol resulted in a mean increase in cost of approximately $8,800 per patient, largely driven by increased intensive care unit length of stay. Life expectancy and quality-adjusted life years were higher in the treatment group; 0.78 and 0.54, respectively. The protocol was associated with an incremental cost of $11,274 per life-year saved and a cost of $16,309 per quality-adjusted life year gained. In patients with septic shock, an integrated sepsis protocol, although not cost-saving, appears to be cost-effective and compares very favorably to other commonly delivered acute care interventions.

  6. Costs and cost-effectiveness of malaria control interventions - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control and elimination of malaria requires expanded coverage of and access to effective malaria control interventions such as insecticide-treated nets (ITNs, indoor residual spraying (IRS, intermittent preventive treatment (IPT, diagnostic testing and appropriate treatment. Decisions on how to scale up the coverage of these interventions need to be based on evidence of programme effectiveness, equity and cost-effectiveness. Methods A systematic review of the published literature on the costs and cost-effectiveness of malaria interventions was undertaken. All costs and cost-effectiveness ratios were inflated to 2009 USD to allow comparison of the costs and benefits of several different interventions through various delivery channels, across different geographical regions and from varying costing perspectives. Results Fifty-five studies of the costs and forty three studies of the cost-effectiveness of malaria interventions were identified, 78% of which were undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa, 18% in Asia and 4% in South America. The median financial cost of protecting one person for one year was $2.20 (range $0.88-$9.54 for ITNs, $6.70 (range $2.22-$12.85 for IRS, $0.60 (range $0.48-$1.08 for IPT in infants, $4.03 (range $1.25-$11.80 for IPT in children, and $2.06 (range $0.47-$3.36 for IPT in pregnant women. The median financial cost of diagnosing a case of malaria was $4.32 (range $0.34-$9.34. The median financial cost of treating an episode of uncomplicated malaria was $5.84 (range $2.36-$23.65 and the median financial cost of treating an episode of severe malaria was $30.26 (range $15.64-$137.87. Economies of scale were observed in the implementation of ITNs, IRS and IPT, with lower unit costs reported in studies with larger numbers of beneficiaries. From a provider perspective, the median incremental cost effectiveness ratio per disability adjusted life year averted was $27 (range $8.15-$110 for ITNs, $143 (range $135

  7. Cost and cost-effectiveness of conventional and liquid-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. The unit of effectiveness was defined as the number of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN) II or higher lesions detected. Costs were assessed retrospectively for the financial year (2010/11) from a laboratory service provider perspective. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed by combining secondary data ...

  8. At What Cost? Examining the Cost Effectiveness of a Universal Social-Emotional Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Leah J.; DiPerna, James C.; Hart, Susan Crandall; Crowley, Max

    2018-01-01

    Although implementation of universal social-emotional learning programs is becoming more common in schools, few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of such programs. As such, the purpose of this article is two fold. First, we provide an overview of cost-effectiveness methods for school-based programs, and second, we share results of a…

  9. Optical cascaded Fabry-Perot interferometer hydrogen sensor based on vernier effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yina; Zhao, Chunliu; Xu, Ben; Wang, Dongning; Yang, Minghong

    2018-05-01

    An optical cascaded Fabry-Perot interferometer hydrogen sensor based on vernier effect has been proposed and achieved. The proposed sensor, which total length is ∼594 μm, is composed of a segment of large mode area fiber (LMAF) and a segment of hollow-core fiber (HCF). The proposed sensor is coated with the Pt-loaded WO3/SiO2 powder which will result in the increase of local temperature of the sensor head when exposed to hydrogen atmosphere. Thus the hydrogen sensor can be achieved by monitoring the change of resonant envelope wavelength. The hydrogen sensitivity is -1.04 nm/% within the range of 0 % -2.4 % which is greatly improved because of the vernier effect. The response time is ∼80 s. Due to its compact configuration, the proposed sensor provides a feasible and miniature structure to achieve detection of hydrogen.

  10. Effect of high pressure hydrogen on the mechanical characteristics of single carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Koo; Kwon, Oh Heon; Jang, Hoon-Sik; Ryu, Kwon Sang; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2018-02-01

    In this study, carbon fiber was exposed to a pressure of 7 MPa for 24 h in high pressure chamber. The tensile test for carbon fiber was conducted to estimate the effect on the high pressure hydrogen in the atmosphere. To determine the tensile strength and Weibull modulus, approximately thirty carbon fiber samples were measured in all cases, and carbon fiber exposed to high pressure argon was evaluated to verify only the effect of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon fiber samples were annealed at 1950 °C for 1 h for a comparison with normal carbon fiber and then tested under identical conditions. The results showed that the tensile strength scatter of normal carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was relatively wider and the Weibull modulus was decreased. Moreover, the tensile strength of the annealed carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was increased, and these samples indicated a complex Weibull modulus because the hydrogen stored in the carbon fiber influenced the mechanical characteristic.

  11. Effect of hydrogen on Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the physical and mechanical properties of the metastable β alloy Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al was examined. This study had three main goals. The first was to improve the understanding of the effects of hydrogen in the β phase. The second goal was to determine the effects of hydrogen on the specific alloy Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al. The third goal was to identify possible in-service problems that could occur in Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and in similar alloys. The effects of hydrogen were examined in three different microstructures: beta-annealed and water-quenched (B/WQ), beta-annealed and furnace cooled (B/FC), and solution treated and aged (STA). The B/WQ microstructure was nominally all-β with some athermal omega phase while the B/FC and STA microstructures were α + β microstructures. Hydrogen concentrations from approx.0 to >30 at.% were used. Hydrogen was introduced into test specimens using either Sieverts charging or cathodic charging techniques. When the B/WQ microstructure was deformed, the β phase was transformed to orthorhombic α'' martensite. Hydrogen effects in the B/FC and STA microstructures were largely the result of hydride formation at α/β interfaces. The effect of hydride formation was observed as decreases in the reduction of area for tensile specimens

  12. Texture-geometric deformational effects in some metal-hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spivak, L.V.; Kats, M.Ya.

    1992-01-01

    Possible deformation effects were studied in vanadium, tantalum, niobium, palladium and iron which occurred during electrolytic hydrogenation of specimens preliminarily deformed by torsion and then annealed. Noticeable texture-geometric effects were observed and related to the system tendency to enhance the degree of specimen form symmetry during hydrogenation. The latter was an off-beat realization of Le-Chatelier principle. It was assumed that the nature of deformation effects was connected with one of minimization channels for overall elastic stress fields in metals being hydrogenated. Some distinction was revealed in behaviour of 5a group metal, palladium and iron

  13. Statin cost effectiveness in primary prevention: A systematic review of the recent cost-effectiveness literature in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Aaron P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature on the cost-effectiveness of statin drugs in primary prevention of coronary heart disease is complex. The objective of this study is to compare the disparate results of recent cost-effectiveness analyses of statins. Findings We conducted a systematic review of the literature on statin cost-effectiveness. The four studies that met inclusion criteria reported varying conclusions about the cost-effectiveness of statin treatment, without a clear consensus as to whether statins are cost-effective for primary prevention. However, after accounting for each study’s assumptions about statin costs, we found substantial agreement among the studies. Studies that assumed statins to be more expensive found them to be less cost-effective, and vice-versa. Furthermore, treatment of low-risk groups became cost-effective as statins became less expensive. Conclusions Drug price is the primary determinant of statin cost-effectiveness within a given risk group. As more statin drugs become generic, patients at low risk for coronary disease may be treated cost-effectively. Though many factors must be weighed in any medical decision, from a cost-effectiveness perspective, statins may now be considered an appropriate therapy for many patients at low risk for heart disease.

  14. Effects of hydrogenation on magnetism of UNiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamska, A.M., E-mail: anna@mag.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30 059 Cracow (Poland); Havela, L. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Prochazka, J. [Faculty of Sports and Physical Education, Charles University, Jose Martiho 31, 16252, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Andreev, A.V. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Skourski, Y. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    U-based intermetallic compound UNiGe absorbs hydrogen up to the stoichiometry UNiGeH{sub 1.2}. In analogy to other compounds with the TiNiSi-type of structure, the structure is modified into hexagonal. The zig-zag U-chains are stretched, the U-U spacing is largely enhanced and the ordering temperature increases up to 100 K. The ordered state has a spontaneous moment, but it is unlikely to be a simple ferromagnet. - Highlights: > UNiGe exhibits a variety of magnetic properties. > Hydrogenation modifies the crystal, electronic structure, and the magnetic properties. > Upon hydrogenation, the crystal symmetry of UNiGe increases from orthorhombic to hexagonal. > Magnetic ordering temperature of UNiGe (T{sub N}=44 K) is double in the hydride, possible second phase transition.

  15. Cost effectiveness methodology for evaluating Korean international communication system alternatives.

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Tae Kyun.

    1987-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. Cost and Effectiveness models are developed by using of cost-effectiveness technique for fiber optic cable and satellite communication media. The models are applied to the Korean international communication problem. Alternative selection is required since the two medias different in cost and effectiveness. The major difficulties encountered were data gathering and measuring the effectiveness of the Korean international ...

  16. Effects of hydrogen on carbon steels at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    Concern has been expressed that hydrogen produced by corrosion, radiolysis, and decomposition of the waste could cause embrittlement of the carbon steel waste tanks at Hanford. The concern centers on the supposition that the hydrogen evolved in many of the existing tanks might penetrate the steel wall of the tank and cause embrittlement that might lead to catastrophic failure. This document reviews literature on the effects of hydrogen on the carbon steel proposed for use in the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility for the time periods before and during construction as well as for the operational life of the tanks. The document draws several conclusions about these effects. Molecular hydrogen is not a concern because it is not capable of entering the steel tank wall. Nascent hydrogen produced by corrosion reactions will not embrittle the steel because the mild steel used in tank construction is not hard enough to be susceptible to hydrogen stress cracking and the corrosion product hydrogen is not produced at a rate sufficient to cause either loss in tensile ductility or blistering. If the steel intended for use in the tanks is produced to current technology, fabricated in accordance with good construction practice, postweld heat treated, and operated within the operating limits defined, hydrogen will not adversely affect the carbon steel tanks during their 50-year design life. 26 refs

  17. Global cost-effectiveness of GDM screening and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Louise K K; Kahn, James G; Marseille, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    a systematic search and abstraction of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility studies from 2002 to 2014. We standardized all findings to 2014 US dollars. We found that cost-effectiveness ratios varied widely. Most variation was found to be due to differences in geographic setting, diagnostic criteria...... and intervention approaches, and outcomes (e.g., inclusion or exclusion of long-term type 2 diabetes risk and associated costs). We concluded that incorporation of long-term benefits of GDM screening and treatment has huge impact on cost-effectiveness estimates. Based on the large methodological heterogeneity...

  18. Low-Cost, Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Gas Detector Using Guided-Wave, Surface-Plasmon Resonance in Chemochromic Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Haberman, D.P.; Hishmeh, G.A.; Ciszek, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel-cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the end of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic material, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemochromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal

  19. Effect of ramp-cavity on hydrogen fueled scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.V.S. Moorthy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained combustion and optimization of combustor are the two challenges being faced by combustion scientists working in the area of supersonic combustion. Thorough mixing, lower stagnation pressure losses, positive thrust and sustained combustion are the key issues in the field of supersonic combustion. Special fluid mechanism is required to achieve good mixing. To induce such mechanisms in supersonic inflows, the fuel injectors should be critically shaped incurring less flow losses. Present investigations are focused on the effect of fuel injection scheme on a model scramjet combustor performance. Ramps at supersonic flow generate axial vortices that help in macro-mixing of fuel with air. Interaction of shocks generated by ramps with the fuel stream generates boro-clinic torque at the air & liquid fuel interface, enhancing micro-mixing. Recirculation zones present in cavities increase the residence time of the combustible mixture. Making use of the advantageous features of both, a ramp-cavity combustor is designed. The combustor has two sections. First, constant height section consists of a backward facing step followed by ramps and cavities on both the top and bottom walls. The ramps are located alternately on top and bottom walls. The complete combustor width is utilized for the cavities. The second section of the combustor is diverging area section. This is provided to avoid thermal choking. In the present work gaseous hydrogen is considered as fuel. This study was mainly focused on the mixing characteristics of four different fuel injection locations. It was found that injecting fuel upstream of the ramp was beneficial from fuel spread point of view.

  20. Hydrogen energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morovic, T.; Pilhar, R.; Witt, B.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of different energy systems from the economic point of view has to be based on data showing all relevant costs incurred and benefits drawn by the society from the use of such energy systems, i.e. internal costs and benefits visible to the energy consumer as prices paid for power supplied, as well as external costs and benefits. External costs or benefits of energy systems cover among other items employment or wage standard effects, energy-induced environmental impacts, public expenditure for pollution abatement and mitigation of risks and effects of accidents, and the user costs connected with the exploitation of reserves, which are not rated high enough to really reflect and demonstrate the factor of depletion of non-renewable energy sources, as e.g. fossil reserves. Damage to the natural and social environment induced by anthropogenous air pollutants up to about 90% counts among external costs of energy conversion and utilisation. Such damage is considered to be the main factor of external energy costs, while the external benefits of energy systems currently are rated to be relatively unsignificant. This means that an internalisation of external costs would drive up current prices of non-renewable energy sources, which in turn would boost up the economics of renewable energy sources, and the hydrogen produced with their energy. Other advantages attributed to most of the renewable energy sources and to hydrogen energy systems are better environmental compatibility, and no user costs. (orig.) [de

  1. Costs and cost-effectiveness of pediatric inguinal hernia repair in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeson, Gareth; Birabwa-Male, Doreen; Pennington, Mark; Blair, Geoffrey K

    2015-02-01

    Surgically treatable diseases contribute approximately 11% of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) worldwide yet they remain a neglected public health priority in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Pediatric inguinal hernia is the most common congenital abnormality in newborns and a major cause of morbidity and mortality yet elective repair remains largely unavailable in LMICs. This study is aimed to determine the costs and cost-effectiveness of pediatric inguinal hernia repair (PIHR) in a low-resource setting. Medical costs of consecutive elective PIHRs were recorded prospectively at two centers in Uganda. Decision modeling was used to compare two different treatment scenarios (adoption of PIHR and non-adoption) from a provider perspective. A Markov model was constructed to estimate health outcomes under each scenario. The robustness of the cost-effectiveness results in the base case analysis was tested in one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The primary outcome of interest was cost per DALY averted by the intervention. Sixty-nine PIHRs were performed in 65 children (mean age 3.6 years). Mean cost per procedure was $86.68 US (95% CI 83.1-90.2 USD) and averted an average of 5.7 DALYs each. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $12.41 per DALY averted. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 95% at a cost-effectiveness threshold of $35 per averted DALY. Results were robust to sensitivity analysis under all considered scenarios. Elective PIHR is highly cost-effective for the treatment and prevention of complications of hernia disease even in low-resource settings. PIHR should be prioritized in LMICs alongside other cost-effective interventions.

  2. A review on cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Jansen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several psychosocial care interventions have been found effective in improving psychosocial outcomes in cancer patients. At present, there is increasingly being asked for information on the value for money of this type of intervention. This review therefore evaluates current evidence from studies investigating cost-effectiveness or cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science yielding 539 unique records, of which 11 studies were included in the study. Studies were mainly performed in breast cancer populations or mixed cancer populations. Studied interventions included collaborative care (four studies, group interventions (four studies, individual psychological support (two studies, and individual psycho-education (one study. Seven studies assessed the cost-utility of psychosocial care (based on quality-adjusted-life-years while three studies investigated its cost-effectiveness (based on profile of mood states [mood], Revised Impact of Events Scale [distress], 12-Item Health Survey [mental health], or Fear of Progression Questionnaire [fear of cancer progression]. One study did both. Costs included were intervention costs (three studies, intervention and direct medical costs (five studies, or intervention, direct medical, and direct nonmedical costs (three studies. In general, results indicated that psychosocial care is likely to be cost-effective at different, potentially acceptable, willingness-to-pay thresholds. Further research should be performed to provide more clear information as to which psychosocial care interventions are most cost-effective and for whom. In addition, more research should be performed encompassing potential important cost drivers from a societal perspective, such as productivity losses or informal care costs, in the analyses.

  3. Measuring the distribution of equity in terms of energy, environmental, and economic costs in the fuel cycles of alternative fuel vehicles with hydrogen pathway scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Patrick E.

    Numerous analyses exist which examine the energy, environmental, and economic tradeoffs between conventional gasoline vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles powered by hydrogen produced from a variety of sources. These analyses are commonly referred to as "E3" analyses because of their inclusion of Energy, Environmental, and Economic indicators. Recent research as sought a means to incorporate social Equity into E3 analyses, thus producing an "E4" analysis. However, E4 analyses in the realm of energy policy are uncommon, and in the realm of alternative transportation fuels, E4 analyses are extremely rare. This dissertation discusses the creation of a novel E4 simulation tool usable to weigh energy, environmental, economic, and equity trade-offs between conventional gasoline vehicles and alternative fuel vehicles, with specific application to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The model, dubbed the F uel Life-cycle Analysis of Solar Hydrogen -- Energy, Environment, Economic & Equity model, or FLASH-E4, is a total fuel-cycle model that combines energy, environmental, and economic analysis methodologies with the addition of an equity analysis component. The model is capable of providing results regarding total fuel-cycle energy consumption, emissions production, energy and environmental cost, and level of social equity within a population in which low-income drivers use CGV technology and high-income drivers use a number of advanced hydrogen FCV technologies. Using theories of equity and social indicators conceptually embodied in the Lorenz Curve and Gini Index, the equity of the distribution of societal energy and environmental costs are measured for a population in which some drivers use CGVs and other drivers use FCVs. It is found, based on baseline input data representative of the United States (US), that the distribution of energy and environmental costs in a population in which some drivers use CGVs and other drivers use natural gas-based hydrogen FCVs can be

  4. Modelling of the hydrogen effects on the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulin, Q.

    2006-01-01

    results. However, these results were obtained without taking into account the presence of atomic hydrogen in the plasma. A thorough study of the effect of atomic hydrogen on the metastable structures produced in simulation is thus carried out. The study of the interaction of atomic hydrogen on the surface of the cluster gives the possibility of finding the proportion of mechanisms (Eley-Rideal hydrogen desorption, hot atom mechanism or absorption on the surface of the cluster) in agreement with experiments on recombination on silicon surfaces. The interaction of atomic hydrogen with the surface of the clusters also induces a modification of the internal organization of the silicon atoms. The organization of the internal silicon atoms of the clusters as a function of cluster size (magic number) makes it possible to understand why the experimental observations indicate the presence of crystalline structures. Finally this study leads to the prediction of a particularly stable structure which could be used as precursor for the growth of silicon nano-wires. (author)

  5. Cost-of-illness studies and cost-effectiveness analyses in anxiety disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnopka, Alexander; Leichsenring, Falk; Leibing, Eric; König, Hans-Helmut

    2009-04-01

    To review cost-of-illness studies (COI) and cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) conducted for anxiety disorders. Based on a database search in Pubmed, PsychINFO and NHS EED, studies were classified according to various criteria. Cost data were inflated and converted to 2005 US-$ purchasing power parities (PPP). We finally identified 20 COI and 11 CEA of which most concentrated on panic disorder (PD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Differing inclusion of cost categories limited comparability of COI. PD and GAD tended to show higher direct costs per case, but lower direct cost per inhabitant than social and specific phobias. Different measures of effectiveness severely limited comparability of CEA. Overall CEA analysed 26 therapeutic or interventional strategies mostly compared to standard treatment, 8 of them resulting in lower better effectiveness and costs than the comparator. Anxiety disorders cause considerable costs. More research on phobias, more standardised inclusion of cost categories in COI and a wider use of comparable effectiveness measures (like QALYs) in CEA is needed.

  6. Hydrogen-powered road vehicles. Positive and negative health effects of new fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    Because of the political, social and environmental problems associated with dependency on fossil fuels, there is considerable interest in alternative energy sources. Hydrogen is regarded as a promising option, particularly as a fuel for road vehicles. The Dutch Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) recently published a vision of the future, in which it suggested that by 2050 more than half of all cars in the Netherlands could be running on hydrogen. Assuming that the hydrogen is produced from renewable energy sources, migration to hydrogen-powered vehicles would also curb carbon dioxide emissions. In the United States, Japan and Europe, considerable public and private investment is therefore being made with a view to developing the technologies needed to make the creation of a hydrogen-based economy possible within a few decades. A switch to using hydrogen as the primary energy source for road vehicles would have far-reaching social consequences. As with all technological developments, opportunities would be created, but drawbacks would inevitably be encountered as well. Some of the disadvantages associated with hydrogen are already known, and are to some degree manageable. It is likely, however, that other drawbacks would come to light only once hydrogen-powered cars were actually in use With that thought in mind, and in view of the social significance of a possible transition to hydrogen, it was decided that the Health Council should assess the positive and negative effects that hydrogen use could have on public health. It is particularly important to make such an assessment at the present early stage in the development of hydrogen technologies, so that gaps in existing scientific knowledge may be identified and appropriate strategies may be developed for addressing such gaps. This report has been produced by the Health and Environment Surveillance Committee, which has special responsibility for the identification of important correlations between

  7. Effect Of Substrates On The Fractionation Of Hydrogen Isotopes During Lipid-Biosynthesis By Haloarcula marismortui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirghangi, S. S.; Pagani, M.

    2010-12-01

    Lipids form an important class of proxies for paleoclimatological research, and hydrogen isotope ratios of lipids are being increasingly used for understanding changes in the hydrological system. Proper understanding of hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis is therefore important and attention has been directed toward understanding the magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation that occurs during lipid biosynthesis in various organisms. Hydrogen isotope ratios of lipids depend on the hydrogen isotopic composition of the ambient water, hydrogen isotopic composition of NADPH used during biosynthesis, growth conditions, pathways of lipid biosynthesis, and substrates in the case of heterotrophic organisms. Recently it has been observed that NADPH contributes a significant part of the hydrogen in fatty acids synthesized by bacteria during heterotrophic growth (Zhang et al, 2009). As NADPH is formed by reduction of NADP+ during metabolism of substrates, different metabolic pathways form NADPH with different D/H ratios, which in turn results in variation in D/H ratios of lipids (Zhang et al, 2009). Therefore, substrates play a significant role in hydrogen isotopic compositions of lipids. For this study, we are investigating the effects of substrates on hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis of isoprenoidal lipids by heterotrophically growing halophilic archaea. Haloarcula marismortui is a halophilic archaea which synthesizes Archaeol (a diether lipid) and other isoprenoidal lipids. We have grown Haloarcula marismortui in pure cultures on three different substrates and are in the process of evaluating isotopic variability of Archaeol and other lipids associated with substrate and the D/H composition of ambient water. Our results will be helpful for a better understanding of hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid synthesis by archaea. Also, halophilic archaea are the only source of archaeol in hypersaline environments. Therefore, our

  8. Cost effectiveness and efficiency in assistive technology service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, C G

    1993-01-01

    In order to develop and maintain a viable service delivery program, the realities of cost effectiveness and cost efficiency in providing assistive technology must be addressed. Cost effectiveness relates to value of the outcome compared to the expenditures. Cost efficiency analyzes how a provider uses available resources to supply goods and services. This paper describes how basic business principles of benefit/cost analysis can be used to determine cost effectiveness. In addition, basic accounting principles are used to illustrate methods of evaluating a program's cost efficiency. Service providers are encouraged to measure their own program's effectiveness and efficiency (and potential viability) in light of current trends. This paper is meant to serve as a catalyst for continued dialogue on this topic.

  9. Design of cost effective antennas for instrumentation radars

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The cost of antennas for instrumentation radars are determined by the development cost. By re-use of the reflector system cost effective antennas can be designed. The factors governing the design of such antennas are described here....

  10. An Assessment Of The Effectiveness Of Collaborative Cost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the effects of Collaborative Cost Reduction Model (CCRM) as a control Approach to reduce the high cost implication that causes the slow pace of migration process from IPV4 to IPV6 in Nigeria. This study reveals that CCRM can be applied to achieve Cost Reduction in collocation efforts in ...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulin Koksal

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: At a cost per vaccine course of US$31.5 for monovalent and US$38 for pentavalent vaccine, routine RV vaccination could be potentially cost effective and also cost saving in Turkey. National RV vaccinations will play a significant role in preventing RV infections.

  12. Surface effects induced by cathodic hydrogenation in type AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.C.V.

    1984-08-01

    Cathodic hydrogen charging of type AISI 304 stainless steel modified its austenitic structure, giving rise to the formation of two new martensitic phases and the appearance of cracks, in most cases delayed. As electrolyte a 1 N H 2 S O 4 solution containing As 2 O 3 was employed. The cathodic hydrogenation was carries out at room temperature. The transformed phases were identified with black and white and coloured metallographic techniques, as well as by X-ray diffraction. The effect of cathodic hydrogenation in samples uniaxially tensile tested with constant nominal strain rate was investigated. It was concluded that the number of cracks per unit surface area changes with hydrogenation conditions and that hydrogen should be present for the embrittlement to occur. (author)

  13. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  14. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure, mechanical properties and phase transformations in austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.Y.; Xing, Z.S.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of high-pressure hydrogen charging on the microstructure, mechanical properties and phase transformations in austenitic steels has been investigated and discussed. The results show that the strength and impact toughness of the steels increase slightly and that the ductility decreases after hydrogen charging. The existence of δ-ferrite deteriorates the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of the steels. The occurrence of carbide in the steel resulted from aging reduces the ductility of the steel and makes the steel sensitive to HE. The existence of sufficient hydrogen promotes the ε-martensitic transformation and suppresses the α'-martensitic transformation. The permeabilities and diffusivities of hydrogen in the steels have also been determined. (orig.)

  15. Cost of childhood diarrhoea in rural South Africa: exploring cost-effectiveness of universal zinc supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhagan, Meera K; Van den Broeck, Jan; Luabeya, Kany-Kany Angelique; Mpontshane, Nontobeko; Bennish, Michael L

    2014-09-01

    To describe the cost of diarrhoeal illness in children aged 6-24 months in a rural South African community and to determine the threshold prevalence of stunting at which universal Zn plus vitamin A supplementation (VAZ) would be more cost-effective than vitamin A alone (VA) in preventing diarrhoea. We conducted a cost analysis using primary and secondary data sources. Using simulations we examined incremental costs of VAZ relative to VA while varying stunting prevalence. Data on efficacy and societal costs were largely from a South African trial. Secondary data were from local and international published sources. The trial included children aged 6-24 months. The secondary data sources were a South African health economics survey and the WHO-CHOICE (CHOosing Interventions that are Cost Effective) database. In the trial, stunted children supplemented with VAZ had 2·04 episodes (95 % CI 1·37, 3·05) of diarrhoea per child-year compared with 3·92 episodes (95 % CI 3·02, 5·09) in the VA arm. Average cost of illness was $Int 7·80 per episode (10th, 90th centile: $Int 0·28, $Int 15·63), assuming a minimum standard of care (oral rehydration and 14 d of therapeutic Zn). In simulation scenarios universal VAZ had low incremental costs or became cost-saving relative to VA when the prevalence of stunting was close to 20 %. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were sensitive to the cost of intervention and coverage levels. This simulation suggests that universal VAZ would be cost-effective at current levels of stunting in parts of South Africa. This requires further validation under actual programmatic conditions.

  16. Production of hydrogen from renewable resources and its effectiveness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bičáková, Olga; Straka, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 16 (2012), s. 11563-11578 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA105/07/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : hydrogen production * biological processes * conventional methods Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.548, year: 2012

  17. The effect of hydrogen on the parameters of plastic deformation localization in low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunev, Aleksey G., E-mail: agl@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Nadezhkin, Mikhail V., E-mail: agl@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Shlyakhova, Galina V., E-mail: shgv@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and Seversk State Technological Institute (National Research Nuclear University MEPhI), Seversk, 636036 (Russian Federation); Barannikova, Svetlana A., E-mail: bsa@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Zuev, Lev B., E-mail: lbz@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    In the present study, the effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested polycrystals of low-carbon steel Fe-0.07%C has been studied using double exposure speckle photography technique. The main parameters of plastic flow localization at various stages of deformation hardening have been determined in polycrystals of steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen in a three-electrode electrochemical cell at a controlled constant cathode potential. Also, the effect of hydrogen on changing of microstructure by using optical microscopy has been demonstrated.

  18. Roughness effects on the hydrogen signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, W.; Bousquet, B.; Lasue, J.

    2017-01-01

    On Mars, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as performed by the ChemCam instrument can be used to measure the hydrogen content of targets in situ, under a low pressure CO2 atmosphere. However, unexpected variations observed in the Martian dataset suggest an effect related to target...... to hydrogen, as other emission lines in the spectra are not affected. The increase of the signal could be related to an addition of hydrogen to the plasma due to interaction with the surrounding target surface, yet the exact physical process to explain such effect remains to be identified. More generally...

  19. Cost-effectiveness and the socialization of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, P

    1995-01-01

    The more health care is socialized, the more cost-effectiveness is an appropriate criterion for expenditure. Utility-maximizing individuals, facing divisibility of health care purchases and declining marginal health gains, and complete information about probable health improvements, should buy health care according to its cost-effectiveness. Absent these features, individual health spending will not be cost-effective; and in any case, differences in personal utilities and risk aversion will not lead to the same ranking of health care interventions for everyone. Private insurance frees consumers from concern for cost, which undermines cost-effectiveness, but lets them emphasize effectiveness, which favors value for money. This is most important for costly and cost-effective interventions, especially for poor people. Cost-effectiveness is more appropriate and easier to achieve under second-party insurance. More complete socialization of health care, via public finance, can yield greater efficiency by making insurance compulsory. Cost-effectiveness is also more attractive when taxpayers subsidize others' care: needs (effectiveness) take precedence over wants (utility). The gain in effectiveness may be greater, and the welfare loss from Pareto non-optimality smaller, in poor countries than in rich ones.

  20. Effect of hydrogen and oxygen content on the embrittlement of Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griger, A.; Hozer, Z.; Matus, L.; Vasaros, L.; Horvath, M.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study is carried out in the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute in order to clear up the role of oxidation and hydrogen uptake in the embrittlement process. Russian E110 type Zr1%Nb and Zircaloy-4 claddings are used as test materials. The differences between the properties of two alloys are examined. The sample preparation covered the following cases: oxidation in Ar+O 2 atmosphere; hydrogen uptake of as received and pre-oxidised samples (in Ar+O 2 atmosphere); oxidation in steam. The oxidation in Ar+O 2 and the subsequent hydrogen uptake procedure make possible the production of samples with well-characterized hydrogen and oxygen content. Corrosion treated ring samples of 8 mm height are examined in ring compression tests. The force-deformation curves are recorded and the crushing force and deformation are determined. The relative deformation is used for the characterisation of embrittlement level. The results of experiments provide detailed information about the effect of hydrogen and oxygen content on the embrittlement of zirconium alloys. The conclusions are: 1) hydrogen seems to play a more important role in the embrittlement of zirconium alloys than oxygen; 2) the Zircaloy-4 alloy becomes brittle at lower hydrogen content than the Zr1%Nb; 3) under steam oxidation conditions the Zr1%Nb alloy takes up much more hydrogen and becomes more brittle than the Zircaloy-4

  1. High-temperature electrochemical performance of low-cost La–Ni–Fe based hydrogen storage alloys with different preparation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiannan [Department of Advanced Energy Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zhu, Ding [Institute of New Energy and Low-Carbon Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zhou, Wanhai; Zhong, Chenglin; Wu, Chaoling [Department of Advanced Energy Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Chen, Yungui, E-mail: ygchen60@aliyun.com [Department of Advanced Energy Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Institute of New Energy and Low-Carbon Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Effects of four different preparation processes were studied at 20/60 °C. • All NS + HT, RS and RS + HT processes can optimize the thermodynamic performance. • The HT process can provoke the precipitation of A{sub 2}B{sub 7} and leads to a poor cycling life. • Al exhibits the most remarkable dissolution for all the alloys, especially at 60 °C. - Abstract: In order to optimize the microstructure and high temperature electrochemical performances of low-cost AB{sub 5}-type Ml(NiMnAl){sub 4.2}Co{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.5} hydrogen storage electrode alloys, four different preparation methods including normal solidification (NS), normal solidification and 900 °C heat treatment (NS + HT), rapid solidification (RS), rapid solidification and 900 °C heat treatment (RS + HT) were adopted in this work. All alloys exhibit CaCu{sub 5} type hexagonal structure and there is a small amount of A{sub 2}B{sub 7} phase in NS + HT and RS + HT alloys. It is found the using of HT process can decrease the hydrogen equilibrium plateau pressure, the plateau slope and hysteresis at 40, 60 and 80 °C. The NS + HT and RS + HT alloys also possess better activation, high rate discharge performance, larger discharge capacity, but poor cycling performance due to the existence of A{sub 2}B{sub 7} phase which can accelerate dissolution of Ni, Mn and Fe elements in KOH alkaline electrolyte. The RS process can make alloy exhibit the best cycling performance especially at 60 °C.

  2. The effect of costs on the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses the future of the nuclear power industry from an economics and cost-factor point of view, from the point of view of plant management, as it affects and requires personnel training, as R and D cost and competition is involved, as end-user cost is involved, and as efficiency and cost effectiveness of nuclear power fare in comparison with other sources of electrical energy

  3. Long-term effect of inoculum pretreatment on fermentative hydrogen production by repeated batch cultivations: homoacetogenesis and methanogenesis as competitors to hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Xie, Li

    2011-01-01

    Long-term effects of inoculum pretreatments(heat, acid, loading-shock) on hydrogen production from glucose under different temperatures (378C, 558C) and initial pH (7 and 5.5) were studied by repeated batch cultivations. Results obtained showed that it was necessary to investigate the long......-term effect of inoculum pretreatment on hydrogen production since pretreatments may just temporarily inhibit the hydrogen consuming processes. After long-term cultivation, pretreated inocula did not enhance hydrogen production compared to untreated inocula under mesophilic conditions (initial pH 7 and pH 5.......5) and thermophilic conditions (initial pH 7). However, pretreatment could inhibit lactate production and lead to higher hydrogen yield under thermophilic conditions at initial pH 5.5. The results further demonstrated that inoculum pretreatment could not permanently inhibit either methanogenesis or homoacetogenesis...

  4. The Kyoto Protocol Is Cost-effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Gatto

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances, there is a high degree of uncertainty concerning the climate change that would result from increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Also, opponents of the Kyoto Protocol raised the key objection that reducing emissions would impose an unacceptable economic burden on businesses and consumers. Based on an analysis of alternative scenarios for electricity generation in Italy, we show that if the costs in terms of damage to human health, material goods, agriculture, and the environment caused by greenhouse gas emissions are included in the balance, the economic argument against Kyoto is untenable. Most importantly, the argument holds true even if we exclude global external costs (those due to global warming, and account for local external costs only (such as those due to acidic precipitation and lung diseases resulting from air pollution.

  5. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Surf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The origin and basic principles of the dilute chemical decontamination (DCD) concept are described and illustrated by reference to the CAN-DECON process. The estimated dose savings from the actual application of the process at several reactors are presented and discussed. Two methods of performing a cost/benefit appraisal are described and discussed. This methodology requires more study by the nuclear industry, including collection by station staff of relevant data on which future cost/benefit appraisals may be based. Finally, three illustrative cases are examinated to show the breakeven point and potential savings achievable by DCD with different initial radiation fields and different amounts of work to be done. The overall conclusion is that there are many situations in which DCD is desirable to reduce radiation exposure of workers, to save costs to the station, and to ease the performance of maintenance and repair work on reactor systems

  6. Hydrogen effects in nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steels; Wirkung von Wasserstoff in stickstofflegierten austenitischen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, M.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Shehata, M.F. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen increases the yield strength of nitrogen-alloyed steels, but on the other hand adversely affects properties such as tensile strength and elongation to fracture. The effect is enhanced with increasing nitrogen and hydrogen contents. Under the effect of hydrogen addition, the discontinuous stress-strain characteristic and the distinct elongation limit of hydrogen-free, nitrogen containing steels is no longer observed in the material. This change of mechanical properties is attributed to an interatomic interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the lattice, which is shown for instance by such effects as reduction of hydrogen velocity, high solubility, and a particularly strong lattice expansion. The nature of this interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the fcc lattice remains to be identified. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Wasserstoff fuehrt in stickstofflegierten Staehlen zu einer Erhoehung der Streckgrenze, aber gleichzeitig zu einer Abnahme der Zugfestigkeit und Bruchdehnung. Dieser Effekt verstaerkt sich mit zunehmenden Stickstoff- und Wasserstoffgehalten. Ein diskontinuierlicher Spannungs-Dehnungsverlauf mit einer ausgepraegten Streckgrenze in wasserstofffreien hochstickstoffhaltigen Staehlen wird nach Wasserstoffeinfluss nicht mehr beobachtet. Die Aenderung der mechanischen Eigenschaften, wird auf eine interatomare Wechselwirkung von Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im Gitter zurueckgefuehrt, die sich u.a. in geringer Wasserstoffdiffusionsgeschwindigkeit, hoher Loeslichkeit und vor allem in extremer Gitteraufweitung aeussert. Insgesamt ist die Natur der Wechselwirkung zwischen Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im kfz Gitter noch nicht aufgeklaert. (orig.)

  7. Effect of hydrogen on the behavior of metals II - Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium alloy TV13CA - effect of oxygen - comparison with non-alloyed titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arditty, Jean-Pierre

    1973-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on the hydrogen embrittlement of non-alloyed titanium and the metastable β titanium alloy, TV13 CA, was studied during dynamic mechanical tests, the concentrations considered varying from 1000 to 5000 ppm (oxygen) and from 0 to 5000 ppm (hydrogen) respectively. TV13 CA alloy has a very high solubility for hydrogen. The establishment of a temperature range and a rate of deformation region in which the embrittlement of the alloy is maximum leads to the conclusion that an embrittlement mechanism occurs involving the dragging and accumulation of hydrogen by dislocations. This is the case for all annealings effected in the medium temperature range, which, by favoring the re-establishment of the stable two-phase α + β state of the alloy, produce hardening. The same is true for oxygen which, in addition to hardening the alloy by the solid solution effect, tends to increase its instability and, in consequence, favors the decomposition of the β phase. Nevertheless oxygen concentrations of up to 1500 ppm contribute to increasing the mechanical resistance without catastrophically reducing the deformation capacity. In the case of non-alloyed titanium, the hardening effect also leads to an increase in E 0.2p c and R, and to a reduction in the deformation capacity. Nevertheless, hydrogen is only very slightly soluble at room temperature and a distribution of the hydride phase linked to the thermal history of the sample predominates. Thus a fine acicular structure obtained from the β phase by quenching, enables an alloy having a good mechanical resistance to be conserved even when large quantities of hydrogen are present; the deformation capacity remains small. On the other hand, when the hydride phase separates the metallic phase into large grains, a very small elongation leads to a breakdown in mechanical resistance. (author) [fr

  8. Concept and cost of a pipeline system to supply hydrogen to fuel cell cars in Germany; Konzept und Kosten eines Pipelinesystems zur Versorgung des deutschen Strassenverkehrs mit Wasserstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, Dennis

    2012-11-01

    Fuel cells and hydrogen have the potential to be essential contributors for meeting the challenges of the future traffic sector. The key challenges include: - reducing global and local emissions - reducing import dependencies - preserving Germany's competitiveness - ensuring sufficient availability of the energy carrier Hydrogen is assumed to be the most appropriate energy carrier, since it can be produced via any primary energy and in terms of security is comparable to natural gas. In the long run, renewable energy, e.g. via wind power electrolysis, will make emission-free driving feasible. In order to use hydrogen to fuel cars, a comprehensive distribution infrastructure is required. This is completely different than the case of conventional fuels such as gasoline or diesel. Large amounts of hydrogen can be transported in a gaseous state in pipelines, as is common practice for natural gas. This option has not been examined to date. In particular, at the moment no suitable material has been identified for transporting hydrogen, which degrades the stability of the pipe. The aim of this thesis was to design a technical concept for a pipeline system that would make it possible to supply hydrogen to fuel cell cars. Using the assumptions of the study GermanHy, crucial technical questions were investigated. These questions comprise aspects such as general material requirements, feed-in, transportation and feed-out of the hydrogen. With respect to the material challenges, different potential possibilities are provided in order to ensure that no embrittlement will occur. Taking Germany as an example, the design and length of the pipeline system were investigated as well as the related economic and ecological aspects. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted in order to calculate the probability density of both the investment and the specific cost. These results were placed in the overall context by calculating the economic impact of production, storage and fuelling stations

  9. Concept and cost of a pipeline system to supply hydrogen to fuel cell cars in Germany; Konzept und Kosten eines Pipelinesystems zur Versorgung des deutschen Strassenverkehrs mit Wasserstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, Dennis

    2012-11-01

    Fuel cells and hydrogen have the potential to be essential contributors for meeting the challenges of the future traffic sector. The key challenges include: - reducing global and local emissions - reducing import dependencies - preserving Germany's competitiveness - ensuring sufficient availability of the energy carrier Hydrogen is assumed to be the most appropriate energy carrier, since it can be produced via any primary energy and in terms of security is comparable to natural gas. In the long run, renewable energy, e.g. via wind power electrolysis, will make emission-free driving feasible. In order to use hydrogen to fuel cars, a comprehensive distribution infrastructure is required. This is completely different than the case of conventional fuels such as gasoline or diesel. Large amounts of hydrogen can be transported in a gaseous state in pipelines, as is common practice for natural gas. This option has not been examined to date. In particular, at the moment no suitable material has been identified for transporting hydrogen, which degrades the stability of the pipe. The aim of this thesis was to design a technical concept for a pipeline system that would make it possible to supply hydrogen to fuel cell cars. Using the assumptions of the study GermanHy, crucial technical questions were investigated. These questions comprise aspects such as general material requirements, feed-in, transportation and feed-out of the hydrogen. With respect to the material challenges, different potential possibilities are provided in order to ensure that no embrittlement will occur. Taking Germany as an example, the design and length of the pipeline system were investigated as well as the related economic and ecological aspects. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted in order to calculate the probability density of both the investment and the specific cost. These results were placed in the overall context by calculating the economic impact of production, storage and fuelling

  10. [Cost effectiveness in treatment of acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, P; Schaffner, A; Dazzi, H

    2000-12-23

    Although the rise in health costs is a widely debated issue, in Switzerland it was until recently taken for granted that patients are given the best available treatment regardless of cost. An example of a disease requiring costly treatment is acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML). To relate cost to benefit we calculated expenditure per life years gained. To assess costs we determined the real cost of treatment up to total remission, followed by consolidation or withdrawal of treatment or death. For survival time exceeding the 2-year observation period we used data from recent literature. The average cost of treatment ranges up to 107,592 Swiss francs (CHF). In 1997 we treated 23 leukaemia patients at Zurich University Hospital and gained a total of 210 life years. This represents an average cost of CHF 11,741 per life year gained. Chief cost items were therapy and personnel costs for nursing staff, followed by hotel business and personnel costs for doctors and diagnosis. Our results for AML treatment are far removed from the $61,500 ranging up to $166,000 discussed in the literature as the "critical" QALY (quality adjusted life years) value. This is the first time the actual costs of AML therapy have been shown for a Swiss cohort. Despite high initial treatment costs and success only in a limited number of patients, the expenditure per QALY is surprisingly low and shows clearly the effectiveness of apparently costly acute medicine.

  11. Cost-effectiveness, feed utilization and body composition of african ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost-effectiveness, feed utilization and body composition of african sharptooth catfish ( Clarias gariepinus , Burchell 1822) fingerlings fed locally formulated and commercial pelleted diets in tarpaulin tanks.

  12. On the ways of improving mechanical properties of boiler steels subject to hydrogen effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.I.; Litvin, A.K.; Zvezdin, Yu.I.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on the strength properties of boiler steels Kh15M2 and 48TS subjected to heat treatment and preliminary plastic deformation has been studied. It is shown that changes in the strength properties of the steel are determined by the heterogeneity of its structure. Treatment which contributes to homogenization of the metal structure increases the resistance of the steel to detrimental effect of hydrogen. Absorption of hydrogen during cathode polarization at various current densities is shown

  13. The relationship between cost system complexity, purposes of use, and cost system effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoute, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses survey data from 133 Dutch, medium-sized manufacturing firms to examine the associations between cost system complexity (in terms of the applied overhead absorption procedures), purposes of use, and cost system effectiveness. First, factor analysis identifies two underlying

  14. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  15. Atomoxetine's Effect on Societal Costs in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myren, Karl-Johan; Thernlund, Gunilla; Nylen, Asa; Schacht, Alexander; Svanborg, Par

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare societal costs between patients treated with atomoxetine and placebo in Sweden. Method: Ninety-nine pediatric ADHD patients were randomized to a 10-week double-blind treatment with atomoxetine (n = 49) or placebo (n = 50). All parents received four sessions of psycho-education. Parents filled out a resource utilization…

  16. Cost, production and effectiveness of masticated fireline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth Dodson; Dana Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Fire managers are continuously looking for improved methods to construct fireline with minimal resource damage. One option for fireline construction that has so far received limited attention is the use of mastication equipment. This study evaluated a masticating disk mounted on a self-leveling feller- buncher for the cost, speed, and adherence to fireline...

  17. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    The basic principles of dilute chemical decontamination are described, as well as the method of application. Methods of computing savings in radiation dose and costs are presented, with results from actual experience and illustrative examples. It is concluded that dilute chemical decontamination is beneficial in many cases. It reduces radiation exposure of workers, saves money, and simplifies maintenance work

  18. FY 2005 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-10-01

    In cooperation with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies, the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program is advancing the state of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in support of the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The initiative seeks to develop hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies needed to make it practical and cost-effective for Americans to choose to use fuel cell vehicles by 2020. Significant progress was made in fiscal year 2005 toward that goal.

  19. High levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas: effects on enamel and pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, George; Zaidel, Lynette; Lin, Nora; Stranick, Michael; Bagley, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Limited data are available to assess the safety of high levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness, pulp penetration, and enamel morphology. Colgate Platinum Professional Overnight Whitening System (Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Canton, MA, USA) (10% carbamide peroxide, equivalent to 3.5% hydrogen peroxide) was compared with two prototype formulations containing either 7.0% or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide. In the pulp chamber studies, human extracted teeth were exposed to 3.5%, 7.0%, or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide for 30 minutes, 4 hours, or 7 hours. Microhardness, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and atomic force microscopy evaluations were made from enamel blocks cut from human extracted molars. The enamel blocks were evaluated following 14 7-hour treatments (98 h total). At 7 hours' post-treatment, hydrogen peroxide penetrated the pulp chamber at 23.12 +/- 10.09, 24.58 +/- 6.90, and 26.39 +/- 5.43 microg for 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% hydrogen peroxide, respectively. With regard to enamel morphology, pulp penetration, microhardness, and elemental composition, no statistically significant differences were observed between treatment groups following 98 hours of treatment. Hydrogen peroxide does not adversely affect enamel morphology or microhardness. The levels recovered in pulp indicate that hydrogen peroxide is not expected to inhibit pulpal enzymes. Overnight tray products containing levels of hydrogen peroxide of 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% are not expected to adversely affect the enamel or pulpal enzymes. Additional safety studies are needed to assess the potential for tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation.

  20. A cohesive zone model to simulate the hydrogen embrittlement effect on a high-strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gobbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to model the fracture mechanical behavior of a high-strength low carbon steel, AISI 4130 operating in hydrogen contaminated environment. The study deals with the development of 2D finite element cohesive zone model (CZM reproducing a toughness test. Along the symmetry plane over the crack path of a C(T specimen a zero thickness layer of cohesive elements are implemented in order to simulate the crack propagation. The main feature of this kind of model is the definition of a traction-separation law (TSL that reproduces the constitutive response of the material inside to the cohesive elements. Starting from a TSL calibrated on hydrogen non-contaminated material, the embrittlement effect is simulated by reducing the cohesive energy according to the total hydrogen content including the lattice sites (NILS and the trapped amount. In this perspective, the proposed model consists of three steps of simulations. First step evaluates the hydrostatic pressure. It drives the initial hydrogen concentration assigned in the second step, a mass diffusion analysis, defining in this way the contribution of hydrogen moving across the interstitial lattice sites. The final stress analysis, allows getting the total hydrogen content, including the trapped amount, and evaluating the new crack initiation and propagation due to the hydrogen presence. The model is implemented in both plane strain and plane stress configurations; results are compared in the discussion. From the analyses, it resulted that hydrogen is located only into lattice sites and not in traps, and that the considered steel experiences a high hydrogen susceptibility. By the proposed procedure, the developed numerical model seems a reliable and quick tool able to estimate the mechanical behavior of steels in presence of hydrogen.

  1. Stress corrosion mechanisms of alloy-600 polycrystals and monocrystals in primary water: effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600 primary water stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, this work is mainly focussed on the two following points. The first one is to understand the influence of hydrogen on SCC of industrial Alloy 600 and the second one is to study the crack initiation and propagation on polycrystals and single crystals. A cathodic potential applied during slow strain rate tests does not affect crack initiation but increases the slow crack growth rate by a factor 2 to 5. Cathodic polarisation, cold work and 25 cm 3 STP/kg hydrogen content increase the slow CGR so that the K ISCC (and therefore fast CGR) is reached. The influence of hydrogenated primary water has been studied for the first time on Alloy 600 single crystals. Cracks cannot initiate on tensile specimens but they can propagate on pre-cracked specimens. Transgranular cracks present a precise crystallographic aspect which is similar to that of 316 alloy in MgCl 2 solutions. Moreover, the following results improve the description of the cracking conditions. Firstly, the higher the hydrogen partial pressure, the lower the Alloy 600 passivation current transients. Since this result is not correlated with the effect of hydrogen on SCC, cracking is not caused by a direct effect of dissolved hydrogen on dissolution. Secondly, hydrogen embrittlement of Alloy 600 disappears at temperatures above 200 deg.C. Thirdly, grain boundary sliding (GBS) does not directly act on SCC but shows the mechanical weakness of grain boundaries. Regarding the proposed models for Alloy 600 SCC, it is possible to draw the following conclusions. Internal oxidation or absorbed hydrogen effects are the most probable mechanisms for initiation. Dissolution, internal oxidation and global hydrogen embrittlement models cannot explain crack propagation. On the other hand, the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model gives a good description of the SCC propagation. (author)

  2. Effect of the oxidation front penetration on in-clad hydrogen migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2018-03-01

    In LWR fuel claddings the embrittlement due to hydrogen precipitates (i.e., hydrides) is a degrading mechanism that concerns in nuclear safety, particularly in dry storage. A relevant factor is the radial distribution of the hydrogen absorbed, especially the hydride rim formed. Thus, a reliable assessment of fuel performance should account for hydrogen migration. Based on the current state of modelling of hydrogen dynamics in the cladding, a 1D radial model has been derived and coupled with the FRAPCON code. The model includes the effect of the oxidation front progression on in-clad hydrogen migration, based on experimental observations found (i.e., dissolution/diffusion/re-precipitation of the hydrogen in the matrix ahead of the oxidation front). A remarkable quantitative impact of this new contribution has been shown by analyzing the hydrogen profile across the cladding of several high burnup fuel scenarios (>60 GW d/tU); other potential contributions like thermodiffusion and diffusion in the hydride phase hardly make any difference. Comparisons against PIE measurements allow concluding that the model accuracy notably increases when the effect of the oxidation front is accounted for in the hydride rim formation. In spite of the promising results, further validation would be needed.

  3. Effect of hydrogen and propylene on the hydrogen peroxide decomposition over Pt, PtO and Au catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kertalli, E.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2017-01-01

    The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on Pt, PtO and Au catalysts has been investigated in the presence of nitrogen, propylene and hydrogen. H2O2 formation on the catalyst is known to be a key intermediate step for the direct synthesis of propylene oxide (PO) from hydrogen, propylene and

  4. Cost effectiveness analysis of indoor radon control measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1989-01-01

    The problem of radon 222 in buildings as a contributor to radiation exposure is described. Five different control methods and the dose reductions that would result from each are analysed. The annualized cost for each control measure was evaluated and the cost effectiveness of each control measure was calculated on the basis of dollars per person-sievert dose reduction. The use of unipolar ion generators for particle removal appears to be the most cost effective and the use of ceiling fans to increase air circulation the least cost effective. 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Preliminary tension effect on low-cycle fatigue of 40Kh13 steel in gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniv, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Comparative bending tests of specimens deformed by tension at 65, 18 and 30% in hydrogen and vacuum were accomplished to reveal the effect of preliminary tension on low-cycle fatigue strength of 40Kh13 martensitic steel. It was found that small amounts of preliminary strains induced a considerable decrease in low-cycle durability in vacuum and hydrogen which was connected with developing defects arising at the early stages of plastic deformation. A rather high degree of preliminary tension promoted steel homogenization, hydrogen embrittlement decrease and service behaviour improvement

  6. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster in gas jet under liquid nitrogen temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jifeng; Yang Chaowen; Miao Jingwei; Fu Pengtao; Luo Xiaobing; Shi Miangong

    2010-01-01

    The generation of hydrogen clusters in gas jet is tested using the Rayleigh scattering method under liquid nitrogen temperature of 79 K. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster is studied and it is found that the cluster formation is greatly affected by the number of expanded molecules. The well designed liquid nitrogen cold trap ensured that the hydrogen cluster would keep maximum size for maximum 15 ms during one gas jet. The scattered light intensity exhibits a power scaling on the backing pressure ranging from 5 to 48 bar with the power value of 4.1.

  7. Modeling of roughness effect on hydrogen permeation in a low carbon steel

    OpenAIRE

    Carreño, J. A.; Uribe, I.; Carrillo, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented to evaluate the effect of the roughness and the profile of concentration of hydrogen in a low carbon steel. The model takes advantage of the Fick's Second Law, to predict the transport of hydrogen in the steel. The problem is treated as a variational one and its space solution is made numerically by means of the Finite Elements Method, while the temporal equation is solved via the Finite Differences Method, in order to determine the concentration profiles of Hydrogen in t...

  8. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  9. Cost-effectiveness of antiplatelet drugs after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisløff, Torbjørn; Atar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel has, for long time, been accepted as the standard treatment for patients who have undergone a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The introduction of prasugrel-and more recently, ticagrelor-has introduced a decision-making problem for clinicians and governments worldwide: to use the cheaper clopidogrel or the more effective, and also more expensive prasugrel or ticagrelor. We aim to give helpful contributions to this debate by analysing the cost-effectiveness of clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor compared with each other. We modified a previously developed Markov model of cardiac disease progression. In the model, we followed up cohorts of patients who have recently had a PCI until 100 years or death. Possible events are revascularization, bleeding, acute myocardial infarction, and death. Our analysis shows that ticagrelor is cost-effective in 77% of simulations at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €7700 compared with clopidogrel. Ticagrelor was also cost-effective against prasugrel at a cost-effectiveness ratio of €7800. Given a Norwegian cost-effectiveness threshold of €70 000, both comparisons appear to be clearly cost-effective in favour of ticagrelor. Ticagrelor is cost-effective compared with both clopidogrel and prasugrel for patients who have undergone a PCI.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of Chlamydia antibody tests in subfertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddelers, A A A; Land, J A; Voss, G; Kessels, A G H; Severens, J L

    2005-02-01

    For the evaluation of tubal function, Chlamydia antibody testing (CAT) has been introduced as a screening test. We compared six CAT screening strategies (five CAT tests and one combination of tests), with respect to their cost-effectiveness, by using IVF pregnancy rate as outcome measure. A decision analytic model was developed based on a source population of 1715 subfertile women. The model incorporates hysterosalpingography (HSG), laparoscopy and IVF. To calculate IVF pregnancy rates, costs, effects, cost-effectiveness and incremental costs per effect of the six different CAT screening strategies were determined. pELISA Medac turned out to be the most cost-effective CAT screening strategy (15 075 per IVF pregnancy), followed by MIF Anilabsystems (15 108). A combination of tests (pELISA Medac and MIF Anilabsystems; 15 127) did not improve the cost-effectiveness of the single strategies. Sensitivity analyses showed that the results are robust for changes in the baseline values of the model parameters. Only small differences were found between the screening strategies regarding the cost-effectiveness, although pELISA Medac was the most cost-effective strategy. Before introducing a particular CAT test into clinical practice, one should consider the effects and consequences of the entire screening strategy, instead of only the diagnostic accuracy of the test used.

  11. Cost effective campaigning in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnis, Bhushan; Kuri, Joy

    2016-05-01

    Campaigners are increasingly using online social networking platforms for promoting products, ideas and information. A popular method of promoting a product or even an idea is incentivizing individuals to evangelize the idea vigorously by providing them with referral rewards in the form of discounts, cash backs, or social recognition. Due to budget constraints on scarce resources such as money and manpower, it may not be possible to provide incentives for the entire population, and hence incentives need to be allocated judiciously to appropriate individuals for ensuring the highest possible outreach size. We aim to do the same by formulating and solving an optimization problem using percolation theory. In particular, we compute the set of individuals that are provided incentives for minimizing the expected cost while ensuring a given outreach size. We also solve the problem of computing the set of individuals to be incentivized for maximizing the outreach size for given cost budget. The optimization problem turns out to be non trivial; it involves quantities that need to be computed by numerically solving a fixed point equation. Our primary contribution is, that for a fairly general cost structure, we show that the optimization problems can be solved by solving a simple linear program. We believe that our approach of using percolation theory to formulate an optimization problem is the first of its kind.

  12. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels; Effets de l'hydrogene sur les caracteristiques de rupture par traction d'aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, R; Pelissier, J; Pluchery, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [French] On etudie les effets de l'hydrogene sur des aciers inoxydables, qui sont des materiaux de gainage possibles pour des reacteurs utilisant l'hydrogene comme gaz de refroidissement. On montre que la charge apparente de rupture a la traction n'est plus que 80 pour cent de sa valeur initiale lorsque la teneur en hydrogene atteint 50 cc TPN/ 100 g, et que la striction passe dans ces conditions de 80 a 55 pour cent. L'examen microfractographique qui a ete effectue avec succes par une technique de double replique malgre la petitesse des echantillons (0,3 mm de diametre environ), revele que tout en gardant un caractere ductile, l'aspect des surfaces de rupture evolue notablement avec la teneur en hydrogene. (auteur)

  13. Can delivery systems use cost-effectiveness analysis to reduce healthcare costs and improve value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Lucy A; Savitz, Samuel T

    2016-01-01

    Understanding costs and ensuring that we demonstrate value in healthcare is a foundational presumption as we transform the way we deliver and pay for healthcare in the U.S. With a focus on population health and payment reforms underway, there is increased pressure to examine cost-effectiveness in healthcare delivery. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is a type of economic analysis comparing the costs and effects (i.e. health outcomes) of two or more treatment options. The result is expressed as a ratio where the denominator is the gain in health from a measure (e.g. years of life or quality-adjusted years of life) and the numerator is the incremental cost associated with that health gain. For higher cost interventions, the lower the ratio of costs to effects, the higher the value. While CEA is not new, the approach continues to be refined with enhanced statistical techniques and standardized methods. This article describes the CEA approach and also contrasts it to optional approaches, in order for readers to fully appreciate caveats and concerns. CEA as an economic evaluation tool can be easily misused owing to inappropriate assumptions, over reliance, and misapplication. Twelve issues to be considered in using CEA results to drive healthcare delivery decision-making are summarized. Appropriately recognizing both the strengths and the limitations of CEA is necessary for informed resource allocation in achieving the maximum value for healthcare services provided.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of open versus arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adla, Deepthi N; Rowsell, Mark; Pandey, Radhakant

    2010-03-01

    Economic evaluation of surgical procedures is necessary in view of more expensive newer techniques emerging in an increasingly cost-conscious health care environment. This study compares the cost-effectiveness of open rotator cuff repair with arthroscopic repair for moderately size tears. This was a prospective study of 30 consecutive patients, of whom 15 had an arthroscopic repair and 15 had an open procedure. Clinical effectiveness was assessed using Oxford and Constant shoulder scores. Costs were estimated from departmental and hospital financial data. At last follow-up, no difference Oxford and Constant shoulder scores was noted between the 2 methods of repair. There was no significant difference between the groups in the cost of time in the operating theater, inpatient time, amount of postoperative analgesia, number of postoperative outpatient visits, physiotherapy costs, and time off work. The incremental cost of each arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was pound675 ($1248.75) more than the open procedure. This was mainly in the area of direct health care costs, instrumentation in particular. Health care policy makers are increasingly demanding evidence of cost-effectiveness of a procedure. This study showed both methods of repair provide equivalent clinical results. Open cuff repair is more cost-effective than arthroscopic repair and is likely to have lower cost-utility ratio. In addition, the tariff for the arthroscopic procedure in some health care systems is same as open repair. Copyright 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of sandhill crane habitat management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Andrew C.; Merchant, James W.; Shultz, Steven D.; Allen, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species often threaten native wildlife populations and strain the budgets of agencies charged with wildlife management. We demonstrate the potential of cost-effectiveness analysis to improve the efficiency and value of efforts to enhance sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) roosting habitat. We focus on the central Platte River in Nebraska (USA), a region of international ecological importance for migrating avian species including sandhill cranes. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a valuation process designed to compare alternative actions based on the cost of achieving a pre-determined objective. We estimated costs for removal of invasive vegetation using geographic information system simulations and calculated benefits as the increase in area of sandhill crane roosting habitat. We generated cost effectiveness values for removing invasive vegetation on 7 land parcels and for the entire central Platte River to compare the cost-effectiveness of management at specific sites and for the central Platte River landscape. Median cost effectiveness values for the 7 land parcels evaluated suggest that costs for creating 1 additional hectare of sandhill crane roosting habitat totaled US $1,595. By contrast, we found that creating an additional hectare of sandhill crane roosting habitat could cost as much as US $12,010 for some areas in the central Platte River, indicating substantial cost savings can be achieved by using a cost effectiveness analysis to target specific land parcels for management. Cost-effectiveness analysis, used in conjunction with geographic information systems, can provide decision-makers with a new tool for identifying the most economically efficient allocation of resources to achieve habitat management goals.

  16. Measurement of effective solvus temperature of hydrogen in Zr - 2. 5 wt % Nb using acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C.E.; Ambler, J.F.R.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of applied tensile stress on the solvus temperature of hydrogen in cold-worked Zr - 2.5 wt % Nb has been measured using acoustic emission. Hydrides are necessary for delayed hydrogen cracking and the lowest temperature at which hydride cracking cannot be detected by acoustic emission was taken as the solvus temperature. The results show that any effect of tensile stress on terminal solubility, Cs, is undetectable. Between about 2 and 100 ppM hydrogen, the results can be described by: C/sub s/ = 1.40 x 10/sup 5/ exp - (36100/RT) ppM. They also suggest that the equilibrium phase, delta-hydride, is responsible for delayed hydrogen cracking.

  17. The effect of hydrogen on the multiaxial stress-strain behavior of titanium tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, C.W.; Hecker, S.S.; Koss, D.A.; Stout, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of internal hydrogen on the multiaxial stress-strain behavior of commercially pure titanium has been studied. Thin-walled specimens containing either 20 or 1070 ppm hydrogen were tested at constant stress ratios in combined tension and internal pressure. Hydrogen lowers the yield strength but has no significant effect on strain hardening behavior at strains epsilon greater than or equal to 0.02. Thus, hydrogen embrittlement under plain strain or equibiaxial loading is not a consequence of changes of flow behavior. The yielding behavior is described well by Hill's quadratic yield criterion. As measured mechanically and pole figure analysis, the plastic anisotropy changes with deformation in a manner which depends on stress state. A strain dependent, texture-induced strengthening effect in equibiaxial tension an enhanced strain hardening rate

  18. Cost effectiveness of haemophilia treatment : a cross-national assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lippert, B; Berger, K; Berntorp, E; Giangrande, P; van den Berg, M; Schramm, W; Siebert, U

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incremental cost effectiveness of on-demand versus prophylactic haemophilia therapy in Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom and The Netherlands from the third-party payers' perspective. Using a decision tree model, the cost effectiveness of on-demand versus

  19. Index method for analyzing cost effectiveness of drilling rigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batura, N P; Bocharov, V V

    1978-01-01

    The method for a complete analysis of the factors determining cost effectiveness of a drilling rig fleet is examined. The system of calculating production indexes from statistical reports is relatively simple and is not difficult to use for production organizations. The analytical results may be used to develop actual measures used to increase cost effectiveness of drilling operations.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of trachoma control in seven world regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Sylla, M.; Frick, K.D.; Mariotti, S.P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The fight against blinding trachoma is being addressed with an integrated strategy of surgery, antibiotics, hygiene promotion, and environmental improvement-the SAFE strategy, but its cost-effectiveness is largely unknown. This paper estimates the cost effectiveness of surgery and

  1. The Cost-Effectiveness of NBPTS Teacher Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2010-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) program suggests that Board certification is less cost-effective than a range of alternative approaches for raising student achievement, including comprehensive school reform, class size reduction, a 10% increase in per pupil expenditure, the use of…

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of infant feeding strategies to prevent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changing feeding practices is beneficial, depending on context. Breastfeeding is dominant (less costly, more effective) in rural settings, whilst formula feeding is a dominant strategy in urban settings. Cost-effectiveness was most sensitive to proportion of women on lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) and infant mortality rate ...

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Cost-effectiveness analysis for priority-setting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health outcomes and wasted resources.4-5 It was found that the cost- effectiveness of South ... Priorities for Developing Countries Project was that emergency (and even some elective) ... to control air pollutants found that in South Africa the most cost- effective ..... outdoor air pollution in South Africa in 2000. S Afr Med J ...

  4. The Potential Cost-Effectiveness of Amblyopia Screening Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, David B.; Wittenborn, John S.; Zhang, Xinzhi; Song, Michael; Saaddine, Jinan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background To estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of amblyopia screening at preschool and kindergarten, we compared the costs and benefits of 3 amblyopia screening scenarios to no screening and to each other: (1) acuity/stereopsis (A/S) screening at kindergarten, (2) A/S screening at preschool and kindergarten, and (3) photoscreening at preschool and A/S screening at kindergarten. Methods We programmed a probabilistic microsimulation model of amblyopia natural history and response to treatment with screening costs and outcomes estimated from 2 state programs. We calculated the probability that no screening and each of the 3 interventions were most cost-effective per incremental quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained and case avoided. Results Assuming a minimal 0.01 utility loss from monocular vision loss, no screening was most cost-effective with a willingness to pay (WTP) of less than $16,000 per QALY gained. A/S screening at kindergarten alone was most cost-effective between a WTP of $17,000 and $21,000. A/S screening at preschool and kindergarten was most cost-effective between a WTP of $22,000 and $75,000, and photoscreening at preschool and A/S screening at kindergarten was most cost-effective at a WTP greater than $75,000. Cost-effectiveness substantially improved when assuming a greater utility loss. All scenarios were cost-effective when assuming a WTP of $10,500 per case of amblyopia cured. Conclusions All 3 screening interventions evaluated are likely to be considered cost-effective relative to many other potential public health programs. The choice of screening option depends on budgetary resources and the value placed on monocular vision loss prevention by funding agencies. PMID:21877675

  5. A systematic review of the cost and cost effectiveness of treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Floyd, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Around 0.4 million cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) occur each year. Only a small fraction of these cases are treated according to international guidelines. Evidence relevant to decisions about whether to scale-up treatment for MDR-TB includes cost and cost-effectiveness data. Up to 2010, no systematic review of this evidence has been available. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of the cost and cost effectiveness of treatment for MDR-TB and synthesize the available data. We searched for papers published or prepared for publication in peer-review journals and grey literature using search terms in five languages: English, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. From an initial set of 420 studies, four were included, from Peru, the Philippines, Estonia and Tomsk Oblast in the Russian Federation. Results on costs, effectiveness and cost effectiveness were extracted. Assessment of the quality of each economic evaluation was guided by two existing checklists around which there is broad consensus. Costs were adjusted to a common year of value (2005) to remove distortions caused by inflation, and calculated in two common currencies: $US and international dollars (I$), to standardize for purchasing power parity. Data from the four identified studies were then synthesized using probabilistic sensitivity analysis, to appraise the likely cost and cost effectiveness of MDR-TB treatment in other settings, relative to WHO benchmarks for assessing whether or not an intervention is cost effective. Best estimates are provided as means, with 5th and 95th percentiles of the distributions. The cost per patient for MDR-TB treatment in Estonia, Peru, the Philippines and Tomsk was $US10 880, $US2423, $US3613 and $US14 657, respectively. Best estimates of the cost per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted were $US598 (I$960), $US163 (I$291), $US143 (I$255) and $US745 (I$1059), respectively. The main influences on costs were (i) the model of care

  6. Synergistic effect of Candida maltosa HY-35 and Enterobacter aerogenes W-23 on hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wenyu; Wen, Jianping; Chen, Yu.; Sun, Bing; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Minghui; Caiyin, Qinggele [Department of Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2007-06-15

    An aciduric high-yielding hydrogen yeast named Candida maltosa HY-35 was screened, which can grow and produce hydrogen at pH 1.3. Further research was carried out batchwise to measure the hydrogen-producing ability of a mixed culture of C. maltosa HY-35 and a facultative anaerobe Enterobacter aerogenes W-23. In this method, with the mixed culture of these two strains at 35 {sup circle} C for 28 h, the hydrogen yield was 1735 ml/l, which was 17.15% and 119.90% higher than those of the monoculture of E. aerogenes W-23 and C. maltosa HY-35, respectively. Meanwhile, the average hydrogen production rate with the mixed culture was 261.1 ml/h/l, which was 7.85% and 146.23% higher than those of the monoculture of E. aerogenes W-23 and C. maltosa HY-35, respectively. The results suggested that mixed culture of these two strains had the synergistic effect on hydrogen production. The optimum fermentation medium and operation conditions for hydrogen production with mixed culture were also investigated. (author)

  7. Numerical estimation of ultrasonic production of hydrogen: Effect of ideal and real gas based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-01-01

    Based on two different assumptions regarding the equation describing the state of the gases within an acoustic cavitation bubble, this paper studies the sonochemical production of hydrogen, through two numerical models treating the evolution of a chemical mechanism within a single bubble saturated with oxygen during an oscillation cycle in water. The first approach is built on an ideal gas model, while the second one is founded on Van der Waals equation, and the main objective was to analyze the effect of the considered state equation on the ultrasonic hydrogen production retrieved by simulation under various operating conditions. The obtained results show that even when the second approach gives higher values of temperature, pressure and total free radicals production, yield of hydrogen does not follow the same trend. When comparing the results released by both models regarding hydrogen production, it was noticed that the ratio of the molar amount of hydrogen is frequency and acoustic amplitude dependent. The use of Van der Waals equation leads to higher quantities of hydrogen under low acoustic amplitude and high frequencies, while employing ideal gas law based model gains the upper hand regarding hydrogen production at low frequencies and high acoustic amplitudes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microstructural Effects on Hydrogen Delayed Fracture of 600 MPa and 800 MPa grade Deposited Weld Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Jae; Lee, Tae Woo; Cho, Kyung Mox; Kang, Namhyun; Yoon, Byung Hyun; Park, Seo Jeong; Chang, Woong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-delayed fracture (HDF) was analyzed from the deposited weld metals of 600-MPa and 800-MPa flux-cored arc (FCA) welding wires, and then from the diffusible hydrogen behavior of the weld zone. Two types of deposited weld metal, that is, rutile weld metal and alkali weld metal, were used for each strength level. Constant loading test (CLT) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) analysis were conducted on the hydrogen pre-charged specimens electrochemically for 72 h. The effects of microstructures such as acicular ferrite, grain-boundary ferrite, and low-temperature-transformation phase on the time-to failure and amount of diffusible hydrogen were analyzed. The fracture time for hydrogen-purged specimens in the constant loading tests decreased as the grain size of acicular ferrite decreased. The major trapping site for diffusible hydrogen was the grain boundary, as determined by calculating the activation energies for hydrogen detrapping. As the strength was increased and alkali weld metal was used, the resistance to HDF decreased.

  9. Cost-effectiveness in fall prevention for older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hektoen, Liv F; Aas, Eline; Lurås, Hilde

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of implementing an exercise-based fall prevention programme for home-dwelling women in the > or = 80-year age group in Norway. The impact of the home-based individual exercise programme on the number of falls is based on a New Zealand study. On the basis of the cost estimates and the estimated reduction in the number of falls obtained with the chosen programme, we calculated the incremental costs and the incremental effect of the exercise programme as compared with no prevention. The calculation of the average healthcare cost of falling was based on assumptions regarding the distribution of fall injuries reported in the literature, four constructed representative case histories, assumptions regarding healthcare provision associated with the treatment of the specified cases, and estimated unit costs from Norwegian cost data. We calculated the average healthcare costs per fall for the first year. We found that the reduction in healthcare costs per individual for treating fall-related injuries was 1.85 times higher than the cost of implementing a fall prevention programme. The reduction in healthcare costs more than offset the cost of the prevention programme for women aged > or = 80 years living at home, which indicates that health authorities should increase their focus on prevention. The main intention of this article is to stipulate costs connected to falls among the elderly in a transparent way and visualize the whole cost picture. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a health policy tool that makes politicians and other makers of health policy conscious of this complexity.

  10. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Leon; Wade, Dave

    2003-07-01

    During the past decade the interest in hydrogen as transportation fuel has greatly escalated. This heighten interest is partly related to concerns surrounding local and regional air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels along with carbon dioxide emissions adding to the enhanced greenhouse effect. More recently there has been a great sensitivity to the vulnerability of our oil supply. Thus, energy security and environmental concerns have driven the interest in hydrogen as the clean and secure alternative to fossil fuels. Remarkable advances in fuel-cell technology have made hydrogen fueled transportation a near-term possibility. However, copious quantities of hydrogen must be generated in a manner independent of fossil fuels if environmental benefits and energy security are to be achieved. The renewable technologies, wind, solar, and geothermal, although important contributors, simply do not comprise the energy density required to deliver enough hydrogen to displace much of the fossil transportation fuels. Nuclear energy is the only primary energy source that can generate enough hydrogen in an energy secure and environmentally benign fashion. Methods of production of hydrogen from nuclear energy, the relative cost of hydrogen, and possible transition schemes to a nuclear-hydrogen economy will be presented.

  11. Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolley, George S.; Jones, Donald W.; Mintz, Marianne M.; Smith, Barton A.; Carlson, Eric; Unnasch, Stefan; Lawrence, Michael; Chmelynski, Harry

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy report, Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress, estimates the effects on employment of a U.S. economy transformation to hydrogen between 2020 and 2050. The report includes study results on employment impacts from hydrogen market expansion in the transportation, stationary, and portable power sectors and highlights possible skill and education needs. This study is in response to Section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) (EPACT). Section 1820, 'Overall Employment in a Hydrogen Economy', requires the Secretary of Energy to carry out a study of the effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on several employment (types) in the United States. As required by Section 1820, the present report considers: (1) Replacement effects of new goods and services; (2) International competition; (3) Workforce training requirements; (4) Multiple possible fuel cycles, including usage of raw materials; (5) Rates of market penetration of technologies; (6) Regional variations based on geography; and (7) Specific recommendations of the study Both the Administration's National Energy Policy and the Department's Strategic Plan call for reducing U.S. reliance on imported oil and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The National Energy Policy also acknowledges the need to increase energy supplies and use more energy-efficient technologies and practices. President Bush proposed in his January 2003 State of the Union Address to advance research on hydrogen so that it has the potential to play a major role in America's future energy system. Consistent with these aims, EPACT 2005 authorizes a research, development, and demonstration program for hydrogen and fuel cell technology. Projected results for the national employment impacts, projections of the job creation and job replacement underlying the total employment changes, training implications, regional employment impacts and the

  12. NbCl 5 and CrCl 3 catalysts effect on synthesis and hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two kinds of novel materials, Mg–1.6 mol% Ni–0.4 mol% NiO–2 mol% MCl (MCl = NbCl5, CrCl3), along with Mg–1.6 mol% Ni–0.4 mol% NiO for comparison, were examined for their potential use in hydrogen storage applications, having been fabricated via cryomilling. The effects of NbCl5 and CrCl3 on hydrogen storage ...

  13. Effect of Tempering and Baking on the Charpy Impact Energy of Hydrogen-Charged 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Lee, E. W.; Frazier, W. E.; Niji, K.; Battel, G.; Tran, A.; Iriarte, E.; Perez, O.; Ruiz, H.; Choi, T.; Stoyanov, P.; Ogren, J.; Alrashaid, J.; Es-Said, O. S.

    2015-01-01

    Tempered AISI 4340 steel was hydrogen charged and tested for impact energy. It was found that samples tempered above 468 °C (875 °F) and subjected to hydrogen charging exhibited lower impact energy values when compared to uncharged samples. No significant difference between charged and uncharged samples tempered below 468 °C (875 °F) was observed. Neither exposure nor bake time had any significant effect on impact energy within the tested ranges.

  14. Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolley, George S.; Jones, Donald W. Mintz, Marianne M.; Smith, Barton A.; Carlson, Eric; Unnasch, Stefan; Lawrence, Michael; Chmelynski, Harry

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy report, Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress, estimates the effects on employment of a U.S. economy transformation to hydrogen between 2020 and 2050. The report includes study results on employment impacts from hydrogen market expansion in the transportation, stationary, and portable power sectors and highlights possible skill and education needs. This study is in response to Section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) (EPACT). Section 1820, “Overall Employment in a Hydrogen Economy,” requires the Secretary of Energy to carry out a study of the effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on several employment [types] in the United States. As required by Section 1820, the present report considers: • Replacement effects of new goods and services • International competition • Workforce training requirements • Multiple possible fuel cycles, including usage of raw materials • Rates of market penetration of technologies • Regional variations based on geography • Specific recommendations of the study Both the Administration’s National Energy Policy and the Department’s Strategic Plan call for reducing U.S. reliance on imported oil and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The National Energy Policy also acknowledges the need to increase energy supplies and use more energy-efficient technologies and practices. President Bush proposed in his January 2003 State of the Union Address to advance research on hydrogen so that it has the potential to play a major role in America’s future energy system. Consistent with these aims, EPACT 2005 authorizes a research, development, and demonstration program for hydrogen and fuel cell technology. Projected results for the national employment impacts, projections of the job creation and job replacement underlying the total employment changes, training implications, regional employment impacts and the

  15. Effect of Exogenous Application of Hydrogen Peroxide on Drought Tolerance of Glob Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Goldani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the important environmental stresses that reduce the crop growth. Oxidative stress is a secondary stress due to drought and other abiotic stresses. In order to study the effect of exogenous application of hydrogen peroxide on drought tolerance of glob amaranth (Gomphrena globosa L., an experiment was conducted in greenhouse conditions. This study was designed as factorial based on completely randomized design with 3 replications. Different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (0, 2.5 and 5 mM and three levels of irrigation intervals (after 4, 7 and 10 days were treated in this study. The results showed that foliar application of hydrogen peroxide can improve shoot and root dry weight and alleviate adverse effects of drought stress. With increasing drought stress stomatal conductance, flower number, total chlorophyll and root volume decreased significantly. So that the lowest of these characterestics was in the irrigation after 10 days. Interaction effects of drought and hydrogen peroxide in shoot dry weight was significantly different in 5% level and in electrolyte leakage, relative water content, free proline and total root length was significantly different in 1% level. In control (4 day irrigation interval with increasing hydrogen peroxide of 2.5 mM, shoot dry weight and total root length increased 20% and 91%, respectively. In control, with increasing hydrogen peroxide to 5 mM total chlorophyll was increased 30.8% compared to 0 mM hydrogen peroxide application (control. The final result showed that foliar application of hydrogen peroxide decreased the adverse effects of drought stress.

  16. Hydrogenation of Phenol over Pt/CNTs: The Effects of Pt Loading and Reaction Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Li; Bo Cao; Wenxi Zhu; Hua Song; Keliang Wang; Cuiqin Li

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-supported Pt nanoparticles were prepared with selective deposition of Pt nanoparticles inside and outside CNTs (Pt–in/CNTs and Pt–out/CNTs). The effects of Pt loading and reaction solvents on phenol hydrogenation were investigated. The Pt nanoparticles in Pt–in/CNTs versus Pt–out/CNTs are smaller and better dispersed. The catalytic activity and reuse stability toward phenol hydrogenation both improved markedly. The dichloromethane–water mixture as the reaction solvent,...

  17. Cost-effective treatment for the couple with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhis, B J; Syrop, C H

    2000-12-01

    Although the evaluation of cost-effective approaches to infertility treatment remains in its infancy, several important principles have emerged from the initial studies in this field. Currently, in treating couples with infertility without tubal disease or severe male-factor infertility, the most cost-effective approach is to start with IUI or superovulation-IUI treatments before resorting to IVF procedures. The woman's age and number of sperm present for insemination are significant factors influencing cost-effectiveness. The influence of certain diagnoses on the cost-effectiveness of infertility treatments requires further study. Even when accounting for the costs associated with multiple gestations and premature deliveries, the cost of IVF decreases within the range of other cost-effective medical procedures and decreases to less than the willingness to pay for these procedures. Indeed, for patients with severe tubal disease, IVF has been found to be more cost-effective than surgical repair. The cost-effectiveness of IVF will likely improve as success rates show continued improvements over the course of time. In addition, usefulness of embryo selection and practices to reduce the likelihood of high-order multiple pregnancies, without reductions in pregnancy rates, will significantly impact cost-effectiveness. The exclusion of infertility treatments from insurance plans is unfortunate and accentuates the importance of physicians understanding the economics of infertility treatment with costs that are often passed directly to the patient. The erroneous economic policies and judgments that have led to inequities in access to infertility health care should not be tolerated.

  18. Effectiveness and cost effectiveness of counselling in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, P; Rowland, N; Mellor, C l; Heywood, P; Godfrey, C; Hardy, R

    2002-01-01

    Counsellors are prevalent in primary care settings. However, there are concerns about the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the treatments they provide, compared with alternatives such as usual care from the general practitioner, medication or other psychological therapies. To assess the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of counselling in primary care by reviewing cost and outcome data in randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and controlled patient preference trials of counselling interventions in primary care, for patients with psychological and psychosocial problems considered suitable for counselling. The original search strategy included electronic searching of databases (including the CCDAN Register of RCTs and CCTs) along with handsearching of a specialist journal. Published and unpublished sources (clinical trials, books, dissertations, agency reports etc.) were searched, and their reference lists scanned to uncover further controlled trials. Contact was made with subject experts and CCDAN members in order to uncover further trials. For the updated review, searches were restricted to those databases judged to be high yield in the first version of the review: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCLIT and CINAHL, the Cochrane Controlled Trials register and the CCDAN trials register. All controlled trials comparing counselling in primary care with other treatments for patients with psychological and psychosocial problems considered suitable for counselling. Trials completed before the end of June 2001 were included in the review. Data were extracted using a standardised data extraction sheet. The relevant data were entered into the Review Manager software. Trials were quality rated, using CCDAN criteria, to assess the extent to which their design and conduct were likely to have prevented systematic error. Continuous measures of outcome were combined using standardised mean differences. An overall effect size was calculated for each outcome with 95

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatments for vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edidin, Avram A; Ong, Kevin L; Lau, Edmund; Schmier, Jordana K; Kemner, Jason E; Kurtz, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) can be treated by nonsurgical management or by minimally invasive surgical treatment including vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the cost to Medicare for treating VCF-diagnosed patients by nonsurgical management, vertebroplasty, or kyphoplasty. We hypothesized that surgical treatments for VCFs using vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty would be a cost-effective alternative to nonsurgical management for the Medicare patient population. Cost per life-year gained for VCF patients in the US Medicare population was compared between operated (kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty) and non-operated patients and between kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty patients, all as a function of patient age and gender. Life expectancy was estimated using a parametric Weibull survival model (adjusted for comorbidities) for 858 978 VCF patients in the 100% Medicare dataset (2005-2008). Median payer costs were identified for each treatment group for up to 3 years following VCF diagnosis, based on 67 018 VCF patients in the 5% Medicare dataset (2005-2008). A discount rate of 3% was used for the base case in the cost-effectiveness analysis, with 0% and 5% discount rates used in sensitivity analyses. After accounting for the differences in median costs and using a discount rate of 3%, the cost per life-year gained for kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty patients ranged from $US1863 to $US6687 and from $US2452 to $US13 543, respectively, compared with non-operated patients. The cost per life-year gained for kyphoplasty compared with vertebroplasty ranged from -$US4878 (cost saving) to $US2763. Among patients for whom surgical treatment was indicated, kyphoplasty was found to be cost effective, and perhaps even cost saving, compared with vertebroplasty. Even for the oldest patients (85 years of age and older), both interventions would be considered cost effective in terms of cost per life-year gained.

  20. An Evaluation of Cost-Effectiveness of Micro Computerized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    /Integrated Set of Information System (CDS/ISIS) application software in the library and its effectiveness in performance operations was evaluated to determine the costeffectiveness. The study population was made up of all the staff involved ...

  1. Cost and cost-effectiveness of tuberculosis treatment shortening: a model-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, G B; Dowdy, D W; Bastos, M L; Zwerling, A; Sweeney, S; Foster, N; Trajman, A; Islam, M A; Kapiga, S; Sinanovic, E; Knight, G M; White, R G; Wells, W A; Cobelens, F G; Vassall, A

    2016-12-01

    Despite improvements in treatment success rates for tuberculosis (TB), current six-month regimen duration remains a challenge for many National TB Programmes, health systems, and patients. There is increasing investment in the development of shortened regimens with a number of candidates in phase 3 trials. We developed an individual-based decision analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of a hypothetical four-month regimen for first-line treatment of TB, assuming non-inferiority to current regimens of six-month duration. The model was populated using extensive, empirically-collected data to estimate the economic impact on both health systems and patients of regimen shortening for first-line TB treatment in South Africa, Brazil, Bangladesh, and Tanzania. We explicitly considered 'real world' constraints such as sub-optimal guideline adherence. From a societal perspective, a shortened regimen, priced at USD1 per day, could be a cost-saving option in South Africa, Brazil, and Tanzania, but would not be cost-effective in Bangladesh when compared to one gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. Incorporating 'real world' constraints reduces cost-effectiveness. Patient-incurred costs could be reduced in all settings. From a health service perspective, increased drug costs need to be balanced against decreased delivery costs. The new regimen would remain a cost-effective option, when compared to each countries' GDP per capita, even if new drugs cost up to USD7.5 and USD53.8 per day in South Africa and Brazil; this threshold was above USD1 in Tanzania and under USD1 in Bangladesh. Reducing the duration of first-line TB treatment has the potential for substantial economic gains from a patient perspective. The potential economic gains for health services may also be important, but will be context-specific and dependent on the appropriate pricing of any new regimen.

  2. Kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution:. ionic strength effects and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, Frank; Elias, Horst; Wannowius, Klaus J.

    Conductometry was used to study the kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite, HSO -3, by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous non-buffered solution at the low concentration level of 10 -5-10 -6 M, typically found in cloud water. The kinetic data confirm that the rate law reported for the pH range 3-6 at higher concentration levels, rate= kH·[H +]·[HSO -3]·[H 2O 2], is valid at the low concentration level and at low ionic strength Ic. At 298 K and Ic=1.5×10 -4 M, third-order rate constant kH was found to be kH=(9.1±0.5)×10 7 M -2 s -1. The temperature dependence of kH led to an activation energy of Ea=29.7±0.9 kJ mol -1. The effect of the ionic strength (adjusted with NaCl) on rate constant kH was studied in the range Ic=2×10 -4-5.0 M at pH=4.5-5.2 by conductometry and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The dependence of kH on Ic can be described with a semi-empirical relationship, which is useful for the purpose of comparison and extrapolation. The kinetic data obtained are critically compared with those reported earlier.

  3. Separate effects tests on hydrogen combustion during direct containment heating events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.; Albrecht, G.; Kirstahler, M.; Schwall, M.; Wachter, E.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of severe accident research for light water reactors Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK/IKET) operates the facilities DISCO-C and DISCO-H since 1998, conceived to investigate the direct containment heating (DCH) issue. Previous DCH experiments have investigated the corium dispersion and containment pressurization during DCH in different European reactor geometries using an iron-alumina melt and steam as model fluids. The analysis of these experiments showed that the containment was pressurized by the debris-to-gas heat transfer but also to a large part by hydrogen combustion. The need was identified to better characterize the hydrogen combustion during DCH. To address this issue separate effect tests in the DISCO-H facility were conducted. These tests reproduced phenomena occurring during DCH (injection of a hot steam-hydrogen mixture jet into the containment and ignition of the air-steam-hydrogen mixture) with the exception of corium dispersion. The effect of corium particles as igniters was simulated using sparkler systems. The data will be used to validate models in combustion codes and to extrapolate to prototypic scale. Tests have been conducted in the DISCO-H facility in two steps. First a small series of six tests was done in a simplified geometry to study fundamental parameters. Then, two tests were done with a containment geometry subdivided into a subcompartment and the containment dome. The test conditions were as follows: As initial condition in the containment an atmosphere was used either with air or with a homogeneous air-steam mixture containing hydrogen concentrations between 0 and 7 mol%, temperatures around 100 C and pressure at 2 bar (representative of the containment atmosphere conditions at vessel failure). Injection of a hot steam-hydrogen jet mixture into the reactor cavity pit at 20 bar, representative of the primary circuit blow down through the vessel and hydrogen produced during this phase. The most important variables

  4. Cost-effectiveness of antenatal screening for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Killie, M K; Kjeldsen-Kragh, J; Husebekk, A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the costs and health consequences of three different screening strategies for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). DESIGN: Cost-utility analysis on the basis of a decision tree that incorporates the relevant strategies and outcomes. SETTING: Three health regions......-4 weeks before term. Severely thrombocytopenic newborn were transfused immediately with compatible platelets. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs. RESULTS: Compared with no screening, a programme of screening and subsequent treatment would generate between 210 and 230...... additional QALYs among 100,000 pregnant women, and at the same time, reduce health care costs by approximately 1.7 million euros. The sensitivity analyses indicate that screening is cost effective or even cost saving within a wide range of probabilities and costs. CONCLUSION: Our calculations indicate...

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatments for premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendas-Baum, Regina; Yang, Min; Gricar, Joseph; Wallenstein, Gene V

    2010-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is reported to affect between 13% and 31% of women. Between 3% and 8% of women are reported to meet criteria for the more severe form of PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Although PMDD has received increased attention in recent years, the cost effectiveness of treatments for PMDD remains unknown. To evaluate the cost effectiveness of the four medications with a US FDA-approved indication for PMDD: fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and drospirenone plus ethinyl estradiol (DRSP/EE). A decision-analytic model was used to evaluate both direct costs (medication and physician visits) and clinical outcomes (treatment success, failure and discontinuation). Medication costs were based on average wholesale prices of branded products; physician visit costs were obtained from a claims database study of PMDD patients and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Clinical outcome probabilities were derived from published clinical trials in PMDD. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated using the difference in costs and percentage of successfully treated patients at 6 months. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to assess the impact of uncertainty in parameter estimates. Threshold values where a change in the cost-effective strategy occurred were identified using a net benefit framework. Starting therapy with DRSP/EE dominated both sertraline and paroxetine, but not fluoxetine. The estimated ICER of initiating treatment with fluoxetine relative to DRSP/EE was $US4385 per treatment success (year 2007 values). Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves revealed that for ceiling ratios>or=$US3450 per treatment success, fluoxetine had the highest probability (>or=0.37) of being the most cost-effective treatment, relative to the other options. The cost-effectiveness acceptability frontier further indicated that DRSP/EE remained the option with the highest expected net monetary benefit for

  6. Cost effective nuclear commercial grade dedication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletz, J.J.; Marston, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new computerized database method to create/edit/view specification technical data sheets (mini-specifications) for procurement of spare parts for nuclear facility maintenance and to develop information that could support possible future facility life extension efforts. This method may reduce cost when compared with current manual methods. The use of standardized technical data sheets (mini-specifications) for items of the same category improves efficiency. This method can be used for a variety of tasks, including: Nuclear safety-related procurement; Non-safety related procurement; Commercial grade item procurement/dedication; Evaluation of replacement items. This program will assist the nuclear facility in upgrading its procurement activities consistent with the recent NUMARC Procurement Initiative. Proper utilization of the program will assist the user in assuring that the procured items are correct for the applications, provide data to assist in detecting fraudulent materials, minimize human error in withdrawing database information, improve data retrievability, improve traceability, and reduce long-term procurement costs

  7. Cost and Cost-Effectiveness of Donor Human Milk to Prevent Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Abigail; Taylor, Celia

    2017-11-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a costly gastrointestinal disorder that mainly affects preterm and low-birth-weight infants and can lead to considerable morbidity and mortality. Mother's own milk is protective against NEC but is not always available. In such cases, donor human milk has also been shown to be protective (although to a lesser extent) compared with formula milk, but it is more expensive. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the cost of donor milk, the cost of treating NEC, and the cost-effectiveness of exclusive donor milk versus formula milk feeding to reduce the short-term health and treatment costs of NEC. We systematically searched five relevant databases to find studies with verifiable costs or charges of donor milk and/or treatment of NEC and any economic evaluations comparing exclusive donor milk with exclusive formula milk feeding. All search results were double screened. Seven studies with verifiable donor milk costs and 17 with verifiable NEC treatment costs were included. The types of cost or charge included varied considerably across studies, so quantitative synthesis was not attempted. Estimates of the incremental length of stay associated with NEC were ∼18 days for medical NEC and 50 days for surgical NEC. Two studies claimed to report economic evaluations but did not do so in practice. It is likely that donor milk provides short-term cost savings by reducing the incidence of NEC. Future studies should provide more details on cost components included and a full economic evaluation, including long-term outcomes, should be undertaken.

  8. A Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Studies Reporting Cost-per-DALY Averted.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Neumann

    Full Text Available Calculating the cost per disability-adjusted life years (DALYs averted associated with interventions is an increasing popular means of assessing the cost-effectiveness of strategies to improve population health. However, there has been no systematic attempt to characterize the literature and its evolution.We conducted a systematic review of cost-effectiveness studies reporting cost-per-DALY averted from 2000 through 2015. We developed the Global Health Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (GHCEA Registry, a repository of English-language cost-per-DALY averted studies indexed in PubMed. To identify candidate studies, we searched PubMed for articles with titles or abstracts containing the phrases "disability-adjusted" or "DALY". Two reviewers with training in health economics independently reviewed each article selected in our abstract review, gathering information using a standardized data collection form. We summarized descriptive characteristics on study methodology: e.g., intervention type, country of study, study funder, study perspective, along with methodological and reporting practices over two time periods: 2000-2009 and 2010-2015. We analyzed the types of costs included in analyses, the study quality on a scale from 1 (low to 7 (high, and examined the correlation between diseases researched and the burden of disease in different world regions.We identified 479 cost-per-DALY averted studies published from 2000 through 2015. Studies from Sub-Saharan Africa comprised the largest portion of published studies. The disease areas most commonly studied were communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disorders (67%, followed by non-communicable diseases (28%. A high proportion of studies evaluated primary prevention strategies (59%. Pharmaceutical interventions were commonly assessed (32% followed by immunizations (28%. Adherence to good practices for conducting and reporting cost-effectiveness analysis varied considerably. Studies mainly included

  9. Cost-effectiveness of emergency contraception options over 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Brandon K; Tak, Casey R; Sanders, Jessica N; Turok, David K; Schwarz, Eleanor B

    2018-05-01

    The copper intrauterine device is the most effective form of emergency contraception and can also provide long-term contraception. The levonorgestrel intrauterine device has also been studied in combination with oral levonorgestrel for women seeking emergency contraception. However, intrauterine devices have higher up-front costs than oral methods, such as ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel. Health care payers and decision makers (eg, health care insurers, government programs) with financial constraints must determine if the increased effectiveness of intrauterine device emergency contraception methods are worth the additional costs. We sought to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 emergency contraception strategies-ulipristal acetate, oral levonorgestrel, copper intrauterine device, and oral levonorgestrel plus same-day levonorgestrel intrauterine device-over 1 year from a US payer perspective. Costs (2017 US dollars) and pregnancies were estimated over 1 year using a Markov model of 1000 women seeking emergency contraception. Every 28-day cycle, the model estimated the predicted number of pregnancy outcomes (ie, live birth, ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, or induced abortion) resulting from emergency contraception failure and subsequent contraception use. Model inputs were derived from published literature and national sources. An emergency contraception strategy was considered cost-effective if the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ie, the cost to prevent 1 additional pregnancy) was less than the weighted average cost of pregnancy outcomes in the United States ($5167). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and probability of being the most cost-effective emergency contraception strategy were calculated from 1000 probabilistic model iterations. One-way sensitivity analyses were used to examine uncertainty in the cost of emergency contraception, subsequent contraception, and pregnancy outcomes as well as the model probabilities. In 1000 women

  10. Probing the Effect of Hydrogen on Elastic Properties and Plastic Deformation in Nickel Using Nanoindentation and Ultrasonic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, S. K.; Somerday, B. P.; Ingraham, M. D.; Bahr, D. F.

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen effects on small-volume plasticity and elastic stiffness constants are investigated with nanoindentation of Ni-201 and sonic velocity measurements of bulk Ni single crystals. Elastic modulus of Ni-201, calculated from indentation data, decreases 22% after hydrogen charging. This substantial decrease is independently confirmed by sonic velocity measurements of Ni single crystals; c 44 decreases 20% after hydrogen exposure. Furthermore, clear hydrogen-deformation interactions are observed. The maximum shear stress required to nucleate dislocations in hydrogen-charged Ni-201 is markedly lower than in as-annealed material, driven by hydrogen-reduced shear modulus. Additionally, a larger number of depth excursions are detected prior to general yielding in hydrogen-charged material, suggesting cross-slip restriction. Together, these data reveal a direct correlation between hydrogen-affected elastic properties and plastic deformation in Ni alloys.

  11. Data compilation for radiation effects on hydrogen recycle in fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Kunio; Fukushima, Kimichika; Ebisawa, Katsuyuki.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiation tests of materials by hydrogen isotopes are under way, to investigate the hydrogen recycling process where exchange of fuel particles takes place between plasma and the wall of the nuclear fusion reactor. In the report, data on hydrogen irradiation are collected and reviewed from the view point of irradiation effects. Data are classified into, (1) Re-emmission, (2) Retention, (Retained hydrogen isotopes, Depth profile in the materials and Thermal desorption spectroscopy), (3) Permeation and (4) Ion impact desorption. Research activities in each area are arranged according to the date of publication, research institutes, materials investigated, so that overview of present status can be made. Then, institute, author and reference are shown for each classification with tables. The list of literature is also attached. (author)

  12. The Synergetic Effects of Hydrogen and Oxygen on the Strength and Ductility of Vanadium Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jiming(谌继明); Xu Ying(徐颖); Deng Ying(邓颖); Yang Ling(杨霖); Qiu Shaoyu(邱绍宇)

    2003-01-01

    A V4Ti alloy and several V4Cr4Ti alloys with different oxygen contents were studied on their tensile properties with the effect of hydrogen concentrations. The ductility of the alloys showed a successive decrease in a varied rate with an increased hydrogen concentration, while the ultimate tensile strength remained unchanged or even decreased for the high oxygen content alloy in spite of the occurrence of hardening in the low oxygen content alloy. Oxygen in the alloy causes grain boundary weakening, increasing the possibility of intergranular fractures and thus enhancing the hydrogen embrittlement. V4Ti showed a higher resistance to the hydrogen embrittlement as compared to the V4Cr4Ti alloys on a similar oxygen content level.

  13. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.; Pelissier, J.; Pluchery, M.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1961-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [fr

  14. Cost-effectiveness of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vos Theo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on cost-effectiveness of interventions to treat schizophrenia can assist health policy decision making, particularly given the lack of health resources in developing countries like Thailand. This study aims to determine the optimal treatment package, including drug and non-drug interventions, for schizophrenia in Thailand. Methods A Markov model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of typical antipsychotics, generic risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine and family interventions. Health outcomes were measured in disability adjusted life years. We evaluated intervention benefit by estimating a change in disease severity, taking into account potential side effects. Intervention costs included outpatient treatment costs, hospitalization costs as well as time and travel costs of patients and families. Uncertainty was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation. A sensitivity analysis of the expected range cost of generic risperidone was undertaken. Results Generic risperidone is more cost-effective than typicals if it can be produced for less than 10 baht per 2 mg tablet. Risperidone was the cheapest treatment with higher drug costs offset by lower hospital costs in comparison to typicals. The most cost-effective combination of treatments was a combination of risperidone (dominant intervention. Adding family intervention has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 1,900 baht/DALY with a 100% probability of a result less than a threshold for very cost-effective interventions of one times GDP or 110,000 baht per DALY. Treating the most severe one third of patients with clozapine instead of risperidone had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 320,000 baht/DALY with just over 50% probability of a result below three times GDP per capita. Conclusions There are good economic arguments to recommend generic risperidone as first line treatment in combination with family intervention. As the uncertainty interval indicates

  15. Cost-effectiveness of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanthunane, Pudtan; Vos, Theo; Whiteford, Harvey; Bertram, Melanie

    2011-05-13

    Information on cost-effectiveness of interventions to treat schizophrenia can assist health policy decision making, particularly given the lack of health resources in developing countries like Thailand. This study aims to determine the optimal treatment package, including drug and non-drug interventions, for schizophrenia in Thailand. A Markov model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of typical antipsychotics, generic risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine and family interventions. Health outcomes were measured in disability adjusted life years. We evaluated intervention benefit by estimating a change in disease severity, taking into account potential side effects. Intervention costs included outpatient treatment costs, hospitalization costs as well as time and travel costs of patients and families. Uncertainty was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation. A sensitivity analysis of the expected range cost of generic risperidone was undertaken. Generic risperidone is more cost-effective than typicals if it can be produced for less than 10 baht per 2 mg tablet. Risperidone was the cheapest treatment with higher drug costs offset by lower hospital costs in comparison to typicals. The most cost-effective combination of treatments was a combination of risperidone (dominant intervention). Adding family intervention has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 1,900 baht/DALY with a 100% probability of a result less than a threshold for very cost-effective interventions of one times GDP or 110,000 baht per DALY. Treating the most severe one third of patients with clozapine instead of risperidone had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 320,000 baht/DALY with just over 50% probability of a result below three times GDP per capita. There are good economic arguments to recommend generic risperidone as first line treatment in combination with family intervention. As the uncertainty interval indicates the addition of clozapine may be dominated and there are serious

  16. Cost-effectiveness of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Information on cost-effectiveness of interventions to treat schizophrenia can assist health policy decision making, particularly given the lack of health resources in developing countries like Thailand. This study aims to determine the optimal treatment package, including drug and non-drug interventions, for schizophrenia in Thailand. Methods A Markov model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of typical antipsychotics, generic risperidone, olanzapine, clozapine and family interventions. Health outcomes were measured in disability adjusted life years. We evaluated intervention benefit by estimating a change in disease severity, taking into account potential side effects. Intervention costs included outpatient treatment costs, hospitalization costs as well as time and travel costs of patients and families. Uncertainty was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation. A sensitivity analysis of the expected range cost of generic risperidone was undertaken. Results Generic risperidone is more cost-effective than typicals if it can be produced for less than 10 baht per 2 mg tablet. Risperidone was the cheapest treatment with higher drug costs offset by lower hospital costs in comparison to typicals. The most cost-effective combination of treatments was a combination of risperidone (dominant intervention). Adding family intervention has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 1,900 baht/DALY with a 100% probability of a result less than a threshold for very cost-effective interventions of one times GDP or 110,000 baht per DALY. Treating the most severe one third of patients with clozapine instead of risperidone had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 320,000 baht/DALY with just over 50% probability of a result below three times GDP per capita. Conclusions There are good economic arguments to recommend generic risperidone as first line treatment in combination with family intervention. As the uncertainty interval indicates the addition of clozapine

  17. Cost-effectiveness of root caries preventive treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Göstemeyer, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    With a growing number of individuals retaining their teeth lifelong, often with periodontitis-induced root surface exposure, there is the need for cost-effective management strategies for root caries lesions. The present study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of root caries preventive treatments. Patients were simulated over 10 years using a Markov model. Four treatments were compared: No treatment, daily 225-800ppm fluoride rinses, chlorhexidine (CHX) varnish (2×/year), silver diamine fluoride (SDF) varnish (2×/year). Data from a systematic review were submitted to network meta-analysis for inferring relative efficacies of treatments. The health outcome was years of teeth being free of root caries. A mixed public-private payer perspective within 2016 German healthcare was taken, with costs being estimated from fee item catalogues or based on market prices. Populations with different numbers of teeth and tooth-level risks were modelled. Monte-Carlo microsimulations, univariate- and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. In populations with 16 teeth at risk and low tooth-level risk for root caries, providing no preventive treatment was least costly, but also least effective (130 Euro, 144 years). SDF ranked next, being more costly (180 Euro), but also more effective (151 years). Payers willing to invest 8.30 Euro per root caries-free tooth-year found SDF most cost-effective. CHX varnish and fluoride rinse were not cost-effective. In populations with more teeth and high tooth-level risk, SDF was the most effective and least costly option. Root caries preventive treatments (like SDF) are effective and might even be cost-saving in high risk populations. Application of SDF can be recommended as a cost-saving treatment for prevention of root caries in patients with high risk of root caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Is individualized medicine more cost-effective? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatz, Maximilian H M; Schremser, Katharina; Rogowski, Wolf H

    2014-05-01

    Individualized medicine (IM) is a rapidly evolving field that is associated with both visions of more effective care at lower costs and fears of highly priced, low-value interventions. It is unclear which view is supported by the current evidence. Our objective was to systematically review the health economic evidence related to IM and to derive general statements on its cost-effectiveness. A literature search of MEDLINE database for English- and German-language studies was conducted. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility studies for technologies meeting the MEDLINE medical subject headings (MeSH) definition of IM (genetically targeted interventions) were reviewed. This was followed by a standardized extraction of general study characteristics and cost-effectiveness results. Most of the 84 studies included in the synthesis were from the USA (n = 43, 51 %), cost-utility studies (n = 66, 79 %), and published since 2005 (n = 60, 71 %). The results ranged from dominant to dominated. The median value (cost-utility studies) was calculated to be rounded $US22,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained (adjusted to $US, year 2008 values), which is equal to the rounded median cost-effectiveness in the peer-reviewed English-language literature according to a recent review. Many studies reported more than one strategy of IM with highly varying cost-effectiveness ratios. Generally, results differed according to test type, and tests for disease prognosis or screening appeared to be more favorable than tests to stratify patients by response or by risk of adverse effects. However, these results were not significant. Different definitions of IM could have been used. Quality assessment of the studies was restricted to analyzing transparency. IM neither seems to display superior cost-effectiveness than other types of medical interventions nor to be economically inferior. Instead, rather than 'whether' healthcare was individualized, the question of 'how' it was individualized was

  19. Structuring a cost-effective site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.; Swaja, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Successful chemical and radiological site characterizations are complex activities which require meticulously detailed planning. Each layer of investigation is based upon previously generated information about the site. Baseline historical, physical, geological, and regulatory information is prerequisite for preliminary studies at a site. Preliminary studies then provide samples and measurements which define the identity of potential contaminants and define boundaries around the area to be investigated. The goal of a full site characterization is to accurately determine the extent and magnitude of contaminants and carefully define the site conditions such that the future movements of site contaminants can be assessed for potential exposure to human occupants and/or environmental impacts. Critical to this process is the selection of appropriate measurement and sampling methodology, selection and use of appropriate instrumentation and management/interpretation of site information. Site investigations require optimization between the need of information to maximize the understanding of site conditions and the cost of acquiring that information. 5 refs., 1 tab

  20. Proposals for software analysis of cost effectiveness and cost-benefit for optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Lombard, J.; Lefaure, C.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this report is to present the principles of decision making software for radiation protection option, applying ALARA principle. The choice of optimum options is performed by applying the models of cost effectiveness and cost-benefit. Options of radiation protection are described by two indicators: a simple economic indicator: cost of radiation protection; and dosimetry indicator: collective dose related to protection. For both analyses the software enables sensitivity analysis. It would be possible to complete the software by integrating a module which would take into account combinations of two options since they are not independent

  1. Effects of Hydrogen Ion Implantation on TiC-C Coating of Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui-qian; LIU Yao-guang; HUANG Ning-kang

    2008-01-01

    Titanium carbide coatings are widely used as various wear-resistant material.The hydrogen erosion resistance of TiC-C films and the effect of hydrogen participation on TiC-C films were studied.Seventy-five percent TiC-C films are prepared on stainless steel surface by using ion mixing,where TiC-C films are deposited by rf magnetron sputtering followed by argon ion bombardment.The samples are then submitted to hydrogen ion implantation at 1.2×10-3 Pa.Characterization for the 75% TiC-C films was done with SIMS,XRD,AES,and XPS.Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to analyze hydrogen concentration variation with depth,X-Ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the phases,and Auger electron spectra (AES) as well as X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) were used to check the effects of hydrogen on shifts of chemical bonding states of C and Ti in the TiC-C films.It is found that TiC-C films on stainless steel surface can prevent hydrogen from entering stainless steel.

  2. Effect of pressure on the solution structure and hydrogen bond properties of aqueous N-methylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Rahul; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups. ► High pressure reduces association propensity causing dispersion of these moieties. ► Orientational polarization of vicinal water molecules near O and H atoms of NMA. ► NMA prefers to be a H-bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water. ► Energy of these hydrogen bonds reduces slightly at high pressure. -- Abstract: Effects of high pressure on hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions are investigated by employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of aqueous N-methylacetamide (NMA) solutions. Such systems are of interest mainly because high pressure causes protein denaturation and NMA is a computationally effective model to understand the atomic-level picture of pressure-induced structural transitions of protein. Simulations are performed for five different pressure values ranging from 1 atm to 8000 atm. We find that NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups and high pressure reduces this association propensity, causing dispersion of these moieties. At high pressure, structural void decreases and the packing efficiency of water molecules around NMA molecules increases. Hydrogen bond properties calculations show favorable NMA–NMA hydrogen bonds as compared to those of NMA–water hydrogen bonds and preference of NMA to be a hydrogen bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Regorafenib for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Ahmad, Bilal B; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Flowers, Christopher R

    2015-11-10

    Regorafenib is a standard-care option for treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer that increases median overall survival by 6 weeks compared with placebo. Given this small incremental clinical benefit, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of regorafenib in the third-line setting for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the US payer perspective. We developed a Markov model to compare the cost and effectiveness of regorafenib with those of placebo in the third-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Drug costs were based on Medicare reimbursement rates in 2014. Model robustness was addressed in univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Regorafenib provided an additional 0.04 QALYs (0.13 life-years) at a cost of $40,000, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $900,000 per QALY. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for regorafenib was > $550,000 per QALY in all of our univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Regorafenib provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in the third-line management of metastatic colorectal cancer. The cost-effectiveness of regorafenib could be improved by the use of value-based pricing. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. How does cognitive dissonance influence the sunk cost effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung SH

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Shao-Hsi Chung,1 Kuo-Chih Cheng2 1Department of Business Administration, Meiho University, Pingtung, Taiwan; 2Department of Accounting, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua City, Taiwan Background: The sunk cost effect is the scenario when individuals are willing to continue to invest capital in a failing project. The purpose of this study was to explain such irrational behavior by exploring how sunk costs affect individuals’ willingness to continue investing in an unfavorable project and to understand the role of cognitive dissonance on the sunk cost effect. Methods: This study used an experimental questionnaire survey on managers of firms listed on the Taiwan Stock Exchange and Over-The-Counter. Results: The empirical results show that cognitive dissonance does not mediate the relationship between sunk costs and willingness to continue an unfavorable investment project. However, cognitive dissonance has a moderating effect, and only when the level of cognitive dissonance is high does the sunk cost have significantly positive impacts on willingness to continue on with an unfavorable investment. Conclusion: This study offers psychological mechanisms to explain the sunk cost effect based on the theory of cognitive dissonance, and it also provides some recommendations for corporate management. Keywords: sunk costs, sunk cost effect, cognitive dissonance, behavior, unfavorable investment

  5. Modelling the cost effectiveness of antidepressant treatment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revicki, D A; Brown, R E; Palmer, W; Bakish, D; Rosser, W W; Anton, S F; Feeny, D

    1995-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of nefazodone compared with imipramine or fluoxetine in treating women with major depressive disorder. Clinical decision analysis and a Markov state-transition model were used to estimate the lifetime health outcomes and medical costs of 3 antidepressant treatments. The model, which represents ideal primary care practice, compares treatment with nefazodone to treatment with either imipramine or fluoxetine. The economic analysis was based on the healthcare system of the Canadian province of Ontario, and considered only direct medical costs. Health outcomes were expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs were in 1993 Canadian dollars ($Can; $Can1 = $US0.75, September 1995). Incremental cost-utility ratios were calculated comparing the relative lifetime discounted medical costs and QALYs associated with nefazodone with those of imipramine or fluoxetine. Data for constructing the model and estimating necessary parameters were derived from the medical literature, clinical trial data, and physician judgement. Data included information on: Ontario primary care physicians' clinical management of major depression; medical resource use and costs; probabilities of recurrence of depression; suicide rates; compliance rates; and health utilities. Estimates of utilities for depression-related hypothetical health states were obtained from patients with major depression (n = 70). Medical costs and QALYs were discounted to present value using a 5% rate. Sensitivity analyses tested the assumptions of the model by varying the discount rate, depression recurrence rates, compliance rates, and the duration of the model. The base case analysis found that nefazodone treatment costs $Can1447 less per patient than imipramine treatment (discounted lifetime medical costs were $Can50,664 vs $Can52,111) and increases the number of QALYs by 0.72 (13.90 vs 13.18). Nefazodone treatment costs $Can14 less than fluoxetine

  6. Blistering effects in neutral injection systems operated with helium and hydrogen gases: a preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    The practical effects of blistering and flaking in neutral injection systems are studied. These effects will soon be more important because of energy increases in systems now under development and because of their operation with fast helium ions as well as hydrogen and deuterium ions. Two main effects were studied: enhanced erosion rate and possible voltage breakdown from sharp flakes and gas emission

  7. Encouraging smokers to quit: the cost effectiveness of reimbursing the costs of smoking cessation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, Janneke; Wagena, Edwin J; van Schayck, Constant P; Severens, Johan L

    2006-01-01

    Smoking cessation should be encouraged in order to increase life expectancy and reduce smoking-related healthcare costs. Results of a randomised trial suggested that reimbursing the costs of smoking cessation treatment (SCT) may lead to an increased use of SCT and an increased number of quitters versus no reimbursement. To assess whether reimbursement for SCT is a cost-effective intervention (from the Dutch societal perspective), we calculated the incremental costs per quitter and extrapolated this outcome to incremental costs per QALY saved versus no reimbursement. In the reimbursement trial, 1266 Dutch smokers were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group using a randomised double consent design. Reimbursement for SCT was offered to the intervention group for a period of 6 months. No reimbursement was offered to the control group. Prolonged abstinence from smoking was determined 6 months after the end of the reimbursement period. The QALYs gained from quitting were calculated until 80 years of age using data from the US. Costs (year 2002 values) were determined from the societal perspective during the reimbursement period (May-November 2002). Benefits were discounted at 4% per annum. The uncertainty of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios was estimated using non-parametric bootstrapping. Eighteen participants in the control group (2.8%) and 35 participants in the intervention group (5.5%) successfully quit smoking. The costs per participant were 291 euro and 322 euro, respectively. If society is willing to pay 1000 euro or 10,000 euro for an additional 12-month quitter, the probability that reimbursement for SCT would be cost effective was 50% or 95%, respectively. If society is willing to pay 18,000 euro for a QALY, the probability that reimbursement for SCT would be cost effective was 95%. However, the external validity of the extrapolation from quitters to QALYs is uncertain and several assumptions had to be made. Reimbursement for SCT may

  8. Japan's Sunshine Project. 1991 Annual Summary of Hydrogen Energy R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    In the study of hydrogen production, tests and experiments were conducted concerning electrolysis of water in solid polymer electrolytes and electrolysis of high-temperature steam. In the study of hydrogen storage and transportation, use of metal hydrides for these purposes was tested with attention paid to CaNi{sub 5} degradation and metal element substitution in ZrMn{sub 2}. In the study of hydrogen application, electrodes in hydrogen storage alloy-aided energy conversion were investigated and hydrogen-oxygen combustion systems were experimented. In the study of hydrogen safety, a fracture in a heat affected weld and fatigue crack propagation therein were simulated, and the effect of hydrogen on the episode was investigated. Investigated in the study of a hydrogen-fired turbine were hydrogen combustion, hydrogen-fired power generation thermal efficiency, fuel cost, power generation cost, etc. (NEDO)

  9. Cost-effective conservation of an endangered frog under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Lucy E; Heard, Geoffrey W; Chee, Yung En; Wintle, Brendan A

    2016-04-01

    How should managers choose among conservation options when resources are scarce and there is uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of actions? Well-developed tools exist for prioritizing areas for one-time and binary actions (e.g., protect vs. not protect), but methods for prioritizing incremental or ongoing actions (such as habitat creation and maintenance) remain uncommon. We devised an approach that combines metapopulation viability and cost-effectiveness analyses to select among alternative conservation actions while accounting for uncertainty. In our study, cost-effectiveness is the ratio between the benefit of an action and its economic cost, where benefit is the change in metapopulation viability. We applied the approach to the case of the endangered growling grass frog (Litoria raniformis), which is threatened by urban development. We extended a Bayesian model to predict metapopulation viability under 9 urbanization and management scenarios and incorporated the full probability distribution of possible outcomes for each scenario into the cost-effectiveness analysis. This allowed us to discern between cost-effective alternatives that were robust to uncertainty and those with a relatively high risk of failure. We found a relatively high risk of extinction following urbanization if the only action was reservation of core habitat; habitat creation actions performed better than enhancement actions; and cost-effectiveness ranking changed depending on the consideration of uncertainty. Our results suggest that creation and maintenance of wetlands dedicated to L. raniformis is the only cost-effective action likely to result in a sufficiently low risk of extinction. To our knowledge we are the first study to use Bayesian metapopulation viability analysis to explicitly incorporate parametric and demographic uncertainty into a cost-effective evaluation of conservation actions. The approach offers guidance to decision makers aiming to achieve cost-effective

  10. Skeletal traction and intramedullary nailing cost-effectiveness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the operative group 24 patients had union with one delayed union while in the traction group 12 patients had union, 9 with mal union and 4 delayed union. Conclusion: Intramedullary nailing is more cost-effective than skeletal traction. It met the dominant strategy, because it was significantly less costly than skeletal ...

  11. Pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial: cost effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Cynthia; Nixon, Jane; Cranny, Gillian; Nelson, E Andrea; Hawkins, Kim; Phillips, Angela; Torgerson, David; Mason, Su; Cullum, Nicky

    2006-06-17

    To assess the cost effectiveness of alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays for the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients admitted to hospital. Cost effectiveness analysis carried out alongside the pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial; a multicentre UK based pragmatic randomised controlled trial. 11 hospitals in six UK NHS trusts. Intention to treat population comprising 1971 participants. Kaplan Meier estimates of restricted mean time to development of pressure ulcers and total costs for treatment in hospital. Alternating pressure mattresses were associated with lower overall costs (283.6 pounds sterling per patient on average, 95% confidence interval--377.59 pounds sterling to 976.79 pounds sterling) mainly due to reduced length of stay in hospital, and greater benefits (a delay in time to ulceration of 10.64 days on average,--24.40 to 3.09). The differences in health benefits and total costs for hospital stay between alternating pressure mattresses and alternating pressure overlays were not statistically significant; however, a cost effectiveness acceptability curve indicated that on average alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays were associated with an 80% probability of being cost saving. Alternating pressure mattresses for the prevention of pressure ulcers are more likely to be cost effective and are more acceptable to patients than alternating pressure overlays.

  12. Improving cost-effectiveness of hypertension management at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To describe the pattern of prescribing for hypertension at a community health centre (CHC) and to evaluate the impact of introducing treatment guidelines and restricting availability of less cost-effective antihypertensive drugs on prescribing patterns, costs of drug treatment and blood pressure (BP) control. Design ...

  13. Flipping the Calculus Classroom: A Cost-Effective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a cost-effective approach to flipping the calculus classroom. In particular, the emphasis is on low-cost choices, both monetarily and with regards to faculty time, that make the daunting task of flipping a course manageable for a single instructor. Student feedback and overall impressions are also presented.

  14. Cost effectiveness of detritiating water with resin columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    There are technologies in use for cleaning up concentrated tritiated process water. These are not cost effective for tritiated water with low concentrations of tritium. There are currently no cost-effective technologies for cleaning up low-tritium-concentration tritiated water, such as most tritiated groundwater, spent fuel storage basin water, or underground storage tank water. Resin removal of tritium from tritiated water at low concentrations (near the order of magnitude of drinking water standard maximums) is being tested on TA-SO (Los Alamos National Laboratory's Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) waste streams. There are good theoretical and test indications that this may be a technologically effective means of removing tritium from tritiated water. Because of likely engineering design similarity, it is reasonable to anticipate that a resin column system's costs will be similar to some common commercial water treatment systems. Thus, the potential cost effectiveness of a resin treatment system offers hope for treating tritiated water at affordable costs. The TA-50 resin treatment cost projection of $18 per 1,000 gallons is within the same order of magnitude as cost data for typical commercial groundwater cleanup projects. The prospective Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resin treatment system at $18 per 1,000 gallons appears to have a likely cost advantage of at least an order of magnitude over the competing, developmental, water detritiation technologies

  15. The Effectiveness of Low-Cost Tele-Lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Hiromitsu; Kikuta, Reiko; Hamano, Takashi; Maesako, Takanori

    1997-01-01

    Compares distance education using PictureTel, a compressed-digital-video system via telephone lines (audio and visual interactive communication) in terms of its costs and effectiveness with traditional in-class education. Costing less than half the traditional approach, the study suggested distance education would be economical if used frequently.…

  16. Discriminant Analysis of the Effects of Software Cost Drivers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper work investigates the effect of software cost drivers on project schedule estimation of software development projects in Nigeria. Specifically, the paper determines the extent to which software cost variables affect our software project time schedule in our environment. Such studies are lacking in the recent ...

  17. Systemic cost-effectiveness analysis of food hazard reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Lawson, Lartey Godwin; Lund, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    stage are considered. Cost analyses are conducted for different risk reduction targets and for three alternative scenarios concerning the acceptable range of interventions. Results demonstrate that using a system-wide policy approach to risk reduction can be more cost-effective than a policy focusing...

  18. Welfare effects of the internalization of external cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijesen, M.; Korteweg, J.A.; Derriks, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of passing through the cost of external effects such as accidents, environment and noise to traffic and transport have been mapped. In nine out of the ten examined variants this 'internalization' will lead to an increase in welfare in the Netherlands. Internalization leads to a decrease of external costs of over 100 million to more than 1.7 billion euros annually. Internalization also brings about collection costs, international transfers and logistic adjustments. The balance of these effects varies from a welfare loss of 20 million euros to a welfare increase of 1.2 billion euros annually. [nl

  19. Operating dedicated data centers – is it cost-effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, M; Hogue, R; Hollowell, C; Strecker-Kellog, W; Wong, A; Zaytsev, A

    2014-01-01

    The advent of cloud computing centres such as Amazon's EC2 and Google's Computing Engine has elicited comparisons with dedicated computing clusters. Discussions on appropriate usage of cloud resources (both academic and commercial) and costs have ensued. This presentation discusses a detailed analysis of the costs of operating and maintaining the RACF (RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility) compute cluster at Brookhaven National Lab and compares them with the cost of cloud computing resources under various usage scenarios. An extrapolation of likely future cost effectiveness of dedicated computing resources is also presented.

  20. Operating Dedicated Data Centers - Is It Cost-Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, M.; Hogue, R.; Hollowell, C.; Strecker-Kellog, W.; Wong, A.; Zaytsev, A.

    2014-06-01

    The advent of cloud computing centres such as Amazon's EC2 and Google's Computing Engine has elicited comparisons with dedicated computing clusters. Discussions on appropriate usage of cloud resources (both academic and commercial) and costs have ensued. This presentation discusses a detailed analysis of the costs of operating and maintaining the RACF (RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility) compute cluster at Brookhaven National Lab and compares them with the cost of cloud computing resources under various usage scenarios. An extrapolation of likely future cost effectiveness of dedicated computing resources is also presented.

  1. Wood pellets. The cost-effective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    The article is based on an interview with Juhani Hakkarainen of Vapo Oy. Wood pellets are used in Finland primarily to heat buildings such as schools and offices and in the home. They are equally suitable for use in larger installations such as district heating plants and power stations. According to him wood pellets are suitable for use in coal-fired units generating heat, power, and steam. Price-wise, wood pellets are a particularly competitive alternative for small coal-fired plants away from the coast. Price is not the only factor on their side, however. Wood pellets also offer a good environmental profile, as they burn cleanly and generate virtually no dust, an important plus in urban locations. The fact that pellets are a domestically produced fuel is an added benefit, as their price does not fluctuate in the same way that the prices of electricity, oil, coal, and natural gas do. The price of pellets is largely based on direct raw material and labour costs, which are much less subject to ups and downs

  2. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis B vaccination of prison inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisu, Maria; Meltzer, Martin Isaac; Lyerla, Rob

    2002-12-13

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating inmates against hepatitis B. From the prison perspective, vaccinating inmates at intake is not cost-saving. It could be economically beneficial when the cost of a vaccine dose is US dollars 30 per dose, or there is no prevalence of infection upon intake, or the costs of treating acute or chronic disease are about 70% higher than baseline costs, or the incidence of infection during and after custody were >1.6 and 50%, respectively. The health care system realizes net savings even when there is no incidence in prison, or there is no cost of chronic liver disease, or when only one dose of vaccine is administered. Thus, while prisons might not have economic incentives to implement hepatitis B vaccination programs, the health care system would benefit from allocating resources to them.

  3. The cost effectiveness of intracyctoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Bruce; Harris, Anthony; Mortimer, Duncan

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the incremental cost effectiveness of ICSI, and total costs for the population of Australia. Treatment effects for three patient groups were drawn from a published systematic review and meta-analysis of trials comparing fertilisation outcomes for ICSI. Incremental costs derived from resource-based costing of ICSI and existing practice comparators for each patient group. Incremental cost per live birth for patients unsuited to IVF is estimated between A$8,500 and 13,400. For the subnormal semen indication, cost per live birth could be as low as A$3,600, but in the worst case scenario, there would just be additional incremental costs of A$600 per procedure. Multiplying out the additional costs of ICSI over the relevant target populations in Australia gives potential total financial implications of over A$31 million per annum. While there are additional benefits from ICSI procedure, particularly for those with subnormal sperm, the additional cost for the health care system is substantial.

  4. Clinical benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Profit

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal intensive care improves survival, but is associated with high costs and disability amongst survivors. Recent health reform in Mexico launched a new subsidized insurance program, necessitating informed choices on the different interventions that might be covered by the program, including neonatal intensive care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a decision analytic model of health and economic outcomes following preterm birth. Model parameters governing health outcomes were estimated from Mexican vital registration and hospital discharge databases, supplemented with meta-analyses and systematic reviews from the published literature. Costs were estimated on the basis of data provided by the Ministry of Health in Mexico and World Health Organization price lists, supplemented with published studies from other countries as needed. The model estimated changes in clinical outcomes, life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, lifetime costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs for neonatal intensive care compared to no intensive care. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis. In the base-case analysis, neonatal intensive care for infants born at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks gestational age prolonged life expectancy by 28, 43, and 34 years and averted 9, 15, and 12 DALYs, at incremental costs per infant of US$11,400, US$9,500, and US$3,000, respectively, compared to an alternative of no intensive care. The ICERs of neonatal intensive care at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks were US$1,200, US$650, and US$240, per DALY averted, respectively. The findings were robust to variation in parameter values over wide ranges in sensitivity analyses

  5. Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Hepatectomy-Induced Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Old Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yue; Guo, Shanbin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Ping; Zhao, Xiaochun

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of hydrogen-rich saline on the cognitive functions of elder mice with partial hepatectomy-induced postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Ninety-six old male Kunming mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 24 each): control group (group C), hydrogen-rich saline group (group H), POCD group (group P), and POCD + hydrogen-rich saline group (group PH). Cognitive function was subsequently assessed using Morris water-maze (MWM) test. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry, along with NF-κB activity determined by ELISA. The morphology of hippocampal tissues were further observed by HE staining. Learning and memory abilities of mice were significantly impaired at day 10 and day 14 post-surgery, as partial hepatectomy significantly prolonged the escape latency, decreased time at the original platform quadrant and frequency of crossing in group P when compared to group C (p hydrogen-rich saline (group PH) partially rescued spatial memory and learning as it shortened escape latency and increased time and crossing frequency of original platform compared to group P (p hydrogen-rich saline. Hydrogen-rich saline can alleviate POCD via inhibiting NF-κB activity in the hippocampus and reducing inflammatory response.

  6. The effect of TTNT nanotubes on hydrogen sorption using MgH2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Coutinho Brum

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotubes are promising materials to be used with magnesium hydride, as catalysts, in order to enhance hydrogen sorption. A study was performed on the hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of MgH2 with the addition of TTNT (TiTanate NanoTubes. The MgH2-TTNT composite was prepared by ball milling and the influence of the TTNT amount (1.0 and 5.0 wt. (% on the hydrogen capacity was evaluated. The milling of pure MgH2 was performed for 24 hours and afterwards the MgH2-TTNT composite was milled for 20 minutes. Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM were used to evaluate the nanotube synthesis and show the particle morphology of the MgH2-TTNT composite, respectively. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC examination provided some evidence with the shifting of the peaks obtained when the amount of TTNT is increased. The hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics tests showed that the TTNT nanotubes can enhance hydrogen sorption effectively and the total hydrogen capacity obtained was 6.5 wt. (%.

  7. Effect of hydrogen environment on the separation of Fe grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shuai; Martin, May L.; Robertson, Ian M.; Sofronis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    A density-functional theory based empirical potential was used to explore the energies of different types of Fe grain boundaries and free surfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium with a hydrogen environment. The classical model for calculating the ideal work of separation with solute atoms is extended to account for every trapping site. This yields the lowest-energy structures at different hydrogen chemical potentials (or gas pressures). At hydrogen gas pressures lower than 1000 atm, the reduction of the reversible work of separation is less than 33% and it increases to 36% at a gas pressure of 5000 atm. Near the hydride formation limit, 5 × 10 4  atm, the reduction is 44%. Based on the magnitude of these reductions for complete decohesion, and accounting for experimental observations of the microstructure associated with hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture of Fe, it is posited that hydrogen-enhanced plasticity and attendant effects establish the local conditions responsible for the transition in fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular. The conclusion is reached that intergranular failure occurs by a reduction of the cohesive energy but with contributions from structural as well as compositional changes in the grain boundary that are driven by hydrogen-enhanced plasticity processes.

  8. The effect of TTNT nanotubes on hydrogen sorption using MgH{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brum, Mariana Coutinho; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da; Santos, Dilson Silva dos, E-mail: monique@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEMM/COPPEP/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2013-11-01

    Nanotubes are promising materials to be used with magnesium hydride, as catalysts, in order to enhance hydrogen sorption. A study was performed on the hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of MgH{sub 2} with the addition of TTNT (TiTanate nanotubes). The MgH{sub 2} -TTNT composite was prepared by ball milling and the influence of the TTNT amount (1.0 and 5.0 wt. (%)) on the hydrogen capacity was evaluated. The milling of pure MgH{sub 2} was performed for 24 hours and afterwards the MgH{sub 2} -TTNT composite was milled for 20 minutes. Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to evaluate the nanotube synthesis and show the particle morphology of the MgH{sub 2} -TTNT composite, respectively. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) examination provided some evidence with the shifting of the peaks obtained when the amount of TTNT is increased. The hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics tests showed that the TTNT nanotubes can enhance hydrogen sorption effectively and the total hydrogen capacity obtained was 6.5 wt. (%). (author)

  9. Effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of 17-4 PH stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capeletti, T.L.

    1976-01-01

    Fracture toughness (K/sub c/) of 17-4 PH stainless steel decreased significantly with increased hydrogen test pressure for a variety of heat treatment conditions: solution annealed, underaged, peak-aged, and overaged. Minimum toughness (13 MPa√m) was obtained with peak-aged samples tested in 69.5-MPa hydrogen; toughness was maximum (100 MPa√m) for samples tested in helium. Aging treatments increased the hardness from 28 R/sub c/ for solution-annealed material to 42 R/c/ for peak-aged material and correspondingly decreased the fracture toughness in high-pressure hydrogen (K/sub H/) from 31 to 13 MPa√m. However, increased hardness had no substantial effect on the K/sub c/ in helium. Fracture mechanism changed from predominantly ductile rupture in helium to cleavage in 69.5-MPa hydrogen, with mixed-mode fractures at lower hydrogen pressure (3.5-MPa). On the basis of these data, 17-4 PH stainless steel is not recommended for hydrogen service

  10. The effect of TTNT nanotubes on hydrogen sorption using MgH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brum, Mariana Coutinho; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da; Santos, Dilson Silva dos

    2013-01-01

    Nanotubes are promising materials to be used with magnesium hydride, as catalysts, in order to enhance hydrogen sorption. A study was performed on the hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of MgH 2 with the addition of TTNT (TiTanate nanotubes). The MgH 2 -TTNT composite was prepared by ball milling and the influence of the TTNT amount (1.0 and 5.0 wt. (%)) on the hydrogen capacity was evaluated. The milling of pure MgH 2 was performed for 24 hours and afterwards the MgH 2 -TTNT composite was milled for 20 minutes. Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to evaluate the nanotube synthesis and show the particle morphology of the MgH 2 -TTNT composite, respectively. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) examination provided some evidence with the shifting of the peaks obtained when the amount of TTNT is increased. The hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics tests showed that the TTNT nanotubes can enhance hydrogen sorption effectively and the total hydrogen capacity obtained was 6.5 wt. (%). (author)

  11. MELCOR simulation of steam condensation effect on hydrogen behavior in THAI HM-2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seongnyeon; Lee, Jung-Jae; Cho, Yong-Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, MELCOR simulation was carried out for THAI HM-2 experiment of OECD. As a results, stratification of hydrogen cloud was reasonably captured in MELCOR simulation. Furthermore, the pressure from simulation results in cases where mass transfer coefficient of MELCOR condensation model was modified was good agreement with the experimental results. Containment Filtered Ventilation System (CFVS) has been introduced as facility to prevent containment failure during severe accident. However, possibility of hydrogen risk has been issued due to inflow of hydrogen, condensation and removal of steam and complicated inner structure in CFVS. Preferentially benchmark work for THAI HM-2 experiment of OECD was decided to validate the methodology before detailed assessment of hydrogen risk in CFVS. The objectives of THAI HM-2 experiment were evaluation of hydrogen behavior, verification of numerical analysis tools and so on. In this paper, therefore, MELCOR simulation was carried out in comparison with the experiment results. Additionally, steam condensation effect was considered for detailed simulation. Hydrogen concentration from MELCOR results was underestimated in comparison to the experimental results.

  12. A molecular dynamics study of nuclear quantum effect on the diffusion of hydrogen in condensed phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Tokumasu, Takashi; Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Koshi, Mitsuo; Hayashie, A. Koichi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule on its diffusivity is analyzed using Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The path integral centroid MD (CMD) method is applied for the reproduction method of time evolution of the molecules. The diffusion coefficient of liquid hydrogen is calculated using the Green-Kubo method. The simulation is performed at wide temperature region and the temperature dependence of the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule is addressed. The calculation results are compared with those of classical MD results. As a result, it is confirmed that the diffusivity of hydrogen molecule is changed depending on temperature by the quantum effect. It is clarified that this result can be explained that the dominant factor by quantum effect on the diffusivity of hydrogen changes from the swollening the potential to the shallowing the potential well around 30 K. Moreover, it is found that this tendency is related to the temperature dependency of the ratio of the quantum kinetic energy and classical kinetic energy

  13. Effect of pre-strain on susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Tiwari, Abhishek; Jain, Uttam; Keskar, Nachiket; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Ram N.; Dey, Gautam K.

    2015-01-01

    The role of pre-strain on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel was investigated using constant nominal strain-rate tension test. The samples were pre-strained to different levels of plastic strain and their mechanical behavior and mode of fracture under the influence of hydrogen was studied. The effect of plastic pre-strain in the range of 0.5–2% on the ductility of the samples was prominent. Compared to samples without any pre-straining, effect of hydrogen was more pronounced on pre-strained samples. Prior deformation reduced the material ductility under the influence of hydrogen. Up to 35% reduction in the total strain was observed under the influence of hydrogen in pre-strained samples. Hydrogen charging resulted in increased occurrence of brittle zones on the fracture surface. Hydrogen Enhanced Decohesion (HEDE) was found to be the dominant mechanism of fracture.

  14. Modelling of the hydrogen effects on the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor; Modelisation des effets de l'hydrogene sur la morphogenese des nanostructures de silicium hydrogene dans un reacteur plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brulin, Q

    2006-01-15

    results. However, these results were obtained without taking into account the presence of atomic hydrogen in the plasma. A thorough study of the effect of atomic hydrogen on the metastable structures produced in simulation is thus carried out. The study of the interaction of atomic hydrogen on the surface of the cluster gives the possibility of finding the proportion of mechanisms (Eley-Rideal hydrogen desorption, hot atom mechanism or absorption on the surface of the cluster) in agreement with experiments on recombination on silicon surfaces. The interaction of atomic hydrogen with the surface of the clusters also induces a modification of the internal organization of the silicon atoms. The organization of the internal silicon atoms of the clusters as a function of cluster size (magic number) makes it possible to understand why the experimental observations indicate the presence of crystalline structures. Finally this study leads to the prediction of a particularly stable structure which could be used as precursor for the growth of silicon nano-wires. (author)

  15. Geostatistics and cost-effective environmental remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautman, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous sites within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex have been contaminated with various radioactive and hazardous materials by defense-related activities during the post-World War II era. The perception is that characterization and remediation of these contaminated sites will be too costly using currently available technology. Consequently, the DOE Office of Technology Development has funded development of a number of alternative processes for characterizing and remediating these sites. The former Feed-Materials Processing Center near Fernald, Ohio (USA), was selected for demonstrating several innovative technologies. Contamination at the Fernald site consists principally of particulate uranium and derivative compounds in surficial soil. A field-characterization demonstration program was conducted during the summer of 1994 specifically to demonstrate the relative economic performance of seven proposed advanced-characterization tools for measuring uranium activity of in-situ soils. These innovative measurement technologies are principally radiation detectors of varied designs. Four industry-standard measurement technologies, including conventional, regulatory-agency-accepted soil sampling followed by laboratory geochemical analysis, were also demonstrated during the program for comparative purposes. A risk-based economic-decision model has been used to evaluate the performance of these alternative characterization tools. The decision model computes the dollar value of an objective function for each of the different characterization approaches. The methodology not only can assist site operators to choose among engineering alternatives for site characterization and/or remediation, but also can provide an objective and quantitative basis for decisions with respect to the completeness of site characterization

  16. Analyses of Blood Bank Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hwai-Tai Chen

    In view of the increasing costs of hospital care, it is essential to investigate methods to improve the labor efficiency and the cost-effectiveness of the hospital technical core in order to control costs while maintaining the quality of care. This study was conducted to develop indices to measure efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and the quality of blood banks; to identify factors associated with efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality; and to generate strategies to improve blood bank labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Indices developed in this study for labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness were not affected by patient case mix and illness severity. Factors that were associated with labor efficiency were identified as managerial styles, and organizational designs that balance workload and labor resources. Medical directors' managerial involvement was not associated with labor efficiency, but their continuing education and specialty in blood bank were found to reduce the performance of unnecessary tests. Surprisingly, performing unnecessary tests had no association with labor efficiency. This suggested the existence of labor slack in blood banks. Cost -effectiveness was associated with workers' benefits, wages, and the production of high-end transfusion products by hospital-based donor rooms. Quality indices used in this study included autologous transfusion rates, platelet transfusion rates, and the check points available in an error-control system. Because the autologous transfusion rate was related to patient case mix, severity of illness, and possible inappropriate transfusion, it was not recommended to be used for quality index. Platelet-pheresis transfusion rates were associated with the transfusion preferences of the blood bank medical directors. The total number of check points in an error -control system was negatively associated with government ownership and workers' experience. Recommendations for improving labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness

  17. The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Yuzbashyan, Ruzanna; Sahakyan, Gayane; Avagyan, Tigran; Mosina, Liudmila

    2011-11-08

    The cost-effectiveness of introducing infant rotavirus vaccination in Armenia in 2012 using Rotarix(R) was evaluated using a multiple birth cohort model. The model considered the cost and health implications of hospitalisations, primary health care consultations and episodes not leading to medical care in children under five years old. Rotavirus vaccination is expected to cost the Ministry of Health $220,000 in 2012, rising to $830,000 in 2016 following termination of GAVI co-financing, then declining to $260,000 in 2025 due to vaccine price maturity. It may reduce health care costs by $34,000 in the first year, rising to $180,000 by 2019. By 2025, vaccination may be close to cost saving to the Ministry of Health if the vaccine purchase price declines as expected. Once coverage has reached high levels, vaccination may prevent 25,000 cases, 3000 primary care consultations, 1000 hospitalisations and 8 deaths per birth cohort vaccinated. The cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) saved is estimated to be about $650 from the perspective of the Ministry of Health, $850 including costs accrued to both the Ministry and to GAVI, $820 from a societal perspective excluding indirect costs and $44 from a societal perspective including indirect costs. Since the gross domestic product per capita of Armenia in 2008 was $3800, rotavirus vaccination is likely to be regarded as "very cost-effective" from a WHO standpoint. Vaccination may still be "very cost-effective" if less favourable assumptions are used regarding vaccine price and disease incidence, as long as DALYs are not age-weighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of an RCT in rehabilitation after lumbar spinal fusion: a low-cost, behavioural approach is cost-effective over individual exercise therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Laurberg, Ida; Christensen, Finn B

    2008-01-01

    Recently, Christensen et al. reported the clinical effects of a low-cost rehabilitation program equally efficient to a relatively intensive program of individual, physiotherapist-guided exercise therapy. Yet, the low-cost approach is not fully supported as an optimal strategy until a full......-scale economic evaluation, including extra-hospital effects such as service utilization in the primary health care sector and return-to-work, is conducted. The objective of this study was to conduct such evaluation i.e. investigate the cost-effectiveness of (1) a low-cost rehabilitation regimen...... with a behavioural element and (2) a regimen of individual exercise therapy, both in comparison with usual practice, from a health economic, societal perspective. Study design was a cost-effectiveness evaluation of an RCT with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients having had posterolateral or circumferential fusion...

  19. Investigations on the heterogenous catalytic hydrogenation using isotope effect and gamma- and neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudlacek, R; Cabicar, J [Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Jaderne Chemie

    1976-01-01

    The kinetic and solvent isotope effects during the maleic acid heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation and deuteration in light and heavy water have been studied. Also the effect of the gamma and neutron irradiation on the Ni-ZnO catalysts (with various ratios of components) on the reaction kinetics and mechanism has been measured, as well as the effect of pH on the adsorption behaviour of maleic acid and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate. Existence of different adsorption centers for hydrogen and maleic acid could be deduced from these experiments. A reaction mechanism based on the two-dimensional diffusion of components in the surface is proposed. The catalyst is formed from Ni and ZnO-microspheres. Hydrogen is bound to nickel and maleic acid is adsorbed on the ZnO-microspheres. The reaction takes place on the boundary layers of these microspheres.

  20. Roughness effects on the hydrogen signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, W.; Bousquet, B.; Lasue, J.

    2017-01-01

    On Mars, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as performed by the ChemCam instrument can be used to measure the hydrogen content of targets in situ, under a low pressure CO2 atmosphere. However, unexpected variations observed in the Martian dataset suggest an effect related to target...... roughness. Here, we present a series of laboratory experiments that reproduce the effect observed on Mars and explore possible causes. We show that the hydrogen peak intensity increases significantly with increasing exposure of the target surface to the LIBS plasma, and that these variations are specific......, this effect should be taken into account for the quantification of hydrogen in any LIBS applications where the roughness of the target is significant....

  1. Effectiveness of thermal ignition devices in lean hydrogen-air-steam mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, H.; McFarlane, R.; Liu, D.D.S.

    1985-03-01

    Deliberate ignition of hydrogen at low concentrations in reactor containment systems is one method of controlling hydrogen during degraded core accidents. Since many postulated accident conditions have substantial amounts of steam present, experiments have been performed to determine the hydrogen-air-steam concentration regimes in which ignitors would be effective. In these experiments, both a GM AC 7G thermal flow plug and a Tayco Model 3442 ignitor have been used. These ignitors have been installed in PWR containments with ice condensers and in BWR Mark III containments. This report presents the results of these ignitor effectiveness experiments, and gives the ignition limits and the effect of steam on the ignitor surface temperatures required for ignition

  2. Effects of cost metric on cost-effectiveness of protected-area network design in urban landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, J C; Lockwood, J L; Maslo, B; Fenn, K H; Leu, K

    2016-04-01

    A common goal in conservation planning is to acquire areas that are critical to realizing biodiversity goals in the most cost-effective manner. The way monetary acquisition costs are represented in such planning is an understudied but vital component to realizing cost efficiencies. We sought to design a protected-area network within a forested urban region that would protect 17 birds of conservation concern. We compared the total costs and spatial structure of the optimal protected-area networks produced using three acquisition-cost surrogates (area, agricultural land value, and tax-assessed land value). Using the tax-assessed land values there was a 73% and 78% cost savings relative to networks derived using area or agricultural land value, respectively. This cost reduction was due to the considerable heterogeneity in acquisition costs revealed in tax-assessed land values, especially for small land parcels, and the corresponding ability of the optimization algorithm to identify lower-cost parcels for inclusion that had equal value to our target species. Tax-assessed land values also reflected the strong spatial differences in acquisition costs (US$0.33/m(2)-$55/m(2)) and thus allowed the algorithm to avoid inclusion of high-cost parcels when possible. Our results add to a nascent but growing literature that suggests conservation planners must consider the cost surrogate they use when designing protected-area networks. We suggest that choosing cost surrogates that capture spatial- and size-dependent heterogeneity in acquisition costs may be relevant to establishing protected areas in urbanizing ecosystems. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmeti, Albana; Preza, Iria; Simaku, Artan; Nelaj, Erida; Clark, Andrew David; Felix Garcia, Ana Gabriela; Lara, Carlos; Hoestlandt, Céline; Blau, Julia; Bino, Silvia

    2015-05-07

    Rotavirus vaccines have been introduced in several European countries but can represent a considerable cost, particularly for countries that do not qualify for any external financial support. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of introducing rotavirus vaccination into Albania's national immunization program and to inform national decision-making by improving national capacity to conduct economic evaluations of new vaccines. The TRIVAC model was used to assess vaccine impact and cost-effectiveness. The model estimated health and economic outcomes attributed to 10 successive vaccinated birth cohorts (2013-2022) from a government and societal perspective. Epidemiological and economic data used in the model were based on national cost studies, and surveillance data, as well as estimates from the scientific literature. Cost-effectiveness was estimated for both the monovalent (RV1) and pentavalent vaccines (RV5). A multivariate scenario analysis (SA) was performed to evaluate the uncertainty around the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). With 3% discounting of costs and health benefits over the period 2013-2022, rotavirus vaccination in Albania could avert 51,172 outpatient visits, 14,200 hospitalizations, 27 deaths, 950 disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and gain 801 life-years. When both vaccines were compared to no vaccination, the discounted cost per DALY averted was US$ 2008 for RV1 and US$ 5047 for RV5 from a government perspective. From the societal perspective the values were US$ 517 and US$ 3556, respectively. From both the perspectives, the introduction of rotavirus vaccine to the Albanian immunization schedule is either cost-effective or highly cost-effective for a range of plausible scenarios. In most scenarios, including the base-case scenario, the discounted cost per DALY averted was less than three times the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. However, rotavirus vaccination was not cost-effective when rotavirus cases

  4. Cost effectiveness of facility and home based HIV voluntary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost effectiveness of facility and home based HIV voluntary counseling and ... Background: In Uganda, the main stay for provision of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  5. Cost-effectiveness and radiation risk of breast cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rombach, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Base cost effectiveness risk associated with radiological screening for tuberculosis and lung tumor the Government of Netherlands advised against mass screening. However, mass screening remains an important method in the case of breast cancer

  6. Bioinformatics tools for development of fast and cost effective simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioinformatics tools for development of fast and cost effective simple sequence repeat ... comparative mapping and exploration of functional genetic diversity in the ... Already, a number of computer programs have been implemented that aim at ...

  7. Determining the Effect (the Social Costs) of Exclusion under the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determining the Effect (the Social Costs) of Exclusion under the South African Exclusionary Rule: Should Factual Guilt Tilt the Scales in Favour of the Admission of Unconstitutionally Obtained Evidence?

  8. Low-cost metal oxide activated carbon prepared and modified by microwave heating method for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, S. E. [Islamic Azad University, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Novel microporous activated carbon (MAC) with high surface area and pore volume has been synthesized by microwave heating. Iron oxide nanoparticles were loaded into MAC by using Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O followed by microwave irradiation for up to five minutes. The surface modified microporous activated carbon was characterized by BET, XRD, SEM and thermogravimetric examinations. Adsorption data of H{sub 2} on the unmodified and modified MACs were collected with PCT method for a pressure range up to 120 bar at 303 K. Greater hydrogen adsorption was observed on the carbon adsorbents doped with 1.45 wt% of iron oxide nanoparticle loaded due to the joint properties of hydrogen adsorption on the carbon surface and the spill-over of hydrogen molecules into carbon structures.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Di; Tan, Anna; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Tan, Donald; Finkelstein, Eric Andrew

    2014-01-01

    To determine the long-term cost-effectiveness of osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis (OOKP) relative to no treatment among patients with end-stage corneal and ocular surface diseases in Singapore. Cost-effectiveness analysis based on data from a retrospective cohort study. From a health system perspective, we calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of OOKP treatment relative to no treatment over a 30-year horizon, based on data from a cohort of 23 patients who underwent OOKP surgery between 2004 and 2009 at Singapore National Eye Centre. Preoperative and postoperative vision-related quality-of-life values were estimated from patients' visual outcomes and were used to calculate the gain in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) resulting from OOKP treatment. Unsubsidized costs for surgery, consultations, examinations, medications, follow-up visits, and treatments for complications were retrieved from patients' bills to estimate the total costs associated with OOKP treatment. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to test the robustness of the model. Over a 30-year period, OOKP treatment, compared with no treatment, improved QALYs by 3.991 among patients with end-stage corneal and ocular surface diseases at an additional cost of S$67 840 (US$55 150), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of S$17 000/QALY (US$13 820/QALY). Based on commonly cited cost-effectiveness benchmarks, the OOKP is a cost-effective treatment for patients with end-stage corneal and ocular surface diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Early vs Late Tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Carrie; Rudmik, Luke

    2016-10-01

    The timing of tracheostomy in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation is controversial. An important consideration that is currently missing in the literature is an evaluation of the economic impact of an early tracheostomy strategy vs a late tracheostomy strategy. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the early tracheostomy strategy vs the late tracheostomy strategy. This economic analysis was performed using a decision tree model with a 90-day time horizon. The economic perspective was that of the US health care third-party payer. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per tracheostomy avoided. Probabilities were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials. Costs were obtained from the published literature and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. A multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to account for uncertainty surrounding mean values used in the reference case. The reference case demonstrated that the cost of the late tracheostomy strategy was $45 943.81 for 0.36 of effectiveness. The cost of the early tracheostomy strategy was $31 979.12 for 0.19 of effectiveness. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the late tracheostomy strategy compared with the early tracheostomy strategy was $82 145.24 per tracheostomy avoided. With a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000, the early tracheostomy strategy is cost-effective with 56% certainty. The adaptation of an early vs a late tracheostomy strategy depends on the priorities of the decision-maker. Up to a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000 per tracheostomy avoided, the early tracheostomy strategy has a higher probability of being the more cost-effective intervention.

  11. Effect of trace solute hydrogen on the fatigue life of electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Junhui; Hu, Shubing, E-mail: 187352581@qq.com; Ji, Longbo

    2017-01-27

    This paper describes an experimental hydrogenating treatment on a Ti-6Al-4V fatigue specimen containing an electron beam welding joint. The effect of trace solute hydrogen on the microstructures and fatigue behavior of welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints was investigated using an optical microscope, X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and other methodologies. The results demonstrated that no hydride formed in the hydrogenated weld joint at a hydrogen concentration of less than 0.140 wt%. Internal hydrogen, which was present in the alloy in the form of solid solution atoms, caused lattice distortion in the β phase. The fatigue properties of the Ti-6Al-4V weld joint hydrogenated with trace solute hydrogen decreased significantly. The solute hydrogen led to an increase in the brittleness of the hydrogenated weld joint. The dislocation densities in the secondary α and β phase were higher. Fatigue cracks nucleated at the α/β interfaces. The effect of solute hydrogen accelerated the separation of the persistent slip bands, which decreased the threshold required for fatigue crack growth. Solute hydrogen also accelerated the fatigue crack growth rate. These two factors contributed to the degradation of the fatigue life in the electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints.

  12. Effect of prospective reimbursement on nursing home costs.

    OpenAIRE

    Coburn, A F; Fortinsky, R; McGuire, C; McDonald, T P

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study evaluates the effect of Maine's Medicaid nursing home prospective payment system on nursing home costs and access to care for public patients. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The implementation of a facility-specific prospective payment system for nursing homes provided the opportunity for longitudinal study of the effect of that system. Data sources included audited Medicaid nursing home cost reports, quality-of-care data from state facility survey and licensure files, and ...

  13. Cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Anjali J; Smith, Catherine C; Laros, Russell K; Caughey, Aaron B; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking. A decision-analytic model was designed comparing private umbilical cord blood banking with no umbilical cord blood banking. Baseline assumptions included a cost of $3,620 for umbilical cord blood banking and storage for 20 years, a 0.04% chance of requiring an autologous stem cell transplant, a 0.07% chance of a sibling requiring an allogenic stem cell transplant, and a 50% reduction in risk of graft-versus-host disease if a sibling uses banked umbilical cord blood. Private cord blood banking is not cost-effective because it cost an additional $1,374,246 per life-year gained. In sensitivity analysis, if the cost of umbilical cord blood banking is less than $262 or the likelihood of a child needing a stem cell transplant is greater than 1 in 110, private umbilical cord blood banking becomes cost-effective. Currently, private umbilical cord blood banking is cost-effective only for children with a very high likelihood of needing a stem cell transplant. Patients considering private blood banking should be informed of the remote likelihood that a unit will be used for a child or another family member. III.

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of computer-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Loewenberger

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for more cost-effective and pedagogically acceptable combinations of teaching and learning methods to sustain increasing student numbers means that the use of innovative methods, using technology, is accelerating. There is an expectation that economies of scale might provide greater cost-effectiveness whilst also enhancing student learning. The difficulties and complexities of these expectations are considered in this paper, which explores the challenges faced by those wishing to evaluate the costeffectiveness of computer-based assessment (CBA. The paper outlines the outcomes of a survey which attempted to gather information about the costs and benefits of CBA.

  15. [Effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Bian, Y X; Feng, T T; Zhang, J H; Yu, Y H

    2017-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn. Methods: One hundred and sixty ICR mice were divided into sham injury, hydrogen, pure burn, and burn+ hydrogen groups according to the random number table, with 40 mice in each group. Mice in pure burn group and burn+ hydrogen group were inflicted with 40% total body surface area full-thickness scald (hereafter referred to as burn) on the back, while mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group were sham injured. Mice in hydrogen group and burn+ hydrogen group inhaled 2% hydrogen for 1 h at post injury hour (PIH) 1 and 6, respectively, while mice in sham injury group and pure burn group inhaled air for 1 h. At PIH 24, lung tissue of six mice in each group was harvested, and then pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by HE staining and the lung tissue injury pathological score was calculated. Inferior vena cava blood and lung tissue of other eight mice in each group were obtained, and then content of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum and lung tissue was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum and lung tissue was detected by spectrophotometry. After arterial blood of other six mice in each group was collected for detection of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)), the wet and dry weight of lung tissue were weighted to calculate lung wet to dry weight ratio. The survival rates of the other twenty mice in each group during post injury days 7 were calculated. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, LSD test and log-rank test. Results: (1) At PIH 24, lung tissue of mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group showed no abnormality. Mice in pure burn group were with pulmonary interstitial edema, serious rupture of alveolar capillary wall, and infiltration of a large number of inflammatory cells. Mice in burn+ hydrogen group were with mild

  16. Cost effectiveness of teratology counseling - the Motherisk experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-01-01

    While the benefits of evidence-based counseling to large numbers of women and physicians are intuitively evident, there is an urgent need to document that teratology counseling, in addition to improving the quality of life of women and families, also leads to cost saving. The objective of the present study was to calculate the cost effectiveness of the Motherisk Program, a large teratology information and counseling service at The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto. We analyzed data from the Motherisk Program on its 2012 activities in two domains: 1) Calculation of cost-saving in preventing unjustified pregnancy terminations; and 2) prevention of major birth defects. Cost of pregnancy termination and lifelong cost of specific birth defects were identified from primary literature and prorated for cost of living for the year 2013. Prevention of 255 pregnancy terminations per year led to cost savings of $516,630. The total estimated number of major malformations prevented by Motherisk counseling in 2012 was 8.41 cases at a total estimated cost of $9,032,492. With an estimated minimum annual prevention of 8 major malformations, and numerous unnecessary terminations of otherwise- wanted pregnancies, a cost saving of $10 million can be calculated. In 2013 the operating budget of Motherisk counseling totaled $640,000. Even based on the narrow range of activities for which we calculated cost, this service is highly cost- effective. Because most teratology counseling services are operating in a very similar method to Motherisk, it is fair to assume that these results, although dependent on the size of the service, are generalizable to other countries.

  17. Cost effectiveness of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Awaidy, Salah Thabit; Gebremeskel, Berhanu G; Al Obeidani, Idris; Al Baqlani, Said; Haddadin, Wisam; O'Brien, Megan A

    2014-06-17

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) is the leading cause of diarrhea in young children in Oman, incurring substantial healthcare and economic burden. We propose to formally assess the potential cost effectiveness of implementing universal vaccination with a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) on reducing the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) in Oman A Markov model was used to compare two birth cohorts, including children who were administered the RV5 vaccination versus those who were not, in a hypothetical group of 65,500 children followed for their first 5 years of life in Oman. The efficacy of the vaccine in reducing RGE-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) and office visits, and days of parental work loss for children receiving the vaccine was based on the results of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST). The outcome of interest was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained from health care system and societal perspectives. A universal RV5 vaccination program is projected to reduce, hospitalizations, ED visits, outpatient visits and parental work days lost due to rotavirus infections by 89%, 80%, 67% and 74%, respectively. In the absence of RV5 vaccination, RGE-related societal costs are projected to be 2,023,038 Omani Rial (OMR) (5,259,899 United States dollars [USD]), including 1,338,977 OMR (3,481,340 USD) in direct medical costs. However, with the introduction of RV5, direct medical costs are projected to be 216,646 OMR (563,280 USD). Costs per QALY saved would be 1,140 OMR (2,964 USD) from the health care payer perspective. An RV5 vaccination program would be considered cost saving, from the societal perspective. Universal RV5 vaccination in Oman is likely to significantly reduce the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis and may be cost-effective from the payer perspective and cost saving from the societal perspective.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of screening for asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdeyn, C P; Powers, W J

    1996-11-01

    The value of screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis has become an important issue with the recently reported beneficial effect of endarterectomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of using Doppler ultrasound as a screening tool to select subjects for arteriography and subsequent surgery. A computer model was developed to simulate the cost-effectiveness of screening a cohort of 1000 men during a 20-year period. The primary outcome measure was incremental present-value dollar expenditures for screening and treatment per incremental present-value quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) saved. Estimates of disease prevalence and arteriographic and surgical complication rates were obtained from the literature. Probabilities of stroke and death with surgical and medical treatment were obtained from published clinical trials. Doppler ultrasound sensitivity and specificity were obtained through review of local experience. Estimates of costs were obtained from local Medicare reimbursement data. A one-time screening program of a population with a high prevalence (20%) of > or = 60% stenosis cost $35130 per incremental QALY gained. Decreased surgical benefit or increased annual discount rate was detrimental, resulting in lost QALYs. Annual screening cost $457773 per incremental QALY gained. In a low-prevalence (4%) population, one-time screening cost $52588 per QALY gained, while annual screening was detrimental. The cost-effectiveness of a one-time screening program for an asymptomatic population with a high prevalence of carotid stenosis may be cost-effective. Annual screening is detrimental. The most sensitive variables in this simulation model were long-term stroke risk reduction after surgery and annual discount rate for accumulated costs and QALYs.

  19. Effectiveness of deep cleaning followed by hydrogen peroxide decontamination during high Clostridium difficile infection incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, E L; Parnell, P; Thirkell, G; Verity, P; Copland, M; Else, P; Denton, M; Hobson, R P; Wilcox, M H

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains an infection control challenge, especially when environmental spore contamination and suboptimal cleaning may increase transmission risk. To substantiate the long-term effectiveness throughout a stroke rehabilitation unit (SRU) of deep cleaning and hydrogen peroxide decontamination (HPD), following a high incidence of CDI. Extensive environmental sampling (342 sites on each occasion) for C. difficile using sponge wipes was performed: before and after deep cleaning with detergent/chlorine agent; immediately following HPD; and on two further occasions, 19 days and 20 weeks following HPD. C. difficile isolates underwent polymerase chain reaction ribotyping and multi-locus variable repeat analysis (MLVA). C. difficile was recovered from 10.8%, 6.1%, 0.9%, 0% and 3.5% of sites at baseline, following deep cleaning, immediately after HPD, and 19 days and 20 weeks after HPD, respectively. C. difficile ribotypes recovered after deep cleaning matched those from CDI cases in the SRU during the previous 10 months. Similarly, 10/12 of the positive sites identified at 20 weeks post-HPD harboured the same C. difficile ribotype (002) and MLVA pattern as the isolate from the first post-HPD CDI case. CDI incidence [number of cases on SRU per 10 months (January-October 2011)] declined from 20 before to seven after the intervention. HPD, after deep cleaning with a detergent/chlorine agent, was highly effective for removing environmental C. difficile contamination. Long-term follow-up demonstrated that a CDI symptomatic patient can rapidly recontaminate the immediate environment. Determining a role for HPD should include long-term cost-effectiveness evaluations. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Clean energy and the hydrogen economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, N P; Kurban, Z

    2017-07-28

    In recent years, new-found interest in the hydrogen economy from both industry and academia has helped to shed light on its potential. Hydrogen can enable an energy revolution by providing much needed flexibility in renewable energy systems. As a clean energy carrier, hydrogen offers a range of benefits for simultaneously decarbonizing the transport, residential, commercial and industrial sectors. Hydrogen is shown here to have synergies with other low-carbon alternatives, and can enable a more cost-effective transition to de-carbonized and cleaner energy systems. This paper presents the opportunities for the use of hydrogen in key sectors of the economy and identifies the benefits and challenges within the hydrogen supply chain for power-to-gas, power-to-power and gas-to-gas supply pathways. While industry players have already started the market introduction of hydrogen fuel cell systems, including fuel cell electric vehicles and micro-combined heat and power devices, the use of hydrogen at grid scale requires the challenges of clean hydrogen production, bulk storage and distribution to be resolved. Ultimately, greater government support, in partnership with industry and academia, is still needed to realize hydrogen's potential across all economic sectors.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Cost-effectiveness of a central venous catheter care bundle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate A Halton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bundled approach to central venous catheter care is currently being promoted as an effective way of preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI. Consumables used in the bundled approach are relatively inexpensive which may lead to the conclusion that the bundle is cost-effective. However, this fails to consider the nontrivial costs of the monitoring and education activities required to implement the bundle, or that alternative strategies are available to prevent CR-BSI. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a bundle to prevent CR-BSI in Australian intensive care patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A Markov decision model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the bundle relative to remaining with current practice (a non-bundled approach to catheter care and uncoated catheters, or use of antimicrobial catheters. We assumed the bundle reduced relative risk of CR-BSI to 0.34. Given uncertainty about the cost of the bundle, threshold analyses were used to determine the maximum cost at which the bundle remained cost-effective relative to the other approaches to infection control. Sensitivity analyses explored how this threshold alters under different assumptions about the economic value placed on bed-days and health benefits gained by preventing infection. If clinicians are prepared to use antimicrobial catheters, the bundle is cost-effective if national 18-month implementation costs are below $1.1 million. If antimicrobial catheters are not an option the bundle must cost less than $4.3 million. If decision makers are only interested in obtaining cash-savings for the unit, and place no economic value on either the bed-days or the health benefits gained through preventing infection, these cost thresholds are reduced by two-thirds. CONCLUSIONS: A catheter care bundle has the potential to be cost-effective in the Australian intensive care setting. Rather than anticipating cash-savings from this intervention, decision

  2. Study of low energy hydrogen ion implantation effects in silicon: electric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barhdadi, A.

    1985-07-01

    Several analysis methods have been developed: hydrogen distribution analysis by nuclear reaction, crystal disorder evaluation by R.B.S., chemical impurities identification by SIMS, optical measurements, electrical characterization of surface barriers, deep level spectroscopy DLTS, ... All these analyses have been made after implantation then after thermal annealing. A model explaining the effect of implantation then after thermal annealing. A model explaining the effect of implanted hydrogen is proposed, the implantation creates an important quantity of defects in a thin layer near the surface; a chemical attack removes them. In Schottky devices, this layer has a basic role on carrier transport phenomena. Other results are given, some of them allow to give an account of the passivation by hydrogen implantation [fr

  3. Sensitization of erbium in silicon-rich silica : the effect of annealing temperature and hydrogen passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, A.R.; Forcales, M.; Elliman, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of annealing temperature and hydrogen passivation on the excitation cross-section and photoluminescence of erbium in silicon-rich silica. Samples were prepared by co-implantation of Si and Er into SiO 2 followed by a single thermal anneal at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100 degrees C, and with or without hydrogen passivation performed at 500 degrees C. Using time-resolved photoluminescence, the effective erbium excitation cross-section is shown to increase by a factor 3, while the number of optically active erbium ions decreases by a factor of 4 with increasing annealing temperature. Hydrogen passivation is shown to increase the luminescence intensity and to shorten the luminescence lifetime at 1.54 μm only in the presence of Si nanocrystals. The implications fo these results for realizing a silicon-based optical amplifier are also discussed. (author). 19 refs., 3 figs

  4. The effect of hydrogen on B4C coatings fabrication in inductively coupled plasma torch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. J. Guo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbide (B4C coatings are prepared by an RF inductively coupled plasma (ICP torch with different amounts of hydrogen introduced into the sheath gas. The effects of the added hydrogen on the characteristics of the plasma are diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy and high speed photography. The effects on the melting of B4C particles in the plasma are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The microstructure of the B4C coatings was determined with SEM imaging and x-ray diffraction analysis. The results show that adding hydrogen to the sheath gas leads to plasma contraction, which results in higher gas temperature of plasma. It also enhances B4C particles spheroidizing and improves the compactness of B4C coatings. Plasma processing does not change the main phase of boron carbide. The obtained results on B4C coatings on Cu substrates allows for improving the B4C coatings fabrication process.

  5. Dynamic modelling of hydrogen evolution effects in the all-vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.A.; Al-Fetlawi, H.; Walsh, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    A model for hydrogen evolution in an all-vanadium redox flow battery is developed, coupling the dynamic conservation equations for charge, mass and momentum with a detailed description of the electrochemical reactions. Bubble formation at the negative electrode is included in the model, taking into account the attendant reduction in the liquid volume and the transfer of momentum between the gas and liquid phases, using a modified multiphase-mixture approach. Numerical simulations are compared to experimental data for different vanadium concentrations and mean linear electrolyte flow rates, demonstrating good agreement. Comparisons to simulations with negligible hydrogen evolution demonstrate the effect of gas evolution on the efficiency of the battery. The effects of reactant concentration, flow rate, applied current density and gas bubble diameter on hydrogen evolution are investigated. Significant variations in the gas volume fraction and the bubble velocity are predicted, depending on the operating conditions.

  6. Effects of dexamethasone and pheniramine hydrogen maleate on stress response in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Kerem; Bostanci, Erdal Birol; Aksoy, Erol; Ulas, Murat; Yigit, Tuba; Erdemli, Mehmet Ozcan; Ercin, Ugur; Bilgihan, Ayse; Saydam, Gul; Akoglu, Musa

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) still leads to significant postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and pain. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone or pheniramine hydrogen maleate, either alone or combined, in reducing the stress response and symptoms after LC. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups, each consisting of 20 patients: control, dexamethasone (8 mg/2 mL), pheniramine hydrogen maleate (45.5 mg/2 mL), and the combined group. The drugs were given before anesthesia induction. C-reactive protein levels (CRP) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were significantly less in the dexamethasone (P = .003) and combined groups (P pheniramine hydrogen maleate (P = .005) significantly reduced PONV. Dexamethasone significantly reduced postoperative pain and the systemic acute-phase response, whereas these effects were only partially attained with pheniramine hydrogen maleate. Both dexamethasone and pheniramine hydrogen maleate significantly reduced PONV. An additive effect seemed to occur if these drugs were used in combination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khouja, Lutfi T; Baron, Eli M; Johnson, J Patrick; Kim, Terrence T; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-06-01

    Medical care has been evolving with the increased influence of a value-based health care system. As a result, more emphasis is being placed on ensuring cost-effectiveness and utility in the services provided to patients. This study looks at this development in respect to minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) costs. A literature review using PubMed, the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Registry, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) was performed. Papers were included in the study if they reported costs associated with minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). If there was no mention of cost, CEA, cost-utility analysis (CUA), quality-adjusted life year (QALY), quality, or outcomes mentioned, then the article was excluded. Fourteen studies reporting costs associated with MISS in 12,425 patients (3675 undergoing minimally invasive procedures and 8750 undergoing open procedures) were identified through PubMed, the CEA Registry, and NHS EED. The percent cost difference between minimally invasive and open approaches ranged from 2.54% to 33.68%-all indicating cost saving with a minimally invasive surgical approach. Average length of stay (LOS) for minimally invasive surgery ranged from 0.93 days to 5.1 days compared with 1.53 days to 12 days for an open approach. All studies reporting EBL reported lower volume loss in an MISS approach (range 10-392.5 ml) than in an open approach (range 55-535.5 ml). There are currently an insufficient number of studies published reporting the costs of MISS. Of the studies published, none have followed a standardized method of reporting and analyzing cost data. Preliminary findings analyzing the 14 studies showed both cost saving and better outcomes in MISS compared with an open approach. However, more Level I CEA/CUA studies including cost/QALY evaluations with specifics of the techniques utilized need to be reported in a standardized manner to make more accurate conclusions on the cost effectiveness of

  8. Cost-effective conservation planning: lessons from economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Joshua M; Dundas, Steven J; Messer, Kent D

    2013-08-15

    Economists advocate that the billions of public dollars spent on conservation be allocated to achieve the largest possible social benefit. This is "cost-effective conservation"-a process that incorporates both monetized benefits and costs. Though controversial, cost-effective conservation is poorly understood and rarely implemented by planners. Drawing from the largest publicly financed conservation programs in the United States, this paper seeks to improve the communication from economists to planners and to overcome resistance to cost-effective conservation. Fifteen practical lessons are distilled, including the negative implications of limiting selection with political constraints, using nonmonetized benefit measures or benefit indices, ignoring development risk, using incomplete cost measures, employing cost measures sequentially, and using benefit indices to capture costs. The paper highlights interrelationships between benefits and complications such as capitalization and intertemporal planning. The paper concludes by identifying the challenges at the research frontier, including incentive problems associated with adverse selection, additionality, and slippage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost effectiveness of reducing radon exposure in Spanish dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, P.A.; Gutierrez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Published information on the distribution of radon levels in Spanish single family dwellings is used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of three different intervention scenarios: remediation of existing dwellings, radon proofing of all future dwellings and the targetting of areas with higher than average indoor radon concentrations. Analysis is carried out on the basis of a Reference Level of 400 Bq m -3 for the existing housing stock and 200 Bq m -3 for new dwellings. Certain assumptions are made about the effectiveness and durability of the measures applied and annualised costs are used to calculate the costs per lung cancer death averted. The results reveal that targetting future housing is a more cost-effective option than remediation of existing dwellings with radon concentrations above the Reference Level -the costs per lung cancer death averted are typically $145000. In high-risk areas, these costs can be considerably less, depending on the percentage of dwellings expected to exceed the Reference Level and the average savings in exposure as a result of the intervention. The costs of intervention to reduce lung cancer deaths following exposure to radon compare favourably with those of other health programmes in other countries. (Author)

  10. Cost Benefit Analysis of Performing a Pilot Project for Hydrogen-Powered Ground Support Equipment at Lemoore Naval Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    34 Bullnet eCommerce Solutions, Bull Group. http://www.bullnet.co.uk/ (accessed November 25, 2006). 13 Philip Baxley, Cynthia Verdugo-Peralta, and Wolfgang...Benefits of Fuel Cells." Bullnet eCommerce Solutions, Bull Group. http://www.bullnet.co.uk/ (accessed November 25, 2006). "Hydrogen Production and

  11. Cost-effectiveness of hysteroscopy screening for infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasius, Jenneke C; Eijkemans, René J C; Mol, Ben W J; Fauser, Bart C J M; Fatemi, Human M; Broekmans, Frank J M

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of office hysteroscopy screening prior to IVF. Therefore, the cost-effectiveness of two distinct strategies - hysteroscopy after two failed IVF cycles (Failedhyst) and routine hysteroscopy prior to IVF (Routinehyst) - was compared with the reference strategy of no hysteroscopy (Nohyst). When present, intrauterine pathology was treated during hysteroscopy. Two models were constructed and evaluated in a decision analysis. In model I, all patients had an increase in pregnancy rate after screening hysteroscopy prior to IVF; in model II, only patients with intrauterine pathology would benefit. For each strategy, the total costs and live birth rates after a total of three IVF cycles were assessed. For model I (all patients benefit from hysteroscopy), Routinehyst was always cost-effective compared with Nohyst or Failedhyst. For the Routinehyst strategy, a monetary profit would be obtained in the case where hysteroscopy would increase the live birth rate after IVF by ≥ 2.8%. In model II (only patients with pathology benefit from hysteroscopy), Routinehyst also dominated Failedhyst. However, hysteroscopy performance resulted in considerable costs. In conclusion, the application of a routine hysteroscopy prior to IVF could be cost-effective. However, randomized trials confirming the effectiveness of hysteroscopy are needed. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact and cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenka, Clint; Parashar, Umesh; Tate, Jacqueline E; Khan, Jahangir A M; Groman, Devin; Chacko, Stephen; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Clark, Andrew; Atherly, Deborah

    2017-07-13

    Diarrheal disease is a leading cause of child mortality globally, and rotavirus is responsible for more than a third of those deaths. Despite substantial decreases, the number of rotavirus deaths in children under five was 215,000 per year in 2013. Of these deaths, approximately 41% occurred in Asia and 3% of those in Bangladesh. While Bangladesh has yet to introduce rotavirus vaccination, the country applied for Gavi support and plans to introduce it in 2018. This analysis evaluates the impact and cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Bangladesh and provides estimates of the costs of the vaccination program to help inform decision-makers and international partners. This analysis used Pan American Health Organization's TRIVAC model (version 2.0) to examine nationwide introduction of two-dose rotavirus vaccination in 2017, compared to no vaccination. Three mortality scenarios (low, high, and midpoint) were assessed. Benefits and costs were examined from the societal perspective over ten successive birth cohorts with a 3% discount rate. Model inputs were locally acquired and complemented by internationally validated estimates. Over ten years, rotavirus vaccination would prevent 4000 deaths, nearly 500,000 hospitalizations and 3 million outpatient visits in the base scenario. With a Gavi subsidy, cost/disability adjusted life year (DALY) ratios ranged from $58/DALY to $142/DALY averted. Without a Gavi subsidy and a vaccine price of $2.19 per dose, cost/DALY ratios ranged from $615/DALY to $1514/DALY averted. The discounted cost per DALY averted was less than the GDP per capita for nearly all scenarios considered, indicating that a routine rotavirus vaccination program is highly likely to be cost-effective. Even in a low mortality setting with no Gavi subsidy, rotavirus vaccination would be cost-effective. These estimates exclude the herd immunity benefits of vaccination, so represent a conservative estimate of the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination

  13. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Kenya and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigei, Charles; Odaga, John; Mvundura, Mercy; Madrid, Yvette; Clark, Andrew David

    2015-05-07

    Rotavirus vaccines have the potential to prevent a substantial amount of life-threatening gastroenteritis in young African children. This paper presents the results of prospective cost-effectiveness analyses for rotavirus vaccine introduction for Kenya and Uganda. In each country, a national consultant worked with a national technical working group to identify appropriate data and validate study results. Secondary data on demographics, disease burden, health utilization, and costs were used to populate the TRIVAC cost-effectiveness model. The baseline analysis assumed an initial vaccine price of $0.20 per dose, corresponding to Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance stipulated copay for low-income countries. The incremental cost-effectiveness of a 2-dose rotavirus vaccination schedule was evaluated for 20 successive birth cohorts from the government perspective in both countries, and from the societal perspective in Uganda. Between 2014 and 2033, rotavirus vaccination can avert approximately 60,935 and 216,454 undiscounted deaths and hospital admissions respectively in children under 5 years in Kenya. In Uganda, the respective number of undiscounted deaths and hospital admission averted is 70,236 and 329,779 between 2016 and 2035. Over the 20-year period, the discounted vaccine program costs are around US$ 80 million in Kenya and US$ 60 million in Uganda. Discounted government health service costs avoided are US$ 30 million in Kenya and US$ 10 million in Uganda (or US$ 18 million including household costs). The cost per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted from a government perspective is US$ 38 in Kenya and US$ 34 in Uganda (US$ 29 from a societal perspective). Rotavirus vaccine introduction is highly cost-effective in both countries in a range of plausible 'what-if' scenarios. The involvement of national experts improves the quality of data used, is likely to increase acceptability of the results in decision-making, and can contribute to strengthened national

  14. Effect of prospective reimbursement on nursing home costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, A F; Fortinsky, R; McGuire, C; McDonald, T P

    1993-04-01

    This study evaluates the effect of Maine's Medicaid nursing home prospective payment system on nursing home costs and access to care for public patients. The implementation of a facility-specific prospective payment system for nursing homes provided the opportunity for longitudinal study of the effect of that system. Data sources included audited Medicaid nursing home cost reports, quality-of-care data from state facility survey and licensure files, and facility case-mix information from random, stratified samples of homes and residents. Data were obtained for six years (1979-1985) covering the three-year period before and after implementation of the prospective payment system. This study used a pre-post, longitudinal analytical design in which interrupted, time-series regression models were estimated to test the effects of prospective payment and other factors, e.g., facility characteristics, nursing home market factors, facility case mix, and quality of care, on nursing home costs. Prospective payment contributed to an estimated $3.03 decrease in total variable costs in the third year from what would have been expected under the previous retrospective cost-based payment system. Responsiveness to payment system efficiency incentives declined over the study period, however, indicating a growing problem in achieving further cost reductions. Some evidence suggested that cost reductions might have reduced access for public patients. Study findings are consistent with the results of other studies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of prospective payment systems in restraining nursing home costs. Potential policy trade-offs among cost containment, access, and quality assurance deserve further consideration, particularly by researchers and policymakers designing the new generation of case mix-based and other nursing home payment systems.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of the Norwegian breast cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijt, P A; Heijnsdijk, E A M; de Koning, H J

    2017-02-15

    The Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP) has a nation-wide coverage since 2005. All women aged 50-69 years are invited biennially for mammography screening. We evaluated breast cancer mortality reduction and performed a cost-effectiveness analysis, using our microsimulation model, calibrated to most recent data. The microsimulation model allows for the comparison of mortality and costs between a (hypothetical) situation without screening and a situation with screening. Breast cancer incidence in Norway had a steep increase in the early 1990s. We calibrated the model to simulate this increase and included recent costs for screening, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and travel and productivity loss. We estimate a 16% breast cancer mortality reduction for a cohort of women, invited to screening, followed over their complete lifetime. Cost-effectiveness is estimated at NOK 112,162 per QALY gained, when taking only direct medical costs into account (the cost of the buses, examinations, and invitations). We used a 3.5% annual discount rate. Cost-effectiveness estimates are substantially below the threshold of NOK 1,926,366 as recommended by the WHO guidelines. For the Norwegian population, which has been gradually exposed to screening, breast cancer mortality reduction for women exposed to screening is increasing and is estimated to rise to ∼30% in 2020 for women aged 55-80 years. The NBCSP is a highly cost-effective measure to reduce breast cancer specific mortality. We estimate a breast cancer specific mortality reduction of 16-30%, at the cost of 112,162 NOK per QALY gained. © 2016 UICC.

  16. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of a pressure ulcer quality collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Roland

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A quality improvement collaborative (QIC in the Dutch long-term care sector (nursing homes, assisted living facilities, home care used evidence-based prevention methods to reduce the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers (PUs. The collaborative consisted of a core team of experts and 25 organizational project teams. Our aim was to determine its cost-effectiveness from a healthcare perspective. Methods We used a non-controlled pre-post design to establish the change in incidence and prevalence of PUs in 88 patients over the course of a year. Staff indexed data and prevention methods (activities, materials. Quality of life (Qol weights were assigned to the PU states. We assessed the costs of activities and materials in the project. A Markov model was built based on effectiveness and cost data, complemented with a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. To illustrate the results of longer term, three scenarios were created in which change in incidence and prevalence measures were (1 not sustained, (2 partially sustained, and (3 completely sustained. Results Incidence of PUs decreased from 15% to 4.5% for the 88 patients. Prevalence decreased from 38.6% to 22.7%. Average Quality of Life (Qol of patients increased by 0.02 Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs in two years; healthcare costs increased by €2000 per patient; the Incremental Cost-effectiveness Ratio (ICER was between 78,500 and 131,000 depending on whether the changes in incidence and prevalence of PU were sustained. Conclusions During the QIC PU incidence and prevalence significantly declined. When compared to standard PU care, the QIC was probably more costly and more effective in the short run, but its long-term cost-effectiveness is questionable. The QIC can only be cost-effective if the changes in incidence and prevalence of PU are sustained.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of a pressure ulcer quality collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makai, Peter; Koopmanschap, Marc; Bal, Roland; Nieboer, Anna P

    2010-06-01

    A quality improvement collaborative (QIC) in the Dutch long-term care sector (nursing homes, assisted living facilities, home