WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmos rosat science

  1. ROSAT Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stephen; Pisarski, Ryszard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) ROSAT SCIENCE DATA CENTER (RSDC) activities for the recent years of our contract. Details have already been reported in the monthly reports. The SAO was responsible for the High Resolution Imager (HRI) detector on ROSAT. We also provided and supported the HRI standard analysis software used in the pipeline processing (SASS). Working with our colleagues at the Max Planck in Garching Germany (MPE), we fixed bugs and provided enhancements. The last major effort in this area was the port from VMS/VAX to VMS/ALPHA architecture. In 1998, a timing bug was found in the HRI standard processing system which degraded the positional accuracy because events accessed incorrect aspect solutions. The bug was fixed and we developed off-line correction routines and provided them to the community. The Post Reduction Off-line Software (PROS) package was developed by SAO and runs in the IRAF environment. Although in recent years PROS was not a contractual responsibility of the RSDC, we continued to maintain the system and provided new capabilities such as the ability to deal with simulated AXAF data in preparation for the NASA call for proposals for Chandra. Our most recent activities in this area included the debugging necessary for newer versions of IRAF which broke some of our software. At SAO we have an operating version of PROS and hope to release a patch even though almost all functionality that was lost was subsequently recovered via an IRAF patch (i.e. most of our problems were caused by an IRAF bug).

  2. The SuperCOSMOS Science Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, N.; Read, M.; Mann, R.; Sutorius, E.; Bond, I.; MacGillivray, H.; Williams, P.; Lawrence, A.

    2004-07-01

    The SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey (SSS {http://www-wfau.roe.ac.uk/sss}; Hambly et al., 2001) consists of digitised scans of Schmidt photographic survey material in a multi-colour (BRI), multi-epoch, uniformly calibrated product. It covers the whole southern hemisphere, with an extension into the north currently underway. Public online access to the 2 Tbytes of SSS pixel data and object catalogues has been available for some time; data are being downloaded at a rate of several gigabytes per week, and many new science results are emerging from community use of the data. In this poster we describe the terabyte-scale SuperCOSMOS Science Archive {http://thoth.roe.ac.uk/ssa} (SSA), which is a recasting of the SSS object catalogue system from flat files into an RDBMS, with an enhanced user interface. We describe some aspects of the hardware and schema design of the SSA, which aims to produce a high performance, VO-compatible database, suitable for data mining by `power users', while maintaining the ease of use praised in the old SSS system. Initially, the SSA will allow access through web forms and a flexible SQL interface. It acts as the prototype for the next generation survey archives to be hosted by the University of Edinburgh's Wide Field Astronomy Unit, such as the WFCAM Science Archive of infrared sky survey data, as well as being a scalability testbed for use by AstroGrid, the UK's Virtual Observatory project. As a result of these roles, it will display subsequently an expanding functionality, as web - and later, Grid - services are deployed on it.

  3. SPS 'Fabric of the Cosmos' Science Cafés

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    2011-12-01

    Hosted by Brian Greene and based on his best selling book of the same title, The Fabric of the Cosmos is a new four part NOVA series that explores the deepest mysteries of space and time. The program was kicked off by more than 30 'Cosmic Cafes' around the country, as part of a Society of Physics Students, NOVA outreach effort funded by an NSF grant. A Cosmic Café is a science café based on the topics discussed in The Fabric of the Cosmos. Science cafes are open events for non-scientists, where they can have an informal discussion with a scientist in a very casual location, usually a restaurant, coffee shop, or a bar. During the summer I assisted in planning this kick off, by reviewing science café and The Fabric of the Cosmos resources and suggesting revisions to make them more relevant for an SPS audience. I also organized and moderated the first Cosmic Café. The café that I organized was discussion based, with the speaker, Dr. James Gates, starting with a short talk and then opening up the floor for questions. Organizing a Cosmic Café gave me first-hand experience with the challenges an SPS chapter might face while organizing a café themselves. I will discuss lessons learned and the effectiveness of the first ever themed science café blitz.

  4. Cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Sparrow, Giles

    2007-01-01

    The magnificent vault of stars emblazoning Earth’s night skies are but an infinitesimal fraction of the hundreds of billions that inhabit our galaxy—and there are at least as many galaxies in the universe as there are stars in the Milky Way. This collection of images of staggering beauty makes sense of this dizzying celestial panorama by exploring it one step at a time, illustrating the planets, moons, stars, nebulae, white dwarfs, black holes, and other exotica that populate the heavens, with some of science's most spectacular photographs. The book opens with an orbital survey of planet Earth, before venturing into the solar system heading for interstellar space and the heart of our galaxy. As the journey unfolds, the rhythms of stellar life emerge: we pass through dark clouds of dust and gas ablaze with newly smelted stars and we witness dying stars bloom and fade as planetary nebulae, or tear themselves apart as supernovae. Having crossed the Milky Way, we enter intergalactic space, where we watch the ...

  5. Uses of wonder in popular science: Cosmos: A Personal Voyage and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsing, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    This paper analyses the use of wonder in the TV-series Cosmos: A Personal Voyage (1980). Popular science has been studied extensively (e.g. Broks 2006; Leane 2007; Perrault 2013), and wonder has been studied moderately (e.g. Daston & Park 1998; Fuller 2006; Vasalou 2015). However, there are very few studies of wonder in popular science. This paper explores how and why wonder is used in Cosmos, with the wider aim of understanding uses of wonder in popular science. The studies that discuss wonder in popular science (Fahnestock 1986; Perrault 2013) argue that wonder is used to enthuse the audience about science, but they do not discuss why wonder has this ability, nor whether wonder has other functions. This paper argues that Fuller's (2006) psychological and evolutionary account of wonder can elucidate why wonder has the ability to enthuse; it discerns three senses of 'wonder' (related to objects, emotions and attitudes); and it discusses other functions of wonder (existential, aesthetic and ethical). Due to the centrality of astrobiological questions in Cosmos, this paper also highlights the relation of these questions to the senses and functions of wonder in Cosmos.

  6. Final Science Reports of the US Experiments Flown on the Russian Biosatellite Cosmos 2229

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, James P. (Editor); Skidmore, Michael G. (Editor); Helwig, Denice A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Cosmos 2229 was launched on December 29, 1992, containing a biological payload including two young male rhesus monkeys, insects, amphibians, and cell cultures. The biosatellite was launched from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia for a mission duration of 11.5 days. The major research objectives were: (1) Study of adaptive response mechanisms of mammals during flight; and (2) Study of physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular, motor system and brain function in primates during early and later adaptation phases. American scientists and their Russian collaborators conducted 11 experiments on this mission which included extensive preflight and postflight studies with rhesus monkeys. Biosamples and data were subsequently transferred to the United States. The U.S. responsibilities for this flight included the development of experiment protocols, the fabrication of some flight instrumentation and experiment-specific ground-based hardware, the conducting of preflight and postflight testing and the analysis of biospecimens and data for the U.S. experiments. A description of the Cosmos 2229 mission is presented in this report including preflight, on-orbit and postflight activities. The flight and ground-based bioinstrumentation which was developed by the U.S. and Russia is also described, along with the associated preflight testing ot the U.S. hardware. Final Science Reports for the experiments are also included.

  7. Cutting Cosmos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Henrik Hvenegaard

    The foundation for this book is an ethnographic study of masculinity in a Bugkalot village in northern Philippines. While offering new research on the Bugkalot, widely known as the Ilongot, more than 30 years after the last important works were written on this famous hill-people, Cutting Cosmos...... into egalitarian relations. Cutting Cosmos shows how these seemingly opposed characteristics of male life - the egalitarianism and the assertive ideals - are interwoven. Acts of dominance are presented as acts of transgression that are persistently ritualized, contained and isolated as spectacular events within...

  8. How "Discover the COSMOS", "PATHWAY", "Go-Lab" and "Inspiring Science Education" are changing the science education in European high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkoumelis, Christine

    2014-04-01

    It has been noted by various reports that during recent years, there has been an alarming decline in young people's interest for science studies and mathematics. Since it is believed that the traditional teaching methods often fail to foster positive attitudes towards learning science, the European Commission has made intensive efforts to promote science education in schools though new methods based on the inquiry methodology of learning: questions, search and answers. This should be coupled to laboratories and hands-on experience which should be structured and scaffolded in a pedagogically meaningful way. "PATHWAY", "Discover the COSMOS" and "ISE" have been providing the lesson plans and the best practices for teachers and students and "Go-lab" is working towards an integrated set up of on-line labs for large scale use in science education. In the next sections some concrete examples which aim to bring the High Energy Physics (HEP) frontier research to schools will be given.

  9. Mindsteps to the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, Gerald S

    2002-01-01

    Mindsteps to the Cosmos shows how modern global civilization depends on giant leaps of understanding that have been made in the past. Science and technology have been inspired and formulated by the sky — the cosmos in which we live. Human development could not have taken place on a cloud-shrouded planet. Mathematics was invented to track the movements of the sun, moon and stars even though back then these were thought to be gods. The space program has taken us beyond the earth, and satellite systems are exploring to the ends of the visible universe. This book provides the reader with algorithms to construct personal computer programs for finding the position of the moon and planets, and for calculating dates through historic periods in the Egyptian as well as the old and new style calendars.

  10. Extreme cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The universe is all about extremes. Space has a temperature 270°C below freezing. Stars die in catastrophic supernova explosions a billion times brighter than the Sun. A black hole can generate 10 million trillion volts of electricity. And hypergiants are stars 2 billion kilometres across, larger than the orbit of Jupiter. Extreme Cosmos provides a stunning new view of the way the Universe works, seen through the lens of extremes: the fastest, hottest, heaviest, brightest, oldest, densest and even the loudest. This is an astronomy book that not only offers amazing facts and figures but also re

  11. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  12. The ROSAT X-ray Background Dipole

    OpenAIRE

    Plionis, M.; Georgantopoulos, I.

    1998-01-01

    We estimate the dipole of the diffuse 1.5 keV X-ray background from the ROSAT all-sky survey map of Snowden et al (1995). We first subtract the diffuse Galactic emission by fitting to the data an exponential scale height, finite radius, disk model. We further exclude regions of low galactic latitudes, of local X-ray emission (eg the North Polar Spur) and model them using two different methods. We find that the ROSAT X-ray background (XRB) dipole points towards $(l,b) ~ (288, 25) \\pm 19 degree...

  13. ROSAT: X ray survey of compact groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkom, Jacqueline

    1993-01-01

    This is the final technical report on grant NAG5-1954, which was awarded under the NASA ROSAT Guest Investigator Program to Columbia University. This grant was awarded for a number of projects on two rather different topics: (1) an x-ray survey of compact groups of galaxies; and (2) the fate of gas

  14. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Silverman, John; McDowell, Jonathan; Callanan, Paul; Snowden, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is 'wobbled', possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC (an x ray spectral fitting package) response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how, the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  15. COSMOS Launch Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnins, Indulis

    2002-01-01

    COSMOS-3M is a two stage launcher with liquid propellant rocket engines. Since 1960's COSMOS has launched satellites of up to 1.500kg in both circular low Earth and elliptical orbits with high inclination. The direct SSO ascent is available from Plesetsk launch site. The very high number of 759 launches and the achieved success rate of 97,4% makes this space transportation system one of the most reliable and successful launchers in the world. The German small satellite company OHB System co-operates since 1994 with the COSMOS manufacturer POLYOT, Omsk, in Russia. They have created the joint venture COSMOS International and successfully launched five German and Italian satellites in 1999 and 2000. The next commercial launches are contracted for 2002 and 2003. In 2005 -2007 COSMOS will be also used for the new German reconnaissance satellite launches. This paper provides an overview of COSMOS-3M launcher: its heritage and performance, examples of scientific and commercial primary and piggyback payload launches, the launch service organization and international cooperation. The COSMOS launch service business strategy main points are depicted. The current and future position of COSMOS in the worldwide market of launch services is outlined.

  16. Scientists as Producers, Presenters, Videographers, Distributors and 'Stars': The Revolution In Science Filmmaking, from COSMOS to iPhones on Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.; Morris, K.

    2013-12-01

    In 1980, Carl Sagan's COSMOS received ratings of some 16 million and won three Emmys and a Peabody award. Sagan was hailed as a 'Showman of Science' by Time magazine, confirming his status as a science superstar. Haines-Stiles, 1st author for this presentation, was a Senior Producer and series director on what was for several decades PBS's highest-rated science series. Some researchers still consider primetime series on national networks as THE way to engage and inform audiences. But a revolution in both the making and consuming of science film and television has transformed the media landscape from high profile series such as COSMOS to more of a 'horizontal' ecosystem in which different formats for diverse audiences via multiple distribution networks are the norm. From the early 1990's the Internet has played an increasingly prominent role in this revolution. In 1993, Haines-Stiles and Akuginow added interactivity to traditional one-way TV broadcasts with 'Dale's Dive Diary,' in what was arguably the world's first science blog, detailing online the joys and rigors of working in Antarctica. Increasingly, the evolution of media allowed for the documentation of the process of doing science along with "eureka" discoveries and press conference results. In POLAR-PALOOZA (PPZA) this new perspective was further extended by taking Arctic and Antarctic researchers on the road to science museums in some 25 communities across the USA for spoken-word performances supported by High Definition video profiles of scientists at work at remote locations. In one instance, a researcher was given a crash course in videography and loaned a low-cost prosumer camcorder to take with her to the heart of East Antarctica. Excellent video was captured, and made part of large screen presentations in IMAX-scale theaters. In addition to the Summative Evaluation (required by project sponsors, NSF and NASA) which focused on audience responses, a recent research paper by communications scholar, Kim

  17. Welcome to the Potato Powered Cosmos

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    As part of the Art@CMS initiative, UK artist Rachael Nee worked with a group of international teachers taking part in the 2017 High School Teacher Programme to produce an art installation. The Potato Powered Cosmos represents CERN as an interrelated system of experiment, machine, energy and people. The installation emphasises the importance of CERN’s community - it doesn’t work without human interaction. Art@CMS has produced a ‘how-to’ guide for other art and science teachers who would like to recreate the Potato Powered Cosmos with their students.

  18. ROSAT observations of six millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Thorsett, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT observations toward six known millisecond radio pulsars. These observations yielded upper limits to the X-ray flux in the ROSAT band (0.1-2.4 keV) for five pulsars and a possible association of an X-ray source with PSR B1821-24, in the globular cluster M28. At the 99.9% confidence level, the source is pulsed at the expected radio pulsar frequency. We compare our results with predicted X-ray luminosities by Seward & Wang Oegelman. The X-ray luminosities of PSRs B1257+12 and J0437-4715, millisecond pulsars with similar periods and spin-down rates, are found to differ by more than a factor of 25. X-ray emission from radio pulsars has been ascribed to a thermal component arising from a surface hot spot and a power-law magnetospheric component (Halpern & Ruderman). In the context of this model and these observations, we argue that the orientation of the magnetic and rotation axes with respect to the line of sight is very different for PSR J0437-4715 compared to PSR B1257+12. Finally, we suggest that the beaming factor for X-ray emission is independent of the pulsar period, unlike that for radio emission; if so, most millisecond pulsars are visible in the radio but no at X-ray energies.

  19. Engines for the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Stephen L.; Reisz, Al; Wyckoff, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Galactic forces spiral across the cosmos fueled by nuclear fission and fusion and atoms in plasmatic states with throes of constraints of gravitational forces and magnetic fields, In their wanderings these galaxies spew light, radiation, atomic and subatomic particles throughout the universe. Throughout the ages of man visions of journeying through the stars have been wondered. If humans and human devices from Earth are to go beyond the Moon and journey into deep space, it must be accomplished with like forces of the cosmos such as electrical fields, magnetic fields, ions, electrons and energies generated from the manipulation of subatomic and atomic particles. Forms of electromagnetic waves such as light, radio waves and lasers must control deep space engines. We won't get far on our Earth accustomed hydrocarbon fuels.

  20. ROSAT observations of the Jupiter aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Bagenal, F.; Seward, F.; Na, C.; Gladstone, G. R.; Cravens, T. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Clarke, J. T.; Elsner, R.; Stern, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Roentgen satellite (ROSAT) high-resolution imager (HRI) and position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations of Jupiter obtained in April 1991 and May 1992 reveal soft X-ray emissions apparently associated with Jupiter's aurora and similar to X-ray emssions observed earlier by the Einstein Observatory. The HRI images show emission mainly from Jupiter's northern hemisphere at all Jovian longitudes observed, and there is some indication of a longitudinal modulation of the emission in phase with well-known ultraviolet modulation of the northern aurora. The PSPC data reveal a very soft spectrum. Comparison of the observed spectrum with models for both electron bremsstrahlung radiation and line emission from S and O ions indicates that the line spectrum gives a much better statistical fit to the observed spectrum. The X ray observations presented here therefore support the hypothesis that ion precipitation is the most likely cause of the Jovian X ray emissions, a result first suggested by the Einstein results (Metzger et al., 1983).

  1. La ciencia del cosmos, la ciencia en el cosmos : 2015 : ciclo de conferencias de astrofisica y cosmologia

    CERN Document Server

    Science of the Cosmos, Science in the Cosmos : 2015 : series of lectures on astrophysics and cosmology

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to "Science of the Cosmos, Sciences in the Cosmos", the series of lectures that the BBVA Foundation has been offering, live and on DVD, since March 2011. Lecture 1 : Comets and planets / Willy Benz ; lecture 2 : The discovery that the Universe is expanding / James E. Peebles ; lecture 3 : The Universe : continuing surprises / Wendy Freedman ; lecture 4 : The high energy Universe : gamma rays, cosmis rays, neutron stars and black holes / Roger Blandford ; lecture 5 : Earliest light, from the end of the Earth / John M. Kovac ; lecture 6 : The amazing liquid xenon for dark matter WIMPs detection / Elena Aprile

  2. La ciencia del cosmos, la ciencia en el cosmos : 2013-2014 : ciclo de conferencias de astrofisica y cosmologia

    CERN Document Server

    Science of the Cosmos, Science in the Cosmos : 2013-2014 : series of lectures on astrophysics and cosmology

    2014-01-01

    Welcome to "Science of the Cosmos, Sciences in the Cosmos", the series of lectures that the BBVA Foundation has been offering, live and on DVD, since March 2011. Lecture 1 : Let there be light : finding the earliest galaxies / Richard Ellis ; lecture 2 : The origin of the galaxies / Simon White ; lecture 3 : Astrobiology : the quest for the conditions of life in the Universe / Gerda Horneck ; lecture 4 : The long-term stability of planetary systems / Scott Tremaine ; lecture 5 : Asteroseismology : the study of starquakes and its impact on astrophysics / Conny Aerts ; lecture 6 : From Mars to multiverse / Martin Rees

  3. Astrophysics Decoding the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Astrophysics: Decoding the Cosmos is an accessible introduction to the key principles and theories underlying astrophysics. This text takes a close look at the radiation and particles that we receive from astronomical objects, providing a thorough understanding of what this tells us, drawing the information together using examples to illustrate the process of astrophysics. Chapters dedicated to objects showing complex processes are written in an accessible manner and pull relevant background information together to put the subject firmly into context. The intention of the author is that the book will be a 'tool chest' for undergraduate astronomers wanting to know the how of astrophysics. Students will gain a thorough grasp of the key principles, ensuring that this often-difficult subject becomes more accessible.

  4. SPS Fabric of the Cosmos Cafe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anish

    2012-02-01

    Hosted by Brian Greene and based on his best-selling book of the same title, The Fabric of the Cosmos is a new four- part NOVA series that explores the deepest mysteries of space and time. The program was kicked-off by 30 ``Cosmic Cafes'' being held around the country funded by an NSF grant which allows SPS-NOVA to fund SPS chapters for these events. During the summer I assisted in planning this kick-off, reviewing and suggesting revisions of resources related to the NOVA series to make them relevant to an SPS audience. I also got to organize and moderate the first ``Cosmic Cafe.'' The Cosmic cafe that I organized was discussion based, with our speaker Dr. James Gates starting with a short talk and then opening the floor up for questions. By organizing a ``Cosmic cafe,'' I got real hand experience about the challenges an SPS chapter would face while organizing a cafe themselves. Based on my experience I shall also discuss the effectiveness of the first ever themed science cafe blitz. A science caf'e is an informal discussion with an expert in a very casual location, usually a restaurant, coffee shop, or a bar. A science cafe is mostly discussion based, but has a lot of freedom for the format. A ``Cosmic'' cafe is a science cafe which is based around the topics discussed in the documentary ``The Fabric of the Cosmos.''

  5. On lunar exospheric column densities and solar wind access beyond the terminator from ROSAT soft X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Collier, M. R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W.M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. K.; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Trávníček, Pavel; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 7 (2014), s. 1459-1478 ISSN 2169-9097 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : HPC2N * Moon * PSPC * ROSAT * SWCX Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JE004628/epdf

  6. Fusion and the cosmos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Wilhelmsson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the following investigation we pay special attention to the role of self-organization in fusion plasma physics and in the cosmos. We present a new approach to the expansion of the universe. Formally the technique developed relies on our experience from treating hot fusion plasmas. We account for the possibility that the universe, as it seems, could have a finite life-time (even if it is counted in billions of years, and combine this assumption with the experimental observation that the velocity of separation of distant galaxies is proportional to the distance between the galaxies (the Hubble law. By analysis of a NL PDE (nonlinear partial differential equation we succed in proving that the crucial value of an exponent has a simple linear relationship with the Hubble constant. It is recognized that the scale-length that we use as a measure of the expansion is equivalent to the Einstein radius of curvature. The final results suggest that the Hubble law should be extended by a factor, which could have an explosive tendency of growth in time (open universe, or a decaying character (closed universe. The possibility of reversed expansion or an oscillating universe "cosmic pendulum" is also discussed.

  7. Initial results from a ROSAT deep survey in Lynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. F.; Windhorst, R. A.; Maccacaro, T.; Burstein, D.; Franklin, B. E.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koo, D. C.; Mathis, D. F.; Morgan, W. A.; Neuschaefer, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from a deep (70 ksec) Rosat survey of the high galactic latitude selected area Lynx.3A are presented. Lynx.3A sensitivity was previously studied in both the optical radio, with deep Westerbork surveys and deep multicolor Charge Couple Device (CCD) images form the Palomar 200 inch Four-Shooter. About 70 x-ray sources were detected within the central 40 foot diameter region of the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), observed surface densities of approximately 200 x-ray sources/sq deg are suggested, and these x-ray sources alone account for approximately 30 percent of the cosmic x-ray background (0.9 to 2.2 keV). An initial look at the observed x-ray logN - logS curve is presented, but a detailed assessment requires further study. The 4 sigma limit of about 7 times 10 to the minus 15th power erg/s.sq cm (0.5 to 2.0 keV) is considerably deeper then the Einstein deep surveys, and of comparable sensitivity to the deepest current Rosat surveys. Cross correlation with our Four Shooter optical catalogs yields at least one likely optical candidate for nearly all of the Rosat x-ray sources; a number of the likely optical identifications have colors of quasi-stellar objects (and stellar PSF), but in other cases galaxies/groups are also viable candidates.

  8. Supernova remnant candidates in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, T.; Becker, W.

    2014-07-01

    Radio supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Galaxy comprise an incomplete sample of the SNR population due to various selection effects. ROSAT performed the first All-Sky Survey (RASS) with an imaging X-ray telescope and thus provided another window for finding SNRs. Schaudel (2003) searched the RASS for unknown SNRs and pinpointed about 210 candidates. Meanwhile, 14 new SNRs of his list were identified (cf. Prinz & Becker 2013 for a summary). Revisiting the RASS SNR candidates and applying more stringent selection criteria as well as taking archival XMM-Newton, Chandra and Fermi data into account the current list of RASS SNR candidates still comprises 73 sources. These sources are promising SNR candidates and studying them with e.g. eRosita will help to reveal their true nature. eRosita is an X-ray telescope which is supposed to be launched in 2016. It will perform an X-ray all-sky survey with a sensitivity of more than 10 times of what was available with ROSAT. It supports to continue the previous SNR identification campaign and may reveal other candidates not seen with ROSAT. We report on the current status of our supernova identification campaign, characterize the most promising candidates and give prospects for eRosita.

  9. New Worlds in the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Michel; Frei, Pierre-Yves; Roukema, Boud

    2003-09-01

    Preface; 1. The quest begins; 2. Infinity and beyond; 3. New arrivals in the Solar System; 4. Why stars wobble; 5. Neutron planets; 6. Brown dwarfs in the headlines; 7. Sirens in the cosmos; 8. Foreign planets different to our home-grown ones; 9. Destination: earths!; 10. Further yet: life.

  10. AC losses in Bi2212 ROSAT wires exposed to an AC magnetic field (1); Bi2212 ROSAT senzai no koryu sonshitsu (1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Kajikawa, K.; Iwakuma, M.; Funaki, K. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Okada, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    Bismuth system superconducting wire rod developed until now has been limited tapeline physical property the. However, the ROSAT wire rod in which tape wire rod had rotational symmetry of 3 times in the cross section of the round line recently was developed. The critical current density which is almost equivalent to tape wire rod in 4.2K and 28T by the homogenization of cross-sectional shape has been realized this ROSAT wire rod. This time, the ac loss in outside fluctuation magnetic field of superscription ROSAT wire rod was measured, and it was compared with the theoretical value, which deduced the ideal polycore line by assuming. (NEDO)

  11. COSMOS: Python library for massively parallel workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Erik; Luquette, Lovelace J; Lancaster, Alex K; Hawkins, Jared B; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Souilmi, Yassine; Wall, Dennis P; Tonellato, Peter J

    2014-10-15

    Efficient workflows to shepherd clinically generated genomic data through the multiple stages of a next-generation sequencing pipeline are of critical importance in translational biomedical science. Here we present COSMOS, a Python library for workflow management that allows formal description of pipelines and partitioning of jobs. In addition, it includes a user interface for tracking the progress of jobs, abstraction of the queuing system and fine-grained control over the workflow. Workflows can be created on traditional computing clusters as well as cloud-based services. Source code is available for academic non-commercial research purposes. Links to code and documentation are provided at http://lpm.hms.harvard.edu and http://wall-lab.stanford.edu. dpwall@stanford.edu or peter_tonellato@hms.harvard.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. [Cosmos, coral and cultural milieu. The significance of the popular science connection in the late German Empire and the Weimar Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirrmacher, Arne

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses the role of popular science communication for the 'cultural milieu' or more generally the 'environment' of scientists and science in Germany between c. 1900 and 1933 in the sense of Paul Forman. On the rich basis of diverse journals aiming at a differentiated public the discourse on atomic physics is sketched. Since the thesis of a general hostility towards atomic physics in particular and science in general cannot be accredited the question arises how widespread and in which sense a crisis of science was discussed in the Weimar years.

  13. Hellhounds of the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Simak, Clifford Donald

    2012-01-01

    This gripping short story from the golden age of science fiction is a must-read for Simak fans, or for anyone looking for an out-of-this-world adventure. As the denizens of Earth face an invasion from inhabitants of another dimension, the future of the planet hangs in the balance. Will anyone be able to stop the marauding attackers and save the human race?

  14. Cosmos and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent; Brier, Søren; Thellefsen, Torkild Leo

    2011-01-01

    a cybersemiotics. In this paper, we focus on the understanding of the evolution of the universe that Peirce produced as an alternative to the mechanistic view underlying classical physics and try to place man in an evolving universe as a creative, aesthetical agent. It is true that modern non-equilibrium physics...... has made a modern foundation for a profound physical understanding of the basic evolutionary processes in the universe. But science still has not produced a theory that can explain how the creativity of the universe could produce signification, interpretation, and first-person consciousness...

  15. The COSMOS2015 Catalog: Exploring the 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laigle, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Hsieh, B. C.; Davidzon, I.; Capak, P.; Hasinger, G.; Silverman, J. D.; Pichon, C.; Coupon, J.; Aussel, H.; Le Borgne, D.; Caputi, K.; Cassata, P.; Chang, Y. -Y; Civano, F.; Dunlop, J.; Fynbo, J.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Le Floc'h, E.; Leauthaud, A.; Lilly, S.; Lin, L.; Marchesi, S.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N.; Smolcic, V.; Stockmann, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Toft, S.; Vaccari, Mattia; Zabl, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present the COSMOS201524 catalog, which contains precise photometric redshifts and stellar masses for more than half a million objects over the 2deg2 COSMOS field. Including new {{YJHK}}{{s}} images from the UltraVISTA-DR2 survey, Y-band images from Subaru/Hyper-Suprime-Cam, and infrared data

  16. Universe unveiled the cosmos in my bubble bath

    CERN Document Server

    Vishveshwara, C V

    2015-01-01

    The bubbles were swirling all around me, massaging my body. As I luxuriated in this fantastic bath, I gasped realizing that those bubbles carried with them miniature galaxies bringing the entire Cosmos into my bathtub... Alfie is back. And so are George and other characters from the author’s previous book Einstein’s Enigma or Black Holes in My Bubble Bath. While the present book, Universe Unveiled - The Cosmos in My Bubble Bath, is completely independent, its storyline can be considered a sequel to the previous one. The scientific content spanning ancient world models to the most recent mysteries of cosmology is presented in an entirely nontechnical and descriptive style through the discussions between Alfie, the enlightened learner, and George, professor of astrophysics. Fantasies, based on these discussions that cover the scientific facts, are created by the magical bubble baths taken by Alfie. Universe Unveiled blends accurate science with philosophy, drama, humour, and fantasy to create an exciting co...

  17. AC losses in Bi2212 ROSAT wires exposed to an AC magnetic field(2); Bi2212 ROSAT senzai no koryu sonshitsu (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Y.; Matsumura, K.; Kajikawa, K.; Iwakuma, M.; Funaki, K. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Okada, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    The wire rod the anisotropy is big for the Bi system superconductor, and it is processed in order to level the orientation of the superconductive crystal, thin tapelike. Therefore, wire rod itself of the rectangular cross section also has the anisotropy for critical current and ac loss characteristics. This time, the base metal was alloyed, and the ac loss was measured on improvement of mechanical strength and Bi2212ROSAT wire rod with the aim of making into low-loss, and it was compared and was examined with the ac loss of theoretical value and pure silver base metal ROSAT wire rod. (NEDO)

  18. Seeing the Cosmos in a Grain of Sand | Mann | Current Writing: Text ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focusing on recent discoveries in the micro-cosmos, he argues that holons of understanding and esemplastic metaphors are sources of spirituality consistent with the findings of contemporary science. The non-linear structure, metaphorical language and emotional chiaroscuro of the work together with frequent allusions to ...

  19. ROSAT Survey Observation of the Taurus--Auriga T Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäuser, Ralph

    1996-02-01

    This work presents results from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) observations in the Taurus--Auriga T association. Prior to the ROSAT mission, about 150 low-mass late-type pre-main sequence stars were known in Taurus--Auriga, about as many classical T Tauri stars (cTTS) with Wλ (H α) > 10Å as weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTS) with H α either weak in emission or in absorption. Observations with the X-ray satellite EINSTEIN led to the conclusion that there might be as many as ~103 wTTS in Taurus--Auriga, many of which could be detectable with the flux-limited but spatially complete RASS. Two thirds of the well-known wTTS, but one sixth of the cTTS were detected with RASS. The energy resolution of the ROSAT PSPC allows some spectral analysis even for low S/N observations with RASS, where TTS are detected with typically 102 counts only or less. It was found that cTTS X-ray spectra appear to be harder than those of wTTS, because circumstellar material around cTTS absorbs X-rays, while wTTS are often clear of disks and envelopes. Correcting for both the X-ray emission energy and the (circumstellar, intercloud, and interstellar) absorption yield X-ray luminosities individually corrected for any detected star, so that one can study X-ray luminosity functions. Comparing cTTS and wTTS Kaplan-Meier estimators (including upper limits of undetected TTS), it was found that wTTS emit intrinsically significantly more X-rays than cTTS, consistent with significantly different RASS detection rates for wTTS and cTTS. There is a significant correlation between X-ray emission and rotation period (and rotational velocity) in TTS suggesting that a dynamo mechanism is responsible for X-ray emission in TTS. The faster a TTS rotates, the larger the stellar magnetic field, so that field line emerge out of the stellar surface forming coronal loops that contain hot plasma. It is well known that cTTS rotate slower than wTTS, thus explaining the significantly different X-ray luminosity functions

  20. A PHILOSOPHICAL LOOK INTO THE COSMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Russo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show why the cosmos has been an important theme in the philosophical tradition. With the aid of some historical and conceptual references, we illustrate what it means that the human experience has a cosmological character: the close relationship between the world and the cosmos, the origins of Logos and astronomy, between the universe and the knowledge of human beings, the moral meaning of contemplatio caeli as an "elevation" above human concerns. For a number of reasons, this tradition has fallen into obscurity. The conquest of space has no spiritual relevance anymore; there is a gap between the cosmos and the world, as if they were different things. The remembrance of that relevance aims to create an incentive of a new cultural background of extraterrestrial experience.

  1. Technical Infrastructure of the COSMOS Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Doulamis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main operations and technologies implemented in the framework of the EU funded COSMOS project. COSMOS introduces an advanced web repository which allows teachers and students to search, retrieve, access educational content and re-use educational material for creating earning activities through a specifically designed web interface incorporating innovative technological solutions. The repository is based on an IEEE LOM representation of the content which supports educational scenarios and learning activities as well. The architecture also supports tools for describing and managing digital content rights, which are interoperably represented using the Creative Commons Rights Expression Language (ccREL.

  2. Light Curve Solutions of Detached Binaries in the ASAS-ROSAT Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, P. E.; Papageorgiou, A.; Chrysopoulos, I.

    2013-09-01

    We present the preliminary results of modeling of the optical counterparts of the ROSAT X-ray sources identified by ASAS survey data for detached systems (Szczygiel et al. 2008, ASAS.ROSAT.cat) in the framework of the optical variability campaign for strong X-ray sources among eclipsing binaries that was launched in summer 2012, with the 14" telescope at the University of Patras "Mythodeia" Observatory. By using the V-I colors and empirical relation for the mass ratio, the photometric elements of these systems are derived from their V curve using the software PHOEBE (Prsa & Zwitter 2005). The derived parameters are used for statistical analysis.

  3. Extraterrestrial altruism evolution and ethics in the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Extraterrestrial Altruism examines a basic assumption of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI): that extraterrestrials will be transmitting messages to us for our benefit. This question of whether extraterrestrials will be altruistic has become increasingly important in recent years as SETI scientists have begun contemplating transmissions from Earth to make contact. Should we expect altruism to evolve throughout the cosmos, or is this only wishful thinking? Would this make biological sense? Is it dangerous to send messages to other worlds, as Stephen Hawking has suggested? Would extraterrestrial societies be based on different ethical principles? Extraterrestrial Altruism explores these and related questions about the motivations of civilizations beyond Earth, providing new insights that are critical for SETI. Chapters are authored by leading scholars from diverse disciplines—anthropology, astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, cosmology, engineering, history of science, law, philos...

  4. The Cosmos Portal and the IYA2009 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Sims, M.; Lindblom, J.

    2009-05-01

    In 2007 the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation (DUF) launched the Earth Portal (earthportal.org) as a comprehensive resource for timely, objective, science-based information about the environment. There are currently over 1000 scholars from 60 countries engaged in this rapidly growing web-based collaboration. The Cosmos Portal is the second major DUF initiative (cosmosportal.org). In support of the IYA2009 effort, the Cosmos Portal is recruiting astronomy professionals to make use of easy online tools to publish articles, blogs, news items, image galleries, class notes, lectures, powerpoint presentations, links to other high quality websites or other educational material. A major difference between the Digital Universe and Wikipedia is that educational material is produced by identified experts, not anonymous contributors with unknown qualifications. The Digital Universe is a 501(c)(3) public charity whose goal is to evolve into a worldwide online community (a social network) whose centerpiece is an ever growing Asimov-Sagan Encyclopedia Galactica created by experts. We encourage you to write an encylopedia article or start a portal on your favorite topic or join an existing topic as an expert contributor.

  5. Discovering the cosmos with small spacecraft the American explorer program

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Explorer was the original American space program and Explorer 1 its first satellite, launched in 1958. Sixty years later, it is the longest continuously running space program in the world, demonstrating to the world how we can explore the cosmos with small spacecraft. Almost a hundred Explorers have already been launched.  Explorers have made some of the fundamental discoveries of the Space Age.Explorer 1 discovered Earth’s radiation belts. Later Explorers surveyed the Sun, the X-ray and ultraviolet universes, black holes, magnetars and gamma ray bursts. An Explorer found the remnant of the Big Bang. One Explorer chased and was the first to intercept a comet. The program went through a period of few launches during the crisis of funding for space science in the 1980s. However, with the era of ‘faster, cheaper, better,’ the program was reinvented, and new exiting missions began to take shape, like Swift and the asteroid hunter WISE.  Discovering the Cosmos with Small Spacecraft gives an account of ...

  6. Modelling mid-Pliocene climate with COSMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stepanek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript we describe the experimental procedure employed at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany in the preparation of the simulations for the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP. We present a description of the utilized Community Earth System Models (COSMOS, version: COSMOS-landveg r2413, 2009 and document the procedures that we applied to transfer the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM Project mid-Pliocene reconstruction into model forcing fields. The model setup and spin-up procedure are described for both the paleo- and preindustrial (PI time slices of PlioMIP experiments 1 and 2, and general results that depict the performance of our model setup for mid-Pliocene conditions are presented. The mid-Pliocene, as simulated with our COSMOS setup and PRISM boundary conditions, is both warmer and wetter in the global mean than the PI. The globally averaged annual mean surface air temperature in the mid-Pliocene standalone atmosphere (fully coupled atmosphere-ocean simulation is 17.35 °C (17.82 °C, which implies a warming of 2.23 °C (3.40 °C relative to the respective PI control simulation.

  7. A catalog of 203 galaxy clusters serendipitously detected in the ROSAT PSPC pointed observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; McNamara, B.R.; Forman, W.

    1998-01-01

    . 1997). We detect clusters in the inner 17.'5 of the ROSAT PSPC field of view using the spatial extent of their X-ray emission. Fluxes of detected clusters range from 1.6 x 10(-14) to 8 x 10(-12) ergs s(-1) cm(-2) in the 0.5-2 keV energy band. X-ray luminosities range from 10(42) ergs s(-1...

  8. COSMOS (County of San Mateo Online System). A Searcher's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo County Superintendent of Schools, Redwood City, CA. Educational Resources Center.

    Operating procedures are explained for COSMOS (County of San Mateo Online System), a computerized information retrieval system designed for the San Mateo Educational Resources Center (SMERC), which provides interactive access to both ERIC and a local file of fugitive documents. COSMOS hardware and modem compatibility requirements are reviewed,…

  9. Cool White Dwarfs from the SuperCOSMOS and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, N. C.; Digby, A. P.; Oppenheimer, B. R.

    2005-07-01

    We have used datamining techniques in the SuperCOSMOS Science Archive (http://surveys.roe.ac.uk/ssa) to obtain a large, well defined proper motion and magnitude selected sample of cool white dwarfs. Using accurate 5-colour photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR1 and SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey photometry and astrometry, we demonstrate the power of reduced proper motion in obtaining a sample of >700 white dwarfs. We examine the characteristics of these objects in various two-colour diagrams in conjunction with new model atmosphere predictions recently computed in the SDSS photometric system. Ultimately, we intend to analyse these data with techniques similar to those already used to examine the subdwarf luminosity function (Digby et al. 2003). In this way, we aim to decompose the contribution of thin disk, thick disk and spheroid white dwarfs in the sample to enable computation of accurate luminosity functions for those respective populations.

  10. An ear turned to ``The Cosmos'': 50 projects to discover the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Puerto, Carmen

    2011-06-01

    In 1609, as Galileo pointed the sky with a telescope, he observed Jupiter's satellites and changed our vision of the universe. Four hundred years later, we celebrate this event all over the world, and also in the Canaries. 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, is a very special year for the Science and Cosmos Museum (Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos). This was the first museum in Spain supported by a public entity, The Local Government of Tenerife (Cabildo de Tenerife), through its Autonomous Council of Museums (Organismo Autónomo de Museos y Centros), and a research centre, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Fifteen years later, this museum, which receives 50,000 visitors a year, celebrates the International Year of Astronomy with fifty projects described in this paper.

  11. Sesquiterpene lactones and phenylpropanoids from Cosmos pringlei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Rachel; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Rivero-Cruz, Blanca; Bye, Robert; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2002-07-01

    Activity-directed fractionation of a phytotoxic extract from Cosmos pringlei led to the isolation of three new compounds, namely, 1'-isovaleroyloxy-4-O-isobutyryleugenol (1), zaluzanin C isobutyrate (2), and zaluzanin C isovalerate (3). In addition, mokko lactone, 1'-isobutiroyloxy-4-O-isobutyryleugenol (4), dehydrocostus lactone (5), costunolide (6), 15-isovaleroyloxycostunolide (7), 15-isobutiroyloxycostunolide (8), 1',2'-epoxy-3',4'-di-isobutyryl-Z-coniferyl alcohol, and 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-pregn-16-en-20-one were obtained. The structures of the new compounds were established by spectral methods. Compounds 5-7 caused inhibition of radicle growth of seedlings of Amaranthus hypochondriacus.

  12. Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Technology Development Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, B. Thai; Clampin, M.; Werneth, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Office was established in FY11 and resides at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The office serves as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters for PCOS Program related matters. We present an overview of the Program’s technology management activities and the Program’s technology development portfolio. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology needs and the Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations. This process improves the transparency and relevance of technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and leverages the technology investments of external organizations by defining a need and a customer. Goals for the PCOS Program envisioned by the National Research Council’s (NRC) “New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics” (NWNH) Decadal Survey report include science missions and technology development for dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray, and inflation probe science.

  13. Cosmos in Concert: Combining astronomy and classical music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kyle

    2018-01-01

    Cosmos in Concert is an outreach initiative designed to combine astronomy education with classical music. Over the past several years, this program has presented large-scale multimedia shows for symphony orchestras, educational programs at K-12 schools, and research-oriented university collaborations designed to develop techniques for the sonification of data. Cosmos in Concert has collaborated with institutions including Fermi National Lab, the Adler Planetarium, the Bienen School of Music, and the Colburn School of Music. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of some of the main Cosmos in Concert initiatives and discuss ways these initiatives may be implemented at other institutions.

  14. Early-type galaxies: Automated reduction and analysis of ROSAT PSPC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Kim, D.-W.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Ciliegi, P.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary results of early-type galaxies that will be part of a galaxy catalog to be derived from the complete Rosat data base are presented. The stored data were reduced and analyzed by an automatic pipeline. This pipeline is based on a command language scrip. The important features of the pipeline include new data time screening in order to maximize the signal to noise ratio of faint point-like sources, source detection via a wavelet algorithm, and the identification of sources with objects from existing catalogs. The pipeline outputs include reduced images, contour maps, surface brightness profiles, spectra, color and hardness ratios.

  15. The universe within from quantum to cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Turok, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A visionary look at the way the human mind can shape the future by world-renowned physicist Neil Turok. Every technology we rely on today was created by the human mind, seeking to understand the universe around us. Scientific knowledge is our most precious possession, and our future will be shaped by the breakthroughs to come. In this personal and fascinating work, Neil Turok, Director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, explores the transformative scientific discoveries of the past three centuries -- from classical mechanics, to the nature of light, to the bizarre world of the quantum, and the evolution of the cosmos. Each new discovery has, over time, yielded new technologies causing paradigm shifts in the organization of society. Now, he argues, we are on the cusp of another major transformation: the coming quantum revolution that will supplant our current, dissatisfying digital age. Facing this brave new world, Turok calls for creatively re-inventing the way advanced knowledge is developed...

  16. Investigations onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1667

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazenko, O. G.; Ilyin, E. A.

    The program of the 7-day flight of the biosatellite Cosmos-1667 launched in July 1985 included experiments on two rhesus monkeys, ten Wistar SPF rats, ten newts, Drosophila flies, maize seedlings, lettuce sprouts, and unicellular organisms - Tetrahymena. The primate study demonstrated that transition to orbital flight was accompanied by a greater excitability of the vestibular apparatus and an increased linear blood flow velocity in the common carotid artery. The rat studies showed that atrophy of antigravity muscles and osteoporosis of limb bones developed even during short-term exposure to microgravity. The experiments on other living systems revealed no microgravity effects on the cell division rate, proliferative activity of cells of regenerating tissues and organs, energy metabolism of developing insects, structure or chemical composition of higher plant seedlings.

  17. Do We Really Understand the Cosmos?

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, T

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge about the universe has increased tremendously in the last three decades or so --- thanks to the progress in observations --- but our understanding has improved very little. There are several fundamental questions about our universe for which we have no answers within the current, operationally very successful, approach to cosmology. Worse still, we do not even know how to address some of these issues within the conventional approach to cosmology. This fact suggests that we are missing some important theoretical ingredients in the overall description of the cosmos. I will argue that these issues --- some of which are not fully appreciated or emphasized in the literature --- demand a paradigm shift: We should not think of the universe as described by a specific solution to the gravitational field equations; instead, it should be treated as a special physical system governed by a different mathematical description, rooted in the quantum description of spacetime. I will outline how this can possibly...

  18. Gravitational Waves- a new window to Cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Prasanna, A R

    2016-01-01

    With the detection of Gravitational waves just about an year ago Einstein`s general theory of relativity- a space-time theory of gravity, got established on a firmer footing than any other theory in physics. Gravitational waves are just propagating disturbances in the gravitational field of extremely strong sources caused by some catastrophic event associated with cosmic bodies, like binary black hole coalescence, or neutron star mergers. As these events happen very far away in cosmos, and the signal strength would be extremely weak, it requires extraordinary detection and analysis technology to observe an event on earth. Luckily the joint collaboration LIGO-VIRGO, have so far detected two events in September and December of 2015 during their analysis of observations made with the laser interferometers over the last few observing sessions. The talk will give a brief theoretical sketch of the analysis required for describing the waves resulting from mass motion in the realm of general relativity, and point out...

  19. Centrally Peaked X-Ray Supernova Remnants in the Small Magellanic Cloud Studied with ASCA and ROSAT

    OpenAIRE

    Yokogawa, Jun; Imanishi, Kensuke; Koyama, Katsuji; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Mizuno, Norikazu

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents ASCA/SIS and ROSAT/HRI results of three supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Small Magellanic Cloud: 0103-726, 0045-734, and 0057-7226. The ROSAT/HRI images of these SNRs indicate that the most of the X-ray emissions are concentrated in the center region. Only from 0103-726 are faint X-rays along the radio shell also detected. The ASCA/SIS spectra of 0103-726 and 0045-734 exhibit strong emission lines from highly ionized metals. The spectra were well-fitted with non-equilibriu...

  20. X-ray emission on hybird stars: ROSAT observations of alpha Trianguli Australis and iota Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, V.; Rosner, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on deep ROSAT observations of two Hybrid atmosphere stars, alpha TrA and iota Aur, and our analysis of these observations. We detect high-energy transient phenomena on alpha TrA and consider the implications of this discovery to the atmospheres of Hybrid stars. We detect iota Aur in the high-energy passband of ROSAT, implying the existence of multimillion degree plasma on the star. Our major results include the following: discovery of two large flare events, detected during pointed observations of alpha TrA; the demonstration that the flare emission most likely comes from the giant itself, rather than from a previously unseen low-mass companion star; the demonstration that the plasma characteristics associated with the flares and with the 'quiescent' component are essentially indistinguishable; and that the geometric dimensions of the emitting plasma are considerably smaller than the critical dimension characterizing stable 'hot' coronal loop structures. Our results suggest that alpha TrA does not have any steady X-ray emission consistent with theoretical expectations, and support the argument that Hybrid stars constitute a transitional type of object in which large-scale magnetic dynamo activity ceases, and the dominant spatial scales characterizing coronal structure rapidly decline as such stars evolve across the X-ray 'Dividing Line' in the H-R diagram.

  1. The CfA-Rosat Survey of Distant Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Brian

    1998-01-01

    We (Vikhlinin, McNamara, Forman, Jones, Hornstrup, Quintana) have completed a new survey of distant clusters of galaxies, which we use to to study cluster evolution over cosmological timescales. The clusters were identified as extended X-ray sources in 650 ROSAT PSPC images of high Galactic latitude fields. Our catalog of approximately 230 extended X-ray sources covers 160 square degrees on the sky. Ours is the largest of the several ROSAT serendipitous cluster surveys in progress (e.g. SHARC, Rosati, WARPS etc.). Using V,R,I imagery obtained at several observatories, we find that greater than 90% of the X-ray sources are associated with distant clusters of galaxies. We have obtained spectroscopic redshifts for nearly 80 clusters in our catalog, and we have measured photometric redshifts for the remaining clusters. Our sample contains more than 20 clusters at z > 0.5. I will discuss the logN-logS relationship for our clusters. Because our large survey area, we are able to confirm the evolution of the most luminous distant clusters first seen in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. In addition, I will discuss the relationships between optical richness, core radius, and X-ray luminosity for distant, X-ray-selected clusters.

  2. The Chemical Cosmos A Guided Tour

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Steve

    2012-01-01

    If you have ever wondered how we get from the awesome impersonality of the Big Bang universe to the point where living creatures can start to form, and evolve into beings like you, your friends and your family, wonder no more. Steve Miller provides us with a tour through the chemical evolution of the universe, from the formation of the first molecules all the way to the chemicals required for life to evolve. Using a simple Hydrogen molecule – known as H-three-plus - as a guide, he takes us on a journey that starts with the birth of the first stars, and how, in dying, they pour their hearts out into enriching the universe in which we live. Our molecular guide makes its first appearance at the source of the Chemical Cosmos, at a time when only three elements and a total of 11 molecules existed. From those simple beginnings, H-three-plus guides us down river on the violent currents of exploding stars, through the streams of the Interstellar Medium, and into the delta where new stars and planets form. We are fi...

  3. Panel Discussion: Life in the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Water appears to be essential to all life on Earth. For this reason, "Follow the Water" has been adopted as a mantra for the search for Life in the Cosmos. Expeditions have helped to establish the limits and biodiversity of life in the most extreme environments on Earth. Microbial extremophiles inhabit acidic streams; hypersaline and hyperalkaline lakes and pools; the cold deep sea floor, permafrost, rocks, glaciers, and perennially ice-covered lakes of the polar environments; geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hydrothermal vents and hot rocks deep within the Earth's crust. The ESA Venus Express Spacecraft entered Venusian Orbit in 2006 and continues to produce exciting results. The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument made the first detection of hydroxyl in the atmosphere of Venus, indicating it is much more similar to Earth and Mars than previously thought. Huge hurricane-like vortices have been found above the poles of the planet and as yet unidentified UV absorbers that form mysterious dark bands in the upper atmosphere. At 70 km and below, water vapor and sulfur dioxide combine to form sulfuric acid droplets that create a haze above the cloud tops. Thermophilic acidophiles, such as have recently been discovered on Earth, could possibly survive in the hot sulfuric acid droplets that exist in the upper atmosphere of Venus. In order to understand how to search for life elsewhere in the Solar System, over 40 VIRTIS images of Earth from Venus have been obtained to search for evidence of life on Earth. The signatures of water and molecular Oxygen were detected in the Earth s atmosphere, but the atmosphere of Venus also exhibits these signatures. The water and water ice are far more abundant on comet, the polar caps and permafrost of Mars and the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. These "frozen worlds" of our Solar System, are much more promising regimes where extant or extinct microbial life may exist. The ESA Mars Advanced Radar for

  4. ROSAT Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the anti-solar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the count rate increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere. Along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed. This technique can be used to explore the solar wind-lunar interaction.

  5. COSMOS: the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zreda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly-developed cosmic-ray method for measuring area-average soil moisture at the hectometer horizontal scale is being implemented in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (or the COSMOS. The stationary cosmic-ray soil moisture probe measures the neutrons that are generated by cosmic rays within air and soil and other materials, moderated by mainly hydrogen atoms located primarily in soil water, and emitted to the atmosphere where they mix instantaneously at a scale of hundreds of meters and whose density is inversely correlated with soil moisture. The COSMOS has already deployed more than 50 of the eventual 500 cosmic-ray probes, distributed mainly in the USA, each generating a time series of average soil moisture over its horizontal footprint, with similar networks coming into existence around the world. This paper is written to serve a community need to better understand this novel method and the COSMOS project. We describe the cosmic-ray soil moisture measurement method, the instrument and its calibration, the design, data processing and dissemination used in the COSMOS project, and give example time series of soil moisture obtained from COSMOS probes.

  6. GREEN GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu, E-mail: panzz@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn [Center of Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-10-10

    We present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of ≈2350 'green valley' galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected NUV–r {sup +} color is used to define 'green valley'; it removes dusty star-forming galaxies from galaxies that are truly transitioning between the blue cloud and the red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini-asymmetry and the Gini-M{sub 20} planes. Approximately 60%-70% of green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5%-10% are pure disk systems, based on morphological classification using the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types. The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of [O II], Hα, and Hβ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra shows that green galaxies are on average older than blue galaxies but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies and blue galaxies have similar projected galaxy density (Σ{sub 10}) distributions at z > 0.7. At z < 0.7, the fractions of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} green galaxies located in a dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transitioning population between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of active galactic nucleus feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5.

  7. Emergent cosmos in Einstein-Cartan theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, H.; Heydarzade, Y.; Hashemi, M.; Darabi, F.

    2018-01-01

    Based on Padmanabhan's proposal, the accelerated expansion of the universe can be driven by the difference between the surface and bulk degrees of freedom in a region of space, described by the relation dV/dt = N_sur-N_bulk where N_sur and N_bulk= -N_em +N_de are the degrees of freedom assigned to the surface area and the matter-energy content inside the bulk such that the indices "em" and "de" represent energy-momentum and dark energy, respectively. In the present work, the dynamical effect of the Weyssenhoff perfect fluid with intrinsic spin and its corresponding spin degrees of freedom in the framework of Einstein-Cartan (EC) theory are investigated. Based on the modification of Friedmann equations due to the spin-spin interactions, a correction term for Padmanabhan's original relation dV /d t=N_sur+N_em -N_de including the number of degrees of freedom related with these spin interactions is obtained through the modification in N_bulk term as N_bulk= -N_em+N_spin +N_de leading to dV /d t=N_sur+N_em-N_spin -N_de in which N_spin is the corresponding degrees of freedom related with the intrinsic spin of the matter content of the universe. Moreover, the validity of the unified first law and the generalized second law of thermodynamics for the Einstein-Cartan cosmos are investigated. Finally, by considering the covariant entropy conjecture and the bound resulting from the emergent scenario, a total entropy bound is obtained. Using this bound, it is shown that the for the universe as an expanding thermodynamical system, the total effective Komar energy never exceeds the square of the expansion rate with a factor of 3/4π.

  8. Fitness of the Cosmos for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.; Conway Morris, Simon; Freeland, Stephen J.; Harper, Charles L., Jr.

    2012-08-01

    Foreword: The improbability of life George M. Whitesides; Part I. The Fitness of 'Fitness' - Henderson in Context: 1. Locating 'fitness' and Lawrence J. Henderson Everett Mendelsohn; 2. Revisiting The Fitness of the Environment Owen Gingerich; 3. Is fine-tuning remarkable? John F. Haught; 4. Complexity in context: the metaphysical implications of evolutionary theory Edward T. Oakes; 5. Tuning fine-tuning Ernan Mcmullin; Part II. The Fitness of the Cosmic Environment: 6. Fitness and the cosmic environment Paul C. W. Davies; 7. The interconnections between cosmology and life Mario Livio; 8. Chemistry and sensitivity John D. Barrow; 9. Fitness of the cosmos for the origin and evolution of life: from biochemical fine-tuning to the Anthropic Principle Julian Chela-Flores; Part III. The Fitness of the Terrestrial Environment: 10. How biofriendly is the universe? Christian de Duve; 11. Tuning into the frequencies of life: a roar of static or a precise signal? Simon Conway Morris; 12. Life on earth: the role of proteins Jayanth R. Banavar and Amos Maritan; 13. Protein-based life as an emergent property of matter: the nature and biological fitness of the protein folds Michael J. Denton; 14. Could an intelligent alien predict earth's biochemistry? Stephen J. Freeland; 15. Would Venus evolve on Mars? Bioenergetic constraints, allometric trends, and the evolution of life-history invariants Jeffrey P. Schloss; Part IV. The Fitness of the Chemical Environment: 16. Creating a perspective for comparing Albert Eschenmoser; 17. Fine-tuning and interstellar chemistry William Klemperer; 18. Framing the question of fine-tuning for intermediary metabolism Eric Smith and Harold J. Morowitz; 19. Coarse-tuning the origin of life? Guy Ourisson; 20. Plausible lipid-like peptides: prebiotic molecular self-assembly in water Shuguang Zhang; 21. Evolution revisited by inorganic chemists R. J. P. Williams and J. J. R. Fraústo da Silva; Index.

  9. Weak gravitational lensing with COSMOS : galaxy selection and shape measurements.

    OpenAIRE

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Rhodes, Jason; Johnston, David E.; Capak, Peter; Heymans, Catherine; Ellis, Richard S.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Le Fevre, Oliver; Mellier, Yannick; Refregier, Alexandre; Robin, Annie C.; Scoville, Nick; Tasca, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    With a primary goal of conducting precision weak-lensing measurements from space, the COSMOS survey has imaged the largest contiguous area observed by Hubble Space Telescope to date, using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). This is the first paper in a series in which we describe our strategy for addressing the various technical challenges in the production of weak-lensing measurements from COSMOS data. We first construct a source catalog from 575 ACS/WFC tiles (1.64 deg^2) subsampled at ...

  10. Cosmic rays and radiations from the cosmos; Rayons cosmiques et rayonnement du cosmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizot, E

    2005-12-01

    This document gathers a lot of recent information concerning cosmic radiations, it is divided into 4 parts. Part I: energy, mass and angular spectra of cosmic rays. Part II: general phenomenology of cosmic rays, this part deals with the standard model, the maximal energy of protons inside supernova remnants, nucleosynthesis of light elements, and super-bubbles. Part III: radiations from the cosmos, this part deals with high energy gamma rays, non-thermal radiation of super-bubbles, positron transport, and the Compton trail of gamma-ray bursts. Part IV: the Pierre Auger observatory (OPA), this part deals with the detection of gamma ray bursts at OPA, the measurement of anisotropy, and top-down models. (A.C.)

  11. Larvicidal, pupicidal and insecticidal activities of Cosmos bipinnatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the larvicidal, pupicidal and insecticidal activities of Cosmos bipinnatus,. Foenuculum vulgare and Tagetes minuta leaf extracts against Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. Methods: The leaves of the plants were extracted with distilled water, ethanol (95 %), and hexane and the extracts screened for ...

  12. Extreme physics probing the mysteries of the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The broader outlines of the physical world, from quarks to the cosmos, have been apparent for decades. Does this mean physicists are about to tie it all up into a neat package? Not at all. Just when you think you know everything, the universe begins to look its strangest.

  13. Larvicidal, pupicidal and insecticidal activities of Cosmos bipinnatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the larvicidal, pupicidal and insecticidal activities of Cosmos bipinnatus, Foenuculum vulgare and Tagetes minuta leaf extracts against Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. Methods: The leaves of the plants were extracted with distilled water, ethanol (95 %), and hexane and the extracts screened for ...

  14. US experiment flown on the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1667

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, John W. (Editor); Skidmore, Michael G. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Two male young-adult rhesus monkeys were flown on the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 1667 for seven days from July 10-17, 1985. Both animals were instrumented to record neurophysiological parameters. One animal, Gordyy, was additionally instrumented to record cardiovascular changes. Space capsule and environmental parameters were very similar to those of previous missions. On Cosmos 1514, which flew for five days in 1983, one animal was fitted with a left carotid artery cuff to measure blood pressure and flow velocity. An additional feature of Cosmos 1667 was a postflight control study using the flight animal. Intermittent postural tilt tests were also conducted before and after spaceflight and synchronous control studies, to simulate the fluid shifts associated with spaceflight. The experiment results support the conclusion derived from Cosmos 1514 that significant cardiovascular changes occur with spaceflight. The changes most clearly seen were rapid initial decreases in heart rate and further decreases with continued exposure to microgravity. The triggering mechanism appeared to be a headward shift in blood and tissue fluid volume which, in turn, triggered adaptive cardiovascular changes. Adaptive changes took place rapidly and began to stabilize after the first two days of flight. However, these changes did not plateau in the animal by the last day of the mission.

  15. In science vs. Bible wrangle, debate moves to the Cosmos

    CERN Multimedia

    Glanz, J

    1999-01-01

    Creationists in Kansas have succeeded in having the theory of the Big Bang removed from the teaching curriculum. They see it as a direct contradiction of the literal biblical explanation of the creation of the universe (1 page).

  16. THE CHANDRA COSMOS LEGACY SURVEY: OPTICAL/IR IDENTIFICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, S.; Civano, F.; Urry, C. M. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Elvis, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Salvato, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Brusa, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Zamorani, G.; Cappelluti, N. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Miyaji, T. [Instituto de Astronomía sede Ensenada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km. 103, Carret. Tijunana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC (Mexico); Treister, E. [Universidad de Concepción, Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Cardamone, C. [Department of Science, Wheelock College, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Griffiths, R. E. [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Natural Sciences Division, University of Hawaii at Hilo, 200 W. Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Karim, A. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2016-01-20

    We present the catalog of optical and infrared counterparts of the Chandra  COSMOS-Legacy  Survey, a 4.6 Ms Chandra  program on the 2.2 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, combination of 56 new overlapping observations obtained in Cycle 14 with the previous C-COSMOS survey. In this Paper we report the i, K, and 3.6 μm identifications of the 2273 X-ray point sources detected in the new Cycle 14 observations. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared (IR) counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. We also update the information for the 1743 sources detected in C-COSMOS, using new K and 3.6 μm information not available when the C-COSMOS analysis was performed. The final catalog contains 4016 X-ray sources, 97% of which have an optical/IR counterpart and a photometric redshift, while ≃54% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. The full catalog, including spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and optical and X-ray properties described here in detail, is available online. We study several X-ray to optical (X/O) properties: with our large statistics we put better constraints on the X/O flux ratio locus, finding a shift toward faint optical magnitudes in both soft and hard X-ray band. We confirm the existence of a correlation between X/O and the the 2–10 keV luminosity for Type 2 sources. We extend to low luminosities the analysis of the correlation between the fraction of obscured AGNs and the hard band luminosity, finding a different behavior between the optically and X-ray classified obscured fraction.

  17. A census with ROSAT of low-luminosity X-ray sources in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, F

    2001-01-01

    I analyze 101 observations from the ROSAT archive to search for X-ray sources in or near 55 globular clusters. New sources are found in the cores of NGC362 (a double source), NGC6121 (marginally significant), NGC6139, and NGC6266; and outside the cores of NGC6205, NGC6352 and NGC6388. More accurate positions are determined for the X-ray sources in some ten clusters. The improved position for the source in NGC6341 excludes the suggested ultraviolet counterpart. It is shown that one of the two sources reported near the core NGC6626 is spurious, as is the detection of a pulsar period in the PSPC data of this cluster; the central source is resolved in three sources. One source reported previously in NGC6304 is demoted to an upper limit. For 20 cluster cores better upper limits to the X-ray luminosity are obtained. From a statistical analysis I argue that several sources outside the cluster cores may well belong to the clusters. All spectral energy distributions observed so far are relatively soft, with bremsstrah...

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Orion Trapezium area ROSAT PSPC obs. I. (Geier+, 1995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, S.; Wendker, H. J.; Wisotzki, L.

    2000-10-01

    A deep ROSAT PSPC image centred on the Orion Trapezium has revealed that most of the X-ray emission originates from discrete sources, in contrast to previous EINSTEIN data which suggested a diffuse emission component. We present a list of 171 X-ray sources all situated in the so-called inner ring of the field of view (20' radius). The field is crowded with sources. A special procedure had to be developed to cope with the severe blending of sources. The present list is not complete for LX<3.5*1029erg/s due to this reason and many more sources can still be expected by a next step in the reduction. Nearly all of the sources could be identified with pre-main sequence stars of the Ori OB 1 association in its subgroups Ic and Id. The statistics of this ensemble are discussed. It seems that members of the above subgroups can be distinguished on the basis of an additional amount of X-ray extinction seen in their spectra or hardness ratios. The O stars in the area ({teta}1 Ori C, {teta}2 Ori A and {iota} Ori) are briefly discussed. Six B stars are identified with X-ray sources. (2 data files).

  19. Preliminary Census of ROSAT Bright Sources: Results from ClassX

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. L.; Suchkov, A. A.; Hanisch, R. J.; Postman, M.; Donahue, M. E.; McGlynn, T. A.; Winter, E. L.; Corcoran, M. F.; Drake, S. A.; Pence, W. D.; White, N.; Angelini, L.; Genova, F.; Ochsenbein, F.; Fernique, P.; Derriere, S.; Voges, W.

    2002-12-01

    ClassX is being developed as a system for automated classification of X-ray sources within the Virtual Observatory environment. Its core is a network of classifiers ``trained'' using diverse data sets for X-ray sources of known object type and their optical, infrared, radio, etc. counterparts. The network is integrated in the ClassX pipeline with a search engine that queries remote multi-wavelength data repositories, using systems such as CDS VizieR service, to get data (in the VOTable format) for the sources to be classified. In this paper we present a preliminary census from ClassX for earlier unclassified X-ray sources observed with the ROSAT PSPC and compare it with the frequency of object types in samples of previously classified sources. The early results include findings that our sources are dominated by QSOs followed by clusters of galaxies. Previously classified sources are by contrast dominated by stars. Since these star-dominated samples were used to train our classifiers, the predominance of extragalactic sources is all the more striking. We find it encouraging that the ClassX census appear to be quite consistent with expectations based on the analysis of flux differences of previously classified and unclassified sources, while the variations between census versions from different classifiers are rather transparently related to the classifier differences.

  20. Basic concepts in physics. From the cosmos to quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaichian, M.; Tureanu, A. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Perez Rojas, H. [ICIMAF, La Habana (Cuba). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    2014-08-01

    A clear, concise and beautifully written presentation of modern physics. Readers will not only learn physics, they will learn to enjoy it. Self-contained and comprehensive History, concepts and formal treatment go hand-in-hand. Suppresses mathematical technicalities in favor of a wide scope of topics. Suited for class use, e.g. as a textbook for the course ''Modern Physics'', but also ideal for ''lone explorers'' and other newcomers to physics. ''Basic Concepts in Physics: From the Cosmos to Quarks'' is the outcome of the authors' long and varied teaching experience in different countries and for different audiences, and gives an accessible and eminently readable introduction to all the main ideas of modern physics. The book's fresh approach, using a novel combination of historical and conceptual viewpoints, makes it ideal complementary reading to more standard textbooks. The first five chapters are devoted to classical physics, from planetary motion to special relativity, always keeping in mind its relevance to questions of contemporary interest. The next six chapters deal mainly with newer developments in physics, from quantum theory and general relativity to grand unified theories, and the book concludes by discussing the role of physics in living systems. A basic grounding in mathematics is required of the reader, but technicalities are avoided as far as possible; thus complex calculations are omitted so long as the essential ideas remain clear. The book is addressed to undergraduate and graduate students in physics and will also be appreciated by many professional physicists. It will likewise be of interest to students, researchers and teachers of other natural sciences, as well as to engineers, high-school teachers and the curious general reader, who will come to understand what physics is about and how it describes the different phenomena of Nature. Not only will readers of this book learn

  1. Panel Discussion: Life in the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Water appears to be essential to all life on Earth. For this reason, "Follow the Water" has been adopted as a mantra for the search for Life in the Cosmos. Expeditions have helped to establish the limits and biodiversity of life in the most extreme environments on Earth. Microbial extremophiles inhabit acidic streams; hypersaline and hyperalkaline lakes and pools; the cold deep sea floor, permafrost, rocks, glaciers, and perennially ice-covered lakes of the polar environments; geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hydrothermal vents and hot rocks deep within the Earth's crust. The ESA Venus Express Spacecraft entered Venusian Orbit in 2006 and continues to produce exciting results. The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument made the first detection of hydroxyl in the atmosphere of Venus, indicating it is much more similar to Earth and Mars than previously thought. Huge hurricane-like vortices have been found above the poles of the planet and as yet unidentified UV absorbers that form mysterious dark bands in the upper atmosphere. At 70 km and below, water vapor and sulfur dioxide combine to form sulfuric acid droplets that create a haze above the cloud tops. Thermophilic acidophiles, such as have recently been discovered on Earth, could possibly survive in the hot sulfuric acid droplets that exist in the upper atmosphere of Venus. In order to understand how to search for life elsewhere in the Solar System, over 40 VIRTIS images of Earth from Venus have been obtained to search for evidence of life on Earth. The signatures of water and molecular Oxygen were detected in the Earth s atmosphere, but the atmosphere of Venus also exhibits these signatures. The water and water ice are far more abundant on comet, the polar caps and permafrost of Mars and the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. These "frozen worlds" of our Solar System, are much more promising regimes where extant or extinct microbial life may exist. The ESA Mars Advanced Radar for

  2. The UCI COSMOS Astronomy and Astrophysics Cluster: A Summer Program for Talented High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecker-Hane, T. A.

    2013-04-01

    COSMOS is a month-long, summer residential program in science and engineering for high school students held each year at four University of California (UC) campuses. Its goals are to expand the scientific horizons of our most talented students by exposing them to exciting fields of research and encouraging them to pursue STEM careers. Students live on campus and choose to study one of seven or eight different subject areas called “clusters.” We run the extremely successful Astronomy & Astrophysics Cluster at UC Irvine (UCI). Over four weeks, students take lecture courses in astrophysics, perform computer lab experiments, and complete a research project conducted in a small group under the supervision of a faculty member or teaching assistant (TA). Here we discuss our curriculum, lessons learned, and quantify student outcomes. We find that putting on a summer program for high school students is highly rewarding for the students as well as the faculty and graduate students.

  3. Dark cosmos in search of our universe's missing mass and energy

    CERN Document Server

    Hooper, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Everyone knows that there are things no one can see, for example, the air you're breathing or a black hole, to be more exotic. But not everyone knows that what we can see makes up only 5 percent of the Universe. The rest is totally invisible to us. The invisible stuff comes in two varieties—dark matter and dark energy. One holds the Universe together while the other tears it apart. What these forces really are has been a mystery for as long as anyone has suspected they were there, but the latest discoveries of experimental physics have brought us closer to that knowledge. Particle physicist Dan Hooper takes his readers, with wit, grace, and a keen knack for explaining the toughest ideas science has to offer, on a quest few would ever have expected: to discover what makes up our dark cosmos.

  4. A fortunate universe life in a finely tuned cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Geraint F

    2016-01-01

    Over the last forty years, scientists have uncovered evidence that if the Universe had been forged with even slightly different properties, life as we know it - and life as we can imagine it - would be impossible. Join us on a journey through how we understand the Universe, from its most basic particles and forces, to planets, stars and galaxies, and back through cosmic history to the birth of the cosmos. Conflicting notions about our place in the Universe are defined, defended and critiqued from scientific, philosophical and religious viewpoints. The authors' engaging and witty style addresses what fine-tuning might mean for the future of physics and the search for the ultimate laws of nature. Tackling difficult questions and providing thought-provoking answers, this volumes challenges us to consider our place in the cosmos, regardless of our initial convictions.

  5. The Extended Northern ROSAT Galaxy Cluster Survey (NORAS II). I. Survey Construction and First Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Trümper, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Retzlaff, Jörg [ESO, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meisenheimer, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schartel, Norbert [ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28692 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    As the largest, clearly defined building blocks of our universe, galaxy clusters are interesting astrophysical laboratories and important probes for cosmology. X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters provide one of the best ways to characterize the population of galaxy clusters. We provide a description of the construction of the NORAS II galaxy cluster survey based on X-ray data from the northern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. NORAS II extends the NORAS survey down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10{sup −12} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} (0.1–2.4 keV), increasing the sample size by about a factor of two. The NORAS II cluster survey now reaches the same quality and depth as its counterpart, the southern REFLEX II survey, allowing us to combine the two complementary surveys. The paper provides information on the determination of the cluster X-ray parameters, the identification process of the X-ray sources, the statistics of the survey, and the construction of the survey selection function, which we provide in numerical format. Currently NORAS II contains 860 clusters with a median redshift of z  = 0.102. We provide a number of statistical functions, including the log N –log S and the X-ray luminosity function and compare these to the results from the complementary REFLEX II survey. Using the NORAS II sample to constrain the cosmological parameters, σ {sub 8} and Ω{sub m}, yields results perfectly consistent with those of REFLEX II. Overall, the results show that the two hemisphere samples, NORAS II and REFLEX II, can be combined without problems into an all-sky sample, just excluding the zone of avoidance.

  6. The concept of fractal cosmos, I: Anaxagoras’ cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujić P.V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a fractal cosmos occupies a prominent position in the modern cosmology. We trace the development of this concept from the presocratic Greece to the present state of affairs. In this first part we consider the original idea due to Anaxagoras and elucidate a number of points with regard to possible interpretation of his cosmological ideas. A comparison has been made with the cosmology of Abderian school and relevance to the modern cosmology discussed.

  7. Radio-optical galaxy shape correlations in the COSMOS field

    OpenAIRE

    Tunbridge, Ben; Harrison, Ian; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the correlations in galaxy shapes between optical and radio wavelengths using archival observations of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. Cross-correlation studies between different wavebands will become increasingly important for precision cosmology as future large surveys may be dominated by systematic rather than statistical errors. In the case of weak lensing, galaxy shapes must be measured to extraordinary accuracy (shear systematics of <0.01 percent) in order ...

  8. Educação, desenvolvimento humano e cosmos Education, human development and cosmos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Mogilka

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura analisar o processo de formação e desenvolvimento humano. Ele toma como ponto de partida conceitos da pedagogia humanista e tenta produzir alguns avanços na reflexão sobre esses processos. O artigo tenta demonstrar que essa abordagem explica esses processos de forma interacionista, global e holística. Suas reflexões iniciais se baseiam no pensamento de Carl Rogers, Jean-Jacques Rousseau e John Dewey, tentando resgatar importantes contribuições desses três pensadores sobre o desenvolvimento humano. Em seguida, busca demonstrar a necessidade de superar algumas contradições nas idéias desses autores, atitude necessária para radicalizar uma compreensão interacionista do tema. Talvez a principal contradição nesses autores e em uma parte considerável das pedagogias antiautoritárias esteja na oscilação entre inatismo e interacionismo. Não obstante o grande valor dessas pedagogias para a estruturação de propostas radicalmente democráticas de educação e de sociedade, o artigo tenta demonstrar a necessidade de superação da citada oscilação para avançarmos nesse campo. Ao radicalizarmos o interacionismo, podemos exercitar uma compreensão complexa de ser humano, que o enxerga como um ser afetivo, político e cósmico, simultaneamente. Assim, o organismo humano é entendido em sua unidade interna, em seu pertencimento social e em sua ligação com o cosmos, dimensões imprescindíveis para uma compreensão não fragmentária do desenvolvimento humano.This article seeks to analyze the process of human formation and development. It takes as a point of departure concepts of the humanist pedagogy, and tries to move forwards in the reflection upon these processes. The text attempts to demonstrate that this approach explains these processes in an interactionist, global and holistic way. Its main reflections are based on the thought of Carl Rogers, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and John Dewey, trying to recall important

  9. ROSAT EUV and soft X-ray studies of atmospheric composition and structure in G191-B2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, M. A.; Fleming, T. A.; Finley, D. S.; Koester, D.; Diamond, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies of the hot DA white dwarf GI91-B2B have been unable to determine whether the observed soft X-ray and EUV opacity arises from a stratified hydrogen and helium atmosphere or from the presence of trace metals in the photosphere. New EUV and soft X-ray photometry of this star, made with the ROSAT observatory, when analyzed in conjunction with the earlier data, shows that the stratified models cannot account for the observed fluxes. Consequently, we conclude that trace metals must be a substantial source of opacity in the photosphere of G191-B2B.

  10. ROSAT Observations of X-ray Emissions from Jupiter During the Impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J H; Gladstone, G R; Franke, K; Lewis, W S; Fabian, A C; Brandt, W N; Na, C; Haberl, F; Clarke, J T; Hurley, K C; Sommer, M; Bolton, S

    1995-06-16

    Röntgensatellit (ROSAT) observations made shortly before and during the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter show enhanced x-ray emissions from the planet's northern high latitudes. These emissions, which occur at System III longitudes where intensity enhancements have previously been observed in Jupiter's ultraviolet aurora, appear to be associated with the comet fragment impacts in Jupiter's southern hemisphere and may represent brightenings of the jovian x-ray aurora caused either by the fragment impacts themselves or by the passage of the fragments and associated dust clouds through Jupiter's inner magnetosphere.

  11. Unseen cosmos the universe in radio

    CERN Document Server

    Graham-Smith, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Radio telescopes have transformed our understanding of the Universe. Pulsars, quasars, Big Bang cosmology: all are discoveries of the new science of radio astronomy. Here, Francis Graham-Smith describes the birth, development, and maturity of radio astronomy, from the first discovery of cosmic radio waves to its present role as a major part of modern astronomy. Radio is part of the electromagnetic spectrum, covering infra-red, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma-rays, and Graham-Smith explains why it is that radio waves give us a unique view of the Universe. Tracing the development o

  12. Focus Area Science Technology Summer Fellowship (FAST-SF)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    : 1977-82. Date of birth: 8 June 1938. Specialization: Theoretical Physics, Quantum Mechanics and History & Philosophy of Science Address: 51, New Cosmos, Juhu-Varsova Link Road, Andheri (West), Mumbai 400 053, Maharashtra Contact:

  13. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Contribution To The ROSAT Sky Survey Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Liu, W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to estimate the contribution of solar wind charge eXchange (SWCX) to the diffuse X-ray background and to help determine the properties of the Local Hot Bubble. The detectors are large area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response that is similar to that of the PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counters) used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky viewed from quite different vantage points in the solar system, and the assumption of approximate isotropy for the solar wind, allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all six RASS bands (R1-R7, excluding R3). We find that the SWCX contribution at l = 140 degrees, b = 0 degrees, where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane, is 33 percent plus or minus 6 percent (statistical) plus or minus 12 percent (systematic) for R1, 44 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R2, 18 percent plus or minus 12 percent plus or minus 11 percent for R4, 14 percent plus or minus 11 percent plus or minus 9 percent for R5, and negligible for the R6 and R7 bands. Reliable models for the distribution of neutral H and He in the solar system permit estimation of the contribution of interplanetary SWCX emission over the the whole sky and correction of the RASS maps. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 26 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 13 percent for R1, 30 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R2, 8 percent plus or minus 5 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R4, 6 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7.

  14. From the Geosphere to the Cosmos

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    On 1 -2 December, the European Network ASPERA will be organising the “From the Geosphere to the Cosmos” workshop at the Palais de la Découverte in Paris. The LIDO platform, 3D-radiography projects for volcanoes, and CERN’s CLOUD experiment are among the interdisciplinary projects that will be presented at the workshop.   Astroparticle physics is a new field mixing both particle physics and astrophysics. It offers many new opportunities for environmental disciplines such as oceanography, climate science and studies of the atmosphere, and geology. “From the Geosphere to the Cosmos” workshop will present them to the scientific community and the press. LIDO: Probing new territories Whales sing at the same wavelength as the neutrinos emitted by stars. This happy coincidence gave physicists the idea to share their undersea telescopes with marine biologists. By helping the development of a bioacoustics network to monitor the deep-sea envir...

  15. Evolution of cluster X-ray luminosities and radii: Results from the 160 square degree rosat survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; McNamara, B.R.; Forman, W.

    1998-01-01

    We searched for cluster X-ray luminosity and radius evolution using our sample of 203 galaxy clusters detected in the 160 deg(2) survey with the ROSAT PSPC (Vikhlinin et al.). With such a large area survey, it is possible, for the first time with ROSAT, to test the evolution of luminous clusters, L-X...... > 3 x 10(44) ergs s(-1) in the 0.5-2 keV band. We detect a factor of 3-4 deficit of such luminous clusters at z > 0.3 compared with the present. The evolution is much weaker or absent at modestly lower luminosities, (1-3) x 10(44) ergs s(-1). At still lower luminosities, we find no evolution from...... the analysis of the log N-log S relation. The results in the two upper L, bins are in agreement with the Einstein Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey evolution result (Gioia et al.; Henry ct al.), which was obtained using a completely independent cluster sample. The low-L-X results are in agreement with other...

  16. Properties and environment of radio-emitting galaxies in the VLA-zCOSMOS survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardelli, S.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčic, V.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Mignoli, M.; Halliday, C.; Kovač, K.; Ciliegi, P.; Caputi, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bondi, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Vergani, D.; Pozzetti, L.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pellò, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Guzzo, L.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Capak, P.; Sanders, D.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Jahnke, K.

    Aims: We investigate the properties and the environment of radio sources with optical counterparts from the combined VLA-COSMOS and zCOSMOS samples. The advantage of this sample is the availability of optical spectroscopic informations, high quality redshifts, and accurate density determination.

  17. The CoSMOS L-band experiment in Southeast Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, K.; Kerr, Y.H.; Boulet, G.

    2007-01-01

    The CoSMOS (Campaign for validating the Operation of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) campaign was conducted during November of 2005 in the Goulburn River Catchment, in SE Australia. The main objective of CoSMOS was to obtain a series of L-band measurements from the air in order...

  18. Chaos and Cosmos on The Streets of Gostivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Turk Niskač

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the streets in Gostivar, Macedonia, and how its young Albanian and Macedonian inhabitants perceive them. I am interested in how the ethnic division in the town influences perceptions and behavior. Macedonian girls are exposed to verbal sexual advances and harassment by Albanians, whereas boys are exposed to occasional fights. On the other hand, among Albanian youth the fear of the Other is not as present as among the Macedonians. In seeking the reasons for this situation, I deal with the concepts of chaos and cosmos, social control, gossip, cultural differences, kinship, and patriarchy. The streets are one of the spaces where identification takes place, and gender and ethnic identities are related to interactions in the streets. By defining boundaries in space, people create and maintain the boundaries between “us” and “them.” Identities are built in the process of interaction with others. The process of identification is connected to defining the similarities and differences in relation to “us.” People place themselves in the center, in the sphere of the cosmos, which they relate to home, the known, order, safety, and cleanliness. They place the Other in the sphere of chaos because the Other represents the distant, the foreign, the unknown, disorder, danger, and uncleanness. Public opinion is important in maintaining identities and boundaries. Girls in particular must safeguard their honor, which is constantly under surveillance. Identification is maintained by avoiding the space of the Other. Individuals avoid it in order to maintain their good name in the eyes of their group. Through the constant maintenance of the identities and boundaries between “us” and “them,” or between cosmos and chaos, one can trace the fear of losing one’s own identity. Each side is afraid that they might become like “them.”

  19. Occurrence of Leaf Blight on Cosmos Caused by Alternaria cosmosa in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xin Deng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, a leaf blight disease was observed on cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus leaves in Nonsan, Korea. The causal pathogen was isolated and identified based on morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological characteristics of the pathogen matched well with the Alternaria cosmosa and also easily distinguishable from Alternaria zinniae reported from cosmos seeds by producing branched beak. Phylogenetically, the pathogen could not be distinguished from A. passiflorae based on the sequence analysis of a combined data set of Alt a1 and gpd genes. However, A. passiflorae was distinguished from the present species by having conidiophores with 4 to 5 conidiogenous loci. The results indicate that the present Alternaria species is A. cosmosa. Pathogenicity tests revealed that the isolate was pathogenic to the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus. This is the first report of Alternaria blight disease caused by A. cosmosa on cosmos in Korea.

  20. Lonely hearts of the cosmos the story of the scientific quest for the secret of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Overbye, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    Ever since the first rocket entered space, science and technology have become the obsessions of the 20th century. With their aid it seems possible that man can discover his own origins and learn the history of the cosmos. This book is the story of the cosmologists whose job discription is to determine the fate of the universe. As well as the creation myths, there are radically opposing theories of the world's origin. Some hold the "big bang" theory, by which the world began in a fiery cataclysm and might disapear again in an equally spectacular crash. Others believe that the universe is infinite and always the same. This is a tribute to the human beings who, with the help of science, might eventually reach the truth.

  1. The Accelerating Universe: Infinite Expansion, the Cosmological Constant, and the Beauty of the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario

    2000-12-01

    Advance Praise for The Accelerating Universe "The Accelerating Universe is not only an informative book about modern cosmology. It is rich storytelling and, above all, a celebration of the human mind in its quest for beauty in all things." -Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams "This is a wonderfully lucid account of the extraordinary discoveries that have made the last years a golden period for observational cosmology. But Mario Livio has not only given the reader one clear explanation after another of what astronomers are up to, he has used them to construct a provocative argument for the importance of aesthetics in the development of science and for the inseparability of science, art, and culture." -Lee Smolin, author of The Life of the Cosmos "What a pleasure to read! An exciting, simple account of the universe revealed by modern astronomy. Beautifully written, clearly presented, informed by scientific and philosophical insights." -John Bahcall, Institute for Advanced Study "A book with charm, beauty, elegance, and importance. As authoritative a journey as can be taken through modern cosmology." -Allan Sandage, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington

  2. ROSAT PSPC observations of two X-ray-faint early-type galaxies: NGC 4365 and NGC 4382

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Trinchieri, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT Positive Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of the two early-type galaxies NGC 4365 and NGC 4382. These galaxies are among those observed with Einstein to have the lowest X-ray to optical flux ratios of early-type galaxies. The PSCP data show that for radii r greater than 50 arcsec the radial distributions of the X-ray surface brightness are consistent with the optical distributions of King (1978). We also find that these galaxies have X-ray spectra significantly different from those observed in X-ray-bright ellipticals, with a relative excess of counts detected in the softest spectral channels. This confirms earlier Einstein results. The characteristics of the ROSAT PSPC do not allow us to discriminate between possible spectral models. If we adopt a two-component thermal model on the grounds of physical plausibility, we find that the spectral data can be fitted with a very soft optically thin component, with kT approximately 0.2 keV, and a hard component with kT greater than (1.0-1.5) keV. The hard component has a luminosity consistent with that expected from the integrated emission of a population of low mass-X-ray binaries in these galaxies; the nature of the very soft component is more speculative. Candidates include the coronal emission of late-type stars, supersoft X-ray sources, RS CVn, and perhaps a hot Interstellar Medium (ISM). Alternatively, the spectal data may be fitted with a 0.6-1 keV bremsstrahlung spectrum (expontential plus Gaunt), and may suggest the presence of a totally new population of X-ray sources.

  3. Gravitational Waves: An Entirely New Window onto the Cosmos

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    On September 14, 2015, scientists from the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration using the LIGO detectors observed the collision and fusion of two black holes by directly measuring the gravitational waves emitted during their collision.  This detection came almost exactly 100 years after Einstein developed his revolutionary general theory of relativity that predicted their existence, and 50 years after scientists began searching for them in earnest.  Since then, two more gravitational-wave events have been confidently detected. These discoveries have truly profound implications for physics and astronomy.   Gravitational waves provide unique information on the most energetic astrophysical events, revealing unique insights into the nature of gravity, matter, space, and time. LIGO has opened a new window onto the cosmos.  I will talk about how we made the detection and discuss how gravitational wave astronomy promises to change our understanding o...

  4. Basic concepts in physics from the cosmos to quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, Anca

    2014-01-01

    "Basic Concepts in Physics: From the Cosmos to Quarks" is the outcome of the authors' long and varied teaching experience in different countries and for different audiences, and gives an accessible and eminently readable introduction to all the main ideas of modern physics. The book’s fresh approach, using a novel combination of historical and conceptual viewpoints, makes it ideal complementary reading to more standard textbooks. The first five chapters are devoted to classical physics, from planetary motion to special relativity, always keeping in mind its relevance to questions of contemporary interest. The next six chapters deal mainly with newer developments in physics, from quantum theory and general relativity to grand unified theories, and the book concludes by discussing the role of physics in living systems. A basic grounding in mathematics is required of the reader, but technicalities are avoided as far as possible; thus complex calculations are omitted so long as the essential ideas remain clear....

  5. Potential medicinal benefits of Cosmos caudatus (Ulam Raja): A scoping review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Shi-Hui; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd Yusof; Anthony, Joseph; Ismail, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Cosmos caudatus is widely used as a traditional medicine in Southeast Asia. C. caudatus has been reported as a rich source of bioactive compounds such as ascorbic acid, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid...

  6. Properties and environment of Radio Emitting Galaxies in the VLA-zCOSMOS survey

    OpenAIRE

    Bardelli, S.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolcic, V.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Mignoli, M; Halliday, C.; Kovac, K.; Ciliegi, P.; Caputi, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bondi, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Vergani, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the properties and the environment of radio sources with optical counterparts from the combined VLA-COSMOS and zCOSMOS samples. The advantage of this sample is the availability of optical spectroscopic informations, high quality redshifts, and accurate density determination. Methods. By comparing the star formation rates estimated from the optical spectral energy distribution with those based on the radio luminosity, we divide the radio sources in to three fam...

  7. Potential medicinal benefits of Cosmos caudatus (Ulam Raja: A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Hui Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmos caudatus is widely used as a traditional medicine in Southeast Asia. C. caudatus has been reported as a rich source of bioactive compounds such as ascorbic acid, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid. Studies have shown that C. caudatus exhibits high anti-oxidant capacity and various medicinal properties, including anti-diabetic activity, anti-hypertensive properties, anti-inflammatory responses, bone-protective effect, and anti-microbial activity. This review aims to present the potential medicinal benefits of C. caudatus from the available scientific literature. We searched PubMed and ScienceDirect database for articles published from 1995 to January 2015. Overall, 15 articles related to C. caudatus and its medicinal benefits are reviewed. All these studies demonstrated that C. caudatus is effective, having demonstrated its anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory, bone-protective, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal activity in both in vitro and animal studies. None of the studies showed any negative effect of C. caudatus related to medicinal use. Currently available evidence suggests that C. caudatus has beneficial effects such as reducing blood glucose, reducing blood pressure, promoting healthy bone formation, and demonstrating anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties. However, human clinical trial is warranted.

  8. How Does The Universe Work? The Physics Of The Cosmos Program (PCOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita M.

    2011-09-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program incorporates cosmology, high-energy astrophysics, and fundamental physics projects aimed at addressing central questions about the nature of complex astrophysical phenomena such as black holes, neutron stars, dark energy, and gravitational waves. Its overarching theme is, How does the Universe work? PCOS includes a suite of operating (Chandra, Fermi, Planck, XMM-Newton, INTEGRAL) and future missions across the electromagnetic spectrum and beyond, which are in concept development and/or formulation. The PCOS program directly supports development of intermediate TRL (4-6) technology relevant to future missions through the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program, as well as data analysis, theory, and experimental astrophysics via other R&A avenues (e.g., ADAP, ATP). The Einstein Fellowship is a vital and vibrant PCOS component funded by the program. PCOS receives community input via its Program Analysis Group, the PhysPAG (www.pcos.gsfc.nasa.gov/physpag.php), whose membership and meetings are open to the community at large. In this poster, we describe the detailed science questions addressed within PCOS, with special emphasis on future opportunities. Details about the PhysPAG operations and functions will be provided, as well as an update on future meetings.

  9. Mapping the heavens the radical scientific ideas that reveal the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a tour of the greatest hits of cosmological discoveries the ideas that reshaped our universe over the past century. The cosmos, once understood as a stagnant place, filled with the ordinary, is now a universe that is expanding at an accelerating pace, propelled by dark energy and structured by dark matter. Priyamvada Natarajan, our guide to these ideas, is someone at the forefront of the research an astrophysicist who literally creates maps of invisible matter in the universe. She not only explains for a wide audience the science behind these essential ideas but also provides an understanding of how radical scientific theories gain acceptance. The formation and growth of black holes, dark matter halos, the accelerating expansion of the universe, the echo of the big bang, the discovery of exoplanets, and the possibility of other universes these are some of the puzzling cosmological topics of the early twenty-first century. Natarajan discusses why the acceptance of new ideas about the univer...

  10. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos and Cosmic Origins technology development programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, Mark; Pham, Thai

    2014-07-01

    NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) and Cosmic Origins (COR) Program Offices, established in 2011, reside at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The offices serve as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. We present an overview of the programs' technology development activities and technology investment portfolio, funded by NASA's Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program. We currently fund 19 technology advancements to enable future PCOS and COR missions to help answer the questions "How did our universe begin and evolve?" and "How did galaxies, stars, and planets come to be?" We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology gaps and Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations that inform the SAT program. The process improves the transparency and relevance of our technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and promotes targeted external technology investments by defining needs and identifying customers. The programs' goal is to promote and support technology development needed to enable missions envisioned by the National Research Council's (NRC) "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" (NWNH) Decadal Survey report [1] and the Astrophysics Implementation Plan (AIP) [2]. These include technology development for dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray and inflation probe science, and a 4m-class UV/optical telescope to conduct imaging and spectroscopy studies, as a post-Hubble observatory with significantly improved sensitivity and capability.

  11. ROSAT and follow-up infrared observations of the X-ray burster KS 1731-260

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Didier; Motch, Christian; Predehl, Peter

    1998-01-01

    We report on the ROSAT HRI (High Resolution Imager) observation of the X-ray burster KS 1731-260. The observation was split in two parts; the first took place in 1995, March 16 lasting for ~ 1 kilosecond and the second one between September 3rd and 14th, 1996 for about 5 kiloseconds. In both observations, KS 1731-260 was clearly detected with a count rate of 0.82 and 7.9ctss respectively. From the first observation we found that the X-ray source is located at a position alpha = 17() h 34() mn 13.5() s and delta = -26() deg 05' 16.8'' (equinox 2000) with an associated error radius of 10.1 arcsec (90% confidence level combining the attitude and centroid uncertainties). The position derived from the second part of the observation is consistent with the previous one. The ROSAT HRI position rules out the two counterparts that have been proposed so far. Our CFHT J and H infrared imaging of the HRI error box reveals at least 13 possible candidates. As expected from a comparison with other X-ray bursters, the upper limits derived for the infrared brightness of KS 1731-260 imply the presence of a low mass companion for the neutron star. We also report on a refined spectral analysis of the PSPC data taken during the all sky survey in September 1990. These data, together with data recorded by TTM and PCA/RXTE indicate that the column density towards KS 1731-260 varies between ~ 1 to 6 x 10(22) H atoms cm(-2) ; thus suggesting that the source is characterized by variable intrinsic absorption. The change in the HRI count rate could be better explained by a change in the column density between the two observations rather than by a true source intensity variation. The numerous detections of the source since its discovery in 1988 together with its recent monitoring by the RXTE/ASM show that KS 1731-260 is a persistent source rather than a soft X-ray transient, as originally thought.

  12. AllWISE counterparts to ROSAT and XMMSlew surveys done using NWAY (An accurate algorithm to pair sources simultaneously between N catalogs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, M.; Buchner, j.; Budavari, T.; Dwelly, T.; Merloni, A.; Brusa, M.; Rau, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Nandra, K.

    2017-10-01

    At the end of the mission, the eROSITA All-sky X-ray survey will provide the community with about 4 million of point-like sources, down to a limit of 10^{-14} erg/cm^2/s in the soft band and 2x10^{-13} erg/cm^2/s in the hard band. The brightest sources however have been already observed by ROSAT, but have been rarely used due to the large uncertainties in their positions, thus making the identification of their right multi-wavelength counterparts a demanding task with uncertain results. New all-sky Optical and IR surveys like GAIA and WISE allow us, for the first time, to provide reliable counterparts to all ROSAT sources, thanks also to the development of a new algorithm, NWAY, based on Bayesian statistic and adoption of color-magnitude priors. This paves the way to new programs of complete characterization of the bright X-ray sky, such as the SDSS-IV/SPIDERS survey started in 2014. In this talk I will briefly present the code and the multiwavelength properties of ROSAT and XMMSLEW counterparts.

  13. The faint radio sky: VLBA observations of the COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Ruiz, N.; Middelberg, E.; Deller, A.; Norris, R. P.; Best, P. N.; Brisken, W.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčić, V.; Delvecchio, I.; Momjian, E.; Bomans, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Carilli, C.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Quantifying the fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the faint radio population and understanding their relation with star-forming activity are fundamental to studies of galaxy evolution. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations are able to identify AGN above relatively low redshifts (z> 0.1) since they provide milli-arcsecond resolution. Aims: We have created an AGN catalogue from 2865 known radio sources observed in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, which has exceptional multi-wavelength coverage. With this catalogue we intend to study the faint radio sky with statistically relevant numbers and to analyse the AGN - host galaxy co-evolution, making use of the large amount of ancillary data available in the field. Methods: Wide-field VLBI observations were made of all known radio sources in the COSMOS field at 1.4 GHz to measure the AGN fraction, in particular in the faint radio population. We describe in detail the observations, data calibration, source detection and flux density measurements, parts of which we have developed for this survey. The combination of number of sources, sensitivity, and area covered with this project are unprecedented. Results: We have detected 468 radio sources, expected to be AGN, with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). This is, to date, the largest sample assembled of VLBI detected sources in the sub-mJy regime. The input sample was taken from previous observations with the Very Large Array (VLA). We present the catalogue with additional optical, infrared and X-ray information. Conclusions: We find a detection fraction of 20 ± 1%, considering only those sources from the input catalogue which were in principle detectable with the VLBA (2361). As a function of the VLA flux density, the detection fraction is higher for higher flux densities, since at high flux densities a source could be detected even if the VLBI core accounts for a small percentage of the total flux density. As a function of

  14. X-Rays from the Nearby Solitary Millisecond Pulsar PSR J0030+0451 - the Final ROSAT Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, W; Bäcker, A N; Lommen, D; Becker, Werner; Tr"umper, Joachim; Backer, Andrea N.Lommen & Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    We report on X-ray observations of the solitary 4.8 ms pulsar PSR J0030+0451. The pulsar was one of the last targets observed in DEC-98 by the ROSAT PSPC. X-ray pulses are detected on a $4.5\\sigma$ level and make the source the $11^{th}$ millisecond pulsar detected in the X-ray domain. The pulsed fraction is found to be $69\\pm18%$. The X-ray pulse profile is characterized by two narrow peaks which match the gross pulse profile observed at 1.4 GHz. Assuming a Crab-like spectrum the X-ray flux is in the range $f_x= 2-3\\times 10^{-13}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2} $ ($0.1-2.4$ keV), implying an X-ray efficiency of $L_x/\\dot{E}\\sim 0.5-5 \\times 10^{-3} (d/0.23 {kpc})^2$.

  15. ROSAT Observations of Soft X-ray Emission from the Solar Wind Interaction with the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the antisolar point. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed.

  16. Stephen Hawking’s universe the cosmos explained

    CERN Document Server

    Filkin, David

    1997-01-01

    Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time has sold over 9 million copies worldwide. Now, in everyday language, Stephen Hawking’s Universe reveals step-by-step how we can all share his understanding of the cosmos, and our own place within it. Stargazing has never been the same since cosmologists discovered that galaxies are moving away from each other at an extraordinary speed. It was this understanding of the movement of galaxies that allowed scientists to develop a theory of how the universe was created—the Big Bang theory. Working with this theory, Stephen Hawking and other physicists felt challenged to come up with a scientific picture that would tackle the fundamental question: what is the nature of the universe? Stephen Hawking’s Universe charts this work and provides simple explanations for phenomena that arouse our curiosity. This work is a voyage of discovery with an astonishing set of conclusions that will enable us to understand how matter can be produced from nothing at all and will provide...

  17. Georges et les trésors du cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Lucy; Parsons, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Les voisins excentriques de Georges, Annie et Eric, ont déménagé en Floride à l'agence Spatiale Globale. Là-bas, Eric s'occupe de son nouveau robot, Homer, qui doit détécter les signes de vie sur Mars. Mais bientôt, Georges reçoit un e-mail : Annie lui demande de la rejoindre au plus vite pour une " mission cosmique " secrète. La jeune fille est persuadée qu'il se passe de drôles de choses sur Mars, car Homer vient de recevoir un message extraterrestre ! Georges et Anne (avec l'aide d'Emmett, un petit garçon bizarre) décident de réparer Cosmos, leur super-ordinateur, et d'aller voir par eux-mêmes... Emmaillotés dans des combinaisons spéciales, ils se lancent alors dans une fabuleuse chasse aux trésors sur Mars, sur les lunes de Saturne, puis sur Titan, avant de se perdre en orbite autour d'Alpha Centauri B... Mais avant de pouvoir élucider le mystère du message extraterrestre, Georges et Annie devront se livrer à une bataille spatiale acharnée qui mettra leur vie en danger, ainsi que ce...

  18. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE COSMOS SURVEY. I. THE XMM-COSMOS SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvis, M.; Hao, H.; Civano, F. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Capak, P. [California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Jahnke, K.; Lusso, E.; Cisternas, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, Heidelberg, D-69117 (Germany); Mainieri, V. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Trump, J. R. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ho, L. C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute for Science, Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Aussel, H. [AIM Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA CNRS, Universite Paris VII UMR n158, Paris (France); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Hasinger, G., E-mail: elvis@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: hhao@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2012-11-01

    The 'Cosmic Evolution Survey' (COSMOS) enables the study of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) because of the deep coverage and rich sampling of frequencies from X-ray to radio. Here we present an SED catalog of 413 X-ray (XMM-Newton)-selected type 1 (emission line FWHM > 2000 km s{sup -1}) AGNs with Magellan, SDSS, or VLT spectrum. The SEDs are corrected for Galactic extinction, broad emission line contributions, constrained variability, and host galaxy contribution. We present the mean SED and the dispersion SEDs after the above corrections in the rest-frame 1.4 GHz to 40 keV, and show examples of the variety of SEDs encountered. In the near-infrared to optical (rest frame {approx}8 {mu}m-4000 A), the photometry is complete for the whole sample and the mean SED is derived from detections only. Reddening and host galaxy contamination could account for a large fraction of the observed SED variety. The SEDs are all available online.

  19. ROSAT PSPC observations of the early-type galaxies NGC 507 and NGC 499: Central cooling and mass determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a deep observation of NGC 507 and NGC 499 with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). The X-ray emission of NGC 507 is extended at least out to 1000 sec (458 kpc at a distance of 94.5 Mpc). The radial profile of X-ray surface brightness goes as Sigma(sub x) is approximately r(exp -1.8) outside the core region. The radial profile is a function of energy such that the softer X-rays have a smaller core radius and a flatter slope. Spectral analysis reveals that the emission temperature, with an average of 1 keV, peaks at an intermediate radius of 2-3 min and falls toward the center (possibly decreases outward as well). The absorption column density is consistent with the Galactic line-of-sight value. The X-ray emission of NGC 499 is extended to 300 sec and suggests a similarly cooler core. The cooler cores of NGC 507 and NGC 499 are strong evidence of the presence of cooling flows in these galaxies. Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium outside the cooling radius, the estimated mass-to-light ratio of NGC 507 is 97 +/- 16 within 458 kpc, indicative of the presence of a heavy halo. Similarly, the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 499 is 89 +/- 14 within 137 kpc. Near the edge of the X-ray-emitting region of NGC 507 we detect 19 soft, unresolved sources. These sources do not have optical counterparts and are significantly in excess of the expected number of background serendipitous sources. We speculate that they may represent cooling clumps in the halo of NGC 507. If there are many undetected cooling clumps distributed at large radii, then the radial profile of the X-ray surface brightness does not directly reflect the potential, adding uncertainty to the measurement of the binding mass; the gas mass could also be overestimated.

  20. The detection of 'intermediate' size magnetic anomalies in Cosmos 49 and OGO 2, 4, 6 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, R. D.; Davis, W. M.; Cain, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Benkova, Dolginov and Simonenko have recently reported the presence of intermediate size magnetic anomalies from Cosmos 49 data and hypothesized a crustal and/or upper mantle origin for these. We have examined the spherical harmonic models of the internal potential function, based on the OGO 2, 4 and 6 data and verified the locations and amplitudes of those anomalies with wavelengths of approximately 4000 km. The patterns of delta-F so computed were then compared with the IZMIRAN maps and also were analyzed statistically, in both the spatial and frequency domains, using residuals computed from the raw Cosmos 49 data. The two sets of data were thus derived from completely independent sets of observations and field references. The two patterns are shown to agree very well over the whole earth surface up to the 50 deg latitude limit of Cosmos 49.

  1. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos and Cosmic Origins Technology Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thai; Seery, Bernard; Ganel, Opher

    2016-01-01

    The strategic astrophysics missions of the coming decades will help answer the questions "How did our universe begin and evolve?" and "How did galaxies, stars, and planets come to be?" Enabling these missions requires advances in key technologies far beyond the current state of the art. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) and Cosmic Origins (COR) Program Offices manage technology maturation projects funded through the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program to accomplish such advances. The PCOS and COR Program Offices, residing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), were established in 2011, and serve as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. We present an overview of the Programs' technology development activities and the current technology investment portfolio of 23 technology advancements. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology gaps and Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations that inform the SAT program. The process improves the transparency and relevance of our technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and promotes targeted external technology investments by defining needs and identifying customers. The Programs' priorities are driven by strategic direction from the Astrophysics Division, which is informed by the National Research Council's (NRC) "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" (NWNH) 2010 Decadal Survey report [1], the Astrophysics Implementation Plan (AIP) [2] as updated, and the Astrophysics Roadmap "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions" [3]. These priorities include technology development for missions to study dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray and inflation probe science, and large far-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)/optical/IR telescopes to conduct imaging and spectroscopy studies. The SAT program is the Astrophysics Division's main investment method to mature technologies

  2. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos and Cosmic Origins programs manage Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thai; Thronson, Harley; Seery, Bernard; Ganel, Opher

    2016-07-01

    The strategic astrophysics missions of the coming decades will help answer the questions "How did our universe begin and evolve?" "How did galaxies, stars, and planets come to be?" and "Are we alone?" Enabling these missions requires advances in key technologies far beyond the current state of the art. NASA's Physics of the Cosmos2 (PCOS), Cosmic Origins3 (COR), and Exoplanet Exploration Program4 (ExEP) Program Offices manage technology maturation projects funded through the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program to accomplish such advances. The PCOS and COR Program Offices, residing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), were established in 2011, and serve as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. We present an overview of the Programs' technology development activities and the current technology investment portfolio of 23 technology advancements. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology gaps and Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations that inform the SAT program. The process improves the transparency and relevance of our technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and promotes targeted external technology investments by defining needs and identifying customers. The Programs' priorities are driven by strategic direction from the Astrophysics Division, which is informed by the National Research Council's (NRC) "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics" (NWNH) 2010 Decadal Survey report [1], the Astrophysics Implementation Plan (AIP) [2] as updated, and the Astrophysics Roadmap "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions" [3]. These priorities include technology development for missions to study dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray and inflation probe science, and large far-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)/optical/IR telescopes to conduct imaging and spectroscopy studies. The SAT program is the

  3. HR-COSMOS: Kinematics of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 0.9

    OpenAIRE

    Pelliccia, D.; Tresse, L.; Epinat, B.; Ilbert, O.; Scoville, N.; Amram, P.; Lemaux, B. C.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-01-01

    We present the kinematic analysis of a sub-sample of 82 galaxies at 0.75 < z < 1.2 from our new survey HR-COSMOS aimed to obtain the first statistical sample to study the kinematics of star-forming galaxies in the treasury COSMOS field at 0 < z < 1.2. We observed 766 emission line galaxies using the multi-slit spectrograph ESO-VLT/VIMOS in high-resolution mode (R = 2500). To better extract galaxy kinematics, VIMOS spectral slits have been carefully tilted along the major axis orientation of t...

  4. Large Structures and Galaxy Evolution in COSMOS at z < 1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, N.; Aussel, H.; Benson, A.; Blain, A.; Calzetti, D.; Capak, P.; Ellis, R. S.; El-Zant, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Guzzo, L.; Hasinger, G.; Koda, J.; Le Fèvre, O.; Massey, R.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Renzini, A.; Rhodes, J.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Sasaki, S. S.; Schinnerer, E.; Sheth, K.; Shopbell, P. L.; Taniguchi, Y.; Taylor, J. E.; Thompson, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    We present the first identification of large-scale structures (LSSs) at zpopulation-recovering structures on all scales from 1' to 20' without a priori assumptions for the structure size or density profile. The COSMOS photometric redshift catalog yields a sample of 1.5×105 galaxies with redshift accuracy, ΔzFWHM/(1+z)population age difference of ~2-4 Gyr at z=0.3-1. We also investigate the evolution of key galactic properties-mass, luminosity, SED, and star formation rate (SFR)-with redshift and environmental density as derived from overdensities in the full pseudo-3D cube. Both the maturity of the stellar populations and the ``downsizing'' of star formation in galaxies vary strongly with redshift (epoch) and environment. For a very broad mass range (1010-1012 Msolar), we find that galaxies in dense environments tend to be older; this is not just restricted to the most massive galaxies. And in low-density environments, the most massive galaxies appear to have also been formed very early (z>2), compared to the lower mass galaxies there. Over the range zpopulations. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555 also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), which are operated by AURA, Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF); the National Radio Astronomy Observatory which is a facility of the NSF operated under cooperative agreement by

  5. Analysis and Implications of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, T. S.

    On 2009 February 10, Iridium 33--an operational US communications satellite in low-Earth orbit--was struck and destroyed by Cosmos 2251--a long-defunct Russian communications satellite. This is the first time since the dawn of the Space Age that two satellites have collided in orbit. To better understand the circumstances of this event and the ramifications for avoiding similar events in the future, this paper provides a detailed analysis of the predictions leading up to the collision, using various data sources, and looks in detail at the collision, the evolution of the debris clouds, and the long-term implications for satellite operations. The only publicly available system available to satellite operators for screening for close approaches, SOCRATES, did predict this close approach, but it certainly wasn't the closest approach predicted for the week of February 10. In fact, at the time of the collision, SOCRATES ranked this close approach 152 of the 11,428 within 5 km of any payload. A detailed breakdown is provided to help understand the limitations of screening for close approaches using the two-line orbital element sets. Information is also provided specifically for the Iridium constellation to provide an understanding of how these limitations affect decision making for satellite operators. Post-event analysis using high-accuracy orbital data sources will be presented to show how that information might have been used to prevent this collision, had it been available and used. Analysis of the collision event, along with the distribution of the debris relative to the original orbits, will be presented to help develop an understanding of the geometry of the collision and the near-term evolution of the resulting debris clouds. Additional analysis will be presented to show the long-term evolution of the debris clouds, including orbital lifetimes, and estimate the increased risk for operations conducted by Iridium and other satellite operators in the low-Earth orbit

  6. Cicero's Cosmos: Somnium Scipionis ("The Dream of Scipio")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N.

    2011-06-01

    The Dream of Scipio (b. 185 BCE) is the concluding excerpt of Cicero's dialogue in his De Republica ("On the Republic"), which has survived in the neo-Platonic commentaries on the text by Macrobius in the 4th century CE. A variation of its model Plato's Republic, the dialogue is set in 129 BCE. Parallels exist between Plato's closing with the myth of Er, recounting the structure of the cosmos and ordering of the planets and Cicero's cosmology updated by post-Hellenistic astronomical speculation. The Dream begins with his adoptive grandfather Cornelius Scipio Africanus appearing to his son Scipio in heaven as he looks down on Earth, a distant sphere amidst spheres of the universe. The deceased father presents the conditions of his legacy-to do upon Earth as his ancestors have done: "love justice and wisdom", and be devoted to your country, the highest form of virtue. Gazing on the stars-the Milky Way, home of the departed souls, Scipio realizes the relative insignificance of the Earth compared to the stars (analogy with the Roman Empire, a "pinpoint […] of this small Earth"). Africanus orders Scipio to look at the universe, the nine concentric spheres at the very center. Thus, fixed in place, the Earth does not move. Scipio then hears sounds-the music of the spheres in motion, its basis in mathematics and harmonic proportions. Comparisons between the works of Plato and Cicero are revealing. Both stress the relationship of city and state, and both share concern with justice and moral behavior. Whereas Plato focuses on the journey of the soul in the afterlife, Cicero's purpose is to show how public service, the importance of civic life, is a divinely sanctioned activity: "And remember that the most splendid deeds you can do are those which serve your country". The two major themes are the immortality of the soul and the relationship between human society and the divine order of the universe. Scipio must "contemplate the heavens in order to act rightly on Earth". The

  7. Optical, IUE, and ROSAT observations of the eclipsing nova-like variable V347 Puppis (LB 1800)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauche, Christopher W.; Raymond, John C.; Buckley, David A. H.; Mouchet, Martine; Bonnell, Jerry; Sullivan, Denis J.; Bonnet-Bidaud, Jean-Marc; Bunk, Wolfram H.

    1994-01-01

    Using time-resolved optical spectroscopy and UBVRI and high-speed photometry obtained at Mount Stromlo Observatory, Mount John University Observatory, and the South African Astronomical Observatory; International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) ultraviolet spectroscopy; and Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) survey X-ray fluxes, we present a study of the accretion disk, hot spot, and emission line regions in the bright eclipsing nova-like variable V347 Pup (LB 1800). In the optical and UV, V347 Pup is a strong emission line source with a continuum spectrum which is remarkably red for a high-M cataclysmic variable. Consistent with its high inclination, we interpret the continuum spectrum as the superposition of the spectrum of the cool (T(sub eff) approximately 7000 K) outer edge and the hot (T(sub eff) approximately 100,000 K) inner regions of a self-eclipsed accretion disk. For the assumed parameters, the model matches the level and shape of the observed spectrum for an inclination of approximately 88 and a distance of approximately 300 pc. The prominent hump in the optical and UV light curves just before eclipse manifests the presence of the hot spot where the accretion stream strikes the edge of the disk. The wavelength dependence of the amplitude of the hump is best modeled by a spot having an effective temperature of approximately 25,000 K and an area of approximately 3 x 10(exp 18) sq cm if the spot radiates like a blackbody, or an effective temperatue of approximately 14,000 K and an area of approximately 3 x 10(exp 19) sq cm if it radiates with a stellar spectrum. In either case, the hot spot produces only one-tenth of the predicted luminosity for the assumed mass-transfer rate of 10(exp -8) solar mass/yr. Either the hot spot is 'buried' in the edge of the accretion disk, or a significant fraction of its luminosity is radiated away in lines. The difference in azimuth between the peak of the hump and the dynamically expected location of the hot spot suggests that the

  8. ONGOING AND CO-EVOLVING STAR FORMATION IN zCOSMOS GALAXIES HOSTING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silverman, J. D.; Lamareille, F.; Maier, C.; Lilly, S. J.; Mainieri, V.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Hasinger, G.; Zamorani, G.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Contini, T.; Carollo, C. M.; Jahnke, K.; Kneib, J. -P.; Le Fevre, O.; Merloni, A.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Brunner, H.; Caputi, K.; Civano, F.; Comastri, A.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Elvis, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Fiore, F.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gilli, R.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovac, K.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Montero, E. Perez; Ricciardelli, E.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Vignali, C.; Zucca, E.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Fumana, M.; Griffiths, R.; Kartaltepe, J.; Koekemoer, A.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Porciani, C.; Salvato, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the host galaxies of active galactic nucleus (AGN) selected from the zCOSMOS survey to establish if accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and star formation are explicitly linked up to z similar to 1. We identify 152 galaxies that harbor AGN, based on their X-ray

  9. COSMOS: A System-Level Modelling and Simulation Framework for Coprocessor-Coupled Reconfigurable Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    and resource management, and iii) present a SystemC based framework to model and simulate coprocessor-coupled reconfigurable systems. We illustrate how COSMOS may be used to capture the dynamic behavior of such systems and emphasize the need for capturing the system aspects of such systems in order to deal...

  10. The dipole anisotropy of WISE × SuperCOSMOS number counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengaly, C. A. P.; Novaes, C. P.; Xavier, H. S.; Bilicki, M.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2018-01-01

    We probe the isotropy of the Universe with the largest all-sky photometric redshift dataset currently available, namely WISE × SuperCOSMOS. We search for dipole anisotropy of galaxy number counts in multiple redshift shells within the 0.10 origin of the latter discrepancy is unclear, and improved data may be needed to explain it.

  11. CoSMOS: Performance of Kurtosis Algorithm for Radio Frequency Interference Detection and Mitigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misra, Sidharth; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Skou, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a previously developed algorithm for Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection and mitigation is experimentally evaluated. Results obtained from CoSMOS, an airborne campaign using a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer are analyzed for this purpose. Data is collected using two...

  12. A Group-galaxy Cross-correlation Function Analysis in zCOSMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobel, C.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Kovač, K.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez Montero, E.; Presotto, V.; Silverman, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Barnes, L.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Cimatti, A.; Coppa, G.; Koekemoer, A. M.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Moresco, M.; Nair, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Welikala, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present a group-galaxy cross-correlation analysis using a group catalog produced from the 16,500 spectra from the optical zCOSMOS galaxy survey. Our aim is to perform a consistency test in the redshift range 0.2 13.5 M sun), for which the measured bias is significantly larger than for any of the

  13. The NAFE'05/CoSMOS Data Set: Toward SMOS Soil Moisture Retrieval, Downscaling, and Assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panciera, Rocco; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Kalma, Jetse D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Airborne Field Experiment 2005 (NAFE'05) and the Campaign for validating the Operation of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (COSMOS) were undertaken in November 2005 in the Goulburn River catchment, which is located in southeastern Australia. The objective of the joint campaign was to...

  14. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: Overview And Catalog From The Cosmos Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Civano, F.; Hickox, R. C.; Puccetti, S.

    2015-01-01

    To provide the census of the sources contributing to the X-ray background peak above 10 keV, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is performing extragalactic surveys using a three-tier "wedding cake" approach. We present the NuSTAR survey of the COSMOS field, the medium sensitivity...

  15. 77 FR 23318 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``African Cosmos: Stellar Arts... Institution's National Museum of African Arts, Washington, DC, from on or about June 20, 2012, until on or... of August 28, 2000, I hereby determine that the object to be included in the exhibition ``African...

  16. Flares from a new Integral hard X-ray source, IGR J17407-2808, likely associated with the ROSAT source SBM 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kretschmar, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Hermsen, W.

    2004-01-01

    This new hard X-ray source, IGR J17407-2808, is positionally coincident with a faint ROSAT source listed as no. 10 in the catalogue of sources in the Galactic Center region by Sidoli, Belloni & Mereghetti 2001, A&A 368, 835 and as 2RXP J174040.9-280852 in the ROSAT Source Browser. No other......). The source was outside the FOV of the JEM-X and OMC monitor instruments during this flare. Note that the position of J17407-2808 is inconsistent with that of the X-ray burster SLX 1737-282 [AX J1740.7-2818] (in't Zand et al. 2002, A&A 389, L43), which is just ~11 arcmin away. The correct Integral attitude...... was not detected. The last flare, with peak fluxes of 0.8±0.1 Crab and 0.6±0.1 Crab in the energy ranges 20-40 keV and 40-60 keV respectively, triggered an automatic alert message of the Integral Burst Alert System (IBAS Alert #2010) which led to the discovery of the source (Gotz et al., GCN Circ. #2793...

  17. Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters and ROSAT Observations of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results on the elliptical galaxy NGC 1407 were published in the proceedings of the first ROSAT symposium. NGC 1407 is embedded in diffuse X-ray-emitting gas which is extensive enough that it is likely to be related to the surrounding group of galaxies, rather than just NGC 1407. Spectral data for NGC 1407 (AO2) and IC 1459 (AO3) are also included in a complete sample of elliptical galaxies I compiled in collaboration with David Davis. This allowed us to construct the first complete X-ray sample of optically-selected elliptical galaxies. The complete sample allows us to apply Malmquist bias corrections to the observed correlation between X-ray and optical luminosities. I continue to work on the implications of this first complete X-ray sample of elliptical galaxies. Paul Eskridge Dave Davis and I also analyzed three long ROSAT PSPC observations of the small (but not dwarf) elliptical galaxy M32. We found the X-ray spectra and variability to be consistent with either a Low Mass X-Ray Binary (LMXRB) or a putative 'micro"-AGN.

  18. The Effects of Cosmos caudatus (Ulam Raja) Supplementation on Serum and Bone Minerals Levels in Ovariectomized Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Norazlina Mohamed; Mohamed Zahir Anverdeen; Nurul Ain Rahim; Chia Jia Wen; Choo Wan Hee; Nurul Hafizah Abas; Muhamad Arizi Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Summary. Osteoporosis is a consequence of estrogen deficiency and has been associated with oxidative stress. Cosmos caudatus (ulam raja), a local plant, has been shown to improve bone histomorphometry in ovariectomized rats. This study further determined the effects of Cosmos caudatus on serum and bone minerals levels in ovariectomised rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups, (I) sham operated (SO) (II) ovariectomised  (OVX) (III) ovariectomised + 500mg/kg Cosmos caudatus ...

  19. Chandra's Cosmos: Dark Matter, Black Holes, and Other Wonders Revealed by NASA's Premier X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Wallace H.

    2017-03-01

    On July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the most powerful X-ray telescope ever built, was launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Since then, Chandra has given us a view of the universe that is largely hidden from telescopes sensitive only to visible light. In Chandra's Cosmos, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra science spokesperson Wallace H. Tucker uses a series of short, connected stories to describe the telescope's exploration of the hot, high-energy face of the universe. The book is organized in three parts: "The Big," covering the cosmic web, dark energy, dark matter, and massive clusters of galaxies; "The Bad," exploring neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes; and "The Beautiful," discussing stars, exoplanets, and life. Chandra has imaged the spectacular, glowing remains of exploded stars and taken spectra showing the dispersal of their elements. Chandra has observed the region around the supermassive black hole in the center of our Milky Way and traced the separation of dark matter from normal matter in the collision of galaxies, contributing to both dark matter and dark energy studies. Tucker explores the implications of these observations in an entertaining, informative narrative aimed at space buffs and general readers alike.

  20. Altered carbohydrate, lipid, and xenobiotic metabolism by liver from rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, A. H. Jr; Hoel, M.; Wang, E.; Mullins, R. E.; Hargrove, J. L.; Jones, D. P.; Popova, I. A.; Merrill AH, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    To determine the possible biochemical effects of prolonged weightlessness on liver function, samples of liver from rats that had flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were analyzed for protein, glycogen, and lipids as well as the activities of a number of key enzymes involved in metabolism of these compounds and xenobiotics. Among the parameters measured, the major differences were elevations in the glycogen content and hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activities for the rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and decreases in the amount of microsomal cytochrome P-450 and the activities of aniline hydroxylase and ethylmorphine N-demethylase, cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes. These results support the earlier finding of differences in these parameters and suggest that altered hepatic function could be important during spaceflight and/or the postflight recovery period.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity evolution of COSMOS BCD sample (Lian+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, J.; Hu, N.; Fang, G.; Ye, C.; Kong, X.

    2018-02-01

    To study low-mass galaxies outside the local universe, we selected a blue compact dwarf (BCD) sample at intermediate redshift in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) deep field and then performed followup spectroscopic observation using Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT). We selected the BCD sample from a public Ks selected catalog of the COSMOS field (Muzzin et al. 2013, J/ApJS/206/8). The observations of these BCDs using the Hectospec/MMT were carried out in 2015 February. Each fiber has a diameter of 1.5" (corresponding to 5 kpc at z=0.2) and covers most of the light of BCDs at intermediate redshift. (2 data files).

  2. THE zCOSMOS-SINFONI PROJECT. I. SAMPLE SELECTION AND NATURAL-SEEING OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, C.; Renzini, A. [INAF-OAPD, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L.; Davies, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cresci, G. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (OAF), INAF-Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Peng, Y.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, M.; Oesch, P. [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zurich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Vergani, D.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G. [INAF-Bologna, Via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Daddi, E. [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Maraston, C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, PO1 3HE Portsmouth (United Kingdom); McCracken, H. J. [IAP, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bouche, N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Shapiro, K. [Aerospace Research Laboratories, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10

    The zCOSMOS-SINFONI project is aimed at studying the physical and kinematical properties of a sample of massive z {approx} 1.4-2.5 star-forming galaxies, through SINFONI near-infrared integral field spectroscopy (IFS), combined with the multiwavelength information from the zCOSMOS (COSMOS) survey. The project is based on one hour of natural-seeing observations per target, and adaptive optics (AO) follow-up for a major part of the sample, which includes 30 galaxies selected from the zCOSMOS/VIMOS spectroscopic survey. This first paper presents the sample selection, and the global physical characterization of the target galaxies from multicolor photometry, i.e., star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, age, etc. The H{alpha} integrated properties, such as, flux, velocity dispersion, and size, are derived from the natural-seeing observations, while the follow-up AO observations will be presented in the next paper of this series. Our sample appears to be well representative of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, covering a wide range in mass and SFR. The H{alpha} integrated properties of the 25 H{alpha} detected galaxies are similar to those of other IFS samples at the same redshifts. Good agreement is found among the SFRs derived from H{alpha} luminosity and other diagnostic methods, provided the extinction affecting the H{alpha} luminosity is about twice that affecting the continuum. A preliminary kinematic analysis, based on the maximum observed velocity difference across the source and on the integrated velocity dispersion, indicates that the sample splits nearly 50-50 into rotation-dominated and velocity-dispersion-dominated galaxies, in good agreement with previous surveys.

  3. Cosmos, Time and Creation (Remarks to the Philosophical, Theological and Physical Conceptions of Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zamarovský

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the beginning of Cosmos appears to be problematic. Not only ancient theological, but also present-day physical approaches evoke many questions. They originate in the definition of time, its dimensionality and its scale. If we accept the Standard Model, all physical processes including processes utilised in clocks (chronometric processes lose their theoretical basis in the vicinity of the initial singularity. The singularity is hidden behind horizon. Does it mean that the singularity did not exist?

  4. Self-incompatibility in Cosmos atrosanauineus: a rare Mexican endemic species of Asteraceae

    OpenAIRE

    Lewendon, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    This work centres on Cosmos atrosanguineus, a rare Mexican endemic self-incompatible species of Asteraceae that is now believed to be extinct in the wild. The two known wild C. atrosanguineus collections, made in made in the 19th century, localise the species to the pine-oak mountain forest ecological region in two areas of central Mexico. Its disappearance from the natural environment is attributed to habitat destruction by the copper mining industry and subsequent urbanisation, so that C. a...

  5. Cosmos caudatus enhances fracture healing in ovariectomised rats: A preliminary biomechanical evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Pamela Godspower Rufus; Norazlina Mohamed; Ahmad Nazrun Shuid

    2015-01-01

    Summary. Osteoporotic fractures occur in osteoporotic states and affect patients’ quality of life. Cosmos caudatus (ulam raja) is a local plant known for its high calcium content and anti-oxidant properties. The present study aimed to investigate the fracture healing properties of C. caudatus water extract in ovariectomised rats by studying the biomechanical properties of tibia. Twenty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: (i) sham operated (ii) ovariectomised control (i...

  6. HR-COSMOS: Kinematics of star-forming galaxies at z 0.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, D.; Tresse, L.; Epinat, B.; Ilbert, O.; Scoville, N.; Amram, P.; Lemaux, B. C.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-03-01

    We present the kinematic analysis of a sub-sample of 82 galaxies at 0.75 COSMOS aimed to obtain the first statistical sample to study the kinematics of star-forming galaxies in the treasury COSMOS field at 0 extract galaxy kinematics, VIMOS spectral slits have been carefully tilted along the major axis orientation of the galaxies, making use of the position angle measurements from the high spatial resolution HST/ACS COSMOS images. We constrained the kinematics of the sub-sample at 0.75 COSMOS photometric catalog, which includes the latest data releases of UltraVISTA and Spitzer. In doubling the sample at these redshifts compared with the literature, we estimated the relation without setting its slope, and found it consistent with previous studies in other deep extragalactic fields assuming no significant evolution of the relation with redshift at z ≲ 1. We computed dynamical masses within the radius R2.2 and found a median stellar-to-dynamical mass fraction equal to 0.2 (assuming Chabrier IMF), which implies a contribution of gas and dark matter masses of 80% of the total mass within R2.2, in agreement with recent integral field spectroscopy surveys. We find no dependence of the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation with environment probing up to group scale masses. This study shows that multi-slit galaxy surveys remain a powerful tool to derive kinematics for large numbers of galaxies at both high and low redshift. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 083.A-0935.

  7. The spatial clustering of X-ray selected AGN in the XMM-COSMOS field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilli, R.; Zamorani, G.; Miyaji, T.; Silverman, J.; Brusa, M.; Mainieri, V.; Cappelluti, N.; Daddi, E.; Porciani, C.; Pozzetti, L.; Civano, F.; Comastri, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Fiore, F.; Salvato, M.; Vignali, C.; Hasinger, G.; Lilly, S.; Impey, C.; Trump, J.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J. -P.; Le Fevre, O.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cimatti, A.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovac, K.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Montero, E. Perez; Ricciardelli, E.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Fumana, M.; Guzzo, L.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Scaramella, R.; Walcher, J.

    We study the spatial clustering of 538 X-ray selected AGN in the 2 deg(2) XMM-COSMOS field that are spectroscopically identified with I(AB) <23 and span the redshift range z = 0.2-3.0. The median redshift and X-ray luminosity of the sample are z = 0.98 and L(0.5-10) = 6.3 x 10(43) erg s(-1),

  8. Proceedings, 13th International Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos (NIC XIII)

    CERN Document Server

    Elekes, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei in the Cosmos is the foremost bi-annual conference of nuclear physicists, astrophysicists, cosmochemists, and others to survey the recent achievements in Nuclear Astrophysics. As an interdisciplinary meeting it promotes mutual understanding and collaboration over fields fundamental to solve a range of open questions, from the origin of the elements to stellar evolution. Inherent part of the conference is a school devoted to students and young scientists where prominent scientists introduce the field of nuclear astrophysics to the participants.

  9. A long-term study of AGN X-ray variability . Structure function analysis on a ROSAT-XMM quasar sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middei, R.; Vagnetti, F.; Bianchi, S.; La Franca, F.; Paolillo, M.; Ursini, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Variability in the X-rays is a key ingredient in understanding and unveiling active galactic nuclei (AGN) properties. In this band, flux variations occur on short timescales (hours) as well as on larger timescales. While short timescale variability is often investigated in single source studies, only a few works are able to explore flux variation on very long timescales. Aims: This work aims to provide a statistical analysis of the AGN long term X-ray variability. We study variability on the largest time interval ever investigated for the 0.2-2 keV band, up to approximately 20 yr rest-frame for a sample of 220 sources. Moreover, we study variability for 2700 quasars up to approximatley eight years rest-frame in the same (soft) band. Methods: We built our source sample using the 3XMM serendipitous source catalogue data release 5, and data from ROSAT All Sky Survey Bright and Faint source catalogues. To ensure that we selected AGN only, we used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogues data releases 7 and 12. Combining ROSAT and XMM-Newton observations, we investigated variability using the structure function analysis which describes the amount of variability as a function of the lag between the observations. Results: Our work shows an increase of the structure function up to 20 yr. We find no evidence of a plateau in the structure function on these long timescales. Conclusions: The increase of the structure function at long time lags suggests that variability in the soft X-rays can be influenced by flux variations originated in the accretion disk or that they take place in a region large enough to justify variation on such long timescales.

  10. CosmosDG: An hp-adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin Code for Hyper-resolved Relativistic MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Peter; Bryant, Colton; Fragile, P. Chris; Holgado, A. Miguel; Lau, Cheuk; Nemergut, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We have extended Cosmos++, a multidimensional unstructured adaptive mesh code for solving the covariant Newtonian and general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, to accommodate both discrete finite volume and arbitrarily high-order finite element structures. The new finite element implementation, called CosmosDG, is based on a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) formulation, using both entropy-based artificial viscosity and slope limiting procedures for the regularization of shocks. High-order multistage forward Euler and strong-stability preserving Runge-Kutta time integration options complement high-order spatial discretization. We have also added flexibility in the code infrastructure allowing for both adaptive mesh and adaptive basis order refinement to be performed separately or simultaneously in a local (cell-by-cell) manner. We discuss in this report the DG formulation and present tests demonstrating the robustness, accuracy, and convergence of our numerical methods applied to special and general relativistic MHD, although we note that an equivalent capability currently also exists in CosmosDG for Newtonian systems.

  11. Universe Awareness: Inspiring Every Child with our Wonderful Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, W.; Nijman, I.; Russo, P.

    2013-04-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international program that aims to reach 4- to 10-year old children from disadvantaged backgrounds and uses astronomy to teach them about science and technology and provide them with a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. The science of astronomy is especially suited for this goal, since the beauty of our Universe grasps the attention of children, and the Universe plays a significant role in the history of global cultures. UNAWE was funded by the European Union in 2011 to start an EU-UNAWE project of a duration of three years. EU-UNAWE has various national websites and is now an international platform for astronomers, teachers and educators to share resources and ideas. EU-UNAWE develops educational materials and organizes teacher training workshops, which are highly appreciated and used by primary school teachers around the world. The UNAWE network continues to broaden, reaching more and more children with astronomy each year.

  12. Coastal hazards in a changing world: projecting and communicating future coastal flood risk at the local-scale using the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Andrea; Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Foxgrover, Amy; Limber, Patrick; Vitousek, Sean; Fitzgibbon, Michael; Wood, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    The risk of coastal flooding will increase for many low-lying coastal regions as predominant contributions to flooding, including sea level, storm surge, wave setup, and storm-related fluvial discharge, are altered with climate change. Community leaders and local governments therefore look to science to provide insight into how climate change may affect their areas. Many studies of future coastal flooding vulnerability consider sea level and tides, but ignore other important factors that elevate flood levels during storm events, such as waves, surge, and discharge. Here we present a modelling approach that considers a broad range of relevant processes contributing to elevated storm water levels for open coast and embayment settings along the U.S. West Coast. Additionally, we present online tools for communicating community-relevant projected vulnerabilities. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) is a numerical modeling system developed to predict coastal flooding due to both sea-level rise (SLR) and plausible 21st century storms for active-margin settings like the U.S. West Coast. CoSMoS applies a predominantly deterministic framework of multi-scale models encompassing large geographic scales (100s to 1000s of kilometers) to small-scale features (10s to 1000s of meters), resulting in flood extents that can be projected at a local resolution (2 meters). In the latest iteration of CoSMoS applied to Southern California, U.S., efforts were made to incorporate water level fluctuations in response to regional storm impacts, locally wind-generated waves, coastal river discharge, and decadal-scale shoreline and cliff changes. Coastal hazard projections are available in a user-friendly web-based tool (www.prbo.org/ocof), where users can view variations in flood extent, maximum flood depth, current speeds, and wave heights in response to a range of potential SLR and storm combinations, providing direct support to adaptation and management decisions. In order to capture

  13. Cosmos of science philosophical problems of the internal and external worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Earman, John

    1998-01-01

    The inaugural volume of the series, devoted to the work of philosopher Adolf Grünbaum, encompasses the philosophical problems of space, time, and cosmology, the nature of scientific methodology, and the foundations of psychoanalysis.

  14. The Cosmos on a Shoestring. Small Spacecraft for Space and Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Management Plan IMAGE Imager for Magnetopause-to- Aurora Global Exploration IMDC Integrated Mission Design Center (GSFC) IPDT Integrated Product...developing metrics: "Generation X observational satellite will successfully map 100 percent of the terrain of six Jovian moons to a resolution of 100

  15. The detection of intermediate size magnetic anomalies in Cosmos-49 and OGO-2, 4, and 6 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, R. D.; Davis, W. M.; Cain, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Benkova, Dolginov, and Simonenko have recently reported the presence of intermediate size magnetic anomalies in the data from COSMOS-49 and hypothesized a crustal and/or upper mantle origin. The spherical harmonic models of the internal potential function were examined, based on the OGO-2, 4, and 6 data (POGO (10/68) and later models), and verified the locations and amplitudes of those anomalies whose wavelengths approximate 4000 km. The comparison was made by subtracting a field model developed with a truncated series of n* = 9 from one computed with n* = 11 and generating a residual map equivalent to the COSMOS-49 data. The patterns of delta F so computed from POGO were then compared with the IZMIRAN maps and also were analyzed statistically, in both the spatial and frequency domains, using residuals computed from the raw COSMOS-49 data with the n* = 9 COSMOS-49 field model as reference. The two sets of data were thus derived from completely independent sets of observations and field references. The two patterns are shown to agree very well over the whole earth surface up to the 50 deg latitude limit of COSMOS-49.

  16. The Entangled Cosmos: an experiment in physical theopoetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    As an experiment in constructive transdisciplinary relationality, a theology of nonseparable difference here engages a physics of quantum entanglement. The metaphoric potential of "spooky action at a distance" to intensify a cosmology resistant to the dominant individualism and conducive to ethical ecologies of interdependence has only begun to develop across multiple discourses. This essay contemplates the specific unfolding of a theory of nonlocal superpositions by physicists such as Stapp, Bohm and Barad. It does not literalize any God-trope, but rather entangles theology in the mysterious uncertainty of our widest interdependencies. This essay, first presented as a lecture at the American Academy of Religion "Science, Technology and Religion" Group, San Francisco, November 2011, forms the core of a chapter in a book I am currently completing, The Cloud of the Impossible: Theological Entanglements.

  17. The enhancement and decrement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect towards the ROSAT Cluster RXJ0658-5557The enhancement and decrement of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect towards the ROSAT Cluster RXJ0658-5557

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreani, P.; Böhringer, H.; Dall'Oglio, G.; Martinis, L.; Shaver, P. A.; Lemke, R.; Nyman, L. A. A.; Booth, R.; Pizzo, L.; Whyborn, N.

    1999-01-01

    Published in: Astrophys. J. 513 (1999) 23 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We report simultaneous observations at 1.2 and 2 mm, with a double channel photometer on the SEST Telescope, of the X-ray cluster RXJ0658-5557 in search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z). The S-Z data

  18. Development Of International Data Standards For The COSMOS/PEER-LL Virtual Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, J. N.

    2005-12-01

    The COSMOS -PEER Lifelines Project 2L02 completed a Pilot Geotechnical Virtual Data Center (GVDC) system capable of both archiving geotechnical data and of disseminating data from multiple linked geotechnical databases. The Pilot GVDC system links geotechnical databases of four organizations: the California Geological Survey, Caltrans, PG&E, and the U. S. Geological Survey The System was presented and reviewed in the COSMOS-PEER Lifelines workshop on June 21 - 23, 2004, which was co-sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and included participation by the United Kingdom Highways Agency (UKHA) , the Association of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists in the United Kingdom (AGS), the United States Army Corp of Engineers (USACOE), Caltrans, United States Geological Survey (USGS), California Geological Survey (CGS), a number of state Departments of Transportation (DOTs), county building code officials, and representatives of academic institutions and private sector geotechnical companies. As of February 2005 COSMOS-PEER Lifelines Project 2L03 is currently funded to accomplish the following tasks: 1) expand the Pilot GVDC Geotechnical Data Dictionary and XML Schema to include data definitions and structures to describe in-situ measurements such as shear wave velocity profiles, and additional laboratory geotechnical test types; 2) participate in an international cooperative working group developing a single geotechnical data exchange standard that has broad international acceptance; and 3) upgrade the GVDC system to support corresponding exchange standard data dictionary and schema improvements. The new geophysical data structures being developed will include PS-logs, downhole geophysical logs, cross-hole velocity data, and velocity profiles derived using surface waves. A COSMOS-PEER Lifelines Geophysical Data Dictionary Working Committee constituted of experts in the development of data dictionary standards and experts in the specific data to be

  19. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation - XIII. AGN quenching of high-redshift star formation in ZF-COSMOS-20115

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Mutch, Simon J.; Duffy, Alan R.; Geil, Paul M.; Poole, Gregory B.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2017-11-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies (MQGs) are thought to have formed stars rapidly at early times followed by a long period of quiescence. The recent discovery of a MQG, ZF-COSMOS-20115 at z ˜ 4, only 1.5 Gyr after the big bang, places new constraints on galaxy growth and the role of feedback in early star formation. Spectroscopic follow-up confirmed ZF-COSMOS-20115 as a MQG at z = 3.717 with an estimated stellar mass of ˜1011 M⊙, showing no evidence of recent star formation. We use the Meraxes semi-analytic model to investigate how ZF-COSMOS-20115 analogues build stellar mass, and why they become quiescent. We identify three analogue galaxies with similar properties to ZF-COSMOS-20115. We find that ZF-COSMOS-20115 is likely hosted by a massive halo with virial mass of ˜1013 M⊙, having been through significant mergers at early times. These merger events drove intense growth of the nucleus, which later prevented cooling and quenched star formation. Therefore, ZF-COSMOS-20115 is unlikely to have experienced strong or extended star formation events at z black holes in our simulation and were luminous quasars at z ˜ 5, indicating that ZF-COSMOS-20115 and other MQGs may be the descendants of high-redshift quasars. In addition, the model suggests that ZF-COSMOS-20115 formed in a region of intergalactic medium that was reionized early.

  20. Single-Molecule Analysis of Pre-mRNA Splicing with Colocalization Single-Molecule Spectroscopy (CoSMoS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Joerg E; Serebrov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of single-molecule techniques to study pre-mRNA splicing has provided insights into the dynamic nature of the spliceosome. Colocalization single-molecule spectroscopy (CoSMoS) allows following spliceosome assembly in real time at single-molecule resolution in the full complexity of cellular extracts. A detailed protocol of CoSMoS has been published previously (Anderson and Hoskins, Methods Mol Biol 1126:217-241, 2014). Here, we provide an update on the technical advances since the first CoSMoS studies including slide surface treatment, data processing, and representation. We describe various labeling strategies to generate RNA reporters with multiple dyes (or other moieties) at specific locations.

  1. The Self-Evolving Cosmos: A Phenomenological Approach to Nature's Unity-in-Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Steven M.

    ch. 1. Introduction: individuation and the quest for unity -- ch. 2. The obstacle to unification in modern physics. 2.1. Introduction. 2.2. Does contemporary mathematical physics actually depart from the classical formulation? -- ch. 3. The phenomenological challenge to the classical formula -- ch. 4. Topological phenomenology. 4.1. Introduction. 4.2. Phenomenological intuition, topology, and the Klein bottle. 4.3. The physical significance of the Klein bottle -- ch. 5. The dimensional family of topological spinors. 5.1. Generalization of intuitive topology. 5.2. Topodimensional spin matrix -- ch. 6. Basic principles of dimensional transformation. 6.1. Synsymmetry and the self-transformation of space. 6.2. From symmetry breaking to dimensional generation. 6.3. The three basic stages of dimensional generation. 6.4. Kleinian topogeny -- ch. 7. Waves carrying waves: the co-evolution of lifeworlds -- ch. 8. The forces of nature. 8.1. The phenomenon of light. 8.2. Phenomenological Kaluza-Klein theory. 8.3. Summary comparison of conventional and topo-phenomenological approaches to Kaluza-Klein theory -- ch. 9. Cosmogony, symmetry, and phenomenological intuition. 9.1. Conventional view of the evolving cosmos. 9.2. The problem of symmetry. 9.3. A new kind of clarity -- ch. 10. The self-evolving cosmos. 10.1. Introduction to the cosmogonic matrix. 10.2. Overview of cosmic evolution. 10.3. The role of the fermions in dimensional generation. 10.4. Projective stages of cosmogony: dimensional divergence. 10.5. Proprioceptive stages of cosmogony: dimensional convergence. 10.6. Conclusion: wider horizons of cosmic evolution -- ch. 11. The psychophysics of cosmogony. 11.1. Psychical aspects of the fundamental particles. 11.2. Toward a reflexive physics. 11.3. Concretization of the self-evolving cosmos.

  2. Catecholamines and their enzymes in discrete brain areas of rats after space flight on biosatellites Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetǹanskỳ, R.; Čulman, J.; Serova, L. V.; Tigranjan, R. A.; Torda, T.; Macho, L.

    The activity of the catecholaminergic system was measured in the hypothalamus of rats which had experienced an 18.5-19.5-day-long stay in the state of weightlessness during space flights on board Soviet biosatellites of the type Cosmos. In the first two experiments, Cosmos 782 and 936, the concentration of norepinephrine and the activities of synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-β-hydroxylase and of the degrading enzyme monoamine oxidase were measured in the total hypothalamus. None of the given parameters was changed after space flight. In the light of the changes of these parameters recorded after exposure to acute stress on Earth, this finding indicates that long-term state of weightlessness does not represent an intensive stressogenic stimulus for the system studied. In the space experiment Cosmos 1129, the concentration of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine was studied in isolated nuclei of the hypothalamus of rats within 6-10 hr following return from space. Norepinephrine was found to be significantly reduced in the arcuate nucleus, median eminence and periventricular nucleus, epinephrine in the median eminence, periventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, whereas dopamine was not significantly changed after space flight. The decreased catecholamine levels found in some hypothalamic nuclei of rats which had undergone space flight indicate that no chronic intensive stressor could have acted during the flight, otherwise the catecholamine concentration would have been increased in the nuclei. The decreased levels must have been induced by the effect of a stressogenic factor acting for a short time only, and that either during the landing maneuver or immediately after landing. Thus long-term exposure of the organism to the state of weightlessness does not represent a stressogenic stimulus for the catecholaminergic system in the hypothalamus, which is one of the regulators of the activation of neuroendocrine reactions under stress.

  3. Preparing the potential and challenge of remote sensing-based sea surface salinity estimation: the CoSMOS airborne campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, Nicolas; Tenerelli, Joseph; Chapron, Bertrand; Guimbard, Sebastien; Picard, Stephane-S.; Le Traon, Pierre-Yves; Zine, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of ocean surface salinity dynamics from space poses numerous engineering and scientific challenges that push the boundaries of ocean remote sensing capabilities. The principles of measuring sea surface salinity (SSS) from space are well established. They involve precise determination of the dielectric characteristics of seawater through lownoise passive microwave (MW) radiometer measurement of the ocean's brightness temperature (TB), optimally performed at a low frequency near 1.4 GHz (L-band). Sea surface salinity from space clearly presents new challenges because science requirements impose the need for resolution of the order of 0.1 psu (practical salinity units). This requirement means that competing terms carried in the ocean TB measurements, foremost being sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean surface roughness, must be accounted for in a new and more robust manner. To reach this aim, we developed consistent forward electromagnetic/geophysical models for the expected surface roughness and foam emissivity signatures [1] at L-band. We also provided models to correct for sunglint [2] and galactic radiation [3] scattered towards the future SMOS sensor. Finally, we have defined the Auxiliary data processing for SMOS, including the processing to get the key SST and wind fields needed for the salinity retrieval [4]. Prior to launch, airborne field measurement efforts are currently on going to perform algorithm validation exercises. Here, we present results from the ESA airborne Campaign CoSMOS, performed in the North Sea in April 2006. This campaign was conducted to help to clarify and bound the limits of uncertainty for the geophysical factors affecting sea surface emissivity at L-band, in order to develop successful salinity inversion algorithms.

  4. Le cosmos et le lotus confessions d'un astrophysicien

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Xuan Thuan

    2011-01-01

    Que nous dit vraiment la science sur la nature de l'univers, sur son origine et son avenir ? Par quel mystère le langage mathématique, pure création de l'esprit humain, se révèle-t-il aussi performant pour nous décrire les phénomènes physiques, de l'infiniment petit à l'infiniment grand ? S'il existe un ordre du monde, ce que nous en disent la physique quantique et la théorie de la relativité est-il compatible avec ce qu'enseigne le bouddhisme ? Et que peut-on en conclure concernant notre propre vie ? A ces questions passionnantes et à beaucoup d'autres, le célèbre astrophysicien Trinh Xuan Thuan répond ici d'une façon personnelle, en s'appuyant sur son expérience. Son itinéraire l'a placé d'emblée à la confluence de trois cultures : issu d'une famille de lettrés vietnamiens imprégnée de traditions bouddhiste et confucéenne, il a reçu une éducation à la française puis une formation scientifique à l'américaine. Une telle richesse de points de vue lui permet d'apporter, non pas de...

  5. The privileged planet how our place in the cosmos is designed for discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2004-01-01

    Is Earth merely an insignificant speck in a vast and meaningless universe? On the contrary. The Privileged Planet: How Our Place in the Cosmos Is Designed for Discovery shows that this cherished assumption of materialism is dead wrong. Earth is far more significant than virtually anyone has realized. Contrary to the scientific orthodoxy, it is not an average planet around an ordinary star in an unremarkable part of the Milky Way.In this provocative book, Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay W. Richards present a staggering array of evidence that exposes the hollowness of this modern

  6. Effects of the Cosmos 1129 Soviet paste diet on body composition in the growing rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Smith, A. H.; Pitts, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    Six Simonsen albino rats (45 days of age) were placed on a regimen of 40 g/day the semipurified Soviet paste diet used in the 18.5 day Cosmos 1129 spacecraft was to support the rats for various experiments on the physiological effects of weightlessness. The animals were maintained on the Soviet paste diet for 35 days, metabolic rate was measured and body composition was determined by direct analysis. The results were compared with a control group of rates of the same age, which had been kept on a standard commercial grain diet during the same period of time.

  7. US plant and radiation dosimetry experiments flown on the Soviet satellite Cosmos 1129

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, M. R. (Editor); Souza, K. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Experiments included: 30 young male Wistar SPF rats used for wide range physiological studies; experiments with plants, fungi, insects, and mammalian tissue cultures; radiation physics experiments; a heat convection study; a rat embryology experiment in which an attempt was made to breed 2 male and 5 female rats during the flight; and fertile quail eggs used to determine the effects of spaceflight on avian embryogenesis. Specimens for US experiments were initially prepared at the recovery site or in Moscow and transferred to US laboratories for complete analyses. An overview of the mission focusing on preflight, on orbit, and postflight activities pertinent to the fourteen US experiments aboard Cosmos 1129 is presented.

  8. FR-type radio sources in COSMOS: relation of radio structure to size, accretion modes and large-scale environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulaki, Eleni; Faustino Jimenez Andrade, Eric; Delvecchio, Ivan; Karim, Alexander; Smolčić, Vernesa; Magnelli, Benjamin; Bertoldi, Frank; Schinnener, Eva; Sargent, Mark; Finoguenov, Alexis; VLA COSMOS Team

    2018-01-01

    The radio sources associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) can exhibit a variety of radio structures, from simple to more complex, giving rise to a variety of classification schemes. The question which still remains open, given deeper surveys revealing new populations of radio sources, is whether this plethora of radio structures can be attributed to the physical properties of the host or to the environment. Here we present an analysis on the radio structure of radio-selected AGN from the VLA-COSMOS Large Project at 3 GHz (JVLA-COSMOS; Smolčić et al.) in relation to: 1) their linear projected size, 2) the Eddington ratio, and 3) the environment their hosts lie within. We classify these as FRI (jet-like) and FRII (lobe-like) based on the FR-type classification scheme, and compare them to a sample of jet-less radio AGN in JVLA-COSMOS. We measure their linear projected sizes using a semi-automatic machine learning technique. Their Eddington ratios are calculated from X-ray data available for COSMOS. As environmental probes we take the X-ray groups (hundreds kpc) and the density fields (~Mpc-scale) in COSMOS. We find that FRII radio sources are on average larger than FRIs, which agrees with literature. But contrary to past studies, we find no dichotomy in FR objects in JVLA-COSMOS given their Eddington ratios, as on average they exhibit similar values. Furthermore our results show that the large-scale environment does not explain the observed dichotomy in lobe- and jet-like FR-type objects as both types are found on similar environments, but it does affect the shape of the radio structure introducing bents for objects closer to the centre of an X-ray group.

  9. Interdisciplinarity and the Two Cultures in [image ommited]--Approaches in a Greek Science Magazine in the 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentzos, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    The contents of the Greek magazine "Physicos Cosmos" include science popularization, teaching proposals, and issues of educational concern. The magazine is addressed to teachers of physics and, consequently, to grammar-school pupils/students. Its articles ranged, in general, from short texts taken from physical sciences to more specialized…

  10. ROSAT detection of an X-ray shadow in the 1/4-keV diffuse background in the Draco nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Mebold, U.; Hirth, W.; Herbstmeier, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M.

    1991-01-01

    The detection by the Roentgen satellite (ROSAT) X-ray telescope of a shadow in the 1/4-keV (C-band, 0.1 to 0.284 keV) cosmic diffuse background is reported. The location and morphology of the local minimum in X-rays are in clear agreement with a discrete H I cloud. The shadow is very deep with a minimum level at 50 percent of the surrounding emission; therefore, a minimum of 50 percent of the observed off-cloud flux must originate on the far side of the cloud. The analysis of H I velocity components links the cloud with the Draco nebula (distance of about 600 parsecs); it then follows that there is significant 1/4-keV X-ray emission at large distance (more than 400 parsecs) from the galactic plane along this line of sight. The extent of the distant emission region is uncertain, and if it indicates the existence of a hot galactic corona, it must be patchy in nature.

  11. On lunar exospheric column densities and solar wind access beyond the terminator from ROSAT soft X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmström, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the Röntgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19° wedges (one north and one south) 13-32° off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38° wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38° wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  12. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. K.; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the antisolar point. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also monitor how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed.

  13. The Properties of the Diffuse X-ray Background from the DXL sounding rocket mission (plus ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Suzaku data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the properties of the different components of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) is made particularly difficult by their similar spectral signature.The University of Miami has been working on disentangling the different DXB components for many years, using a combination of proprietary and archival data from XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra, and a sounding rocket mission (DXL) specifically designed to study the properties of Local Hot Bubble (LHB) and Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) using their spatial signature. In this talk we will present:(a) Results from the DXL mission, specifically launch #2, to study the properties of the SWCX and LHB (and GH) and their contribution to the ROSAT All Sky Survey Bands(b) Results from a Suzaku key project to characterize the SWCX and build a semi-empirical model to predict the SWCX line emission for any time, any direction. A publicly available web portal for the model will go online by the end of the year(c) Results from XMM-Newton deep surveys to study the angular correlation of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) in the direction of the Chandra Deep Field South.DXL launch #3, schedule for January 2018 and the development of the DXG sounding rocket mission to characterize the GH-CGM emission using newly developed micropore optics will also be discussed.

  14. Submillimeter Stacking in Overdense Environments at z>2: Exploring Galaxies’ ISM Content in the COSMOS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Richard; Hung, Chao-Ling; Casey, Caitlin M.; Chiang, Yi-Kuan

    2018-01-01

    A galaxy’s evolution is affected by its environment. Today, we see quiescent elliptical galaxies preferentially in the high-density environments of galaxy clusters, while star-forming galaxies are found only in lower density environments. However, this trend is less clear at z > 2, with some works arguing for a possible reversal of star formation with environmental density. While star formation is quenched in the cores of today's galaxy clusters, their progenitors likely had ongoing star formation in line with cosmic downsizing. In order to better understand when and how the cores of galaxy protoclusters formed their stars, We search for a dependence between environment and gas content in galaxy protoclusters at z > 2. To do this, we utilize the 2deg^2 COSMOS survey and SCUBA2 850 micron maps of the COSMOS field to trace galaxy gas content and environment. We conduct a stacking analysis with the code SIMSTACK to aide in our search for a relationship between environment and gas content.

  15. Einstein's steady-state theory: an abandoned model of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac; McCann, Brendan; Nahm, Werner; Mitton, Simon

    2014-09-01

    We present a translation and analysis of an unpublished manuscript by Albert Einstein in which he attempted to construct a `steady-state' model of the universe. The manuscript, which appears to have been written in early 1931, demonstrates that Einstein once explored a cosmic model in which the mean density of matter in an expanding universe is maintained constant by the continuous formation of matter from empty space. This model is very different to previously known Einsteinian models of the cosmos (both static and dynamic) but anticipates the later steady-state cosmology of Hoyle, Bondi and Gold in some ways. We find that Einstein's steady-state model contains a fundamental flaw and suggest that it was abandoned for this reason. We also suggest that he declined to explore a more sophisticated version because he found such theories rather contrived. The manuscript is of historical interest because it reveals that Einstein debated between steady-state and evolving models of the cosmos decades before a similar debate took place in the cosmological community.

  16. COSMOS2015 photometric redshifts probe the impact of filaments on galaxy properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laigle, C.; Pichon, C.; Arnouts, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Dubois, Y.; Devriendt, J.; Slyz, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ilbert, O.; Kraljic, K.; Malavasi, N.; Park, Changbom; Vibert, D.

    2018-03-01

    The variation of galaxy stellar masses and colour types with the distance to projected cosmic filaments are quantified using the precise photometric redshifts of the COSMOS2015 catalogue extracted from Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field (2 deg2). Realistic mock catalogues are also extracted from the lightcone of the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation HORIZON-AGN. They show that the photometric redshift accuracy of the observed catalogue (σz 1010M⊙ and z galaxies are statistically closer to their neighbouring filament. At fixed stellar mass, passive galaxies are also found closer to their filament, while active star-forming galaxies statistically lie further away. The contributions of nodes and local density are removed from these gradients to highlight the specific role played by the geometry of the filaments. We find that the measured signal does persist after this removal, clearly demonstrating that proximity to a filament is not equivalent to proximity to an overdensity. These findings are in agreement with gradients measured in both 2D and 3D in the HORIZON-AGN simulation and those observed in the spectroscopic surveys VIPERS and GAMA (which both rely on the identification of 3D filaments). They are consistent with a picture in which the influence of the geometry of the large-scale environment drives anisotropic tides that impact the assembly history of galaxies, and hence their observed properties.

  17. High-Performance Computer Modeling of the Cosmos-Iridium Collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S; Cook, K; Fasenfest, B; Jefferson, D; Jiang, M; Leek, J; Levatin, J; Nikolaev, S; Pertica, A; Phillion, D; Springer, K; De Vries, W

    2009-08-28

    This paper describes the application of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness (SSA) enterprise, to the recent Cosmos-Iridium collision. This framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel, high-performance computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We will describe the application of this framework to the recent collision of the Cosmos and Iridium satellites, including (1) detailed hydrodynamic modeling of the satellite collision and resulting debris generation, (2) orbital propagation of the simulated debris and analysis of the increased risk to other satellites (3) calculation of the radar and optical signatures of the simulated debris and modeling of debris detection with space surveillance radar and optical systems (4) determination of simulated debris orbits from modeled space surveillance observations and analysis of the resulting orbital accuracy, (5) comparison of these modeling and simulation results with Space Surveillance Network observations. We will also discuss the use of this integrated modeling and simulation framework to analyze the risks and consequences of future satellite collisions and to assess strategies for mitigating or avoiding future incidents, including the addition of new sensor systems, used in conjunction with the Space Surveillance Network, for improving space situational awareness.

  18. Dernières nouvelles du cosmos vers la première seconde

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, Hubert

    1994-01-01

    « Ces dernières années, les recherches scientifiques sur le passé le plus lointain de l'univers ont été menées avec une grande vigueur. Je me propose d'en présenter ici les résultats les plus marquants. La théorie du Big Bang s'impose comme la description la plus adéquate de l'évolution du cosmos. Les arguments en sa faveur se sont accumulés. Mais, en parallèle, un certain nombre de difficultés sont apparues. Mon objectif est d'amener le lecteur vers les premiers temps de l'univers pour lui permettre d'estimer lui-même le degré de crédibilité de la théorie. Dans ce livre, nous remontons le temps jusqu'au moment où l'horloge conventionnelle marque " une seconde ". (Un ouvrage ultérieur nous présentera ce que nous savons de l'univers pendant cette première seconde.) Les affirmations de la théorie sont fondées sur une collection d'observations, les " fossiles cosmologiques ", qui nous renseignent sur l'état du cosmos à certains moments de son histoire. Nous donnons à chaque étape le...

  19. ESA's Hipparcos satellite revises the scale of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Sun, called parallaxes, give the first direct measurements of the distances of large numbers of stars. With the overall calculations completed, the harvest of scientific discoveries has begun. Among those delighted with the immediate irruption into cosmology, from this spacecraft made in Europe, is ESA's director of science, Roger Bonnet. "When supporters of the Hipparcos project argued their case," Bonnet recalls, "they were competing with astrophysical missions with more obvious glamour. But they promised remarkable consequences for all branches of astronomy. And already we see that even the teams using the Hubble Space Telescope will benefit from a verdict from Hipparcos on the distance scale that underpins all their reckonings of the expansion of the Universe." The pulse-rates of the stars Cepheid stars alternately squeeze themselves and relax, like a beating heart. They wax and wane rhythmically in brightness, every few days or weeks, at a rate that depends on their luminosity. Henrietta Leavitt at the Harvard College Observatory discovered in the early years of this century that bigger and more brilliant Cepheids vary with a longer period, according to a strict rule. It allows astronomers to gauge relative distances simply by taking the pulse-rates of the Cepheids and measuring their apparent brightnesses. Nearby Cepheids are typically 1000-2000 light-years away. They are too far for even Hipparcos to obtain very exact distance measurements, but by taking twenty-six examples and comparing them, Michael Feast and his colleague Robin Catchpole of RGO Cambridge arrive at consistent statistics. These define the relationship between the period and the luminosity, needed to judge the distances of Cepheids. The zero point is for an imaginary Cepheid pulsating once a day. This would be a star 300 times more luminous than the Sun, according to the Hipparcos data. The slowest Cepheid in the sample, l Carinae, has a period of 36 days and is equivalent to 18,000 suns

  20. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and electrolyte metabolism in rat blood after flight aboard Cosmos-1129 biosatellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Tigranyan, R.A.; Jindra, A.; Viting, T.A.

    1982-08-01

    Blood plasma aldosterone concentration and renin activity were studied in rats flow in space on the Cosmos 1129 satellite using radioimmunoassay techniques. Immediately after the flight, the animals presented significant decreases in plasma renin activity, as compared to rats in the vivarium control and animals in the synchronous experiment. R. J.

  1. Calibración in situ del sensor cosmos para determinar humedad del suelo en escalas intermedias (~1 km

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidencio Cruz Bautista

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available La heterogeneidad del suelo influye ampliamente en el contenido de humedad, dificultando la precisa determinación de este parámetro en estudios con fines hidrológicos y ecológicos que requieren de mediciones continuas y representativas para escalas intermedias (~1 km. En este contexto un sensor de neutrón de rayo cósmico The COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS permite cuantificar humedad del suelo de manera continua y a escalas espaciales de cientos de metros. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar un esquema de calibración para un sensor COSMOS CRS-1000. El estudio se realizó en una sabana de zacate buffel (Pennisetum ciliare en Rayón Sonora, México. En este sitio se instaló el COSMOS CRS-1000 y para su calibración se realizaron muestreos de suelo en dos etapas. A estas muestras se les determinó el contenido de humedad y su densidad aparente por técnicas gravimétricas. Con el contenido de humedad de estas muestras, expresado en términos volumétricos, se obtuvo por aproximación el parámetro de calibración para el COSMOS CRS-1000. El valor obtenido para este parámetro fue de 4121 conteos por hora (tasa de conteo del neutrón sobre suelo. Con este valor se realizó la corrección a los valores estimados originalmente por el sensor COSMOS CRS-1000. Al realizar esta corrección, se observó un incremento en el contenido de humedad del suelo de 1 a 2 % con respecto a los valores estimados con el COSMOS CRS-1000 en todo el periodo de análisis. A pesar de la variabilidad espacial en el contenido de humedad del suelo bajo estudio, se observó que el sensor COSMOS CRS-1000 tiene la capacidad de proveer estimaciones razonables del contenido de la humedad del suelo de manera continua a una profundidad de 0 a 40 cm, en una superficie de alrededor de 30 ha.

  2. Cosmic Art: Artistic Expressions of the Universe in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacosta, P.

    2013-04-01

    Students in some of the science classes at Columbia College Chicago are encouraged to use their artistic talents to express their fascination with, understanding of, or sense of mystery about the cosmos. These creative expressions have numerous educational benefits that reinforce the learning process. Furthermore, this type of assignment often improves the students' attitude towards science, instilling in them a life-long interest for learning. These projects also break down barriers between the disciplines, particularly those of science and art. In this paper, I describe the pedagogy and benefits of the art/science partnership in my science classes with examples of student artworks that depict cosmic phenomena.

  3. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne.......The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  4. The UV Spectral Components in RE1938-461, the Brightest ROSAT WFC Discovered Polar with a High Euv/optical Ratio: CYCLE4 Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Simon

    1994-01-01

    Eight new magnetic cataclysmic variables were discovered during the ROSAT WFC survey. Seven of these have been identified with polar (or AM Her) systems. A striking result that has emerged is that the new polars appear to populate a region of high EUV/optical flux ratio when compared to that measured for the previously known systems that were also detected in the WFC survey. It is highly likely that these new polars also possess large soft/hard X-ray flux ratios. In this case, the WFC result suggests that a) polars with large soft excesses are more common than previously believed and b) that the mode of accretion in these particular systems is likely to be via the direct penetration of the white dwarf's surface by blobs of accreting material rather than by the formation of a hard X-ray emitting column above the surface. The new polars will have a direct bearing on the division between the two different modes of accretion. They also provide the means to probe the detailed nature of the processes occurring in the accretion region. We are proposing low resolution HST FOS observations of the brightest of these EUV luminous polars discovered in the WFC survey to a) search for the tail of the emission component from the heated region around the accreting pole to constrain the luminosity, size and temperature of this constituent and b) to perform an initial study of the UV emission lines, measuring their flux and radial velocity motion to constrain the dynamics and physical (ionization) structure within the accretion flow.

  5. DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 observations of lower hybrid waves excited by VLF whistler mode waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T. F; Inan, U. S.; Lauben, D.; Sonwalkar, V. S.; Helliwell, R. A.; Sobolev, Ya. P.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Gonzalez, S.

    1994-01-01

    Past work demostrates that strong lower hybrid (LH) waves can be excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves throughout large regions of the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere. The effects of the excited LH waves upon the suprathermal ion population in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere depend upon the distribution of LH wave amplitude with wavelength lambda. The present work reports plasma wave data from the DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 spacecraft which suggests that the excited LH wave spectrum has components for which lambda less than or equal to 3.5 m when excitation occurs at a frequency roughly equal to the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. This wavelength limit is a factor of approximately 3 below that reported in past work and suggests that the excited LH waves can interact with suprathermal H(+) ions with energy less than or equal to 6 eV. This finding supports recent work concerning the heating of suprathermal ions above thunderstorm cells.

  6. [The effect of weightlessness on fracture healing of rats flown on the biosatellite Cosmos-2044].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnova, G N; Burkovskaia, T E; Vorotnikova, E V; Kaplanskiĭ, A S; Arustamov, O V

    1991-01-01

    Two days before launch of the biosatellite Cosmos-2044 five rats were exposed to surgical intervention: their fibulas were cut bilaterally. The purpose was to study the effect of microgravity on bone fracture healing. Histologically and histomorphometrically it was demonstrated that healing was inhibited; as a result, bone callus was poorly developed and bone fragment consolidation was inadequate. An increase in the relative volume of osteoid and a simultaneous decrease in the number and activity of osteoblasts point to mineral disorders of newly formed bone in microgravity. Study of untreated tibia showed that exposure to microgravity led to osteoporosis of proximal metaphyses. This osteoporosis was produced by inhibited neoformation and enhanced resorption of bone. Comparative analysis of injured fibula and untreated tibia of rats exposed to real microgravity for 14 days or tail suspended demonstrated similarity of changes. This indicates that tail suspension can be viewed as an adequate simulation of microgravity with respect to changes in hindlimb bones.

  7. Frozen storage stability of beef patties incorporated with extracts from ulam raja leaves (Cosmos caudatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihani, S F S; Tan, Thuan-Chew; Huda, Nurul; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2014-07-15

    In Malaysia, fresh ulam raja leaves (Cosmos caudatus) are eaten raw with rice. In this study, beef patties incorporated with extracts of ulam raja (UREX) and commercial green tea extract (GTE) added individually at 200 and 500 mg/kg were stored at -18°C for up to 10 weeks. Lipid oxidation, cooking yield, physicochemical properties, textural properties, proximate composition and sensory characteristics of the beef patties were compared between those incorporated with UREX, GTE and the control (pure beef patty). Incorporation of UREX or GTE at 500 mg/kg into beef patties reduced the extent of lipid oxidation significantly (P0.05) on the colour, pH, proximate composition and overall sensory acceptability of the patties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  9. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  10. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Physical parameters of compact SFGs in COSMOS field (Fang+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G.; Ma, Z.; Kong, X.; Fan, L.

    2017-10-01

    Our study is based on a sample of high-redshift massive galaxies that is built from 3D-HST (Skelton et al. 2014, J/ApJS/214/24) and CANDELS (Grogin et al. 2011ApJS..197...35G; Koekemoer et al. 2011ApJS..197...36K) data. The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ~900 arcmin2 in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-north, GOODS-south, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All of these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the HST data, which makes it possible to construct the SEDs of objects over a wide wavelength range (Skelton et al. 2014, J/ApJS/214/24). (1 data file).

  12. Alterations in erythrocyte survival parameters in rats after 19.5 days aboard Cosmos 782

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Cummins, J.; Landaw, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were subjected to 19.5 days of weightless space flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite, Cosmos 782. Based on the output of CO-14, survival parameters of a cohort of erythrocytes labeled 15.5 days preflight were evaluated upon return from orbit. These were compared to vivarium control rats injected at the same time. Statistical evaluation indicates that all survival factors were altered by the space flight. The mean potential lifespan, which was 63.0 days in the control rats, was decreased to 59.0 days in the flight rats, and random hemolysis was increased three-fold in the flight rats. The measured size of the cohort was decreased, lending further support to the idea that hemolysis was accelerated during some portion of the flight. A number of factors that might be contributory to these changes are discussed, including forces associated with launch and reentry, atmospheric and environmental parameters, dietary factors, radiation, and weightlessness.

  13. An international prospective cohort study of mobile phone users and health (COSMOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledano, Mireille B; Auvinen, Anssi; Tettamanti, Giorgio

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates validity of self-reported mobile phone use in a subset of 75 993 adults from the COSMOS cohort study. Agreement between self-reported and operator-derived mobile call frequency and duration for a 3-month period was assessed using Cohen's weighted Kappa (κ). Sensitivity...... and specificity of both self-reported high (≥10 calls/day or ≥4h/week) and low (≤6 calls/week or users of one mobile phone, agreement was fair for call frequency (κ=0.35, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.36) and moderate for call duration (κ=0.50, 95......-reported mobile phone use was lower in women, younger age groups and those reporting symptoms during/shortly after using a mobile phone. This study highlights the ongoing value of using self-report data to measure mobile phone use. Furthermore, compared to continuous scale estimates used by previous studies...

  14. Serotonin in individual hypothalamic nuclei of rats after space flight on biosatellite cosmos 1129

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čulman, J.; Kvetňansky, T.; Serova, L. V.; Tigranjan, R. A.; Macho, L.

    The experiment on Cosmos 1129 was based on our results obtained in rats exposed to single or repeated restrain stress in the laboratory. These results have convincingly demonstrated a significant increase of serotonin concentration (5-HT) in the hypothalamus in acutely stressed rats. This response, which was found also in the isolated hypothalamic nuclei, was diminished in repeatedly (40 times) immobilized rats. While the concentration of 5-HT was unchanged in the majority of the hypothalamic nuclei of animals subjected to cosmic flight, an increase was recorded only in the supraoptic nucleus (NSO) and a decrease in the periventricular nucleus. These findings demonstrate that only few areas of the hypothalamus respond to cosmic flight with changes of 5-HT concentration and suggest either that long-term cosmic flight cannot be an intensive stressor or that during the flight the rats became already adapted to its long-term effect. However, the exposure of flight rats to repeated immobilization stress resulted in a significant increase of 5-HT in the NSO, paraventricular and dorsomedial (NDM) nuclei. It should be noted that we have never seen any changes of 5-HT concentration, tryptophan hydroxylase and monoamineoxidase activities in repeatedly (40 times) immobilized rats. On the other hand, the increase of 5-HT concentration in the NDM is a typical finding after seven exposures of rats to immobilization on Earth, daily for 150 min. In the experiment COSMOS 1129 such an increase of 5-HT concentration in the NDM was found not only in the flight group but also in the control group of rats subjected to five daily exposures of immobilization stress. With respect to these findings, the increased 5-HT concentrations observed in some isolated hypothalamic nuclei in the flight group of rats exposed after landing to repeated immobilization stress suggest that long-term space flight and the state of weightlessness do not represent a stressogenic factor with respect to the

  15. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 1-year storm in Orange County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  16. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Orange County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  17. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  18. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  19. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  20. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Ventura County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  1. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Ventura County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  2. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in Orange County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  3. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: average conditions in Ventura County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  4. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in Ventura County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  5. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  6. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  7. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 20-year storm in Orange County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  8. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: average conditions in Orange County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  9. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Orange County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  10. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  11. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 100-year storm in Ventura County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  12. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 20-year storm in Ventura County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  13. Détection de structures par combinaison des données Planck et BOSS et détection simultanée d’amas de galaxies dans les données Planck et ROSAT

    OpenAIRE

    Verdier, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    Originating from the gravitational collapse of the primordial fluctuations of matter, galaxy clusters are the mixture of a dark matter halo, a baryonic plasma also called « hot gas » and several galaxies. Cluster counts provide stringent constraints on cosmology.Improving the detection of the hot gas component in nearby or distant structures is the main goal of my work. We can detect this hot gas in the Planck satellite maps thanks to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and in the ROSAT satellite m...

  14. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 storm-hazard projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; O'Neill, Andrea; Foxgrover, Amy; Herdman, Liv

    2017-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future SLR scenarios, as well as long-term shoreline change and cliff retreat.  Resulting projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Several versions of CoSMoS have been implemented for areas of the California coast, including Southern California, Central California, and San Francisco Bay, and further versions will be incorporated as additional regions and improvements are developed.

  15. Einstein's cosmology review of 1933: a new perspective on the Einstein-de Sitter model of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac; O'Keeffe, Michael; Nahm, Werner; Mitton, Simon

    2015-09-01

    We present a first English translation and analysis of a little-known review of relativistic cosmology written by Albert Einstein in late 1932. The article, which was published in 1933 in a book of Einstein papers translated into French, contains a substantial review of static and dynamic relativistic models of the cosmos, culminating in a discussion of the Einstein-de Sitter model. The article offers a valuable contemporaneous insight into Einstein's cosmology in the early 1930s and confirms that his interest lay in the development of the simplest model of the cosmos that could account for observation. The article also confirms that Einstein did not believe that simplified relativistic models could give an accurate description of the early universe.

  16. From quantum physics to consciousness. Cosmos, spirit, and matter; Von der Quantenphysik zum Bewusstsein. Kosmos, Geist und Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goernitz, Thomas [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Goernitz, Brigitte

    2016-07-01

    The present book is a consequent continuation and deepening of a new concept layed down ba Thomas and Brigitte Goernitz in several writings. Starting from quantum theory they describe the evolution of the spirituality from the origin of the cosmos until the origin of the consciousness. Obtained was this knowledge by profund physical and mathematical research lasting for decades and in cooperation lasting for years with scientists and philosophers, especially with Carl Friedrich v. Weizsaecker.

  17. COMAPARATIVE IN VITRO EVALUATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES ON STEMS AND LEAVES EXTRACTS OF COSMOS CAUDATUS

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindran Muthukumarasamy* , Alifah Ilyana Binti Abdul Bielal, Nur Asmaq Binti Mahasan, Faten Nabilah Binti Mohd Fuad and Nadia Binti Rosli

    2017-01-01

    Currently, people are looking forward to discover the beneficial content of natural resources such as marines and herbs that might have potential in enhancing healthy living. Naturally, Cosmos caudatus is one of the promoting herbs that had been introduced long time ago by the ancient communities, furthermore in Malaysia it is traditionally been used in the treatment of few ailments such as hypertension, osteoporosis, diabetic and inflammation. Even tough, there is a previous study that has b...

  18. Late-stage galaxy mergers in cosmos to z ∼ 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, C. N.; Silverman, J. D. [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Salvato, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, D-84571 Garching (Germany); Kampczyk, P. [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Kartaltepe, J. S. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sanders, D.; Lee, N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Capak, P.; Scoville, N. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Civano, F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Halliday, C. [23, rue d’Yerres, F-91230 Montgeron (France); Ilbert, O.; Le Fèvre, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire dAstrophysique de Marseille), F-13388, Marseille (France); Jahnke, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Koekemoer, A. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Liu, C. T. [Astrophysical Observatory, CUNY, College of Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Sheth, K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Toft, S., E-mail: claire.lackner@ipmu.jp [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DK-2100 (Denmark)

    2014-12-01

    The role of major mergers in galaxy and black hole formation is not well-constrained. To help address this, we develop an automated method to identify late-stage galaxy mergers before coalescence of the galactic cores. The resulting sample of mergers is distinct from those obtained using pair-finding and morphological indicators. Our method relies on median-filtering of high-resolution images to distinguish two concentrated galaxy nuclei at small separations. This method does not rely on low surface brightness features to identify mergers, and is therefore reliable to high redshift. Using mock images, we derive statistical contamination and incompleteness corrections for the fraction of late-stage mergers. The mock images show that our method returns an uncontaminated (<10%) sample of mergers with projected separations between 2.2 and 8 kpc out to z∼1. We apply our new method to a magnitude-limited (m{sub FW} {sub 814}<23) sample of 44,164 galaxies from the COSMOS HST/ACS catalog. Using a mass-complete sample with logM{sub ∗}/M{sub ⊙}>10.6 and 0.25COSMOS, we find that the star formation rates and X-ray selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in likely late-stage mergers are higher by factors of ∼2 relative to those of a control sample. Combining our sample with more

  19. Reviews Book: Nucleus Book: The Wonderful World of Relativity Book: Head Shot Book: Cosmos Close-Up Places to Visit: Physics DemoLab Book: Quarks, Leptons and the Big Bang EBook: Shooting Stars Equipment: Victor 70C USB Digital Multimeter Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Nucleus: A Trip into the Heart of Matter A coffee-table book for everyone to dip into and learn from The Wonderful World of Relativity A charming, stand-out introduction to relativity The Physics DemoLab, National University of Singapore A treasure trove of physics for hands-on science experiences Quarks, Leptons and the Big Bang Perfect to polish up on particle physics for older students Victor 70C USB Digital Multimeter Equipment impresses for usability and value WORTH A LOOK Cosmos Close-Up Weighty tour of the galaxy that would make a good display Shooting Stars Encourage students to try astrophotography with this ebook HANDLE WITH CARE Head Shot: The Science Behind the JKF Assassination Exploration of the science behind the crime fails to impress WEB WATCH App-lied science for education: a selection of free Android apps are reviewed and iPhone app options are listed

  20. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oil of Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. Leaves from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso; Ashafa, Anofi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils isolated from the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus and its antibacterial activity were analyzed by GC-MS and microbroth dilution assay respectively. The essential oil extracted from this plant was predominantly composed of monoterpenes (69.62%) and sesquiterpenes (22.73%). The antibacterial assay showed that the oil had significant inhibitory effects against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria isolates. The MIC of Gram-positive strains ranged between 0.16 and 0.31 mg/mL while those of Gram-negative bacteria ranged between 0.31 and 0.63 mg/mL. The Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to the essential oil than the Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the major components of this oil in other plants have been reported for antimicrobial activities. The antibacterial activity can be attributed to effects of the combination of several components of the oil. The results indicate that the C. bipinnatus might be exploited as natural antibacterial agent and have application in the treatment of several infectious diseases caused by these bacteria. Since this species is endemic to the eastern Free State, the plant could be collected during its bloom and used efficiently in the management of bacterial infections in South Africa. PMID:25587332

  1. Rapid screening and characterisation of antioxidants of Cosmos caudatus using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Guanghou; Leong, Lai Peng; Wong, Shih Peng

    2005-11-15

    Ulam raja (Cosmos caudatus) is used traditionally for improving blood circulation. In this study, it was found that ulam raja had extremely high antioxidant capacity of about 2,400 mg l-ascorbic acid equivalent antioxidant capacity (AEAC) per 100 g of fresh sample. Antioxidant peaks in extract of ulam raja were firstly characterized using free radical spiking test through high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). Upon reaction with 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) free radicals, intensities of antioxidant peaks will be significantly reduced. HPLC/MS(n) was further applied to elucidate the chemical structures of antioxidant peaks characterized in the spiking test. More than twenty antioxidants were identified in ulam raja, and their chemical structures were proposed. The major antioxidants in ulam raja were attributed to a number of proanthocyanidins that existed as dimers through hexamers, quercetin glycosides, chlorogenic, neo-chlorogenic, crypto-chlorogenic acid and (+)-catching. High content of antioxidants antioxidants contained in ulam raja could be partly responsible for its ability to reduce oxidative stress.

  2. Influence of growth stage and season on the antioxidant constituents of Cosmos caudatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Ping, Tan Chin; Khatib, Alfi; Lajis, Nordin H

    2012-12-01

    The impact of tropical seasons (dry and wet) and growth stages (8, 10 and 12 weeks) of Cosmos caudatus on the antioxidant activity (AA), total phenolic content (TPC) as well as the level of bioactive compounds were evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The plant morphology (plant height) also showed variation between the two seasons. Samples planted from June to August (during the dry season) exhibited a remarkably higher bioactivity and height than those planted from October to December (during the wet season). The samples that were harvested at eight weeks of age during the dry season showed the highest bioactivity with values of 26.04 g GAE/100 g and 22.1 μg/ml for TPC and IC₅₀, respectively. Identification of phytochemical constituents in the C. caudatus extract was carried out by liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection and electrospray tandem mass (LC-DAD-ESIMS/MS) technique and the confirmation of constituents was achieved by comparison with literature data and/or co-chromatography with authentic standards. Six compounds were indentified including quercetin 3-O-rhamnoside, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, rutin, quercetin 3-O-arabinofuranoside, quercetin 3-O-galactoside and chlorogenic acid. Their concentrations showed significant variance among the 8, 10 and 12-week-old herbs during both seasons.

  3. The effects of Cosmos caudatus (ulam raja) on dynamic and cellular bone histomorphometry in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Norazlina; Sahhugi, Zulaikha; Ramli, Elvy Suhana Mohd; Muhammad, Norliza

    2013-06-24

    Cosmos caudatus is a local plant which has antioxidant properties and contains high calcium. It is also reported to be able to strengthen the bone. This report is an extension to previously published article in Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (doi:10.1155/2012/817814). In this study, we determined the effectiveness of C. caudatus as an alternative treatment for osteoporosis due to post-menopause by looking at the dynamic and cellular paramaters of bone histomorphometry. Forty female Wistar rats were divided into four groups i.e. sham operated, ovariectomized, ovariectomized treated with calcium 1% ad libitum and ovariectomized force-fed with 500 mg/kg C. caudatus extract. Treatment was given six days a week for eight weeks. Dynamic and cellular histomorphometry parameters were measured. C. caudatus increased double-labeled surface (dLS/BS), mineral appositional rate (MAR), osteoid volume (OV/BV) and osteoblast surface (Ob.S/BS). C. caudatus also gave better results compared to calcium 1% in the osteoid volume (OV/BV) parameter. C. caudatus at the 500 mg/kg dose may be an alternative treatment in restoring bone damage that may occur in post-menopausal women.

  4. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednieks, Maija I.; Popova, Irina A.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 is determined. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particular cell fractions with a (32P)-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP is followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. It is shown that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins exhibited some variability in tissues of individual animals, but showed no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. It is inferred that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions.

  5. Morphological and biochemical examination of Cosmos 1887 rat heart tissue. Part 1: Ultrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Popova, I. A.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Miquel, J.; Sapp, W.

    1990-01-01

    Morphological changes were observed in the left ventricle of rat heart tissue from animals flown on the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite for 12.5 days. These tissues were compared to the synchronous and vivarium control hearts. While many normal myofibrils were observed, others exhibited ultrastructural alterations, i.e., damaged and irregular-shaped mitochondria and generalized myofibrillar edema. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the volume density data revealed a statistically significant increase in glycogen and a significant decrease in mitochondria compared to the synchronous and vivarium controls. Point counting indicated an increase in lipid and myeloid bodies and a decrease in microtubules, but these changes were not statistically significant. In addition, the flight animals exhibited some patchy loss of protofibrils (actin and myosin filaments) and some abnormal supercontracted myofibrils that were not seen in the controls. This study was undertaken to gain insight into the mechanistic aspects of cardiac changes in both animals and human beings as a consequence of space travel. Cardiac hypotrophy and fluid shifts have been observed after actual or simulated weightlessness and raise concerns about the functioning of the heart and circulatory system during and after travel in space.

  6. A coemergência do “eu”, do cosmos e do conhecimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi Schorn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente escrito aborda a relação entre subjetividade e objetividade, mais precisamente trata da constituição e configuração da subjetividade na concepção do racionalismo crítico de Karl Popper. Considerando que para os fins deste texto os termos “eu” e “sujeito” são usados como sinônimos, o título do presente artigo poderia ser: “O que o sujeito pensa que está fazendo no cosmos?”; “O ‘eu’ pensa que por ser autocriado é Deus?”; “Pode objetivamente uma máquina ser insubstituível?” Ou ainda: “O fantasma emerge no mundo”; Todas essas possibilidades têm em comum a indicação direta ou metafórica da interdependência entre o “eu” (o sujeito, o fantasma, a personalidade, o cérebro (máquina, corpo e o pensamento objetivo (resultado da interação entre o “eu” e o cérebro. Qualquer das possibilidades acima evita as variáveis à pergunta que tradicionalmente foi feita: o que é o “eu”? Este tipo de questão normalmente conduz a respostas essencialistas, infrutíferas e que redundam em verbalismos e equívocos.

  7. Bulgeless galaxies in the COSMOS field: environment and star formation evolution at z < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Marco; Fernandes, Cristina A. C.; Sobral, David; Afonso, José; Telles, Eduardo; Bizzocchi, Luca; Paulino-Afonso, Ana; Matute, Israel

    2018-03-01

    Combining the catalogue of galaxy morphologies in the COSMOS field and the sample of H α emitters at redshifts z = 0.4 and z = 0.84 of the HiZELS survey, we selected ˜ 220 star-forming bulgeless systems (Sérsic index n ≤ 1.5) at both epochs. We present their star formation properties and we investigate their contribution to the star formation rate function (SFRF) and global star formation rate density (SFRD) at z 3). At both redshifts, the SFRF is dominated by the contribution of bulgeless galaxies and we show that they account for more than 60 per cent of the cosmic SFRD at z types, but it is stronger for bulge-dominated systems. Star-forming bulgeless systems are mostly located in regions of low to intermediate galaxy densities (Σ ˜ 1-4 Mpc-2) typical of field-like and filament-like environments and their specific star formation rates (sSFRs) do not appear to vary strongly with local galaxy density. Only few bulgeless galaxies in our sample have high (sSFR > 10-9 yr-1) and these are mainly low-mass systems. Above M* ˜ 1010 M⊙ bulgeless are evolving at a `normal' rate (10-9 yr-1 < sSFR < 10-10 yr-1) and in the absence of an external trigger (i.e. mergers/strong interactions) they might not be able to develop a central classical bulge.

  8. State of spermatogenesis in rats flown aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-690. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plakhuta-Plakutina, G.I.

    1977-01-01

    Testes of 30 rats flown aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-690 for 20.5 d and 30 rats kept in a ground-based experiment, which simulated all flight except weightlessness and acceleration, were examined morphologically. On the 10th experimental day the rats were exposed for 24 h to gamma irradiation from a /sup 137/Cs source at doses of 220, 800, and 955 rad. Tests from 60 nonirradiated rats that remained in the vivarium were used as controls. On the 1st-2nd and 26-27th post-experimental days the animals showed a significant decrease in the weight of testes, post-radiation death of spermatogonia, and important structural changes in the spermatogenic epithelium, whose level depended on the dose of irradiation and the time elapsed after the exposure. No significant differences in the weight of testes, frequency of occurrence of individual components of the spermatogenic epithelium, and time of emergence of reparative processes were noted. No modifying effect of space flight factors on the development of radiation-induced changes in the spermatogenic epithelium of rats was found.

  9. Jazz with the cosmos | CERN at the Montreux Jazz Festival | 12 July

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    CERN will be participating in the Montreux Jazz Festival again this year with "The Physics of Music and the Music of Physics" at the Petit Palais on 12 July. The event, which is also part of CERN's 60th anniversary schedule, brings the music of the LHC, the Higgs boson, and the distant cosmos.   The Physics of Music and the Music of Physics Petit Palais, Montreux Jazz Festival Saturday 12 July 2014 - 5.00 p.m.  Free Entrance - for more information, visit the event site You may not realise it but energetic cosmic rays are passing through your body every second. They are produced by the collision of high-energy charged particles with the Earth’s upper atmosphere. The particles come from events occurring all over our Universe, some of which happened billions of years ago. A little over 100 years ago, scientists started detecting these ‘cosmic rays’, finding that there were many more particles in our Universe than we originally th...

  10. Infrared Selection of Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei in the COSMOS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Yen; Le Floc’h, Emeric; Juneau, Stéphanie; da Cunha, Elisabete; Salvato, Mara; Civano, Francesca; Marchesi, Stefano; Ilbert, Olivier; Toba, Yoshiki; Lim, Chen-Fatt; Tang, Ji-Jia; Wang, Wei-Hao; Ferraro, Nicholas; Urry, Megan C.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.

    2017-12-01

    We present a study of the connection among black hole accretion, star formation, and galaxy morphology at z≤slant 2.5. We focus on active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected by their mid-IR power-law emission. By fitting optical to far-IR photometry with state-of-the-art spectral energy distribution (SED) techniques, we derive stellar masses, star formation rates, dust properties, and AGN contributions in galaxies over the whole COSMOS field. We find that obscured AGNs lie within or slightly above the star-forming sequence. We confirm our previous finding about compact host galaxies of obscured AGNs at z∼ 1, and find that galaxies with 20%–50% AGN contributions tend to have smaller sizes, by ∼25%–50%, compared to galaxies without AGNs. Furthermore, we find that a high merger fraction of up to 0.5 is appropriate for the most luminous ({log}({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )∼ 12.5) AGN hosts and non-AGN galaxies, but not for the whole obscured AGN sample. Moreover, the merger fraction depends on the total and star-forming IR luminosity, rather than on the decomposed AGN infrared luminosity. Our results suggest that major mergers are not the main driver of AGN activity, and therefore obscured AGNs might be triggered by internal mechanisms, such as secular processes, disk instabilities, and compaction in a particular evolutionary stage. We make the SED modeling results publicly available.

  11. Mapping the dark matter in the NGC 5044 group with ROSAT: Evidence for a nearly homogeneous cooling flow with a cooling wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Laurence P.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Daines, Stuart

    1994-01-01

    The NGC 5044 group of galaxies was observed by the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) for 30 ks during its reduced pointed phase (1991 July). Due to the relatively cool gas temperature in the group (kT = 0.98 +/- 0.02 keV) and the excellent photon statistics (65,000 net counts), we are able to determine precisely a number of fundamental properties of the group within 250 kpc of the central galaxy. In particular, we present model-independent measurements of the total gravitating mass, the temperature and abundance profiles of the gas, and the mass accretion rate. Between 60 and 250 kpc, the gas is nearly isothermal with T varies as r(exp (-0.13 +/- 0.03)). The total gravitating mass of the group can be unambiguously determined from the observed density and temperature profiles of the gas using the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Within 250 kpc, the gravitating mass is 1.6 x 10(exp 13) solar mass, yielding a mass-to-light ratio of 130 solar mass/solar luminosity. The baryons (gas and stars) comprise 12% of the total mass within this radius. At small radii, the temperature clearly increases outward and attains a maximum value at 60 kpc. The positive temperature gradient in the center of the group confirms the existence of a cooling flow. The cooling flow region extends well beyond the temperature maximum with a cooling radius between 100 and 150 kpc. There are two distinct regions in the cooling flow separated by the temperature maximum. In the outer region, the gas is nearly isothermal with a unifor m Fe abundance of approximately 80% solar, the flow is nearly homogeneous with dot-M= 20 to 25 solar mass/year, the X-ray contours are spherically symmetric, and rho(sub gas) varies as r(exp -1.6). In the inner region, the temperature profile has a positive gradient, the mass accretion rate decreases rapidly inward, the gas density profile is steeper, and the X-ray image shows some substrucutre. NGC 5044 is offset from the centroid of the outer X

  12. Active galactic nuclei vs. host galaxy properties in the COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Marchesi, S.; Perna, M.; Pozzi, F.; Salvato, M.; Symeonidis, M.; Vignali, C.; Vito, F.; Volonteri, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The coeval active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy evolution, and the observed local relations between super massive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxy properties suggest some sort of connection or feedback between SMBH growth (I.e., AGN activity) and galaxy build-up (I.e., star formation history). Aims: We looked for correlations between average properties of X-ray detected AGN and their far-IR (FIR) detected, star forming host galaxies in order to find quantitative evidence for this connection, which has been highly debated in recent years. Methods: We exploited the rich multiwavelength data set (from X-ray to FIR) available in the COSMOS field for a large sample (692 sources) of AGN and their hosts in the redshift range 0.1 average host LIRSF has a flat distribution in bins of AGN LX, while the average AGN LX increases in bins of host LIRSF with logarithmic slope of 0.7 in the redshift range 0.4 average column density (NH) shows a clear positive correlation with the host M∗ at all redshifts, but not with the SFR (or LIRSF). This translates into a negative correlation with specific SFR at all redshifts. The same is true if the obscured fraction is computed. Conclusions: Our results are in agreement with the idea, introduced in recent galaxy evolutionary models, that SMBH accretion and SFRs are correlated, but occur with different variability time scales. Finally, the presence of a positive correlation between NH and host M∗ suggests that the column density that we observe in the X-rays is not entirely due to the circumnuclear obscuring torus, but may also include a significant contribution from the host galaxy. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/602/A123

  13. A census of radio-selected AGNs on the COSMOS field and of their FIR properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Popesso, P.; Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.

    2018-01-01

    We use the new catalogue by Laigle et al. to provide a full census of VLA-COSMOS radio sources. We identify 90 per cent of such sources and sub-divide them into active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies on the basis of their radio luminosity. The AGN sample is complete with respect to radio selection at all z ≲ 3.5. Out of 704 AGNs, 272 have a counterpart in the Herschel maps. By exploiting the better statistics of the new sample, we confirm the results of Magliocchetti et al.: the probability for a radio-selected AGN to be detected at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths is both a function of radio luminosity and redshift, whereby powerful sources are more likely FIR emitters at earlier epochs. Such an emission is due to star-forming processes within the host galaxy. FIR emitters and non-FIR emitters only differentiate in the z ≲ 1 universe. At higher redshifts, they are indistinguishable from each other, as there is no difference between FIR-emitting AGNs and star-forming galaxies. Lastly, we focus on radio AGNs which show AGN emission at other wavelengths. We find that mid-infrared (MIR) emission is mainly associated with ongoing star formation and with sources which are smaller, younger and more radio luminous than the average parent population. X-ray emitters instead preferentially appear in more massive and older galaxies. We can therefore envisage an evolutionary track whereby the first phase of a radio-active AGN and of its host galaxy is associated with MIR emission, while at later stages the source becomes only active at radio wavelengths and possibly also in the X-ray.

  14. Mass and Environment as Drivers of Galaxy Evolution in SDSS and zCOSMOS and the Origin of the Schechter Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying-jie; Lilly, Simon J.; Kovač, Katarina; Bolzonella, Micol; Pozzetti, Lucia; Renzini, Alvio; Zamorani, Gianni; Ilbert, Olivier; Knobel, Christian; Iovino, Angela; Maier, Christian; Cucciati, Olga; Tasca, Lidia; Carollo, C. Marcella; Silverman, John; Kampczyk, Pawel; de Ravel, Loic; Sanders, David; Scoville, Nicholas; Contini, Thierry; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Scodeggio, Marco; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Bardelli, Sandro; Bongiorno, Angela; Caputi, Karina; Coppa, Graziano; de la Torre, Sylvain; Franzetti, Paolo; Garilli, Bianca; Lamareille, Fabrice; Le Borgne, Jean-Francois; Le Brun, Vincent; Mignoli, Marco; Perez Montero, Enrique; Pello, Roser; Ricciardelli, Elena; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tresse, Laurence; Vergani, Daniela; Welikala, Niraj; Zucca, Elena; Oesch, Pascal; Abbas, Ummi; Barnes, Luke; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Bottini, Dario; Cappi, Alberto; Cassata, Paolo; Cimatti, Andrea; Fumana, Marco; Hasinger, Gunther; Koekemoer, Anton; Leauthaud, Alexei; Maccagni, Dario; Marinoni, Christian; McCracken, Henry; Memeo, Pierdomenico; Meneux, Baptiste; Nair, Preethi; Porciani, Cristiano; Presotto, Valentina; Scaramella, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    We explore the simple inter-relationships between mass, star formation rate, and environment in the SDSS, zCOSMOS, and other deep surveys. We take a purely empirical approach in identifying those features of galaxy evolution that are demanded by the data and then explore the analytic consequences of these. We show that the differential effects of mass and environment are completely separable to z ~ 1, leading to the idea of two distinct processes of "mass quenching" and "environment quenching." The effect of environment quenching, at fixed over-density, evidently does not change with epoch to z ~ 1 in zCOSMOS, suggesting that the environment quenching occurs as large-scale structure develops in the universe, probably through the cessation of star formation in 30%-70% of satellite galaxies. In contrast, mass quenching appears to be a more dynamic process, governed by a quenching rate. We show that the observed constancy of the Schechter M* and αs for star-forming galaxies demands that the quenching of galaxies around and above M* must follow a rate that is statistically proportional to their star formation rates (or closely mimic such a dependence). We then postulate that this simple mass-quenching law in fact holds over a much broader range of stellar mass (2 dex) and cosmic time. We show that the combination of these two quenching processes, plus some additional quenching due to merging naturally produces (1) a quasi-static single Schechter mass function for star-forming galaxies with an exponential cutoff at a value M* that is set uniquely by the constant of proportionality between the star formation and mass quenching rates and (2) a double Schechter function for passive galaxies with two components. The dominant component (at high masses) is produced by mass quenching and has exactly the same M* as the star-forming galaxies but a faint end slope that differs by Δαs ~ 1. The other component is produced by environment effects and has the same M* and αs as the

  15. Cosmos Caudatus as a Potential Source of Polyphenolic Compounds: Optimisation of Oven Drying Conditions and Characterisation of Its Functional Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Chin Ping Tan; Alfi Khatib; Faridah Abas; Ahmed Mediani

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of oven thermal processing of Cosmos caudatus on the total polyphenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (DPPH) of two different solvent extracts (80% methanol, and 80% ethanol). Sonication was used to extract bioactive compounds from this herb. The results showed that the optimised conditions for the oven drying method for 80% methanol and 80% ethanol were 44.5 °C for 4 h with an IC50 of 0.045 mg/mL and 43.12 °C for 4.05 h with an IC50 ...

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Merging galaxies with tidal tails in COSMOS to z=1 (Wen+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z. Z.; Zheng, X. Z.

    2017-02-01

    Our study utilizes the public data and catalogs from multi-band deep surveys of the COSMOS field. The UltraVISTA survey (McCracken+ 2012, J/A+A/544/A156) provides ultra-deep near-IR imaging observations of this field in the Y,J,H, and Ks-band, as well as a narrow band (NB118). The HST/ACS I-band imaging data are publicly available, allowing us to measure morphologies in the rest-frame optical for galaxies at zACS I-band images reach a 5σ depth of 27.2 magnitude for point sources. (1 data file).

  17. COordination of Standards in MetabOlomicS (COSMOS): facilitating integrated metabolomics data access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salek, R.M.; Neumann, S.; Schober, D.; Hummel, J.; Billiau, K.; Kopka, J.; Correa, E.; Reijmers, T.; Rosato, A.; Tenori, L.; Turano, P.; Marin, S.; Deborde, C.; Jacob, D.; Rolin, D.; Dartigues, B.; Conesa, P.; Haug, K.; Rocca-Serra, P.; O’Hagan, S.; Hao, J.; Vliet, M. van; Sysi-Aho, M.; Ludwig, C.; Bouwman, J.; Cascante, M.; Ebbels, T.; Griffin, J.L.; Moing, A.; Nikolski, M.; Oresic, M.; Sansone, S.A.; Viant, M.R.; Goodacre, R.; Günther, U.L.; Hankemeier, T.; Luchinat, C.; Walther, D.; Steinbeck, C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics has become a crucial phenotyping technique in a range of research fields including medicine, the life sciences, biotechnology and the environmental sciences. This necessitates the transfer of experimental information between research groups, as well as potentially to publishers and

  18. Recently Quenched Galaxies at z = 0.2–4.8 in the COSMOS UltraVISTA Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Akie; Matsuoka, Yoshiki, E-mail: ichikawa@cosmos.phys.sci.ehime-u.ac.jp [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    We present a new analysis of the stellar mass function and morphology of recently quenched galaxies (RQGs), whose star formation has been recently quenched for some reason. The COSMOS2015 catalog was exploited to select those galaxies at 0.2 < z < 4.8, over 1.5 deg{sup 2} of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) UltraVISTA field. This is the first time that RQGs are consistently selected and studied in such a wide range of redshift. We find increasing number density of RQGs with time in a broad mass range at z > 1, while low-mass RQGs start to grow very rapidly at z < 1. We also demonstrate that the migration of RQGs may largely drive the evolution of the stellar mass function of passive galaxies. Moreover, we find that the morphological type distribution of RQGs are intermediate between those of star-forming and passive galaxies. These results indicate that RQGs represent a major transitional phase of galaxy evolution, in which star-forming galaxies turn into passive galaxies, accompanied by the build up of spheroidal component.

  19. Cosmos caudatus as a potential source of polyphenolic compounds: optimisation of oven drying conditions and characterisation of its functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Khatib, Alfi; Tan, Chin Ping

    2013-08-29

    The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of oven thermal processing of Cosmos caudatus on the total polyphenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (DPPH) of two different solvent extracts (80% methanol, and 80% ethanol). Sonication was used to extract bioactive compounds from this herb. The results showed that the optimised conditions for the oven drying method for 80% methanol and 80% ethanol were 44.5 °C for 4 h with an IC₅₀ of 0.045 mg/mL and 43.12 °C for 4.05 h with an IC₅₀ of 0.055 mg/mL, respectively. The predicted values for TPC under the optimised conditions for 80% methanol and 80% ethanol were 16.5 and 15.8 mg GAE/100 g DW, respectively. The results obtained from this study demonstrate that Cosmos caudatus can be used as a potential source of antioxidants for food and medicinal applications.

  20. Cosmos Caudatus as a Potential Source of Polyphenolic Compounds: Optimisation of Oven Drying Conditions and Characterisation of Its Functional Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Ping Tan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of oven thermal processing of Cosmos caudatus on the total polyphenolic content (TPC and antioxidant capacity (DPPH of two different solvent extracts (80% methanol, and 80% ethanol. Sonication was used to extract bioactive compounds from this herb. The results showed that the optimised conditions for the oven drying method for 80% methanol and 80% ethanol were 44.5 °C for 4 h with an IC50 of 0.045 mg/mL and 43.12 °C for 4.05 h with an IC50 of 0.055 mg/mL, respectively. The predicted values for TPC under the optimised conditions for 80% methanol and 80% ethanol were 16.5 and15.8 mg GAE/100 g DW, respectively. The results obtained from this study demonstrate that Cosmos caudatus can be used as a potential source of antioxidants for food and medicinal applications.

  1. From Genomes to Life to the Planet and the Cosmos: In Appreciation of Carl Sagan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Earth and life have evolved in tandem; It is impossible to separate the two over most of geologic time. Geological and geochemical processes create and define the conditions necessary for life. In turn, life has shaped geological processes in ways that are understood, and ways that are not yet understood. The reciprocal interaction between the planet and its inhabitants has driven changes in the molecules, metabolisms, and morphologies of terrean organisms. Today, with the emergence of complete genome sequences and tools from molecular biology, we are now better able, more than ever before, to tell stories of how we came to be, on a planet and in a cosmos that has both nourished us and (from time to time) threatened to extinguish us. The stories to be told in this talk combine information from the geological and paleontological records, analysis of genome sequence data, and experiments that resurrect ancient, extinct life forms for study in the laboratory. The talk will emphasize the non-recurring, progressive feature of the dance between Earth and Life. We will show how the emergence of humans was influenced by the environment, and how humans placed their irreversible mark on the genes of organisms that they touched. We will show how the global environmental crisis that began in the Oligocene irreversibly transformed the plant and animal kingdoms. We will proceed back to the Cretaceous, to explore how plants and dinosaurs influenced each other, and the genomes of surviving fungus and flies. From there we will go to the Jurassic, as the first placental mammals reconstructed their reproductive systems in response to the planetary changes. We will ask how cosmic events, from asteroids to supernova, may have influenced life on Earth. We will ask what consequential features of life that we see around us might be unique to Earth, and what features might be found universally in life elsewhere. The talk will also review some of the methodological issues associated

  2. Active galactic nucleus X-ray variability in the XMM-COSMOS survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Ponti, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Nandra, P. K.; Merloni, A.; Rosario, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hasinger, G.; Sanders, D. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822-1839 (United States); Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Bongiorno, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma Via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Lusso, E.; Steinhardt, C. [Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Silverman, J.; Schramm, M. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Trump, J. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Kartaltepe, J., E-mail: lanzuisi@noa.gr [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    We used the observations carried out by XMM in the COSMOS field over 3.5 yr to study the long term variability of a large sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) (638 sources) in a wide range of redshifts (0.1 < z < 3.5) and X-ray luminosities (10{sup 41} < L {sub 0.5-10} <10{sup 45.5}). Both a simple statistical method to assess the significance of variability and the Normalized Excess Variance (σ{sub rms}{sup 2}) parameter were used to obtain a quantitative measurement of the variability. Variability is found to be prevalent in most AGNs, whenever we have good statistics to measure it, and no significant differences between type 1 and type 2 AGNs were found. A flat (slope –0.23 ± 0.03) anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and X-ray luminosity is found when all significantly variable sources are considered together. When divided into three redshift bins, the anti-correlation becomes stronger and evolving with z, with higher redshift AGNs being more variable. We prove, however, that this effect is due to the pre-selection of variable sources: when considering all of the sources with an available σ{sub rms}{sup 2} measurement, the evolution in redshift disappears. For the first time, we were also able to study long term X-ray variability as a function of M {sub BH} and Eddington ratio for a large sample of AGNs spanning a wide range of redshifts. An anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and M {sub BH} is found, with the same slope of anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and X-ray luminosity, suggesting that the latter may be a by-product of the former. No clear correlation is found between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and the Eddington ratio in our sample. Finally, no correlation is found between the X-ray σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and optical variability.

  3. (Sub)millimetre interferometric imaging of a sample of COSMOS/AzTEC submillimetre galaxies. III. Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolčić, V.; Miettinen, O.; Tomičić, N.; Zamorani, G.; Finoguenov, A.; Lemaux, B. C.; Aravena, M.; Capak, P.; Chiang, Y.-K.; Civano, F.; Delvecchio, I.; Ilbert, O.; Jurlin, N.; Karim, A.; Laigle, C.; Le Fèvre, O.; Marchesi, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Riechers, D. A.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Tasca, L.; Toft, S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the environment of 23 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) drawn from a signal-to-noise (S/N)-limited sample of SMGs originally discovered in the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT)/AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum survey of a Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) subfield and then followed up with the Submillimetre Array and Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 890 μm and 1.3 mm, respectively. These SMGs already have well-defined multiwavelength counterparts and redshifts. We also analyse the environments of four COSMOS SMGs spectroscopically confirmed to lie at redshifts zspec > 4.5, and one at zspec = 2.49 resulting in a total SMG sample size of 28. We search for overdensities using the COSMOS photometric redshifts based on over 30 UV-NIR photometric measurements including the new UltraVISTA data release 2 and Spitzer/SPLASH data, and reaching an accuracy of σΔz/ (1 + z) = 0.0067 (0.0155) at z 3.5). To identify overdensities we apply the Voronoi tessellation analysis, and estimate the redshift-space overdensity estimator δg as a function of distance from the SMG and/or overdensity centre. We test and validate our approach via simulations, X-ray detected groups or clusters, and spectroscopic verifications using VUDS and zCOSMOS catalogues which show that even with photometric redshifts in the COSMOS field we can efficiently retrieve overdensities out to z ≈ 5. Our results yield that 11 out of 23 (48%) JCMT/AzTEC 1.1 mm SMGs occupy overdense environments. Considering the entire JCMT/AzTEC 1.1 mm S/N ≥ 4 sample and taking the expected fraction of spurious detections into account, this means that 35-61% of the SMGs in the S/N-limited sample occupy overdense environments. We perform an X-ray stacking analysis in the 0.5-2 keV band using a 32″ aperture and our SMG positions, and find statistically significant detections. For our z 2 subsample yields an average flux of (1.3 ± 0.5) × 10-16 erg s-1 cm-2 and a corresponding total massof M200 = 2 × 1013M⊙. Our

  4. Spot the difference : Impact of different selection criteria on observed properties of passive galaxies in zCOSMOS-20k sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moresco, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Cimatti, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bolzonella, M.; Lamareille, F.; Mignoli, M.; Zucca, E.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J. -P; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovač, K.; Le Borgne, J. -F; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pelló, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Presotto, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Barnes, L.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Diener, C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Le Floc'h, E.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Nair, P.; Oesch, P.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.; Welikala, N.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and morphological properties for differently selected samples of passive galaxies up to z = 1 extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k spectroscopic survey. This analysis intends to explore the dependence of galaxy properties on the selection

  5. zCOSMOS-10k-bright spectroscopic sample. The bimodality in the galaxy stellar mass function : Exploring its evolution with redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzetti, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Lilly, S.; Renzini, A.; Moresco, M.; Mignoli, M.; Cassata, P.; Tasca, L.; Lamareille, F.; Maier, C.; Meneux, B.; Halliday, C.; Oesch, P.; Vergani, D.; Caputi, K.; Kovac, K.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Iovino, A.; Peng, Y.; Carollo, M.; Contini, T.; P. Kneib, J.; Le F'evre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Coppa, G.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; F. Le Borgne, J.; Le Brun, V.; Pell`o, R.; Perez Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; D. Silverman, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tresse, L.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Guzzo, L.; M. Koekemoer, A.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; J. McCracken, H.; Memeo, P.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.

    2010-01-01

    We present the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) to redshift z similar or equal to 1, based on the analysis of about 8500 galaxies with I <22.5 (AB mag) over 1.4 deg(2), which are part of the zCOSMOS-bright 10k spectroscopic sample. We investigate the total GSMF, as well as the contributions of

  6. The evolution of the stellar mass functions of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 from the COSMOS/ultraVISTA survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzzin, Adam; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefano, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95,675 Ks -selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar...

  7. The COSMOS2015 galaxy stellar mass function . Thirteen billion years of stellar mass assembly in ten snapshots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidzon, I.; Ilbert, O.; Laigle, C.; Coupon, J.; McCracken, H. J.; Delvecchio, I.; Masters, D.; Capak, P.; Hsieh, B. C.; Le Fèvre, O.; Tresse, L.; Bethermin, M.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Faisst, A. L.; Le Floc'h, E.; Steinhardt, C.; Toft, S.; Aussel, H.; Dubois, C.; Hasinger, G.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N.; Silverman, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    We measure the stellar mass function (SMF) and stellar mass density of galaxies in the COSMOS field up to z 6. We select them in the near-IR bands of the COSMOS2015 catalogue, which includes ultra-deep photometry from UltraVISTA-DR2, SPLASH, and Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. At z> 2.5 we use new precise photometric redshifts with error σz = 0.03(1 + z) and an outlier fraction of 12%, estimated by means of the unique spectroscopic sample of COSMOS ( 100 000 spectroscopic measurements in total, more than one thousand having robust zspec> 2.5). The increased exposure time in the DR2, along with our panchromatic detection strategy, allow us to improve the completeness at high z with respect to previous UltraVISTA catalogues (e.g. our sample is >75% complete at 1010 ℳ⊙ and z = 5). We also identify passive galaxies through a robust colour-colour selection, extending their SMF estimate up to z = 4. Our work provides a comprehensive view of galaxy-stellar-mass assembly between z = 0.1 and 6, for the first time using consistent estimates across the entire redshift range. We fit these measurements with a Schechter function, correcting for Eddington bias. We compare the SMF fit with the halo mass function predicted from ΛCDM simulations, finding that at z> 3 both functions decline with a similar slope in thehigh-mass end. This feature could be explained assuming that mechanisms quenching star formation in massive haloes become less effective at high redshifts; however further work needs to be done to confirm this scenario. Concerning the SMF low-mass end, it shows a progressive steepening as it moves towards higher redshifts, with α decreasing from -1.47+0.02-0.02 at z ≃ 0.1 to -2.11+0.30-0.13-2.11-0.13+0.30 at z ≃ 5. This slope depends on the characterisation of the observational uncertainties, which is crucial to properly remove the Eddington bias. We show that there is currently no consensus on the method to quantify such errors: different error models result in

  8. Effects of Different Drying Methods and Storage Time on Free Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenolic Content of Cosmos Caudatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mediani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the effect of air (AD, oven (OD and freeze drying (FD on the free radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content (TPC of Cosmos caudatus and the effect of storage time by the comparison with a fresh sample (FS. Among the three drying methods that were used, AD resulted in the highest free radical scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH (IC50 = 0.0223 mg/mL and total phenolic content (27.4 g GAE/100 g, whereas OD produced the lowest scavenging activity and TPC value. After three months of storage, the dried samples showed a high and consistent free radical scavenging activity when compared to stored fresh material. The drying methods could preserve the quality of C. caudatus during storage and the stability of its bioactive components can be maintained.

  9. Investigating soil water dynamics and surface energy partitioning in the JULES model using COSMOS and Ameriflux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, J.; Rosolem, R.; Wagener, T.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role controlling the exchanges of water and energy within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum, ultimately impacting the evolution of weather and climate systems. Despite its importance in terrestrial hydrometeorology, soil moisture across different scales is difficult to obtain because of the inherent spatial heterogeneity in measurements. The development of cosmic-ray soil moisture sensors in recent years, such as those deployed in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS), provides a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of the impact of soil water dynamics on surface energy fluxes in land surface models. The horizontal footprint of the cosmic-ray sensors (~700m diameter) fills the gap between point-scale sensors and large-scale satellite remote sensing products, and its horizontal footprint is comparable to typical measurement footprint observed at flux tower sites. Measurement penetration depth varies according to soil water content but provides a direct monitoring of soil water dynamics within the root zone (i.e., 10 to 50 cm deep). In this study, the performance of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) model is evaluated at selected COSMOS sites co-located with flux tower measurements representing a variety of climatic conditions, and vegetation/soil characteristics. Five groups are identified (1) dry shrubland, (2) dry forest, (3) temperate crop/grass lands, (4) temperate forest, and (5) wet forest. The sensitivity and uncertainty of model parameters and structures are analysed with the objective to improve the description of soil moisture and evapotranspiration coupling (i.e., energy partitioning) in the JULES model.

  10. On the Power of Music: Using 'Cosmos' and 'Anthropos' to Articulate a Holistic Approach to Discussing the Power of Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Cates

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Music is an experience that is universal to all of mankind, no matter one’s race, gender, culture, or socioeconomic status. Whether it’s beholding one of Mahler’s symphonies in Carnegie Hall or listening to the “No. 1 Top Single” on iTunes using headphones, one truth is evident: music moves. The statement “music moves” inherently possesses an implication of the 'cosmic' and the 'anthropic’ nature of music – a holistic union of both mystery and humanity. This one truth has been the subject of an ongoing 2,000 year-old discussion that attempts to articulate the powerful reaction that results from experiencing music in all forms, beginning with the ancient Greeks of antiquity who possessed a cosmologically-grounded explanation to the power of music. However, as time moved forward, this cosmological, mysterious paradigm of the power of music slowly began to incorporate explainable and tangible anthropological articulations of the power of the music with respect to the human emotions, senses, and thoughts. This incorporation of anthropos reached a climax in the Renaissance era with the ushering in of humanism, which stripped away the mysterious and replaced the cosmologically-grounded explanation of music with the anthropologically-grounded view of naturalism. Since this profound departure from cosmos, society seems to be at a loss in articulating accurate reactions to music. This paper offers two proposals with respect to musical thought, one for society at large and one for the individual. I assert in this paper that society, in general, needs to return to an appreciation of the cosmos, the answerable, and the mysterious in nature, and that the individual needs to commence thinking holistically with respect to music—incorporating both cosmic and anthropic thought. I have reached my conclusions, assertions, and propositions based on this thesis by critically analyzing both primary and secondary resources in the form of the

  11. CoSMoS Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) flood hazard projections: Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Foxgrover, Amy; O'Neill, Andrea; Herdman, Liv

    2015-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Southern California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Phase I data for Southern California include flood-hazard information for the coast from the Mexican Border to Pt. Conception for a 100-year storm scenario. Data are complete for the information presented but are considered preliminary; changes may be reflected in the full data release (Phase II) in summer 2016.

  12. COSMOS--improving the quality of life in nursing home patients: protocol for an effectiveness-implementation cluster randomized clinical hybrid trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husebo, Bettina S; Flo, Elisabeth; Aarsland, Dag; Selbaek, Geir; Testad, Ingelin; Gulla, Christine; Aasmul, Irene; Ballard, Clive

    2015-09-15

    Nursing home patients have complex mental and physical health problems, disabilities and social needs, combined with widespread prescription of psychotropic drugs. Preservation of their quality of life is an important goal. This can only be achieved within nursing homes that offer competent clinical conditions of treatment and care. COmmunication, Systematic assessment and treatment of pain, Medication review, Occupational therapy, Safety (COSMOS) is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid trial that combines and implements organization of activities evidence-based interventions to improve staff competence and thereby the patients' quality of life, mental health and safety. The aim of this paper is to describe the development, content and implementation process of the COSMOS trial. COSMOS includes a 2-month pilot study with 128 participants distributed among nine Norwegian nursing homes, and a 4-month multicenter, cluster randomized effectiveness-implementation clinical hybrid trial with follow-up at month 9, including 571 patients from 67 nursing home units (one unit defined as one cluster). Clusters are randomized to COSMOS intervention or current best practice (control group). The intervention group will receive a 2-day education program including written guidelines, repeated theoretical and practical training (credited education of caregivers, physicians and nursing home managers), case discussions and role play. The 1-day midway evaluation, information and interviews of nursing staff and a telephone hotline all support the implementation process. Outcome measures include quality of life in late-stage dementia, neuropsychiatric symptoms, activities of daily living, pain, depression, sleep, medication, cost-utility analysis, hospital admission and mortality. Despite complex medical and psychosocial challenges, nursing home patients are often treated by staff possessing low level skills, lacking education and in facilities with a high staff turnover

  13. Ionospheric precursors of the intensification of isolated tropical cyclones according to the IKB-1300 and Cosmos-1809 satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, V. M.; Belyaev, G. G.; Boichev, B.; Trushkina, E. P.; Ovcharenko, O. Ya.

    2015-03-01

    The ionospheric parameters were analyzed, which made it possible to distinguish several successive stages in the development of isolated tropical cyclones (TCs). Data were taken from the Cosmos-1809 and Intercosmos Bulgaria-1300 satellites, which passed over several dozen TCs. The first stage of TC development consists of a sharp increase in altitudinal substorm activity caused by a tropical disturbance and depression. During this stage, plasma density caverns extending over several hundreds of kilometers are observed in the nighttime upper ionosphere a day before the formation of a tropical storm or even a category-I hurricane. The second stage, typical of TCs with intensities reaching categories I and II, is the displacement of a wide plasma density maximum in the upper ionosphere from the geomagnetic equator into the region, the center of which along the geomagnetic field line is projected to 200-230 km altitudes at a TC latitude. The third stage, which is typical of TC categories III-V, consists of the formation of an additional Ne peak (with a width reaching 1000 km) near the TC zenith. This peak includes Δ Ne disturbances and is accompanied by electrostatic oscillations at the H+ and He+ cyclotron frequencies and at the lower hybrid resonance frequency and by electric fields that are projected into the magnetically conjugate region. The crossing of New Caledonia by the category-IV TC Harry was considered in detail. It was shown that the neutral particle ascending jet probably deviated along the meridian in this case.

  14. An observation planning algorithm applied to multi-objective astronomical observations and its simulation in COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Gu, Yonggang; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic sky surveys are now booming, such as LAMOST already built by China, BIGBOSS project put forward by the U.S. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and GTC (Gran Telescopio Canarias) telescope developed by the United States, Mexico and Spain. They all use or will use this approach and each fiber can be moved within a certain area for one astrology target, so observation planning is particularly important for this Sky Surveys. One observation planning algorithm used in multi-objective astronomical observations is developed. It can avoid the collision and interference between the fiber positioning units in the focal plane during the observation in one field of view, and the interested objects can be ovserved in a limited round with the maximize efficiency. Also, the observation simulation can be made for wide field of view through multi-FOV observation. After the observation planning is built ,the simulation is made in COSMOS field using GTC telescope. Interested galaxies, stars and high-redshift LBG galaxies are selected after the removal of the mask area, which may be bright stars. Then 9 FOV simulation is completed and observation efficiency and fiber utilization ratio for every round are given. Otherwise,allocating a certain number of fibers for background sky, giving different weights for different objects and how to move the FOV to improve the overall observation efficiency are discussed.

  15. An ALMA survey of submillimetre galaxies in the COSMOS field: The extent of the radio-emitting region revealed by 3 GHz imaging with the Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, O.; Novak, M.; Smolčić, V.; Delvecchio, I.; Aravena, M.; Brisbin, D.; Karim, A.; Murphy, E. J.; Schinnerer, E.; Albrecht, M.; Aussel, H.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P. L.; Casey, C. M.; Civano, F.; Hayward, C. C.; Herrera Ruiz, N.; Ilbert, O.; Jiang, C.; Laigle, C.; Le Fèvre, O.; Magnelli, B.; Marchesi, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Middelberg, E.; Muñoz Arancibia, A. M.; Navarrete, F.; Padilla, N. D.; Riechers, D. A.; Salvato, M.; Scott, K. S.; Sheth, K.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Bondi, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The observed spatial scale of the radio continuum emission from star-forming galaxies can be used to investigate the spatial extent of active star formation, constrain the importance of cosmic-ray transport, and examine the effects of galaxy interactions. Aims: We determine the radio size distribution of a large sample of 152 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at 1.1 mm, and later detected with the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA) in the observed-frame 1.3 mm dust continuum emission at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ≥5. Methods: We used the deep, subarcsecond-resolution (1σ = 2.3μJy beam-1;.̋75) centimetre radio continuum observations taken by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA)-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project. Results: One hundred and fifteen of the 152 target SMGs (76% ± 7%) were found to have a 3 GHz counterpart (≥ 4.2σ), which renders the radio detection rate notably high. The median value of the deconvolved major axis full width at half maximum (FWHM) size at 3 GHz is derived to be 0.̋59 ± 0.̋05 , or 4.6 ± 0.4 kpc in physical units, where the median redshift of the sources is z = 2.23 ± 0.13 (23% are spectroscopic and 77% are photometric values). The radio sizes are roughly log-normally distributed, and they show no evolutionary trend with redshift, or difference between different galaxy morphologies. We also derived the spectral indices between 1.4 and 3 GHz, and 3 GHz brightness temperatures for the sources, and the median values were found to be α1.4 GHz3 GHz = -0.67 (Sν ∝ να) and TB = 12.6 ± 2 K. Three of the target SMGs, which are also detected with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.4 GHz (AzTEC/C24b, 61, and 77a), show clearly higher brightness temperatures than the typical values, reaching TB(3 GHz) > 104.03 K for AzTEC/C61. Conclusions: The derived median radio spectral index agrees with a value expected for optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation

  16. Personal Universes: revealing community college students' competences though their organization of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck Bracey, Zoë

    2017-10-01

    In this article I present a study on learners' conceptions in cosmology by situating the results in the context of broader historical and sociocultural themes. Participants were community college students in California from non-dominant cultural and linguistic backgrounds finishing their first semester of astronomy. Data were collected through a drawing activity and card sort given during clinical-style interviews. This type of work is typically done from the perspective of conceptual change theory, using drawings to reveal student "misconceptions." I argue that in analyzing this kind of data, we need to come from the perspective that students are competent, and put their conceptions in context. I begin by presenting traditional frameworks for evaluating and describing learning, all of which rely on an outdated "banking" or "transmission" model of learning that puts an over-emphasis on the performance and attributes of individuals. Not only do these theories provide an incomplete picture of what learning looks like, they create and reify unnecessary divides between "scientific" and "unscientific" that can contribute to student alienation from the world of science. To illustrate this, I present my own results as a window into the logic of learners' assumptions within a sociocultural context, and suggest ways to support their learning trajectories, rather than figuring out how to unlearn their misconceptions. Through this analysis, I hope to show how taking student conceptions out of sociocultural context can potentially exclude students from non-dominant cultural and linguistic backgrounds from science.

  17. Science and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravetz, David

    2005-01-01

    This article is for teachers looking for new ways to motivate students, increase science comprehension, and understanding without using the old standard expository science textbook. This author suggests reading a science fiction novel in the science classroom as a way to engage students in learning. Using science fiction literature and language…

  18. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Sofia Science Festival

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Have you ever imagined that you could have access to CERN, one of the word’s largest and most respected centres for scientific research? Have you ever imagined that you could have access to science educational material with just one click? The Discover the COSMOS project goes to this year’s Sofia Science Festival and organises a dedicated Open Science workshop on innovative ways of engaging teachers and students in e-Science through the use of existing e-infrastructures in order to spark young people’s interest in science and in following scientific careers. Participants of this workshop will learn about e-science apps in particle physics and astronomy that can be used in the classroom. They will also have the unique opportunity to take a virtual tour at the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Einsteinian Revolution's Wrong Turn: Lumpy Interacting Cosmos Assumed as Smooth Perfect Fluid, no Dark Energy, Eternal Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2014-03-01

    Newtonian Cosmology involving a smooth fluid was plagued with the problem of indefiniteness, and General Relativity gave the novel concept of a finite yet unbounded Einstein's Static Universe (ESU). Later, Big Bang model (BBM) essentially incorporated non-static versions of ESU. Also, the concept of a Cosmological Constant (Λ) got reinstated through "Inflation" and "Dark Energy". We dismantle this edifice by presenting several exact proofs showing that Λ = 0 and both ESU & deSitter metrics are just the Minkowski vacuum. More importantly, by using the Schwarzschild form of the FRW metric (Mitra, Grav. Cosmology 2013), we show that FRW metric too is actually the Minkowski vacuum! It is suggested that physical universe is quasi-Newtonian where for any given galaxy, finite gravitational potential is due to interaction of nearest neighbors while the infinite background forces cancel due to symmetry (Chandrasekhar, ApJ 1941). Such an universe is likely to have a fractal structure as suggested by observations. The cosmic redshift might arise due to asymmetric spread of wave packets associated with line emissions from distant galaxies. The cosmic background radiation might be due to thermalization of star lights in an eternal universe as suggested by Hoyle. The compact objects in quasars are ultracompact radiation pressure supported stars which may synthesize light elements and whose explosions & flares infuse fresh plasma for a recycled eternal universe. While these are possibilities, there is indeed no robust alternative cosmology. Though BBM appears to be the best bet, it turns out to be vacuous. In the absence of the BBM singularity, the rationale for "Quantum Gravity" vanishes. It is predicted that there are no primordial Gravitational Waves contrary to BBM suggestion. The fact that the farthest galaxy (z = 7.5) is rich in metals (Finkelstein et al., Nature, 502, 524, 2013) contradicts BBM, and suggests cosmos might be eternal and static.

  20. Near-infrared Variability of Obscured and Unobscured X-Ray-selected AGNs in the COSMOS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, P.; Lira, P.; Cartier, R.; Pérez, V.; Miranda, N.; Yovaniniz, C.; Arévalo, P.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Fynbo, J.; Dunlop, J.; Coppi, P.; Marchesi, S.

    2017-11-01

    We present our statistical study of near-infrared (NIR) variability of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field, using UltraVISTA data. This is the largest sample of AGN light curves in YJHKs bands, making it possible to have a global description of the nature of AGNs for a large range of redshifts and for different levels of obscuration. To characterize the variability properties of the sources, we computed the structure function. Our results show that there is an anticorrelation between the structure function A parameter (variability amplitude) and the wavelength of emission and a weak anticorrelation between A and the bolometric luminosity. We find that broad-line (BL) AGNs have a considerably larger fraction of variable sources than narrow-line (NL) AGNs and that they have different distributions of the A parameter. We find evidence that suggests that most of the low-luminosity variable NL sources correspond to BL AGNs, where the host galaxy could be damping the variability signal. For high-luminosity variable NL sources, we propose that they can be examples of “true type II” AGNs or BL AGNs with limited spectral coverage, which results in missing the BL emission. We also find that the fraction of variable sources classified as unobscured in the X-ray is smaller than the fraction of variable sources unobscured in the optical range. We present evidence that this is related to the differences in the origin of the obscuration in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  1. Cosmic Web of Galaxies in the COSMOS Field: Public Catalog and Different Quenching for Centrals and Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Behnam; Mobasher, Bahram; Martin, D. Christopher; Sobral, David; Scoville, Nick; Stroe, Andra; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2017-03-01

    We use a mass complete (log(M/{M}⊙ ) ≥slant 9.6) sample of galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts in the COSMOS field to construct the density field and the cosmic web to z = 1.2. The comic web extraction relies on the density field Hessian matrix and breaks the density field into clusters, filaments, and the field. We provide the density field and cosmic web measures to the community. We show that at z ≲ 0.8, the median star formation rate (SFR) in the cosmic web gradually declines from the field to clusters and this decline is especially sharp for satellites (˜1 dex versus ˜0.5 dex for centrals). However, at z ≳ 0.8, the trend flattens out for the overall galaxy population and satellites. For star-forming (SF) galaxies only, the median SFR is constant at z ≳ 0.5 but declines by ˜0.3-0.4 dex from the field to clusters for satellites and centrals at z ≲ 0.5. We argue that for satellites, the main role of the cosmic web environment is to control their SF fraction, whereas for centrals, it is mainly to control their overall SFR at z ≲ 0.5 and to set their fraction at z ≳ 0.5. We suggest that most satellites experience a rapid quenching mechanism as they fall from the field into clusters through filaments, whereas centrals mostly undergo a slow environmental quenching at z ≲ 0.5 and a fast mechanism at higher redshifts. Our preliminary results highlight the importance of the large-scale cosmic web on galaxy evolution.

  2. Anti-obesity effect of ethanolic extract from Cosmos caudatus Kunth leaf in lean rats fed a high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hafeedza Abdul; Sahib, Najla Gooda; Saari, Nazamid; Abas, Faridah; Ismail, Amin; Mumtaz, Muhammad Waseem; Hamid, Azizah Abdul

    2017-02-22

    Obesity is a major health concern both in developed and developing countries. The use of herbal medicines became the subject of interest for the management of obesity due to its natural origin, cost effectiveness and minimal side effects. The present study aimed at investigating anti-obesity potential of ethanolic extract from Cosmos caudatus Kunth leaf (EECCL). In this study, the rats were randomly divided into six groups i.e., (1) Normal Diet (ND); (2) Normal Diet and 175 mg/kgBW of EECCL (ND + 175 mg/kgBW); (3) Normal Diet and 350 mg/kgBW of EECCL (ND + 350 mg/kgBW); (4) High Fat Diet (HFD); (5) High Fat Diet and 175 mg/kgBW of EECCL (HFD + 175 mg/kgBW); (6) High Fat Diet and 350 mg/kgBW of EECCL (HFD + 350 mg/kgBW). The anti-obesity potential was evaluated through analyses of changes in body weight, visceral fat weight, and blood biochemicals including total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), leptin, insulin, adiponectin, ghrelin and fecal fat content. In addition, metabolite profiling of EECCL was carried out using NMR spectroscopy. Rats receiving EECCL together with HFD showed significant (p  0.05) different with those of ND rats. Other related obesity biomarkers including plasma lipid profiles, insulin, leptin, ghrelin and adiponectin levels also showed significant improvement (p extract. Conclusively, EECCL showed anti-obesity properties by inhibition of intestinal lipid absorption and modulation of adipocytes markers.

  3. Spectroscopic Redshifts to 1300 Low-Mass Galaxies with 0.3 ≤ z ≤ 0.4 in the COSMOS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Brian; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2018-01-01

    Recent theoretical models and hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy evolution give predictions for the star-forming properties and sizes of low-mass galaxies. Due to their faintness, there exist few unbiased samples of low-mass galaxies to test these predictions. However, the Hubble Space Telescope's deep observations of the COSMOS field allow for the creation of an unbiased collection of galaxies with stellar masses 10^9 work provides a population of low-mass galaxies for which we can measure star formation rates, furthering our understanding of low-mass galaxy evolution.

  4. Science and data science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blei, David M; Smyth, Padhraic

    2017-08-07

    Data science has attracted a lot of attention, promising to turn vast amounts of data into useful predictions and insights. In this article, we ask why scientists should care about data science. To answer, we discuss data science from three perspectives: statistical, computational, and human. Although each of the three is a critical component of data science, we argue that the effective combination of all three components is the essence of what data science is about.

  5. EROSITA: AGN SCIENCE, BACKGROUND DETERMINATION, AND OPTICAL FOLLOW-UP SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Boller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years after the highly impacting ROSAT all-sky survey in the soft X-ray spectral range, we are close to the next major X-ray all/sky surveys with eROSITA. eROSITA will be the primary instrument on-board the Russian “Spectrum–Roentgen–Gamma” (SRG satellite which will be launched from Baikonur in 2014 and placed in an L2 orbit. It will perform the first imaging all-sky survey in the medium energy X-ray range up to 10 keV with an unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The eROSITA all sky X-ray survey will take place in a very different context than the ROSAT survey. There is now a wealth of complete, ongoing and planned surveys of the sky in broad range of wavelengths from the gamma, X-ray to the radio. A significant amount of science can be accomplished through the multi-frequency study of the eROSITA AGN and cluster sample, including optical confirmation and photometric redshift estimation of the eROSITA extended sources and AGNs. Optical spectroscopy has been, and will for the foreseeable future be, one of the main tools of astrophysics allowing studies of a large variety of astronomical objects over many fields of research. The fully capitalize on the eROSITA potential, a dedicated spectroscopic follow-up program is needed. 4MOST is the ideal instrument to secure the scientific success of the eROSITA X-ray survey and to overcome the small sample sizes together with selection biases that plagued past samples. The aim is to have the instrument commissioned in 2017, well matched to the data releases of eROSITA and Gaia. The design and implementation of the 4MOST facility simulator aimed to optimize the science output for eROSITA is described in necessary details.

  6. An international prospective cohort study of mobile phone users and health (COSMOS): Factors affecting validity of self-reported mobile phone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Mireille B; Auvinen, Anssi; Tettamanti, Giorgio; Cao, Yang; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Fremling, Karin; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Kojo, Katja; Knowles, Gemma; Smith, Rachel B; Schüz, Joachim; Johansen, Christoffer; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Deltour, Isabelle; Vermeulen, Roel; Kromhout, Hans; Elliott, Paul; Hillert, Lena

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates validity of self-reported mobile phone use in a subset of 75 993 adults from the COSMOS cohort study. Agreement between self-reported and operator-derived mobile call frequency and duration for a 3-month period was assessed using Cohen's weighted Kappa (κ). Sensitivity and specificity of both self-reported high (≥10 calls/day or ≥4h/week) and low (≤6 calls/week or mobile phone use were calculated, as compared to operator data. For users of one mobile phone, agreement was fair for call frequency (κ=0.35, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.36) and moderate for call duration (κ=0.50, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.50). Self-reported low call frequency and duration demonstrated high sensitivity (87% and 76% respectively), but for high call frequency and duration sensitivity was lower (38% and 56% respectively), reflecting a tendency for greater underestimation than overestimation. Validity of self-reported mobile phone use was lower in women, younger age groups and those reporting symptoms during/shortly after using a mobile phone. This study highlights the ongoing value of using self-report data to measure mobile phone use. Furthermore, compared to continuous scale estimates used by previous studies, categorical response options used in COSMOS appear to improve validity considerably, most likely by preventing unrealistically high estimates from being reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. How to Establish and Follow up a Large Prospective Cohort Study in the 21st Century--Lessons from UK COSMOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Mireille B; Smith, Rachel B; Brook, James P; Douglass, Margaret; Elliott, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale prospective cohort studies are invaluable in epidemiology, but they are increasingly difficult and costly to establish and follow-up. More efficient methods for recruitment, data collection and follow-up are essential if such studies are to remain feasible with limited public and research funds. Here, we discuss how these challenges were addressed in the UK COSMOS cohort study where fixed budget and limited time frame necessitated new approaches to consent and recruitment between 2009-2012. Web-based e-consent and data collection should be considered in large scale observational studies, as they offer a streamlined experience which benefits both participants and researchers and save costs. Commercial providers of register and marketing data, smartphones, apps, email, social media, and the internet offer innovative possibilities for identifying, recruiting and following up cohorts. Using examples from UK COSMOS, this article sets out the dos and don'ts for today's cohort studies and provides a guide on how best to take advantage of new technologies and innovative methods to simplify logistics and minimise costs. Thus a more streamlined experience to the benefit of both research participants and researchers becomes achievable.

  8. How to Establish and Follow up a Large Prospective Cohort Study in the 21st Century--Lessons from UK COSMOS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille B Toledano

    Full Text Available Large-scale prospective cohort studies are invaluable in epidemiology, but they are increasingly difficult and costly to establish and follow-up. More efficient methods for recruitment, data collection and follow-up are essential if such studies are to remain feasible with limited public and research funds. Here, we discuss how these challenges were addressed in the UK COSMOS cohort study where fixed budget and limited time frame necessitated new approaches to consent and recruitment between 2009-2012. Web-based e-consent and data collection should be considered in large scale observational studies, as they offer a streamlined experience which benefits both participants and researchers and save costs. Commercial providers of register and marketing data, smartphones, apps, email, social media, and the internet offer innovative possibilities for identifying, recruiting and following up cohorts. Using examples from UK COSMOS, this article sets out the dos and don'ts for today's cohort studies and provides a guide on how best to take advantage of new technologies and innovative methods to simplify logistics and minimise costs. Thus a more streamlined experience to the benefit of both research participants and researchers becomes achievable.

  9. Particle trajectories in seeds of Lactuca sativa and chromosome aberrations after exposure to cosmic heavy ions on cosmos biosatellites 8 and 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facius, R.; Scherer, K.; Reitz, G.; Bücker, H.; Nevzgodina, L. V.; Maximova, E. N.

    1994-10-01

    The potentially specific importance of the heavy ions of the galactic cosmic radiation for radiation protection in manned spaceflight continues to stimulate in situ, i.e., spaceflight experiments to investigate their radiobiological properties. Chromosome aberrations as an expression of a direct assault on the genome are of particular interest in view of cancerogenesis being the primary radiation risk for man in space. In such investigations the establishment of the geometrical correlation between heavy ions' trajectories and the location of radiation sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved for the identification of particle trajectories in the order of 2~10 μm as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed. We describe how this was achieved for seeds of Lactuca sativa as biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographies displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The incidence of chromosome aberrations in cells exposed during the COSMOS 1887 (Biosatellite 8) and the COSMOS 2044 (Biosatellite 9) mission was determined for seeds hit by cosmic heavy ions. In those seeds the incidence of both single and multiple chromosome aberrations was enhanced. The results of the Biosatellite 9 experiment, however, are confounded by spaceflight effects unrelated to the passage of heavy ions.

  10. Changes of deoxyribonucleoprotein in the spleen, thymus and liver of rats exposed to weightlessness and artificial gravity aboard the Cosmos biosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišúrová, E.; Tigranyan, R. A.; Praslička, M.

    Changes of deoxyribonucleoprotein in the spleen, thymus and liver of rats exposed to wegithlessness or artifical gravity on board biosatellites Cosmos 782 and Cosmos 936 after 20 days of flight were investigated. The level of polydeoxyribonucleotides in the spleen and thymus of rats exposed during the flight to weightlessness increased 4 - 11 hours after landing, suggesting breakdown of a part of the deoxyribonucleoprotein present. The use of artifical gravity prevented this breakdown in the thymus but not in the spleen. The breakdown was accompanied in the majority of cases by a decrease in teh deoxyribonucleoprotein content. We believe the breakdown of deoxyribonucleoprotein is due to a nonspecific stress reaction to the change from the weightless state to that of terrestrial gravity during landing. The polydeoxyribonucleotide level and amount of deoxyribonucleoprotein in the majority of cases returned to normal values during the 25 days of readaptation. No substantial change of deoxyribonucleoprotein was found in the liver. The different findings in the three organs are due to the fact that breakdown of deoxyribonucleoprotein takes place in sensitive cells underlying pycnosis. These cells are found in the spleen and thymus, but not in the liver.

  11. Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  12. Science versus (?) Art: Human Perception of Other Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1998-09-01

    At the time of the Renaissance, science and art were mixed together as a way to understand the human relation to the larger cosmos. Leonardo da Vinci exemplifies this approach. In modern times, the two have become separate, and even antagonistic, ``two cultures." Scientists have increasingly been satisfied to present quantitative measures of phenomena, without ever asking what the measures mean in human terms. Examples include the nature of the lunar surface, asteroid colors and brightness of the Io aurora, as will be discussed. However, in presenting the "big picture" to the public, and even to other working scientists, it is useful to revisit the Renaissance paradigm. Artists are increasingly working with scientists to translate the understanding of other worlds to the public, and this creates many opportunities for education projects in schools, and for careers in public outreach and science journalism.

  13. America's First Carl Sagan: Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel, Pre-Civil War Astronomer and Lecturer on the Cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    2002-12-01

    In the years before television, videos, radio. movies, or even loudspeakers, Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel (1809-1862) was the best-known popularizer of astronomy and the scientific study of the universe in nineteenth-century America. Each winter he traveled the country by railroad, steamer, and stagecoach, speaking to large paying crowds in principal cities from Boston, New York, and Philadelphia through Cincinnati to New Orleans on the cosmos and our place in it, with special attention to possible inhabitants of planers orbiting other stars. Mitchel had much the same attraction as Sagan did in our time, and awakened many people's interest in astronomy through the human angle, as Carl did. His argument was simple, and according to Frank Triplett goes back thousands of years: other stars are suns, our sun has planets with people on one of them, why should not other stars also have populated planets? But first Mitchel, like Sagan, always explained clearly the discoveries of astronomy that fleshed out this argument with facts. He emphasized the ``clockwork universe", governed by gravity, that Newton, Herschel, and Laplace had investigated and found to be stable. There were many other similarities between these two great popularizers. Mitchel's base was the Cincinnati Observatory, which he had founded, raising the funds for it himself in small contributions from hundreds of ``members", which he publicised as far more democratic than support from European kings and lords. He went abroad to get a telescope, and finally found his ``Great [12-inch] Refractor" in Munich, with help from John Quincy Adams, Astronomer Royal George Biddle Airy, and Paris Observatory Director Fracois Arago, in spite of a rebuff by President John Tyler. These episodes have similarities in Sagan's lobbying NASA for close-up images of Mars. Views of other American professional astronomers on life on other worlds will also be described briefly, from Denison Olmsted, Elias Loomis, Charles A. Young (who

  14. Science in Computational Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson Cerrosen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing theory in relation to science presents the physics as an ideal, although many sciences not approach the same, so that the current philosophy of science-Theory of Science- is not much help when it comes to analyze the computer science, an emerging field of knowledge that aims investigation of computers, which are included in the materialization of the ideas that try to structure the knowledge and information about the world. Computer Science is based on logic and mathematics, but both theoretical research methods and experimental follow patterns of classical scientific fields. Modeling and computer simulation, as a method, are specific to the discipline and will be further developed in the near future, not only applied to computers but also to other scientific fields. In this article it is analyze the aspects of science in computer science, is presenting an approach to the definition of science and the scientific method in general and describes the relationships between science, research, development and technology.

  15. Le Cosmos d'Alexandre von Humboldt et La Tentation de saint Antoine de Gustave Flaubert : deux œuvres de toute une vie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Orr

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dans le septième et dernier tableau de La Tentation de saint Antoine de 1874, la fin célèbre est mise en contexte par une description longue et détaillée qui n’a jamais attiré l’attention critique qu’elle mérite. Cet article analyse l’importance de ce panorama du monde naturel sous la forme d’une exploration intertextuelle des passages du Cosmos d’Alexandre de Humboldt. Que Flaubert signale ses lectures de l’œuvre de Humboldt dans sa Correspondance de 1860 suggère des liens très riches entre Le Cosmos – que Humboldt désigne comme « l’œuvre de ma vie » – et la Tentation de saint Antoine définitive que Flaubert retravaillait au même moment. Cette relecture de La Tentation à travers la perspective de Humboldt souligne la place importante du Cosmos parmi les découvertes et les textes scientifiques contemporains de Flaubert, et la manière dont ceux-ci informent la vision de la vie scientifique et religieuse de son protagoniste, Antoine.In the seventh and final tableau of the Tentation de Saint Antoine of 1874, the famous finale is set in the context of a long, detailed description which has not attracted the critical attention it deserves. This article focuses on the importance of this panorama of the natural world as an intertextual exploration of passages from Kosmos by Alexander von Humboldt. The fact that Flaubert’s Correspondance of 1860 mentions his reading of Humboldt’s works suggests rich lines of investigation between Kosmos – which Humboldt calls the « work of all of life » and the final Tentation de Saint Antoine,which Flaubert was reworking at the same moment. This re-reading of the Tentation through the optic of Humboldt underscores the pivotal position of Kosmos amid the scientific discoveries and texts contemporary to Flaubert, and how these inform the vision of life of his protagonist, Antoine, as scientific and religious.

  16. Galaxy mapping the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, James

    2014-01-01

    Each night, we are able to gaze up at the night sky and look at the thousands of stars that stretch to the end of our individual horizons. But the stars we see are only those that make up our own Milky Way galaxy-but one of hundreds of billions in the whole of the universe, each separated  by inconceivably huge tracts of empty space. In this book, astronomer James Geach tells the rich stories of both the evolution of galaxies and our ability to observe them, offering a fascinating history of how we've come to realize humanity's tiny place in the vast universe.             Taking us on a compel

  17. Experiment K-6-13. Morphological and biochemical examination of heart tissue. Part 1: Effects of microgravity on the myocardial fine structure of rats flown on Cosmos 1887. Ultrastructure studies. Part 2: Cellular distribution of cyclic ampdependent protein kinase regulatory subunits in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Miquel, Jaime; Mednieks, M. I.; Sapp, W.; Popova, I. A.; Serova, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    The left ventricle of hearts from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite for 12.5 days was compared to the same tissue of synchronous and vivarium control animals maintained in a ground based laboratory. The volume density of the mitochondria in the myocardium of the space-flown animals was statistically less (p equal less than 0.01) than that of the synchronous or vivarium control rats. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a certain degree of myocardial degeneration manifested in mitochondrial changes and accumulation of myeloid bodies. Generalized myofibrillar edema was also observed.

  18. Science, Philosophy of Science and Science Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkana, Yehuda

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of science through historical accounts. History should become an integral part of science teaching at all levels as it is through history of science that students can become aware of the open nature of science, and more importantly, of the open nature of methods by which science can be done. (Author/SAH)

  19. Experiment K-6-16. Morphological examination of rat testes. The effect of Cosmos 1887 flight on spermatogonial population and testosterone level in rat testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Vasques, M.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.; Popova, I. A.; Serova, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    Testes from rats flown on Cosmos 1887 for twelve and a half days were compared to basal control, synchronous control and vivarium maintained rats. When the mean weights of flight testes, normalized for weight/100 gms, were compared to the vivarium controls they were 6.7 percent lighter. Although the flight testes were lighter than the synchronous, the difference is not significant. Counts of spermatogonial cells from 5 animals in each group revealed a 4 percent decrease in flight compared to vivarium controls. In both cases the t-Test significance was less than 0.02. The serum testosterone levels of all animals (flight, synchronous and vivarium) were significantly below the basal controls.

  20. A progress report on the development of the COSMOS International Guidelines for Applying Noninvasive Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Seismic Site Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, A.; Facilitation Committee, C. O. S. M. O. S.

    2016-12-01

    Site effects associated with near-surface geological conditions are an important part of any seismic hazard assessment. Traditional invasive downhole methods directly measure shear-wave velocity (Vs); however, these methods are often cost- and/or environmentally-prohibitive and their results do not always reflect the lateral variability of seismic conditions beyond the immediate vicinity of the test site. In comparison, noninvasive methods record active- or passive-source data consisting of surface or body waves and are less prohibitive to employ. Moreover, these methods use multiple horizontally-spaced surface receivers, thus lateral subsurface variability beneath the array is accounted for in their results. Most noninvasive methods, however, indirectly measure Vs, and thus have inherent uncertainties. Despite this issue, the use of noninvasive methods continues to gain popularity. As developers and practitioners work to improve and understand uncertainties in noninvasive methods, an expert group has come together to develop guidelines (best practices) for applying noninvasive techniques to characterize seismic site conditions. The Consortium of Organizations for Strong Motion Observation Systems (COSMOS) established the COSMOS Facilitation Committee and hosted two workshops to facilitate progress in the development of the guidelines, one workshop prior to the 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting and another after the 2016 Seismological Society of America Annual Meeting. Workshops are planned as part of the programs for the 2016 35th European Seismic Commission General Assembly and the 2017 16th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering. The project, thus far, has developed a table of contents and is establishing subcommittees, to be led by key developers of each noninvasive technique, to draft chapters outlining best practices for applying the respective techniques.

  1. A robust morphological classification of high-redshift galaxies using support vector machines on seeing limited images. II. Quantifying morphological k-correction in the COSMOS field at 1 < z < 2: Ks band vs. I band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Company, M.; Tasca, L.; Rouan, D.; Pelat, D.; Kneib, J. P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Capak, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Koekemoer, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Willott, C.

    2009-04-01

    Context: Morphology is the most accessible tracer of galaxies physical structure, but its interpretation in the framework of galaxy evolution still remains problematic. Its quantification at high redshift requires deep high-angular resolution imaging, which is why space data (HST) are usually employed. At z > 1, the HST visible cameras however probe the UV flux, which is dominated by the emission of young stars, which could bias the estimated morphologies towards late-type systems. Aims: In this paper we quantify the effects of this morphological k-correction at 1 Methods: In Paper I we presented a new non-parametric method of quantifying morphologies of galaxies on seeing-limited images based on support vector machines. Here we use this method to classify ~50 000 Ks selected galaxies in the COSMOS area observed with WIRCam at CFHT. We use a 10-dimensional volume, including 5 morphological parameters, and other characteristics of galaxies such as luminosity and redshift. The obtained classification is used to investigate the redshift distributions and number counts per morphological type up to z ~ 2 and to compare them to the results obtained with HST/ACS in the I-band on the same objects. We associate to every galaxy with Ks find less early-type galaxies than the Ks-band one by a factor ~1.5, which might be a consequence of morphological k-correction effects. Conclusions: We argue therefore that studies based on I-band HST/ACS classifications at z > 1 could be underestimating the elliptical population. Using our method in a Ks ≤ 21.5 magnitude-limited sample, we observe that the fraction of the early-type population is (21.9% ± 8%) at z ~ 1.5-2 and (32.0% ± 5%) at the present time. We will discuss the evolution of the fraction of galaxies in types from volume-limited samples in a forthcoming paper. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des

  2. Science or Science Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefsrud, Lianne M.; Meyer, Renate

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the framings and identity work associated with professionals’ discursive construction of climate change science, their legitimation of themselves as experts on ‘the truth’, and their attitudes towards regulatory measures. Drawing from survey responses of 1077 professional......, legitimation strategies, and use of emotionality and metaphor. By linking notions of the science or science fiction of climate change to the assessment of the adequacy of global and local policies and of potential organizational responses, we contribute to the understanding of ‘defensive institutional work...

  3. Narrating Science and Religion. Storytelling Strategies in Journey of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Menning

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While scientific and religious narratives use distinct discourse strategies to reach different audiences, the documentary film Journey of the Universe combines scientific and humanistic perspectives to narrate the origin and evolution of the universe, life on Earth, and human consciousness. This science-based mythic telling of the universe story foregrounds science to enhance the story’s plausibility while using mythic elements to invite an ethical response. We evaluate how this film blends scientific and mythic storytelling strategies to present a plausible story with moral force. Journey of the Universe presents an image of humanity as naturally emerging from an increasingly complex cosmos, capable of profound wonder, and poised to use its intellectual gifts to renew the face of the earth. We argue that narrative strategies aligning scientific content with the viewer’s personal experiences of nature are generally effective, and that the film’s focus on the local and terrestrial, even in the midst of the vastness of the cosmos, supports its ecological message.

  4. An ALMA survey of submillimetre galaxies in the COSMOS field: Physical properties derived from energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, O.; Delvecchio, I.; Smolčić, V.; Aravena, M.; Brisbin, D.; Karim, A.; Magnelli, B.; Novak, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Albrecht, M.; Aussel, H.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P. L.; Casey, C. M.; Hayward, C. C.; Ilbert, O.; Intema, H. T.; Jiang, C.; Le Fèvre, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Muñoz Arancibia, A. M.; Navarrete, F.; Padilla, N. D.; Riechers, D. A.; Salvato, M.; Scott, K. S.; Sheth, K.; Tasca, L. A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) represent an important source population in the origin and cosmic evolution of the most massive galaxies. Hence, it is imperative to place firm constraints on the fundamental physical properties of large samples of SMGs. Aims: We determine the physical properties of a sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at the observed-frame wavelength of λobs = 1.1 mm, and followed up at λobs = 1.3 mm with the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA). Methods: We used the MAGPHYS model package to fit the panchromatic (ultraviolet to radio) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 124 of the target SMGs, which lie at a median redshift of z = 2.30 (19.4% are spectroscopically confirmed). The SED analysis was complemented by estimating the gas masses of the SMGs by using the λobs = 1.3 mm dust emission as a tracer of the molecular gas component. Results: The sample median and 16th-84th percentile ranges of the stellar masses, obscured star formation rates, dust temperatures, and dust and gas masses were derived to be log(M⋆/M⊙) = 11.09+0.41-0.53, SFR = 402+661-233 M⊙ yr-1, Tdust = 39.7+9.7-7.4 K, log(Mdust/M⊙) = 9.01+0.20-0.31, and log(Mgas/M⊙ = 11.34+0.20-0.23, respectively. The Mdust/M⋆ ratio was found to decrease as a function of redshift, while the Mgas/Mdust ratio shows the opposite, positive correlation with redshift. The derived median gas-to-dust ratio of 120+73-30 agrees well with the canonical expectation. The gas fraction (Mgas/ (Mgas + M⋆)) was found to range from 0.10 to 0.98 with a median of 0.62+0.27-0.23. We found that 57.3% of our SMGs populate the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, while 41.9% of the sources lie above the MS by a factor of greater than three (one source lies below the MS). These super-MS objects, or starbursts, are preferentially found at z ≳ 3, which likely reflects the sensitivity limit of our source selection. We estimated that the median gas

  5. The Art and Science of Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was established in 1958, and its Marshall Space Flight Center was founded in 1960, as space-related work was transferred from the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Redstone Arsenal, where Marshall is located. With this heritage, Marshall contributes almost 50 years of systems engineering experience with human-rated launch vehicles and scientific spacecraft to fulfill NASA's mission exploration and discovery. These complex, highly specialized systems have provided vital platforms for expanding the knowledge base about Earth, the solar system, and cosmos; developing new technologies that also benefit life on Earth; and opening new frontiers for America's strategic space goals. From Mercury and Gemini, to Apollo and the Space Shuttle, Marshall's systems engineering expertise is an unsurpassed foundational competency for NASA and the nation. Current assignments comprise managing Space Shuttle Propulsion systems; developing environmental control and life support systems and coordinating science operations on the International Space Station; and a number of exploration-related responsibilities. These include managing and performing science missions, such as the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter slated to launch for the Moon in April 2009, to developing the Ares I crew launch vehicle upper stage and integrating the vehicle stack in house, as well as designing the Ares V cargo launch vehicle and contributing to the development of the Altair Lunar Lander and an International Lunar Network with communications nodes and other infrastructure.

  6. Effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus), noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia), and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus) as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeri

    OpenAIRE

    Karimy MF; Julendr H; Hayati SN; Sofyan a; Damayanti E; Priyowidodo D

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus), noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia), and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus) as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeria tenella. One hundred day old chick (DOC) of the Cobb strain broiler were randomly devided into 10 groups and each group consisted of 10 chickens. All groups were orally infected by 5000 sporulated oocys...

  7. Moving People from Science Adjacent to Science Doers with Twitch.tv

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela L.; CosmoQuest

    2017-10-01

    The CosmoQuest community is testing the ability to attract people from playing online videogames to doing fully online citizen science by engaging people through the Twitch.tv streaming platform. Twitch.tv launched in 2011 as an online platform for video gamers to stream their gameplay while providing narrative. In its six years of regular growth, the platform has added support for people playing non-video games, and for those participating in non-game activities. As part of their expansion, in April 2017, Twitch.tv hosted a science week during which they streamed the Cosmos series and allowed different feeds provide real-time commentary. They also hosted panel discussions on a variety of science topics. CosmoQuest participated in this event and used it as a jumping off point for beginning to interact with Twitch.tv community members online. With CosmoQuest’s beta launch of Image Detectives, they expanded their use of this streaming platform to include regular “office hours”, during which team members did science with CosmoQuest’s online projects, took questions from community members, and otherwise promoted the CosmoQuest community. This presentation examines this case study, and looks at how well different kinds of Twitter engagements attracted audiences, the conversion rate from viewer to subscriber, and at how effectively CosmoQuest was able to migrate users from viewing citizen science on Twitch.tv to participating in citizen science on CosmoQuest.org.This project was supported through NASA cooperative agreement NNX17AD20A.

  8. Primary Science Interview: Science Sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In this "Primary Science" interview, Lynne Bianchi talks with Emma Vanstone about "Science Sparks," which is a website full of creative, fun, and exciting science activity ideas for children of primary-school age. "Science Sparks" started with the aim of inspiring more parents to do science at home with their…

  9. Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Nicholas

    2009-10-01

    Introduction: what this book is about and why you might want to read it; Prologue: three orphans share a common paternity: professional science communication, popular journalism, and literary fiction are not as separate as they seem; Part I. Professional Science Communication: 1. Spreading the word: the endless struggle to publish professional science; 2. Walk like an Egyptian: the alien feeling of professional science writing; 3. The future's bright? Professional science communication in the age of the internet; 4. Counting the horse's teeth: professional standards in science's barter economy; 5. Separating the wheat from the chaff: peer review on trial; Part II. Science for the Public: What Science Do People Need and How Might They Get It?: 6. The Public Understanding of Science (PUS) movement and its problems; 7. Public engagement with science and technology (PEST): fine principle, difficult practice; 8. Citizen scientists? Democratic input into science policy; 9. Teaching and learning science in schools: implications for popular science communication; Part III. Popular Science Communication: The Press and Broadcasting: 10. What every scientist should know about mass media; 11. What every scientist should know about journalists; 12. The influence of new media; 13. How the media represents science; 14. How should science journalists behave?; Part IV. The Origins of Science in Cultural Context: Five Historic Dramas: 15. A terrible storm in Wittenberg: natural knowledge through sorcery and evil; 16. A terrible storm in the Mediterranean: controlling nature with white magic and religion; 17. Thieving magpies: the subtle art of false projecting; 18. Foolish virtuosi: natural philosophy emerges as a distinct discipline but many cannot take it seriously; 19. Is scientific knowledge 'true' or should it just be 'truthfully' deployed?; Part V. Science in Literature: 20. Science and the Gothic: the three big nineteenth-century monster stories; 21. Science fiction: serious

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of the active components from the roots of Cosmos bipinnatus in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sang-Hyun; Yun, Bong-Sik; Kim, So-Young; Choi, Wahn-Soo; Jeon, Hyun-Soo; Yoo, Jun-Sik; Kim, Si-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    We isolated a sesquiterpene lactone from the methanol extract of the roots of Cosmos bipinnatus, namely, MDI (a mixture of dihydrocallitrisin and isohelenin). The anti-inflammatory activity of MDI was evaluated using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. MDI significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2. Consistent with these results, the production of NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was suggested to be suppressed by MDI in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 value was 0.94 and 2.88 µg mL(-1) for NO and PGE2, respectively). In addition, MDI significantly inhibited the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α. Furthermore, MDI attenuated DNA-binding activity of NF-κB by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκB. These results indicate that MDI isolated from the roots of C. bipinnatus shows anti-inflammatory activity in LPS-stimulated murine macrophages by modulating the NF-κB pathway.

  11. Science/s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Tricoire

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Un forum a été organisé en mars par la Commission européenne. Il s’appelait « Science in Society ». Depuis 2000 la Commission a mis en place un Plan d’Action élaboré pour que soit promue « la science » au sein du public, afin que les citoyens prennent de bonnes décisions, des décisions informées. Il s’agit donc de développer la réflexivité au sein de la société, pour que cette dernière agisse avec discernement dans un monde qu’elle travaille à rendre durable. ...

  12. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  13. The fundamentals of modern astrophysics a survey of the cosmos from the home planet to space frontiers

    CERN Document Server

    Marov, Mikhail Ya

    2015-01-01

    The Fundamentals of Modern Astrophysics provides an overview of the modern science of astrophysics. It covers the Sun, Solar System bodies, exoplanets, stars, and star life cycle, planetary systems origin and evolution, basics of astrobiology, our galaxy the Milky Way, other galaxies and galactic clusters, a general view of the Universe, its structure, evolution and fate, modern views and advanced models of cosmology as well as the synergy of micro- and macro physics, standard model, superstring theory, multiversity and worm holes. The main concepts of modern astrophysics and prospects for future studies are accompanied by numerous illustrations and a summary of the advanced projects at various astronomical facilities and space missions. Dr. Marov guides readers through a maze of complicated topics to demystify the field and open its wonders to all.

  14. Why natural science needs phenomenological philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Through an exploration of theoretical physics, this paper suggests the need for regrounding natural science in phenomenological philosophy. To begin, the philosophical roots of the prevailing scientific paradigm are traced to the thinking of Plato, Descartes, and Newton. The crisis in modern science is then investigated, tracking developments in physics, science's premier discipline. Einsteinian special relativity is interpreted as a response to the threat of discontinuity implied by the Michelson-Morley experiment, a challenge to classical objectivism that Einstein sought to counteract. We see that Einstein's efforts to banish discontinuity ultimately fall into the "black hole" predicted in his general theory of relativity. The unavoidable discontinuity that haunts Einstein's theory is also central to quantum mechanics. Here too the attempt has been made to manage discontinuity, only to have this strategy thwarted in the end by the intractable problem of quantum gravity. The irrepressible discontinuity manifested in the phenomena of modern physics proves to be linked to a merging of subject and object that flies in the face of Cartesian philosophy. To accommodate these radically non-classical phenomena, a new philosophical foundation is called for: phenomenology. Phenomenological philosophy is elaborated through Merleau-Ponty's concept of depth and is then brought into focus for use in theoretical physics via qualitative work with topology and hypercomplex numbers. In the final part of this paper, a detailed summary is offered of the specific application of topological phenomenology to quantum gravity that was systematically articulated in The Self-Evolving Cosmos (Rosen, 2008a). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Cosmic Origins: A Traveling Science Exhibit and Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Morrow, C. A.; Harold, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Space Science Institute of Boulder, Colorado, is developing a 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Cosmic Origins, which will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Cosmic Origins will have three interrelated exhibit areas: Star Formation, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about the wide range of conditions for life on Earth and how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Visitors will also learn about the tools scientists' use, such as space-based and ground-based telescopes, to improve our understanding of the cosmos. Exhibit content will address age-old questions that form the basis of NASA's Origins and Astrobiology programs: Where did we come from? Are we alone? In addition to the exhibit, our project will include workshops for educators and docents at host sites, as well as a public Web site that will use a virtual rendering of exhibit content. The exhibit's size will permit it to visit medium sized museums in underserved regions of the country. It will begin its 3-year tour to 9 host museums and science centers in early 2005. A second 3-year tour is also planned for 2008. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) will manage the exhibit's national tour. Current partners in the Cosmic Origins project include ASTC, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Lawrence Hall of Science, NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA missions (e.g. PlanetQuest, SIRTF, and Kepler), New York Hall of Science, the SETI Institute, and the Space Telescope Science Institute. The exhibition is supported by grants from NSF and NASA. This report will focus on the Planet Quest part of the exhibition.

  16. Pure Science and Applied Science*

    OpenAIRE

    Aumann, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    (Excerpt) The name of my talk is Pure Science and Applied Science, and the idea I would like to sell to you today is that there is no such thing as “pure” or “applied” science. In other words, there is such a thing as science, but there is no difference between pure and applied science. Science is one entity and cannot be separated into different categories. In order to back that up, I would like to tell you a little story. As an undergraduate, I studied mathematics at City College in New...

  17. The FMOS-COSMOS Survey of Star-forming Galaxies at Z ˜ 1.6. V: Properties of Dark Matter Halos Containing Hα Emitting Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashino, Daichi; More, Surhud; Silverman, John D.; Daddi, Emanuele; Renzini, Alvio; Sanders, David B.; Rodighiero, Giulia; Puglisi, Annagrazia; Kajisawa, Masaru; Valentino, Francesco; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Nagao, Tohru; Arimoto, Nobuo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2017-07-01

    We study the properties of dark matter halos that contain star-forming galaxies at 1.43 ≤ z ≤ 1.74, using the FMOS-COSMOS survey. The sample consists of 516 objects with a detection of the Hα emission line, which represent the star forming population at this epoch, having a stellar mass range of 109.57 ≤ M */M ⊙ ≲ 1011.4 and a star-formation rate range of 15 ≲ SFR/(M ⊙ yr-1) ≲ 600. We measure the projected two-point correlation function while carefully taking into account observational biases, and find a significant clustering amplitude at scales of 0.04-10 h -1 cMpc, with a correlation length {r}0={5.26}-0.62+0.75 {h}-1 {cMpc} and a bias b={2.44}-0.32+0.38. We interpret our clustering measurement using a halo occupation distribution model. The sample galaxies appear to reside in halos with mass {M}{{h}}={4.71}-1.62+1.19× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ on average, which will likely become present-day halos of mass M h (z = 0) ˜ 2 × 1013 h -1 M ⊙, equivalent to the typical halo mass scale of galaxy groups. We then confirm the decline of the stellar-to-halo mass ratio at M h generation instrument that will provide strong constraints on the galaxy-formation scenario by obtaining precise measurements of galaxy clustering at z > 1.

  18. The VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project: Cosmic evolution of radio AGN and implications for radio-mode feedback since z 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolčić, V.; Novak, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Ceraj, L.; Bondi, M.; Delhaize, J.; Marchesi, S.; Murphy, E.; Schinnerer, E.; Vardoulaki, E.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-06-01

    Based on a sample of over 1800 radio AGN at redshifts out to z 5, which have typical stellar masses within 3 × (1010 - 1011)M⊙, and 3 GHz radio data in the COSMOS field, we derived the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity functions for radio AGN (L1.4 GHz 1022 - 1027 W Hz-1) out to z 5. We constrained the evolution of this population via continuous models of pure density and pure luminosity evolutions, and we found best-fit parametrizations of Φ∗ ∝ (1 + z)(2.00 ± 0.18) - (0.60 ± 0.14)z, and L∗ ∝ (1 + z)(2.88 ± 0.82) - (0.84 ± 0.34)z, respectively, with a turnover in number and luminosity densities of the population at z ≈ 1.5. We converted 1.4 GHz luminosity to kinetic luminosity taking uncertainties of the scaling relation used into account. We thereby derived the cosmic evolution of the kinetic luminosity density provided by the AGN and compared this luminosity density to the radio-mode AGN feedback assumed in the Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) model, I.e., to the redshift evolution of the central supermassive black hole accretion luminosity taken in the model as the source of heating that offsets the energy losses of the cooling, hot halo gas, and thereby limits further stellar mass growth of massive galaxies. We find that the kinetic luminosity exerted by our radio AGN may be high enough to balance the radiative cooling of the hot gas at each cosmic epoch since z 5. However, although our findings support the idea of radio-mode AGN feedback as a cosmologically relevant process in massive galaxy formation, many simplifications in both the observational and semi-analytic approaches still remain and need to be resolved before robust conclusions can be reached.

  19. Transgenic apple plants overexpressing the chalcone 3-hydroxylase gene of Cosmos sulphureus show increased levels of 3-hydroxyphloridzin and reduced susceptibility to apple scab and fire blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutabarat, Olly Sanny; Flachowsky, Henryk; Regos, Ionela; Miosic, Silvija; Kaufmann, Christine; Faramarzi, Shadab; Alam, Mohammed Zobayer; Gosch, Christian; Peil, Andreas; Richter, Klaus; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Treutter, Dieter; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of chalcone-3-hydroxylase provokes increased accumulation of 3-hydroxyphloridzin in Malus . Decreased flavonoid concentrations but unchanged flavonoid class composition were observed. The increased 3-hydroxyphlorizin contents correlate well with reduced susceptibility to fire blight and scab. The involvement of dihydrochalcones in the apple defence mechanism against pathogens is discussed but unknown biosynthetic steps in their formation hamper studies on their physiological relevance. The formation of 3-hydroxyphloretin is one of the gaps in the pathway. Polyphenol oxidases and cytochrome P450 dependent enzymes could be involved. Hydroxylation of phloretin in position 3 has high similarity to the B-ring hydroxylation of flavonoids catalysed by the well-known flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H). Using recombinant F3'H and chalcone 3-hydroxylase (CH3H) from Cosmos sulphureus we show that F3'H and CH3H accept phloretin to some extent but higher conversion rates are obtained with CH3H. To test whether CH3H catalyzes the hydroxylation of dihydrochalcones in planta and if this could be of physiological relevance, we created transgenic apple trees harbouring CH3H from C. sulphureus. The three transgenic lines obtained showed lower polyphenol concentrations but no shift between the main polyphenol classes dihydrochalcones, flavonols, hydroxycinnamic acids and flavan 3-ols. Increase of 3-hydroxyphloridzin within the dihydrochalcones and of epicatechin/catechin within soluble flavan 3-ols were observed. Decreased activity of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase and chalcone synthase/chalcone isomerase could partially explain the lower polyphenol concentrations. In comparison to the parent line, the transgenic CH3H-lines showed a lower disease susceptibility to fire blight and apple scab that correlated with the increased 3-hydroxyphlorizin contents.

  20. The Evolution of the Stellar Mass Functions of Star-forming and Quiescent Galaxies to z = 4 from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzin, Adam; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Franx, Marijn; McCracken, Henry J.; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Dunlop, James S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Brammer, Gabriel; Labbé, Ivo; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95,675 Ks -selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar mass density of the universe was only 50%, 10%, and 1% of its current value at z ~ 0.75, 2.0, and 3.5, respectively. The quiescent population drives most of the overall growth, with the stellar mass density of these galaxies increasing as ρstarvprop(1 + z)-4.7 ± 0.4 since z = 3.5, whereas the mass density of star-forming galaxies increases as ρstarvprop(1 + z)-2.3 ± 0.2. At z > 2.5, star-forming galaxies dominate the total SMF at all stellar masses, although a non-zero population of quiescent galaxies persists to z = 4. Comparisons of the Ks -selected star-forming galaxy SMFs with UV-selected SMFs at 2.5 3.5. We estimate the average mass growth of individual galaxies by selecting galaxies at fixed cumulative number density. The average galaxy with log(M star/M ⊙) = 11.5 at z = 0.3 has grown in mass by only 0.2 dex (0.3 dex) since z = 2.0 (3.5), whereas those with log(M star/M ⊙) = 10.5 have grown by >1.0 dex since z = 2. At z budget in the SMFs. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under ESO programme ID 179.A-2005 and on data products produced by TERAPIX and the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit on behalf of the UltraVISTA consortium.

  1. Sound Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickel, Aaron J.; Lee, Michele H.; Pareja, Enrique M.

    2010-01-01

    How can a teacher simultaneously teach science concepts through inquiry while helping students learn about the nature of science? After pondering this question in their own teaching, the authors developed a 5E learning cycle lesson (Bybee et al. 2006) that concurrently embeds opportunities for fourth-grade students to (a) learn a science concept,…

  2. Science and Science Fiction Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubeck, Leroy W.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physics course for nonscience majors which combines physics with science fiction films. Includes course format, sample module on the concept of momentum, and an appendix with a listing of science fiction films used in this course. (DS)

  3. Open Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süreyya Çankırı

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Science is based on the confirmation of phenomena and events in a continuum. In the development of science; the cumulative progress and effective sharing of information comes to the forefront. Within the scope of science, producing new information requires a social approach. Because science has more participants every day so the meaning and importance of science also becomes different. In this sense, the idea of open science, which is based on open access, open data and open source, continues to mediate the socialization of information as well as the purpose of the rapid spread of scientific research results among scientists. In the editorial section, the approach of open science, which has gained momentum in recent years, is evaluated in the context of information retrieval and interaction.

  4. Cognitive science

    OpenAIRE

    John N. Drobak

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive science is the study of intelligence and intelligent systems. Several disciplines including psychology, philosophy, linguistics and the neurosciences have well-established interests in these topics. Cognitive science is an attempt to organise and unify views of thought developed within these distinct disciplines. Cognitive Science is concerned with the construction of abstract theory of intelligent processes, the investigation of human and animal intelligence with the goal of develo...

  5. Science Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2013-01-01

    Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when...... bubbles appear in science, truth and reliability are the first victims. This paper explores how fashions in research funding and research management may turn science into something like a bubble economy....

  6. Science Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains 31 activities and experiments from the biological and physical sciences. Addresses such areas as reproduction, biotechnology, ecology, proteins, nitrates, aerosols, metal crystallinity, circuit boards, and photoswitching. (ML)

  7. Science Shops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1999-01-01

    The paper prsents the overall concept of science shops as practised in most of the European science shops and present the concept practised and some experience obtained at the Technical University of Denmark. An outline for the planning of new sceince shops is presented.......The paper prsents the overall concept of science shops as practised in most of the European science shops and present the concept practised and some experience obtained at the Technical University of Denmark. An outline for the planning of new sceince shops is presented....

  8. Ionised gas structure of 100 kpc in an over-dense region of the galaxy group COSMOS-Gr30 at z 0.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epinat, B.; Contini, T.; Finley, H.; Boogaard, L. A.; Guérou, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Carton, D.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Bacon, R.; Cantalupo, S.; Carollo, M.; Hamer, S.; Kollatschny, W.; Krajnović, D.; Marino, R. A.; Richard, J.; Soucail, G.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Wisotzki, L.

    2018-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 104 kpc2 gaseous structure detected in [O II]λλ3727, 3729 in an over-dense region of the COSMOS-Gr30 galaxy group at z 0.725 with deep MUSE Guaranteed Time Observations. We estimate the total amount of diffuse ionised gas to be of the order of ( 5 ± 3) × 1010 M⊙ and explore its physical properties to understand its origin and the source(s) of the ionisation. The MUSE data allow the identification of a dozen group members that are embedded in this structure through emission and absorption lines. We extracted spectra from small apertures defined for both the diffuse ionised gas and the galaxies. We investigated the kinematics and ionisation properties of the various galaxies and extended gas regions through line diagnostics (R23, O32, and [O III]/Hβ) that are available within the MUSE wavelength range. We compared these diagnostics to photo-ionisation models and shock models. The structure is divided into two kinematically distinct sub-structures. The most extended sub-structure of ionised gas is likely rotating around a massive galaxy and displays filamentary patterns that link some galaxies. The second sub-structure links another massive galaxy that hosts an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to a low-mass galaxy, but it also extends orthogonally to the AGN host disc over 35 kpc. This extent is likely ionised by the AGN itself. The location of small diffuse regions in the R23 vs. O32 diagram is compatible with photo-ionisation. However, the location of three of these regions in this diagram (low O32, high R23) can also be explained by shocks, which is supported by their high velocity dispersions. One edge-on galaxy shares the same properties and may be a source of shocks. Regardless of the hypothesis, the extended gas seems to be non-primordial. We favour a scenario where the gas has been extracted from galaxies by tidal forces and AGN triggered by interactions between at least the two sub-structures. Based on observations made with

  9. CosmoQuest: A Glance at Citizen Science Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew; Grier, Jennifer; Gay, Pamela; Lehan, Cory; Buxner, Sanlyn; CosmoQuest Team

    2018-01-01

    CosmoQuest is a virtual research facility focused on engaging people - citizen scientists - from across the world in authentic research projects designed to enhance our knowledge of the cosmos around us. Using image data acquired by NASA missions, our citizen scientists are first trained to identify specific features within the data and then requested to identify those features across large datasets. Responses submitted by the citizen scientists are then stored in our database where they await for analysis and eventual publication by CosmoQuest staff and collaborating professional research scientists.While it is clear that the driving power behind our projects are the eyes and minds of our citizen scientists, it is CosmoQuest’s custom software, Citizen Science Builder (CSB), that enables citizen science to be accomplished. On the front end, CosmoQuest’s CSB software allows for the creation of web-interfaces that users can access to perform image annotation through both drawing tools and questions that can accompany images. These tools include: using geometric shapes to identify regions within an image, tracing image attributes using freeform line tools, and flagging features within images. Additionally, checkboxes, dropdowns, and free response boxes may be used to collect information. On the back end, this software is responsible for the proper storage of all data, which allows project staff to perform periodic data quality checks and track the progress of each project. In this poster we present these available tools and resources and seek potential collaborations.

  10. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Science literacy is imperative for well informed civic and personal decision making, yet only a quarter of American adults are proficient enough in science to understand science stories reported in the popular press. Hands-on research increases confidence in and understanding of science. When guiding students in designing and conducting science fair projects, mentors can foster science literacy by helping students focus on three goals: (1) articulating hypotheses or questions, (2) designing feasible projects, and (3) learning to make and interpret graphs. These objectives introduce students to the methodological nature of scientific research and give them the tools to interpret scientific facts and data in order to make informed decisions for themselves and society.

  11. The science in social science

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, H. Russell

    2012-01-01

    A recent poll showed that most people think of science as technology and engineering—life-saving drugs, computers, space exploration, and so on. This was, in fact, the promise of the founders of modern science in the 17th century. It is less commonly understood that social and behavioral sciences have also produced technologies and engineering that dominate our everyday lives. These include polling, marketing, management, insurance, and public health programs.

  12. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global base of marine science. The journal publishes original research articles dealing with all aspects of marine science and coastal manage- ment. Topics include, but are not limited to: theoretical studies, oceanography, marine biology and ...

  13. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal publishes original research articles dealing with all aspects of marine science and coastal manage- ment. ... Science (WIOJMS), as a special issue entitled “Coral reefs of Mauritius in a changing global climate”. ...... 2014) with the highest disaster risk exposed to natural hazards, including storms and floods.

  14. Life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  15. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sustainable use of coastal and marine resources. This is central to the goal of supporting and promoting sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global base of marine science. The journal publishes original research articles dealing with all aspects of marine science and coastal manage-.

  16. Science Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. Science Matters A Book for Curious Minds. Rohini Godbole. Book Review Volume 2 Issue 2 February 1997 pp 94-95. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/02/0094-0095 ...

  17. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chief Editor José Paula | Faculty of Sciences of University of Lisbon, Portugal. Copy Editor ... sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global base of marine science. ... salt works along the coast of Ungwana Bay provide alternative fishing grounds for local fishers unable to venture.

  18. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- ination of high ... The journal publishes original research articles dealing with all aspects of marine science and coastal manage- ment. Topics ..... of enteric pathogens from warm-blooded animals, including ...

  19. The sciences of science communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischhoff, Baruch

    2013-08-20

    The May 2012 Sackler Colloquium on "The Science of Science Communication" brought together scientists with research to communicate and scientists whose research could facilitate that communication. The latter include decision scientists who can identify the scientific results that an audience needs to know, from among all of the scientific results that it would be nice to know; behavioral scientists who can design ways to convey those results and then evaluate the success of those attempts; and social scientists who can create the channels needed for trustworthy communications. This overview offers an introduction to these communication sciences and their roles in science-based communication programs.

  20. Science teaching in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund , which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  1. Revolutionary Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-03-01

    On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind's view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn's formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported. Copyright © 2016 Casadevall and Fang.

  2. Revolutionary Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Casadevall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind’s view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn’s formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported.

  3. Albert Einstein, cosmos and religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doković V.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider Einstein's attitude regarding religious as such, from both cosmological and epistemological points of view. An attempt to put it into a wider socio-historical perspective was made, with the emphasis on ethnic and religious background. It turns out that the great scientist was neither atheist nor believer in the orthodox sense and the closest labels one might stick to him in this respect would be pantheism/cosmism (ontological aspect and agnosticism (episte­mological aspect. His ideas on divine could be considered as a continuation of line traced by Philo of Alexandria, who himself followed Greek Stoics and (Neo- Platonists and especially Baruch Spinoza. It turns out that Einstein's both scientific (rational aspects and religious (intuitive aspects thinking were deeply rooted in the Hellenic culture. His striving to unravel the secrets of the universe and the roots of cosmological order resembles much the ancient ideas of the role of knowledge in fathoming the divine as such, as ascribed to Gnostics. .

  4. The Intellect and the cosmos

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brisson, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The complex, and even contradictory character of the demiurge in Plato’s Timaeus has given rise to multiple interpretations from Antiquity to our time, even if the demiurge is usually considered as an intellect...

  5. Tuning in on the Cosmos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Ole; Laurberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Tidsskriftsartikel om samarbejdet mellem det kosmisk/psykedeliske band Popol Vuh og den anerkendte tyske filmskaber Werner Herzog......Tidsskriftsartikel om samarbejdet mellem det kosmisk/psykedeliske band Popol Vuh og den anerkendte tyske filmskaber Werner Herzog...

  6. NEW SUNS IN THE COSMOS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Freitas, D. B.; Leao, I. C.; Lopes, C. E. Ferreira; Paz-Chinchon, F.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Alves, S.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-20

    The present work reports on the discovery of three stars that we have identified to be rotating Sun-like stars, based on rotational modulation signatures inferred from light curves from the CoRoT mission's Public Archives. In our analysis, we performed an initial selection based on the rotation period and position in the period-T{sub eff} diagram. This revealed that the stars CoRoT IDs 100746852, 102709980, and 105693572 provide potentially good matches to the Sun with a similar rotation period. To refine our analysis, we applied a novel procedure, taking into account the fluctuations of the features associated with photometric modulation at different time intervals and the fractality traces that are present in the light curves of the Sun and of these ''New Sun'' candidates alike. In this sense, we computed the so-called Hurst exponent for the referred stars, for a sample of 14 CoRoT stars with sub- and super-solar rotational periods, and for the Sun itself in its active and quiet phases. We found that the Hurst exponent can provide a strong discriminant of Sun-like behavior, going beyond what can be achieved with solely the rotation period itself. In particular, we find that CoRoT ID 105693572 is the star that most closely matches the solar rotation properties as far as the latter's imprints on light curve behavior are concerned. The stars CoRoT IDs 100746852 and 102709980 have significant smaller Hurst exponents than the Sun, notwithstanding their similarity in rotation periods.

  7. Saturday Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugart, Cecil G.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the organization of demonstration oriented seminars in which the physics of toys, music, sports and other topics are investigated. Reports that this university based service has increased high school physics and science fair enrollments. (CP)

  8. Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettell, T. A.; Saferstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of articles appealing to forensic practitioners. Topics include: drugs and poisons, forensic biochemistry, and trace evidence. Lists noteworthy books published on forensic science topics since 1986. (MVL)

  9. Science Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Shirley; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes 36 science activities. Topics include: osmosis, fermentation, anhydrobiotic organisms, breathing monitors, trypsin, weeds, amyloplasts, electrolysis, polarimeters, ethene ripening of fruit, colorimetry, diffusion, redox reactions, equilibria, acid-base relationships, electricity, power, resonance, measurement, parallax, amplifiers,…

  10. Scuba Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickstein, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an integrated unit on scuba science. Studies oxygen in kinetic theory, Boyle's law, Charles's law, Dalton's law, human circulatory and respiratory systems, and diving dangers such as decompression sickness. (YDS)

  11. Science Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is one of the world’s leading environmental and human health research organizations. Science provides the foundation for Agency policies, actions, and decisions made on behalf of the American people.

  12. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science ... Topics include, but are not limited to: theoretical studies, oceanography, marine biology and ... While no populations of seals are resident in the tropical Indian Ocean, ...

  13. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue ... Topics include, but are not limited to: theoretical studies, oceanography, marine biology and ecology, .... population of Chumbe Island Coral Park,.

  14. Influence of timing of admission in labour and management of labour on method of birth: results from a randomised controlled trial of caseload midwifery (COSMOS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Mary-Ann; McLachlan, Helen L; Forster, Della; Flood, Margaret

    2013-12-01

    group, maternal age and maternal body mass index, early admission to hospital was strongly associated with caesarean section. Admission before the cervix was 5 cm dilated increased the odds 2.4-fold (95%CI 1.4, 4.0; p=0.001). Augmentation of labour and use of epidural analgesia were each strongly associated with caesarean section (adjusted odds ratios 3.10 (95%CI 2.1, 4.5) and 5.77 (95%CI 4.0, 8.4) respectively. these findings that women allocated to caseload care were admitted to hospital later in labour, and that earlier admission was strongly associated with birth by caesarean section, suggest that remaining at home somewhat longer in labour may be one of the mechanisms by which caseload care was effective in reducing caesarean section in the COSMOS trial. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    ...: Life sciences, aerospace medicine, agriculture science, biochemistry, biophysics, genetics, immunology, industrial medicine, laser bioeffects, medicine, molecular biology, nonionizing radiation...

  16. Science Fiction Aids Science Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubeck, Leroy W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Cited are the experiences of the authors with a college-level course which used science fiction films to teach scientific principles. Included is a set of sample scientific concepts explored using the film "Forbidden Planet." (CW)

  17. Pure Science and Applied Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Aumann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available (Excerpt The name of my talk is Pure Science and Applied Science, and the idea I would like to sell to you today is that there is no such thing as “pure” or “applied” science. In other words, there is such a thing as science, but there is no difference between pure and applied science. Science is one entity and cannot be separated into different categories. In order to back that up, I would like to tell you a little story. As an undergraduate, I studied mathematics at City College in New York. At that time, what was called Pure Mathematics was in vogue, and the more prominent mathematicians were a little contemptuous of any kind of application. A very famous, prominent mathematician in the first half of the previous century by the name of G. H. Hardy, who was in a branch of mathematics called number theory, said that the only thing he regretted was that he unwittingly did some important work in mathematical genetics that eventually turned out to have some application. … Such was the atmosphere in the late ’40s of the previous century and, being a young man and impressionable, I was swept up in this atmosphere.

  18. Exploring science through science fiction

    CERN Document Server

    Luokkala, Barry B

    2014-01-01

    How does Einstein’s description of space and time compare with Dr. Who? Can James Bond really escape from an armor-plated railroad car by cutting through the floor with a laser concealed in a wristwatch? What would it take to create a fully-intelligent android, such as Star Trek’s Commander Data? How might we discover intelligent civilizations on other planets in the galaxy? Is human teleportation possible? Will our technological society ever reach the point at which it becomes lawful to discriminate on the basis of genetic information, as in the movie GATTACA? Exploring Science Through Science Fiction addresses these and other interesting questions, using science fiction as a springboard for discussing fundamental science concepts and cutting-edge science research. The book is designed as a primary text for a college-level course which should appeal to students in the fine arts and humanities as well as to science and engineering students. It includes references to original research papers, landmark scie...

  19. Is normal science good science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Kępińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available “Normal science” is a concept introduced by Thomas Kuhn in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962. In Kuhn’s view, normal science means “puzzle solving”, solving problems within the paradigm—framework most successful in solving current major scientific problems—rather than producing major novelties. This paper examines Kuhnian and Popperian accounts of normal science and their criticisms to assess if normal science is good. The advantage of normal science according to Kuhn was “psychological”: subjective satisfaction from successful “puzzle solving”. Popper argues for an “intellectual” science, one that consistently refutes conjectures (hypotheses and offers new ideas rather than focus on personal advantages. His account is criticized as too impersonal and idealistic. Feyerabend’s perspective seems more balanced; he argues for a community that would introduce new ideas, defend old ones, and enable scientists to develop in line with their subjective preferences. The paper concludes that normal science has no one clear-cut set of criteria encompassing its meaning and enabling clear assessment.

  20. Slicing COSMOS with SC4K: the evolution of typical Lyα emitters and the Lyα escape fraction from Z ˜ 2 to Z ˜ 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, David; Santos, Sérgio; Matthee, Jorryt; Paulino-Afonso, Ana; Ribeiro, Bruno; Calhau, João; Khostovan, Ali A.

    2018-02-01

    We present and explore deep narrow- and medium-band data obtained with the Subaru and the Isaac Newton telescopes in the ˜2 deg2 COSMOS field. We use these data as an extremely wide, low-resolution (R ˜ 20 - 80) IFU survey to slice through the COSMOS field and obtain a large sample of ˜4000 Lyα emitters (LAEs) from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 6 in 16 redshift slices (SC4K). We present new Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) covering a co-moving volume of ˜108 Mpc3. SC4K extensively complements ultra-deep surveys, jointly covering over 4 dex in Lyα luminosity and revealing a global (2.5 3.5, likely linked with the evolution of the AGN population. The Lyα luminosity density rises by a factor ˜2 from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 3 but is then found to be roughly constant (1.1^{+0.2}_{-0.2}× 10^{40} erg s-1 Mpc-3) to z ˜ 6, despite the ˜0.7 dex drop in UV luminosity density. The Lyα/UV luminosity density ratio rises from 4 ± 1% to 30 ± 6% from z ˜ 2.2 to z ˜ 6. Our results imply a rise of a factor of ≈2 in the global ionisation efficiency (ξion) and a factor ≈4 ± 1 in the Lyα escape fraction from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 6, hinting for evolution in both the typical burstiness/stellar populations and even more so in the typical ISM conditions allowing Lyα photons to escape.

  1. Spectrum management for science in the 21st century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Scientific Use of the Radio Spectrum; Committee on Radio Frequencies; National Research Council

    2010-01-01

    "Radio observations of the cosmos are gathered by geoscientists using complex earth-orbiting satellites and ground-based equipment, and by radio astronomers using large ground-based radio telescopes...

  2. Network science

    CERN Document Server

    Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Networks are everywhere, from the Internet, to social networks, and the genetic networks that determine our biological existence. Illustrated throughout in full colour, this pioneering textbook, spanning a wide range of topics from physics to computer science, engineering, economics and the social sciences, introduces network science to an interdisciplinary audience. From the origins of the six degrees of separation to explaining why networks are robust to random failures, the author explores how viruses like Ebola and H1N1 spread, and why it is that our friends have more friends than we do. Using numerous real-world examples, this innovatively designed text includes clear delineation between undergraduate and graduate level material. The mathematical formulas and derivations are included within Advanced Topics sections, enabling use at a range of levels. Extensive online resources, including films and software for network analysis, make this a multifaceted companion for anyone with an interest in network sci...

  3. Science Fiction on Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, David

    1985-01-01

    Reviews science fiction films used in a science fiction class. Discusses feature films, short science fiction films, short story adaptations, original science fiction pieces and factual science films that enrich literature. (EL)

  4. Nonlinear Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Zensho

    2010-01-01

    This book gives a general, basic understanding of the mathematical structure "nonlinearity" that lies in the depths of complex systems. Analyzing the heterogeneity that the prefix "non" represents with respect to notions such as the linear space, integrability and scale hierarchy, "nonlinear science" is explained as a challenge of deconstruction of the modern sciences. This book is not a technical guide to teach mathematical tools of nonlinear analysis, nor a zoology of so-called nonlinear phenomena. By critically analyzing the structure of linear theories, and cl

  5. Islam and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus

    The following sections are included: * The Holy Quran and Science * Modem Science, A Greco- Islamic Legacy * The Decline of Sciences in Islam * The Limitations of Science * Faith and Science * The Present Picture of Sciences in the Islamic Countries * Renaissance of Sciences in Islam * Steps Needed for Building up Sciences in the Islamic Countries * Science Education * Science Foundations in Islam * Technology in Our Countries * Concluding Remarks * REFERENCES

  6. The Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Kuchner, Marc; Schneider, Adam; Meisner, Aaron; Gagné, Jonathan; Filippazzo, Joeseph; Trouille, Laura; Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 Collaboration; Jacqueline Faherty

    2018-01-01

    In February of 2017 our team launched a new citizen science project entitled Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 to scan the cosmos for fast moving stars, brown dwarfs, and even planets. This Zooniverse website, BackyardWorlds.org, invites anyone with a computer or smartphone to flip through WISE images taken over a several year baseline and mark any point source that appears to move. This “blinking technique” is the same that Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto with over 80 years ago. In the first few days of our program we recruited over 30,000 volunteers. After 3/4 of a year with the program we have completed 30% of the sky and our participants have identified several hundred candidate movers. These include (1) over 20 candidate Y-type brown dwarfs, (2) a handful of new co-moving systems containing a previously unidentified low mass object and a known nearby star, (3) over 100 previously missed M dwarfs, (4) and more than 200 candidate L and T brown dwarfs, many of which occupy outlier positions on reduced proper motion diagrams. Our first publication credited four citizen scientists as co-authors. The Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 project is both scientifically fruitful and empowering for any mind across the globe that has ever wanted to participate in a discovery-driven astronomy research project.

  7. Cosmopolitics: towards a new articulation of politics, science and critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiro

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores how Ulrich Beck's world-risk-society theory (WRST) and Bruno Latour's Actor-Network Theory (ANT) can be combined to advance a theory of cosmopolitics. On the one hand, WRST helps to examine 'cosmopolitan politics', how actors try to inject cosmopolitanism into existing political practices and institutions anchored in the logic of nationalism. On the other hand, ANT sheds light on 'cosmological politics', how scientists participate in the construction of reality as a reference point for political struggles. By combining the WRST and ANT perspectives, it becomes possible to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of cosmopolitics that takes into account both political and ontological dimensions. The proposed synthesis of WRST and ANT also calls for a renewal of critical theory by making social scientists aware of their performative involvement in cosmopolitics. This renewal prompts social scientists to explore how they can pragmatically support certain ideals of cosmopolitics through continuous dialogues with their objects of study, actors who inhabit different nations and different cosmoses. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  8. Meeting IYA Goals for Diverse Planetarium and Science Museum Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. M.; Carney, K. E.

    2008-11-01

    The International Year of Astronomy (IYA) in 2009 provides the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, Illinois with a chance to bring astronomy into the city of Chicago and beyond. The Adler serves diverse audiences in the Chicagoland area and elsewhere. Each audience has unique needs to be taken into account when designing for IYA. The Adler has created a suite of programs for IYA that addresses a number of topical strands, tailored for the many audiences that Adler serves. Adler has found synergy between some existing programs designed for these audiences and IYA thematic strands. One advantage of this is that it increases the likelihood of program sustainability. The authors will outline some of Adler's program plans to date from person-to-person community outreach programs such as Café Scientifique programs, to a citizen science light pollution observation program, to programs within the institution, such as a new temporary exhibit about the roles of telescopes in our understanding of the cosmos. The presenters will focus on the range of programming and how they bring together IYA topics as well as addressing the needs of our identified audiences.

  9. HEASARC - The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's archive for high-energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. Over the next five years the HEASARC will ingest observations from up to 12 operating missions, while serving data from these and over 30 archival missions to the community. The HEASARC archive presently contains over 37 TB of data, and will contain over 60 TB by the end of 2014. The HEASARC continues to secure major cost savings for NASA missions, providing a reusable mission-independent framework for reducing, analyzing, and archiving data. This approach was recognized in the NRC Portals to the Universe report (2007) as one of the HEASARC's great strengths. This poster describes the past and current activities of the HEASARC and our anticipated developments in coming years. These include preparations to support upcoming high energy missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, GEMS) and ground-based and sub-orbital CMB experiments, as well as continued support of missions currently operating (Chandra, Fermi, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL). In 2012 the HEASARC (which now includes LAMBDA) will support the final nine-year WMAP data release. The HEASARC is also upgrading its archive querying and retrieval software with the new Xamin system in early release - and building on opportunities afforded by the growth of the Virtual Observatory and recent developments in virtual environments and cloud computing.

  10. Subterranean science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paling, Sean; Sadler, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    The deep underground laboratories of the world are no longer the scientific realm of astroparticle physics alone. From Mars rovers to muon tomography, and from radioactive dating to astrobiology, Sean Paling and Stephen Sadler describe the renaissance in the science taking place far beneath our feet.

  11. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ination of high quality research generated in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region, in particular on the sustainable use of coastal ... The journal publishes original research articles dealing with all aspects of marine science and coastal manage- ment. Topics ..... diatom C-biomass is a result of changes in silicate. Figure 4.

  12. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Special Issue 1/ 2017 | Jul 2017 | ISSN: 0856-860X. Western Indian Ocean. J O U R N A L O F. Marine Science. Coral reefs of Mauritius in a changing global climate .... of coral diseases, and Stylophora pistillata-like morphotypes occurring around Mauritius Island, respec- tively. .... (2013) assumed that the life cycle of.

  13. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global base of marine science. .... to accommodate multiple user-groups while con- .... Criteria used to select trawling sites within the survey areas were traw- lability and depth range (100-699 m), and sites were stratified by depth and latitude.

  14. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incomati Estuary and describing forest condition, this study shows the poor condition of peri-urban mangroves at locations such ...... Bay (Kenya) using quickbird satellite imagery. Spa- tial Science 52: 75-86. Neukermans G, Koedam, N (2014) Saco da Inhaca man- grove vegetation mapping and change detection using very ...

  15. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- ination of high quality research generated in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region, in particular on the sustainable use of coastal and marine resources. This is central to the goal of supporting and promoting.

  16. Brewing Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelter, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Following the brewing process from grain to glass, this course uses the biological and chemical principles of brewing to teach science to the nonscience major. Discussion of the scientific aspects of malting, mashing, fermentation, and the making of different beer styles is complemented by laboratory exercises that use scientific methods to…

  17. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Special Issue 1/ 2017 | Jul 2017 | ISSN: 0856-860X. Western ... Sweden. Johan GROENEVELD. South Africa. Issufo HALO. South Africa/Mozambique. Christina HICKS. Australia/UK. Johnson KITHEKA. Kenya. Kassim KULINDWA .... WIO Journal of Marine Science Special Issue 1 / 2017 31-41 | D. Kaullysing et al. sediment ...

  18. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- ination of high .... pod diversity and distribution are important especially since studies on marine biodiversity are scarce around Mauritius. .... accurate approach to molluscan systematics. They are helpful in ...

  19. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The special issues aim to contribute for advancing marine science in the WIO by focusing on specific themes, geographical areas or assembling contributions from scientific meetings. The editorial processes are exactly the same as for regular issues, with double peer-review, and guest editors are considered. José Paula.

  20. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johan GROENEVELD. South Africa. Issufo HALO. South Africa/Mozambique. Christina HICKS. Australia/UK. Johnson KITHEKA. Kenya. Kassim KULINDWA ... Science (WIOJMS), as a special issue entitled “Coral reefs of Mauritius in a changing global climate”. ..... This is due to important inputs of groundwater at La.

  1. Skeptical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alan J.; Barnhart, Carolyn M.; Parejko, Ken S.; Schultz, Forrest S.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the legitimacy of teaching about astrology, extrasensory perception, UFOs, touch therapy, cloning dinosaurs, or any other unusual claims in the classroom. Suggests that bringing unusual claims to the science classroom is an opportunity to motivate students in the principles of scientific thought. (SAH)

  2. Cognitive Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocking, Rodney R.; Mestre, Jose P.

    The focus of this paper is on cognitive science as a model for understanding the application of human skills toward effective problem-solving. Sections include: (1) "Introduction" (discussing information processing framework, expert-novice distinctions, schema theory, and learning process); (2) "Application: The Expert-Novice…

  3. Science Smiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 22, Issue 12. Current Issue Volume 22 | Issue 12. December 2017. Home · Volumes & Issues · Categories · Special Issues · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  4. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- ination of high quality research generated in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region, in particular on the sustainable use of coastal and .... taken up to a depth of 5cm using a plastic hand core of. 2.6cm diameter.

  5. Boundless Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilhaus, F.

    2009-04-01

    Our science is critical to understanding the future prospects for life. The laboratory for natural sciences encompasses our planet and reaches into the solar system. The forces of nature respect no boundaries. But, we who try to understand these forces are handicapped by national, political, language, religious, and other concocted barriers. These barriers limit both our effectiveness as scientists and our ability to reach those outside our community who need to know what we have uncovered about our environment. An unencumbered worldwide scientific community has been an objective with limited successes for too long. Action began in earnest after the first world war with the formation of the various scientific Unions and ICSU. Fifty years later Keith Runcorn initiated another approach, when he proposed what quickly became EGS and which has grown and evolved with the merger with EUG. To be truly effective we need to communicate and share comfortably with colleagues worldwide. Personal relationships and trust are required. We count on a high level of ethical behavior within our community. We individually must also be constantly vigilant for the encroachment of the manmade barriers that have held back science through time immemorial. Our scientific organizations cannot achieve this alone. They will facilitate, however, the onus is on each of us to reach out and form interlocking informal communities, which will bring our whole planet-wide community together at many overlapping levels. When we achieve this community, our science will more bountiful and better address the needs of human society.

  6. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and trophic organization of the fish community in shallow waters of an impacted tropical habitat. Estu- arine Coastal and Shelf Science 58: 89-98. Hajisamae S, Yeesin P, Ibrahim S (2006) Feeding ecology of two sillaginid fishes and trophic interrelations with other co-existing species in the southern part of. South China Sea.

  7. Organizational Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriwal, Madhu; Clegg, Stewart; Collopy, Fred; McDaniel, Reuben, Jr.; Morgan, Gareth; Sutcliffe, Kathleen; Kaufman, Roger; Marker, Anthony; Selwyn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of organizational science, broadly defined as including many fields--organizational behavior and development, management, workplace performance, and so on--were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might…

  8. Current Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching of the theory of evolution

  9. Science and anti-science

    CERN Document Server

    Holton, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    What is good science? What goal--if any--is the proper end of scientific activity? Is there a legitimating authority that scientists mayclaim? Howserious athreat are the anti-science movements? These questions have long been debated but, as Gerald Holton points out, every era must offer its own responses. This book examines these questions not in the abstract but shows their historic roots and the answers emerging from the scientific and political controversies of this century. Employing the case-study method and the concept of scientific thematathat he has pioneered, Holton displays the broad scope of his insight into the workings of science: from the influence of Ernst Mach on twentiethcentury physicists, biologists, psychologists, and other thinkers to the rhetorical strategies used in the work of Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, and others; from the bickering between Thomas Jefferson and the U.S. Congress over the proper form of federal sponsorship of scientific research to philosophical debates since Oswald...

  10. Caring Science or Science of Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkel, Marian C; Watson, Jean; Giovannoni, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    The concepts caring science and science of caring have different meanings; however, they are often used interchangeably. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the synthesis of the scholarly literature on the definitions of the science of caring and caring science and to affirm the authors' perspective relating to the language of caring science. Caring science advances the epistemology and ontology of caring. Ideas related to caring science inquiry are presented, and the authors acknowledge the future of caring science as unitary caring science.

  11. Alien Earths: A Traveling Science Exhibit and Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Morrow, C. A.; Harold, J.

    2004-05-01

    Where did we come from? Are we alone? These age-old questions form the basis of NASA's Origins Program, a series of missions spanning the next twenty years that will use a host of space- and ground-based observatories to understand the origin and development of galaxies, stars, planets, and the conditions necessary to support life. The Space Science Institute in Boulder, CO, is developing a 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Alien Earths, which will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Alien Earths will have four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about the wide range of conditions for life on Earth and how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Visitors will also learn about the tools scientists use, such as space-based and ground-based telescopes, to improve our understanding of the cosmos. The exhibit's size will permit it to visit medium sized museums in all regions of the country. It will begin its 3-year tour to 9 host museums and science centers in early 2005 at the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley, California. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) will manage the exhibit's national tour. In addition to the exhibit, the project includes workshops for educators and docents at host sites, as well as a public website that will use exhibit content to delve deeper into origins research. Current partners in the Alien Earths project include ASTC, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Lawrence Hall of Science, NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA missions (Navigator, SIRTF, and Kepler), the SETI Institute, and the Space Telescope Science Institute

  12. Portraying Real Science in Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Esther M.

    2011-01-01

    In both formal and informal settings, not only science but also views on the nature of science are communicated. Although there probably is no singular nature shared by all fields of science, in the field of science education it is commonly assumed that on a certain level of generality there is a consensus on many features of science. In this…

  13. Science News and the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  14. The Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Peter, Ed.

    This 12-chapter book discusses the scientific facts behind the ideas included in the novels of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, Arthur C. Clark and other science fiction writers. Areas explored in the first 11 chapters include: exploration of deep space; energy and exotic power sources; likelihood of extra-terrestrial life and the…

  15. Vastu Shastra And Feng Shui The Ancient Sciences And Their Fusion In Context Of Indian Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Saran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available About 30 present of modern buildings are suffering from sick building syndrome. The design of buildings according to ancient sciences like vastu shastra and Feng shui are efficient to resolve the problem of sick building syndrome by making the building physically and psychologically satisfactory. Both the sciences are based on five basic elements. Human body is also composed of five elements and above all the nature is made up five elements. Therefore there should be an inter-relationship between man building and universe. These sciences are capable of resolving the problem of sick building syndrome by incorporating five basic elements as a part of building like Ayurveda a field of medicine based on natural means to heal and maintain the sick body. Similarly Buildings should be designed as a union of physical and metaphysical aspects. The physical aspect is related to five basic elements. Elements made up of matter and matter is associated with different colour and each colour has its own energy in terms of its wavelength colour is also important element to balance the energies the chromo therapy is also a way to balance the energies of human body and buildings and the metaphysical aspect is related to cosmos.

  16. The Science of Filming Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, D.

    2016-12-01

    Filmmaking is a science. It is observation, data collection, analysis, experimentation, structure, and presentation. Filmmaking is a process that is familiar to scientists. Observation - what we know is gained from observation of the world around us. Film allows us to focus this observation, to pick out details, to understand nuance, to direct seeing. Filmmaking is a tool for learning about the world. Data collection - to study what we observe we must see what it is now, and how it is changing. This element of filmmaking is collecting images, video, documenting events, and gathering information. Analysis - to understand the film data we have collected we must understand connections, correlations, and cause and effect. We ask questions. We discover. Experimentation - film allows us to experiment with different scenarios, to test observations and make models. Structure - what we find or what we want to present must be sorted into a structured format using the tools of writing, filming, and editing. Presentation - the final film is the result of what we observe, what observations we collect, what we learn from those observations, how we test what we've learned, and how we organize and show what we find. Online video is transforming the way we see the world. We now have easy access to lectures by the famous and the obscure; we can observe lab experiments, documentaries of field expeditions, and actually see recent research results. Video is omnipresent in our culture and supplements or even replaces writing in many applications. We can easily present our own scientific results to new and important audiences. Video can do a lot for science and scientists: It can provide an expanded audience for scientific news and information, educate thousands, spread the word about scientific developments, help frame controversial science issues, show real scientists at work in the real world, promote interest in scientific publications, and report on science-agency programs. It can

  17. Computer sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  18. Mechanical science

    CERN Document Server

    Bolton, W C

    2013-01-01

    This book gives comprehensive coverage of mechanical science for HNC/HND students taking mechanical engineering courses, including all topics likely to be covered in both years of such courses, as well as for first year undergraduate courses in mechanical engineering. It features 500 problems with answers and 200 worked examples. The third edition includes a new section on power transmission and an appendix on mathematics to help students with the basic notation of calculus and solution of differential equations.

  19. Specialized science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2014-04-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism.

  20. Imagine the Universe! The Anatomy of Black Holes. Probing the Structure & Evolution of the Cosmos. An Information and Activity Booklet. Grades 9-12, 1998-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Granger, Kara C.; Mahon, Jane D.

    The information provided in this booklet is meant to give the necessary background information so that the science of black holes can be taught confidently to secondary students. The featured activities can be used to engage and excite students about the topic of black holes in different disciplines and in a number of ways. Activities include: (1)…

  1. Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Program is structured so that NASA s headquarters is responsible for the program content and selection, through the Enterprise Scientist, and MSFC provides for implementation of ground and flight programs with a Discipline Scientist and Discipline Manager. The Discipline Working Group of eminent scientists from outside of NASA acts in an advisory capacity and writes the Discipline Document from which the NRA content is derived. The program is reviewed approximately every three years by groups such as the Committee on Microgravity Research, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the OBPR Maximization and Prioritization (ReMaP) Task Force. The flight program has had as many as twenty-six principal investigators (PIs) in flight or flight definition stage, with the numbers of PIs in the future dependent on the results of the ReMaP Task Force and internal reviews. Each project has a NASA-appointed Project Scientist, considered a half-time job, who assists the PI in understanding and preparing for internal reviews such as the Science Concept Review and Requirements Definition Review. The Project Scientist also insures that the PI gets the maximum science support from MSFC, represents the PI to the MSFC community, and collaborates with the Project Manager to insure the project is well-supported and remains vital. Currently available flight equipment includes the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) and Microgravity Science Glovebox. Ground based projects fall into one or more of several categories. Intellectual Underpinning of Flight Program projects include theoretical studies backed by modeling and computer simulations; bring to maturity new research, often by young researchers, and may include preliminary short duration low gravity experiments in the KC-135 aircraft or drop tube; enable characterization of data sets from previous flights; and provide thermophysical property determinations to aid PIs. Radiation Shielding and preliminary In

  2. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  3. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  4. National Women's Science Congress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TSC

    of Science, Engineering, Technology, Industrial Entrepreneurship and Management which will automatically empower ... The Science Congress would cover the entire spectrum of science, engineering and technology, ... Archaeology and Earth Sciences; (8) Ecology, Biodiversity, and Environment (9) Emerging. Frontier ...

  5. Science commons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    SCP: Creative Commons licensing for open access publishing, Open Access Law journal-author agreements for converting journals to open access, and the Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine for retaining rights to self-archive in meaningful formats and locations for future re-use. More than 250 science and technology journals already publish under Creative Commons licensing while 35 law journals utilize the Open Access Law agreements. The Addendum Engine is a new tool created in partnership with SPARC and U.S. universities. View John Wilbanks's biography

  6. Science Night

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Would it surprise you to know that you can measure the speed of light using chocolate and a microwave oven? If you're interested in this and in finding out much more, come along to the Museum of the History of Science on 3 and 4 July 2004, when dozens of companies, institutions, colleges and organizations will be running exhibits, shows, and displays on the theme of counting and measuring. CERN will be there with a display stand that includes two particle detectors. Full details are available from the Museum website at: http://www.lanuitdelascience.ch/

  7. Science blogging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Christie

    2016-01-01

    Here is the essential how-to guide for communicating scientific research and discoveries online, ideal for journalists, researchers, and public information officers looking to reach a wide lay audience. Drawing on the cumulative experience of twenty-seven of the greatest minds in scientific communication, this invaluable handbook targets the specific questions and concerns of the scientific community, offering help in a wide range of digital areas, including blogging, creating podcasts, tweeting, and more. With step-by-step guidance and one-stop expertise, this is the book every scientist, science writer, and practitioner needs to approach the Wild West of the Web with knowledge and confidence.

  8. Nanomaterials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Rohrer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanometer regime covers the transition from condensed matter behavior to atomic and molecular properties and thus is a very rich but also very demanding area in materials science. Close to the condensed matter side, properties and functions might still very well be scalable, whereas close to the atomic and molecular side, the scalability is mostly lost. Properties and functions change qualitatively or quantitatively by orders of magnitude when the dimensions become smaller than a critical size in the nanometer range. Examples are the ballistic regime for electron or spin transport at dimensions below the mean free path, near-field effects in scanning near-field optical microscopy and quantum wells when the dimensions are below an appropriate wavelength, novel electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties when the number of bulk atoms becomes smaller than that of surface atoms, quantum conduction, and Coulomb blockade. Thus, by going below a certain size, an abundance of novel properties and functions are at one's disposal, or, in other words, we can functionalize materials simply by reducing their size to the nanoscale.The key to the future lies in the functions that we give to materials, not just in finding 'novel functional materials'. This catch expression in many materials science programs and initiatives of the past two decades sounds great, but it is not what really counts. All materials are functional in one way or another and, therefore, all new materials are 'novel functional materials'. Certainly, finding new materials is always an important part of progress, but we should also focus on the much larger domain of novel functions that we can give to existing or modified materials. A good example is semiconductors: they are fifty or more years old and their properties are very well known, but they were not of widespread interest and use until the transistor changed their destiny into being the central material in the information

  9. Do Gender-Science Stereotypes Predict Science Identification and Science Career Aspirations among Undergraduate Science Majors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, Jessica L.; Vescio, Theresa K.; Loken, Eric; Lo, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined whether gender-science stereotypes were associated with science identification and, in turn, science career aspirations among women and men undergraduate science majors. More than 1,700 students enrolled in introductory science courses completed measures of gender-science stereotypes (implicit associations and…

  10. Discovering indigenous science: Implications for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, Gloria; Corsiglia, John

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous science relates to both the science knowledge of long-resident, usually oral culture peoples, as well as the science knowledge of all peoples who as participants in culture are affected by the worldview and relativist interests of their home communities. This article explores aspects of multicultural science and pedagogy and describes a rich and well-documented branch of indigenous science known to biologists and ecologists as traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Although TEK has been generally inaccessible, educators can now use a burgeoning science-based TEK literature that documents numerous examples of time-proven, ecologically relevant, and cost effective indigenous science. Disputes regarding the universality of the standard scientific account are of critical importance for science educators because the definition of science is a de facto gatekeeping device for determining what can be included in a school science curriculum and what cannot. When Western modern science (WMS) is defined as universal it does displace revelation-based knowledge (i.e., creation science); however, it also displaces pragmatic local indigenous knowledge that does not conform with formal aspects of the standard account. Thus, in most science classrooms around the globe, Western modern science has been taught at the expense of indigenous knowledge. However, because WMS has been implicated in many of the world's ecological disasters, and because the traditional wisdom component of TEK is particularly rich in time-tested approaches that foster sustainability and environmental integrity, it is possible that the universalist gatekeeper can be seen as increasingly problematic and even counter productive. This paper describes many examples from Canada and around the world of indigenous people's contributions to science, environmental understanding, and sustainability. The authors argue the view that Western or modern science is just one of many sciences that need to be

  11. Learning Science with Science Fiction Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence; Cavanaugh, Catherine

    This paper is an excerpt from a book on learning science using science fiction. The focus is on the use of science fiction films to engage students and encourage greater enthusiasm and interest in science. "Jurassic Park" is used as an example that can provide educators with countless lesson opportunities. This approach recommends the use of fun…

  12. Science kitsch and pop science: A reconnaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Eduard

    2013-07-01

    Science kitsch? The combination of these two words rings like an oxymoron. Science - as the common saying has it - exposes, discovers, tells the truth; kitsch conceals, covers, lies. I think, this "shadow" of science deserves a specific scrutiny, not only because it reflects the altered place and role of science in contemporary "knowledge" society but also because it pinpoints the task of relocating science in the "multicultural" context of postmodernism, with its different epistemic claims. The genre of science kitsch may help to regain credit by working as a probe to detect false pretensions, explanatory exuberance and exaggerations in science.

  13. 75 FR 10845 - Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology... Subcommittee on Forensic Science of the National Science and Technology Council's (NSTC's) Committee on Science..., Subcommittee on Forensic Science. BILLING CODE 4410-FY-P ...

  14. Enacting science

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Anthony Leo

    My study examines the development of forms of knowing that arise when students engage in open-ended explorations involving self-directed design and building involving simple materials. It is grounded in an enactivist theoretical perspective on cognition which holds that the creation of action-thought processes for engaging the world is interwoven with the meanings that are constructed for these experiences. A dynamic conception of persons-acting-in-a-setting is fundamental to an enactivist view of cognition. How is understanding enacted in building activity? How does the shape of a problem emerge? How do students enact meaning and understanding when they experience a high degree of physical engagement in building things? What are some characteristics of an enactive learning/teaching environment? My research settings comprise a range of individual, group and classroom engagements of varying lengths over a three and one-half year period. The first research episode involved two grade eight students in an investigation of Paper Towels. The second four month engagement was in a grade nine science class that culminated in the building of a Solar House. The third grade ten episode involved a one month project to build a Mousetrap Powered Car. A fourth Invent a Machine project was conducted in two grade eight science classes taught by the teacher who participated in the Solar House project. Two students were present in three of the four projects. I interviewed one of these students upon completion of his high school physics courses. I found that building is a form of thinking which develops competency in managing complex practical tasks. A triadic relationship of exploration, planning and acting is present. Practical and procedural understandings emerge as students enter and re-enter self-directed problem settings. Thinking patterns depend on the kinds of materials chosen, the ways they are used, and on how students contextualize the problem. Classroom assessment

  15. FOREWORD Nanomaterials science Nanomaterials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Heinrich

    2010-10-01

    The nanometer regime covers the transition from condensed matter behavior to atomic and molecular properties and thus is a very rich but also very demanding area in materials science. Close to the condensed matter side, properties and functions might still very well be scalable, whereas close to the atomic and molecular side, the scalability is mostly lost. Properties and functions change qualitatively or quantitatively by orders of magnitude when the dimensions become smaller than a critical size in the nanometer range. Examples are the ballistic regime for electron or spin transport at dimensions below the mean free path, near-field effects in scanning near-field optical microscopy and quantum wells when the dimensions are below an appropriate wavelength, novel electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties when the number of bulk atoms becomes smaller than that of surface atoms, quantum conduction, and Coulomb blockade. Thus, by going below a certain size, an abundance of novel properties and functions are at one's disposal, or, in other words, we can functionalize materials simply by reducing their size to the nanoscale. The key to the future lies in the functions that we give to materials, not just in finding 'novel functional materials'. This catch expression in many materials science programs and initiatives of the past two decades sounds great, but it is not what really counts. All materials are functional in one way or another and, therefore, all new materials are 'novel functional materials'. Certainly, finding new materials is always an important part of progress, but we should also focus on the much larger domain of novel functions that we can give to existing or modified materials. A good example is semiconductors: they are fifty or more years old and their properties are very well known, but they were not of widespread interest and use until the transistor changed their destiny into being the central material in the information technology revolution

  16. Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess

    2015-01-01

    Scientists and engineers constantly face new challenges, despite myriad advances in computing. More sets of data are collected today from earth and sky than there is time or resources available to carefully analyze them. Some problems either don't have fast algorithms to solve them or have solutions that must be found among millions of options, a situation akin to finding a needle in a haystack. But all hope is not lost: advances in technology and the Internet have empowered the general public to participate in the scientific process via individual computational resources and brain cognition, which isn't matched by any machine. Citizen scientists are volunteers who perform scientific work by making observations, collecting and disseminating data, making measurements, and analyzing or interpreting data without necessarily having any scientific training. In so doing, individuals from all over the world can contribute to science in ways that wouldn't have been otherwise possible.

  17. Supercomputational science

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    1990-01-01

    In contemporary research, the supercomputer now ranks, along with radio telescopes, particle accelerators and the other apparatus of "big science", as an expensive resource, which is nevertheless essential for state of the art research. Supercomputers are usually provided as shar.ed central facilities. However, unlike, telescopes and accelerators, they are find a wide range of applications which extends across a broad spectrum of research activity. The difference in performance between a "good" and a "bad" computer program on a traditional serial computer may be a factor of two or three, but on a contemporary supercomputer it can easily be a factor of one hundred or even more! Furthermore, this factor is likely to increase with future generations of machines. In keeping with the large capital and recurrent costs of these machines, it is appropriate to devote effort to training and familiarization so that supercomputers are employed to best effect. This volume records the lectures delivered at a Summer School ...

  18. Blending Entertainment, Education, and Science in a Modern Digital Planetarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.

    2015-11-01

    Students at the University of Arizona have a relatively rare opportunity to learn in a state-of-the-art planetarium. Originally opened as a campus planetarium in 1975, the Flandrau Science Center recently expanded into the digital realm. In 2014 Flandrau’s antique Minolta star projector was joined by a full-dome 4K digital projection system powered by a high performance computer cluster. Currently three science courses are taught in the planetarium for non-science majors — stellar astronomy, astrobiology, and planetary science (taught by SJK).The new digital system allows us to take our classes off the surface of Earth on a journey into the cosmos. Databases from dozens of spacecraft missions and deep-space telescopic surveys are tapped by the software to generate a realistic immersive 3D perspective of the universe, from local planets, satellites and rings to distant stars and galaxies all the way out to the limit of the visible universe. Simple clicks of a mouse allow us to change the orientation, trajectory, and speed of the virtual spacecraft, giving our students diverse views of different phenomena.The challenge with this system is harnessing the entertainment aspect for educational purposes. The visualization capabilities allow us to artificially enhance certain features and time scales. For example, the sizes of Earth and the moon can be enlarged on-the-fly to help demonstrate phases and eclipses. Polar axes and latitude lines can be added to Earth as it orbits the sun to help convey the reasons for seasons. Orbital paths can be highlighted to allow students to more accurately comprehend the population of near-Earth asteroids.These new immersive computer-generated visualization techniques have the potential to enhance comprehension in science education, especially for concepts involving 3D spatial and temporal relationships. Whether or not this potential is being realized will require studies to gauge student learning and retention beyond the short

  19. Effects of spaceflight in the adductor longus muscle of rats flown in the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2044. A study employing neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) immunocytochemistry and conventional morphological techniques (light and electron microscopy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, F.; Daunton, N. G.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight upon the "slow" muscle adductor longus were examined in rats flown in the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2044. The techniques employed included standard methods for light microscopy, neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. Light microscopic observations revealed myofiber atrophy and segmental necrosis accompanied by cellular infiltrates composed of macrophages, leukocytes and mononuclear cells. Neural cell adhesion molecule immunoreactivity (N-CAM-IR) was seen on the myofiber surface and in regenerating myofibers. Ultrastructural alterations included Z band streaming, disorganization of myofibrillar architecture, sarcoplasmic degradation, extensive segmental necrosis with apparent preservation of the basement membrane, degenerative phenomena of the capillary endothelium and cellular invasion of necrotic areas. Regenerating myofibers were identified by the presence of increased amounts of ribosomal aggregates and chains of polyribosomes associated with myofilaments. The principal electron microscopic changes of the neuromuscular junctions showed axon terminals with a decrease or absence of synaptic vesicles replaced by microtubules and neurofilaments, degeneration of axon terminals, vacant axonal spaces and changes suggestive of axonal sprouting. The present observations suggest that alterations such as myofibrillar disruption and necrosis, muscle regeneration and denervation and synaptic remodeling at the level of the neuromuscular junction may take place during spaceflight.

  20. Comparison Stripmap Cosmos SkyMed X-Band and TOPS Sentinel-1C Band in Estimating Ground Subsidence Using Irstea TomoSAR Platform: Ho Chi Minh City Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Tong Minh, Dinh; Vuong, Quoc Viet; Le, Van Trung; Ngo, Yen-Nhi

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a better understanding of Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) capabilities in subsidence estimations of TOPSAR Sentinel-1 data. This work has presented an advanced PSI analysis, to provide unprecedented spatial extent and continuous temporal coverage of the subsidence in Ho Chi Minh City by using 49 stripmap Cosmos SkyMED (CSK) X-band and TOPS Sentinel-1 C- band 23 images acquired from 2014 to 2016. The analysis was carried out by using the Irstea TomoSAR platform, which supports the entire processing from SAR, Interferometry, Polarimetry, to Tomography (so called TomoSAR). The study shows that the performance of stripmap CSK and TOPS Sentinel-1 is quite similar and effective to detect the subsidence phenomena. Subsidence is most severe in the Holocene silt loam areas along Sai Gon river and in the Southwest of the city, with the maximum value up to -30 mm/yr, similar with the previous study using ALOS PALSAR.

  1. Team science for science communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Strauss, Benjamin H

    2014-09-16

    Natural scientists from Climate Central and social scientists from Carnegie Mellon University collaborated to develop science communications aimed at presenting personalized coastal flood risk information to the public. We encountered four main challenges: agreeing on goals; balancing complexity and simplicity; relying on data, not intuition; and negotiating external pressures. Each challenge demanded its own approach. We navigated agreement on goals through intensive internal communication early on in the project. We balanced complexity and simplicity through evaluation of communication materials for user understanding and scientific content. Early user test results that overturned some of our intuitions strengthened our commitment to testing communication elements whenever possible. Finally, we did our best to negotiate external pressures through regular internal communication and willingness to compromise.

  2. Voodoo Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Robert

    2011-03-01

    A remarkable scientific result that appears to violate natural law may portend a revolutionary advance in human knowledge. It is, however, more likely an experimental screw up. Error is normal; it can be reduced by repeating measurements and better design of controls, but the success and credibility of science is anchored in a culture of openness. Ideas and observations are freely exposed to independent testing and evaluation by others. What emerges is the book of nature. On its pages we find, if not a simple world, at least an orderly world, in which everything from the birth of stars to falling in love is governed by the same natural laws. These laws cannot be circumvented by any amount of piety or cleverness, they can be understood - with the possible exception of String Theory. For those who elect to work outside the scientific community, errors may go unrecognized. We will examine examples of this, including claims of perpetual motion and cancer caused by cell-phone radiation.

  3. Life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gregory K

    2002-12-01

    Space life sciences research activities are reviewed for the year. Highlights of animal studies were the first long-term flight of an animal enclosure module and an avian development facility on STS-108. Plant research efforts focused on a biomass production system for eventual use on the International Space Station (ISS), the PESTO experiment on ISS, and screening of several salad crop varieties for potential use in space. Health-related studies included the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) on the Mars Odyssey mission, presentation of results from NASA's Biomolecular Physics and Chemistry Program, and research related to human liver cell function in space through an agreement with StelSys. In industry and academia, a memorandum of understanding was signed between NASA and the biotechnology industry to enhance communication between NASA and the industry, expand commercial biotechnology space research and development, and expand formal and informal education of industry and the public regarding biotechnology and space research. NASA selected Purdue University to lead an NSCORT for advanced life support research to develop technologies to enable long-duration planetary mission and sustain human space colonies.

  4. Using NASA Data in the Classroom: Promoting STEM Learning in Formal Education using Real Space Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B.; Hemenway, M. K.; Mendez, B.; Odenwald, S.

    2013-04-01

    Among NASA's major education goals is the training of students in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) disciplines. The use of real data, from some of the most sophisticated observatories in the world, provides formal educators the opportunity to teach their students real-world applications of the STEM subjects. Combining real space science data with lessons aimed at meeting state and national education standards provides a memorable educational experience that students can build upon throughout their academic careers. Many of our colleagues have adopted the use of real data in their education and public outreach (EPO) programs. There are challenges in creating resources using real data for classroom use that include, but are not limited to, accessibility to computers/Internet and proper instruction. Understanding and sharing these difficulties and best practices with the larger EPO community is critical to the development of future resources. In this session, we highlight three examples of how NASA data is being utilized in the classroom: the Galaxies and Cosmos Explorer Tool (GCET) that utilizes real Hubble Space Telescope data; the computer image-analysis resources utilized by the NASA WISE infrared mission; and the space science derived math applications from SpaceMath@NASA featuring the Chandra and Kepler space telescopes. Challenges and successes are highlighted for these projects. We also facilitate small-group discussions that focus on additional benefits and challenges of using real data in the formal education environment. The report-outs from those discussions are given here.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Science and Eastern Orthodoxy. From the Greek Fathers to the Age of Globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, E.; Sterken, C.

    2014-01-01

    The long debate on the ambivalent relation between science and religion in Western civilization is well documented in the literature on the history and philosophy of science and religion, but few studies paid attention to that relation within Eastern civilization. Nicolaidis' book provides an overview of the relationship between science and Christian Orthodoxy, the official church of the Oriental Roman Empire. The study covers a time span from the fourth to the twentieth century. The author documents the vision that conflicts between science and the Greek Orthodox church were not science versus Christianity, but rather ecclesiastical debates that traversed the whole of society. This book provides a wealth of information concerning the attitude of the Orthodox (i.e., non-Slavic) Church to science today as well as in the past. But the book covers much more than science and religion: also political debates are documented, as well as the role played by Byzantine emperors in relation with science and Orthodoxy. The book presents a very useful time line of events and works covering circa AD 300-1980. There are short descriptions of the Ptolemaic cosmos, the spherical universe with its seven planets (i.e., excluding the Earth, but including Sun and Moon), the Hellenic Aristotelian world view, the duration of the world (eternal or created), the place of the Earth, the matter of creation, the nature of darkness and light, day and night, the Sun and stars, the laws of nature. The last two chapters about Greece, from the independence to the European Union (but also covering science and religion in the Greek State), are quite interesting. Particularly fascinating for astronomers is the fact that the very first establishment (in 1842) of the Greek nation-state that could be termed a research institute was the Observatory of Athens, made possible by a donation from a very wealthy diaspora Greek who resided in Vienna. This is a very useful book to serve as supportive document for

  6. Using Storytelling to Communicate Science to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderazzo, J.

    2014-12-01

    "Science is the greatest of all adventure stories," says physicist Brian Greene, author of The Elegant Universe. "It's been unfolding for thousands of years as we have sought to understand ourselves and our surroundings . . . and needs to be communicated in a manner that captures this drama." Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson, the old and new storytelling hosts of Cosmos, would agree. So would Rachel Carson, who used one of the oldest and simplest of all story forms, the fable, to coax her readers into a complicated tale of pesticides, chemistry, and ecological succession. Silent Spring may well be the most influential science book of the last fifty years. More than ever, scientists need to communicate clearly and passionately to the public, the media, and decision-makers. Not everyone can be as articulate as a Jane Goodall or an Alan Rabinowitz. But humans are storytelling animals, and recent communications research suggests that information conveyed in story form activates more parts of the brain than when it is conveyed by bullet point or other non-narrative ways. Even a shy and retiring researcher can easily learn to use, at minimum, small and subtle techniques to find common ground with an audience who will not forget the message. Additionally, much recent communications research suggests strongly that the most memorable and effective way to coomunicate with the public is by conveying shared values or common ground. Stories--common to virtually every human society over time--inherently do that. As a literary and nonfiction writer for 40 years, and a university teacher of nonfiction and science/nature wiritng for the last 30, I know this first hand as well as through core scholarship about literature and narrative theory. Among other things, my talk will explore how some of the above science communication stars have used these sometimes-buried communication strategies--and how others can, too. Not crucial, but a brief interactive excerise I could conduct would

  7. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    Partial Contents: Aerospace Medicine, Agricultural Science, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Biotechnology, Epidemiology, Genetics, Immunology, Industrial Medicine, Laser Bioeffects, Marine Mammals, Medicine, Microbiology...

  8. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1990-01-01

    Partial Contents: Agricultural Science, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Epidemiology, Genetics, Laser Bioeffects, Medicine, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Nonionizing Radiation Effects, Physiology, Public Health...

  9. Cognitive science contributions to decision science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2015-02-01

    This article briefly reviews the history and interplay between decision theory, behavioral decision-making research, and cognitive psychology. The review reveals the increasingly important impact that psychology and cognitive science have on decision science. One of the main contributions of cognitive science to decision science is the development of dynamic models that describe the cognitive processes that underlay the evolution of preferences during deliberation phase of making a decision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Teaching Ethics in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes arguments for and against teaching ethics within science education, and clarifies what might be the several aims of teaching ethics in science. Discusses how ethics instruction might be incorporated into the science curriculum. (Contains 120 references.) (WRM)

  11. Saturdays, Summer, and Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Edward J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a science program (Saturday Science) designed to provide learning experiences that are thematic and stress critical/creative thinking as well as development of science process skills for elementary, middle, and junior high students. (ZWH)

  12. Common Earth Science Misconceptions in Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A survey of the Earth science content of science textbooks found a wide range of misconceptions. These are discussed in this article with reference to the published literature on Earth science misconceptions. Most misconceptions occurred in the "sedimentary rocks and processes" and "Earth's structure and plate tectonics"…

  13. Science + Maths = A Better Understanding of Science!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwick, Andy; Clark, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Science and mathematics share a common purpose: to explore, understand and explain the pure beauty of our universe and how it works. Using mathematics in science enquiry can enhance children's understanding of science and also provide opportunities for children to apply their mathematical knowledge to "real" contexts. The authors…

  14. Speaking of Science and for Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 12. Speaking of Science and for Science. G Baskaran. Article-in-a-Box Volume 7 Issue 12 December 2002 pp 47-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/12/0047-0047 ...

  15. Promoting science through science fiction and pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslund, C.

    1986-11-01

    A great deal of physics can be learned from reading good science fiction. Many writers of this genre have shown great talent in explaining the laws of physics in language that is both lucid and accessible. Their writings can readily be used by the science teacher to enhance and to stimulate student understanding of physics and science.

  16. A study to assess COPD Symptom-based Management and to Optimise treatment Strategy in Japan (COSMOS-J based on GOLD 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsuyaku T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomoko Betsuyaku,1 Motokazu Kato,2 Keisaku Fujimoto,3 Gerry Hagan,4 Akihiro Kobayashi,5 Hideki Hitosugi,5 Mark James,5 Paul W Jones61Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Respiratory Disease, Kishiwada City Hospital, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan; 4Private Practice, Marbella, Spain; 5GlaxoSmithKline KK, Tokyo, Japan; 6Division of Clinical Science, St George’s, University of London, London, UKBackground and objective: The Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD Committee has proposed a COPD assessment framework focused on symptoms and on exacerbation risk. This study will evaluate a symptom and exacerbation risk-based treatment strategy based on GOLD in a real-world setting in Japan. Optimal management of COPD will be determined by assessing symptoms using the COPD Assessment Test (CAT and by assessing the frequency of exacerbations.Methods: This study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01762800 is a 24-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group study. It aims to recruit 400 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. Patients will be randomized to receive treatment with either salmeterol/fluticasone propionate (SFC 50/250 µg twice daily or with tiotropium bromide 18 µg once daily. Optimal management of patients will be assessed at four-weekly intervals and, if patients remain symptomatic, as measured using the CAT, or experience an exacerbation, they have the option to step up to treatment with both drugs, ie, SFC twice daily and tiotropium once daily (TRIPLE therapy. The primary endpoint of the study will be the proportion of patients who are able to remain on the randomized therapy.Results: No data are available. This paper summarizes the methodology of the study in advance of the study starting.Conclusion: The results of this study will help physicians to understand

  17. What's science? Where's science? Science journalism in German print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summ, Annika; Volpers, Anna-Maria

    2016-10-01

    This article examines the current state of science coverage in German print media. It deals with the following questions: (1) how the main characteristics of science journalism can be described, (2) whether there is a difference between various scientific fields, and (3) how different definitions of science journalism lead to differing findings. Two forms of science coverage were analyzed in a standardized, two-part content analysis of German newspapers (N = 1730 and N = 1640). The results show a significant difference between a narrow and a broad definition of science journalism. In the classic understanding, science journalism is prompted by scientific events and is rather noncritical. Science coverage in a broad sense is defined by a wider range of journalistic styles, driven by non-scientific events, and with a focus on the statements of scientific experts. Furthermore, the study describes the specific role of the humanities and social sciences in German science coverage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. The FMOS-COSMOS survey of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6. II. The mass-metallicity relation and the dependence on star formation rate and dust extinction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahid, H. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Chu, J.; Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kashino, D. [Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan); Silverman, J. D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Kewley, L. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Daddi, E. [CEA-Saclay, Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renzini, A. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Rodighiero, G. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università di Padova, vicolo dell Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Nagao, T. [The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Arimoto, N. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, 650 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kartaltepe, J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Maier, C. [Vienna University, Department of Astrophysics, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, 1180 Vienna (Austria); Geller, M. J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Capak, P. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ilbert, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, 13388, Marseille (France); Kajisawa, M., E-mail: jabran@ifa.hawaii.edu [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Collaboration: COSMOS Team; and others

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the relationships between stellar mass, gas-phase oxygen abundance (metallicity), star formation rate (SFR), and dust content of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 using Subaru/FMOS spectroscopy in the COSMOS field. The mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at z ∼ 1.6 is steeper than the relation observed in the local universe. The steeper MZ relation at z ∼ 1.6 is mainly due to evolution in the stellar mass where the MZ relation begins to turnover and flatten. This turnover mass is 1.2 dex larger at z ∼ 1.6. The most massive galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 (∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) are enriched to the level observed in massive galaxies in the local universe. The MZ relation we measure at z ∼ 1.6 supports the suggestion of an empirical upper metallicity limit that does not significantly evolve with redshift. We find an anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR for galaxies at a fixed stellar mass at z ∼ 1.6, which is similar to trends observed in the local universe. We do not find a relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR that is independent of redshift; rather, our data suggest that there is redshift evolution in this relation. We examine the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and dust extinction, and find that at a fixed stellar mass, dustier galaxies tend to be more metal rich. From examination of the stellar masses, metallicities, SFRs, and dust extinctions, we conclude that stellar mass is most closely related to dust extinction.

  19. Effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus, noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia, and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimy MF

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study effectivity of water soluble granule from kenikir leaves extract (Cosmos caudatus, noni leaves extract (Morinda citrifolia, and earthworm meal extract (Lumbricus rubellus as a natural coccidiostat for broiler chickens against infection caused by Eimeria tenella. One hundred day old chick (DOC of the Cobb strain broiler were randomly devided into 10 groups and each group consisted of 10 chickens. All groups were orally infected by 5000 sporulated oocyst of E. tenella on the 25th days old as a challenge infection. The chickens was treated by granule of kenikir leaves extract, noni leaves extract and granule of earthworm meal extract which level dosage was 100, 200 and 300 mg/kgbw, respectively on each treatment (K1, K2, K3; M1, M2, M3 and T1, T2, T3. Control (K0 did not treated by feed additive. Treatment was administered on drinking water. On the 5th days after challenge infection 5 chickens of each groups were slaughtered and necropted to evaluate lession score and histopatology of caeca. Oocyst per gram excreta was count on 7th days until 10th days after challenge infection of the others 5 chickens of each groups. The results showed that the lowest score of lession was obtained on M2 and M3 whereas the lowest total oocyst per gram excreta was obtained on M3. Histopathological observation revealed that there was no stadia development of E. tenella in M2 treatment. It was concluded that granule of noni leaves extract at 200 mg/kgbw (M2 was the most effective natural coccidiostat.

  20. Science Olympiad students' nature of science understandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Cindy J.

    2007-12-01

    Recent reform efforts in science education focus on scientific literacy for all citizens. In order to be scientifically literate, an individual must have informed understandings of nature of science (NOS), scientific inquiry, and science content matter. This study specifically focused on Science Olympiad students' understanding of NOS as one piece of scientific literacy. Research consistently shows that science students do not have informed understandings of NOS (Abd-El-Khalick, 2002; Bell, Blair, Crawford, and Lederman, 2002; Kilcrease and Lucy, 2002; Schwartz, Lederman, and Thompson, 2001). However, McGhee-Brown, Martin, Monsaas and Stombler (2003) found that Science Olympiad students had in-depth understandings of science concepts, principles, processes, and techniques. Science Olympiad teams compete nationally and are found in rural, urban, and suburban schools. In an effort to learn from students who are generally considered high achieving students and who enjoy science, as opposed to the typical science student, the purpose of this study was to investigate Science Olympiad students' understandings of NOS and the experiences that formed their understandings. An interpretive, qualitative, case study method was used to address the research questions. The participants were purposefully and conveniently selected from the Science Olympiad team at a suburban high school. Data collection consisted of the Views of Nature of Science -- High School Questionnaire (VNOS-HS) (Schwartz, Lederman, & Thompson, 2001), semi-structured individual interviews, and a focus group. The main findings of this study were similar to much of the previous research in that the participants had informed understandings of the tentative nature of science and the role of inferences in science, but they did not have informed understandings of the role of human imagination and creativity, the empirical nature of science, or theories and laws. High level science classes and participation in

  1. From the Cosmos to the Geosphere: the quest of four European Deep Underground Laboratories originally built for Astroparticle Physics to understand Global Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafioti, I.

    2014-12-01

    A number of deep underground laboratories exist around the world, all originally developed to advance our understanding of the Universe. They were built to host 'low-background' Astroparticle Physics experiments, needing to be shielded from interference produced by cosmic radiation. These unique infrastructures show great diversity in terms of depth, size, and geological and environmental characteristics. Over the last decade, the four European deep underground laboratories - LSM in France, LSC in Spain, LNGS in Italy and Boulby in the UK - supported by their funding agencies, have been making great efforts to get integrated into a single distributed research infrastructure. At the same time, they have been asking "how can our facilities, primarily built for Astroparticle Physics, be used to tackle global challenges?". Astroparticle Physicists have wide experience in forming long-term large international collaborations, developing innovative technologies, building unique facilities and organising data handling, reduction, storage and analysis: all of these were put to the disposal of scientists from other disciplines. As a result, a number of very interesting multidisciplinary projects have been hosted in the labs with excellent scientific results: geologists, climatologists, environmental scientists and biologists from academia and public authorities have all used these deep underground environments. Even more recently, the four European labs have decided to go one step further: in order to treat global challenges, global cooperation is necessary, so they are trying to unite the global deep underground science community around these multidisciplinary synergies. The objective of this talk is to present the bottom-up policy adopted by these world-leading European research infrastructures related to global environmental change, including some of the most interesting scientific results received so far (e.g. muon tide detector for continuous, passive monitoring of

  2. Connecting Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasants, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Helping students understand the Nature of Science (NOS) is a long-standing goal of science education. One method is to provide students examples of science history in the form of short stories. This article modifies that approach, using historical case studies to address both the history of science and the history of technology, as well as the…

  3. Science Fiction & Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerneda, Julie E.

    2006-01-01

    The term "science fiction" has become synonymous, in the media at least, for any discovery in science too incredible or unexpected for the nonscientist to imagine. One of the most common classroom uses of science fiction is for students to pick out flaws in science fiction movies or television shows. Unfortunately, this approach can result in…

  4. Science & Engineering Indicators--1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. National Science Board.

    This volume is the ninth in the biennial "Science Indicators" series initiated by the National Science Board. The series provides a broad base of quantitative information about the structure and function of United States science and technology and comparisons with other advanced industrial countries. An overview of science and technology…

  5. Project-Based Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcik, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Project-based science is an exciting way to teach science that aligns with the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS"). By focusing on core ideas along with practices and crosscutting concepts, classrooms become learning environments where teachers and students engage in science by designing and carrying out…

  6. Pragmaticism, Science and Theology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This review assesses Ashley and Deely’s claims regarding the relation of science and religion, taking Einstein’s famous statement that “science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind” as its starting point. It argues that Ashley and Deely’s book How Science Enriches Theology...

  7. Science to the People

    CERN Document Server

    Doswaldbeck, L; Brancati, D; Colombo, U; Coyaud, S; De Semir, V; Dupuy, G; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Lecourt, D; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Mettan, G; Montagnier, L; Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston; Rampini, F; Ting, Samuel C C; Ugo, R; Widman, A; CERN. Geneva

    1994-01-01

    Science & society : urgent topics Risk perception : Ringing the alarm bells Basic research : Understanding its relevance Science and Economics : Comparing puplic costs and puplic benefits Language(s) : Translating expert knowledge into common culture Science and ethics : Freedom of research and limits to its applications Science,Media & Society: A confrontation

  8. Science in Cinema. Teaching Science Fact through Science Fiction Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubeck, Leroy W.; And Others

    Many feel that secondary school graduates are not prepared to compete in a world of rapidly expanding technology. High school and college students in the United States often prefer fantasy to science. This book offers a strategy for overcoming student apathy toward the physical sciences by harnessing the power of the cinema. In it, ten popular…

  9. A mirror for science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasanoff, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Early conceptions of the public understanding of science suffered from a narrow framing of what science means and a presumption that science is divided from its publics by walls of ignorance and indifference. Those assumptions amplified misunderstanding and led to faulty policies. It is time to reopen each element in the term "public understanding of science" to renewed reflection. This journal can advance that goal by encouraging research on actual rather than imagined public responses to science, on representations of science in the public sphere, and on interactions between science, technology and society.

  10. Holography: science and art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Pierre M.

    1998-09-01

    Art and science are separated by a very large distance nowadays. Long ago, e.g. in Renaissance, or even earlier, in classic Greece and Rome, or still earlier in Egypt or Mesopotamia, arts and sciences were united. Today they seem to go separate paths: science for the industry, arts for the gallery. Holography is an exception: no art without science, but also no science without art.

  11. The Communication of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yuzhou; Cong, Zhiyuan; Haugaard, Anastasiya; Kelder, Yonatan

    2006-01-01

    In science, the natural science is being used to study the nature surrounding us. As a rule, the methods of natural science are based on strong scientific evidence that would either prove or disprove the scientific hypothesis. Therefore, the natural science is considered to be pretty much unilateral; there is very little uncertainty within the evidence of natural science. Doing this project has taught us the opposite. The basic semester requirement is to write a project “about science” and...

  12. Science Operations for Onboard Autonomous Rover Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estlin, T.; Castano, R.; Haldemann, A. F.; McHenry, M.; Bornstein, B.; Gaines, D.; Burl, M.; Anderson, R. C.; Powell, M.; Shu, I.; Farr, T.; Nesnas, I.; Jain, A.; Judd, M.

    2006-12-01

    Onboard autonomous science represents one means to balance the large amounts of scientific data that current and future rovers can acquire with the limited ability to download it to Earth. Several systems are under development to perform autonomous rover science. The use of such systems represents a departure from standard operations, which closely resemble batch tele-operation. It is important for the science operations team to understand the capabilities and limitations of the onboard system to effectively use the tool of autonomous onboard science to increase overall mission science return, however it is difficult for the science team to get a feel for the onboard system without hands on experience in an operational system setting. This past year, the OASIS (Onboard Autonomous Science Investigation System) team has been working with the SOOPS (Science Operations On Planetary Surfaces) task to investigate how science returns for surface missions can be improved through the use of science autonomy. A limited version of OASIS was tested at the system level. The test involved a high-fidelity software simulation of a rover exploring a remote terrain using realistic operational interfaces. By using the simulation environment it is feasible to run many more experiments than testing with physical rover. Further, the simulation environment combined with the integrated operational system provides situational awareness for the science operations team along with greater flexibility and control over experiments to help answer "what if" questions that can lead to identifying the most effective ways to use the onboard system. In the tests, OASIS applied predetermined criteria provided by the scientists to prioritize which data collected during a traverse to send home, given specified bandwidth constraints. In addition, rock summary information (which requires very little bandwidth) was returned and provided as both a table and a map to the science team. We discuss the results

  13. The World of Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheila

    1971-01-01

    Science fiction is discussed from the following standpoints: What Is Science Fiction?; The History of Science Fiction; and The Themes of Science Fiction. A list of films, books, and records about science fiction is given. (DB)

  14. A Science Cloud for Data Intensive Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken T Murata

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is often discussed that the fourth methodology for science research is "informatics". The first methodology is a theoretic approach, the second one is observation and/or experiment, and the third one is computer simulation. Informatics is a new methodology for data intensive science, which is a new concept based on the fact that most scientific data are digitalized and the amount of data is huge. The facilities to support informatics are cloud systems. Herein we propose a cloud system especially designed for science. The basic concepts, design, resources, implementation, and applications of the NICT science cloud are discussed.

  15. Network science, nonlinear science and infrastructure systems

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Network Science, Nonlinear Science and Infrastructure Systems has been written by leading scholars in these areas. Its express purpose is to develop common theoretical underpinnings to better solve modern infrastructural problems. It is felt by many who work in these fields that many modern communication problems, ranging from transportation networks to telecommunications, Internet, supply chains, etc., are fundamentally infrastructure problems. Moreover, these infrastructure problems would benefit greatly from a confluence of theoretical and methodological work done with the areas of Network Science, Dynamical Systems and Nonlinear Science. This book is dedicated to the formulation of infrastructural tools that will better solve these types of infrastructural problems. .

  16. Complementary social science? Quali-quantitative experiments in a Big Data world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Blok

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The rise of Big Data in the social realm poses significant questions at the intersection of science, technology, and society, including in terms of how new large-scale social databases are currently changing the methods, epistemologies, and politics of social science. In this commentary, we address such epochal (“large-scale” questions by way of a (situated experiment: at the Danish Technical University in Copenhagen, an interdisciplinary group of computer scientists, physicists, economists, sociologists, and anthropologists (including the authors is setting up a large-scale data infrastructure, meant to continually record the digital traces of social relations among an entire freshman class of students ( N  > 1000. At the same time, fieldwork is carried out on friendship (and other relations amongst the same group of students. On this basis, the question we pose is the following: what kind of knowledge is obtained on this social micro-cosmos via the Big (computational, quantitative and Small (embodied, qualitative Data, respectively? How do the two relate? Invoking Bohr’s principle of complementarity as analogy, we hypothesize that social relations, as objects of knowledge, depend crucially on the type of measurement device deployed. At the same time, however, we also expect new interferences and polyphonies to arise at the intersection of Big and Small Data, provided that these are, so to speak, mixed with care. These questions, we stress, are important not only for the future of social science methods but also for the type of societal (self-knowledge that may be expected from new large-scale social databases.

  17. Science & Technology Review May 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M B

    2005-04-05

    Articles in this month's issue include: (1) Einstein's Legacy Alive at Livermore--Commentary by Michael R. Anastasio; (2) Applying Einstein's Theories of Relativity--In their efforts to understand the cosmos, Livermore physicists must account for the relativistic effects postulated by Albert Einstein; (3) Locked in Rock: Sequestering Carbon Dioxide Underground--Livermore scientists are examining technologies to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide by burying it deep underground; (4) Modeling the Subsurface Movement of Radionuclides--Using data from past underground nuclear tests, a Livermore team is modeling radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site; and (5) Novel Materials from Solgel Chemistry--Livermore chemists are developing a method for fabricating solgels to better control the physical properties of the new materials.

  18. Empirical philosophy of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann; Nersessian, Nancy J.; Andersen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of philosophers of science make use of qualitative empirical data, a development that may reconfigure the relations between philosophy and sociology of science and that is reminiscent of efforts to integrate history and philosophy of science. Therefore, the first part...... of this introduction to the volume Empirical Philosophy of Science outlines the history of relations between philosophy and sociology of science on the one hand, and philosophy and history of science on the other. The second part of this introduction offers an overview of the papers in the volume, each of which...

  19. NX15 science workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Science. For some of us, it's daunting or maybe even terrifying. How to tell a good science story? That's the question we will explore together in this workshop. Conceived and produced by journalist and Scientific News producer Claudio Rosmino of Euronews, and presented by Euronews' Jeremy Wilks, the workshop will look at actual case studies (from Euronews and beyond) where science news proved exciting, inspiring and accessible to audiences around the world. These might include the Rosetta mission and CERN's work on Science for Peace. Together, we'll share ideas and knowledge around how science journalism and science news can increase its visibility in the media and maybe save the planet...!

  20. Towards Data Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyong Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a huge amount of data is being rapidly generated in cyberspace. Datanature (all data in cyberspace is forming due to a data explosion. Exploring the patterns and rules in datanature is necessary but difficult. A new discipline called Data Science is coming. It provides a type of novel research method (a data-intensive method for natural and social sciences and goes beyond computer science in researching data. This paper presents the challenges presented by data and discusses what differentiates data science from the established sciences, data technologies, and big data. Our goal is to encourage data related researchers to transfer their focus towards this new science.

  1. CSIR ScienceScope: Life sciences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available , manage our unique and fragile ecosystems, and find more sustainable energy alternatives. This edition of ScienceScope features some CSIR research outcomes in life sciences achieved to date, while outlining current and future objectives. L I F E SC...

  2. Women in Science : A Career in Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    not appear that there is a societal perception in India of women being incapable of intellectual attainment in science since women students are not in short supply at the under-graduate and post-graduate levels in science. ... Transport, congestion and traps in a communication network. Department of Physics, IIT, Madras.

  3. Teaching Science Fact with Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raham, R. Gary

    2004-01-01

    The literature of science fiction packs up the facts and discoveries of science and runs off to futures filled with both wonders and warnings. Kids love to take the journeys it offers for the thrill of the ride, but they can learn as they travel, too. This book will provide the reader with: (1) an overview of the past 500 years of scientific…

  4. Democratizing data science through data science training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Fierro, Lily; Kamdar, Jeana; Gordon, Jonathan; Stewart, Crystal; Bhattrai, Avnish; Abe, Sumiko; Lei, Xiaoxiao; O'Driscoll, Caroline; Sinha, Aakanchha; Jain, Priyambada; Burns, Gully; Lerman, Kristina; Ambite, José Luis

    2018-01-01

    The biomedical sciences have experienced an explosion of data which promises to overwhelm many current practitioners. Without easy access to data science training resources, biomedical researchers may find themselves unable to wrangle their own datasets. In 2014, to address the challenges posed such a data onslaught, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative. To this end, the BD2K Training Coordinating Center (TCC; bigdatau.org) was funded to facilitate both in-person and online learning, and open up the concepts of data science to the widest possible audience. Here, we describe the activities of the BD2K TCC and its focus on the construction of the Educational Resource Discovery Index (ERuDIte), which identifies, collects, describes, and organizes online data science materials from BD2K awardees, open online courses, and videos from scientific lectures and tutorials. ERuDIte now indexes over 9,500 resources. Given the richness of online training materials and the constant evolution of biomedical data science, computational methods applying information retrieval, natural language processing, and machine learning techniques are required - in effect, using data science to inform training in data science. In so doing, the TCC seeks to democratize novel insights and discoveries brought forth via large-scale data science training.

  5. Science & Engineering Indicators 2016. National Science Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Science and Engineering Indicators" (SEI) is first and foremost a volume of record comprising high-quality quantitative data on the U.S. and international science and engineering enterprise. SEI includes an overview and seven chapters that follow a generally consistent pattern. The chapter titles are as follows: (1) Elementary and…

  6. Advancing the Science of Team Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk‐Krzesinski, Holly J.; Börner, Katy; Contractor, Noshir; Fiore, Stephen M.; Hall, Kara L.; Keyton, Joann; Spring, Bonnie; Stokols, Daniel; Trochim, William; Uzzi, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The First Annual International Science of Team Science (SciTS) Conference was held in Chicago, IL April 22–24, 2010. This article presents a summary of the Conference proceedings. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 263–266. PMID:20973925

  7. Analogies in Science and Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Simon; Salter, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Analogies are often used in science, but students may not appreciate their significance, and so the analogies can be misunderstood or discounted. For this reason, educationalists often express concern about the use of analogies in teaching. Given the important place of analogies in the discourse of science, it is necessary that students are…

  8. Science and religion: implications for science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Michael J.

    2010-03-01

    A religious perspective on life shapes how and what those with such a perspective learn in science; for some students a religious perspective can hinder learning in science. For such reasons Staver's article is to be welcomed as it proposes a new way of resolving the widely perceived discord between science and religion. Staver notes that Western thinking has traditionally postulated the existence and comprehensibility of a world that is external to and independent of human consciousness. This has led to a conception of truth, truth as correspondence, in which our knowledge corresponds to the facts in this external world. Staver rejects such a conception, preferring the conception of truth as coherence in which the links are between and among independent knowledge claims themselves rather than between a knowledge claim and reality. Staver then proposes constructivism as a vehicle potentially capable of resolving the tension between religion and science. My contention is that the resolution between science and religion that Staver proposes comes at too great a cost—both to science and to religion. Instead I defend a different version of constructivism where humans are seen as capable of generating models of reality that do provide richer and more meaningful understandings of reality, over time and with respect both to science and to religion. I argue that scientific knowledge is a subset of religious knowledge and explore the implications of this for science education in general and when teaching about evolution in particular.

  9. Informal science education at Science City

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, April Nicole

    The presentation of chemistry within informal learning environments, specifically science museums and science centers is very sparse. This work examines learning in Kansas City's Science City's Astronaut Training Center in order to identify specific behaviors associated with visitors' perception of learning and their attitudes toward space and science to develop an effective chemistry exhibit. Grounded in social-constructivism and the Contextual Model of Learning, this work approaches learning in informal environments as resulting from social interactions constructed over time from interaction between visitors. Visitors to the Astronaut Training Center were surveyed both during their visit and a year after the visit to establish their perceptions of behavior within the exhibit and attitudes toward space and science. Observations of visitor behavior and a survey of the Science City staff were used to corroborate visitor responses. Eighty-six percent of visitors to Science City indicated they had learned from their experiences in the Astronaut Training Center. No correlation was found between this perception of learning and visitor's interactions with exhibit stations. Visitor attitudes were generally positive toward learning in informal settings and space science as it was presented in the exhibit. Visitors also felt positively toward using video game technology as learning tools. This opens opportunities to developing chemistry exhibits using video technology to lessen the waste stream produced by a full scale chemistry exhibit.

  10. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  11. Big Science, Team Science, and Open Science for Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christof; Jones, Allan

    2016-11-02

    The Allen Institute for Brain Science is a non-profit private institution dedicated to basic brain science with an internal organization more commonly found in large physics projects-large teams generating complete, accurate and permanent resources for the mouse and human brain. It can also be viewed as an experiment in the sociology of neuroscience. We here describe some of the singular differences to more academic, PI-focused institutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. AAAS: Politics. . . and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Reviews topics discussed during the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting held in Washington, D.C. Topics included: the equal rights amendment, laetrile, nuclear radiation hazards, sociobiology, and various science topics. (SL)

  13. Science of landscape restoration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Wet, Benita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available or email bdewet@ csir.co.za. The science of landscape restoration Over the last two decades the ecological restoration of industrial land has developed into a specialist science combined with highly sophisticated management activities. A prime...

  14. Science and Shakespeare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Steven; Chinnery, Charlene

    2003-01-01

    Describes an assignment in which the preservice teacher must find a connection between science and Shakespeare. Connects the science of the witches in Shakespeare's "Macbeth" to the holistic approach of education. (SG)

  15. Integrating Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  16. ICASE Computer Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering computer science program is discussed in outline form. Information is given on such topics as problem decomposition, algorithm development, programming languages, and parallel architectures.

  17. Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Science Inventory is a searchable database of research products primarily from EPA's Office of Research and Development. Science Inventory records provide descriptions of the product, contact information, and links to available printed material or websites.

  18. National Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs Distinctive Voices Lecture Series Science & Entertainment Exchange Evolution Resources Biographical Memoirs National Academy of Sciences About The NAS Mission History Organization Leadership and Governance Membership Policy Studies and Reports Giving ...

  19. Inequalities in Science

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Inequalities in scientists’ contributions to science and their rewards have always been very high. There are good reasons to propose that inequalities in science across research institutions and across individual scientists have increased in recent years. In the meantime, however, globalization and internet technology have narrowed inequalities in science across nations and facilitated the expansion of science and rapid production of scientific discoveries through international collaborative ...

  20. Social science that matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    2006-01-01

    Social science is headed down a dead end toward mere scientism, becoming a second-rate version of the hard sciences. We neeed to recognise and support a different kind of social science research - and so should those who demand accountability from researchers. This paper asks what kind of social...... science we - scholars, policy makers, administrators - should and should not promote in democratic societies, and how we may hold social scientists accountable to deliver what we ask them for....

  1. Inequalities in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Inequalities in scientists’ contributions to science and their rewards have always been very high. There are good reasons to propose that inequalities in science across research institutions and across individual scientists have increased in recent years. In the meantime, however, globalization and internet technology have narrowed inequalities in science across nations and facilitated the expansion of science and rapid production of scientific discoveries through international collaborative networks. PMID:24855244

  2. Traveling science: An elementary science enhancement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotlib, L.; Brown, S. [South Granvile High School, Creedmoor, NC (United States); Bibby, E. [Granville County Schools, Oxford, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Traveling Science is an elementary science visitation program by two high school teachers (using scheduled release time) for every third to fifth grade student and teacher in Granville County, North Carolina (a total of sixty-one classes, 1,600 students-over 25,000 student contacts in three years). Teachers and students see and participate in hands-on, inquiry-based science done with inexpensive, readily available materials (usually less than 2% per class). Teachers become more confident and self-reliant with respect to science education, and students get increased exposure to hands-on science. In addition to the classroom visits (a total of six per year for each class), teachers receive a guide containing introductory and follow-up materials, and a monthly newsletter. Visit topics cover the physical, life and earth sciences; designed to stress the processes of science. We try to use topics of interest and relevance to students, such as toys, food, animals and playground activities. Teachers and schools also receive additional materials (posters and videos).

  3. Ames Life Science Data Archive: Translational Rodent Research at Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Alan E.; French, Alison J.; Ngaotheppitak, Ratana; Leung, Dorothy M.; Vargas, Roxana S.; Maese, Chris; Stewart, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Life Science Data Archive (LSDA) office at Ames is responsible for collecting, curating, distributing and maintaining information pertaining to animal and plant experiments conducted in low earth orbit aboard various space vehicles from 1965 to present. The LSDA will soon be archiving data and tissues samples collected on the next generation of commercial vehicles; e.g., SpaceX & Cygnus Commercial Cargo Craft. To date over 375 rodent flight experiments with translational application have been archived by the Ames LSDA office. This knowledge base of fundamental research can be used to understand mechanisms that affect higher organisms in microgravity and help define additional research whose results could lead the way to closing gaps identified by the Human Research Program (HRP). This poster will highlight Ames contribution to the existing knowledge base and how the LSDA can be a resource to help answer the questions surrounding human health in long duration space exploration. In addition, it will illustrate how this body of knowledge was utilized to further our understanding of how space flight affects the human system and the ability to develop countermeasures that negate the deleterious effects of space flight. The Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) includes current descriptions of over 700 experiments conducted aboard the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), NASA/MIR, Bion/Cosmos, Gemini, Biosatellites, Apollo, Skylab, Russian Foton, and ground bed rest studies. Research areas cover Behavior and Performance, Bone and Calcium Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chronobiology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental Monitoring, Gastrointestinal Physiology, Hematology, Immunology, Life Support System, Metabolism and Nutrition, Microbiology, Muscle Physiology, Neurophysiology, Pharmacology, Plant Biology, Pulmonary Physiology, Radiation Biology, Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, and Toxicology. These

  4. African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences is an open access, free online, internationally refereed journal publishing original articles on research, clinical practice, public health, policy, planning, implementation and evaluation, in the health and related sciences relevant to Africa and the tropics. African Health Sciences acknowledges support ...

  5. But Is It Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mike; Salehjee, Saima; Essex, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Early years science education is not science, but a curricular construction designed to induct young children into a range of ideas and practices related to the natural world. While inquiry-based learning is an important approach to this, it is not of itself unique to science and there are a range of logico-mathematical constructions that come…

  6. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  7. Science Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Sun-Ja; Yoo, Chang Young; Chung, Min Suk

    2012-01-01

    Science comic strips entitled Dr. Scifun were planned to promote science jobs and studies among professionals (scientists, graduate and undergraduate students) and children. To this end, the authors collected intriguing science stories as the basis of scenarios, and drew four-cut comic strips, first on paper and subsequently as computer files.…

  8. Computers in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Science fiction writers' perceptions of the "thinking machine" are examined through a review of Baum's Oz books, Heinlein's "Beyond This Horizon," science fiction magazine articles, and works about robots including Asimov's "I, Robot." The future of computers in science fiction is discussed and suggested readings are listed. (MBR)

  9. Science on Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Maxine L.

    1973-01-01

    A science program was developed which is based on a mobile laboratory containing scientific experiments in biology, chemistry, physics, applied science, and mathematics. Discussion and experiments differ from the normal classroom setting as they utilize small groups and center around the relationship of modern science and technology of the urban…

  10. Sci-Fi Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenrich, Craig C.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends using science fiction television episodes, novels, and films for teaching science and motivating students. Studies Newton's Law of Motion, principles of relativity, journey to Mars, interplanetary trajectories, artificial gravity, and Martian geology. Discusses science fiction's ability to capture student interest and the advantages of…

  11. Forensic Science Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Forensic science technicians, also called crime laboratory technicians or police science technicians, help solve crimes. They examine and identify physical evidence to reconstruct a crime scene. This article discusses everything students need to know about careers for forensic science technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career…

  12. Agricultural science and ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, Mickey; Vaarst, Mette

    2014-01-01

    , about 20 % of the world's coral reefs and 35 % of the mangrove areas were lost (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2005). In the following, the development of agricultural science will be sketched out and the role of ethics in agricultural science will be discussed. Then different views of nature that have...... between agricultural science and ethics....

  13. Social Work and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Interest has grown in the past few years about the place of social work in science. Questions remain, such as whether social work should be considered a science, and if so, where it fits into the constellation of sciences. This article attempts to shed light on these questions. After briefly considering past and present constructions of science…

  14. Science and Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Leon N.

    2015-01-01

    Part I. Science and Society: 1. Science and human experience; 2. Does science undermine our values?; 3. Can science serve mankind?; 4. Modern science and contemporary discomfort: metaphor and reality; 5. Faith and science; 6. Art and science; 7. Fraud in science; 8. Why study science? The keys to the cathedral; 9. Is evolution a theory? A modest proposal; 10. The silence of the second; 11. Introduction to Copenhagen; 12. The unpaid debt; Part II. Thought and Consciousness: 13. Source and limits of human intellect; 14. Neural networks; 15. Thought and mental experience: the Turing test; 16. Mind as machine: will we rubbish human experience?; 17. Memory and memories: a physicist's approach to the brain; 18. On the problem of consciousness; Part III. On the Nature and Limits of Science: 19. What is a good theory?; 20. Shall we deconstruct science?; 21. Visible and invisible in physical theory; 22. Experience and order; 23. The language of physics; 24. The structure of space; 25. Superconductivity and other insoluble problems; 26. From gravity to light and consciousness: does science have limits?

  15. Super Science Fair Sourcebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iritz, Maxine Haren

    This guide to science fair projects is designed for students and provides clear directions on how to complete a successful science project. Real projects are used as examples and information and advice is provided by teachers, judges, and participants and their families about the process. Topics covered in this book include choosing a science fair…

  16. Science Challenge Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  17. Fundamentals of soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study guide provides comments and references for professional soil scientists who are studying for the soil science fundamentals exam needed as the first step for certification. The performance objectives were determined by the Soil Science Society of America's Council of Soil Science Examiners...

  18. African Crop Science Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Crop Science Journal, a quarterly publication, publishes original research papers dealing with all aspects of crop agronomy, production, genetics and breeding, germplasm, crop protection, post harvest systems and utilisation, agro-forestry, crop-animal interactions, information science, environmental science ...

  19. Information science in transition

    CERN Document Server

    Gilchrist, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Are we at a turning point in digital information? The expansion of the internet is unprecedented. Will information science become part of computer science and does rise of the term informatics demonstrate convergence of information science and information technology - a convergence that must surely develop? This work reflects on such issues.

  20. Science and Literacy Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meeteren, Beth Dykstra; Escalada, Lawrence T.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, science has taken a backseat to reading and mathematics in many primary classrooms. Imaginative teachers have coped with this loss of science time by creatively integrating science topics into reading instructional materials (Douglas, Klentschy, and Worth 2006). In this article, the author describes an effective physical science…

  1. Demystifying Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Judith; Bartels, Selina; Lederman, Norman; Gnanakkan, Dionysius

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS"; NGSS Lead States 2013), it is apparent that teaching and learning about nature of science (NOS) continues to be an important goal of science education for all K-12 students. With this emphasis on NOS, early childhood teachers are asking how to design…

  2. 75 FR 4882 - Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Subcommittee on Forensic Science; Committee on Science; National Science and Technology... Executive Branch responses to the National Academy of Sciences 2009 report: ``Strengthening Forensic Science... ). SUMMARY: The Subcommittee on Forensic Science (SOFS) of the National Science and Technology Council's...

  3. New Science on the Open Science Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Board, The Open Science Grid Executive; Pordes, Ruth; Altunay, Mine; Avery, Paul; Bejan, Alina; Blackburn, Kent; Blatecky, Alan; Gardner, Rob; Kramer, Bill; Livny, Miron; McGee, John; Potekhin, Maxim; Quick, Rob; Olson, Doug; Roy, Alain; Sehgal, Chander; Wenaus, Torre; Wilde, Mike; Wuerthwein, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) includes work to enable new science, new scientists, and new modalities in support of computationally based research. There are frequently significant sociological and organizational changes required in transformation from the existing to the new. OSG leverages its deliverables to the large scale physics experiment member communities to benefit new communities at all scales through activities in education, engagement and the distributed facility. As a partner to the poster and tutorial at SciDAC 2008, this paper gives both a brief general description and some specific examples of new science enabled on the OSG. More information is available at the OSG web site: (http://www.opensciencegrid.org).

  4. Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: Contact. Journal Home > About the Journal > Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: Contact. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: About this journal. Journal Home > Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Archives: Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 31 of 31 ... Archives: Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie. Journal Home > Archives: Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. BES Science Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biocca, Alan; Carlson, Rich; Chen, Jackie; Cotter, Steve; Tierney, Brian; Dattoria, Vince; Davenport, Jim; Gaenko, Alexander; Kent, Paul; Lamm, Monica; Miller, Stephen; Mundy, Chris; Ndousse, Thomas; Pederson, Mark; Perazzo, Amedeo; Popescu, Razvan; Rouson, Damian; Sekine, Yukiko; Sumpter, Bobby; Dart, Eli; Wang, Cai-Zhuang -Z; Whitelam, Steve; Zurawski, Jason

    2011-02-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  10. Chemistry and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Jack H.

    1998-11-01

    This lively collection looks at science as filtered through literature, film, and television. It discusses classic works in science fiction and provides an in-depth look at the chemistry depicted in popular culture, particularly in Start Trek , Star Wars , and Doctor Who . It includes an examination by Nebula Award winner Connie Willis of how science fiction authors use science, and reprints two tongue-in-cheek short stories by Isaac Asimov. The book also includes suggestions for using science fiction as an educational resource.

  11. Networks in Cognitive Science

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Chater, Nick; Christiansen, Morten H

    2013-01-01

    Networks of interconnected nodes have long played a key role in cognitive science, from artificial neural networks to spreading activation models of semantic memory. Recently, however, a new Network Science has been developed, providing insights into the emergence of global, system-scale properties in contexts as diverse as the Internet, metabolic reactions or collaborations among scientists. Today, the inclusion of network theory into cognitive sciences, and the expansion of complex systems science, promises to significantly change the way in which the organization and dynamics of cognitive and behavioral processes are understood. In this paper, we review recent contributions of network theory at different levels and domains within the cognitive sciences.

  12. Media, risk and science

    CERN Document Server

    Allan, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    How is science represented by the media? Who defines what counts as a risk, threat or hazard, and why? In what ways do media images of science shape public perceptions? What can cultural and media studies tell us about current scientific controversies? "Media, Risk and Science" is an exciting exploration into an array of important issues, providing a much needed framework for understanding key debates on how the media represent science and risk. In a highly effective way, Stuart Allan weaves together insights from multiple strands of research across diverse disciplines. Among the themes he examines are: the role of science in science fiction, such as "Star Trek"; the problem of 'pseudo-science' in "The X-Files"; and how science is displayed in science museums. Science journalism receives particular attention, with the processes by which science is made 'newsworthy' unravelled for careful scrutiny. The book also includes individual chapters devoted to how the media portray environmental risks, HIV-AIDS, food s...

  13. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-26

    copyright owner. SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY USSR: EARTH SCIENCES CONTENTS OCEANOGRAPHY Determination of Mean Thermohaline Characteristics of the...MEAN THERMOHALINE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OCEAN Moscow VESTNIK MOSKOVSKOGO UNIVERSITETA: SERIYA 5, GEOGRAFIYA in Russian No 3, May-Jun 87 (manuscript...motions in general are anisotropic). However, during a cruise of the "Akademik A. Vinogradov" it was discovered that during a calm the rotation of

  14. Science policy up close

    CERN Document Server

    Marburger, John H

    2015-01-01

    In a career that included tenures as president of Stony Brook University, director of Brookhaven National Laboratory, and science advisor to President George W. Bush, John Marburger (1941 2011) found himself on the front line of battles that pulled science ever deeper into the political arena. From nuclear power to global warming and stem cell research, science controversies, he discovered, are never just about science. Science Policy Up Close" presents Marburger s reflections on the challenges science administrators face in the twenty-first century. In each phase of public service Marburger came into contact with a new dimension of science policy. The Shoreham Commission exposed him to the problem of handling a volatile public controversy over nuclear power. The Superconducting Super Collider episode gave him insights into the collision between government requirements and scientists expectations and feelings of entitlement. The Directorship of Brookhaven taught him how to talk to the public about the risks ...

  15. A guided science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsiner, Jaan

    That sciences are guided by explicit and implicit ties to their surrounding social world is not new. Jaan Valsiner fills in the wide background of scholarship on the history of science, the recent focus on social studies of sciences, and the cultural and cognitive analyses of knowledge making....... The theoretical scheme that he uses to explain the phenomena of social guidance of science comes from his thinking about processes of development in general—his theory of bounded indeterminacy—and on the relations of human beings with their culturally organized environments. Valsiner examines reasons for the slow...... and nonlinear progress of ideas in psychology as a science at the border of natural and social sciences. Why is that intellectual progress occurs in different countries at different times? Most responses are self-serving blinders for presenting science as a given rather than understanding it as a deeply human...

  16. WikiScience: Wikipedia for science and technology

    OpenAIRE

    Aibar Puentes, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Peer-reviewed Presentació de la conferència "WikiScience: Wikipedia for science and technology". Presentación de la conferencia "WikiScience: Wikipedia for science and technology". Presentation of the conference "Science Wiki: Wikipedia for science and technology".

  17. The Double Helix: Why Science Needs Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, Athena

    2003-01-01

    Discusses why science needs science fiction, commenting on the author's book about science that draws heavily on the "Star Trek" series. The best science, in spite of popular thinking, comes from leaps of intuition, and science fiction provides a creative spark that encourages participation in science. (SLD)

  18. Science Process Skills in Science Curricula Applied in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumusak, Güngör Keskinkiliç

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important objectives of the science curricula is to bring in science process skills. The science process skills are skills that lie under scientific thinking and decision-making. Thus it is important for a science curricula to be rationalized in such a way that it brings in science process skills. New science curricula were…

  19. Exoplanet Science in the National Science Olympiad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Young, Donna

    2015-11-01

    The National Science Olympiad is one of the United States' largest science competitions, reaching over 6,000 schools in 48 states. The Olympiad includes a wide variety of events, stretching a full range of potential future STEM careers, from biological sciences to engineering to earth and space sciences. The Astronomy event has been a mainstay at the high school level for well over a decade, and nominally focuses on aspects of stellar evolution. For the 2014-2015 competition season, the event focus was aligned to include exoplanet discovery and characterization along with star formation. Teams studied both the qualitative features of exoplanets and exoplanetary systems and the quantitative aspects behind their discovery and characterization, including basic calculations with the transit and radial velocity methods. Students were also expected to have a qualitative understanding of stellar evolution and understand the differences between classes of young stars including T Tauri and FU Orionis variables, and Herbig Ae/Be stars. Based on the successes of this event topic, we are continuing this event into the 2015-2016 academic year. The key modification is the selection of new exoplanetary systems for students to research. We welcome feedback from the community on how to improve the event and the related educational resources that are created for Science Olympiad students and coaches. We also encourage any interested community members to contact your regional or state Science Olympiad tournament directors and volunteer to organize competitions and supervise events locally.

  20. Science for Diplomacy, Diplomacy for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colglazier, E. Wiliam

    2015-04-01

    I was a strong proponent of ``science diplomacy'' when I became Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State in 2011. I thought I knew a lot about the subject after being engaged for four decades on international S&T policy issues and having had distinguished scientists as mentors who spent much of their time using science as a tool for building better relations between countries and working to make the world more peaceful, prosperous, and secure. I learned a lot from my three years inside the State Department, including great appreciation and respect for the real diplomats who work to defuse conflicts and avoid wars. But I also learned a lot about science diplomacy, both using science to advance diplomacy and diplomacy to advance science. My talk will focus on the five big things that I learned, and from that the one thing where I am focusing my energies to try to make a difference now that I am a private citizen again.